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Sample records for diabetes risk factors

  1. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... of people who have diabetes die of some type of cardiovascular disease. Diabetic women are at especially high risk for dying ... aware of my risk factors, such as being diabetic and having a family history of heart ... levels—you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. But you can take steps to ...

  2. Psychosocial Factors in Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Ruth A; Steptoe, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that is increasing in prevalence globally. Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in diabetes, and lifestyle and clinical risk factors do not fully account for the link between the conditions. This article provides an overview of the evidence concerning the role of psychosocial stress factors in diabetes risk, as well as in cardiovascular complications in people with existing diabetes. Several types of psychosocial factors are discussed including depression, other types of emotional distress, exposure to stressful conditions, and personality traits. The potential behavioral and biological pathways linking psychosocial factors to diabetes are presented and implications for patient care are highlighted. PMID:27566328

  3. Associations and Risk Factors of Diabetic Maculopathy.

    PubMed

    Islam, M M; Ali, M; Naher, Z U; Akhanda, A H; Motaleb, M A; Uddin, M S; Islam, M R

    2016-04-01

    Diabetic maculopathy is characterised by increased capillary leakage in the main retinal vessels and by alterations in the microcirculation of the macula. Maculopathy occurs frequently in type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. Prevalence is higher in type 2 than in type 1 diabetic patients. Factors associated with the development of maculopathy are mostly unknown. As maculopathy is the main cause of vision deprivation in diabetic patients it is essential to know the associations and risk factors of diabetic maculopathy so that appropriate measures can be taken to prevent as well as treat diabetic maculopathy. We started the research work to find out the relation between diabetic maculopathy and various associated factors and risk factors for patients with diabetic retinopathy with maculopathy. This cross-sectional observational study done at the Department of Ophthalmology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka & National Institute of Ophthalmology & Hospital (NIO & H), Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh from January 2006 to June 2006. In this study out of 50 patients, diabetes was controlled in 20(40%) patients and uncontrolled in 30(60%). A significant percentage of patients (40%) had elevated blood pressure. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy was observed in 24% cases and polyneuropathy was observed in 36% cases. It is evident that diabetic maculopathy has association with dyslipidaemia, abnormal renal function due to nephropathy. This study lighted on the association of diabetic maculopathy with diabetic nephropathy, cardiac abnormalities and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:27277354

  4. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean that the β-cell autoantibodies are pathogenic, but rather that they represent reproducible biomarkers of the pathogenesis. The primary risk factor for β-cell autoimmunity is genetic, mainly occurring in individuals with either HLA-DR3-DQ2 or HLA-DR4-DQ8 haplotypes, or both, but a trigger from the environment is generally needed. The pathogenesis can be divided into three stages: 1, appearance of β-cell autoimmunity, normoglycaemia, and no symptoms; 2, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and no symptoms; and 3, β-cell autoimmunity, dysglycaemia, and symptoms of diabetes. The genetic association with each one of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis. PMID:27302272

  5. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  6. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rewers, Marian; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen considerably in the past 30 years due to changes in the environment that have been only partially identified. In this Series paper, we critically discuss candidate triggers of islet autoimmunity and factors thought to promote progression from autoimmunity to overt type 1 diabetes. We revisit previously proposed hypotheses to explain the growth in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in light of current data. Finally, we suggest a unified model in which immune tolerance to β cells can be broken by several environmental exposures that induce generation of hybrid peptides acting as neoautoantigens. PMID:27302273

  7. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  9. Diabetic foot risk factors in type 2 diabetes patients: a cross-sectional case control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot is a serious condition in patients with a long lasting diabetes mellitus. Diabetic foot treated improperly may lead not only to delayed ulceration healing, generalized inflammation, unnecessary surgical intervention, but also to the lower limb amputation. The aim of this study was to compare diabetic foot risk factors in population with type 2 diabetes and risk factors for diabetes in healthy subjects. Methods The study included 900 subjects: 145 with diabetic foot, 293 with type 2 diabetes without diabetic foot and 462 healthy controls matched in terms of mean age, gender structure and cardiovascular diseases absence. Study was conducted in Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases Department, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland. In statistical analysis a logistic regression model, U Mann-Whitney’s and t-Student test were used. Results The binomial logit models analysis showed that the risk of diabetic foot in patients with type 2 diabetes was decreased by patient’s age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.92-0.96; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81; p = 0.01). In contrast, male gender (OR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.86-4.28; p = 0.00001) diabetes duration (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.0003), weight (OR = 1.04; 95% CI: 1.03-1.06; p = 0.00001), height (OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.05-1.11; p = 0.00001) and waist circumference (OR = 1.028; 95% CI: 1.007-1.050; p = 0.006) increase the risk of diabetic foot. The onset of type 2 diabetes in healthy subjects was increased by weight (OR = 1.035; 95% CI: 1.024-1.046; p = 0.00001), WC (OR = 1.075; 95% CI: 1.055-1.096; p = 00001), hip circumference (OR = 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05; p = 0.005), overweight defined with body mass index (BMI) above 24,9 kg/m2 (OR = 2.49; 95% CI: 1.77-3.51; p = 0.00001) and hyperlipidaemia (OR = 3.53; 95% CI: 2.57-4.84; p = 0.00001). Conclusions Risk factors for Type 2 diabetes and diabetic foot are only partially common. Study proved

  10. Diabetic retinopathy and the associated risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients in Abha, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Razia A.; Khalil, Shamsun N.; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the proportion and grades of retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetes type 2 patients. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 401 type 2 diabetic patients. A questionnaire and checklist were used to collect the data. Retinopathy was diagnosed and graded by fundus photographs and slit lamp examination. The duration of diabetes, age of patients, age at onset of diabetes, body mass index, hemoglobin A1c level, blood pressure, and complications were noted. Results: The mean age of male and female patients was 54.93 and 54.25 years; 57.6% were males. The mean age of onset and mean duration of diabetes were 43.91 and 13.4 years, respectively. The proportion of retinopathy was 36.4%. Grades of retinopathy were: Mild 57.5%, moderate 19.9%, severe nonproliferative 11%, and proliferative retinopathy 11.6%; 7.2% of patients had maculopathy. Retinopathy was significantly associated with older age, younger age at onset, longer duration of disease, poorly controlled blood sugar, hypertension, insulin use; the presence of neuropathy and nephropathy appeared as a significant risk. Younger age at onset, longer duration, and insulin use appeared as the strongest predictors for diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions: More than a third (36.4%) of the diabetic patients attending a diabetic center had retinopathy. The control of the risk factors may reduce both prevalence and consequences of retinopathy. PMID:26929725

  11. Diabetes mellitus: an important risk factor for reactivation of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Carmen; Mangual, Michelle; Martinez, José; Rivera, Kelvin; Fernandez, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Diabetes mellitus was identified as a risk factor for developing tuberculosis (TB) infection, and relapse after therapy. The risk of acquiring TB is described as comparable to that of HIV population. The fact that diabetics are 3× times more prone to develop pulmonary TB than nondiabetics cannot be overlooked. With DM recognized as global epidemic, and TB affecting one-third of the world population, physicians must remain vigilant. We present a 45-year-old woman born in Dominican Republic (DR), with 10-year history of T2DM treated with metformin, arrived to our Urgency Room complaining of dry cough for the past 3months. Interview unveiled unintentional 15lbs weight loss, night sweats, occasional unquantified fever, and general malaise but denied bloody sputum. She traveled to DR 2years before, with no known ill exposure. Physical examination showed a thin body habitus, otherwise well appearing woman with stable vital signs, presenting solely right middle lung field ronchi. LDH, ESR, hsCRP and Hg A1C were elevated. Imaging revealed a right middle lobe cavitation. Sputum for AFB disclosed active pulmonary TB. Our case portrays that the consideration of TB as differential diagnosis in diabetics should be exercised with the same strength, as it is undertaken during the evaluation of HIV patients with lung cavitation. Inability to recognize TB will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. Learning points Diabetes mellitus should be considered an important risk factor for the reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. High clinical suspicious should be taken into consideration as radiological findings for pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with diabetes mellitus may be atypical, involving middle and lower lobes. Inability to recognize pulmonary tuberculosis will endanger the patient, hospital dwellers and staff, and perpetuate this global public health menace. PMID:27482384

  12. Air pollution as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM.

  13. ASSESSMENT OF RISK FACTORS FOR DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE 2

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Edin; Arnautovic, Amira; Masic, Izet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia, and represents a disease of the modern age, disease of the 21st century. Prevention of this disease is listed as imperative. Aim of this article was to evaluate questionnaires on the assessment of risk factors for Diabetes Mellitus type 2. Material and Methods: A total of 540 questionnaires handed out randomly to citizens of Canton Sarajevo of all ages, sexes and educational levels (in January 2016) were analyzed. Results: Analyzed questionnaires showed relatively low risk of getting diabetes in the next ten years in the majority of the population. These results are rather encouraging but may in some way be in confrontation with the statistics which show a rapid outburst of diabetes. Conclusion: The life-style is the main reason for such a thing to happen, and looking at these questionnaires, we might get the feeling that we really do live in a, conditionally speaking, physically active society. That, from our everyday experience is not entirely true. It would be wise to continue doing research on this topic on the territory of Bosnia and Herzegovina. PMID:27482159

  14. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations.

  15. Environmental contaminants as risk factors for developing diabetes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, David O

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) to the incidence of diabetes has received little attention until recently. A number of reports have emerged, however, concerning elevated diabetes in persons occupationally exposed to dioxin. United States (US) Air Force personnel in Vietnam who sprayed Agent Orange containing dioxin as a contaminant had elevated rates of diabetes, leading to US government compensation for diabetes in these veterans. Recent studies in populations exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides found a dose-dependent elevated risk of diabetes. An elevation in risk of diabetes in relation to levels of several POPs has been demonstrated by two different groups using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a random sampling of US citizens. The strong associations seen in quite different studies suggest the possibility that exposure to POPs could cause diabetes. One striking observation is that obese persons that do not have elevated POPs are not at elevated risk of diabetes, suggesting that the POPs rather than the obesity per se is responsible for the association. Although a specific mechanism is not known, most POPs induce a great number and variety of genes, including several that alter insulin action. Because diabetes is a dangerous disease that is increasing in frequency throughout the world, further study of the possibility that exposure to POPs contributes to the etiology of diabetes is critical. PMID:18557598

  16. Beyond HbA1c: Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nwanyanwu, Kristen Harris; Newman-Casey, Paula-Anne; Gardner, Thomas W; Lim, Jennifer I

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy affects 4.2 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in working-aged people. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, cost-effective interventions to decrease blindness from diabetic retinopathy will be paramount. While HbA1c and duration of disease are known risk factors, they account for only 11% of the risk of developing microvascular complications from the disease. The assessment of environmental risk factors for diabetic eye disease allows for the determination of modifiable population-level challenges that may be addressed to facilitate the end of blindness from diabetes. PMID:26973797

  17. Spousal diabetes as a diabetes risk factor: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes history in biologically-related individuals increases diabetes risk. We assessed diabetes concordance in spouses (that is, biologically unrelated family members) to gauge the importance of socioenvironmental factors. Methods We selected cross-sectional, case–control and cohort studies examining spousal association for diabetes and/or prediabetes (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance), indexed in Medline, Embase or Scopus (1 January 1997 to 28 February 2013). Effect estimates (that is, odds ratios, incidence rate ratios, and so on) with body mass index (BMI) adjustment were pooled separately from those without BMI adjustment (random effects models) to distinguish BMI-dependent and independent concordance. Results Searches yielded 2,705 articles; six were retained (n = 75,498 couples) for systematic review and five for meta-analysis. Concordance was lowest in a study that relied on women’s reports of diabetes in themselves and their spouses (effect estimate 1.1, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.30) and highest in a study with systematic assessment of glucose tolerance (2.11, 95% CI 1.74 to 5.10). The random-effects pooled estimate adjusted for age and other covariates but not BMI was 1.26 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.45). The estimate with BMI adjustment was lower (1.18, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.40). Two studies assessing between-spouse associations of diabetes/prediabetes determined by glucose testing reported high concordance (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.37 without BMI adjustment; 2.32, 95% CI 1.87 to 3.98 with BMI adjustment). Two studies did not distinguish type 1 and type 2 diabetes. However given that around 95% of adults is type 2, this is unlikely to have influenced the results. Conclusions Our pooled estimate suggests that a spousal history of diabetes is associated with a 26% diabetes risk increase. Recognizing shared risk between spouses may improve diabetes detection and motivate couples to increase collaborative efforts to optimize eating and

  18. STAT4: a risk factor for type 1 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Zervou, Maria I; Mamoulakis, Dimitrios; Panierakis, Charalampos; Boumpas, Dimitrios T; Goulielmos, George N

    2008-10-01

    Genes and mechanisms involved in autoimmune diseases, affecting approximately 5% of human population, remain still obscure but there is accumulating evidence that common genetic factors might predispose to multiple autoimmune disorders. STAT4, a transcription factor transmitting signals induced by several key cytokines, has recently been identified as a genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren's disease (SD), thus indicating that multiple autoimmune diseases may share common biochemical pathways that lead to immune deregulation. Here we demonstrate for the first time, in a genetically homogeneous population, the association of the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism, which has been shown to be associated with these autoimmune diseases, with susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). The susceptibility is associated with a significant increase of the frequency of the T allele (p = 0.0012, two-tailed chi(2), OR = 1.94, 95% CI = 1.29-2.91) in this single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We also present an indication for association with Wegener's granulomatosis. These findings suggest that this variant form of STAT4 may have a putative key role in the development of a variety of autoimmune diseases, probably because of signaling defects that it causes in the IL-12 pathway. PMID:18703106

  19. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:24444518

  1. [Biomarkers and risk factors of cardiovascular system disease in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Prystupiuk, O M

    2013-01-01

    The content of glycated hemoglobin, a biomarker of diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes correlates with risk factors for cardiovascular disease: hypertension, BMI and ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Therefore, increase in glycosylated hemoglobin should be considered a predictor of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. PRESENCE OF DIABETES RISK FACTORS IN A LARGE U.S. EIGHTH-GRADE COHORT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted in 12 middle schools to determine the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes, and diabetes risk factors in eighth-grade students who were predominantly minority and to evaluate the feasibility of collecting physical and laboratory data in schools. RESEARCH DESIGN AND...

  3. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhi-Peng; Ma, Jing-Xue

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in northern Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). METHODS This retrospective cross-sectional study was performed between May 2011 and April 2012. A total of 1100 patients (male/female, 483/617) were included in this study. DR was defined following the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) severity scale. All included patients accepted a comprehensive ophthalmic examination including retinal photographs. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS Retinopathy was present in 307 patients with a prevalence of 27.9%. In univariate logistic analysis, presence of DR was associated with longer duration of diabetes (OR, 5.70; 95%CI, 2.91-12.56), higher concentration of fasting blood glucose (OR, 12.94; 95%CI, 2.40-67.71), higher level of glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c (OR, 5.50; 95%CI, 3.78-11.97) and insulin treatment (OR, 6.99; 95%CI, 1.39-35.12). The lifestyle of patients with T2DM including smoking, alcohol consumption and regular exercise seemed not associated with the development of DR. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that fasting serum glucose concentration, HbA1c level, duration of diabetes and insulin treatment are potential risk factors for DR in northern Chinese patients with T2DM, while the lifestyle of included patients seems not associated with DR. PMID:27588275

  4. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  5. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk. PMID:25987904

  6. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  7. Risk Factors for and Barriers to Control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi Population

    PubMed Central

    Alneami, Yahya Mari; Coleman, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is dramatically increasing in urban areas within Saudi Arabia. Hence, Type-2 Diabetes has now become the most common public health problem. Understanding the major risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes may lead to strategies to prevent, control, and reduce in the burden of disease cases. Objective: To describe risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Methods: The literature search was conducted on risk factors for and barriers to control Type- 2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia using the databases PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar (2007-2015). The literature search yielded 80 articles, of which 70 articles were included in this review after excluding non-relevant articles. Results: The literature review revealed that obesity, physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, smoking, and aging are the major risk factors for Type-2 Diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Further, the review allocated a complex set of barriers including, lack of education, social support, and healthy environment. These barriers may hinder Saudis with Type-2 Diabetes from controlling their disease. Conclusion: The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes is high among the Saudi population and represents a major public health problem. Effective research programs are needed to address the modifiable risk factors for and barriers to control Type-2 Diabetes among Saudi population. PMID:27157156

  8. Pleiotropic effects of type 2 diabetes management strategies on renal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Smits, Mark M; Kramer, Mark H H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with the type 2 diabetes pandemic, diabetic kidney disease has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As established in landmark randomised trials and recommended in clinical guidelines, prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease focuses on control of the two main renal risk factors, hyperglycaemia and systemic hypertension. Treatment of systemic hypertension with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers is advocated because these drugs seem to exert specific renoprotective effects beyond blood pressure lowering. Emerging evidence shows that obesity, glomerular hyperfiltration, albuminuria, and dyslipidaemia might also adversely affect the kidney in diabetes. Control of these risk factors could have additional benefits on renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, despite multifactorial treatment approaches, residual risk for the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes remains, and novel strategies or therapies to treat the disease are urgently needed. Several drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with pleiotropic effects that could favourably or unfavourably change patients' renal risk profile. We review the risk factors and treatment of diabetic kidney disease, and describe the pleiotropic effects of widely used drugs in type 2 diabetes management on renal outcomes, with special emphasis on antihyperglycaemic drugs.

  9. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  10. Diabetes mellitus: Possible risk and promoting factors of cholangiocarcinoma: Association of diabetes mellitus and cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saengboonmee, Charupong; Seubwai, Wunchana; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2015-06-01

    The highest incidence of Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a malignancy of bile duct epithelia, is in the Northeast of Thailand. The liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, is the known risk factor for CCA development in this region. Approximately 1% of O. viverrini infected individuals develop CCA. There could be other factors that influence the cholangiocarcinogenesis particularly in the O. viverrini infected individuals. The global epidemiological studies of risk factors for CCA in non-O. viverrini related patients indicated diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor of CCA. The molecular studies in many cancers indicated that high levels of glucose, insulin and an obese condition directly and indirectly enhanced growth of cancers. For O. viverrini associated CCA, there is limited information related to DM and CCA development. High mortality rates of CCA and DM, however, were reported in the same geographical areas of northeastern Thailand. Whether DM is a factor that enhances CCA development in O. viverrini infected individuals or promotes CCA progression are discussed in a perspective of epidemiological and molecular studies. PMID:25910864

  11. [Clinical and pathophysiological features of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their risk factors for diabetic complication].

    PubMed

    Sone, Hirohito

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiological backgrounds as well as clinical phenotypes of Japanese or East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes are quite different from those in Western countries. According to results of East Asian large-scale studies such as the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS), which is a representative cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, Japanese patients had a much lower body mass index and lower incidence of coronary heart disease compared with Caucasian diabetic patients. Other differences between Japanese and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes could be found in risk factors such as fruit intake on retinopathy and significance of triglycerides, or the effects of moderate alcohol drinking on cardiovascular disease. These results demonstrated a necessity of ethnic group-specific risk evaluations and care of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  12. Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and assessments of their risk factors in urban slums of Bangalore

    PubMed Central

    Dasappa, Hemavathi; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Prabhakar, Rugmani; Sarin, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and to assess the risk factors associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes in the urban slums of Bangalore. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four slums of Bangalore in the age group of 35 years and above comprising of total 2013 subjects. Risk factors like age, sex, family history, behavior, physical activity, BMI, waist hip ration, diet habits were assessed to find their association with diabetes. Results: Prevalence of diabetes was 12.33% and of pre-diabetes was 11.57%. Prevalence was more among the females compared to males. Increasing age, over weight and obesity, sedentary life style, tobacco consumption, diet habits showed statistically significant association with prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes. Conclusion: Physical activity like regular exercises both at the office and at home, fibers-rich diet, blood sugar estimation after 35 years are some of the recommendations which can control diabetes. PMID:26288781

  13. Risk factors of type 2 diabetes in population of Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ankit; Sharma, Swarkar; Dhar, Manoj K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2013-09-01

    We sought to identify risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Jammu and Kashmir populations, India. A total of 424 diabetic and 226 non-diabetic subjects from Jammu, and 161 diabetic and 100 non-diabetic subjects from Kashmir were screened for various parameters including fasting blood glucose level, 2 hour glucose level, urea, creatinine, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL-C), uric acid, systolic and diastolic blood pressure level. We found that subjects aged 40-49 years had the highest rate of diabetes, with family income playing not much of a role. Kashmiri migrants or populations with rapid cultural, environmental, social or lifestyle change along with reduced physical activity, obesity and unhealthy lifestyle (smoking and alcohol consumption) were found to have higher rates of diabetes. High blood glucose, triglycerides and low HDL-C levels were found to be contributing to disease outcome. High blood pressure also contributed to a higher risk of developing T2D. Our study supports earlier reports confirming the contribution of comfortable life style, Western dietary habits and rapid life style change along with many other factors to the prevalence of diabetes. This may contribute to the epidemic proportion of diabetes in Jammu and Kashmir. Early diagnosis and routine screening for undiagnosed diabetes in obese subjects and subjects with parental diabetes history is expected to decrease the burden of chronic diabetic complications worldwide.

  14. Prevalence of Pre-Diabetes and Its Associated Risk Factors in Rural Areas of Ningbo, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Hongbo; Yuan, Yanyan; Wang, Fuyan; Xi, Yang; Wen, Li Ming; Shen, Peng; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and explore its associated risk factors in rural areas of Ningbo, China. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 4583 adult residents in rural areas of Ningbo, China between March and May 2013. The survey used a multi-stage, stratified, cluster sampling method. Data collected included demographics and medical history, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood lipid, and plasma glucose. After at least 10 h of overnight fasting, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to identify pre-diabetes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associated risk factors for pre-diabetes, and to estimate the effect of interaction between the factors. Results: There were 1307 survey participants having pre-diabetes (28.52%) and the age-standardized prevalence was 30.53%. Multivariate logistic regression results showed that overweight/obesity, hypertension, and higher triglycerides were the risk factors for developing pre-diabetes. There were positive interactions between overweight/obesity and triglycerides, and also between hypertension and triglycerides on the multiplicative scale, suggesting that they synergistically influenced the development of pre-diabetes. Conclusions: The rural areas in Ningbo had a high prevalence of pre-diabetes. Overweight and obesity, hypertension, and elevated triglycerides were the major risk factors. There is a need of early intervention for preventing pre-diabetes. PMID:27517947

  15. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. Methods: In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. Results: The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2–4.1). Conclusions: There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity. PMID:26605019

  16. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  17. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis.

  18. Type 2 diabetes in children: Clinical aspects and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rao, P V

    2015-04-01

    A strong link between obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome has been reported with development of a new paradigm to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with some evidence suggesting that beta-cell dysfunction is present before the onset of impaired glucose tolerance. Differentiating type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM is actually not very easy and there exists a number of overlapping characteristics. The autoantibody frequencies of seven antigens in T1DM patients may turn out to be actually having T2DM patients (pre-T2DM). T2DM patients generally have increased C-peptide levels (may be normal at time of diagnosis), usually no auto-antibodies, strong family history of diabetes, obese and show signs of insulin resistance (hypertension, acanthosis, PCOS). The American Academy of Paediatrics recommends lifestyle modifications ± metformin when blood glucose is 126-200 mg/dL and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <8.5. Insulin is recommended when blood glucose is >200 mg/dL and HbA1c >8.5, with or without ketosis. Metformin is not recommended if the patient is ketotic, because this increases the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin is currently the only oral hypoglycemic that has been approved for use in children. Knowing these subtle differences in mechanism, and knowing how to test patients for which mechanism (s) are causing their diabetes mellitus, may help us eventually tailor treatment programs on an individual basis. PMID:25941651

  19. Incidence and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in African Americans with diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Ayokanmi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Desvorieux, Moise; Pankow, James S.; Taylor, Herman

    2002-01-01

    To determine the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its association with conventional and less well-established risk factors in African Americans with diabetes, we studied 741 African Americans aged 45 to 64 years with diabetes, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Risk factors were measured from 1987 to 1989, and incident CVD (n = 143 coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke events) was ascertained through 1998. The crude incidence rate (per 1000 person-years) of CVD was 22.5 (11.9 for CHD and 12.0 for stroke). After multivariate adjustments, total cholesterol, prevalent hypertension and current smoking were significantly and positively associated with incident CVD among these African Americans with diabetes. Among the non-conventional risk factors, serum creatinine, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and white blood cell count were positively and serum albumin negatively and independently associated with CVD incidence. Adjusted relative risks for highest versus lowest tertiles of these risk factors ranged from 1.77 to 2.13. This study confirms that the major risk factors (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and smoking) are important determinants of CVD in African Americans with diabetes. In addition, several blood markers of hemostasis or inflammatory response and elevated serum creatinine also proved to be CVD risk factors in African Americans with diabetes. PMID:12510702

  20. Physiological and behavioral risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural India

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Anamitra; Mazumdar, Sumit; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Rai, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamics of physiological and behavioral risk factors of diabetes in rural India is poorly understood. Using data from a health and demographic surveillance site of Birbhum district in West Bengal, India, this study aims to assess the risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods A total of 7674 individuals aged ≥18 years participated in a cross-sectional study. Venous plasma glucose method was used for measuring and reporting glucose concentrations in blood, categorized as individuals with diabetes, pre-diabetes or impaired, and normoglycemic. Aside from a set of physiological and behavioral risk factors, a range of socioeconomic confounders of diabetes was computed. Bivariate analysis with χ2 test, and multivariate ordered logit regression methods were deployed to attain the study's objective. Results Overall 2.95% and 3.34% of study participants were diagnosed as individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes or impaired, respectively. Compared to the poorest, the richest have higher probability (β: 0.730; 95% CI 0.378 to 1.083) of being diagnosed with diabetes. As compared to people with normal body mass index, overweight/obese people are more prone to being diagnosed with diabetes (β: 0.388; 95% CI 0.147 to 0.628). With a decreasing level of physical activity, people are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes. Conclusions To curb the level of diabetes, this study recommends a culturally sensitive, focused intervention for the adoption of physical activity with more traditional dietary practices, to control the level of overweight/obesity. Attention should be paid to relatively older patients with diabetes or adults with pre-diabetes. PMID:27547420

  1. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  2. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension. PMID:21222313

  3. Risk Factors for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Tesse, Riccardina; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Maggialetti, Nicola; Monteduro, Mariantonietta; Giordano, Paola; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it seems to predict cardiovascular events both in obese and diabetic subjects. We aimed to evaluate early signs of atherosclerosis and investigate for predisposing factors in children and adolescents affected by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or obesity, comparing them with healthy controls. Methods. Out of 71 enrolled subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 2.3 years), 26 had T1DM and 24 were obese, while 21 age- and sex-matched subjects acted as controls. cIMT was measured using standardized methods. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in obese subjects. Results. Diabetic and obese individuals showed higher cIMT mean values than healthy controls (p<0.005). cIMT of the three examined segments correlated positively with fasting glucose levels and negatively with units of insulin/kg/day administered in T1DM individuals. A positive correlation between insulin levels (basal and after oral glucose load) and cIMT of common, internal and external carotid artery was found in obese subjects (p<0.03). High density cholesterol levels represented a protective factor for cIMT in this latter group of the study population. Conclusions. Our findings show that cIMT correlates with high insulin levels (a sign of insulin resistance) in obese patients and with high fasting glucose levels (a sign of relative insulin deficiency) in T1DM subjects, confirming the need of reducing hyperinsulinism and monitoring blood glucose levels in these subjects to prevent atherosclerosis. PMID:23423872

  4. Coronary artery bypass surgery in diabetic patients – risk factors for sternal wound infections

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kristina; Brandt, Michael; Fraund-Cremer, Sandra; Cremer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of sternal wound infections (SWI) after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) as reported worldwide is low. However, it is associated with significant increase of postoperative mortality and treatment costs. The major risk factors discussed are diabetes mellitus and bilateral IMA harvesting of the internal mammary artery. This study analyses data of 590 patients receiving CABG concerning the risk factors for SWI. Sternal wound infections occur significantly more often in diabetic patients, one crucial and significant additional risk factor is obesity. PMID:27547690

  5. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young adults with arterial hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Gomes, Emiliana Bezerra; dos Santos, Jênifa Cavalcante

    2010-12-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in young adults assisted in six Family Health Units (UBASF), of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. This is a descriptive and documental study, based on the records of the Care Program to Arterial Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus (HIPERDIA). The sample was composed of 60 records, including hypertensive, diabetics and patients with the two diagnoses. The results showed prevalence of young female adults (78%). Regarding the risk factors, arterial hypertension (n=45), family history (n=33), overweight (n=33) and sedentary lifestyle (n=27) stood out. Regarding the cardiovascular risk stratification, most presented Medium additional risk for cardiovascular disease. We concluded that the individualized evaluation of risk factors supports an action addressed for possible events, being necessary investments in prevention and also in training and maintenance of the HIPERDIA system.

  6. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  7. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  8. Lifestyle risk factors for atherosclerosis in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Ogden, Lorraine G; Kinney, Greg L; Rewers, Marian

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the amount of self-reported physical activity, alcohol and tobacco use in a large sample of adults with type 1 diabetes and non-diabetic subjects. A second aim is to test the hypothesis that these lifestyle risk factors are associated cross-sectionally with coronary artery calcification. In 2000-2002, the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) study applied validated questionnaires for smoking, alcohol and physical activity to 582 type 1 diabetes subjects and 724 non-diabetic subjects. More type 1 diabetes subjects reported current smoking than non-diabetic subjects (12.3% versus 8.6%, p=0.027). Overall, reported physical activity did not differ by diabetes status (p=0.79). More type 1 diabetes subjects reported never having consumed alcohol (10% versus 4%, p<0.0001) and those who drank consumed less alcohol (p=0.0015) than non-diabetic subjects. Physical activity and smoking were significantly associated with the presence of coronary artery calcification (adjusted OR=0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-0.996, p=0.045, and OR=1.7, CI: 1.1-2.6, p=0.03, respectively). Type 1 diabetes was independently associated with increased odds of coronary artery calcification (OR=3.5, 95% CI: 2.5-5.0, p<0.0001). Differences exist in lifestyle-related cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with type 1 diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects in the CACTI study. PMID:20368221

  9. Risk factors for ulceration and amputation in diabetic foot: study in a cohort of 496 patients.

    PubMed

    Moura Neto, Arnaldo; Zantut-Wittmann, Denise Engelbrecht; Fernandes, Tulio Diniz; Nery, Marcia; Parisi, Maria Candida Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Treatment strategies for foot at risk and diabetic foot are mainly preventive. Studies describing demographic data, clinical and impacting factors continue to be, however, scarce. Our objective was to determine the epidemiological presentation of diabetic foot and understand whether there were easily assessable variables capable of predicting the development of diabetic foot. This was a retrospective study of 496 patients with established foot at risk or diabetic foot, who were evaluated based on age, gender, type and duration of diabetes, foot at risk classification, and the presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation. The presence of deformities, ulceration, and amputation was recorded in 45.9, 25.3, and 12.9 % of patients, respectively. As for diabetic foot classification, the great majority of our cohort had diabetic neuropathy (92.9 %). Approximately 30 % had neuro-ischemic disease and only 7.1 % had ischemic disease alone. Sixty-two percent of patients presented neuropathy with no signs of arteriopathy. Foot classification was as a significant predictor for the presence of ulcer (p = 0.009; OR = 3.2; 95 % CI = 1.18-7.3). Only male gender was a significant predictor for ulceration (p < 0.001). Predictors of amputation were male gender (p < 0.001; OR = 3.44 95 % CI = 1.81-6.56) and neuro-ischemic diabetic foot (p < 0.049; OR = 4.6; 95 % CI = 1.01-20.9). The predictors for diabetic foot were male gender and the presence of neuropathy. The combination of neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease adds significantly to the risk for amputation among patients with the diabetic foot syndrome. Men, presenting combined risk factors, should be a group receiving special attention and in the foot clinic, due to their potentially worse evolution.

  10. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Increase the Risks of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to examine whether poor glycemic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors, can predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Patients aged ≥30 years with type 2 DM, enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, and free of DPN (n = 37,375) in the period 2002 to 2004 were included and followed up until 2011. The related factors were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. For an average follow-up of 7.00 years, 8379 cases of DPN were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 32.04/1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, patients with HbA1c levels 7 to 8%, 8 to 9%, 9 to 10%, and ≥10% exhibited higher risk of DPN (adjusted HR: 1.11 [1.04–1.20], 1.30 [1.21–1.40], 1.32 [1.22–1.43], and 1.62 [1.51–1.74], respectively) compared with patients with HbA1c level 6 to 7%. There was a significant linear trend in DPN incidence with increasing HbA1c (P < 0.001) and significant HRs of DPN for patients with HbA1c level ≥7%, blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg, triglycerides (TG) ≥150 mg/dL, high density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) <40 mg/dL in males and <50 mg/dL in females, low density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥100 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Patients with type 2 DM and HbA1c ≥7.0% exhibit increased risk of DPN, demonstrating a linear relationship. The incidence of DPN is also associated with poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, hyper-triglyceridemia, low HDL-C, high LDL-C, and decreased eGFR. PMID:26496307

  11. The presence of family history and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in rural children.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Lammon, Carol Ann Barnett

    2007-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated casual blood glucose, elevated total cholesterol, and the presence of acanthosis nigricans) for development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural children with or without a family history of diabetes during annual school health fairs. Of the children screened, 40% (673) presented with two or more of the identified risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of multiple risk factors in participants reporting a positive family history of diabetes mellitus versus those with no family history was not statistically significant. Based on the study results, factors other than family history may be more predictive for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural school children.

  12. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  13. Depression in romanian patients with type 2 diabetes: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, ANDREIA S.; IANCU, SILVIA S.; DUMA, LIVIA; MURESEANU, CAMELIA; BABAN, ADRIANA S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Co-existing major depression was found to have a negative impact on the diabetes outcome and the quality of life. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms in Romanian diabetes patients and to identify the risk factors associated with depression. Methods A total of 144 type 2 diabetes patients were included in the study. Five models of presumed predictors were used to assess the risk factors for depressive symptoms, using hierarchical regression analysis. Together with demographics, disease, lifestyle predictors, previous depressive symptoms and diabetes distress were taken into account. Results In our sample the prevalence of depression was 12.6%. Main risk factors for depressive symptoms were previous depressive symptoms which were associated with depression in both Model 4 (β=0.297, p=0.013) and Model 5 (β=0.239, p=0.017) and diabetes distress in Model 5 (β=0.540, p≤0.001). Employment (β =−0.276, p=0.029) and increased number of diabetes complications (β=0.236, p=0.017) became significant when diabetes distress was added to the analysis. Conclusions The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be in range with the prevalence identified in the literature. Previous depression and diabetes distress were both independently associated with depression, confirming the bidirectional relationship between depression and diabetes distress. Due to the consequences for daily living, screening for diabetes distress and depression should be done in primary care units both by physicians and trained nurses. PMID:27547056

  14. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  15. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  16. Prevalence and risk factors for micro- and macroalbuminuria in diabetic subjects and entire population of Nauru.

    PubMed

    Collins, V R; Dowse, G K; Finch, C F; Zimmet, P Z; Linnane, A W

    1989-12-01

    Rates of elevated urinary albumin concentration, defined as microalbuminuria (30-299 micrograms/ml) and macroalbuminuria (greater than or equal to 300 micrograms/ml), were determined on random morning urine specimens in the population of Nauru, which has a high prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of elevated urinary albumin levels in the total Nauruan population was very high: 26 and 30% of men and women, respectively, had microalbuminuria, whereas 13% of both sexes had macroalbuminuria. Of the subjects with macroalbuminuria, 66% had diabetes. The prevalence increased with worsening glucose tolerance; 26% of subjects with normal glucose tolerance had either micro- or macroalbuminuria, increasing to 43% of subjects with impaired glucose tolerance, 63% of newly diagnosed diabetic subjects, and 75% of previously diagnosed diabetic subjects. Associations between elevated urinary albumin concentration and putative risk factors were assessed for both the total population (n = 1184) and the diabetic subgroup alone (n = 318). Fasting plasma glucose and hypertension were the most important independent correlates for the whole population, whereas plasma creatinine was also important in diabetic subjects. Age at onset and duration of diabetes were not found to be significantly associated with elevated albumin concentration. In subjects with normal glucose tolerance, hypertension and hyperuricemia were the most important associated factors. These results suggest that blood glucose, blood pressure, and possibly obesity and plasma uric acid are important modifiable risk factors for both micro- and macroalbuminuria in this population.

  17. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, S; Balakumar, S; Arasaratnam, V

    2015-09-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District. Multistage stratified cluster sampling technique was employed to select 544 participants. An interviewer administrated questionnaire was used. Anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded and biochemical parameters were analysed. Response rate was 95.3%. Of them, 224 (43.8%) were male. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 16.4% (95% CI: 13.3- 19.9); in males 19.6% (95% CI: 14.6-25.4) and in females 13.9% (95% CI: 10.1-18.5). Of the diabetics, 27.4% were previously undiagnosed. In the final multivariable model, participants with family history of diabetes were 3.5 times (p<0.001) more likely and those with high waist hip ratio were 2 times (p=0.009) more likely to develop diabetes mellitus. PMID:26520866

  19. Undiagnosed diabetes in breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Robert I; Lindquist, Karla J; O'Malley, Cynthia D; Gleeson, Michelle L; Duryea, Jennifer L; Valderas, José M; Danese, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Our study describes the incidence and risk factors for undiagnosed diabetes in elderly cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data, we followed patients with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer from 24 months before to 3 months after cancer diagnosis. Medicare claims were used to exclude patients with diabetes 24 to 4 months before cancer (look-back period), identify those with diabetes undiagnosed until cancer, and construct indicators of preventive services, physician contact, and comorbidity during the look-back period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes. Overall, 2,678 patients had diabetes undiagnosed until cancer. Rates were the highest in patients with both advanced-stage cancer and low prior primary care/medical specialist contact (breast 8.2%, colorectal 5.9%, lung 4.4%). Nonwhite race/ethnicity, living in a census tract with a higher percent of the population in poverty and a lower percent college educated, lower prior preventive services use, and lack of primary care and/or medical specialist care prior to cancer all were associated with higher (P ≤ 0.05) adjusted odds of undiagnosed diabetes. Undiagnosed diabetes is relatively common in selected subgroups of cancer patients, including those already at high risk of poor outcomes due to advanced cancer stage.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor axis and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

    PubMed

    Rajpathak, Swapnil N; He, Meian; Sun, Qi; Kaplan, Robert C; Muzumdar, Radhika; Rohan, Thomas E; Gunter, Marc J; Pollak, Michael; Kim, Mimi; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Beasley, Jeannette; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Hu, Frank B; Strickler, Howard D

    2012-09-01

    IGF-I shares structural homology and in vitro metabolic activity with insulin. Laboratory models suggest that IGF-I and its binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 have potentially beneficial effects on diabetes risk, whereas IGFBP-3 may have adverse effects. We therefore conducted a prospective nested case-control investigation of incident diabetes (n = 742 case subjects matched 1:1 to control subjects) and its associations with IGF-axis protein levels in the Nurses' Health Study, a cohort of middle-aged women. The median time to diabetes was 9 years. Statistical analyses were adjusted for multiple risk factors, including insulin and C-reactive protein. Diabetes risk was fivefold lower among women with baseline IGFBP-2 levels in the top versus bottom quintile (odds ratio [OR](q5-q1) = 0.17 [95% CI 0.08-0.35]; P trend < 0.0001) and was also negatively associated with IGFBP-1 levels (OR(q5-q1) = 0.37 [0.18-0.73]; P trend = 0.0009). IGFBP-3 was positively associated with diabetes (OR(q5-q1) = 2.05 [1.20-3.51]; P trend = 0.002). Diabetes was not associated with total IGF-I levels, but free IGF-I and diabetes had a significant association that varied (P interaction = 0.003) by insulin levels above the median (OR(q5-q1) = 0.48 [0.26-0.90]; P trend = 0.0001) versus below the median (OR(q5-q1) = 2.52 [1.05-6.06]; P trend < 0.05). Thus, this prospective study found strong associations of incident diabetes with baseline levels of three IGFBPs and free IGF-I, consistent with hypotheses that the IGF axis might influence diabetes risk.

  1. [Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor in vascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Zan, S; Tridico, F; Panier Suffat, P; Pica, D; Sorisio, V; Contessa, L; Caldart, M; Bruno, F

    1990-03-01

    The paper reports a series of 23 diabetic patients affected by occlusive arterial disease of the lower limbs treated by reconstructive vascular surgery. Revascularisation interventions were performed in 9 patients affected by claudication, with good long-term results. Fourteen patients underwent operations for limb salvage. The major amputation rate was 35%.

  2. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  3. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes in a sixth-grade multi-racial cohort: The HEALTHY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HEALTHY is a 3-year middle school intervention program designed to reduce risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes risk factors at baseline in a cohort of 6,358 sixth-grade students is reported. Forty-two schools at seven U.S. sites were randomly assigned to intervention or contr...

  4. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Ibrahim, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk. PMID:26989695

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroparesis-related symptoms among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Rakan A; Alhussan, Fulwa A; Alnasser, Sulaiman A; Algeffari, Metab A

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroparesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) vary widely. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and explore the relationship between gastroparesis and other risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluating 147 type 2 diabetics using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI). A GCSI Total Score ≥ 1.90 were chosen as having definite symptoms of gastroparesis. All patients completed a demographic questionnaire and interviewed to complete the. Demographic Data, disease duration, Medication, comorbidities, recent blood glucose and HbA1C were collected and investigated. Results The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among type 2 diabetics was 10.8%. Clinical symptoms of gastroparesis were significantly correlated to HbA1c (p=0.001), blood glucose (p= 0.003), duration of diabetes (p= 0.02) and comorbidities (p=0.009). The most common symptoms were bloating, stomach fullness and early satiety (63.94%, 55.1% and 48.3% respectively). In logistic regression analysis, female gender emerged as significant independent predictors of the presence of at least one symptom. Conclusions The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis observed in the Saudi patientsdiagnosedwithtype2 diabetes was 10.8% and is independently associated with poor controlled diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long duration of diabetes and history of Co-morbid conditions. PMID:27610063

  6. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroparesis-related symptoms among patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Almogbel, Rakan A; Alhussan, Fulwa A; Alnasser, Sulaiman A; Algeffari, Metab A

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of gastroparesis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) vary widely. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and explore the relationship between gastroparesis and other risk factors. Methods A cross-sectional study evaluating 147 type 2 diabetics using the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptoms Index (GCSI). A GCSI Total Score ≥ 1.90 were chosen as having definite symptoms of gastroparesis. All patients completed a demographic questionnaire and interviewed to complete the. Demographic Data, disease duration, Medication, comorbidities, recent blood glucose and HbA1C were collected and investigated. Results The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis among type 2 diabetics was 10.8%. Clinical symptoms of gastroparesis were significantly correlated to HbA1c (p=0.001), blood glucose (p= 0.003), duration of diabetes (p= 0.02) and comorbidities (p=0.009). The most common symptoms were bloating, stomach fullness and early satiety (63.94%, 55.1% and 48.3% respectively). In logistic regression analysis, female gender emerged as significant independent predictors of the presence of at least one symptom. Conclusions The prevalence of clinical symptoms of gastroparesis observed in the Saudi patientsdiagnosedwithtype2 diabetes was 10.8% and is independently associated with poor controlled diabetes, hyperglycemia, and long duration of diabetes and history of Co-morbid conditions.

  7. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  8. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact

  9. "It is not possible for me to have diabetes"-community perceptions on diabetes and its risk factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-06-12

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

  10. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors. PMID:22520399

  11. Are the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Associated With Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Daisy; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; He, Ka; Jacobs, David R.; Shikany, James M.; Popkin, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the prospective association between accordance with the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and subsequent diabetes incidence and changes in cardiometabolic risk factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The sample consisted of 4,381 black and white young adults examined repeatedly from 1985 to 2005. We used the 2005 Diet Quality Index (DQI) to rate participants’ diets based on meeting key dietary recommendations conveyed by the 2005 DGA. RESULTS Overall, we found no association between DQI score and diabetes risk using Cox models adjusted for potential confounders. Higher DQI scores were associated with favorable changes in HDL cholesterol and blood pressure overall (P for trend <0.05), but with increased insulin resistance among blacks (P for trend <0.01). CONCLUSIONS Our findings highlight the need for evaluation of the DGA’s effectiveness, particularly among ethnic minority populations. Clinicians should be aware that following the DGA might not lower diabetes risk. PMID:21478463

  12. Diabetes Is a Risk Factor for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study from Mwanza, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George; Jeremiah, Kidola; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Aabye, Martine Grosos; Changalucha, John; Christensen, Dirk Lund; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Krarup, Henrik; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Friis, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent. Methods A case-control study was conducted in an urban population in Tanzania among culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients and non-TB neighbourhood controls. Participants were tested for diabetes according to WHO guidelines and serum concentrations of acute phase reactants were measured. The association between diabetes and TB, and the role of HIV as an effect modifier, were examined using logistic regression. Since blood glucose levels increase during the acute phase response, we adjusted for elevated serum acute phase reactants. Results Among 803 cases and 350 controls the mean (SD) age was 34.8 (11.9) and 33.8 (12.0) years, and the prevalence of diabetes was 16.7% (95% CI: 14.2; 19.4) and 9.4% (6.6; 13.0), respectively. Diabetes was associated with TB (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 3.4, p<0.001). However, the association depended on HIV status (interaction, p = 0.01) due to a stronger association among HIV uninfected (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 11.6, p = 0.01) compared to HIV infected (OR 0.1, 95% CI: 0.01; 1.8, p = 0.13) after adjusting for age, sex, demographic factors and elevated serum acute phase reactants. Conclusion Diabetes is a risk factor for TB in HIV uninfected, whereas the association in HIV infected patients needs further study. The increasing diabetes prevalence may be a threat to TB control. PMID:21912626

  13. Diabetic nephropathy--a review of the natural history, burden, risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ayodele, Olugbenga E.; Alebiosu, C. Olutayo; Salako, Babatunde L.

    2004-01-01

    The earliest clinical evidence of diabetic nephropathy is microalbuminuria. Progression from microalbuminuria to overt nephropathy occurs in 20-40% within a 10-year period with approximately 20% of these patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. End-stage renal disease develops in 50% of type-1 diabetes patients with overt nephropathy within 10 years and in more than 75% by 20 years in the absence of treatment. In type-2 diabetes, a greater proportion of patients have microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy at or shortly after diagnosis of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with subsequent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy. The risk factors identified in the development of DN from longitudinal and cross-sectional studies include race, genetic susceptibility, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperfiltration, smoking, advanced age, male sex, and high-protein diet. Treatment interventions in diabetic nephropathy include glycemic control, treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cessation of smoking, protein restriction, and renal replacement therapy. Multifactorial approach includes combined therapy targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, microalbuminuria, and dyslipidemia. PMID:15586648

  14. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in People with and without Diabetes Mellitus: A Middle Eastern Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Jahangiri-Noudeh, Younes; Akbarpour, Samaneh; Lotfaliany, Mojtaba; Zafari, Neda; Khalili, Davood; Tohidi, Maryam; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis To investigate secular trends in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors during a decade of follow-up in a Middle Eastern cohort, and to compare observed trends between diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Methods In a population of 6181 participants (2622 males and 3559 females), diabetes status and CVD risk factors were evaluated in 4 study phases from 1999–2011. 1045 subjects had type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline and 5136 participants were diabetes-free. To examine the trends of CVD risk factors, generalized estimation equation models were constructed. The interaction between the diabetes status and each phase of the study was checked in a separate model. Results During the follow-up period diabetic females significantly gained better control of their blood pressure, serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol and general and central obesity measures compared to non-diabetic counterparts, although 60% of them had high BP and 64% had high serum LDL-C levels till the end of the study. Diabetic males however, experienced significantly better control on their serum LDL-C and general and central obesity measures compared to their non-diabetic controls; but 24% of them were still smoker, 63% had high BP and 60% had high serum LDL-C levels at the end of the follow-up (all Ps interaction <0.05). Use of lipid-lowering and antihypertensive medications increased consistently in both diabetic and non-diabetic populations. Conclusions/Interpretation Although CVD risk factors have been controlled to some extent among diabetic population in Iran, still high numbers of people with diabetes have uncontrolled CVD risk factors that prompt more attention. PMID:25461381

  15. Direct linkage of mitochondrial genome variation to risk factors for type 2 diabetes in conplastic strains

    PubMed Central

    Pravenec, Michal; Hyakukoku, Masaya; Houstek, Josef; Zidek, Vaclav; Landa, Vladimir; Mlejnek, Petr; Miksik, Ivan; Dudová-Mothejzikova, Kristyna; Pecina, Petr; Vrbacký, Marek; Drahota, Zdenek; Vojtiskova, Alena; Mracek, Tomas; Kazdova, Ludmila; Oliyarnyk, Olena; Wang, Jiaming; Ho, Christopher; Qi, Nathan; Sugimoto, Ken; Kurtz, Theodore

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the relationship of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants to metabolic risk factors for diabetes and other common diseases has begun to attract increasing attention. However, progress in this area has been limited because (1) the phenotypic effects of variation in the mitochondrial genome are difficult to isolate owing to confounding variation in the nuclear genome, imprinting phenomena, and environmental factors; and (2) few animal models have been available for directly investigating the effects of mtDNA variants on complex metabolic phenotypes in vivo. Substitution of different mitochondrial genomes on the same nuclear genetic background in conplastic strains provides a way to unambiguously isolate effects of the mitochondrial genome on complex traits. Here we show that conplastic strains of rats with identical nuclear genomes but divergent mitochondrial genomes that encode amino acid differences in proteins of oxidative phosphorylation exhibit differences in major metabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes. These results (1) provide the first direct evidence linking naturally occurring variation in the mitochondrial genome, independent of variation in the nuclear genome and other confounding factors, to inherited variation in known risk factors for type 2 diabetes; and (2) establish that spontaneous variation in the mitochondrial genome per se can promote systemic metabolic disturbances relevant to the pathogenesis of common diseases. PMID:17693571

  16. Antidepressant Medication as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Katharine; Peveler, Robert C.; Holt, Richard I.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antidepressant use has risen sharply over recent years. Recent concerns that antidepressants may adversely affect glucose metabolism require investigation. Our aim was to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with antidepressants through a systematic review. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, American Diabetes Association, and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, U.K. Clinical Research Network, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved articles, and contact with relevant experts. Relevant studies of antidepressant effects were included. Key outcomes were diabetes incidence and change in blood glucose (fasting and random). RESULTS Three systemic reviews and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Research designs included 1 case series and 21 observational studies comprising 4 cross-sectional, 5 case-control, and 12 cohort studies. There was evidence that antidepressant use is associated with type 2 diabetes. Causality is not established, but rather, the picture is confused, with some antidepressants linked to worsening glucose control, particularly with higher doses and longer duration, others linked with improved control, and yet more with mixed results. The more recent, larger studies, however, suggest a modest effect. Study quality was variable. CONCLUSIONS Although evidence exists that antidepressant use may be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, long-term prospective studies of the effects of individual antidepressants rather than class effects are required. Heightened alertness to potential risks is necessary until these are complete. PMID:24065841

  17. Ethnic differences in control of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes attending an Inner London diabetes clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, T A; Lasker, S S; Mahfuz, R

    2006-01-01

    Background South Asians have higher risk of diabetic complications compared with white Europeans. The aim of this study was to compare management of cardiovascular risk factors between Bangladeshis and white Europeans. Methods A retrospective survey of all diabetic patients attending an Inner London hospital diabetic clinic over one year was undertaken. Data were obtained from the hospital diabetes database: presence of macrovascular (myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, transient ischaemic attack, cardiac intervention) and microvascular disease (neuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy), glycated haemoglobin, blood pressure, lipids, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) were all determined. Results A total of 1162 white European and 912 Bangladeshi patients with full data available were included in the analyses. The groups were equivalent in age, sex, duration of diabetes. Compared with white Europeans, Bangladeshis had more macrovascular disease (19.5% v 11.9% p<0.01), sight threatening retinopathy (7.2% v 3.8%, p<0.01), and nephropathy (15.3% v 9.1%, p<0.01). In addition, Bangladeshis had significantly more male smokers (28.1% v 22.1%, p<0.01), poorer glycaemic control (mean HbA1c 8.6% v 8.1%, p = 0.039), greater proportion with uncontrolled hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol >5.0 mmol/l, 31.6% v 26% p = 0.05), and poorer control of blood pressure (proportion with BP >140/80 mm Hg, 43.2% v 32.1%, p<0.01). Conclusions South Asians with type 2 diabetes have poorer glycaemic, blood pressure, and lipid control than white Europeans. The reasons for this are probably multifactorial. PMID:16517804

  18. Diabetes mellitus, other medical conditions and familial history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, D T; Schiffman, M; Everhart, J; Goldstein, A; Lillemoe, K D; Swanson, G M; Schwartz, A G; Brown, L M; Greenberg, R S; Schoenberg, J B; Pottern, L M; Hoover, R N; Fraumeni, J F

    1999-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer conducted in three areas of the USA, 484 cases and 2099 controls were interviewed to evaluate the aetiologic role of several medical conditions/interventions, including diabetes mellitus, cholecystectomy, ulcer/gastrectomy and allergic states. We also evaluated risk associated with family history of cancer. Our findings support previous studies indicating that diabetes is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, as well as a possible complication of the tumour. A significant positive trend in risk with increasing years prior to diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was apparent (P-value for test of trend = 0.016), with diabetics diagnosed at least 10 years prior to diagnosis having a significant 50% increased risk. Those treated with insulin had risks similar to those not treated with insulin (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6 and 1.5 respectively), and no trend in risk was associated with increasing duration of insulin treatment. Cholecystectomy also appeared to be a risk factor, as well as a consequence of the malignancy. Subjects with a cholecystectomy at least 20 years prior to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer experienced a 70% increased risk, which was marginally significant. In contrast, subjects with a history of duodenal or gastric ulcer had little or no elevated risk (OR = 1.2; confidence interval = 0.9–1.6). Those treated by gastrectomy had the same risk as those not receiving surgery, providing little support for the hypothesis that gastrectomy is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A significant 40% reduced risk was associated with hay fever, a non-significant 50% decreased risk with allergies to animals, and a non-significant 40% reduced risk with allergies to dust/moulds. These associations, however, may be due to chance since no risk reductions were apparent for asthma or several other types of allergies. In addition, we observed significantly increased risks for subjects reporting a first-degree relative

  19. Revision Rate and Risk Factors After Lower Extremity Amputation in Diabetic or Dysvascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Wanivenhaus, Florian; Mauler, Flavien; Stelzer, Teresa; Tschopp, Alois; Böni, Thomas; Berli, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the revision rate and possible risk factors for lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were collected from 421 patients with diabetes mellitus or PAD who underwent amputations of the lower extremity at the authors' institution from 2002 to 2012. There was a 25.2% overall revision rate. Mean time from amputation to revision was 244 days (range, 2-2590 days). Patients with diabetes mellitus had a significantly higher rate of revision to a more proximal level compared with patients without diabetes mellitus (type 1: odds ratio [OR]=3.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-11.52; P=.022; and type 2: OR=2.3; 95% CI, 1.07-4.95; P=.033). A significant increase in revision rates was observed from Fontaine stage 0 to IV (stage 0: 17.9%; stage IV, 34.7%; P=.03). Risk factors for revision were diabetic nephropathy (OR=2.26; 95% CI, 1.4-3.63; P=.001) and polyneuropathy (OR=1.68; 95% CI, 1.03-2.73; P=.037). Patients who underwent revision amputation had a significantly younger mean age than patients who did not undergo revision amputation (65.23 years [range, 40-92 years] vs 68.52 years [range, 32-96 years]; P=.013). Anticipated amputation in this patient population requires a multidisciplinary approach with optimization of the patient's health. In the authors' clinical practice, the determination of the appropriate amputation level is performed individually for each patient, considering the risk factors identified in this study and the patient's expected mobilization potential, social background, and acceptance of a more proximal primary amputation level.

  20. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adman Câmara Soares; Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; de Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; de Almeida, Paulo César; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables. Method cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected. Results the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000), age (p=0.004) and marital status (p=0.012), as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018) and marital status (p=0.007) and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033). Conclusion distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight. PMID:25029061

  1. Obesity, Diabetes, and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Populations of South America.

    PubMed

    Ingaramo, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in both developed and developing countries. In South America, the native population comprises a great number of different ethnic groups. The cardiovascular risk factors observed in these groups have proved similar to and even higher than those found in general non-native populations. Relatively recent epidemiologic information reveals that many native communities have healthy habits with low prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, while their prevalence is higher in those who have kept close contact with non-native populations and have westernized their habits. The differences in the presence of risk factors in these populations have been explained as the result of several interacting factors including genetic to environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural causes.

  2. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus; frequency and related risk factors: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Ali; PourAli, Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Hatami, Sanaz; Modarres, Vanooshe

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a serious complication after organ transplantation, which could lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The rate of PTDM increased in recent years, probably due to new immunosuppressive drugs such as Tacrolimus. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the frequency of PTDM and related risk factors in 644 non diabetic patients who underwent renal transplantation. Data was analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact test in SPSS software ver11.5. Among 644 patients PTDM developed in 10.2% similar to literature. PTDM was significantly correlated to age (P value = 0.000), positive familial history (P= 0.003) and HBV infection (P= 0.046). In conclusion, PTDM is not uncommon in Iranian patients and a positive family history of diabetes, HBV infection and older age increases the likelihood to develop PTDM. PMID:20814117

  3. Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus; frequency and related risk factors: a single center study.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, Ali; PourAli, Reza; Sepehrvand, Nariman; Hatami, Sanaz; Modarres, Vanooshe

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a serious complication after organ transplantation, which could lead to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The rate of PTDM increased in recent years, probably due to new immunosuppressive drugs such as Tacrolimus. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the frequency of PTDM and related risk factors in 644 non diabetic patients who underwent renal transplantation. Data was analyzed by chi-square and Fisher's exact test in SPSS software ver11.5. Among 644 patients PTDM developed in 10.2% similar to literature. PTDM was significantly correlated to age (P value = 0.000), positive familial history (P= 0.003) and HBV infection (P= 0.046). In conclusion, PTDM is not uncommon in Iranian patients and a positive family history of diabetes, HBV infection and older age increases the likelihood to develop PTDM.

  4. Prevalence and Management of Diabetes and Metabolic Risk Factors in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aekplakorn, Wichai; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Sangthong, Rassamee; Inthawong, Rungkarn; Putwatana, Panwadee; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes in Thai adults in 2009 and examine the extent of changes in proportions of diagnosis, treatment, and control for blood glucose, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol between 2004 and 2009. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data from the multistage cross-sectional National Health Examination Survey (NHES) IV of 18,629 Thai adults aged ≥20 years conducted in 2009 were used to analyze and compare with the data from NHES III in 2004. RESULTS The prevalence of IFG and diabetes was 10.6 and 7.5%, respectively. Of all diabetes diagnoses, 35.4% were not previously diagnosed, and the proportion was higher in men than in women (47.3 vs. 23.4%, P < 0.05). Compared with those in year 2004, the proportions of individuals with diabetes and concomitant hypertension did not significantly decrease in 2009 in both sexes, but the proportions of women with diabetes who were abdominally obese or had high total cholesterol (≥5.2 mmol/L) significantly increased in 2009 by 18.0 and 23.5%, respectively (all P < 0.01). The rates of treatment and control of blood glucose, high blood pressure, and high total cholesterol were favorably improved in 2009. However, in substantial proportions of individuals with diabetes these concomitants were still controlled suboptimally. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of diabetes and IFG remained high in Thai adults. Improvement in detection and control of diabetes and associated metabolic risk factors, particularly obesity and high serum cholesterol, are necessary. PMID:21816976

  5. Hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia: possible risk factors of colorectal cancer among diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, C K; Ulrich, C M

    2003-05-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia are two possible risk factors for colorectal cancer, which constitutes the third leading cause of cancer death in Western countries. Molecular evidence as well as animal models provide support for these associations: Insulin has been shown to be an important growth factor for colonic carcinoma cells, and both insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors have been detected in colon cancer tissue. The insulin-signal transduction pathway is involved in the regulation of gene expression and apoptosis. The role of hyperglycaemia in carcinogenesis could include pathways via luminal factors (related to fecal bile acid concentrations, stool bulk, and prolonged transit time) or circulatory factors (via glucose as the only energy source for neoplastic cells). This review summarizes the epidemiologic literature with respect to hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia as risk factors for colorectal cancer, and aims to integrate the biological and epidemiological evidence. Epidemiologic findings to date indicate a slightly increased risk of colorectal cancer for diabetic patients; however, there are some inconsistencies. Possible explanations for these inconsistencies include inadequate information about patients' diabetic disease and treatment states. We suggest that future studies should take medical history, staging and treatment for hyperinsulinaemia and hyperglycaemia into account to further our understanding of the role of hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  6. Factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes and incipient nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nelaj, E; Gjata, M; Lilaj, I; Burazeri, G; Sadiku, E; Collaku, L; Bare, O; Tase, M

    2008-01-01

    Background: Microalbuminuria was originally established as a predictor of renal failure and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus as well as in general population. The aim of our study is to assess the relationship between microalbuminuria and the other risk factors in diabetics and their prevalence. Methods: Sixty five patients, 22 men and 43 women with mean age 58.6 ±10.09, with type 2 diabetes, were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine in the University Hospital Center "Mother Teresa" in Tirana, Albania, between March 2007 and February 2008. These patients with a mean duration of diabetes 6.09±5.41 were divided in two groups: with (Group A: 24 patients) and without (Group B: 41 patients) microalbuminuria and each group was evaluated for left ventricular mass index (LVMI), body mass index (BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), lipid profile and intima media thickness (IMT). Results: The prevalence of microalbuminuria in our study was 32.3%. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in males was 37.5 and in females 62.5%. The microalbuminuric patients were older ( 59.71±9.87 vs 57.07±10.32) and had a longer duration of diabetes (7.74±5.74 vs 4.45±5.08) compared with normoalbuminuric patients.(p=0.01). The Group A had significantly higher LVMI compared with Group B ( p= 0.02). The prevalence of obesity (BMI >30kg/m2) in our sample was 44.6%. In Group A the mean BMI (30.13±4.98) was significantly higher compared with Group B (28.00±3.72, p= 0.04). Diabetic retinopathy was more frequent in Group A compared with Group B ( 33.3% vs 14.6%, p=0.05). The mean value of IMT was higher in Group A compared with Group B (1.28±0.35 vs 1.09±0.28, p=0.03) Conclusion: In patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria LVMI, IMT, BMI, duration of diabetes was significantly higher compared with patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria. PMID:19158965

  7. [Markers of endocrine system and inflammation as prognostic risk factors of vascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Verbovoĭ, A F; Morkovskikh, N V

    2011-01-01

    The high risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is a key problem in modern medicine. In this review, the basic risk factors of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus are described and their prognostic value analysed. Special attention is paid to the evaluation of the role of adipose tissue hormone adiponectin. The anti-inflammatory properties of adiponectin suggest its protective action against atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. In this article, we review a number of studies on the relationship between adiponectin and the main cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Type 2 diabetes in Asians: prevalence, risk factors, and effectiveness of behavioral intervention at individual and population levels.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary Beth; Oza-Frank, Reena; Staimez, Lisa R; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2012-08-21

    This review summarizes the current data on diabetes risk factors, prevalence, and prevention efforts in Asia and Asian migrant populations. Studies indicate that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a large and growing threat to public health in Asian populations. Furthermore, Asian subgroups (e.g., South Asians/Asian Indians, Chinese) have unique risk factor profiles for developing diabetes, which differ from other populations and between Asian ethnic groups. Lifestyle intervention programs are effective in preventing diabetes in Asians, as with other ethnicities. The strength of these findings is lessened by the lack of systematically collected data using objective measurements. Large epidemiologic studies of diabetes prevalence and risk factor profiles and translational trials identifying sustainable and culturally acceptable lifestyle programs for Asian subgroups are needed.

  9. Early onset type 2 diabetes: risk factors, clinical impact and management

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Iskandar

    2014-01-01

    Early onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasingly prevalent with a significant impact on the individual, healthcare service delivery and planning. The individuals are likely to be obese, lead a sedentary lifestyle, have a strong family history of T2DM, be of black and minority ethnic (BME) origin and come from a less affluent socioeconomic group. They have a heightened risk of developing microvascular and macrovascular complications, often at an earlier stage and with greater frequency than seen in type 1 diabetes. As such, early and aggressive risk factor management is warranted. Early onset T2DM is complex and impacts on service delivery with a need for multidisciplinary care of complications and comorbidities’, in addition to adequate educational and psychological support. This review on the impact of early onset T2DM provides the latest insights into this emerging epidemic. PMID:25364491

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of type 2 diabetes in older Vietnam-born Australians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong Thuy; Jorm, Louisa R; Johnson, Maree; Bambrick, Hilary; Lujic, Sanja

    2014-02-01

    Vietnamese immigrants in Australia represent the second largest Vietnamese community in developed countries, following the United States. However, limited information is available about prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relative roles of socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and Vietnamese ethnicity per se in this population. This study investigated the prevalence of T2D and its risk factors in older Vietnam-born Australians, in comparison to native-born Australians. The study used baseline questionnaire data from 787 Vietnam- and 196,866 Australia-born individuals (≥45 years), who participated in the 45 and Up Study, which is Australia's largest population-based cohort study. Country of birth specific prevalence of T2D and its risk factors were age-standardised to the 2006 Australian population (≥45 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were built for each group to assess the relationship between T2D and socio-demographic characteristics, family history of diabetes, lifestyle factors and health status. Compared to Australia-born counterparts, Vietnam-born individuals had significantly (p < 0.001) higher age-standardised prevalence of T2D (14.7 vs 7.4 %) and significantly (p < 0.001) lower levels of vegetable consumption (≥5 serves/day, 19.4 vs 33.5 %), physical activity (≥5 sessions/week, 68.7 vs 78.5 %) and overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2), 21.5 vs 62.7 %). The increased risk of T2D associated with a family history of diabetes for Vietnam-born people [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 7.14, 95 % CI 4.15-12.28] was almost double that for Australia-born people (OR 3.77, 95 % CI 3.63-3.90). The patterns of association between T2D and other factors were similar between the two groups. The findings suggest a genetic predisposition to T2D in people of Vietnamese ethnicity. Reducing lifestyle risk factors for diabetes and better management of diabetes are priorities for Vietnam-born populations.

  11. Eating Disorders in children and adolescents with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: prevalence, risk factors, warning signs.

    PubMed

    Racicka, Ewa; Bryńska, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk for eating disorders, various dependent on type of diabetes. Binge eating disorder is more common in patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Whereas, intentional omission of insulin doses for the purpose of weight loss occurs mainly in patient with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), however, in some patients with type 2 diabetes omission of oral hypoglycemic drugs can be present. Risk factors for the development of eating disorders in patients with diabetes include: age, female gender, greater body weight, body image dissatisfaction, history of dieting and history of depression. Poor glycemic control, recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis or recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, secondary to intentional insulin overdose, missed clinical appointments, dietary manipulation and low self-esteem should raise concern. The consequence of eating disorders or disordered eating patterns in patients with diabetes is poor glycemic control and hence higher possibility of complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy and premature death. PMID:26688851

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Beverly T.; Vangaveti, Venkat N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98–65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity. PMID:27446962

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Beverly T; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98-65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity. PMID:27446962

  14. Metabolic, Anthropometric, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Related Risk Factors in Normal and Pre-Diabetic Adults.

    PubMed

    Al-Thani, Mohamed H; Nasser, Heba S; Sayegh, Suzan; Haddad, Alexandra; Sadoun, Eman

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major global health problem. The present study examines the relationship between the metabolic, anthropometric and Finnish risk score (FINDRISC) among normal and pre-diabetic adults. Subjects (n = 1319, aged above 18 years) from the Qatari population were classified into two groups based on their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements (non-diabetic A1c<5.6% and pre-diabetic 5.6% ≤ A1c ≤ 6.4%) were examined for their anthropometric (height, weight and waist circumference), metabolic [fat, fat free mass (FFM), muscle mass (MM), total body water (TBW), bone mass, degree of obesity, basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass index (BMI), metabolic age, visceral fat rating, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), total cholesterol (Total-C), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG), fasting / random plasma glucose (FPG / RPG), HbA1c and vitamin D (VitD)] and FINDRISC. Means and frequencies were determined in aggregate and by subgroups for all variables and correlations between categorical variables were tested to estimate the association between the anthropometric and metabolic risk factors with the FINDRISC. A percentage of 74.8% (n = 987) of the study population aged below 45 years old and their overall BMI was 28.8±5.2kg/m2 (overweight). Pre-diabetic subgroup have shown a statistically higher FINDRISC compared to their non-diabetic counterparts (11.2±4.1 vs. 9.8±4, p<0.001). The FINDRISC was significantly and directly correlated with the BMI, HbA1c and FPG. However, HbA1c was correlated directly with BMI, SBP, DBP, FPG / RPG and indirectly with the levels of HDL. This study demonstrates an apparent relationship between the HbA1c and FINDRISC score. Pursuing further research on this association may permit using HbA1c with the FINDRISC in predicting the risk of T2DM to be a better tool rather than using the current FPG/RPG, OGTT methods. PMID:27530580

  15. Health Risk Factor Modification Predicts Incidence of Diabetes in an Employee Population: Results of an 8-Year Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Lori; Byrne, Daniel W.; McGown, Paula W.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Elasy, Tom; Yarbrough, Mary I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand risk factor modification effect on Type 2 Diabetes incidence in a workforce population. Methods Annual Health Risk Assessment (HRA) data (n=3125) in years 1 through 4 were used to predict diabetes development in years 5 through 8. Results Employees who reduced their BMI from ≥30 to < 30 decreased their chances of developing diabetes (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.93), while those who became obese increased their diabetes risk (OR 8.85, 95% CI 2.53 to 31.0). Conclusions Weight reduction observed over a long period can result in clinically important reductions in diabetes incidence. Workplace health promotion programs may prevent diabetes among workers by encouraging weight loss and adoption of healthy lifestyle habits. PMID:23532193

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p < 0.001). In adults without DM, risk factors for periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Conclusions: Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM. PMID:27604799

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Nauru

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background No comprehensive assessment of diabetes prevalence in Nauru has been conducted since an extreme prevalence was documented more than two decades ago. This study aims to determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose. Methods A nationwide survey in 2004 of people aged 15- 64 years (n = 1592). Fasting plasma glucose levels were used to defined diabetes (≥7.0 mmol/l or 126 mg/dl) and prediabetes (6.1-6.9 mmol/l or 110-125 mg/dl). Results The sex-standardized prevalence of diabetes was 13.0% (95% CI: 10.6, 15.4) in men, 14.4% (11.9, 16.9) in women, and 13.7% (12.0, 15.4) combined. The sex-standardized prevalence of prediabetes was 6.4% (4.6, 8.2) for men, 5.5% (3.9, 7.2) for women, and 6.0% (4.8, 7.3) combined. The prevalence of diabetes for individuals 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54 and 55-64 years was 4.5%, 7.6%, 24.1%, 32.9%, and 42.7%, respectively. The prevalence of prediabetes for the same age categories was 4.2%, 8.8%, 5.9%, 6.6%, 7.1%, respectively. Multivariable, multinomial logit modeling found risk factors for prediabetes were high cholesterol levels (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 1.66, 2.47) and elevated waist circumference (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.08), and for diabetes were age in years (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.07), cholesterol levels (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.58, 2.14) and waist circumference (OR: 1.04, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.07). Conclusions Diabetes remains a major public health problem in Nauru, affecting one out of every ten people. While the prevalence of diabetes has declined, its burden has persisted among the old but also extended towards the younger age groups. PMID:21943388

  18. Prevalence of and Racial Disparities in Risk Factor Control in Older Adults With Diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Christina M.; Rastegar, Ina; Godino, Job G.; Miedema, Michael D.; Matsushita, Kunihiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Controversy surrounds appropriate risk factor targets in older adults with diabetes. We evaluated the proportion of older adults with diabetes meeting different targets, focusing on possible differences by race, and assessed whether demographic and clinical characteristics explained disparities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5,018 participants aged 67–90 years (1,574 with and 3,444 without diagnosed diabetes) who attended visit 5 of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (2011–2013). Risk factor targets were defined using both stringent (and less stringent) goals: hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <7%, <53 mmol/mol (<8%, <64 mmol/mol); LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) <100 mg/dL (<130 mg/dL); and blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg (<150/90 mmHg). We used Poisson regression to obtain prevalence ratios (PRs). RESULTS Most older adults with diabetes met stringent (and less stringent) targets: 72% (90%) for HbA1c, 63% (86%) for LDL-c, and 73% (87%) for BP; but only 35% (68%) met all three. A higher proportion of whites than blacks met targets, however defined. Among people treated for risk factors, racial disparities in prevalence of meeting stringent targets persisted even after adjustment: PRs (whites vs. blacks) were 1.03 (95% CI 0.91, 1.17) for HbA1c, 1.21 (1.09, 1.35) for LDL-c, 1.10 (1.00, 1.21) for BP, and 1.28 (0.99, 1.66) for all three. Results were similar but slightly attenuated using less stringent goals. Black women were less likely than white women to meet targets for BP and all three risk factors; this disparity was not observed in men. CONCLUSIONS Black-white disparities in risk factor control in older adults with diabetes were not fully explained by demographic or clinical characteristics and were greater in women than men. Further study of determinants of these disparities is important. PMID:25852205

  19. Risk factors for development of critical limb ischemia -- a survey of diabetic vs. nondiabetic population.

    PubMed

    Bosevski, M; Meskovska, S; Tosev, S; Peovska, I; Asikov, I; Georgievska-Ismail, L J

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the risk factors for development of chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI) in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). 127 patients (pts) with PAD (63 with type 2 diabetes and 64 nondiabetic) were randomly included in a cross sectional study. Out of them 17 were with CLI. Population was investigated for age, height, weight, sex, duration of PAD and diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, obesity, systolic blood pressure, value of ankle-brachial index, previous claudicating distance and peripheral intervention, amputation, medical treatment with prostanoids, insulin and antiplatelet drugs and histories of cerebrovascular disease, coronary artery disease and other concomitant diseases. After adjudging linear correlation between mentioned variables and presence of CLI, logistic regression model was built. There were no significant differences in demographic data between both populations. Hyperlipidemia was more frequent in nondiabetic population. Multiple regression model show ankle-brachial index < 0,5, measured in previous 1-3 years (OR 3.39 CI 95% 0.28-40.78), microvascular complication retinopathy (OR 12.98 CI 95% 1.76-95.58), heart failure (OR 1.91 CI 95% 0.29-2.72) and previous prostanoids treatment (OR 15.92 CI 95% 0.53-476.58) as predictors of development of CLI in diabetic population with PAD. After heart failure exclusion of model of nondiabetic pts, previous surgery (OR 3.14 CI 95% 0.61-16.09) and smoking (OR 0.35 CI 95% 0.78-1.62) were presented as prognostic factors for CLI's onset. Our results indicate differences between predictors of CLI's onset in diabetic and nondiabetic population with PAD. Presence of retinopathy, previous measured ankle-brachial index and prostanoids treatment are predictors of development of CLI in diabetic population. Previous surgery is independent predictor for CLI'onset in nondiabetics. Treating concomitant heart failure for both populations

  20. An Update on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor for Dementia.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Huang, Edgar

    2016-05-01

    With the rapidly expanding evidence on brain structural and functional changes in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, there is an increasing need to update our understanding on how T2DM associates with dementia as well as the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. A literature search of T2DM and dementia or cognition impairments was carried out in electronic databases Medline, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. In this review, the chosen evidence was limited to human subject studies only, and data on either type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) or non-classified diabetes were excluded. T2DM is a risk factor for both vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), although AD pathological marker studies have not provided sufficient evidence. T2DM interacts additively or synergistically with many factors, including old age, hypertension, total cholesterol, and APOEɛ4 carrier status for impaired cognition functions seen in patients with T2DM. In addition, comorbid T2DM can worsen the clinical presentations of patients with either AD or VaD. In summary, T2DM increases the risk for AD through different mechanisms for VaD although some mechanisms may overlap. Tau-related neurofibrillary tangles instead of amyloid-β plaques are more likely to be the pathological biomarkers for T2DM-related dementia. Degeneration of neurons in the brain, impaired regional blood supply/metabolism, and genetic predisposition are all involved in T2DM-associated dementia or cognitive impairments.

  1. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (P<0.0001 both). BDNF improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the diabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; P<0.01) and for VDTR from 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.92) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98; P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common risk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  2. Identification of Risk Factors Affecting Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes in Adult Patients from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yutian; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Yuhan; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shili; Zhang, Huiping; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Yaqin; Li, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides genetic factors, the occurrence of diabetes is influenced by lifestyles and environmental factors as well as trace elements in diet materials. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore risk factors affecting IFG and diabetes in patients from Northeast China. Methods: A population-based, cross-sectional survey of chronic diseases and related risk factors was conducted in Jilin Province of Northeast China. All adult residents, aged 18–79, were invited to participate in this survey using the method of multistage stratified random cluster sampling. One hundred thirty-four patients with IFG or DM and 391 healthy control subjects were recruited. We compared demographic factors, body size measurements, healthy-related behaviors, and hair metallic element contents between IFG/diabetes patients and healthy individuals. Results: IFG/diabetes patients had a greater weight, waist, hip, and body mass index (BMI) than control subjects. Significant differences in the content of zinc (Zn), potassium (K), copper (Ca), and sodium (Na) as well as Cu/Zn ratios between IFG or DM patients and control subjects (p < 0.05) were also observed. Hair Cu, selenium (Se), and Na contents were positively correlated with blood glucose levels (Cu: rs = 0.135, p = 0.002; Se: rs = 0.110, p = 0.012; Na: rs = 0.091, p = 0.038). Polytomous logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes and BMI, showed that subjects with high BMI were more likely to develop IFG and DM (IFG: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.02–1.29; DM: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.01–1.33). Moreover, rarely or never eating fruits was a risk factor for DM (OR = 5.46, OR 95% CI = 1.87–15.98) but not for IFG (OR = 1.70, OR 95% CI = 0.72–4.02). Subjects with abdominal obesity or DM history were more susceptible to DM (abdominal obesity: OR = 2.99, OR 95% CI = 1.07–8.37; DM history: OR = 2.69, OR 95% CI = 1

  3. Estimated Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Adolescents with and without Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Specht, Brian J; Wadwa, R Paul; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen J; Bishop, Franziska K; Maahs, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors are similar in adolescents with and without diabetes (T1D) in the most insulin sensitive (IS) tertile and CVD risk factors are more atherogenic with decreasing IS in adolescents with T1D. Study design Adolescents with IS T1D (n=292; age=15.4±2.1 years; duration=8.8±3.0 years, HbA1c=8.9±1.6%) and non-diabetic (non-DM) controls (n=89; age=15.4±2.1 years) was estimated using the model: logeIS=4.64725 – 0.02032(waist, cm) – 0.09779(HbA1c, %) – 0.00235(triglycerides, mg/dl). CVD risk factors (blood pressure, fasting total, LDL and HDL-cholesterol, hs-CRP, and BMI Z-score) were compared between all non-DM adolescents and those with T1D in the most IS tertile, and then examined for a linear trend by IS tertile in adolescents with T1D, adjusted for sex, race/ethnicity and Tanner Stage. Results Estimated IS was significantly lower in adolescents with T1D compared with those without (T1D=7.8±2.4, non-DM=11.5±2.9; p<0.0001). CVD risk factors were similar for non-DM compared with the adolescents with most IS T1D, except for higher HDL-c and DBP in adolescents with T1D (p<0.05). Among adolescents with T1D, all CVD risk factors except for HDL-c, were more atherogenic across decreasing IS tertiles in linear regression analysis (p<0.05). Conclusion Adolescents with T1D who are the most IS have similar CVD risk factors compared with non-DM adolescents. CVD risk factors are inversely associated with adolescents with IS T1D. IS may be an important therapeutic target for reducing CVD risk factors in adolescents with T1D. PMID:22921593

  4. Psychosocial Illness in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevalence, Pattern and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, Ghanshyam Singh; Sharma, Monika; Choudhary, Shyama; Nagaraj, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and psychosocial illness influence each other in multiple ways. The extent of psychosocial disorders in children with T1DM remains largely unstudied in India. Aim To assess the prevalence, severity, pattern and variables affecting psychosocial illness in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods This observational study included 84 children (6-14 years of age) having T1DM at least for 1 year and 100 non diabetic children for comparison. “DSM-5 parent/guardian-Rated Level 1 & 2 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure –Child age 6-17” was used to assess psychosocial illness, specific domains and severity. Socio-demographic variables were studied and HbA1c levels were measured. Results Significantly higher prevalence of psychosocial illness was observed in children with T1DM as compared with non diabetic group (55.95% vs 20%; p<0.0001). The prevalence for mild, moderate and severe psychosocial illness was 8.33%, 27.38% and 20.24% respectively in diabetic children. Most common psychosocial abnormality was irritation (38.1%), followed by depression (36.9%) and anxiety (32.1%). The prevalence of psychosocial illness was significantly higher in T1DM patients with poorer metabolic control (HbA1c>7.5, p=0.014). Significant association of psychosocial illness was also noticed with poor dietary compliance (p=0.021) and higher mean HbA1c level (p<0.001). Conclusion This study established T1DM as a risk factor for development of psychosocial illness. Irritation, depression and anxiety were most common abnormalities. Significant association of psychosocial illness with poor dietary compliance and poor metabolic control was observed. Psychosocial assessment of every diabetic child is suggested for optimal management. PMID:27790539

  5. Gestational Diabetes and Future Risk of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Subash Chander; Vinnamala, Sudheer; Jenkins, David

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study of women with gestational diabetes we attempted to (a) Determine the magnitude of the long term risk of progression to diabetes and (b) Identify factors that predict the development of diabetes. Methods All women diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GDM) at Worcestershire Royal Hospital, UK from 1995 to 2003 were included in this observational cohort study and followed up till 2009. Diabetes was diagnosed if fasting glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L, random/two-hour glucose following 75 gram oral glucose test (OGTT) ≥ 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c ≥ 7.0%. Results The risk of developing diabetes was 6.9% at five years and 21.1% at ten years following the initial diagnosis of GDM. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels in the oral glucose tolerance test during pregnancy were associated with future risk of diabetes. There was no association with age, gestational age at diagnosis of GDM, numbers of previous and subsequent pregnancies. Conclusion Risk of progression to diabetes in a UK based cohort of women with GDM is estimated. Women with fasting antenatal glucose ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and/or an antenatal two-hour glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L are at higher risk and need close follow up. PMID:23519363

  6. [Monitoring of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes type 2].

    PubMed

    Petrlová, B; Rosolová, H; Simon, J; Sefrna, F; Sifalda, P; Sípová, I

    2009-09-01

    The control of basic cardiovascular risk factors was examined in a sample of 415 diabetes type 2 patients, aged 66 +/- 10 years, with a 9.4 +/- 8 years long history of diabetes, both genders represented proportionally; 95% of the sample were hypertensive. The recommended blood pressure value was achieved by 13% males and 17% females. Antihypertensive monotherapy was indicated in 40% of the sample. Renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system inhibitors were prescibed to 90% of the sample. The fasting glycaemia < or = 6 mmol/L were achieved in 10% males and 11% females; glycosilated hemoglobin < 4.5% in 20% males and 24% females; 60% of the sample had antidiabetic pharmacotherapy--44% males and 48% females used metformin. Total fasting plasma cholesterol < 4.5 mmol/L was achieved in 31% males and 23% females; LDL-cholesterol < 2.5 mmol/L was achieved in 31% males and 41% females. The target values for diabetics in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases or with subclinical atherosclerosis was achieved in 13% of the sample. Statins were prescribed in 60% of the sample, fibrates in 4%. Only 2 females achieved all the target values. Hypolipidemic and antihypertensive drug therapy is unsatisfactory; there is certainly a big potential in life style changes among the diabetic patients.

  7. [Prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the population of Kamchatka Province and its risk factors].

    PubMed

    Burlak, S I

    1982-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Kamchatka newcomers in 26.7/1000 of the subjects examined (21 among males and 30.7 in females). The urban population is more often subjected to the risk of diabetes mellitus development (30/1000), than that of the rural locality (15/1000). Among the groups of different ages it is maximum in males, aged 50 to 59 years (48.6/1000), and in females, aged 40 to 49 years (59/1000), and is minimum in boys and girls, aged 15 to 19 years (5 and 5.3/1000, respectively). The highest indices of the distributed tolerance to glucose were seen in males, aged 50 to 59, 60 years and older (86.9 and 73.1/1000) and females, aged 50 to 59 years (68.5/1000), remaining sufficiently high in subjects, aged 40 to 49,60 years and older (33.4 and 46.2/1000). High indices of the disease prevalence are observed among office workers (5.2/1000 in males and 49.3/1000 in females) and not engaged subjects (29/1000 among males and 36/1000 among females). Cases of diabetes mellitus risk were adaptation period, (247), heredity (207), biliary (150) and hepatitis (122) diseases, overeating (104), cardiovascular diseases (97) for males, aged 50 to 59 years (48.6), and females, aged 40 to 49 years (59), arterial hypertension (36). Diabetes mellitus risk factors, i.e. the birth of large foetuses, cardiovascular diseases, age, an increased, carbohydrate content in the diet were noted in the native population. A scientific system of prophylactic measures has been developed on the base of the results obtained.

  8. Trans-Palmitoleic Acid, Metabolic Risk Factors, and New-Onset Diabetes in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Palmitoleic acid (cis-16:1n-7), produced by endogenous fat synthesis, has been linked to both beneficial and deleterious metabolic effects, potentially confounded by diverse determinants and tissue sources of endogenous production. Trans-palmitoleate (trans-16:1n-7) represents a distinctly exogenous source of 16:1n-7, unconfounded by endogenous synthesis or its determinants, that may be uniquely informative. Objective We investigated whether circulating trans-palmitoleate was independently related to lower metabolic risk and incident type2 diabetes. Design Prospective cohort study (1992–2006). Setting Four US communities. Patients 3,736 adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Measurements Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, anthropometry, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, and glucose-insulin levels were measured at baseline in 1992; and diet, 3 years earlier. In multivariable-adjusted models, we investigated how demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors independently related to trans-palmitoleate; how trans-palmitoleate related to major metabolic risk factors; and how trans-palmitoleate related to new-onset diabetes (304 incident cases). We validated findings for metabolic risk factors in an independent cohort of 327 women. Results In multivariable-analyses, whole-fat dairy consumption was most strongly associated with higher trans-palmitoleate. Higher trans-palmitoleate was associated with slightly lower adiposity and, independently, higher high-density-lipoprotein(HDL)-cholesterol (across quintiles: +1.9%, P=0.04), lower triglycerides (−19.0%, P<0.001), lower total:HDL-cholesterol (−4.7%, P<0.001), lower C-reactive protein (−13.8%, P=0.05), and lower insulin resistance (−16.7%, P<0.001). Trans-palmitoleate was associated with substantially lower incidence of diabetes, with multivariable-hazard-ratios=0.41 (95%CI=0.27–0.64) and 0.38 (95%CI=0.24–0.62) in quintile-4 and quintile-5, versus quintile-1 (P-trend<0.001). Findings were

  9. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p < 0.050). A significant risk was noted in women with a history of diabetes (p < 0.001), and those with mothers’ with a history of GDM. A significant (p < 0.010) relationship with a likelihood ratio of 43.9 was observed between the incidence of GDM in women with five or six pregnancies, a history of > 3 deliveries, height < 155 cm, and pregnancy or marriage at age < 18 years (p < 0.010). The mean difference in random plasma glucose, one-hour OGTT, and two-hour OGTT was significantly higher in GDM cases compared to control. Conclusions Glucose profile, family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM.

  10. Risk Factors and Plasma Glucose Profile of Gestational Diabetes in Omani Women

    PubMed Central

    Chitme, Havagiray R; Al Shibli, Sumaiya Abdallah Said; Al-Shamiry, Raya Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to conduct a detailed study on the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Omani women to determine the actual and applicable risk factors and glucose profile in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional case-control study using pregnant women diagnosed with GDM. Pregnant women without GDM were used as a control group. We collected information related to age, family history, prior history of pregnancy complications, age of marriage, age of first pregnancy, fasting glucose level, and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results from three hospitals in Oman through face-to-face interviews and hospital records. Results The median age of women with GDM was 33 years old (p < 0.050). A significant risk was noted in women with a history of diabetes (p < 0.001), and those with mothers’ with a history of GDM. A significant (p < 0.010) relationship with a likelihood ratio of 43.9 was observed between the incidence of GDM in women with five or six pregnancies, a history of > 3 deliveries, height < 155 cm, and pregnancy or marriage at age < 18 years (p < 0.010). The mean difference in random plasma glucose, one-hour OGTT, and two-hour OGTT was significantly higher in GDM cases compared to control. Conclusions Glucose profile, family history, anthropometric profile, and age of first pregnancy and marriage should be considered while screening for GDM and determining the care needs of Omani women with GDM. PMID:27602192

  11. Prevention of gestational diabetes in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Govinden, Gemma; Bustani, R; Song, S; Farrell, TA

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus can be defined as ‘glucose intolerance or hyperglycaemia with onset or first recognition during pregnancy.’ Objective The objective of our systematic review was to see if there was any intervention that could be used for primary prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Search strategy Major databases were searched from 1966 to Aug 2012 without language restriction. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing intervention with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes were included. Meta-analysis was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. The primary outcome assessed was the incidence of gestational diabetes. Data collection and analysis Data from included trials were extracted independently by two authors and analysed using Rev-Man 5. Main results A total of 2422 women from 14 randomised trials were included; which compared diet (four randomised trials), exercise (three randomised trials), lifestyle changes (five randomised trials) and metformin (two randomised trials) with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Dietary intervention was associated with a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes (Odds ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76) and gestational hypertension (Odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.09, 0.86) compared to standard care. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus or in the secondary outcomes with exercise, lifestyle changes or metformin use compared to standard care. Conclusions The use of dietary intervention has shown a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus and gestational hypertension compared to standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27512459

  12. A pilot urban church-based programme to reduce risk factors for diabetes among Western Samoans in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D; Fleming, C; Voyle, J; Fou, F; Feo, S; Gatland, B

    1998-02-01

    We have assessed the impact of a 2-year pilot church-base diabetes risk reduction programme on major lifestyle predictors of future Type 2 diabetes mellitus: exercise and weight control in a prospective non-randomized controlled study of a modular lifestyle and diabetes awareness intervention programme using a community development model. The study involved two complete church congregations from an ethnic group at high risk of diabetes (Western Samoans) (intervention church n = 78; control church n = 144). Weight remained stable (0+/-4.8 kg) in the intervention church but increased by 3.1+/-9.8 kg in the control church (p = 0.05). In the intervention church, there was an associated reduction in waist circumference (-4+/-10 cm vs +2+/-7 cm in control, p < 0.001), an increase in diabetes knowledge (46+/-26% vs 4+/-17% in control, p < 0.001) and an increase in the proportion exercising regularly (+22% vs -8% in control, p < 0.05). Consumption of key fatty foods was also reduced in the intervention church. We conclude that diabetes risk reduction programmes based upon lifestyle change, diabetes awareness, and empowerment of high risk communities can significantly reduce risk factors for future Type 2 diabetes.

  13. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Recurrence in Immunosuppressed Recipients of Simultaneous Pancreas–Kidney Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Vendrame, F.; Hopfner, Y‐Y.; Diamantopoulos, S.; Virdi, S. K.; Allende, G.; Snowhite, I. V.; Reijonen, H. K.; Chen, L.; Ruiz, P.; Ciancio, G.; Hutton, J. C.; Messinger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are recipients of pancreas transplants are believed to rarely develop T1D recurrence in the allograft if effectively immunosuppressed. We evaluated a cohort of 223 recipients of simultaneous pancreas–kidney allografts for T1D recurrence and its risk factors. With long‐term follow‐up, recurrence was observed in approximately 7% of patients. Comparing the therapeutic regimens employed in this cohort over time, lack of induction therapy was associated with recurrence, but this occurs even with the current regimen, which includes induction; there was no influence of maintenance regimens. Longitudinal testing for T1D‐associated autoantibodies identified autoantibody positivity, number of autoantibodies, and autoantibody conversion after transplantation as critical risk factors. Autoantibodies to the zinc transporter 8 had the strongest and closest temporal association with recurrence, which was not explained by genetically encoded amino acid sequence donor–recipient mismatches for this autoantigen. Genetic risk factors included the presence of the T1D‐predisposing HLA‐DR3/DR4 genotype in the recipient and donor–recipient sharing of HLA‐DR alleles, especially HLA‐DR3. Thus, T1D recurrence is not uncommon and is developing in patients treated with current immunosuppression. The risk factors identified in this study can be assessed in the transplant clinic to identify recurrent T1D and may lead to therapeutic advances. PMID:26317167

  14. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  15. EQ-5D visual analog scale and utility index values in individuals with diabetes and at risk for diabetes: Findings from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD)

    PubMed Central

    Grandy, Susan; Fox, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    Background The EQ-5D was used to compare burden experienced by respondents with diabetes and those at risk for diabetes. Methods A survey including the EQ-5D was mailed to individuals with self-reported diabetes, as well as those without diabetes but with the following risk factors (RFs): (1) abdominal obesity, (2) body mass index ≥ 28 kg/m2, (3) dyslipidemia, (4) hypertension, and (5) cardiovascular disease. Non-diabetes respondents were combined into 0–2 RFs and 3–5 RFs. Mean EQ-5D scores were compared across groups using analysis of variance. Multivariable linear regression modeling identified factors affecting respondents' EQ-5D scores. Results Complete responses were available from >75% of each cohort. Mean EQ-5D index scores were significantly lower for respondents with type 2 diabetes and 3–5 RFs (0.778 and 0.792, respectively) than for those with 0–2 RFs (0.870, p < 0.001 for each); score for respondents with type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower than for those with 3–5 RFs (p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen for visual analog scale (VAS). For both VAS and index scores, after adjusting for other characteristics, respondents reported decreasing EQ-5D scores as status moved from low to high risk (-6.49 for VAS score and -0.045 for index score) to a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (-9.75 for VAS score and -0.054 for index score; p < 0.001 vs. 0–2 RFs for all). Conclusion High-risk and type 2 diabetes groups had similar EQ-5D scores, and both were substantially lower than in low-risk respondents. PMID:18304340

  16. Potential explanatory factors for higher incident hip fracture risk in older diabetic adults.

    PubMed

    Strotmeyer, Elsa S; Kamineni, Aruna; Cauley, Jane A; Robbins, John A; Fried, Linda F; Siscovick, David S; Harris, Tamara B; Newman, Anne B

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is associated with higher fracture risk. Diabetes-related conditions may account for this risk. Cardiovascular Health Study participants (N = 5641; 42.0% men; 15.5% black; 72.8±5.6 years) were followed 10.9 ± 4.6 years. Diabetes was defined as hypoglycemic medication use or fasting glucose (FG) ≥126 mg/dL. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as ankle-arm index <0.9. Incident hip fractures were from medical records. Crude hip fracture rates (/1000 person-years) were higher for diabetic vs. non-diabetic participants with BMI <25 (13.6, 95% CI: 8.9-20.2 versus 11.4, 95% CI: 10.1-12.9) and BMI ≥25 to <30 (8.3, 95% CI: 5.7-11.9 versus 6.6, 95% CI: 5.6-7.7), but similar for BMI ≥30. Adjusting for BMI, sex, race, and age, diabetes was related to fractures (HR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.01-1.78). PAD (HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 0.92-1.57)) and longer walk time (HR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04-1.10)) modified the fracture risk in diabetes (HR = 1.17 (95% CI: 0.87-1.57)). Diabetes was associated with higher hip fracture risk after adjusting for BMI though this association was modified by diabetes-related conditions. PMID:21837239

  17. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key points Low volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetes The weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  18. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  19. Advanced glycation end products as environmental risk factors for the development of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yap, Felicia Y T; Kantharidis, Phillip; Coughlan, Melinda T; Slattery, Robyn; Forbes, Josephine M

    2012-04-01

    The globally rising incidence of Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is no longer restricted to individuals with higher risk genotypes, but is now significantly increasing in a population with lower risk genotypes, likely as the result of environmental factors. In this review, we discuss the potential of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) as environmental contributors to the development of T1D. AGEs are nonenzymatically formed protein modifications found in the body, as well as, consumed in our daily diets. To date, many studies have provided evidence of AGE involvement in β cell dysfunction, whether by AGE modification itself or via interaction with AGE receptors. The receptor for AGE (RAGE) and AGE-receptor-1 (AGE-R1) are of particular interest, given that studies have demonstrated the deleterious effects of RAGE modulation and the protection afforded by AGE-R1 in the context of diabetes. More interestingly, we have recently found that two RAGE polymorphism are predictive of T1D in humans while the third is protective. Moreover, soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels (a circulating competitive inhibitor of RAGE) were greatly reduced at seroconversion to autoantibodies in both children on high risk of T1D background and in an animal model of autoiummune diabetes. Taken together with the fact that AGEs have also shown to be involved in immunomodulation, it is tempting to postulate that dietary AGEs, RAGE and even AGE-R1 could be working synergistically or independently to breach the tightly regulated immune system, providing a missing link in the development of T1D. PMID:22250649

  20. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2014-12-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization. PMID:25521362

  1. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2014-12-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization.

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jun Ouk; Lee, Tae Hee; Park, Ja Young; Choi, Seong Ho; Park, Hee Seung; Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Seung Heon; Seo, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Hwan; Kang, Young Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in Korea appears to be increasing. Some studies have shown that T2DM is a risk factor for symptomatic GERD. However, this possibility is still debated, and the pathogenesis of GERD in T2DM is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk factors (including autonomic neuropathy) of GERD in patients with T2DM. Methods This cross-sectional case-control study enrolled T2DM patients (n=258) and healthy controls (n=184). All participants underwent physical examinations and laboratory tests. We evaluated medical records and long-term diabetes complications, including peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in patients with T2DM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in all patients. The Los Angeles (LA) classification was used to grade GERD. GERD was defined as LA grade A (or higher) or minimal change with GERD symptoms. GERD symptoms were examined using a frequency scale. Data were expressed as mean±standard error. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups. Results The prevalence of GERD (32.6% vs. 35.9%, P=0.266) and GERD symptoms (58.8% vs. 59.2%, P=0.503) was not significantly different between T2DM patients and controls. We found no significant differences between T2DM patients with GERD and T2DM patients without GERD with respect to diabetic complications, including autonomic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, duration of DM, and glucose control. Conclusion The prevalence of GERD in patients with T2DM showed no difference from that of controls. GERD was also not associated with peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, age, or duration of DM in patients with T2DM. PMID:27352149

  3. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for gastrointestinal cancers among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juhua; Chlebowski, Rowan; Liu, Simin; McGlynn, Katherine A; Parekh, Niyati; White, Donna L; Margolis, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    Background While diabetes has been linked to several cancers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, findings have been mixed for sites other than colorectal and liver cancer. We used the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) data and conducted a comprehensive assessment of associations between diabetes and GI malignancy (esophagus, stomach, liver, biliary, pancreas, colon and rectal). Methods 145,765 postmenopausal women ages 50-79 enrolled in the WHI were followed for a mean 10.3 years. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between GI cancers and diagnosed diabetes, including its duration and treatment. Results Diabetes at enrollment was associated with increased risk for liver (HR = 3.00 95% CI 1.68-5.36), pancreatic (HR=1.64 95% CI: 1.16-2.33), colon (HR=1.37 95% CI: 1.13-1.65) and rectal (HR=1.90, 95%CI: 1.24-2.90) cancer. Diabetes severity, assessed by duration or need for pharmacotherapy, appeared to have stronger links to risk of liver, pancreatic and rectal cancer, but not colon cancer. There was no statistically significant association of diabetes with biliary, esophageal and stomach cancers. Conclusion Type 2 diabetes is associated with a significantly increased risk of cancers of the liver, pancreas, colon and rectum in postmenopausal women. Diabetes severity may further increase risk of pancreatic, liver and rectal cancer. Impact This study confirmed that diabetes increases risk of cancers of the liver, pancreas, colon and rectum. The suggestion that diabetes severity further increases these cancer risks requires future studies. PMID:22622863

  4. A hemochromatosis-causing mutation C282Y is a risk factor for proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, Borut; Globocnik Petrovic, Mojca; Makuc, Jana; Hawlina, Marko; Petrovic, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Iron metabolism might be involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. C282Y and H63D mutations in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene are associated with increased serum iron levels and consequently with hereditary hemochromatosis. In the present study, we searched for a relationship between C282Y and H63D gene mutations and the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes. For this purpose, 90 subjects with type 2 diabetes with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) were compared to 133 diabetic subjects without PDR. There was a significantly higher frequency of the C282Y heterozygotes in patients with PDR compared to subjects without it (OR=3.0, 95% CI=1.2-8.0; p=0.02), whereas no association was demonstrated between PDR and H63D genotypes (OR=1.1, 95% CI=0.6-2.2; p=0.7). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the C282Y mutation was a significant independent risk factor for the development of PDR (OR=6.1, 95% CI=1.2-30.5; p=0.027). These data suggest that heterozygosity for C282Y might be a novel risk factor for PDR in Caucasians with type 2 diabetes. PMID:14618419

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifestyle and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michelle; Giani, Elisa; Laffel, Lori

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Specific risk factors associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycemia and kidney disease, have been demonstrated to increase the incidence and progression of CVD. Nevertheless, few data exist on the effects of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, obesity, and hypertension on CVD risk in youth with T1D. Improvements in understanding and approaches to the evaluation and management of CVD risk factors, specifically for young persons with T1D, are desirable. Recent advances in noninvasive techniques to detect early vascular damage, such as the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction and aortic or carotid intima-media thickness, provide new tools to evaluate the progression of CVD in childhood. In the present review, current CVD risk factor management, challenges, and potential therapeutic interventions in youth with T1D are described.

  6. Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Lifestyle and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michelle; Giani, Elisa; Laffel, Lori

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Specific risk factors associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycemia and kidney disease, have been demonstrated to increase the incidence and progression of CVD. Nevertheless, few data exist on the effects of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, obesity, and hypertension on CVD risk in youth with T1D. Improvements in understanding and approaches to the evaluation and management of CVD risk factors, specifically for young persons with T1D, are desirable. Recent advances in noninvasive techniques to detect early vascular damage, such as the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction and aortic or carotid intima-media thickness, provide new tools to evaluate the progression of CVD in childhood. In the present review, current CVD risk factor management, challenges, and potential therapeutic interventions in youth with T1D are described. PMID:26520142

  7. The correlation between the Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinling; Zhao, Youmin; Chai, Jianwen; Hao, Dongqin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relativity between the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors and definite the significance of predicting the cardiovascular risk factors through cross-sectional research method. There were 2007 cases volunteers (including 650 cases of male, 1357 cases of female) from city community with complete information involved in the research of diabetes. The value of HbA1c 6.5% was set as the diagnose boundary of the diabetes. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P<0.05. Hypertension, dyslipidemi, being overweight or obesity, age (male was over 45 years old and female was over 55 years old.), HbA1c 6.0% and fasting blood glucose (FBG) 6.1mmol/L were regarded as cardiovascular risk factors. Then we analyzed the number of risk factors for individuals in different HbA1c groups. Meanwhile, patients were grouped into zero, one, two, three, four or more groups with reference to the number of risk factors they had in order to compare the values of risk factors in different groups through Logistic regression. The results showed that (1) For those people who had no less than three risk factors, the frequency of risk factors was on the rise with the increase of HbA1c levels. (2) The value of HbA1c in different groups of risk factors rose with the increasing number of risk factors. There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between groups. (3) The Regression analysis showed that there was a stronger correlation between HbA1c levels and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), fasting blood glucose (FBG) rather than age. So Non-diabetics whose HbA1c levels ranged from 6.0% to 6.5% were at high risk of cardiovascular risk factors. HbA1c levels, which can be a prediction index for cardiovascular risk factors dependent from other cardiovascular risk factors for non-diabetics, and it were highly relevant with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting blood glucose (FBG).

  8. The correlation between the Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinling; Zhao, Youmin; Chai, Jianwen; Hao, Dongqin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relativity between the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetics and cardiovascular risk factors and definite the significance of predicting the cardiovascular risk factors through cross-sectional research method. There were 2007 cases volunteers (including 650 cases of male, 1357 cases of female) from city community with complete information involved in the research of diabetes. The value of HbA1c 6.5% was set as the diagnose boundary of the diabetes. Differences were considered to be statistically significant at P<0.05. Hypertension, dyslipidemi, being overweight or obesity, age (male was over 45 years old and female was over 55 years old.), HbA1c 6.0% and fasting blood glucose (FBG) 6.1mmol/L were regarded as cardiovascular risk factors. Then we analyzed the number of risk factors for individuals in different HbA1c groups. Meanwhile, patients were grouped into zero, one, two, three, four or more groups with reference to the number of risk factors they had in order to compare the values of risk factors in different groups through Logistic regression. The results showed that (1) For those people who had no less than three risk factors, the frequency of risk factors was on the rise with the increase of HbA1c levels. (2) The value of HbA1c in different groups of risk factors rose with the increasing number of risk factors. There was a significant difference (P<0.001) between groups. (3) The Regression analysis showed that there was a stronger correlation between HbA1c levels and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), fasting blood glucose (FBG) rather than age. So Non-diabetics whose HbA1c levels ranged from 6.0% to 6.5% were at high risk of cardiovascular risk factors. HbA1c levels, which can be a prediction index for cardiovascular risk factors dependent from other cardiovascular risk factors for non-diabetics, and it were highly relevant with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and impaired fasting blood glucose (FBG). PMID:27005508

  9. [Coronary heart diseases and associated risk factors in newly manifested type II diabetic patients over the course of 5 years].

    PubMed

    Schmechel, H; Schulze, J; Hanefeld, M; Lippold, C; Schwanebeck, U; Rössger, G; Haller, H

    1989-03-15

    Using the baseline data of the diabetes intervention study (DIS) from 1126 newly manifested type II-diabetics our analysis demonstrates higher mean-values of some components of the so-called metabolic syndrome in patients with ECG-abnormalities indicating coronary heart disease (CHD) in diagnosis of diabetes compared with subjects without ECG-findings. The impact of general risk factors for the prevalence of CHD in diagnosis and after a 5-year follow-up is obviously different in both sexes. In multivariate analysis only systolic blood pressure was persistently a significant predictor in both sex groups. With increasing age life-duration gets as time-related factor importance for the development of CHD. The mathematically demonstrated association of triglyceride levels to the presence of ECG-abnormalities agrees with the results of WHO multinational study of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus. In the interventions as well as in the control-groups diabetic subjects with CHD after 5 year follow-up showed in comparison to diabetics without CHD higher levels of investigated risk factors which develop their pathogenetic effect probably by their clustering impact, because the differences of their mean-values are only in some cases significant. The common lower level of the most risk factors at the intervention group compared with the conventionally treated group is the result of the intervention measures. PMID:2728558

  10. Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Cohort of 2,011 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun; Xin, Lei; Wang, Dan; Liao, Zhuan; Lin, Jin-Huan; Li, Bai-Rong; Du, Ting-Ting; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increases the mortality. The identification of risk factors for DM development may contribute to the early detection and potential risk reduction of DM in patients with CP.Patients with CP admitted to Changhai Hospital (Shanghai, China) from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of DM after the onset of CP were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression model.A total of 2011 patients with CP were enrolled. During follow-up (median duration, 22.0 years), 564 patients developed DM. Cumulative rates of DM 20 and 50 years after the onset of CP were 45.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.8%-50.0%) and 90.0% (95% CI, 75.4%-97.7%), respectively. Five risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified: male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.08-2.11), alcohol abuse (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), steatorrhea (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.11), biliary stricture (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43-3.52), and distal pancreatectomy (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.80-6.44).In conclusion, the risk of developing DM in patients with CP is not only influenced by the development of biliary stricture and steatorrhea indicating disease progression, and inherent nature of study subjects such as male sex, but also by modifiable factors including alcohol abuse and distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27057870

  11. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Complications of Diabetes in the Kilimanjaro Region: A Population-Based Study from Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Makuka, Gerald Jamberi; Egger, Joseph R.; Maro, Venance; Maro, Honest; Karia, Francis; Patel, Uptal D.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, diabetes is a growing burden, yet little is known about its prevalence, risk factors, and complications. To address these gaps and help inform public health efforts aimed at prevention and treatment, we conducted a community-based study assessing diabetes epidemiology. Methods and Findings We conducted a stratified, cluster-designed, serial cross-sectional household study from 2014–2015 in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to randomly select individuals. To estimate prevalence, we screened individuals for glucose impairment, including diabetes, using hemoglobin A1C. We also screened for hypertension and obesity, and to assess for potential complications, individuals with diabetes were assessed for retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. We enrolled 481 adults from 346 urban and rural households. The prevalence of glucose impairment was 21.7% (95% CI 15.2–29.8), which included diabetes (5.7%; 95% CI 3.37–9.47) and glucose impairment with increased risk for diabetes (16.0%; 95% CI 10.2–24.0). Overweight or obesity status had an independent prevalence risk ratio for glucose impairment (2.16; 95% CI 1.39–3.36). Diabetes awareness was low (35.6%), and few individuals with diabetes were receiving biomedical treatment (33.3%). Diabetes-associated complications were common (50.2%; 95% CI 33.7–66.7), including renal (12.0%; 95% CI 4.7–27.3), ophthalmic (49.6%; 95% CI 28.6–70.7), and neurological (28.8%; 95% CI 8.0–65.1) abnormalities. Conclusions In a northern region of Tanzania, diabetes is an under-recognized health condition, despite the fact that many people either have diabetes or are at increased risk for developing diabetes. Most individuals were undiagnosed or untreated, and the prevalence of diabetes-associated complications was high. Public health efforts in this region will need to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, which appear to include

  12. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Profile in Individuals With Diabetes Compared With Non-Diabetic Subjects in North-East of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Niroumand, Shabnam; Dadgarmoghaddam, Maliheh; Eghbali, Babak; Abrishami, Maryam; Gholoobi, Arash; Bahrami Taghanaki, Hamid Reza; Khajedaluee, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is assumed to be a strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and is frequently associated with other CVD risk factors. Objectives The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of different patterns of dyslipidemia in individuals with diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects and evaluate other accompanied CVD risk factors between the two groups. Patients and Methods This was an analytical cross-sectional study on 230 participants, aged 28 - 66 years old, who were referred to different urban health centers of Khorasan Razavi province (north-east of Iran). Data from the participants were collected during their first visit by primary care physicians. Statistical package for social science (version 11.5) was used to analyze the data. The chi-square or Fisher’s exact, student’s t or the Mann-Whitney U and correlation tests were used in the analysis. Results The age and gender of the participants were not different between the two groups (P = 0.1 and P = 0.4, respectively). The most common patterns of dyslipidemia in both groups were isolated dyslipidemia followed by combined dyslipidemia. Prevalence of dyslipidemia as a whole (one, two or three lipid profile abnormalities) in patients with diabetes and non-diabetic participants was 89.3% and 82.6%, respectively and the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.1). Subjects with diabetes had higher systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001), higher diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.002) and higher body mass index (P = 0.09) compared to non-diabetics. Moreover, they were more likely to have higher levels of total cholesterol (P = 0.01), triglycerides (P = 0.001) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.009) and lower levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (P = 0.2). Conclusions Cardiovascular diseases risk factors are more common in patients with diabetes; however, non-diabetic individuals also had a high prevalence of risk factors

  13. Secular Trends of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Changes in Its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Geum Joon; Kim, Log Young; Sung, Ye Na; Kim, Jee Ae; Hwang, Soon Young; Hong, Hye-Ri; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the secular trends of incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and insulin treatment for GDM in a Korean population and to determine the factors that contribute to the trends in the incidence of GDM. Study Design We used data collected by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service of Korea and analyzed data from women who had given birth from 2006 to 2010. We evaluated the trends in the incidence of GDM and GDM requiring insulin treatment and the changes in risk factors. Results There were 1,824,913 births during the study period, which included 129,666 cases of GDM, an incidence of 7.11% over this period. The incidence of GDM increased from 3.86% in 2007 to 11.83% in 2010, with a continuous increase after adjustment for age. However, the number of GDM cases that required insulin treatment decreased significantly from 13.87% in 2007 to 5.94% in 2010. The proportion of patients who were at an older age and multiparity, 2 GDM risk factors, increased during the study period. Conclusions In Korea, the incidence of GDM, especially mild GDM, increased dramatically during the period from 2006 to 2010. Further efforts are needed to monitor this trend and to identify associated factors. PMID:26292282

  14. Prevalence of Hypertension in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II) and its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha; Pathak, Rahul; Kotian, Mangalore Shashidhar; Ullal, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major public health problem in India and worldwide. Since hypertension is often asymptomatic, it commonly remains undetected, leading to serious complications if untreated. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease. It doubles the risk of developing coronary artery disease, increases the risk of congestive heart failure by four folds and that of cerebrovascular disease and stroke by seven folds. Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 42% of coronary heart disease deaths in India. Aim To identify prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a semi urban population of Mangalore, who participated in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 551 subjects aged ≥ 20 years who were randomly selected. Hypertension was diagnosed and classified according to Joint National Committee 7 (JNC) criteria. Blood pressure was measured by a doctor using calibrated sphygmomanometer. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glucose estimations were done for all subjects. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and student’s t-test (unpaired). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done using hypertension as dependent variable and the various risk factors as independent variables. Results Overall prevalence of hypertension in the community was 41% (227/551) (40.9% in men, 41.3% in women). Prehypertension was found in 40% (223/551) (45.4% in men, 38.1% in women), and only 18.3% (101/551) had normal blood pressure. Stage I hypertension was seen in 29.7% (164/551) (28.9% in men, 30.1% in women). Stage II hypertension was seen in 11.4% (63/551) (12% in men, 11% in women). Age, obesity, diabetes, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides were strongly associated with hypertension. Only 46% (254/551) of the hypertensive subjects were aware that they were hypertensive. Conclusion Prevalence of hypertension was high in this

  15. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  16. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms.

  17. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms. PMID:24439387

  18. Racial/ethnic Differences in Clinical and Biochemical Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Fennoy, Ilene; Accacha, Siham; Altshuler, Lisa; Carey, Dennis E.; Holleran, Steven; Rapaport, Robert; Shelov, Steven P.; Speiser, Phyllis W.; Ten, S.; Bhangoo, Amrit; Boucher-Berry, Claudia; Espinal, Yomery; Gupta, Rishi; Hassoun, Abeer A.; Iazetti, Loretta.; Jacques, Fabien J.; Jean, Amy M.; Klein, Michelle. L.; Levine, Robert; Lowell, Barbara; Michel, Lesley; Rosenfeld, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether peri-adolescent children demonstrate the significant racial/ethnic differences in body fatness relative to BMI and in the prevalence and relationship of body composition to risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as in adults. Design and Methods We examined family history of obesity and T2DM, anthropometry, insulin sensitivity and secretory capacity, lipids, and cytokines (IL-6, CRP, TNF-α, and adiponectin) in a cohort of 994 middle school students (47% male, 53%, female; 12% African American, 14% East Asian, 13% South Asian, 9% Caucasian, 44% Hispanic, and 8% other). Results Fractional body fat content was significantly greater at any BMI among South Asians. There were racial/ethnic specific differences in lipid profiles, insulin secretory capacity, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers corrected for body fatness that are similar to those seen in adults. Family history of T2DM was associated with lower insulin secretory capacity while family history of obesity was more associated with insulin resistance. Conclusion Children show some of the same racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for adiposity-related co-morbidities as adults. BMI and waist circumference cutoffs to identify children at-risk for adiposity-related co-morbidities should be adjusted by racial/ethnic group as well as other variables such as birthweight and family history. PMID:23596082

  19. Diabetic Risk Factors Promote Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Misfolding by a Common, Membrane-mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Okada, Alan K; Teranishi, Kazuki; Isas, J Mario; Bedrood, Sahar; Chow, Robert H; Langen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The current diabetes epidemic is associated with a diverse set of risk factors including obesity and exposure to plastics. Notably, significant elevations of negatively charged amphiphilic molecules are observed in obesity (e.g. free fatty acids and phosphatidic acid) and plastics exposure (monophthalate esters). It remains unclear whether these factors share pathogenic mechanisms and whether links exist with islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) misfolding, a process central to β-cell dysfunction and death. Using a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism and electron microscopy, we show that phosphatidic acid, oleic acid, and the phthalate metabolite MBzP partition into neutral membranes and enhance IAPP misfolding. The elevation of negative charge density caused by the presence of the risk factor molecules stabilizes a common membrane-bound α-helical intermediate that, in turn, facilitates IAPP misfolding. This shared mechanism points to a critical role for the membrane-bound intermediate in disease pathogenesis, making it a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27531121

  20. Diabetic Risk Factors Promote Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Misfolding by a Common, Membrane-mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Alan K.; Teranishi, Kazuki; Isas, J. Mario; Bedrood, Sahar; Chow, Robert H.; Langen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The current diabetes epidemic is associated with a diverse set of risk factors including obesity and exposure to plastics. Notably, significant elevations of negatively charged amphiphilic molecules are observed in obesity (e.g. free fatty acids and phosphatidic acid) and plastics exposure (monophthalate esters). It remains unclear whether these factors share pathogenic mechanisms and whether links exist with islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) misfolding, a process central to β-cell dysfunction and death. Using a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism and electron microscopy, we show that phosphatidic acid, oleic acid, and the phthalate metabolite MBzP partition into neutral membranes and enhance IAPP misfolding. The elevation of negative charge density caused by the presence of the risk factor molecules stabilizes a common membrane-bound α-helical intermediate that, in turn, facilitates IAPP misfolding. This shared mechanism points to a critical role for the membrane-bound intermediate in disease pathogenesis, making it a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27531121

  1. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Vietnam: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chung T; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Lee, Andy H; Binns, Colin W

    2015-09-01

    This systematic review examined trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and identified its risk factors among adults in Vietnam. PubMed, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, and Scopus databases were searched to identify relevant literature. The search yielded 10 studies, including 2 national surveys and 8 regional investigations. National prevalence estimates of T2DM were 2.7% in 2002 and 5.4% in 2012. The estimates for the northern region were 1.4% in 1994 and 3.7% in 2012 and those for the southern region were 3.8% in 2004, 7.0% in 2008, and 12.4% in 2010. The major determinants of T2DM included older age, urban residence, high levels of body and abdominal fat, physical inactivity, sedentary lifestyle, genetic factors, and hypertension. The prevalence rate by gender was variable in both national and regional studies. There was insufficient information available on some potentially important risk factors such as smoking, dietary intake, income, and educational level. Our review signifies a rapidly growing prevalence of T2DM in Vietnam and suggests that extra effort is required to prevent and control this disease.

  2. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Vietnam: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chung T; Pham, Ngoc Minh; Lee, Andy H; Binns, Colin W

    2015-09-01

    This systematic review examined trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and identified its risk factors among adults in Vietnam. PubMed, Web of Science, Wiley Online Library, and Scopus databases were searched to identify relevant literature. The search yielded 10 studies, including 2 national surveys and 8 regional investigations. National prevalence estimates of T2DM were 2.7% in 2002 and 5.4% in 2012. The estimates for the northern region were 1.4% in 1994 and 3.7% in 2012 and those for the southern region were 3.8% in 2004, 7.0% in 2008, and 12.4% in 2010. The major determinants of T2DM included older age, urban residence, high levels of body and abdominal fat, physical inactivity, sedentary lifestyle, genetic factors, and hypertension. The prevalence rate by gender was variable in both national and regional studies. There was insufficient information available on some potentially important risk factors such as smoking, dietary intake, income, and educational level. Our review signifies a rapidly growing prevalence of T2DM in Vietnam and suggests that extra effort is required to prevent and control this disease. PMID:26187848

  3. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies to Uncovering Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Sylvia H.; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Sun, Qi; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Zhang, Cuilin; Qi, Lu; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHS II to addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of 1976 to 2016 NHS and NHS II publications. Results. The NHS and NHS II have uncovered important roles in type 2 diabetes for individual nutrients, foods, dietary patterns, and physical activity independent of excess body weight. Up to 90% of type 2 diabetes cases are potentially preventable if individuals follow a healthy diet and lifestyle. The NHS investigations have also identified novel biomarkers for diabetes, including adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, nutrition metabolites, and environmental pollutants, offering new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Global collaborative efforts have uncovered many common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and improved our understanding of gene–environment interactions. Continued efforts to identify epigenetic, metagenomic, and metabolomic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have the potential to reveal new pathways and improve prediction and prevention. Conclusions. Over the past several decades, the NHS and NHS II have made major contributions to public health recommendations and strategies designed to reduce the global burden of diabetes. PMID:27459454

  4. Multiple risk factor intervention reduces carotid atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with rapid progression of carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) were shown to have a higher future risk for cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of multiple risk factor intervention on CIMT progression and to establish whether new cardiovascular surrogate measurements would allow prediction of CIMT changes. Materials and methods In this prospective, open, 2-years study, we included 97 patients with type 2 diabetes and at least two insufficiently treated cardiovascular risk factors, i.e. HbA1c > 7.5% (58 mmol/mol); LDL-cholesterol >3.1 mmol/l or blood pressure >140/90 mmHg. Treatment was intensified according to current guidelines over 3 months with the aim to maintain intensification over 2 years. The primary outcome was the change in CIMT after 2 years. We also assessed markers of mechanical and biochemical endothelial function and endothelial progenitor cells before and after 3 months of treatment intensification. For testing differences between before and after multifactorial treatment measurements we used either the paired student’s t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, depending on the distribution of the data. Additional, explorative statistical data analysis was done on CIMT progression building a linear multivariate regression model. Results Blood glucose, lipids and blood pressure significantly improved during the first 3 months of intensified treatment, which was sustained over the 2-year study duration. Mean CIMT significantly decreased from baseline to 2 year (0.883 ± 0.120 mm vs. 0.860 ± 0.130 mm; p = 0.021). None of the investigated surrogate measures, however, was able to predict changes in IMT early after treatment intensification. Conclusions Intensification of risk factor intervention in type 2 diabetes results in CIMT regression over a period of 2 years. None of the biomarkers used including endothelial function parameters or endothelial progenitor cells turned out to be useful to

  5. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wesley K.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; LeBlanc, Marissa; Bettella, Francesco; Mills, Ian G.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gautvik, Kaare M.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR) method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD) at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity. PMID:26695485

  6. Serum vitamin D levels, diabetes and cardio-metabolic risk factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of serum 25–hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), have been associated with development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD); however there are limited data on serum 25(OH)D in Indigenous Australians, a population at high risk for both diabetes and CVD. We aimed to assess levels of serum 25(OH)D in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and to explore relationships between 25(OH)D and cardio-metabolic risk factors and diabetes. Methods 592 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australian participants of The eGFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) Study, a cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study performed in 2007–2011, from urban and remote centres within communities, primary care and tertiary hospitals across Northern Territory, Far North Queensland and Western Australia. Assessment of serum 25(OH)D, cardio-metabolic risk factors (central obesity, diabetes, hypertension, history of cardiovascular disease, current smoker, low HDL-cholesterol), and diabetes (by history or HbA1c ≥6.5%) was performed. Associations were explored between 25(OH)D and outcome measures of diabetes and number of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Results The median (IQR) serum 25(OH)D was 60 (45–77) nmol/L, 31% had 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L. For participants with 25(OH)D < 50 vs ≥50 nmol/L, cardio-metabolic risk profile differed for: diabetes (54%, 36% p < 0.001), past history of cardiovascular disease (16%, 9%, p = 0.014), waist-hip ratio (0.98, 0.92, p < 0.001), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (2.7, 1.5 mg/mmol, p < 0.001). The OR (95% CI) for diabetes was 2.02 (1.03 – 3.95) for people in the lowest vs highest tertiles of 25(OH)D (<53 vs >72 nmol/L, respectively) after adjusting for known cardio-metabolic risk factors. Conclusion The percentage of 25(OH)D levels <50 nmol/L was high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians from Northern and Central Australia. Low 25(OH)D level was associated with

  7. Investigation of factors contributing to diabetes risk in american indian/alaska native youth.

    PubMed

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not significantly differ in BMI compared to peers. However, children with a parental history of diabetes had significantly higher BMIs than children without. PMID:18286446

  8. Investigation of factors contributing to diabetes risk in american indian/alaska native youth.

    PubMed

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not significantly differ in BMI compared to peers. However, children with a parental history of diabetes had significantly higher BMIs than children without.

  9. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetes-related foot complications in Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Laura N.; Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Herman, William H.; Wrobel, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The objective was to describe the prevalence of diabetes-related foot complications in a managed care population and to identify the demographic and biological risk factors. Methods We assessed the period prevalence of foot complications on 6,992 patients using ICD-9 diagnosis codes from health plan administrative data. Demographic and biological variables were ascertained from surveys and medical record reviews. We defined four mutually exclusive groups: any Charcot foot, DFU with debridement, amputation ± DFU and debridement, and no foot conditions. Results Overall, 55 (0.8%) patients had Charcot foot, 205 (2.9%) had DFU with debridement, and 101 (1.4%) had a lower-extremity amputation. There were 6,631 patients with no prevalent foot conditions. Racial/ethnic minorities were less likely to have Charcot foot (OR=0.21; 95%CI: 0.10, 0.46) or DFU (OR=0.61; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.84) compared to non-Hispanic Whites, but there were no racial/ethnic differences in amputation. Histories of micro- or macrovascular disease were associated with a two- to four-fold increase in the odds of foot complications. Conclusion In managed care patients with uniform access to health care, we found a relatively high prevalence of foot complications, but attenuation of the racial/ethnic differences of rates reported in the literature. PMID:24035357

  11. Beverage-consumption patterns and associations with metabolic risk factors among low-income Latinos with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Monica L; Lemon, Stephenie C; Olendzki, Barbara; Rosal, Milagros C

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, Latinos experience disproportionately higher rates of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications than non-Latino whites. Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is strongly associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing caloric intake, particularly from energy-dense, low-nutrient foods or beverages, can be an effective and key strategy for metabolic and weight control. However, little is known about the contribution of various types of beverages, including but not limited to SSBs, to total caloric intake among Latinos with type 2 diabetes. Low-income Latinos (87.7% Puerto Rican) participating in a diabetes self-management intervention trial (N=238) provided cross-sectional, descriptive data on beverage-consumption patterns, anthropometric outcomes, and metabolic characteristics. Beverages accounted for one fifth of the total daily caloric intake. SSBs and milk beverages, respectively, contributed 9.6% of calories to overall daily caloric intake. Interventions directed at diabetes risk factors among low-income Latinos with diabetes can benefit from consideration of beverage-consumption behaviors as an important strategy to reduce caloric and sugar intake.

  12. Prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in southern region of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alavudeen, Sirajudeen S.; Dhanapal, C.K.; Khan, Noohu Abdulla; Al Akhali, Khalid M.; Paulliah, Sam Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aim Dyslipidemia is a significant predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality in diabetes patients. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence rates, characteristics of dyslipidemia and their control in outpatient population in a Diabetic Centre. Methods A cross sectional prospective study design was used to collect data from 255 patients which included patient characteristics, past medical history of CVD, medications and parameters related to DM and cardiovascular risk factor control. Blood pressure and laboratory measurements for glycosylated hemoglobin and lipoprotein panel were recorded. Results Body mass index (BMI) of the dyslipidemic diabetic patients was significantly higher for females. In terms of age, duration of diabetes, family history, diabetes treatment offered did not differed significantly among genders. Clinical characteristics of HDL values were significantly higher for female in comparison to men (P = 0.02) whereas glycosylated hemoglobin and blood pressure appeared not to differ significantly. Among the three factors studied BMI, duration of diabetes mellitus and drug therapy on lipoprotein levels of diabetes patients, except for the influence of drug therapy which influenced significantly the total cholesterol level (P = 0.02). Number of females with normolipid were more than males (P = 0.009) and number of males with abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride patients were significantly more than females (0.0002). Conclusion Dyslipidemia among males were higher than females which could be a significant risk factor for causing low glycemic control culminating in cardiovascular events. Control of hyperglycaemia and other CVD risk factor appears to be suboptimal in Saudi Arabia. Addressing health system components such as providing medical staff training, incentive to health professionals and better patient education may improve quality of DM care. PMID:24563593

  13. Earlier age at menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in Brazilian adults: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Early menarche has been linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Western and Asian societies, yet whether age at menarche is associated with diabetes in Latin America, where puberty and diabetes may have different life courses, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk in Brazilian adults. Methods We used data from 8,075 women aged 35-74 years in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) who had complete information on age at menarche, diabetes status, and covariates. Diabetes was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis, medication use, and laboratory variables (fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, and glycated hemoglobin). Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Menarche onset < 11 years [vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher risk of diabetes (RR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, maternal education, maternal and paternal diabetes, and birth weight. This persisted after further control for BMI at age 20 years and relative leg length. Additionally, among those not taking diabetes medications, earlier menarche [<11 years vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher % glycated hemoglobin (p < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.001), C-reactive protein (p = 0.003), waist circumference (p < 0.001), and BMI measured at baseline exam (p < 0.001). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with greater risk for adult diabetes and cardiometabolic disease in the Brazilian context. PMID:24438044

  14. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Health Advisor Tools To Know Your Risk Alert Day Diabetes Basics Home Symptoms Diagnosis America's Diabetes ... Volunteer Center American Diabetes Month® American Diabetes Association Alert Day® Become a Member Advocacy Home Take Action ...

  15. Hyperamylinemia as a risk factor for accelerated cognitive decline in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ly, Han; Despa, Florin

    2015-01-01

    Type II diabetes increases the risk for cognitive decline via multiple traits. Amylin is a pancreatic hormone that has amyloidogenic and cytotoxic properties similar to the amyloid-β peptide. The amylin hormone is overexpressed in individuals with pre-diabetic insulin resistance or obesity leading to amylin oligomerization and deposition in pancreatic islets. Amylin oligomerization was implicated in the apoptosis of the insulin-producing β-cells. Recent studies showed that brain tissue from diabetic patients with cerebrovascular dementia or Alzheimer's disease contains significant deposits of oligomerized amylin. It has also been reported that the brain amylin deposition reduced exploratory drive, recognition memory and vestibulomotor function in a rat model that overexpresses human amylin in the pancreas. These novel findings are reviewed here and the hypothesis that type II diabetes is linked with cognitive decline by amylin accumulation in the brain is proposed. Deciphering the impact of hyperamylinemia on the brain is critical for both etiology and treatment of dementia.

  16. Dietary patterns and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among urban indigenous women in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Lako, J V; Nguyen, V C

    2001-01-01

    transition, coupled with dietary excesses and physical inactivity, seem to be potential risk factors of diabetes among the indigenous women in the urban area. PMID:11708306

  17. Dietary patterns and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among urban indigenous women in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Lako, J V; Nguyen, V C

    2001-01-01

    transition, coupled with dietary excesses and physical inactivity, seem to be potential risk factors of diabetes among the indigenous women in the urban area.

  18. Investigation of Factors Contributing to Diabetes Risk in American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not…

  19. Contribution of modifiable risk factors for hypertension and type-2 diabetes in Peruvian resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Smeeth, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Background It is important to understand the local burden of non-communicable diseases including within-country heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to characterise hypertension and type-2 diabetes profiles across different Peruvian geographical settings emphasising the assessment of modifiable risk factors. Methods Analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study baseline assessment was conducted. Cardiometabolic outcomes were blood pressure categories (hypertension, prehypertension, normal) and glucose metabolism disorder status (diabetes, prediabetes, normal). Exposures were study setting and six modifiable factors (smoking, alcohol drinking, leisure time and transport-related physical activity levels, TV watching, fruit/vegetables intake and obesity). Poisson regression models were used to report prevalence ratios (PR). Population attributable risks (PAR) were also estimated. Results Data from 3238 participants, 48.3% male, mean age 45.3 years, were analysed. Age-standardised (WHO population) prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension was 24% and 16%, whereas for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes it was 18% and 6%, respectively. Outcomes varied according to study setting (p<0.001). In multivariable model, hypertension was higher among daily smokers (PR 1.76), heavy alcohol drinkers (PR 1.61) and the obese (PR 2.06); whereas only obesity (PR 2.26) increased the prevalence of diabetes. PAR showed that obesity was an important determinant for hypertension (15.7%) and type-2 diabetes (23.9%). Conclusions There is an evident heterogeneity in the prevalence of and risk factors for hypertension and diabetes within Peru. Prehypertension and prediabetes are highly prevalent across settings. Our results emphasise the need of understanding the epidemiology of cardiometabolic conditions to appropriately implement interventions to tackle the burden of non-communicable diseases. PMID:26248550

  20. The Influence of Incretin Mimetics on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kinalska, Ida; Bednarska-Chabowska, Dorota; Adamiec-Mroczek, Joanna; Hak, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    The authors discuss the strategy of use of incretin hormones in type 2 diabetes treatment in the context of cardiovascular complications. The results of the phase III study on human GLP-1 (Glucagon-like peptide-1) analogue-liraglutide have been presented under common acronym LEAD (Liraglutide-Effect and Action In Diabetes). The liraglutide therapy improved glycemic control with low hypoglycemia risk and decreased glycated hemoglobin by an average 1,13%. Decreases in systolic pressure and significant body weight loss were observed. Not only did the index describing beta cells function HOMA-B improve but also did the ratio of insulin to proinsulin. Summing up, incretin hormones beneficially influence blood glucose level, moreover, their use decreases blood pressure and body weight which might indicate their positive influence on cardiovascular system in diabetic patients. PMID:22462016

  1. Study of differences in presentation, risk factors and management in diabetic and nondiabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Krishna Kumar; Mathur, Mukul; Lodha, Sailesh; Sharma, Surendra Kumar; Sharma, Niharika; Gupta, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare clinical characteristics, treatment, and utilization of evidence-based medicines at discharge from hospital in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with or without diabetes at a tertiary care cardiac center in India. Methods: We performed an observational study in consecutive patients discharged following management of ACS. We obtained demographic details, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular risk factors, physical and biochemical parameters, and management. Descriptive statistics are reported. Results: We enrolled 100 patients (diabetics = 28) with mean age of 59.0 ± 10.8 years (diabetics 59.3 ± 11.6, nondiabetics 58.9 ± 8.5). Forty-nine patients had ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) (diabetics = 14, 28.7%) while 51 had nonSTEMI/unstable angina (diabetics = 14, 27.4%) (P = nonsignificant). Among diabetics versus nondiabetics there was greater prevalence (%) of hypertension (78.6% vs. 44.4%), obesity (25.0% vs. 8.3%), abdominal obesity (85.7% vs. 69.4%) and sedentary activity (89.2% vs. 77.8%), and lower prevalence of smoking/tobacco use (10.7% vs. 25.0%) (P < 0.05). In STEMI patients 28 (57.1%) were thrombolysed (diabetes 17.8% vs. 31.9%), percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) was in 67.8% diabetics versus 84.7% nondiabetics and coronary bypass surgery in 21.4% versus 8.3%. At discharge, in diabetics versus nondiabetics, there was similar use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (67.9% vs. 69.4%) and statins (100.0% vs. 98.6%) while use of dual antiplatelet therapy (85.7% vs. 95.8%) and beta-blockers (64.3% vs. 73.6%) was lower (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Diabetic patients with ACS have greater prevalence of cardiometabolic risk factors (obesity, abdominal obesity, and hypertension) as compared to nondiabetic patients. Less diabetic patients undergo PCIs and receive lesser dual anti-platelet therapy and beta-blockers. PMID:27186553

  2. Effects of metformin plus gliclazide versus metformin plus glimepiride on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Memy Hegazy; Abd-Allah, Gamil Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    High blood glucose level, lipid profile disturbances and plasma homocysteine (Hcy) are important risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was conducted to evaluate and compare effects of glimepiride/metformin combination versus gliclazide/metformin combination on cardiovascular risk factors in type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. One hundred and eighty T2DM patients were randomly allocated for treatment with placebo (control), metformin (500 mg twice daily), glimepiride (3mg once daily), gliclazide (80 mg once daily), metformin plus glimepiride or metformin plus gliclazide for 3 months. We evaluated plasma levels of glucose (PG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), Hcy, vitamin B12, folic acid and lipid profile before treatment and 3 months post treatment. Compared to metformin treated patients, glimepiride plus metformin induced significant reductions in: fasting plasma glucose, postprandial PG level, HbA1C % and Hcy level. Conversely, plasma folic acid and vitamin B12 were significantly increased. The levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly decreased; low-density lipoprotein was markedly decreased, whereas high-density lipoprotein was significantly increased and hence risk ratio was significantly decreased. Similar results but with lower values were obtained using combination of metformin plus gliclazide on glycemic control only. Combination of glimepiride with metformin was superior to gliclazide plus metformin in alleviating the cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. PMID:26408873

  3. Identification and Progression of Heart Disease Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients from Longitudinal Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Dai, Hong-Jie; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Therefore, assessing the risk of its occurrence is a crucial step in predicting serious cardiac events. Identifying heart disease risk factors and tracking their progression is a preliminary step in heart disease risk assessment. A large number of studies have reported the use of risk factor data collected prospectively. Electronic health record systems are a great resource of the required risk factor data. Unfortunately, most of the valuable information on risk factor data is buried in the form of unstructured clinical notes in electronic health records. In this study, we present an information extraction system to extract related information on heart disease risk factors from unstructured clinical notes using a hybrid approach. The hybrid approach employs both machine learning and rule-based clinical text mining techniques. The developed system achieved an overall microaveraged F-score of 0.8302. PMID:26380290

  4. Cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mortality burden of cardio-metabolic risk factors between 1980 and 2010: comparative risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Elevated blood pressure and glucose, serum cholesterol, and body mass index (BMI) are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs); some of these factors also increase the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes. We estimated CVD, CKD, and diabetes mortality attributable to these four cardio-metabolic risk factors for all countries and regions between 1980 and 2010. Methods We used data on risk factor exposure by country, age group, and sex from pooled analysis of population-based health surveys. Relative risks for cause-specific mortality were obtained from pooling of large prospective studies. We calculated the population attributable fractions (PAF) for each risk factor alone, and for the combination of all risk factors, accounting for multi-causality and for mediation of the effects of BMI by the other three risks. We calculated attributable deaths by multiplying the cause-specific PAFs by the number of disease-specific deaths from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors 2010 Study. We propagated the uncertainties of all inputs to the final estimates. Findings In 2010, high blood pressure was the leading risk factor for dying from CVDs, CKD, and diabetes in every region, causing over 40% of worldwide deaths from these diseases; high BMI and glucose were each responsible for about 15% of deaths; and cholesterol for 10%. After accounting for multi-causality, 63% (10.8 million deaths; 95% confidence interval 10.1–11.5) of deaths from these diseases were attributable to the combined effect of these four metabolic risk factors, compared with 67% (7.1 million deaths; 6.6–7.6) in 1980. The mortality burden of high BMI and glucose nearly doubled between 1980 and 2010. At the country level, age-standardised death rates attributable to these four risk factors surpassed 925 deaths per 100,000 among men in Belarus, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan, but were below 130 deaths per 100,000 for women and below 200 for men in some

  5. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, João Paulo; Amado, Duarte; Pinto, Luís Abegão; Ferreira, Joana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, based mainly in population prevalence analyzes, have shown opposite outcomes in time and even in the most recent articles also the association remains inconclusive. On the contrary, the experimental models based on animal induced chronic hyperglycemia have shown an important association of both diseases, explained by common neurodegenerative mechanisms. Diabetic patients have a different wound healing process in the eye viz-a-viz other organs. The healing process is more and it results in lower surgical survival time, higher intraocular pressure (IOP) levels and, therefore, these patients usually need more medication to lower the IOP. Both randomized and nonrandomized retrospective and experimental molecular studies have shown the association between DM and glaucoma. Further studies are needed to get better explanations about outcomes on more recent surgical procedures and with the exponential use of antifibrotics. How to cite this article: Costa L, Cunha JP, Amado D, Pinto LA, Ferreira J. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):81-85. PMID:26997842

  6. Low Physical Activity and Its Association with Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Brugnara, Laura; Murillo, Serafín; Novials, Anna; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; Goday, Albert; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Castaño, Luis; Gaztambide, Sonia; Valdés, Sergio; Franch, Josep; Castell, Conxa; Vendrell, Joan; Casamitjana, Roser; Bosch-Comas, Anna; Bordiú, Elena; Carmena, Rafael; Catalá, Miguel; Delgado, Elias; Girbés, Juan; López-Alba, Alfonso; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Gomis, Ramon; Ortega, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Low physical activity (PA), or sedentary lifestyle, is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. We aimed to investigate current prevalence of sedentariness and its association with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. PA was evaluated in a population-based, cross-sectional, randomly sampled study conducted in 2009–2010 in Spain. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (SF-IPAQ) was used to assess PA. 4991 individuals (median age 50 years, 57% women) were studied. Prevalence of sedentariness was 32.3% for men and 39% for women (p < 0.0001). Sex differences were particularly notable (age*sex interaction, p = 0.0024) at early and older ages. Sedentary individuals had higher BMI (28 vs. 27 kg/m2) and obesity prevalence (37 vs. 26%). Low PA was present in 44, 43, and 38% of individuals with known diabetes (KDM), prediabetes/unknown-diabetes (PREDM/UKDM), and normal glucose regulation (p = 0.0014), respectively. No difference between KDM and PREDM/UKDM (p = 0.72) was found. Variables independently associated (p < 0.05) with sedentariness were age, sex, BMI, central obesity, Mediterranean diet adherence, smoking habit, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and dyslipidemia. Low PA is on the rise in Spain, especially among women. Sedentariness is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and may be responsible for the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this country. PMID:27532610

  7. Low Physical Activity and Its Association with Diabetes and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Nationwide, Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Brugnara, Laura; Murillo, Serafín; Novials, Anna; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico; Goday, Albert; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Castaño, Luis; Gaztambide, Sonia; Valdés, Sergio; Franch, Josep; Castell, Conxa; Vendrell, Joan; Casamitjana, Roser; Bosch-Comas, Anna; Bordiú, Elena; Carmena, Rafael; Catalá, Miguel; Delgado, Elias; Girbés, Juan; López-Alba, Alfonso; Martínez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Menéndez, Edelmiro; Mora-Peces, Inmaculada; Pascual-Manich, Gemma; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Gomis, Ramon; Ortega, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    Low physical activity (PA), or sedentary lifestyle, is associated with the development of several chronic diseases. We aimed to investigate current prevalence of sedentariness and its association with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. PA was evaluated in a population-based, cross-sectional, randomly sampled study conducted in 2009-2010 in Spain. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (SF-IPAQ) was used to assess PA. 4991 individuals (median age 50 years, 57% women) were studied. Prevalence of sedentariness was 32.3% for men and 39% for women (p < 0.0001). Sex differences were particularly notable (age*sex interaction, p = 0.0024) at early and older ages. Sedentary individuals had higher BMI (28 vs. 27 kg/m2) and obesity prevalence (37 vs. 26%). Low PA was present in 44, 43, and 38% of individuals with known diabetes (KDM), prediabetes/unknown-diabetes (PREDM/UKDM), and normal glucose regulation (p = 0.0014), respectively. No difference between KDM and PREDM/UKDM (p = 0.72) was found. Variables independently associated (p < 0.05) with sedentariness were age, sex, BMI, central obesity, Mediterranean diet adherence, smoking habit, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and dyslipidemia. Low PA is on the rise in Spain, especially among women. Sedentariness is associated with several cardiovascular risk factors and may be responsible for the increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes in this country. PMID:27532610

  8. Sugar-sweetened and diet beverage consumption is associated with cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bortsov, Andrey V.; Bell, Ronny A.; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Lawrence, Jean M.; Maahs, David M.; McKeown, Robert; Marcovina, Santica M.; Thomas, Joan; Williams, Desmond E.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes is high and associated with age, gender, and race/ethnicity. It has also been shown that youth with type 1 diabetes often do not follow dietary recommendations. The objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to explore the association of sugar-sweetened and diet beverage intake with A1c, plasma lipids, adiponectin, leptin, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in youth with type 1 diabetes. We examined data from 1,806 youth age 10–22 years with type 1 diabetes, of which 22% were minority (10% Hispanic, 8% African Americans, 4% other races) and 48% were female. Sugar-sweetened beverage, diet beverage, and mineral water intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for socio-demographic and clinical covariates, physical activity and total energy intake, high sugar-sweetened beverage intake (at least one serving per day vs. none), was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and plasma triglycerides, but not with A1c. High diet beverage intake was associated with higher A1c, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. These associations were partially confounded by body mass index, saturated fat and total fiber intake. High sugar-sweetened beverage intake may have an adverse effect on CVD risk in youth with type 1 diabetes. Diet beverage intake may be a marker of unhealthy lifestyle which, in turn, is associated with worse metabolic control and CVD risk profile in these youth. Youth with diabetes should be encouraged to minimize sugar-sweetened beverage intake. PMID:21249401

  9. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Agyemang, Charles; Addo, Juliet; Bhopal, Raj; de Graft Aikins, Ama; Stronks, Karien

    2009-01-01

    Background Most European countries are ethnically and culturally diverse. Globally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. The major risk factors for CVD have been well established. This picture holds true for all regions of the world and in different ethnic groups. However, the prevalence of CVD and related risk factors vary among ethnic groups. Methods This article provides a review of current understanding of the epidemiology of vascular disease, principally coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and related risk factors among populations of Sub-Sahara African descent (henceforth, African descent) in comparison with the European populations in Europe. Results Compared with European populations, populations of African descent have an increased risk of stroke, whereas CHD is less common. They also have higher rates of hypertension and diabetes than European populations. Obesity is highly prevalent, but smoking rate is lower among African descent women. Older people of African descent have more favourable lipid profile and dietary habits than their European counterparts. Alcohol consumption is less common among populations of African descent. The rate of physical activity differs between European countries. Dutch African-Suriname men and women are less physically active than the White-Dutch whereas British African women are more physically active than women in the general population. Literature on psychosocial stress shows inconsistent results. Conclusion Hypertension and diabetes are highly prevalent among African populations, which may explain their high rate of stroke in Europe. The relatively low rate of CHD may be explained by the low rates of other risk factors including a more favourable lipid profile and the low prevalence of smoking. The risk factors are changing, and on the whole, getting worse especially among African women. Cohort studies and clinical trials are therefore needed among these groups to determine the relative

  10. Insulin resistance: an additional risk factor in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tushar P; Rawal, Komal; Bagchi, Ashim K; Akolkar, Gauri; Bernardes, Nathalia; Dias, Danielle da Silva; Gupta, Sarita; Singal, Pawan K

    2016-01-01

    Sedentary life style and high calorie dietary habits are prominent leading cause of metabolic syndrome in modern world. Obesity plays a central role in occurrence of various diseases like hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, which lead to insulin resistance and metabolic derangements like cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) mediated by oxidative stress. The mortality rate due to CVDs is on the rise in developing countries. Insulin resistance (IR) leads to micro or macro angiopathy, peripheral arterial dysfunction, hampered blood flow, hypertension, as well as the cardiomyocyte and the endothelial cell dysfunctions, thus increasing risk factors for coronary artery blockage, stroke and heart failure suggesting that there is a strong association between IR and CVDs. The plausible linkages between these two pathophysiological conditions are altered levels of insulin signaling proteins such as IR-β, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, Glut4 and PGC-1α that hamper insulin-mediated glucose uptake as well as other functions of insulin in the cardiomyocytes and the endothelial cells of the heart. Reduced AMPK, PFK-2 and elevated levels of NADP(H)-dependent oxidases produced by activated M1 macrophages of the adipose tissue and elevated levels of circulating angiotensin are also cause of CVD in diabetes mellitus condition. Insulin sensitizers, angiotensin blockers, superoxide scavengers are used as therapeutics in the amelioration of CVD. It evidently becomes important to unravel the mechanisms of the association between IR and CVDs in order to formulate novel efficient drugs to treat patients suffering from insulin resistance-mediated cardiovascular diseases. The possible associations between insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases are reviewed here. PMID:26542377

  11. The Age-Specific Quantitative Effects of Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Farzadfar, Farshad; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Woodward, Mark; Wormser, David; Kaptoge, Stephen; Whitlock, Gary; Qiao, Qing; Lewington, Sarah; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; vander Hoorn, Stephen; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Ali, Mohammed K.; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Ezzati, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of systolic blood pressure (SBP), serum total cholesterol (TC), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and body mass index (BMI) on the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have been established in epidemiological studies, but consistent estimates of effect sizes by age and sex are not available. Methods We reviewed large cohort pooling projects, evaluating effects of baseline or usual exposure to metabolic risks on ischemic heart disease (IHD), hypertensive heart disease (HHD), stroke, diabetes, and, as relevant selected other CVDs, after adjusting for important confounders. We pooled all data to estimate relative risks (RRs) for each risk factor and examined effect modification by age or other factors, using random effects models. Results Across all risk factors, an average of 123 cohorts provided data on 1.4 million individuals and 52,000 CVD events. Each metabolic risk factor was robustly related to CVD. At the baseline age of 55–64 years, the RR for 10 mmHg higher SBP was largest for HHD (2.16; 95% CI 2.09–2.24), followed by effects on both stroke subtypes (1.66; 1.39–1.98 for hemorrhagic stroke and 1.63; 1.57–1.69 for ischemic stroke). In the same age group, RRs for 1 mmol/L higher TC were 1.44 (1.29–1.61) for IHD and 1.20 (1.15–1.25) for ischemic stroke. The RRs for 5 kg/m2 higher BMI for ages 55–64 ranged from 2.32 (2.04–2.63) for diabetes, to 1.44 (1.40–1.48) for IHD. For 1 mmol/L higher FPG, RRs in this age group were 1.18 (1.08–1.29) for IHD and 1.14 (1.01–1.29) for total stroke. For all risk factors, proportional effects declined with age, were generally consistent by sex, and differed by region in only a few age groups for certain risk factor-disease pairs. Conclusion Our results provide robust, comparable and precise estimates of the effects of major metabolic risk factors on CVD and diabetes by age group. PMID:23935815

  12. Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project: A Community-Based Intervention Targeting Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in a First Nations Community

    PubMed Central

    Kakekagumick, Kara E.; Naqshbandi Hayward, Mariam; Harris, Stewart B.; Saksvig, Brit; Gittelsohn, Joel; Manokeesic, Gary; Goodman, Starsky; Hanley, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project (SLHDP) was initiated in 1991 as a partnership between Sandy Lake First Nation and researchers interested in addressing the high rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the community. Following the expressed wishes of the community, the SLHDP has encompassed a variety of community-wide interventions and activities including: community surveys to document T2DM prevalence and risk factors, the Northern Store program aimed at increasing the availability and knowledge of healthy food options, a home visit program for the prevention and management of T2DM, a local diabetes radio show, a school diabetes curriculum for grades 3 and 4, a community-wide walking trail to encourage increased physical activity, youth diabetes summer camps, and a variety of community events focusing on nutrition and physical activity. Over the 22 year existence of the SLHDP, the community has taken ownership of the program and activities have evolved in alignment with community needs and priorities. This paper discusses the history, implementation, evaluation, and outcomes of the SLHDP and describes its sustainability. The SLHDP is a model of culturally appropriate participatory research that is iterative, with reciprocal capacity building for both key community stakeholders and academic partners. PMID:24302919

  13. Sandy lake health and diabetes project: a community-based intervention targeting type 2 diabetes and its risk factors in a first nations community.

    PubMed

    Kakekagumick, Kara E; Naqshbandi Hayward, Mariam; Harris, Stewart B; Saksvig, Brit; Gittelsohn, Joel; Manokeesic, Gary; Goodman, Starsky; Hanley, Anthony J

    2013-01-01

    The Sandy Lake Health and Diabetes Project (SLHDP) was initiated in 1991 as a partnership between Sandy Lake First Nation and researchers interested in addressing the high rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the community. Following the expressed wishes of the community, the SLHDP has encompassed a variety of community-wide interventions and activities including: community surveys to document T2DM prevalence and risk factors, the Northern Store program aimed at increasing the availability and knowledge of healthy food options, a home visit program for the prevention and management of T2DM, a local diabetes radio show, a school diabetes curriculum for grades 3 and 4, a community-wide walking trail to encourage increased physical activity, youth diabetes summer camps, and a variety of community events focusing on nutrition and physical activity. Over the 22 year existence of the SLHDP, the community has taken ownership of the program and activities have evolved in alignment with community needs and priorities. This paper discusses the history, implementation, evaluation, and outcomes of the SLHDP and describes its sustainability. The SLHDP is a model of culturally appropriate participatory research that is iterative, with reciprocal capacity building for both key community stakeholders and academic partners.

  14. Risk factors for recurrence of diabetic foot ulcers: prospective follow-up analysis in the Eurodiale subgroup.

    PubMed

    Dubský, Michal; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Bem, Robert; Fejfarová, Vladimira; Skibová, Jelena; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2013-10-01

    Few studies have examined factors associated with diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) recurrence. Using data from patients enrolled in the prospective Eurodiale DFU study, we investigated the frequency of and risk factors for DFU recurrence after healing during a 3-year follow-up period. At our site, 93 Eurodiale-enrolled patients had a healed DFU. Among these, 14 were not alive; of the remaining 79 patients we enrolled 73 in this study. On entry to the Eurodiale study, we assessed demographic factors (age, sex and distance from hospital); diabetes-related factors [duration, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels]; comorbidities (obesity, renal failure, smoking and alcohol abuse) and DFU-related factors [peripheral arterial disease, ulcer infection, C-reactive protein (CRP) and; foot deformities]. During the 3-year follow-up period, a DFU had recurred in 42 patients (57.5%). By stepwise logistic regression of findings at initial DFU presentation, the significant independent predictors for recurrence were plantar ulcer location [odds ratio (OR) 8.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-33.2]; presence of osteomyelitis (OR 5.17, 95% CI 1.4-18.7); HbA1c > 7.5% ([DCCT], OR 4.07, 95% CI 1.1-15.6) and CRP > 5 mg/l (OR 4.27, 95% CI 1.2-15.7). In these patients with a healed DFU, the majority had a recurrence of DFU during a 3-year follow-up period, despite intensive foot care. The findings at diagnosis of the initial DFU were independent risk factors associated with ulcer recurrence (plantar location, bone infection, poor diabetes control and elevated CRP) and define those at high risk for recurrence, but may be amenable to targeted interventions.

  15. Risk Factors for Macro- and Microvascular Complications among Older Adults with Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Sheena M.; Fitzgerald, Anthony P.; Buckley, Claire M.; Canavan, Ronan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To explore risk factors for macro- and microvascular complications in a nationally representative sample of adults aged 50 years and over with type 2 diabetes in Ireland. Methods. Data from the first wave of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) (2009–2011) was used in cross-sectional analysis. The presence of doctor diagnosis of diabetes, risk factors, and macro- and microvascular complications were determined by self-report. Gender-specific differences in risk factor prevalence were assessed with the chi-squared test. Binomial regression analysis was conducted to explore independent associations between established risk factors and diabetes-related complications. Results. Among 8175 respondents, 655 were classified as having type 2 diabetes. Older age, being male, a history of smoking, a lower level of physical activity, and a diagnosis of high cholesterol were independent predictors of macrovascular complications. Diabetes diagnosis of 10 or more years, a history of smoking, and a diagnosis of hypertension were associated with an increased risk of microvascular complications. Older age, third-level education, and a high level of physical activity were protective factors (p < 0.05). Conclusions. Early intervention to target modifiable risk factors is urgently needed to reduce diabetes-related morbidity in the older population in Ireland. PMID:27294152

  16. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing.

  17. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37±11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing. PMID:26789839

  18. Factors Motivating Individuals to Consider Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Risk Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jennifer; Gupta, Jyoti; de Groot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify attitudes and perceptions of willingness to participate in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk prediction in the general population. Adults (n = 598) were surveyed on attitudes about utilizing genetic testing to predict future risk of T2D. Participants were recruited from public libraries (53%), online registry (37%) and a safety net hospital emergency department (10%). Respondents were 37 ± 11 years old, primarily White (54%), female (69%), college educated (46%), with an annual income ≥$25,000 (56%). Half of participants were interested in genetic testing for T2D (52%) and 81% agreed/strongly agreed genetic testing should be available to the public. Only 57% of individuals knew T2D is preventable. A multivariate model to predict interest in genetic testing was adjusted for age, gender, recruitment location and BMI; significant predictors were motivation (high perceived personal risk of T2D [OR = 4.38 (1.76, 10.9)]; family history [OR = 2.56 (1.46, 4.48)]; desire to know risk prior to disease onset [OR = 3.25 (1.94, 5.42)]; and knowing T2D is preventable [OR = 2.11 (1.24, 3.60)], intention (if the cost is free [OR = 10.2 (4.27, 24.6)]; and learning T2D is preventable [OR = 5.18 (1.95, 13.7)]) and trust of genetic testing results [OR = 0.03 (0.003, 0.30)]. Individuals are interested in genetic testing for T2D risk which offers unique information that is personalized. Financial accessibility, validity of the test and availability of diabetes prevention programs were identified as predictors of interest in T2D testing. PMID:26789839

  19. Lower Plasma Creatinine and Urine Albumin in Individuals at Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes with Factor V Leiden Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Andreas; Machicao, Fausto; Nawroth, Peter P.; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Isermann, Berend

    2014-01-01

    The factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation is the most frequent genetic cause of venous thrombosis in Caucasians. However, protective effects have been suggested to balance the disadvantages. We have recently observed protective effects of FVL mutation on experimental diabetic nephropathy in mice as well as an association with reduced albuminuria in two human cohorts of diabetic patients. In the present study we aimed to reevaluate these findings in an independent, larger cohort of 1905 Caucasians at risk of developing type 2 diabetes and extend possible associations to earlier disease stages of nephropathy. Carriers of FVL mutation had a significantly lower urine albumin excretion (P = 0.03) and tended to have lower plasma creatinine concentrations (P = 0.07). The difference in plasma creatinine concentrations was significant after adjustment for the influencing factors: age, gender, and lean body mass (P = 0.048). These observations at a very early “disease” stage are an important extension of previous findings and suggest that modification of glomerular dysfunction by FVL mutation is relevant during very early stages of diabetic nephropathy. This makes the underlying mechanism an interesting therapeutic target and raises the question whether FVL mutation may also exert protective effects in other glomerulopathies. PMID:24729885

  20. Association between Growth Differentiation Factor 15 (GDF15) and Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We investigated an association between serum Growth Differentiation Factor 15 (GDF15) level and cardiovascular risk in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). A total of 107 participants were screened for T2D and divided into a T2D group and a control group (without diabetes). We used the Framingham risk score (FRS) and the New Pooled Cohort Equation score to estimate the 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Serum GDF15 levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Correlation analyses were performed to evaluate the associations between GDF15 level and cardiovascular risk scores. The mean serum GDF15 level was elevated in the T2D group compared to the control group (P < 0.001). A positive correlation was evident between serum GDF15 level and age (r = 0.418, P = 0.001), the FRS (r = 0.457, P < 0.001), and the Pooled Cohort Equation score (r = 0.539, P < 0.001). After adjusting for age, LDL-C level, and body mass index (BMI), the serum GDF15 level was positively correlated with the FRS and the New Pooled Cohort Equation score. The serum GDF15 level is independently associated with cardiovascular risk scores of newly diagnosed T2D patients. This suggests that the level of GDF15 may be a useful predictive biomarker of cardiovascular risk in newly diagnosed T2D patients. PMID:27510384

  1. Changes in diet, cardiovascular risk factors and modelled cardiovascular risk following diagnosis of diabetes: 1-year results from the ADDITION-Cambridge trial cohort

    PubMed Central

    Savory, L A; Griffin, S J; Williams, K M; Prevost, A T; Kinmonth, A-L; Wareham, N J; Simmons, R K

    2014-01-01

    Aims To describe change in self-reported diet and plasma vitamin C, and to examine associations between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the year following diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Methods Eight hundred and sixty-seven individuals with screen-detected diabetes underwent assessment of self-reported diet, plasma vitamin C, cardiovascular disease risk factors and modelled cardiovascular disease risk at baseline and 1 year (n = 736) in the ADDITION-Cambridge trial. Multivariable linear regression was used to quantify the association between change in diet and cardiovascular disease risk at 1 year, adjusting for change in physical activity and cardio-protective medication. Results Participants reported significant reductions in energy, fat and sodium intake, and increases in fruit, vegetable and fibre intake over 1 year. The reduction in energy was equivalent to an average-sized chocolate bar; the increase in fruit was equal to one plum per day. There was a small increase in plasma vitamin C levels. Increases in fruit intake and plasma vitamin C were associated with small reductions in anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. Increased vegetable intake was associated with an increase in BMI and waist circumference. Reductions in fat, energy and sodium intake were associated with reduction in HbA1c, waist circumference and total cholesterol/modelled cardiovascular disease risk, respectively. Conclusions Improvements in dietary behaviour in this screen-detected population were associated with small reductions in cardiovascular disease risk, independently of change in cardio-protective medication and physical activity. Dietary change may have a role to play in the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk following diagnosis of diabetes. PMID:24102972

  2. Management of diabetes mellitus and associated cardiovascular risk factors in Brazil – the Brazilian study on the practice of diabetes care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Brazilian Study on the Practice of Diabetes Care main objective was to provide an epidemiological profile of individuals with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in Brazil, concerning therapy and adherence to international guidelines in the medical practice. Methods This observational, cross-sectional, multicenter study collected and analyzed data from individuals with type 1 and 2 DM attending public or private clinics in Brazil. Each investigator included the first 10 patients with type 2 DM who visited his/her office, and the first 5 patients with type 1 DM. Results A total of 1,358 patients were analyzed; 375 (27.6%) had type 1 and 983 (72.4%) had type 2 DM. Most individuals were women, Caucasian, and private health care users. High prevalence rates of hypertension, dyslipidemia and central obesity were observed, particularly in type 2 DM. Only 7.3% and 5.1% of the individuals with types 1 and 2 DM, respectively, had optimal control of blood pressure, plasma glucose and lipids. The absence of hypertension and female sex were associated with better control of type 1 DM and other cardiovascular risk factors. In type 2 DM, older age was also associated with better control. Conclusions Female sex, older age, and absence of hypertension were associated with better metabolic control. An optimal control of plasma glucose and other cardiovascular risk factors are obtained only in a minority of individuals with diabetes. Local numbers, compared to those from other countries are worse. PMID:23972112

  3. Childhood obesity in Canada: a review of prevalence estimates and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ball, Geoff D C; McCargar, Linda J

    2003-02-01

    Childhood obesity in Canada has become increasingly prevalent over the past 2 decades. Despite inconsistencies regarding different anthropometric indicators, cut-offs, and reference populations, both regional and national investigations have revealed high numbers of overweight and obese children and adolescents. A number of risk factors and health consequences have been associated with increased levels of body fatness in youth. Specifically, risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and type 2 diabetes are known to develop early in life and tend to emerge in clusters among overweight youngsters. Unhealthy lifestyle behaviours (i.e., physical inactivity), a genetic disposition, and a centralized body fat distribution, all contribute to increased risk. In order to prevent future generations of children from experiencing increased morbidity and mortality as overweight and obese adults, coordinated efforts at all levels (family, school, community, and government) must be established with a long-term commitment to promote healthy nutrition and physical activity behaviours in our youth.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Preethi; Greenberg, Harly

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with cardiovascular and cardiometabolic risk in several large epidemiologic studies. OSA leads to several physiologic disturbances such as intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation, and increase in autonomic tone. These disturbances have been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in animal and human studies. Studies also suggest a bidirectional relationship between OSA and T2DM whereby T2DM itself might contribute to the features of OSA. Moreover, successful treatment of OSA may reduce these risks, although this is controversial. The purpose of this article is to review 1) the links and bidirectional associations between OSA and T2DM; 2) the pathogenic mechanisms that might link these two disease states; 3) the role of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in improving glucose tolerance, sensitivity, and resistance; and 4) the implications for clinical practice. PMID:26491377

  5. Obesity, Islet Cell Autoimmunity, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth at Onset of Type 1 Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cedillo, Maribel; Arena, Vincent C.; Zhou, Lei; Trucco, Massimo; Ize-Ludlow, Diego; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Becker, Dorothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The current increase in childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and obesity has led to two conflicting hypotheses and conflicting reports regarding the effects of overweight on initiation and spreading of islet cell autoimmunity vs earlier clinical manifestation of preexisting autoimmune β-cell damage driven by excess weight. Objective: The objective of the study was to address the question of whether the degree of β-cell autoimmunity and age are related to overweight at diabetes onset in a large cohort of T1D youth. Design: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of youth with autoimmune T1D consecutively recruited at diabetes onset. Setting: The study was conducted at a regional academic pediatric diabetes center. Patients: Two hundred sixty-three consecutive children younger than 19 years at onset of T1D participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures: Relationships between body mass index and central obesity (waist circumference and waist to height ratio) and antigen spreading (islet cell autoantibody number), age, and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors examined at onset and/or 3 months after the diagnosis were measured. Results: There were no significant associations between number of autoantibodies with measures of adiposity. Age relationships revealed that a greater proportion of those with central obesity (21%) were in the youngest age group (0–4 y) compared with those without central obesity (6%) (P = .001). Patients with central obesity had increased CVD risk factors and higher onset C-peptide levels (P < .05). Conclusions: No evidence was found to support the concept that obesity accelerates progression of autoantibody spreading once autoimmunity, marked by standard islet cell autoantibody assays, is present. Central obesity was present in almost one-third of the subjects and was associated with early CVD risk markers already at onset. PMID:25250632

  6. Added sugars and risk factors for obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Rippe, J M; Angelopoulos, T J

    2016-03-01

    The effects of added sugars on various chronic conditions are highly controversial. Some investigators have argued that added sugars increase the risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, few randomized controlled trials are available to support these assertions. The literature is further complicated by animal studies, as well as studies which compare pure fructose to pure glucose (neither of which is consumed to any appreciable degree in the human diet) and studies where large doses of added sugars beyond normal levels of human consumption have been administered. Various scientific and public health organizations have offered disparate recommendations for upper limits of added sugar. In this article, we will review recent randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies. We conclude that the normal added sugars in the human diet (for example, sucrose, high-fructose corn syrup and isoglucose) when consumed within the normal range of normal human consumption or substituted isoenergetically for other carbohydrates, do not appear to cause a unique risk of obesity, diabetes or cardiovascular disease. PMID:27001643

  7. Underreporting of energy intake and associated factors in a Latino population at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Olendzki, Barbara C; Ma, Yunsheng; Hébert, James R; Pagoto, Sherry L; Merriam, Philip A; Rosal, Milagros C; Ockene, Ira S

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of underreporting of total energy intake and associated factors in a low-income, low-literacy, predominantly Caribbean Latino community in Lawrence, MA. Two hundred fifteen Latinos participated in a diabetes prevention study, for which eligibility included a >or=30% risk of developing diabetes in 7.5 years. Dietary self-reported energy intake was assessed using three randomly selected days of 24-hour diet recalls. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) was estimated using the Mifflin-St Jeor equation. Underreporting was determined by computing a ratio of energy intake to BMR, with a ratio of 1.55 expected for sedentary populations. Linear regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with underreporting (energy intake:BMR ratio). The population was predominately women (77%), middle-aged (mean 52+/-11 years), obese (78% had a body mass index >or=30); low-literate (62% < high school education), unemployed (57% reported no job), married or living with partner (52%), and some had a family history of diabetes (37% had siblings with diabetes). Reported total daily energy intake was 1,540+/-599 kcal, whereas estimated BMR was 1,495.7+/-245.1 kcal/day. When multiplied by an activity factor (1.20 for sedentariness), expected energy intake was 1,794+/-294.0 per day, indicating underreporting by an average of 254 kcal/day. Mean energy intake:BMR was 1.03+/-0.37, and was lower for participants with higher body mass index, siblings with diabetes, sedentary lifestyle, and those who were unemployed. Energy intake underreporting is prevalent in this low-income, low-literacy Caribbean Latino population. Future studies are needed to develop dietary assessment measures that minimize underreporting in this population.

  8. Re-amputation after minor foot amputation in diabetic patients: Risk factors leading to limb loss

    PubMed Central

    Nerone, Vincent S.; Springer, Kevin D.; Atway, Said

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury in diabetic patients has been a recent topic of interest in published studies. Previous studies have shown increased complications in diabetic patients compared with nondiabetic controls who have sustained these injuries. A paucity of research has been devoted to foot-specific diabetic burn injury. We present a case series evaluating the mechanisms and complications of diabetic foot burns. PMID:23419696

  9. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Territory of Guam: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, James W; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the US Territory of Guam and describes the burdens due to NCD, with an emphasis on diabetes; and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been an increase of 2.6% in the total population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity. The leading causes of death include heart disease, cancer, and cerebrovascular accidents. Population surveys show that 9.1% of the adult population in 2009 reported being diagnosed with diabetes. Other data reports show that of the adults, 35.4% were overweight and 25.9% were obese; and among youth, 30% were overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address NCDs and diabetes. There is no Territory-wide health plan to address the prevention and control of NCDs including diabetes. There are no common standards of care or policy and procedures that are used by all the various medical and health care providers. Based on these findings, priority issues and needs were identified for the administrative and clinical systems. PMID:23900408

  10. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Territory of Guam: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Gillan, James W; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the US Territory of Guam and describes the burdens due to NCD, with an emphasis on diabetes; and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been an increase of 2.6% in the total population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity. The leading causes of death include heart disease, cancer, and cerebrovascular accidents. Population surveys show that 9.1% of the adult population in 2009 reported being diagnosed with diabetes. Other data reports show that of the adults, 35.4% were overweight and 25.9% were obese; and among youth, 30% were overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address NCDs and diabetes. There is no Territory-wide health plan to address the prevention and control of NCDs including diabetes. There are no common standards of care or policy and procedures that are used by all the various medical and health care providers. Based on these findings, priority issues and needs were identified for the administrative and clinical systems.

  11. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view.

  12. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. PMID:24602600

  13. Is the C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene or plasma homocysteine a risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese individuals?

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Hong, Tianpei

    2012-10-25

    The present study enrolled 251 diabetic patients, including 101 with neuropathy and 150 without neuropathy. Of the 150 patients, 100 had no complications, such as retinopathy, nephropathy, or neuropathy. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to identify methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene variants. Plasma homocysteine levels were also measured. Homocysteine levels and the frequency of hyperhomocysteinemia were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with diabetic patients without neuropathy (P < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis with neuropathy as the dependent variable, the frequency of C677T in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy compared with patients without diabetic complications. Homocysteine levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy carrying the 677T allele and low folic acid levels. In conclusion, hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for diabetic neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes. The C677T polymorphism in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and low folic acid levels may be risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in Chinese patients with diabetes.

  14. Risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: a hospital-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Pemayun, Tjokorda Gde Dalem; Naibaho, Ridho M.; Novitasari, Diana; Amin, Nurmilawati; Minuljo, Tania Tedjo

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) may cause significant morbidity and lower extremity amputation (LEA) due to diabetic foot problems can occur more often compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to use an epidemiological design to determine and to quantify the risk factors of subsequent amputation in hospitalized DFU patients. Methods We performed a hospital-based, case–control study of 47 DFU patients with LEA and 47 control DFU patients without LEA. The control subjects were matched to cases in respect to age (±5 years), sex, and nutritional status, with ratio of 1:1. This study was conducted in Dr. Kariadi General Hospital Semarang between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients’ demographical data and all risk factors-related information were collected from clinical records using a short structural chart. Using LEA as the outcome variable, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. Univariate and stepwise logistic regression analyses were used to assess the independent effect of selected risk factors associated with LEA. The data were analyzed in SPSS version 21. Results There were 47 case–control pairs, all of which were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seven potential independent variables show a promise of influence, the latter being defined as p≤0.15 upon univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression identified levels of HbA1c ≥8% (OR 20.47, 95% CI 3.12–134.31; p=0.002), presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (OR 12.97, 95% CI 3.44–48.88; p<0.001), hypertriglyceridemia (OR 5.58, 95% CI 1.74–17.91; p=0.004), and hypertension (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.14–11.79; p=0.028) as the independent risk factors associated with subsequent LEA in DFU. Conclusions Several risk factors for LEA were identified. We found that HbA1c ≥8%, PAD, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension have been recognized as the predictors of LEA in this study. Good glycemic

  15. Postdinner resistance exercise improves postprandial risk factors more effectively than predinner resistance exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D.; Winn, Nathan C.; Mari, Andrea; Booth, Frank W.; Rector, R. Scott; Thyfault, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormally elevated postprandial glucose and triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations are risk factors for cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes. The most effective time to exercise to lower postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations is unknown. Thus the aim of this study was to determine what time is more effective, either pre- or postdinner resistance exercise (RE), at improving postprandial risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Thirteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes completed three trials in a random order in which they consumed a dinner meal with 1) no RE (NoRE), 2) predinner RE (RE → M), and 3) postdinner RE beginning 45 min after dinner (M → RE). Clinical outcome measures included postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations. In addition, postprandial acetaminophen (gastric emptying), endocrine responses, free fatty acids, and β-cell function (mathematical modeling) were measured to determine whether these factors were related to changes in glucose and TAG. The TAG incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was ∼92% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M, an effect due in part to lower very-low-density lipoprotein-1 TAG concentrations. The glucose iAUC was reduced (P = 0.02) by ∼18 and 30% during the RE → M and M → RE trials, respectively, compared with NoRE, with no difference between RE trials. RE → M and M → RE reduced the insulin iAUC by 35 and 48%, respectively, compared with NoRE (P < 0.01). The glucagon-like peptide-1 iAUC was ∼50% lower (P ≤ 0.02) during M → RE compared with NoRE and RE → M. Given that predinner RE only improves postprandial glucose concentrations, whereas postdinner RE improves both postprandial glucose and TAG concentrations, postdinner RE may lower the risk of cardiovascular disease more effectively. PMID:25539939

  16. Influence of diabetes mellitus and risk factors in activating latent tuberculosis infection: a case for targeted screening in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Swarna Nantha, Y

    2012-10-01

    A review of the epidemiology of tuberculosis, its contributing risk factors (excluding HIV) and the role of screening latent tuberculosis infection in Malaysia was done. Despite the global and domestic decrease in prevalence rates of tuberculosis in the past decade, there is an alarming increase in the trend of non communicable diseases in the country. High prevalence rates of major risk factors leading to reactivation of tuberculosis were seen within the population, with diabetes mellitus being in the forefront. The rising numbers in the ageing population of Malaysia poses a further threat of re-emergence of tuberculosis in the years to come. Economically, screening of diabetic patients with comorbidities for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using two major techniques, namely tuberculin sensitivity (TST) and Interferon gamma release assay tests (IGRA) could be a viable option. The role of future research in the detection of LTBI in the Malaysian setting might be necessary to gauge the disease reservoir before implementing prophylactic measures for high risk groups involved.

  17. Four-year analysis of cardiovascular disease risk factors, depression symptoms, and antidepressant medicine use in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) clinical trial of weight loss in diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE To study the association of depressive symptoms or antidepressant medicine (ADM) use with subsequent cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor status in the Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) trial of weight loss in type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (n = 5,1...

  18. Is Risk Factor-based Screening Good Enough to Detect Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in High-Risk Pregnant Women? A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Meththananda Herath, H. M.; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Weerasinghe, Nayani Prasangika

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a long lasting dilemma over the ideal screening and diagnostic method in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Even though universal screening is commonly practiced, selective screening based on risk factors is also practiced in some center. The aim of this study is to evaluate the most appropriate method to screen GDM in high-risk pregnant women in Sri Lanka. Methods: This study was a clinic-based, cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary referral center, Sri Lanka. All women underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of gestation. Diagnosis of GDM was made according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results: With universal screening using IADPSG criteria, 23.2% (105/452) were found to have GDM and with risk factor-based screening 20.1% (91/452) were detected to have GDM. The prevalence of GDM dropped to 18.1% when GDM was diagnosed using the WHO criteria with universal screening approach. It was further dropped to 15.7% when the WHO criteria were used along with risk factors-based screening approach. Conclusions: The IADPSG criteria labeled considerably higher number of women as having GDM compared to the WHO criteria. With regards to the screening methods, the risk-based screening had a lower detection rate of GDM; however, it reduced the necessity of screening of women by around 20%.

  19. Is Risk Factor-based Screening Good Enough to Detect Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in High-Risk Pregnant Women? A Sri Lankan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Meththananda Herath, H. M.; Weerarathna, Thilak Priyantha; Weerasinghe, Nayani Prasangika

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a long lasting dilemma over the ideal screening and diagnostic method in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Even though universal screening is commonly practiced, selective screening based on risk factors is also practiced in some center. The aim of this study is to evaluate the most appropriate method to screen GDM in high-risk pregnant women in Sri Lanka. Methods: This study was a clinic-based, cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary referral center, Sri Lanka. All women underwent 75 g oral glucose tolerance test at 24–28 weeks of gestation. Diagnosis of GDM was made according to the International Association of the Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results: With universal screening using IADPSG criteria, 23.2% (105/452) were found to have GDM and with risk factor-based screening 20.1% (91/452) were detected to have GDM. The prevalence of GDM dropped to 18.1% when GDM was diagnosed using the WHO criteria with universal screening approach. It was further dropped to 15.7% when the WHO criteria were used along with risk factors-based screening approach. Conclusions: The IADPSG criteria labeled considerably higher number of women as having GDM compared to the WHO criteria. With regards to the screening methods, the risk-based screening had a lower detection rate of GDM; however, it reduced the necessity of screening of women by around 20%. PMID:27625764

  20. Change in cardiovascular risk factors following early diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a cohort analysis of a cluster-randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Black, James A; Sharp, Stephen J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Sandbæk, Annelli; Rutten, Guy EHM; Lauritzen, Torsten; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Griffin, Simon J; Simmons, Rebecca K

    2014-01-01

    Background There is little evidence to inform the targeted treatment of individuals found early in the diabetes disease trajectory. Aim To describe cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profiles and treatment of individual CVD risk factors by modelled CVD risk at diagnosis; changes in treatment, modelled CVD risk, and CVD risk factors in the 5 years following diagnosis; and how these are patterned by socioeconomic status. Design and setting Cohort analysis of a cluster-randomised trial (ADDITION-Europe) in general practices in Denmark, England, and the Netherlands. Method A total of 2418 individuals with screen-detected diabetes were divided into quartiles of modelled 10-year CVD risk at diagnosis. Changes in treatment, modelled CVD risk, and CVD risk factors were assessed at 5 years. Results The largest reductions in risk factors and modelled CVD risk were seen in participants who were in the highest quartile of modelled risk at baseline, suggesting that treatment was offered appropriately. Participants in the lowest quartile of risk at baseline had very similar levels of modelled CVD risk at 5 years and showed the least variation in change in modelled risk. No association was found between socioeconomic status and changes in CVD risk factors, suggesting that treatment was equitable. Conclusion Diabetes management requires setting of individualised attainable targets. This analysis provides a reference point for patients, clinicians, and policymakers when considering goals for changes in risk factors early in the course of the disease that account for the diverse cardiometabolic profile present in individuals who are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. PMID:24686885

  1. Comatose and noncomatose adult diabetic ketoacidosis patients at the University Teaching Hospital, Zambia: Clinical profiles, risk factors, and mortality outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kakusa, Mwanja; Kamanga, Brown; Ngalamika, Owen; Nyirenda, Soka

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is one of the commonly encountered diabetes mellitus emergencies. Aim: This study aimed at describing the clinical profiles and hospitalization outcomes of DKA patients at the University Teaching Hospital (UTH) in Lusaka, Zambia and to investigate the role of coma on mortality outcome. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of hospitalized DKA patients at UTH. The data collected included clinical presentation, precipitating factors, laboratory profiles, complications, and hospitalization outcomes. Primary outcome measured was all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results: The median age was 40 years. Treatment noncompliance was the single highest identified risk factor for development of DKA, followed by new detection of diabetes, then infections. Comatose patients were significantly younger, had lower baseline blood pressure readings, and higher baseline respiratory rates compared to noncomatose patients. In addition, comatose patients had higher baseline admission random blood glucose readings. Their baseline sodium and chloride levels were also higher. The prevalences of hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia were also higher among comatose patients compared to noncomatose patients. Development of aspiration during admission with DKA, pneumonia at baseline, development of renal failure, and altered mental status were associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure was independently predictive of mortality. Conclusion: The mortality rate from DKA hospitalizations is high at UTH. Treatment noncompliance is the single highest identifiable precipitant of DKA. Aspiration, development of renal failure, altered sensorium, and pneumonia at baseline are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Development of renal failure during admission is predictive of mortality. PMID:27042416

  2. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali; Danaei, Goodarz; Sichieri, Rosely; Monteiro, Carlos A; Louzada, Maria L. C.; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes in Brazil in 2010. Information on national diets and metabolic risks were obtained from the Brazilian Household Budget Survey, the Food and Agriculture Organization database, and large observational studies including Brazilian adults. Relative risks for each risk factor were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized trials or prospective cohort studies; and disease-specific mortality from the GBD 2010 database. We quantified uncertainty using probabilistic simulation analyses, incorporating uncertainty in dietary and metabolic data and relative risks by age and sex. Robustness of findings was evaluated by sensitivity to varying feasible optimal levels of each risk factor. Results In 2010, high systolic blood pressure (SBP) and suboptimal diet were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths in Brazil, responsible for 214,263 deaths (95% uncertainty interval [UI]: 195,073 to 233,936) and 202,949 deaths (95% UI: 194,322 to 211,747), respectively. Among individual dietary factors, low intakes of fruits and whole grains and high intakes of sodium were the largest contributors to cardiometabolic deaths. For premature cardiometabolic deaths (before age 70 years, representing 40% of cardiometabolic deaths), the leading risk factors were suboptimal diet (104,169 deaths; 95% UI: 99,964 to 108,002), high SBP (98,923 deaths; 95%UI: 92,912 to 104,609) and high body-mass index (BMI) (42,643 deaths; 95%UI: 40,161 to 45,111). Conclusion suboptimal diet, high SBP, and high

  3. Incidence and risk factors for diabetes, hypertension and obesity after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anastácio, Lucilene Rezende; Ribeiro, Hélem de Sena; Ferreira, Livia García; Lima, Agnaldo Soares; Vilela, Eduardo García; Toulson Davisson Correia, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Los trastornos metabólicos han sido ampliamente descritos en los pacientes sometidos al transplante hepático (TH). Material y métodos: La incidencia de hipertensión arterial, diabetes mellitus y obesidad además de los factores de riesgo se evaluaron en 144 pacientes post-TH al menos un año después del trasplante (59% hombres, edad promedio 54 años, mediana del tiempo desde el trasplante 4 años). Los factores de riesgo se evaluaron mediante análisis de regresión logística de acuerdo con variables demográficas, socioeconómicas, estilo de vida, así como variables clínicas, antropométricas y dietéticas. Resultados: La incidencia de hipertensión fue del 18,9%, la diabetes, el 14,0% y la obesidad, el 15,9%. Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de la hipertensión fueron la obesidad abdominal (OR: 2,36, IC: 1,02-5,43, p < 0,05), los antecedentes familiares de hipertensión arterial (OR: 2,75, IC: 1,06-7,19, p < 0,05) y el uso de la ciclosporina (OR: 3,92, IC: 1,05-14,70, p < 0,05). Los factores de riesgo para la incidencia de diabetes fueron niveles más altos de glucosa en ayuno (mg/dL) pre-TH (OR: 1,04, IC: 1,01-1,06, p < 0,05) y el diagnóstico de cirrosis alcohólica como indicación de TH (OR: 2,54, IC: 0,84-7,72, p < 0,05). La incidencia de obesidad después del TH se relacionó con el bajo consumo de la leche (mL) (OR: 1,01, IC: 1,001-10,01, p < 0,05), donante con IMC más grande (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,34, IC: 1,04-1,74; p < 0,05), mayor índice de masa corporal antes de la enfermedad hepática (kg/m(2)) (OR: 1,79, IC: 1,36-2,36, p < 0,01) y ingreso per cápita dos veces el sueldo mínimo (OR: 5,71, IC: 4,51- 6,86, p < 0,05). Conclusión: El TH se asoció con tasas significativamente más altas de hipertensión, diabetes y obesidad. La incidencia de estos trastornos se relacionó con la terapia inmunosupresora y otros factores de riesgo que comunes en la población general.

  4. Outcomes of Combined Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management Strategies in Type 2 Diabetes: The ACCORD Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Karen L.; O’Connor, Patrick J.; Morgan, Timothy M.; Buse, John B.; Cohen, Robert M.; Cushman, William C.; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Evans, Gregory W.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Grimm, Richard H.; Lipkin, Edward W.; Narayan, K.M.Venkat; Riddle, Matthew C.; Sood, Ajay; Goff, David C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare effects of combinations of standard and intensive treatment of glycemia and either blood pressure (BP) or lipids in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS ACCORD enrolled 10,251 type 2 diabetes patients aged 40–79 years at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Participants were randomly assigned to hemoglobin A1c goals of <6.0% (<42 mmol/mol; intensive glycemia) or 7.0–7.9% (53–63 mmol/mol; standard glycemia) and then randomized a second time to either 1) systolic BP goals of <120 mmHg (intensive BP) or <140 mmHg (standard BP) or 2) simvastatin plus fenofibrate (intensive lipid) or simvastatin plus placebo (standard lipid). Proportional hazards models were used to assess combinations of treatment assignments on the composite primary (deaths due to CVD, nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and nonfatal stroke) and secondary outcomes. RESULTS In the BP trial, risk of the primary outcome was lower in the groups intensively treated for glycemia (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67; 95% CI 0.50–0.91), BP (HR 0.74; 95% CI 0.55–1.00), or both (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.52–0.96) compared with combined standard BP and glycemia treatment. For secondary outcomes, MI was significantly reduced by intensive glycemia treatment and stroke by intensive BP treatment; most other HRs were neutral or favored intensive treatment groups. In the lipid trial, the general pattern of results showed no evidence of benefit of intensive regimens (whether single or combined) compared with combined standard lipid and glycemia treatment. The mortality HR was 1.33 (95% CI 1.02–1.74) in the standard lipid/intensive glycemia group compared with the standard lipid/standard glycemia group. CONCLUSIONS In the ACCORD BP trial, compared with combined standard treatment, intensive BP or intensive glycemia treatment alone improved major CVD outcomes, without additional benefit from combining the two. In the ACCORD lipid

  5. Angiogenin gene polymorphism: A risk factor for diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the northern Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Fan, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yingshuang

    2013-12-25

    Angiogenin is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Here, we quenced the coding region of the angiogenin gene in genomic DNA from 207 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (129 diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and 78 diabetic non-neuropathy patients) and 268 healthy controls. All subjects were from the Han population of northern China. No mutations were found. We then compared the genotype and allele frequencies of the angiogenin synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism rs11701 between the diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients and controls, and between the diabetic neuropathy and non-neuropathy patients, using a case-control design. We detected no statistically significant genetic associations. Angiogenin may not be associated with genetic susceptibility to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the Han population of northern China.

  6. Acute Myocardial Infarction Is a Risk Factor for New Onset Diabetes in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Soo; Chung, Woo Baek; Choi, Yun Seok; Kim, Pum Joon; Lee, Jong Min; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Hee Yeol; Yoo, Ki Dong; Song, Ki-Ho; Chung, Wook Sung; Seung, Ki Bae; Lee, Man Young; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that acute myocardial infarction (AMI) might accelerate development of new onset diabetes in patients with coronary artery disease independent of known risk factors. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study within COACT (CathOlic medical center percutAneous Coronary inTervention) registry. From a total of 9,127 subjects, 2,036 subjects were diabetes naïve and followed up for at least one year with both index and follow-up laboratory data about diabetes. Cox proportional hazard model was used to derive hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for new onset diabetes associated with AMI in univariate and multivariate analysis after adjusting several covariates. Results The overall hazard for diabetes was higher in AMI compared to non-AMI patients (p by log rank <0.01) with HR of 1.78 and 95% CI of 1.37–2.32 in univariate analysis. This association remained significant after adjusting covariates (HR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.14–2.07; p<0.01). AMI was an independent predictor for higher quartile of WBC count in multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis (OR, 6.75; 95% CI, 5.53–8.22, p<0.01). In subgroup analysis, the diabetogenic effect of AMI was more prominent in the subgroup without MetS compared to MetS patients (p for interaction<0.05). Compared to the reference group of non-AMI+nonMetS, the group of AMI+non-MetS (HR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.58–3.76), non-AMI+MetS (HR, 3.42; 95% CI, 2.34–4.98) and AMI+MetS (HR, 4.12; 95% CI, 2.67–6.36) showed higher HR after adjusting covariates. However, the hazard was not different between the non-AMI+MetS and AMI+non-MetS groups. Conclusions AMI patients have a greater risk of new-onset diabetes when compared to non AMI patients, especially those with mild metabolic abnormalities. PMID:26295946

  7. Biomechanical risk factors for tripping during obstacle--Crossing with the trailing limb in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ming-Wei; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2016-03-01

    People with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) are at a high risk of falling especially during more challenging locomotor tasks such as obstacle-crossing. The current study aimed to identify the risk factors for tripping in these patients during trailing-limb obstacle-crossing. Fourteen patients with type II DM with or without mild peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 14 healthy controls walked and crossed obstacles of three different heights while their motion data were measured using a motion capture system and two forceplates. The DM group was found to cross obstacles with significantly reduced trailing toe clearance (p<0.05), increasing the probability of the foot hitting the obstacle, and thus the risk of tripping. This altered end-point control was associated with significantly reduced knee flexion and hip adduction of the trailing swing limb (p<0.05), as well as significantly increased ankle plantarflexor moments in the leading stance limb (p<0.05). Therefore, reduced knee flexion and hip adduction of the swing limb are identified as risk factors for tripping during obstacle-crossing. Increased mechanical demands on the ankle plantarflexors suggest that weakness of these muscles may further reduce the already compromised performance of obstacle-crossing in these patients. The current results showed that obstacle-crossing can be used to detect gait deviations and to identify the associated risk of tripping in patients with type II DM without or at an early stage of PN.

  8. Biomechanical risk factors for tripping during obstacle--Crossing with the trailing limb in patients with type II diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ming-Wei; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2016-03-01

    People with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) are at a high risk of falling especially during more challenging locomotor tasks such as obstacle-crossing. The current study aimed to identify the risk factors for tripping in these patients during trailing-limb obstacle-crossing. Fourteen patients with type II DM with or without mild peripheral neuropathy (PN) and 14 healthy controls walked and crossed obstacles of three different heights while their motion data were measured using a motion capture system and two forceplates. The DM group was found to cross obstacles with significantly reduced trailing toe clearance (p<0.05), increasing the probability of the foot hitting the obstacle, and thus the risk of tripping. This altered end-point control was associated with significantly reduced knee flexion and hip adduction of the trailing swing limb (p<0.05), as well as significantly increased ankle plantarflexor moments in the leading stance limb (p<0.05). Therefore, reduced knee flexion and hip adduction of the swing limb are identified as risk factors for tripping during obstacle-crossing. Increased mechanical demands on the ankle plantarflexors suggest that weakness of these muscles may further reduce the already compromised performance of obstacle-crossing in these patients. The current results showed that obstacle-crossing can be used to detect gait deviations and to identify the associated risk of tripping in patients with type II DM without or at an early stage of PN. PMID:26979890

  9. Cardiovascular Risk Factors (Diabetes, Hypertension, Hypercholesterolemia and Metabolic Syndrome) in Older People with Intellectual Disability: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia and the metabolic syndrome are important risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In older people with intellectual disability (ID), CVD is a substantial morbidity risk. The aims of the present study, which was part of the Healthy Ageing in Intellectual Disability (HA-ID) study, were (1) to…

  10. Predictive factors of diabetic complications: a possible link between family history of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was assessment of predictive factors of diabetic retinopathy. Methods A cross-sectional study was designed by recruiting 1228 type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes referral clinic over a six-month period (from July to December, 2012). Diabetes risk factors, complications, laboratory results have been recorded. Results Of the 1228 diabetic patients (54% women, mean age 58.48 ± 9.94 years), prevalence of diabetes retinopathy was 26.6%. There were significant associations between retinopathy and family history of diabetes (p = 0.04), hypertension (p = 0.0001), diabetic duration (p = 0.0001), poor glycemic control (p = 0.0001) and age of onset of diabetes (p = 0.0001). However, no significant associations were found between retinopathy with dyslipidemia and obesity. In logistic regression model, poor glycemic control (p = 0.014), hypertension (p = 0.0001), duration of diabetes (p = 0.0001) and family history of diabetes (p = 0.012) independently predicted retinopathy after adjustment for age and sex. Conclusions Diabetic complications are resulting from an interaction from genes and environmental factors. A family history of diabetes is pointing toward a possible genetic and epigenetic basis for diabetic retinopathy. Our findings suggest the role of epigenetic modifications and metabolic memory in diabetic retinopathy in subjects with family history of diabetes. PMID:24860795

  11. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A; Levitt, Naomi S; Cohen, Karen

    2016-03-01

    Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern African cohort commencing NNRTI-based first-line ART. Our cohort included HIV-infected adults starting NNRTI-based ART in a private sector HIV disease management program from January 2002 to December 2011. Incident diabetes was identified by the initiation of diabetes treatment. Patients with prevalent diabetes were excluded. We included 56,298 patients with 113,297 patient-years of follow-up (PYFU) on first-line ART. The crude incidence of diabetes was 13.24 per 1000 PYFU. Treatment with efavirenz rather than nevirapine was associated with increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-1.46)) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline CD4 count, viral load, NRTI backbone, and exposure to other diabetogenic medicines. Zidovudine and stavudine exposure were also associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. We found that treatment with efavirenz, as well as stavudine and zidovudine, increased the risk of incident diabetes. Interventions to detect and prevent diabetes should be implemented in ART programs, and use of antiretrovirals with lower risk of metabolic complications should be encouraged. PMID:26945366

  12. Risk Factors for Incident Diabetes in a Cohort Taking First-Line Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Karamchand, Sumanth; Leisegang, Rory; Schomaker, Michael; Maartens, Gary; Walters, Lourens; Hislop, Michael; Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Cohen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efavirenz is the preferred nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens in low- and middle-income countries, where the prevalence of diabetes is increasing. Randomized control trials have shown mild increases in plasma glucose in participants in the efavirenz arms, but no association has been reported with overt diabetes. We explored the association between efavirenz exposure and incident diabetes in a large Southern African cohort commencing NNRTI-based first-line ART. Our cohort included HIV-infected adults starting NNRTI-based ART in a private sector HIV disease management program from January 2002 to December 2011. Incident diabetes was identified by the initiation of diabetes treatment. Patients with prevalent diabetes were excluded. We included 56,298 patients with 113,297 patient-years of follow-up (PYFU) on first-line ART. The crude incidence of diabetes was 13.24 per 1000 PYFU. Treatment with efavirenz rather than nevirapine was associated with increased risk of developing diabetes (hazard ratio 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–1.46)) in a multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, baseline CD4 count, viral load, NRTI backbone, and exposure to other diabetogenic medicines. Zidovudine and stavudine exposure were also associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes. We found that treatment with efavirenz, as well as stavudine and zidovudine, increased the risk of incident diabetes. Interventions to detect and prevent diabetes should be implemented in ART programs, and use of antiretrovirals with lower risk of metabolic complications should be encouraged. PMID:26945366

  13. Diet, lifestyle, and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetes: a review from the Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological evidence collected from three large US cohorts (Nurses’ Health Study, Nurses’ Health Study 2, and Health Professionals’ Follow-up Study) has yielded important information regarding the roles of overall diet, individual foods and nutrients, physical activity and other lifestyle factors in the development of type 2 diabetes. Excess adiposity is a major risk factor for diabetes, and thus, maintaining a healthy body weight and avoidance of weight gain during adulthood is the cornerstone of diabetes prevention. Independent of body weight, the quality or type of dietary fat and carbohydrate is more crucial than the quantity in determining diabetes risk. Higher consumption of coffee, whole grains, fruits, and nuts is associated with lower risk of diabetes, whereas regular consumption of refined grains, red and processed meats, and sugar-sweetened beverages including fruits juices is associated with increased risk. Dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and nuts and legumes but lower in red and processed meats, refined grains, and sugar-sweetened beverages are consistently associated with diabetes risk, even after adjustment for body mass index. The genome-wide association studies conducted in these cohorts have contributed substantially to the discoveries of novel genetic loci for type 2 diabetes and other metabolic traits, although the identified common variants explain only a small proportion of overall diabetes predisposition. Taken together, these ongoing large cohort studies have provided convincing epidemiologic evidence that a healthy diet, together with regular physical activity, maintenance of a healthy weight, moderate alcohol consumption, and avoidance of sedentary behaviors and smoking would prevent the majority of type 2 diabetes cases. PMID:25599007

  14. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Nóra; Nagy, Géza; Németh, Helga; Somogyi, Anikó; Hosszufalusi, Nóra; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3' UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3' UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function.

  15. Prevalence of Lipohypertrophy and Associated Risk Factors in Insulin-Treated Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al Ajlouni, Mo’men; Abujbara, Mousa; Batieha, Anwar; Ajlouni, Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Secondary failure of oral hypoglycemic agents is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); thus, patients often need insulin therapy. The most common complication of insulin treatment is lipohypertrophy (LH). Objectives: This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of LH among insulin-treated patients with Patients with T2DM, to identify the risk factors for the development of LH, and to examine the association between LH and glycemic control. Patients and Methods: A total of 1090 patients with T2DM aged 20 to 89 years, who attended the diabetes clinics at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Genetics (NCDEG, Amman, Jordan) between October 2011 and January 2012, were enrolled. The presence of LH was examined by inspection and palpation of insulin injection sites at the time of the visit as relevant clinical and laboratory data were obtained. The LH was defined as a local tumor-like swelling of subcutaneous fatty tissue at the site of repeated insulin injections. Results: The overall prevalence of LH was 37.3% (27.4% grade 1, 9.7% grade 2, and 0.2% grade 3). The LH was significantly associated with the duration of diabetes, needle length, duration of insulin therapy, lack of systematic rotation of insulin injection sites, and poor glycemic control. Conclusions: The LH is a common problem in insulin-treated Jordanian patients with T2DM. More efforts are needed to educate patients and health workers on simple interventions such as using shorter needles and frequent rotation of the insulin injection sites to avoid LH and improve glycemic control. PMID:25926852

  16. Continuing Disparities in Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Complications Between Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australians With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Timothy M.E.; Hunt, Kerry; McAullay, Daniel; Chubb, Stephen A.P.; Sillars, Brett A.; Bruce, David G.; Davis, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether disparities in the nature and management of type 2 diabetes persist between Aboriginal and the majority Anglo-Celt patients in an urban Australian community. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Baseline data from the observational Fremantle Diabetes Study collected from 1993 to 1996 (phase I) and from 2008 to 2011 (phase II) were analyzed. Patients characterized as Aboriginal or Anglo-Celt by self-report and supporting data underwent comprehensive assessment, including questionnaires, examination, and biochemical testing in a single laboratory. Generalized linear modeling with age/sex adjustment was used to examine differences in changes in variables in the two groups between phases I and II. RESULTS The indigenous participants were younger at entry and at diabetes diagnosis than the Anglo-Celt participants in both phases. They were also less likely to be educated beyond primary level and were more likely to be smokers. HbA1c decreased in both groups over time (Aboriginal median 9.6% [interquartile range 7.8–10.7%] to 8.4% [6.6–10.6%] vs. Anglo-Celt median 7.1% [6.2–8.4%] to 6.7% [6.2–7.5%]), but the gap persisted (P = 0.65 for difference between phases I and II by ethnic group). Aboriginal patients were more likely to have microvascular disease in both phases. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (ankle-brachial index ≤0.90 or lower-extremity amputation) increased in Aboriginal but decreased in Anglo-Celt participants (15.8–29.7 vs. 30.7–21.5%; P = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS Diabetes management has improved for Aboriginal and Anglo-Celt Australian patients, but disparities in cardiovascular risk factors and complications persist. PMID:22815295

  17. Risk factors for development of microalbuminuria in insulin dependent diabetic patients: a cohort study. Microalbuminuria Collaborative Study Group, United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the risk factors for the development of persistent microalbuminuria in insulin dependent diabetic patients. DESIGN--Four year follow up of a cohort of diabetic patients. SETTING--Outpatient departments of teaching and district general hospitals in England. SUBJECTS--148 non-microalbuminuric, non-hypertensive insulin dependent diabetic patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Urinary albumin excretion rate and arterial blood pressure. RESULTS--137 patients completed four year follow up, of whom 11 developed persistent microalbumin-uria (albumin excretion rate > or = 30 micrograms/min on at least two consecutive occasions), giving a cumulative frequency of 8%. 103 remained normoalbuminuric and 23 exhibited intermittent microalbuminuria. At baseline the persistent microalbuminuric group had had significantly raised blood pressure (mean 137.9 (SD 14.9)/82.3 (7.6) v 123.5 (13.2)/72.8 (9.1) mm Hg), glycated haemoglobin concentration 10.4% (2.0%) v 8-9% (2.0%), and albumin excretion rate (median (interquartile range) 17.5 (13.0-22.3) v 4.8 (3.7-6.7) micrograms/min) (p < 0.05 for all) compared with the normo-albuminuric group. Blood pressure and glycated haemoglobin remained significantly higher in the persistent microalbuminuric group throughout the study (p < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed initial albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, and smoking to be significant determinants of persistent microalbuminuria (p < 0.02). CONCLUSION--In insulin dependent diabetic patients with poor glucose control, which may initially increase albumin excretion rate, an early rise of arterial pressure and smoking are implicated in the development of persistent microalbuminuria. Images p1237-a PMID:8499853

  18. Type 2 diabetes mellitus might be a risk factor for mild cognitive impairment progressing to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Shifu

    2016-01-01

    Background Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the prodromal stage of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), so identification of the related risk factors can be helpful. Although the association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and these modest changes in cognition is well established, whether T2DM will promote the transformation of MCI into AD is not a unified conclusion. Objective This study aims to explore the relationship between T2DM and MCI in the elderly population living in the community in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China. Methods A total of 197 participants were included in the study. They were screened for T2DM, hyperlipidemia, traumatic brain injury, and family history of dementia. The Mini-Mental State Examination and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment were used to assess cognitive function. The diagnosis of AD was made according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, whereas the diagnosis of MCI was made according to Petersen’s criteria. Then, we investigated the relation between T2DM and MCI. Results A total of 82 (41.6%) participants had no cognitive impairment, 82 (41.6%) participants had MCI, and 33 (16.8%) participants had AD. Multivariate logistic regression models demonstrated that T2DM was a risk factor for AD (odds ratio =49.723, 95% CI =21.173–111.987). Conclusion T2DM might be a risk factor for MCI progressing into AD. PMID:27729793

  19. Cardiovascular risk factors, micro and macrovascular complications at diagnosis in patients with young onset type 2 diabetes in India: CINDI 2

    PubMed Central

    Sosale, Bhavana; Sosale, Aravind R.; Mohan, Anjana R.; Kumar, Prassanna M.; Saboo, Banshi; Kandula, Sai

    2016-01-01

    Context: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in young adults is increasing in India. Data on the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and complications associated with young-onset T2DM (YOD) at the time of diagnosis of diabetes are limited. This data can aid in aggressive diabetes management, CV risk reduction, and prevention of complications. Aim: To determine the prevalence of CV risk factors, micro and macrovascular complications in patients with newly diagnosed YOD. To assess the percentage of patients who require statin therapy based on current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study of 1500 patients with newly detected YOD across seven centers from 2013 to 2015. Designs and Methods: Patients were evaluated for complications of diabetes and CV risk factors such as body mass index (BMI), hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking. Statistical Analysis: Measurements have been presented as mean ± standard deviation; results on categorical measurements have been presented in percentages. Results: The mean age, glycated hemoglobin and BMI were 34.7 ± 4.2 years, 9.9 ± 2.4%, and 26.8 ± 4.7 kg/m2. Hypertension, dyslipidemia, BMI >23 kg/m2, and smoking were presented in 27.6%, 62.4%, 84.2%, and 24%. Diabetic retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy were seen in 5.1%, 13.2%, and 0.9%. Ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and stroke were presented in 0.7%, 2%, and 0.1%. As per current guidelines, 95.33% needed statin therapy. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with YOD have micro and macrovascular complications at diagnosis. Nearly, every patient required a statin to reduce CV risk. This highlights the importance of screening patients with YOD for CV risk factors and complications of diabetes at the time of diagnosis. PMID:26904479

  20. Genetic Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes with Pharmacologic Intervention in African-American Patients with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    MR, Irvin; HW, Wiener; RP, Perry; RM, Savage; CP, Go R

    2009-01-01

    An increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in schizophrenia (SCZ) patients has been observed. Exposure to antipsychotics (APs) has been shown to induce metabolic dysregulation in some patients but not all treated patients. We hypothesized important candidate genes for T2D may increase risk for T2D in African-American patients with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder. The PAARTNERS study comprises African-American families with at least one proband with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder. The current study of PAARTNERS SCZ and schizoaffective disorder cases (N=820) examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within select T2D candidate genes including transcription factor like 7 (TCF7L2), calpain 10 (CAPN10), and ectoenzyme nucleotide pyrophosphate phosphodiesterase 1 (ENNP1) for association with prevalent T2D. We report association of TCF7L2 (rs7903146) with T2D under both an additive and recessive model for the risk allele T. Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) for having T2D was 1.4 (p=0.03) under an additive model and 2.4 (p=0.004) under a recessive model. We also report a marginally significant TCF7L2 by AP treatment interaction that should be investigated in future studies. CAPN10 (rs3792267) was marginally associated with T2D with OR=1.5 (p=0.08) when considering the model GG vs. AG/AA with risk allele G. ENPP1 (rs1044498) was not associated with T2D. We conclude TCF7L2, a risk factor for T2D in the general population, is also a risk factor for T2D in African-American patients with SCZ or schizoaffective disorder. Research is needed to determine if T2D associated polymorphisms are of interest in the pharmacogenetics and future treatment choices of antipsychotics in African-American patients. PMID:19643578

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for self-reported diabetes among adult men and women in India: findings from a national cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Ebrahim, Shah

    2011-01-01

    Objective We examined the distribution of diabetes and modifiable risk factors to provide data to aid diabetes prevention programmes in India. Design Population-based cross-sectional survey of men and women included in India's third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005–2006). Setting The sample is a multistage cluster sample with an overall response rate of 98 %. All states of India are represented in the sample (except the small Union Territories), covering more than 99 % of the country's population. Subjects Women (n 99 574) and men (n 56 742) aged 20–49 years residing in the sample households. Results Prevalence of diabetes was 1598/100 000 (95 % CI 1462, 1735) among men and 1054/100 000 (95 % CI 974, 1134) among women in India. Rural–urban and marked geographic variation were found with higher rates in south and north-eastern India. Weekly and daily fish intake contributed to a significantly higher risk of diabetes among both women and men. Risks of diabetes increased with increased BMI, age and wealth status of both women and men, but no effects of the consumption of milk/curd, vegetables, eggs, television watching, alcohol consumption or smoking were found. Daily consumption of pulse/beans or fruits was associated with a significantly reduced risk of diabetes among women, whereas non-significant inverse associations were observed in the case of men. Conclusions Prevalence was underestimated using self-reports. The wide variation in self-reported diabetes is unlikely to be due entirely to reporting biases or access to health care, and indicates that modifiable risk factors exist. Prevention of diabetes should focus on obesity and target specific socio-economic groups in India. PMID:22050916

  2. Comprehensive Cardiovascular Risk Factor Control Improves Survival: The Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Vera; Bertolet, Marnie; Felix, Rafael Barraza; Farkouh, Michael E.; Goldberg, Suzanne; Ramanathan, Kodangudi B.; Redmon, J. Bruce; Sperling, Laurence; Rutter, Martin K.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear if achieving multiple risk factor (RF) goals through protocol-guided intensive medical therapy is feasible or improves outcomes in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Objectives We sought to quantify the relationship between achieved RF goals in the BARI 2D (Bypass Angioplasty Investigation Revascularization 2 Diabetes) trial and cardiovascular events/survival. Methods We performed a nonrandomized analysis of survival/cardiovascular events and control of 6 RFs (nonsmoker, non-HDL-C <130 mg/dl, triglycerides <150 mg/dl, blood pressure [systolic <130 mm Hg; diastolic <80 mm Hg], hemoglobin A1c <7%) in BARI 2D. Cox models with time-varying number of RFs in control were adjusted for baseline number of RFs in control, clinical characteristics, and trial randomization assignments. Results In 2,265 patients (mean age 62 years, 29% women) followed for 5 years, the mean ± SD number of RFs in control improved from 3.5 ± 1.4 out of 6 at baseline to 4.2 ± 1.3 at 5 years, p < 0.0001. The number of RFs in control during the trial was strongly related to death (global p = 0.0010) and the composite of death, myocardial infarction and stroke (global p = 0.0035) in fully adjusted models. Participants with 0 to 2 RFs in control during follow-up had a 2-fold higher risk of death (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3 to 3.3, p = 0.0031) and a 1.7-fold higher risk of the composite endpoint (HR: 1.7; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.5, p = 0.0043), compared with those with 6 RFs in-control. Conclusions Simultaneous control of multiple RFs through protocol-guided intensive medical therapy is feasible and relates to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary disease and T2DM. PMID:26271057

  3. HbA1c Variability as an Independent Risk Factor for Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 1 Diabetes: A German/Austrian Multicenter Analysis on 35,891 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Julia M.; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Rosenbauer, Joachim; Schütt, Morten; Siegel, Erhard; Holl, Reinhard W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze the effect of HbA1c variability on the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes patients. Patients and Methods 35,891 patients with childhood, adolescent or adult onset of type 1 diabetes from a large multicentre survey, the German/Austrian prospective documentation system (DPV), were analysed. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine whether intra-individual HbA1c variability expressed as variation coefficient is an independent risk factor for the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Results Kaplan-Meier curves stratified by median HbA1c and variation coefficient revealed that retinopathy-free survival probability is lower when both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability are above the 50th percentile. Cox regression models confirmed this finding: After adjustment for age at diabetes onset, gender and median HbA1c, HbA1c variability was independently associated with the occurrence of diabetic retinopathy. Time-covariate interactions used to model non-proportionality indicated an effect decreasing with duration of diabetes for both median HbA1c and HbA1c variability. Predictive accuracy increased significantly when adding HbA1c variability to the Cox regression model. Conclusions In patients with type 1 diabetes, HbA1c variability adds to the risk of diabetic retinopathy independently of average metabolic control. PMID:24609115

  4. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of Palau: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Demei, Yorah; Kuartei, Stevenson; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Republic of Palau and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 7.1% increase in the population between 2000 and 2010. Significant shifts in the age groups show declines among children and young adults under 34 years of age and increases among adult residents over 45 years of age. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that play a significant role in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include heart disease and cancer. A 2003 community household survey was conducted and 22.4% of them reported a history of diabetes in the household. A survey among Ministry of Health employees showed that 44% of the men and 47% of the women were overweight and 46% of the men and 42% of the women were obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. Priority issues and needs for the administrative and clinical systems were identified.

  5. Effects of aggressive approach to the multiple risk factors for diabetic nephro-pathy on proteinuria reduction in diabetes type 2 patients.

    PubMed

    Ascić-Buturović, Belma; Kacila, Mirsad; Kulić, Mehmed

    2009-02-01

    Dietary interventions with protein and salt restriction, good glucose control, smoking cessation, aggressive blood pressure control, good control of cholesterol and triglycerides, use of ACE inhibitors and ARBs can delay the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The aim of this study was to present the effects of aggressive treatment of the multiple risk factors for diabetic nephropathy on proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this study we included 15 patients with diabetes type 2 and insufficient regulation of glycaemia. The patients were followed for three months period. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides and proteinuria were followed prior and after the study. Prior the study patients were treated with premix insulin divided in two daily doses + metformin after the lunch and they had insufficient regulation of glycaemia. During the study patients were treated with one daily dose of basal insulin, three doses of metformin (2550 mg), one daily dose of atorvastatin (20 mg) and one daily dose of ramipril (5 to 10 mg). Doses of insulin were titrated separately for each patients (0,7-1,0 IU/kg). Patients were advised to start with lifestyle modification, increased physical activity and dietary interventions with protein and salt restriction, energy restricted diet and smoking cessation. A total of 20 patients (male 12 and female 8) with diabetes type 2 were studied. The mean age of the subjects was 53+/-5,25 years. The mean diabetes duration was 4,05+/-1,96 years. The mean body mass index decreased from 28,1+/-1,67 kg/m2 to 25,9 +/-1,22 kg/m2 after the study. Mean HbA1c decreased from 8,82 +/- 0,53 % to 7,15 +/- 0,23 % (p<0,05). Mean fasting glycemia decreased from 8,79+/-0,58 mmol/dm3 to 7,03+/-0,18 mmol/dm3 (p < 0,05). Mean postmeal glycemia decreased from 9,93 +/- 0,77 mmol/dm3 to 7,62 +/- 0,42 mmol/dm3 (p<0,05). The mean cholesterol level decreased

  6. Risk taking among diabetic clients.

    PubMed

    Joseph, D H; Schwartz-Barcott, D; Patterson, B

    1992-01-01

    Diabetic clients must make daily decisions about their health care needs. Observational and anecdotal evidence suggests that vast differences exist between the kinds of choices diabetic clients make and the kinds of chances they are willing to take. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a diabetic risk-assessment tool. This instrument, which is based on subjective expected utility theory, measures risk-prone and risk-averse behavior. Initial findings from a pilot study of 18 women clients who are on insulin indicate that patterns of risk behavior exist in the areas of exercise, skin care, and diet. PMID:1729123

  7. Diabetes, Triglyceride Levels, and Other Risk Factors for Glaucoma in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2008

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Fang; Boland, Michael V.; Gupta, Priya; Gadkaree, Shekhar K.; Vitale, Susan; Guallar, Eliseo; Zhao, Di; Friedman, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine risk factors for glaucoma in a population-based study in the United States. Methods Participants age 40 and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey underwent questionnaires, physical examination, laboratory tests, and vision tests including fundus imaging. Glaucoma was determined based on expert grading of fundus photographs. Regression modeling of glaucoma risk factors was performed. Results Participants with glaucoma (172) were older (mean age 68.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 65.6–70.7] vs. 56.4 years [95% CI 55.6–57.2, P < 0.001]), likely to have less than high school education (25.1% vs. 18.1%, P = 0.05), to have diabetes (23.1% vs. 10.8%, P < 0.001), to have central obesity (72.5% vs. 60.7%, P = 0.01), to have systolic hypertension (30.3% vs. 20.1%, P = 0.01), to have diastolic hypotension (30.3% vs. 13.9%, P < 0.001), and to be nonsmokers (91.0% vs. 79.3%, P = 0.002). Sex, poverty, access to health care, fasting glucose, insulin dependence, body mass index, cholesterol levels, diastolic hypertension, systolic hypotension, obstructive sleep apnea, and marijuana were not associated with glaucoma. Multivariable modeling showed associations between glaucoma and older age (odds ratio [OR] 1.09 per year, 95% CI 1.04–1.14), black race (OR 4.40, 95% CI 1.71–11.30), and poverty (OR 3.39, 95% CI 1.73–6.66). Diabetes was no longer associated with glaucoma after adjustment for triglyceride levels. Sex, education, insurance status, body mass index, blood pressure, obstructive sleep apnea, and smoking were not associated with glaucoma. Conclusions People who are older, of black race, and with lower income levels have a higher prevalence of glaucoma. A novel association between diabetes, triglyceride levels, and glaucoma is also identified. PMID:27111561

  8. Control of Glycemia and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, Irene; Mata-Cases, Manel; Hermosilla, Eduard; Morros, Rosa; Fina, Francesc; Rosell, Magdalena; Castell, Conxa; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Bolíbar, Bonaventura; Mauricio, Didac

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and levels of glycemic and cardiovascular risk factor control in patients with type 2 diabetes that are in primary health care centers in Catalonia (Spain). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This was a cross-sectional study of a total population of 3,755,038 individuals aged 31–90 years at the end of 2009. Clinical data were obtained retrospectively from electronic clinical records. RESULTS A total of 286,791 patients with type 2 diabetes were identified (7.6%). Fifty-four percent were men, mean (SD) age was 68.2 (11.4) years, and mean duration of disease was 6.5 (5.1) years. The mean (SD) A1C value was 7.15 (1.5)%, and 56% of the patients had A1C values ≤7%. The mean (SD) blood pressure (BP) values were 137.2 (13.8)/76.4 (8.3) mmHg, mean total cholesterol concentration was 192 (38.6) mg/dL, mean HDL cholesterol concentration was 49.3 (13.2) mg/dL, mean LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration was 112.5 (32.4) mg/dL, and mean BMI was 29.6 (5) kg/m2. Thirty-one percent of the patients had BP values ≤130/80 mmHg, 37.9% had LDL-C values ≤100 mg/dL, and 45.4% had BMI values ≤30 kg/m2. Twenty-two percent were managed exclusively with lifestyle changes. Regarding medicated diabetic patients, 46.9, 22.9, and 2.8% were prescribed one, two, or three antidiabetic drugs, respectively, and 23.4% received insulin therapy. CONCLUSIONS The results from this study indicate a similar or improved control of glycemia, lipids, and BP in patients with type 2 diabetes when compared with previous studies performed in Spain and elsewhere. PMID:22344609

  9. Environmental contaminants as etiologic factors for diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Longnecker, M P; Daniels, J L

    2001-01-01

    For both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, the rates have been increasing in the United States and elsewhere; rates vary widely by country, and genetic factors account for less than half of new cases. These observations suggest environmental factors cause both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Occupational exposures have been associated with increased risk of diabetes. In addition, recent data suggest that toxic substances in the environment, other than infectious agents or exposures that stimulate an immune response, are associated with the occurrence of these diseases. We reviewed the epidemiologic data that addressed whether environmental contaminants might cause type 1 or type 2 diabetes. For type 1 diabetes, higher intake of nitrates, nitrites, and N-nitroso compounds, as well as higher serum levels of polychlorinated biphenyls have been associated with increased risk. Overall, however, the data were limited or inconsistent. With respect to type 2 diabetes, data on arsenic and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin relative to risk were suggestive of a direct association but were inconclusive. The occupational data suggested that more data on exposure to N-nitroso compounds, arsenic, dioxins, talc, and straight oil machining fluids in relation to diabetes would be useful. Although environmental factors other than contaminants may account for the majority of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the etiologic role of several contaminants and occupational exposures deserves further study. PMID:11744505

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: A risk factor for Helicobacter pylori infection: A hospital based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Devrajani, Bikha Ram; Shah, Syed Zulfiquar Ali; Soomro, Aftab Ahmed; Devrajani, Tarachand

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in diabetic and non-diabetic patients and to compare the frequency of H. pylori infection in both groups. Study Design: Case control. Place and Duration: Department of Medicine, Liaquat University Hospital from October 2007 to March 2008. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based case-control study was conducted on 148 subjects and divided into two groups i.e. type 2 diabetics and non-diabetics; each group consisting of 74 patients. All diabetic patients of ≥ 35 years of age, both gender and the known cases with history of dyspepsia, epigastric pain or bloating for more than a month were screened for Helicobacter pylori infection. The collected data of both groups was evaluated and separated for analysis. Results: Majority of the patients were male with mean age ± SD, 52.86 ± 8.51. Among the diabetic group, HpSA was positive in 54/74 (73%), whereas in the non-diabetic group HpSA was positive in 38/74 (51.4%) cases. Fasting blood glucose was identified as low in 04 (5.40%) H. pylori infected - diabetic patients where as the blood glucose level of 07 (9.45%) known diabetic patients was raised despite the ongoing medication. Conclusion: Diabetic patients are more prone and at risk to acquire H. Pylori infection. Therefore proper monitoring of blood glucose level and screening for H. pylori infection are effective preventive measures for this life threatening infection. PMID:20431802

  11. Modelling the Interplay between Lifestyle Factors and Genetic Predisposition on Markers of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, Christina; Ambrosini, Gina L.; Fuller, Nicholas R.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Hauner, Hans; Caterson, Ian D.; Jebb, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by a complex interplay involving lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition. Despite this, many studies do not consider the relative contributions of this complex array of factors to identify relationships which are important in progression or prevention of complex diseases. We aimed to describe the integrated effect of a number of lifestyle changes (weight, diet and physical activity) in the context of genetic susceptibility, on changes in glycaemic traits in overweight or obese participants following 12-months of a weight management programme. A sample of 353 participants from a behavioural weight management intervention were included in this study. A graphical Markov model was used to describe the impact of the intervention, by dividing the effects into various pathways comprising changes in proportion of dietary saturated fat, physical activity and weight loss, and a genetic predisposition score (T2DM-GPS), on changes in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion (HOMA-B) and short and long term glycaemia (glucose and HbA1c). We demonstrated the use of graphical Markov modelling to identify the importance and interrelationships of a number of possible variables changed as a result of a lifestyle intervention, whilst considering fixed factors such as genetic predisposition, on changes in traits. Paths which led to weight loss and change in dietary saturated fat were important factors in the change of all glycaemic traits, whereas the T2DM-GPS only made a significant direct contribution to changes in HOMA-IR and plasma glucose after considering the effects of lifestyle factors. This analysis shows that modifiable factors relating to body weight, diet, and physical activity are more likely to impact on glycaemic traits than genetic predisposition during a behavioural intervention. PMID:26154605

  12. Modelling the Interplay between Lifestyle Factors and Genetic Predisposition on Markers of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk.

    PubMed

    Walker, Celia G; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Holzapfel, Christina; Ambrosini, Gina L; Fuller, Nicholas R; Loos, Ruth J F; Hauner, Hans; Caterson, Ian D; Jebb, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is determined by a complex interplay involving lifestyle factors and genetic predisposition. Despite this, many studies do not consider the relative contributions of this complex array of factors to identify relationships which are important in progression or prevention of complex diseases. We aimed to describe the integrated effect of a number of lifestyle changes (weight, diet and physical activity) in the context of genetic susceptibility, on changes in glycaemic traits in overweight or obese participants following 12-months of a weight management programme. A sample of 353 participants from a behavioural weight management intervention were included in this study. A graphical Markov model was used to describe the impact of the intervention, by dividing the effects into various pathways comprising changes in proportion of dietary saturated fat, physical activity and weight loss, and a genetic predisposition score (T2DM-GPS), on changes in insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IR), insulin secretion (HOMA-B) and short and long term glycaemia (glucose and HbA1c). We demonstrated the use of graphical Markov modelling to identify the importance and interrelationships of a number of possible variables changed as a result of a lifestyle intervention, whilst considering fixed factors such as genetic predisposition, on changes in traits. Paths which led to weight loss and change in dietary saturated fat were important factors in the change of all glycaemic traits, whereas the T2DM-GPS only made a significant direct contribution to changes in HOMA-IR and plasma glucose after considering the effects of lifestyle factors. This analysis shows that modifiable factors relating to body weight, diet, and physical activity are more likely to impact on glycaemic traits than genetic predisposition during a behavioural intervention. PMID:26154605

  13. Exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution as risk factors for type 2 diabetes: A feasibility study in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing public health problem in Bulgaria. While individual and lifestyle determinants have been researched; till date there has been no study on environmental risks such as road traffic, noise, and air pollution. As a first step toward designing a large-scale population-based survey, we aimed at exploring the overall associations of prevalent T2DM with exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution. A total of 513 residents of Plovdiv city, Bulgaria were recruited. Individual data on self-reported doctor-diagnosed T2DM and confounding factors were linked to objective and self-rated exposure indicators. Logistic and log-link Poisson regressions were conducted. In the fully adjusted logistic models, T2DM was positively associated with exposures to L(den) 71-80 dB (odds ratio (OR) = 4.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 14.68), fine particulate matter (PM) 2.5 25.0-66.8 μg/m 3 (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 0.28, 6.24), benzo alpha pyrene 6.0-14.02 ng/m 3 (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 0.52, 5.98) and high road traffic (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 0.48, 4.07). L(den) remained a significant risk factor in the: Poisson regression model. Other covariates with consistently high multivariate effects were age, gender, body mass index, family history of T2DM, subjective sleep disturbance, and especially bedroom location. We concluded that residential noise exposure might be associated with elevated risk of prevalent T2DM. The inferences made by this research and the lessons learned from its limitations could guide the designing of a longitudinal epidemiological survey in Bulgaria. PMID:27157686

  14. Exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution as risk factors for type 2 diabetes: A feasibility study in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing public health problem in Bulgaria. While individual and lifestyle determinants have been researched; till date there has been no study on environmental risks such as road traffic, noise, and air pollution. As a first step toward designing a large-scale population-based survey, we aimed at exploring the overall associations of prevalent T2DM with exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution. A total of 513 residents of Plovdiv city, Bulgaria were recruited. Individual data on self-reported doctor-diagnosed T2DM and confounding factors were linked to objective and self-rated exposure indicators. Logistic and log-link Poisson regressions were conducted. In the fully adjusted logistic models, T2DM was positively associated with exposures to L(den) 71-80 dB (odds ratio (OR) = 4.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 14.68), fine particulate matter (PM) 2.5 25.0-66.8 μg/m 3 (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 0.28, 6.24), benzo alpha pyrene 6.0-14.02 ng/m 3 (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 0.52, 5.98) and high road traffic (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 0.48, 4.07). L(den) remained a significant risk factor in the: Poisson regression model. Other covariates with consistently high multivariate effects were age, gender, body mass index, family history of T2DM, subjective sleep disturbance, and especially bedroom location. We concluded that residential noise exposure might be associated with elevated risk of prevalent T2DM. The inferences made by this research and the lessons learned from its limitations could guide the designing of a longitudinal epidemiological survey in Bulgaria.

  15. Factors Associated with Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in At-Risk Adolescents and Young Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Darrell M.; Calhoun, Peter M.; Maahs, David M.; Chase, H. Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A.; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K.; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Materials and Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15–45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of <60 mg/dL for ≥30 min) included bedtime blood glucose (BG), exercise intensity, bedtime snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Results: Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (P<0.001), lower HbA1c levels (P=0.006), medium/high-intensity exercise during the preceding day (P=0.003), and the occurrence of antecedent daytime hypoglycemia (P=0.001). There was a trend for lower bedtime BG levels to be associated with more frequent nocturnal hypoglycemia (P=0.10). Bedtime snack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Conclusions: Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night. PMID:25761202

  16. Exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution as risk factors for type 2 diabetes: A feasibility study in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Dzhambov, Angel M; Dimitrova, Donka D

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing public health problem in Bulgaria. While individual and lifestyle determinants have been researched; till date there has been no study on environmental risks such as road traffic, noise, and air pollution. As a first step toward designing a large-scale population-based survey, we aimed at exploring the overall associations of prevalent T2DM with exposures to road traffic, noise, and air pollution. A total of 513 residents of Plovdiv city, Bulgaria were recruited. Individual data on self-reported doctor-diagnosed T2DM and confounding factors were linked to objective and self-rated exposure indicators. Logistic and log-link Poisson regressions were conducted. In the fully adjusted logistic models, T2DM was positively associated with exposures to Lden 71-80 dB (odds ratio (OR) = 4.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 14.68), fine particulate matter (PM)2.5 25.0-66.8 μg/m3 (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 0.28, 6.24), benzo alpha pyrene 6.0-14.02 ng/m3 (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 0.52, 5.98) and high road traffic (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 0.48, 4.07). Lden remained a significant risk factor in the: Poisson regression model. Other covariates with consistently high multivariate effects were age, gender, body mass index, family history of T2DM, subjective sleep disturbance, and especially bedroom location. We concluded that residential noise exposure might be associated with elevated risk of prevalent T2DM. The inferences made by this research and the lessons learned from its limitations could guide the designing of a longitudinal epidemiological survey in Bulgaria. PMID:27157686

  17. Study of Disease Progression and Relevant Risk Factors in Diabetic Foot Patients Using a Multistate Continuous-Time Markov Chain Model.

    PubMed

    Begun, Alexander; Morbach, Stephan; Rümenapf, Gerhard; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The diabetic foot is a lifelong disease. The longer patients with diabetes and foot ulcers are observed, the higher the likelihood that they will develop comorbidities that adversely influence ulcer recurrence, amputation and survival (for example peripheral arterial disease, renal failure or ischaemic heart disease). The purpose of our study was to quantify person and limb-related disease progression and the time-dependent influence of any associated factors (present at baseline or appearing during observation) based on which effective prevention and/or treatment strategies could be developed. Using a nine-state continuous-time Markov chain model with time-dependent risk factors, all living patients were divided into eight groups based on their ulceration (previous or current) and previous amputation (none, minor or major) status. State nine is an absorbing state (death). If all transitions are fully observable, this model can be decomposed into eight submodels, which can be analyzed using the methods of survival analysis for competing risks. The dependencies of the risk factors (covariates) were included in the submodels using Cox-like regression. The transition intensities and relative risks for covariates were calculated from long-term data of patients with diabetic foot ulcers collected in a single specialized center in North-Rhine Westphalia (Germany). The detected estimates were in line with previously published, but scarce, data. Together with the interesting new results obtained, this indicates that the proposed model may be useful for studying disease progression in larger samples of patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

  18. Overview of saxagliptin efficacy and safety in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease or risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus have or will develop multiple independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease, particularly coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and treating these patients is challenging. The risk of hypoglycemia, weight gain, or fluid retention with some diabetes medications should be considered when developing a treatment plan for individuals with a history of CAD or at risk for CAD. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are oral antihyperglycemic agents that inhibit the breakdown of the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, resulting in increased glucose-dependent insulin secretion and suppression of glucagon secretion. Saxagliptin is a potent and selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor that improves glycemic control and is generally well tolerated when used as monotherapy and as add-on therapy to other antihyperglycemic medications. This review summarizes findings from recently published post hoc analyses of saxagliptin clinical trials that have been conducted in patients with and without a history of cardiovascular disease and in patients with and without various risk factors for cardiovascular disease. The results show that saxagliptin was generally well tolerated and consistently improved glycemic control, as assessed by reductions from baseline in glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose concentration, and postprandial glucose concentration, regardless of the presence or absence of baseline cardiovascular disease, hypertension, statin use, number of cardiovascular risk factors, or high Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk score. PMID:25565858

  19. Elevated HDL is a risk factor for recurrent coronary events in a subgroup of non-diabetic postinfarction patients with hypercholesterolemia and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, James P; Zareba, Wojciech; Moss, Arthur J; Rainwater, David L; Sparks, Charles E

    2006-07-01

    Recent studies demonstrate important roles for inflammation in development of atherosclerosis with current attention focusing on interactions of inflammation with traditional lipoprotein risk factors. Since the nature of such relationships is largely unknown, we sought to investigate interactions of inflammation with hyperlipidemia in generating cardiovascular risk in a way that would allow recognition of such interactions whether anticipated or not. Thus, we searched for subgroups at high risk for recurrent coronary events in 767 non-diabetic postinfarction patients using an exploratory three-dimensional graphical screening technique with previously established factor analysis-derived inflammatory and lipoprotein-related factors. Results indicated a high-risk patient subgroup defined by factor interaction that was best characterized clinically by high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and total cholesterol. Kaplan-Meier and Cox multivariate analysis confirmed high-risk. Additionally, within-subgroup risk related to metabolic, inflammatory, and thrombogenic blood markers was assessed using Cox analysis with results showing only elevated HDL as a significant and independent predictor of risk with hazard ratio, 2.24 (95% CI; 1.12, 4.49; p = 0.023). We conclude that in non-diabetic postinfarction patients, elevated HDL is predictive of risk of recurrent coronary events within a subgroup of patients characterized by simultaneous elevations in serum CRP and total cholesterol. PMID:16242700

  20. Diabetic dyslipidaemia: effective management reduces cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A

    2005-05-01

    Patients with diabetes are at significantly increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD); even those patients without a history of a previous myocardial infarction (MI) have as high a risk of a fatal or nonfatal MI as nondiabetic patients with a history of previous MI. As a result it is now generally recommended that cardiovascular risk factors be treated as aggressively in patients with diabetes as in nondiabetic patients with a history of CHD. Results from the recently published Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS) and meta-analysis of primary and secondary interventions trials confirm that there is a uniform relative risk reduction across a wide range of high-risk patients including diabetes patients without established CHD. A highly significant 22-24% reduction in risk of future vascular events is evident when patients with diabetes are treated with statins in trials. Current guidelines, including the recently updated National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) guidelines, endorse aggressive, early intervention in very-high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes plus cardiovascular disease (CVD), regardless of baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level in order to achieve an LDL-C goal of 70 mg/dL (1.8 mmol/L). However, despite increasing evidence and knowledge of the value of lipid lowering, a recent survey of diabetes specialists indicates that many patients with diabetes remain untreated or undertreated. The availability of more effective statins should help to close this "action gap", in concert with other measures such as initiatives to improve patient compliance.

  1. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for obesity and diabetes type 2 in women at late reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Grineva, E N; Karonova, T; Micheeva, E; Belyaeva, O; Nikitina, I L

    2013-07-01

    It was suggested that glucose metabolism and body fat content depend on serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. We studied 320 healthy women at late reproductive age of 40 to 52 years old (mean age 46.1±4.5) from St. Petersburg (North-West region of Russia). 25(ОН)D levels were from 19.4 to 134.0 nMol/L (mean 52.9±22.7). Vitamin D deficiency (lower than 50 nMol/L) and insufficiency (50-75 nMol/L) was revealed in 59.1% and 27.8% of women, respectively. The study showed that low 25(OH)D levels were associated with obesity (r=-0.35, p$#X003C0.01), increased plasma glucose levels after OGTT (r=-0.31, p$#X003C0.01) and decreased insulin sensitivity index (r=-0.28, p$#X003C0.01). We found that 25(OH)D levels below 50 nMol/L were associated with obesity risk (OR 2.25[1.05-3.95], CI 95%) but not with risk of impaired glucose metabolism (1.07[0.54-2.12],CI95%). Our results showed that vitamin D insufficiency is highly prevalent in the population of healthy women. Low 25(OH)D levels correlated with high body fat, glucose levels and decreased insulin sensitivity. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is a potential risk factor for obesity and development of insulin resistance leading to diabetes type 2.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for obesity and diabetes type 2 in women at late reproductive age

    PubMed Central

    Grineva, EN; Karonova, T; Micheeva, E; Belyaeva, O; Nikitina, IL

    2013-01-01

    It was suggested that glucose metabolism and body fat content depend on serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]. We studied 320 healthy women at late reproductive age of 40 to 52 years old (mean age 46.1±4.5) from St. Petersburg (North-West region of Russia). 25(OH)D levels were from 19.4 to 134.0 nMol/L (mean 52.9±22.7). Vitamin D deficiency (lower than 50 nMol/L) and insufficiency (50-75 nMol/L) was revealed in 59.1% and 27.8% of women, respectively. The study showed that low 25(OH)D levels were associated with obesity (r=-0.35, p<0.01), increased plasma glucose levels after OGTT (r=-0.31, p<0.01) and decreased insulin sensitivity index (r=-0.28, p<0.01). We found that 25(OH)D levels below 50 nMol/L were associated with obesity risk (OR 2.25[1.05-3.95], CI 95%) but not with risk of impaired glucose metabolism (1.07[0.54-2.12],CI95%). Our results showed that vitamin D insufficiency is highly prevalent in the population of healthy women. Low 25(OH)D levels correlated with high body fat, glucose levels and decreased insulin sensitivity. We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is a potential risk factor for obesity and development of insulin resistance leading to diabetes type 2. PMID:23924693

  3. Do improvements in dietary behaviour contribute to cardiovascular risk factor reduction over and above cardio-protective medication in newly diagnosed diabetes patients?

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Andrew J. M.; Schliemann, Desiree; Long, Gráinne H.; Griffin, Simon J.; Simmons, Rebecca K.

    2015-01-01

    Background/objectives A healthy diet is an integral component of successful diabetes management. However, the comparative importance of adopting a healthy diet for cardiovascular risk factor reduction over and above medication use among newly diagnosed diabetes patients remains unclear. Subjects/Methods We computed a dietary score consistent with American Diabetes Association and Diabetes UK recommendations in 574 newly diagnosed diabetes patients by summing standardised values for the intake of total energy, saturated fat, sodium, fibre and plasma vitamin C. In linear regression analyses, stratified by cardio-protective medication use (yes/no), we quantified the comparative longitudinal associations of baseline diet and change in diet over 1-year with change in blood pressure, HbA1c and lipids. Results Baseline diet was generally not predictive of change in cardiovascular risk factor levels at 1-year. In contrast, dietary change over 1-year among patients prescribed and not prescribed cardio-protective medication after baseline was associated with comparative (p-interaction all ≥0.95) reductions in diastolic blood pressure (−2.38 vs. −2.93 mmHg, respectively) and triglycerides (−0.31 vs. −0.21 mmol/l, respectively), independent of potential confounding factors and change from baseline to follow-up in physical activity and smoking status. Conclusions Modest dietary change over the first year following diagnosis of diabetes was associated with reductions in blood pressure and triglycerides, over and above the effects of cardio-protective medication. Our findings support the notion that dietary change should be viewed as an integral component of successful diabetes self-management, irrespective of medication use. PMID:24801371

  4. Sequence variants in SLC16A11 are a common risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy L; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Churchhouse, Claire; Márquez-Luna, Carla; García-Ortíz, Humberto; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Burtt, Noël P; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Florez, Jose C; Orozco, Lorena; Haiman, Christopher A; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Altshuler, David

    2014-02-01

    Performing genetic studies in multiple human populations can identify disease risk alleles that are common in one population but rare in others, with the potential to illuminate pathophysiology, health disparities, and the population genetic origins of disease alleles. Here we analysed 9.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each of 8,214 Mexicans and other Latin Americans: 3,848 with type 2 diabetes and 4,366 non-diabetic controls. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identified a novel locus associated with type 2 diabetes at genome-wide significance spanning the solute carriers SLC16A11 and SLC16A13 (P = 3.9 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.29). The association was stronger in younger, leaner people with type 2 diabetes, and replicated in independent samples (P = 1.1 × 10(-4); OR = 1.20). The risk haplotype carries four amino acid substitutions, all in SLC16A11; it is present at ~50% frequency in Native American samples and ~10% in east Asian, but is rare in European and African samples. Analysis of an archaic genome sequence indicated that the risk haplotype introgressed into modern humans via admixture with Neanderthals. The SLC16A11 messenger RNA is expressed in liver, and V5-tagged SLC16A11 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of SLC16A11 in heterologous cells alters lipid metabolism, most notably causing an increase in intracellular triacylglycerol levels. Despite type 2 diabetes having been well studied by genome-wide association studies in other populations, analysis in Mexican and Latin American individuals identified SLC16A11 as a novel candidate gene for type 2 diabetes with a possible role in triacylglycerol metabolism. PMID:24390345

  5. Sequence variants in SLC16A11 are a common risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amy L; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Churchhouse, Claire; Márquez-Luna, Carla; García-Ortíz, Humberto; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Burtt, Noël P; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Florez, Jose C; Orozco, Lorena; Haiman, Christopher A; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Altshuler, David

    2014-02-01

    Performing genetic studies in multiple human populations can identify disease risk alleles that are common in one population but rare in others, with the potential to illuminate pathophysiology, health disparities, and the population genetic origins of disease alleles. Here we analysed 9.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each of 8,214 Mexicans and other Latin Americans: 3,848 with type 2 diabetes and 4,366 non-diabetic controls. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identified a novel locus associated with type 2 diabetes at genome-wide significance spanning the solute carriers SLC16A11 and SLC16A13 (P = 3.9 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.29). The association was stronger in younger, leaner people with type 2 diabetes, and replicated in independent samples (P = 1.1 × 10(-4); OR = 1.20). The risk haplotype carries four amino acid substitutions, all in SLC16A11; it is present at ~50% frequency in Native American samples and ~10% in east Asian, but is rare in European and African samples. Analysis of an archaic genome sequence indicated that the risk haplotype introgressed into modern humans via admixture with Neanderthals. The SLC16A11 messenger RNA is expressed in liver, and V5-tagged SLC16A11 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of SLC16A11 in heterologous cells alters lipid metabolism, most notably causing an increase in intracellular triacylglycerol levels. Despite type 2 diabetes having been well studied by genome-wide association studies in other populations, analysis in Mexican and Latin American individuals identified SLC16A11 as a novel candidate gene for type 2 diabetes with a possible role in triacylglycerol metabolism.

  6. Conversion of mild cognitive impairment to dementia among subjects with diabetes: a population-based study of incidence and risk factors with five years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Wu, Tianfeng; Miao, Rujuan; Xiao, Yan Yu; Zhang, Wenwen; Huang, Guowei

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a key determinant in this association. It is not clear whether T2DM increases the risk of conversion from MCI to dementia. We plan to explore the relationship between T2DM-MCI and dementia and identify its potential risk factors. A prospective community-based cohort study was conducted from March 2010 to March 2014, including 634 participants with T2DM-MCI, 261 T2DM participants who were cognitively intact, and 585 MCI participants without diabetes. All cohort members received detailed annual evaluations to detect dementia onset during the 5 years of follow-up. The three cohorts were compared to assess differences in dementia onset. Furthermore, Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify risk factors for dementia onset in the T2DM-MCI cohort. During follow-up, 152 and 49 subjects developed dementia in the MCI and cognitively-intact cohorts, amounting to an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.66 (95% CI 1.07-2.26). In a survival analysis of the cohorts, MCI accelerated the median progression to dementia by 2.74 years. In a multivariable analysis of the T2DM-MCI cohort, major risk factors for dementia were age >75 years and longer durations of diabetes, while significantly reduced risks of dementia were associated with oral hypoglycemic agents and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. Insulin was not associated with significantly changed risk. T2DM-MCI may aggravate the clinical picture as a concomitant factor. To minimize progression to dementia, it may be worthwhile to target several modifiable diabetes-specific features, such as the duration of disease, glycemic control, and antidiabetic agents.

  7. Relationships of Obesity and Fat Distribution With atherothrombotic Risk Factors: Baseline Results From the Bypass angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BaRI 2D) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Albu, Jeanine B.; Lu, Jiang; Mooradian, Arshag D.; Krone, Ronald J.; Nesto, Richard W.; Porter, Marty H.; Rana, Jamal S.; Rogers, William J.; Sobel, Burton E.; Gottlieb, Sheldon H.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of obesity on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and established coronary artery disease (CAD) is controversial; whether BMI and/or waist circumference correlate with atherothrombotic risk factors in such patients is uncertain. We sought to evaluate whether higher BMI or waist circumference are associated with specific risk factors among 2,273 Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) study participants with T2DM and documented CAD (baseline data, mean age 62 years, 66% non-Hispanic white, 71% men). Multiple linear regression models were constructed after adjusting for sex, age, race/ ethnicity, US vs. non-US site, diabetes duration, exercise, smoking, alcohol, and relevant medication use. First-order partial correlations of BMI with risk factors after controlling for waist circumference and of waist circumference with risk factors after controlling for BMI were also evaluated. Ninety percent of the patients were overweight (BMI ≥25 kg/m2); 68% of men and 89% of women had high-risk waist circumference measures (≥102 and ≥88 cm, respectively). BMI and waist circumference, in separate models, explained significant variation in metabolic (insulin, lipids, blood pressure (BP)) and inflammatory/procoagulation (C-reactive protein, PAI-1 activity and antigen, and fibrinogen) risk factors. In partial correlation analyses BMI was independently associated with BP and inflammatory/procoagulation factors, waist circumference with lipids, and both BMI and waist circumference with insulin. We conclude that, in cross-sectional analyses, both BMI and waist circumference, independently, are associated with increased atherothrombotic risk in centrally obese cohorts such as the BARI 2D patients with T2DM and CAD. PMID:19875998

  8. Cardiometabolic Risk Factor Changes Observed in Diabetes Prevention Programs in US Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zabetian, Azadeh; Goodman, Michael; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B.; Albright, Ann L.; Gregg, Edward W.; Ali, Mohammed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) study showed that weight loss in high-risk adults lowered diabetes incidence and cardiovascular disease risk. No prior analyses have aggregated weight and cardiometabolic risk factor changes observed in studies implementing DPP interventions in nonresearch settings in the United States. Methods and Findings In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we pooled data from studies in the United States implementing DPP lifestyle modification programs (focused on modest [5%–7%] weight loss through ≥150 min of moderate physical activity per week and restriction of fat intake) in clinical, community, and online settings. We reported aggregated pre- and post-intervention weight and cardiometabolic risk factor changes (fasting blood glucose [FBG], glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c], systolic or diastolic blood pressure [SBP/DBP], total [TC] or HDL-cholesterol). We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrials.gov databases from January 1, 2003, to May 1, 2016. Two reviewers independently evaluated article eligibility and extracted data on study designs, populations enrolled, intervention program characteristics (duration, number of core and maintenance sessions), and outcomes. We used a random effects model to calculate summary estimates for each outcome and associated 95% confidence intervals (CI). To examine sources of heterogeneity, results were stratified according to the presence of maintenance sessions, risk level of participants (prediabetes or other), and intervention delivery personnel (lay or professional). Forty-four studies that enrolled 8,995 participants met eligibility criteria. Participants had an average age of 50.8 years and body mass index (BMI) of 34.8 kg/m2, and 25.2% were male. On average, study follow-up was 9.3 mo (median 12.0) with a range of 1.5 to 36 months; programs offered a mean of 12.6 sessions, with mean participant attendance of 11.0 core sessions. Sixty percent of

  9. Risk Factors for Reporting Poor Cultural Competency Among Patients with Diabetes in Safety-Net Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Fernandez, Alicia; Stern, Rachel J.; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Quan, Judy; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Cultural Competency (CAHPS-CC) Item Set assesses patient perceptions of aspects of the cultural competence of their health care. Objective To determine characteristics of patients who identify the care they receive as less culturally competent Research Design Cross-sectional survey consisting of face-to-face interviews Subjects Safety-net population of patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600) receiving ongoing primary care Measures Participants completed the CAHPS-CC and answered questions about their race/ethnicity, gender, age, education, health status, depressive symptoms, insurance coverage, English proficiency, duration of relationship with primary care provider, and co-morbidities. Results In adjusted models, depressive symptoms were significantly associated with poor cultural competency in the Doctor Communication – Positive Behaviors domain (OR 1.73, 95%CI 1.11, 2.69). African-Americans were less likely than Whites to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication – Positive Behaviors domain (OR 0.52, 0.28–0.97). Participants who reported a longer relationship (≥3 years) with their primary care provider were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Doctor Communication – Health Promotion (OR 0.35, 0.21–0.60) and Trust domains (OR 0.4, 0.24–0.67), while participants with lower educational attainment were less likely to report poor cultural competence in the Trust domain (OR 0.51, 0.30–0.86). Overall, however, sociodemographic and clinical differences in reports of poor cultural competence were insignificant or inconsistent across the various domains of cultural competence examined. Conclusions Cultural competence interventions in safety-net settings should be implemented across populations, rather than being narrowly focused on specific sociodemographic or clinical groups. PMID:22895232

  10. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  11. Metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Josep; Martinez-Castelao, Albert; Bayés, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of biochemical abnormalities including cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. The development of diabetes mellitus after renal transplant represents a major posttransplant complication that may adversely affect graft/patient survival. The aim of this study was to assess the role of metabolic syndrome in patients on hemodialysis as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant. Patients and methods This was a prospective observational epidemiologic study carried out in adult nondiabetic patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and on the renal transplant waiting list between November 2008 and April 2009. Patients were followed up from Visit 1 (baseline) to 6 months after the renal transplant. The analysis of the role of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis patients as a risk factor for the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplant included the estimation of relative risk and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results A total of 383 evaluable patients were entered into the study (mean age, 52.7 years; male, 57.7%; Caucasian, 90.1%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome on hemodialysis was 30.4% (95% CI, 25.8%–35.4%). Hypertension was the most prevalent criterion for metabolic syndrome (65.0%), followed by low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (52.7%), abdominal obesity (36.2%), hypertriglyceridemia (32.4%), and impaired glucose (8.9%). After the renal transplant, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was still 25.8%. During the posttransplant period, the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus reached 13.0% (95% CI, 7.8%–20.6%) and patients with pretransplant metabolic syndrome were 2.6 times (95% CI, 1.043–6.608) more likely to develop new-onset diabetes mellitus after the renal transplant than those without metabolic syndrome. Conclusion The presence of metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing hemodialysis represents an independent risk factor

  12. Reduction in Weight and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes: One-Year Results of the Look AHEAD Trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective The effectiveness of intentional weight loss in reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in type 2 diabetes is unknown. This report describes one-year changes in CVD risk factors in a trial designed to examine the long-term effects of an intensive lifestyle intervention on the incidence of major CVD events. Research Design and Methods A multi-centered randomized controlled trial of 5,145 individuals with type 2 diabetes, aged 45–74 years, with body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (≥27 kg/m2 if taking insulin). An Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) involving group and individual meetings to achieve and maintain weight loss through decreased caloric intake and increased physical activity was compared to a Diabetes Support and Education (DSE) condition. Results Participants assigned to ILI lost an average 8.6% of their initial weight versus 0.7% in DSE group (p<0.001). Mean fitness increased in ILI by 20.9% versus 5.8% in DSE (p<0.001). A greater proportion of ILI participants had reductions in diabetes, hypertension, and lipid-lowering medicines. Mean HbA1c dropped from 7.3% to 6.6% in ILI (p<0.001) versus from 7.3% to 7.2% in DSE. Systolic and diastolic pressure, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, and urine albumin/creatinine improved significantly more in ILI than DSE participants (all p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, ILI resulted in clinically significant weight loss in persons with type 2 diabetes. This was associated with improved diabetes control and CVD risk factors and reduced medicine use in ILI versus DSE. Continued intervention and follow-up will determine whether these changes are maintained and will reduce CVD risk. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00017953 PMID:17363746

  13. Depression as a Risk Factor for Mortality in Individuals with Diabetes: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Mareike; Köhler, Birgit; Leichsenring, Falk; Kruse, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the impact of depression measured by self-reports and depression measured by clinical interview on all-cause mortality in individuals with diabetes and to analyze the strength of both associations, the influence of covariates, and possible differences between studies assessing self-rated depressive symptoms and those using a clinical interview to measure depression as predictors of mortality. Research Design and Methods PUBMED and PsycINFO were searched up to July 2013 for prospective studies assessing depression, diabetes and mortality. The pooled hazard ratios were calculated using random-effects models. Results Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. After adjustment for demographic variables depression measured by self-reports was associated with an increased all-cause mortality risk (pooled HR = 2.56, 95% CI 1.89–3.47), and the mortality risk remained high after additional adjustment for diabetes complications (HR = 1.76, 95% CI 1.45–2.14,). Six studies reporting adjusted HRs for depression measured by clinical interviews supported the results of the other models (HR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.15–1.93). Conclusions Both depression measured by self-report and depression measured by clinical interview have an unfavorable impact on mortality in individuals with diabetes. The results, however, are limited by the heterogeneity of the primary studies. It remains unclear whether self-reports or clinical interviews for depression are the more precise predictor. PMID:24278183

  14. Comparing Type 2 Diabetes, Prediabetes, and Their Associated Risk Factors in Asian Indians in India and in the U.S.: The CARRS and MASALA Studies

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, K.M. Venkat; Pradeepa, R. Ghua; Deepa, Mohan; Ali, Mohammed K.; Anjana, Ranjit M.; Kandula, Namratha R.; Mohan, Viswanathan; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes and the associated risk factors in two Asian Indian populations living in different environments. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed cross-sectional analyses, using representative samples of 2,305 Asian Indians aged 40–84 years living in Chennai, India, from the Centre for cArdiometabolic Risk Reduction in South-Asia study (CARRS) (2010–2011), and 757 Asian Indians aged 40–84 years living in the greater San Francisco and Chicago areas from the U.S. Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) study (2010–2013). Diabetes was defined as self-reported use of glucose-lowering medication, fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, or 2-h glucose ≥200 mg/dL. Prediabetes was defined as fasting glucose 100–125 mg/dL and/or 2-h glucose 140–199 mg/dL. RESULTS Age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was higher in India (38% [95% CI 36–40]) than in the U.S. (24% [95% CI 21–27]). Age-adjusted prediabetes prevalence was lower in India (24% [95% CI 22–26]) than in the U.S. (33% [95% CI 30–36]). After adjustment for age, sex, waist circumference, and systolic blood pressure, living in the U.S. was associated with an increased odds for prediabetes (odds ratio 1.2 [95% CI 0.9–1.5]) and a decreased odds for diabetes (odds ratio 0.5 [95% CI 0.4–0.6]). CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate possible changes in the relationship between migration and diabetes risk and highlight the growing burden of disease in urban India. Additionally, these results call for longitudinal studies to better identify the gene-environment-lifestyle exposures that underlie the elevated risk for type 2 diabetes development in Asian Indians. PMID:25877810

  15. Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been linked to some cancers: Links between air pollution and cancer risk have been found. These include ... between lung cancer and secondhand tobacco smoke , outdoor air pollution, and asbestos . Drinking water that contains a large ...

  16. Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus Is a Risk Factor for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A 1:2 Matched Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Ze; Tian, Yun-Hong; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Cao, Ka-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes has been identified as an adverse prognostic variable which associated with an increased mortality in various cancers, including colorectal, lung, and breast cancers. However, previous studies provided inconsistent results on the association between diabetes and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The main aim of this study was to investigate the associations between diabetes mellitus and the survival of NPC patients. Methods This study was designed as a 1:2 matched case–control study. Cases were patients who met the criteria for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetic mellitus (DM) below. Controls, matched 1:2, were patients who were normoglycemic (NDM). The survival rates were assessed by Kaplan–Meier analysis, and the survival curves were compared using a log-rank test. Multivariate analysis was conducted using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results Both locoregional relapse-free survival (LRRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in the NDM group were higher than that in the DM group (p = 0.001 and p = 0.033). Additionally, subset analyses revealed that the differences in OS, LRRFS, and DFS were all significant between the two groups in the N0-N1 subset (p = 0.007, p =.000 and p = 0.002). The LRRFS was higher in the NDM group in the III-IV, T3-T4 and N0-N1 subsets (p = 0.004, p = 0.002 and p =.000). In T3-T4 subset, the NDM group experienced higher DFS than the DM group (p = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, T stage and N stage were found to be independent predictors for OS, DMFS and DFS; chemotherapy was a significant prognostic factor for DMFS and DFS, age for OS, and diabetes for LRRFS and DFS. Conclusions Type 2 diabetic mellitus is associated with poorer prognosis among patients with NPC. PMID:27760202

  17. Study of Disease Progression and Relevant Risk Factors in Diabetic Foot Patients Using a Multistate Continuous-Time Markov Chain Model

    PubMed Central

    Begun, Alexander; Morbach, Stephan; Rümenapf, Gerhard; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The diabetic foot is a lifelong disease. The longer patients with diabetes and foot ulcers are observed, the higher the likelihood that they will develop comorbidities that adversely influence ulcer recurrence, amputation and survival (for example peripheral arterial disease, renal failure or ischaemic heart disease). The purpose of our study was to quantify person and limb-related disease progression and the time-dependent influence of any associated factors (present at baseline or appearing during observation) based on which effective prevention and/or treatment strategies could be developed. Using a nine-state continuous-time Markov chain model with time-dependent risk factors, all living patients were divided into eight groups based on their ulceration (previous or current) and previous amputation (none, minor or major) status. State nine is an absorbing state (death). If all transitions are fully observable, this model can be decomposed into eight submodels, which can be analyzed using the methods of survival analysis for competing risks. The dependencies of the risk factors (covariates) were included in the submodels using Cox-like regression. The transition intensities and relative risks for covariates were calculated from long-term data of patients with diabetic foot ulcers collected in a single specialized center in North-Rhine Westphalia (Germany). The detected estimates were in line with previously published, but scarce, data. Together with the interesting new results obtained, this indicates that the proposed model may be useful for studying disease progression in larger samples of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:26814723

  18. Study of Disease Progression and Relevant Risk Factors in Diabetic Foot Patients Using a Multistate Continuous-Time Markov Chain Model.

    PubMed

    Begun, Alexander; Morbach, Stephan; Rümenapf, Gerhard; Icks, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The diabetic foot is a lifelong disease. The longer patients with diabetes and foot ulcers are observed, the higher the likelihood that they will develop comorbidities that adversely influence ulcer recurrence, amputation and survival (for example peripheral arterial disease, renal failure or ischaemic heart disease). The purpose of our study was to quantify person and limb-related disease progression and the time-dependent influence of any associated factors (present at baseline or appearing during observation) based on which effective prevention and/or treatment strategies could be developed. Using a nine-state continuous-time Markov chain model with time-dependent risk factors, all living patients were divided into eight groups based on their ulceration (previous or current) and previous amputation (none, minor or major) status. State nine is an absorbing state (death). If all transitions are fully observable, this model can be decomposed into eight submodels, which can be analyzed using the methods of survival analysis for competing risks. The dependencies of the risk factors (covariates) were included in the submodels using Cox-like regression. The transition intensities and relative risks for covariates were calculated from long-term data of patients with diabetic foot ulcers collected in a single specialized center in North-Rhine Westphalia (Germany). The detected estimates were in line with previously published, but scarce, data. Together with the interesting new results obtained, this indicates that the proposed model may be useful for studying disease progression in larger samples of patients with diabetic foot ulcers. PMID:26814723

  19. Effects of Prior Intensive Insulin Therapy and Risk Factors on Visual Quality-of-Life in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (DCCT/EDIC) Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Gubitosi-Klug, Rose A.; Sun, Wanjie; Cleary, Patricia A.; Braffett, Barbara H.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Das, Arup; Tamborlane, William; Klein, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Importance Preservation of visual acuity in patients with diabetes is critical to preserve VQOL. Interventions to improve glycemic control through early intensive treatment of diabetes reduce rates of severe retinopathy and preserve VA. Objective To assess the effect of prior intensive treatment and risk factors on visual quality of life (VQOL) in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial/Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study (DCCT/EDIC) cohort. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial followed by an observational follow-up study. Setting 28 institutions across the United States and Canada. Participants 1184 DCCT/EDIC participants with type 1 diabetes completed the National Eye Institute (NEI) Visual Functioning Questionnaire (VFQ) during EDIC years 17-20, up to thirty years after the start of the DCCT. Main Outcome Measures The 25-item NEI-VFQ was administered. Visual acuity (VA) was measured by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocol and the presence and severity of retinopathy and macular edema were detected by masked grading of stereoscopic color fundus photographs using the ETDRS retinopathy severity scheme. The composite VQOL and subscales were scored on a scale of 0 to 100 corresponding to poor to excellent function, respectively. Quantile regression was used to assess the treatment/risk factor effect on median QOL score, owing to the ordinal scoring and a skewed distribution. Results The overall average VQOL for DCCT/EDIC participants with a 30 year duration of diabetes was high (median 91.7, interquartile (IQR), 89.7-96.9). After adjustment for gender, age, HbA1c, and retinopathy level at DCCT baseline, the former intensive (INT) treatment group had a significant, albeit modest, improvement in overall VQOL compared to the former conventional (CONV) diabetes treatment group (median difference −1.0 [−1.7, −0.3], p=0.0058). This beneficial treatment effect was fully attributed to the prior

  20. Effect of multiple risk factors on differences between blacks and whites in the prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cowie, C C; Harris, M I; Silverman, R E; Johnson, E W; Rust, K F

    1993-04-01

    The higher prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in US blacks as compared with whites may be due to a higher frequency of NIDDM risk factors in blacks, a higher inherent susceptibility to NIDDM among blacks, or the risk factors' having a greater effect in blacks. The authors evaluated 4,379 subjects from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1976-1980) for whom NIDDM was ascertained by medical history and oral glucose tolerance test, and for whom data on a number of risk factors were available. The prevalence of NIDDM was 60% higher in blacks than in whites (p < 0.001) and was highest in black women. Although most risk factors for NIDDM were more common in blacks, this higher frequency did not completely explain the racial disparity in the prevalence of NIDDM. After adjustment for all risk factors by logistic regression, an elevated risk of NIDDM was particularly evident at higher obesity levels in blacks as compared with whites; the odds were 70% higher for blacks at a percentage of desirable weight of 150 (95% confidence interval 1.1-2.8). The risk of NIDDM associated with obesity was greatest in black women: The odds in this group were sevenfold higher at a percentage of desirable weight of 150 versus 100 (95% confidence interval 2.6-18.8). The possibility of racial differences in metabolic adaptation to obesity highlights the importance of preventing this condition in blacks, particularly in black women. PMID:8484363

  1. Sex Differences in Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Acute Coronary Syndrome in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Long-Term Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Jian Gang; Chen, Xiang Yan; Wang, Li; Lau, Alex; Wong, Adrian; Thomas, G. Neil; Tomlinson, Brian; Liu, Roxanna; Chan, Juliana C. N.; Leung, Thomas W.; Mok, Vincent; Wong, Ka Sing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetic patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are at higher risk of poor outcome than are non-diabetic patients with ACS. Few studies have focused on sex-related ACS incidence, ACS-related mortality or risk factors to affects sex specific ACS in Chinese with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Based on a hospital-based cohort of Chinese patients with T2DM, we aimed to investigate whether there was sex difference in ACS or ACS-related mortality or risk factors of ACS. Methods Totally 2,135 Hong Kong Chinese with T2DM were recruited during 1994-1996 and followed up until August 2012. We systematically analyzed sex-related ACS incidence and ACS-related mortality and risk factors with χ2-squared test, descriptive statistics and survival analysis. Results Regular follow-up was completed in 2,105 subjects (98.6%), with a median period of 14.53 years. The occurrence of ACS was recorded among 414 patients (19.7%) and ACS-related death among 104 patients (4.9%). ACS incidences increased with age in both men and women, and men had a higher prevalence of ACS than women across different age categories and different follow-up periods (log rank χ2=20.32, P<0.001). The transition of ACS incidences from slow to rapid increase were about 5 years earlier in men (at 51-55 years) than in women (55-60 years). Among ACS patients, cumulative ACS-related mortalities was similar between men and women (log rank χ2=0.063, P=0.802). Besides age and albuminuria, different profiles of risk factors accounted for the occurrence of ACS between men and women. Conclusions Our findings demonstrated sex differences in ACS incidence and risk factors, but not in ACS-related mortality in Chinese patients withT2DM. These findings suggest that screening and prevention campaigns should be optimized for men and women, which may help to identify diabetic patients at higher risk of coronary heart disease. PMID:25830291

  2. Management of cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: 2002-2012 literature review.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Gerardo; Mangione, Carol M

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most common chronic conditions in older adults and is often accompanied by comorbidities and geriatric syndromes. The management of cardiovascular disease risk factors in older adults with DM is important to clinicians. The literature was reviewed from 2002 to 2012 to provide an American Geriatrics Society expert panel with an evidence base for updating and making new recommendations for improving the care of older adults with type 2 DM. This review includes only the domains of the management of blood pressure, lipid control, glycemic control, and use of aspirin. Over the last 10 years, new randomized controlled trials (RCT) designed to study different blood pressure treatment targets did not find evidence that intensive systolic blood pressure control (<130 mmHg) resulted in lower rates of myocardial infarction and mortality than less-intensive control. There are risks of side effects with achieving systolic blood pressure of less than 120 mmHg. Lipid-lowering statins are effective in reducing cardiovascular events in middle-aged and older adults, but data on niacin and fibrates is limited. Trials of statins and other lipid-lowering agents do not evaluate the cardiovascular effects on outcomes from treating lipids to different low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. No RCTs of lipid-lowering drugs enrolled significant numbers of adults aged 80 and older with or without DM. Three major RCTs that investigated intensive glycemic control did not find reductions in primary cardiovascular endpoints, and one study reported greater mortality with glycosylated hemoglobin of less than 6%. Two recently published RCTs were designed to study the cardiovascular benefits of aspirin use by individuals with DM. Neither trial found significantly fewer primary cardiovascular endpoints with aspirin than in control groups. Overall, RCTs enrolled few adults aged 80 and older or with significant comorbidities. More research is needed for

  3. Indoor confinement and physical inactivity rather than the proportion of dry food are risk factors in the development of feline type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Slingerland, L I; Fazilova, V V; Plantinga, E A; Kooistra, H S; Beynen, A C

    2009-02-01

    With domestication and urbanisation, cats have transformed from being hunting animals that eat protein-rich prey into more sedentary animals that eat a carbohydrate-rich diet. It was hypothesised that a high intake of dry cat food and a lack of physical activity may play a role in the development of feline type 2 diabetes mellitus. Information on dietary history and physical activity of 96 cats with diabetes mellitus and 192 matched controls was collected retrospectively, using a telephone questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between questionnaire-derived variables and the development of diabetes mellitus. The energy percentage of dry food in the diet was not significantly correlated with the development of diabetes mellitus (P=0.29), whereas both indoor confinement (P=0.002) and low physical activity (P=0.004) were. The results indicated that the proportion of dry food in a cat's diet may not be an independent risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas physical inactivity and indoor confinement are.

  4. Trends and risk factors of hyperglycemia and diabetes among Kuwaiti adults: National Nutrition Surveillance Data from 2002 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Current prevalence estimates for diabetes in Arabian Gulf countries are some of the world’s highest, yet regional trends and contributing factors are poorly documented. The present study was designed to determine temporal changes in the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes and associated factors in Kuwaiti adults. Methods Data analysis from the nationally representative cross-sectional Kuwait National Nutrition Surveillance System. 2745 males and 3611 females, aged 20–69 years, attending registration for employment or pensions and Hajj Pilgrimage health check-ups or accompanying children for immunizations from 2002 through 2009 were participated. Socio-demographic and lifestyle information, height and weight, and blood samples were collected. Results During the 8 years (2002–09), prevalences of IFG in males and females decreased by 7.4% and 6.8% and of diabetes by 9.8% and 8.9% in males and females, respectively. Linear regression for blood glucose level with time, adjusted for age, BMI, blood cholesterol and education level, showed a greater decrease in males than females (1.12 vs 0.93 mmol/L); males also showed an increase in 2002–2003 followed by a marked decrease in 2006–2007 while females showed a significant decrease in 2008–2009. Both males and females showed the largest decrease in the 2nd half of the study accounting for the majority of the overall decrease (1.13 mmol/L for males and 0.87 mmol/l for females for the 4 years). Compared with 2002–03, the OR for IFG in males decreased with time, and becoming significantly lower (OR=0.32; 95% CI: 0.21-0.49) for 2008–09. In females, the OR for IFG decreased significantly with time, except in 2006–07. Similarly, the OR for diabetes in males decreased to 0.34 (95% CI: 0.24-0.49) and in females to 0.33 (95% CI: 0.22-0.50) in 2008–09. For both genders, age and BMI were independently positively associated with IFG and diabetes, while education levels and smoking

  5. Metabolic Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Correlated Glycemic Control/Complications: A Cross-Sectional Study between Rural and Urban Uygur Residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hua; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Qi; Tuerdi, Ablikm; He, Xiao-dong; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Shu-xia; Su, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major global public health problem driven by a high prevalence of metabolic risk factors. Objective To describe the differences of metabolic risk factors of type 2 diabetes, as well as glycemic control and complicated diabetic complications between rural and urban Uygur residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. Methods This comparative cross-sectional study, conducted among 2879 urban and 918 rural participants in Xinjiang, China, assessed the metabolic risk factors of diabetes and related complications differences between urban and rural settlements. Results Compared to rural areas, urban participants had higher education level and more average income, little physical activity, less triglycerides and higher HDL-c (p < 0.05 respectively). Differences in metabolic risk factors by urban/rural residence included overweight or obesity, triglycerides (≥1.71mmol/l), HDL-c (< 1.04 mmol/l), alcohol intake, and physical inactivity (p < 0.01 respectively). There was significant difference regarding the prevalence of HbA1c >8% (48.1% versus 54.5%, p = 0.019) between rural and urban diabetic participants. No significant difference in the prevalence of type 2 diabetic complications between urban and rural participants (74.9% versus 72.2%; p = 0.263) was detected. Compared to rural participants, the most prevalent modifiable risk factors associated with diabetic complications in urban participants were obesity (BMI ≥ 28 Kg/m2), HDL-c (< 1.04 mmol/l), physical inactivity and irregular eating habits (p = 0.035, p = 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.013, respectively). Conclusions Urban settlers were significantly more likely to have metabolic risk factors highlighting the need for public health efforts to improve health outcomes for these vulnerable populations. Diabetes related complications risk factors were prevalent amongst rural and urban diabetes settlers. PMID:27622506

  6. A school-based intervention for diabetes risk reduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program, addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race, or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a mu...

  7. Impact and cost of a 2-week community-based screening and awareness program for diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors in a Swiss canton

    PubMed Central

    Bovet, Pascal; Hirsiger, Philippe; Emery, Frédéric; De Bernardini, Jessica; Rossier, Christophe; Trebeljahr, Josefine; Hagon-Traub, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Background: Community-based diabetes screening programs can help sensitize the population and identify new cases. However, the impact of such programs is rarely assessed in high-income countries, where concurrent health information and screening opportunities are common place. Intervention and methods: A 2-week screening and awareness campaign was organized as part of a new diabetes program in the canton of Vaud (population of 697,000) in Switzerland. Screening was performed without appointment in 190 out of 244 pharmacies in the canton at the subsidized cost of 10 Swiss Francs per participant. Screening included questions on risk behaviors, measurement of body mass index, blood pressure, blood cholesterol, random blood glucose (RBG), and A1c if RBG was ≥7.0 mmol/L. A mass media campaign promoting physical activity and a healthy diet was channeled through several media, eg, 165 spots on radio, billboards in 250 public places, flyers in 360 public transport vehicles, and a dozen articles in several newspapers. A telephone survey in a representative sample of the population of the canton was performed after the campaign to evaluate the program. Results: A total of 4222 participants (0.76% of all persons aged ≥18 years) underwent the screening program (median age: 53 years, 63% females). Among participants not treated for diabetes, 3.7% had RBG ≥ 7.8 mmol/L and 1.8% had both RBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and A1c ≥ 6.5. Untreated blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg and/or untreated cholesterol ≥5.2 mmol/L were found in 50.5% of participants. One or several treated or untreated modifiable risk factors were found in 78% of participants. The telephone survey showed that 53% of all adults in the canton were sensitized by the campaign. Excluding fees paid by the participants, the program incurred a cost of CHF 330,600. Conclusion: A community-based screening program had low efficiency for detecting new cases of diabetes, but it identified large numbers of persons with elevated

  8. High prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indians: A community survey - Chandigarh Urban Diabetes Study (CUDS)

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Rama; Bhansali, Anil; Ravikiran, Muthuswamy; Ravikumar, Padala; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Shanmugasundar, G.; Dutta, Pinaki; Sachdeva, Naresh

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies conducted to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors among different regions of the country show variation in risk factors in different age groups and urban and rural population. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among urban adults in a north Indian city. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 2227 subjects aged ≥ 20 yr were studied from April 2008 to June 2009 in Urban Chandigarh, a north Indian city. Demographic history, anthropometry and blood pressure were assessed. Fasting, and 2 h capillary plasma glucose after 75 g glucose load, HDL-C and triglycerides were estimated. Results: The most prevalent cardiovascular risk factors in the age group of 20-29 yr was sedentary lifestyle (63%), while from fourth decade and onwards, it was overweight/obesity (59-85%). The second most common prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the age group of 20-29 yr was overweight/obesity, in 30-49 yr sedentary lifestyle, in 50-69 yr hypertension and in subjects ≥70 yr, it was hypertriglyceridaemia. The prevalence of overweight/obesity, hypertension, dysglycaemia and smoking was almost double in subjects in the fourth decade of life, as compared to those in the third decade of life. The prevalence of CV risk factors significantly increased with age irrespective of gender and prevalence of low HDL-C was significantly more common in women as compared to men. Interpretation & conclusions: Sedentary lifestyle, obesity and low HDL-C are the most prevalent CV risk factors in subjects in the third and fourth decade of life in this north Indian population and clustering of these cardiovascular risk factors increases with advancing age. Strategies need to be formulated to target this population to prevent the epidemic of cardiovascular disease. PMID:24718400

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus at diagnosis of acromegaly: a study in 148 patients.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulou, Orsalia; Bex, Marie; Kamenicky, Peter; Mvoula, Augustine Bessomo; Chanson, Philippe; Maiter, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    Acromegaly is frequently associated with alterations of glucose metabolism but factors predisposing these patients to exhibit impaired glucose tolerance or overt diabetes at diagnosis are poorly understood. This study included 148 patients with newly diagnosed acromegaly (80 men; mean age: 45 ± 20 year). All patients underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), unless already treated for diabetes. Insulin sensitivity (S) and β-cell function (B) were also evaluated by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) was observed in 67 patients (46 %), impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG) or glucose tolerance (IGT) were found in 39 (26 %), and diabetes mellitus (DM) in 42 (28 %). NGT patients were 10 years younger than patients with abnormal glucose metabolism (p < 0.001) and diabetic patients had a higher BMI (p < 0.05). While HOMA-S was similar, HOMA-B was reduced in the IFG/IGT group (p < 0.05) and further in the DM group (p < 0.001). IGF-I z-score was higher in IFG/IGT (5.2 ± 1.4) and DM patients (5.4 ± 1.3) than in NGT patients (4.4 ± 1.3; p < 0.05), but fasting and post-OGTT GH levels were not different between groups. In multivariate analyses, family history of diabetes and IGF-I were associated with hyperglycaemia, BMI and IGF-I predicted insulin resistance, and age was inversely correlated with β-cell function. Impaired glucose metabolism is present in more than 50 % of patients at diagnosis of acromegaly, and is associated with an older age, a higher BMI, a family history of diabetes and a higher IGF-I z-score, but not with fasting or post-OGTT GH levels.

  10. An after-school dance and lifestyle education program reduces risk factors for heart disease and diabetes in elementary school children

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Jeannette; Diaz, Alejandro; Cid, Margareth Del; Mueller, Charles; Lipman, Elizabeth Grace; Cheruvu, Sunita; Chiu, Ya-lin; Vogiatzi, Maria; Nimkarn, Saroj

    2013-01-01

    Background Forty-three percent of New York City's (NYC) school-age children are overweight or obese, placing them at risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Objective The objective of this study was to determine if an intensive after-school dance and lifestyle education program would reduce risk factors for heart disease, T2DM, and improve lifestyle choices. Subjects Subject include 64 fourth- and fifth-grade students at an elementary school in NYC. Methods Students received freestyle dance and lifestyle classes for 16 weeks and were evaluated for changes in body composition, endurance, biochemical measurements, and lifestyle choices. Results Significant improvements in BMI percentiles were found among children in the overweight and obese categories as well as in endurance and biochemical measurements that reflect heart disease and diabetes risk. Improvement was also reported in lifestyle choices. Conclusion An intensive after-school dance and lifestyle education program can reduce risk factors for heart disease and T2DM and improve lifestyle choices among elementary school children. PMID:22876547

  11. Women at High Risk for Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... 173-199. 3 Dabelea D, Crume T. Maternal environment and the transgenerational cycle of obesity and diabetes. Diabetes Care , 2011;60:1849-1855. 4 Kitzmiller JL, Dang-Kilduff L, Taslimi MM. Gestational diabetes after delivery: short-term management and long-term risks. Diabetes Care. 2007;30: ...

  12. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN. PMID:27648419

  13. Different Risk Indictors of Diabetic Nephropathy in Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 T869C CC/CT Genotype and TT Genotype

    PubMed Central

    MOU, Xin; LIU, Yinghui; ZHOU, Diyi; HU, Yongbin; MA, Guoling; SHOU, Chengmin; CHEN, Jiawei; ZHOU, Danyang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor-beta 1(TGF-β1) T869C (rs1800470, the same below) gene polymorphism is notably relative with the development of Diabetic Nephropathy (DN), and CC/CT genotype diabetic have higher frequency of than TT genotype diabetic. To find out individual risk factors in the two genotypes especially in susceptible genotype could provide more efficient and targeted prevention. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 251 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients [53.4% male, 56(52–67) years] were enrolled in this cohort study. Multiple concerned factors were collected and the relationship of these risk factors and development of DN were evaluated by Cox regression analysis. Hazard ratios of development of DN were calculated by Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazards model for CC/CT genotype versus TT genotype patients. Results: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN in T2DM patients (HR, 2.08; 95%CI, 1.18–3.66; P=0.012). Hyperlipemia (HR, 1.91; 95%CI, 1.19–3.08; P=0.007), age (HR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93–0.98; P=0.001) and smoking status (HR, 2.36; 95%CI, 1.07–5.21; P=0.033) were risk indictors of the development of DN in CC/CT genotype patients. HbA1c (HR, 2.8; 95%CI, 1.07–7.30; P=0.036), hypertension (HR, 7.46; 95%CI, 1.38–40.29; P=0.02), and hyperlipemia (HR, 12.33; 95%CI, 1.05–145.39; P=0.046) were risk indictors for the development of DN in TT genotype patients. Conclusion: TGF-β1 T869C gene polymorphism was an independent predictor of DN for T2DM patients and CC/CT genotype had higher susceptibility to DN. CC/CT genotype and TT genotype patients had different risk indictors of DN.

  14. Sequence variants in SLC16A11 are a common risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Performing genetic studies in multiple human populations can identify disease risk alleles that are common in one population but rare in others1, with the potential to illuminate pathophysiology, health disparities, and the population genetic origins of disease alleles. We analyzed 9.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each of 8,214 Mexicans and Latin Americans: 3,848 with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 4,366 non-diabetic controls. In addition to replicating previous findings2–4, we identified a novel locus associated with T2D at genome-wide significance spanning the solute carriers SLC16A11 and SLC16A13 (P=3.9×10−13; odds ratio (OR)=1.29). The association was stronger in younger, leaner people with T2D, and replicated in independent samples (P=1.1×10−4; OR=1.20). The risk haplotype carries four amino acid substitutions, all in SLC16A11; it is present at ≈50% frequency in Native American samples and ≈10% in East Asian, but rare in European and African samples. Analysis of an archaic genome sequence indicated the risk haplotype introgressed into modern humans via admixture with Neandertals. The SLC16A11 mRNA is expressed in liver, and V5-tagged SLC16A11 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of SLC16A11 in heterologous cells alters lipid metabolism, most notably causing an increase in intracellular triacylglycerol levels. Despite T2D having been well studied by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in other populations, analysis in Mexican and Latin American individuals identified SLC16A11 as a novel candidate gene for T2D with a possible role in triacylglycerol metabolism. PMID:24390345

  15. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Becky; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) and describes the burdens due to NCDs, with an emphasis on diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifies the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 22.7% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings of medical and health data reveal that the risk factors of lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD. The leading causes of death are heart disease, stroke and cancer. The 2009 BRFSS survey reveals that the prevalence rate for diabetes was 9.8%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCDs. There is no overall health plan to address NCDs or diabetes, there is little coordination between the medical care and public health staff, and there is no functional data system to identify, register, and track patients with diabetes. Based on the findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative system and clinical system are identified. PMID:23900536

  16. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    deBrum, Ione; Kedi, Shra; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-associated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll and describes the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and risky lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include sepsis, cancer, diabetes-related deaths, pneumonia, and hypertension. Population-based survey for the RMI show that 62.5% of the adults are overweight or obese and the prevalence of diabetes stands at 19.6%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no policy and procedure manual for the hospital or public health diabetes clinics and there is little communication, coordination, or collaboration between the medical and public health staff. There is no functional data system that allows for the identification, registry, or tracking of patients with diabetes or other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified. PMID:23901367

  17. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David M.; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C.; Bunt, Joy C.; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = −0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism. PMID:18056794

  18. Palmitate action to inhibit glycogen synthase and stimulate protein phosphatase 2A increases with risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mott, David M; Stone, Karen; Gessel, Mary C; Bunt, Joy C; Bogardus, Clifton

    2008-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that abnormal regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is associated with Type 2 diabetes in rodent and human tissues. Results with cultured mouse myotubes support a mechanism for palmitate activation of PP2A, leading to activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3. Phosphorylation and inactivation of glycogen synthase by glycogen synthase kinase 3 could be the mechanism for long-chain fatty acid inhibition of insulin-mediated carbohydrate storage in insulin-resistant subjects. Here, we test the effects of palmitic acid on cultured muscle glycogen synthase and PP2A activities. Palmitate inhibition of glycogen synthase fractional activity is increased in subjects with high body mass index compared with subjects with lower body mass index (r = -0.43, P = 0.03). Palmitate action on PP2A varies from inhibition in subjects with decreased 2-h plasma glucose concentration to activation in subjects with increased 2-h plasma glucose concentration (r = 0.45, P < 0.03) during oral glucose tolerance tests. The results do not show an association between palmitate effects on PP2A and glycogen synthase fractional activity. We conclude that subjects at risk for Type 2 diabetes have intrinsic differences in palmitate regulation of at least two enzymes (PP2A and glycogen synthase), contributing to abnormal insulin regulation of glucose metabolism.

  19. Population Ancestry and Genetic Risk for Diabetes and Kidney, Cardiovascular, and Bone Disease: Modifiable Environmental Factors May Produce the Cures

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D.

    2013-01-01

    Variable rates of disease observed between members of different continental population groups may be mediated by inherited factors, environmental exposures, or their combination. This manuscript provides evidence in support of differential allele frequency distributions that underlie the higher rates of non-diabetic kidney disease in the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis spectrum of disease and lower rates of coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque and osteoporosis in populations of African ancestry. With recognition that these and other common complex diseases are affected by biologic factors comes the realization that targeted manipulation of environmental exposures and pharmacologic treatments will have different effects based on genotype. The current era of precision medicine will couple one’s genetic make-up with specific therapies to reduce rates of disease based on presence of disease-specific alleles. PMID:23896482

  20. An integrative study identifies KCNC2 as a novel predisposing factor for childhood obesity and the risk of diabetes in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Hyo Jung; Go, Min Jin; Jang, Han Byul; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lee, Hye-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. To unravel the genetic determinants of obesity-associated diabetes, we performed a genome-wide study using the 1,000 Genomes-based imputation in a Korean childhood cohort (KoCAS-1, n = 484) and carried out de novo replication in an independent population (KoCAS-2, n = 1,548). A novel variant (rs10879834) with multiple diverse associations for obesity-related traits was also found to be replicated in an adult cohort (KARE, n = 8,842). Functional annotations using integrative epigenetic analyses identified biological significance and regulatory effects with an inverse methylation-expression correlation (cg27154343 in the 5'-UTR of the KCNC2 gene), tissue-specific enhancer mark (H3K4me1), and pathway enrichment (insulin signaling). Further functional studies in cellular and mouse models demonstrated that KCNC2 is associated with anti-obesogenic effects in the regulation of obesity-induced insulin resistance. KCNC2 shRNA transfection induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overproduction of KCNC2 decreased ER stress, and treatment with metformin enhanced KCNC2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that reduction of KCNC2 is associated with modified hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased ER stress on obesity-mediated diabetic risk. An integrative multi-omics analysis might reveal new functional and clinical implications related to the control of energy and metabolic homeostasis in humans. PMID:27623749

  1. An integrative study identifies KCNC2 as a novel predisposing factor for childhood obesity and the risk of diabetes in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Hyo Jung; Go, Min Jin; Jang, Han Byul; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lee, Hye-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. To unravel the genetic determinants of obesity-associated diabetes, we performed a genome-wide study using the 1,000 Genomes-based imputation in a Korean childhood cohort (KoCAS-1, n = 484) and carried out de novo replication in an independent population (KoCAS-2, n = 1,548). A novel variant (rs10879834) with multiple diverse associations for obesity-related traits was also found to be replicated in an adult cohort (KARE, n = 8,842). Functional annotations using integrative epigenetic analyses identified biological significance and regulatory effects with an inverse methylation-expression correlation (cg27154343 in the 5'-UTR of the KCNC2 gene), tissue-specific enhancer mark (H3K4me1), and pathway enrichment (insulin signaling). Further functional studies in cellular and mouse models demonstrated that KCNC2 is associated with anti-obesogenic effects in the regulation of obesity-induced insulin resistance. KCNC2 shRNA transfection induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overproduction of KCNC2 decreased ER stress, and treatment with metformin enhanced KCNC2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that reduction of KCNC2 is associated with modified hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased ER stress on obesity-mediated diabetic risk. An integrative multi-omics analysis might reveal new functional and clinical implications related to the control of energy and metabolic homeostasis in humans.

  2. Delay in the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Crossover Point as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Varela, Manuel; Vigil, Luis; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vargas, Borja; García-Carretero, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) measures the complexity of a glucose time series obtained by means of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) and has proven to be a sensitive marker of glucoregulatory dysfunction. Furthermore, some authors have observed a crossover point in the DFA, signalling a change of dynamics, arguably dependent on the beta-insular function. We investigate whether the characteristics of this crossover point have any influence on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To this end we recruited 206 patients at increased risk of T2DM (because of obesity, essential hypertension, or a first-degree relative with T2DM). A CGMS time series was obtained, from which the DFA and the crossover point were calculated. Patients were then followed up every 6 months for a mean of 17.5 months, controlling for the appearance of T2DM diagnostic criteria. The time to crossover point was a significant predictor risk of developing T2DM, even after adjusting for other variables. The angle of the crossover was not predictive by itself but became significantly protective when the model also considered the crossover point. In summary, both a delay and a blunting of the crossover point predict the development of T2DM.

  3. Delay in the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis Crossover Point as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Manuel; Vigil, Luis; Rodriguez, Carmen; Vargas, Borja; García-Carretero, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) measures the complexity of a glucose time series obtained by means of a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) and has proven to be a sensitive marker of glucoregulatory dysfunction. Furthermore, some authors have observed a crossover point in the DFA, signalling a change of dynamics, arguably dependent on the beta-insular function. We investigate whether the characteristics of this crossover point have any influence on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To this end we recruited 206 patients at increased risk of T2DM (because of obesity, essential hypertension, or a first-degree relative with T2DM). A CGMS time series was obtained, from which the DFA and the crossover point were calculated. Patients were then followed up every 6 months for a mean of 17.5 months, controlling for the appearance of T2DM diagnostic criteria. The time to crossover point was a significant predictor risk of developing T2DM, even after adjusting for other variables. The angle of the crossover was not predictive by itself but became significantly protective when the model also considered the crossover point. In summary, both a delay and a blunting of the crossover point predict the development of T2DM. PMID:27294154

  4. I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Can Lower My Risk for Type 2 Diabetes: A Guide for American Indians Research Gives Hope Diabetes Can Be Prevented "After I started exercising and ... other risk factors for heart disease. What is diabetes? Diabetes causes blood glucose levels to be above ...

  5. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Tolenoa, Nena; Taulung, Livinson; Mongkeya, Maria; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae and describes the burdens due to NCDs, including diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 13.9% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to nutrition and metabolic diseases followed by diseases of the circulatory system. Data from selected community programs show that the prevalence of overweight and obese participants ranged between 82% and 95% and the rate of reported diabetes ranged from 13% to 14%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified that need to be addressed to begin to mitigate the burdens of NCDs among the residents of Kosrae State. PMID:23900387

  6. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Tolenoa, Nena; Taulung, Livinson; Mongkeya, Maria; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Kosrae and describes the burdens due to NCDs, including diabetes, and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 13.9% decline in the population between 2000 and 2010. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to nutrition and metabolic diseases followed by diseases of the circulatory system. Data from selected community programs show that the prevalence of overweight and obese participants ranged between 82% and 95% and the rate of reported diabetes ranged from 13% to 14%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified that need to be addressed to begin to mitigate the burdens of NCDs among the residents of Kosrae State.

  7. Prevalence of High Non-high-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Associated Risk Factors in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus in Jilin Province, China: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Zhen, Qing; Li, Yong; Kou, Chang Gui; Tao, Yu Chun; Wang, Chang; Kanu, Joseph Sam; Lu, Yu Ping; Yu, Ming Xi; Zhang, Hui Ping; Yu, Ya Qin; Li, Bo; Liu, Ya Wen

    2016-07-01

    Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in patients with diabetes, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) is a better predictor of CVDs than low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in patients with diabetes. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the distribution of non-HDL-C and the prevalence of high non-HDL-C level in Chinese patients with diabetes mellitus and identify the associated risk factors. Non-HDL-C concentration positively correlated with total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-C concentrations. Although both non-HDL-C and LDL-C concentration both related positively with TC concentration, the magnitude of correlation was relatively higher for non-HDL-C. The prevalence of high non-HDL-C (⋝4.14 mmol/L) was higher in two age groups (55-64 years: 46.7%; 65-79 years: 47.3%) than other age groups (18-24 years: 4.2%; 25-34 years: 43.6%; 35-44 years: 38.1%; 45-54 years: 41.0%). It was also higher among overweight (45.1%), generally obese (50.9%), or abdominally obese (47.3%) subjects, compared with normal weight subjects (34.5%). The risk of high non-HDL-C increased with advancing age. Both general obesity [odds ratio (OR)=1.488, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.003-2.209] and abdominal obesity (OR=1.561, 95% CI: 1.101-2.214) were significantly associated with high non-HDL-C levels. PMID:27554125

  8. Risk of Cancer in Diabetes: The Effect of Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Mojtaba; Emami, Zahra; Khamseh, Mohammad E.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is the second cause of death. Association of diabetes as a growing and costly disease with cancer is a major health concern. Meanwhile, preexisting diabetes is associated with an increased risk of all-cause and cancer-specific mortalities. Presence of diabetes related comorbidities, poorer response to cancer treatment, and excess mortality related to diabetes are among the most important explanations. Although diabetes appear to be a risk factor for cancer and is associated with the mortality risk in cancer patients, several factors such as diabetes duration, multiple drug therapy, and the presence of diabetes comorbidities make the assessment of the effect of diabetes treatment on cancer risk and mortality difficult. Metformin is the drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The available evidence from basic science, clinical, and population-based research supports the anticancer effect of metformin. However, randomized controlled clinical trials do not provide enough evidence for a strong protective effect of metformin on cancer incidence or mortality. One of the most important limitations of these trials is the short duration of the followup. Further long-term randomized controlled clinical trials specifically designed to determine metformin effect on cancer risk are needed to provide the best answer to this challenge. PMID:24224094

  9. Transcription Factor 7-Like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 Polymorphism as a Risk Factor for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Chao; Lin, Wei-Ting; Yeh, Yao-Hsien; Wung, Shu-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Background There are racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Prior meta-analyses included small samples and very limited non-Caucasian populations. Studies to determine the relationship between transcription factor 7 like-2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 polymorphism and risk of GDM in Hispanics/Latinos are recently available. The present meta-analysis was to estimate the impact of allele variants of TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism on GDM susceptibility in overall population and racial/ethnic subgroups. Methods Literature was searched in multiple databases including PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE (Ovid SP), Airiti Library, Medline Complete, and ProQuest up to July 2015. Allelic frequency for TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism in GDM and control subjects was extracted and statistical analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis (CMA) 2.0 statistical software. The association between TCF7L2 rs7903146 polymorphism and GDM risk was assessed by pooled odd ratios (ORs) using five gene models (dominant, recessive, homozygote, heterozygote, and allele). Stratified analysis based on race/ethnicity was also conducted. The between-study heterogeneity and contribution of each single study to the final result was tested by Cochran Q test and sensitivity analyses, respectively. Publication bias was evaluated using Egger’s linear regression test. Results A total of 16 studies involving 4,853 cases and 10,631 controls were included in this meta-analysis. Significant association between the T-allele of rs7903146 and GDM risk was observed under all genetic models, dominant model (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.19–1.74), recessive model (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.08–1.70), heterozygous model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12–1.53), homozygous model (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.31–2.12), and allele model (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.12–1.53). Stratified analysis by race/ethnicity showed a statistically significant association between rs7903146 polymorphism and

  10. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: Application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Liese, Angela D.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Tooze, Janet A.; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C.; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1diabetes in youth and capitalize on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Research Design and Methods Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically-consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, applying ME adjustment. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQs and three 24-hour dietary recalls within one month. The full sample included 2,286 youth with type 1 diabetes. Results SSB intake was significantly associated with higher triglycerides, total and LDL-cholesterol, adjusted for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, gender, education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately threefold) after application of the NCI method than without ME adjustment. Compared to individuals consuming one serving of SSB every two weeks, those who consumed one serving every two days had 3.7 mg/dL higher triglycerides, 4.0 mg/dL higher total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, adjusted for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Conclusions Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1diabetes and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of measurement error. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for measurement error when studying the influence of diet on health status. PMID:26177613

  11. Sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile in youth with type 1 diabetes: application of measurement error methodology in the SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study.

    PubMed

    Liese, Angela D; Crandell, Jamie L; Tooze, Janet A; Kipnis, Victor; Bell, Ronny; Couch, Sarah C; Dabelea, Dana; Crume, Tessa L; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-08-14

    The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study aims to investigate the role of dietary intake on the development of long-term complications of type 1 diabetes in youth, and capitalise on measurement error (ME) adjustment methodology. Using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) method for episodically consumed foods, we evaluated the relationship between sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and cardiovascular risk factor profile, with the application of ME adjustment methodology. The calibration sample included 166 youth with two FFQ and three 24 h dietary recall data within 1 month. The full sample included 2286 youth with type 1 diabetes. SSB intake was significantly associated with higher TAG, total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for energy, age, diabetes duration, race/ethnicity, sex and education. The estimated effect size was larger (model coefficients increased approximately 3-fold) after the application of the NCI method than without adjustment for ME. Compared with individuals consuming one serving of SSB every 2 weeks, those who consumed one serving of SSB every 2 d had 3.7 mg/dl (0.04 mmol/l) higher TAG concentrations and 4.0 mg/dl (0.10 mmol/l) higher total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol concentrations, after adjusting for ME and covariates. SSB intake was not associated with measures of adiposity and blood pressure. Our findings suggest that SSB intake is significantly related to increased lipid levels in youth with type 1 diabetes, and that estimates of the effect size of SSB on lipid levels are severely attenuated in the presence of ME. Future studies in youth with diabetes should consider a design that will allow for the adjustment for ME when studying the influence of diet on health status.

  12. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Robina; Keller, Elizabeth; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifies the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension. Population survey data show that 32.1% of the adult population had diabetes with a higher rate among women (37.1%) when compared to men (26.4%). The data also showed that 73.1% of the adult population was overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no overall planning document for the prevention and control of NCDs or diabetes. There is evidence of little communication among the medical and health care providers which leads to fragmentation of care and loss of continuity of care. Based on some of the findings, priority issues and problems that need to be addressed for the administrative and clinical systems are identified. PMID:23900565

  13. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Anson, Robina; Keller, Elizabeth; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Pohnpei and describes the burden due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifies the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. Leading causes of death were due to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension. Population survey data show that 32.1% of the adult population had diabetes with a higher rate among women (37.1%) when compared to men (26.4%). The data also showed that 73.1% of the adult population was overweight or obese. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no overall planning document for the prevention and control of NCDs or diabetes. There is evidence of little communication among the medical and health care providers which leads to fragmentation of care and loss of continuity of care. Based on some of the findings, priority issues and problems that need to be addressed for the administrative and clinical systems are identified.

  14. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Yurow, Julie; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap, and describes the burdens due to diabetes and other NCDs (heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic renal disease), and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 1.2% increase in the population between 2000 and 2010; however, there was a significant increase in the 45-64 year old age group. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Local household surveys show that 63% to 80% of the adults and 20.5% to 33.8% of the children were overweight or obese. The surveys also showed that 23% of the adult population had diabetes and 35% were hypertensive. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is a policy and procedure manual that guides the NCD staff. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes and other NCDs. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified.

  15. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yurow, Julie; Lippwe, Kipier; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Federated States of Micronesia, State of Yap, and describes the burdens due to diabetes and other NCDs (heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic renal disease), and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. There has been a 1.2% increase in the population between 2000 and 2010; however, there was a significant increase in the 45–64 year old age group. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are a significant factor in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Local household surveys show that 63% to 80% of the adults and 20.5% to 33.8% of the children were overweight or obese. The surveys also showed that 23% of the adult population had diabetes and 35% were hypertensive. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is a policy and procedure manual that guides the NCD staff. There is no functional data system that is able to identify, register, or track patients with diabetes and other NCDs. Priority administrative and clinical issues were identified. PMID:23900490

  16. A Retrospective Study in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome: Diabetic Risk Factor Response to Daily Consumption of Agaricus bisporus (White Button Mushrooms).

    PubMed

    Calvo, Mona S; Mehrotra, Anita; Beelman, Robert B; Nadkarni, Girish; Wang, Lingzhi; Cai, Weijing; Goh, Boon Cher; Kalaras, Michael D; Uribarri, Jaime

    2016-09-01

    Adults with metabolic syndrome from different race/ethnicities are often predisposed to developing type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, growing evidence suggests that healthy diets and lifestyle choices can significantly slow or prevent progression to T2D. This poorly understood relationship to healthy dietary patterns and prevention of T2D motivated us to conduct a retrospective analysis to determine the potential impact of a minor dietary lifestyle change (daily mushroom consumption) on known T2D risk factors in racially diverse adults with confirmed features of the metabolic syndrome. Retrospectively, we studied 37 subjects who had participated in a dietary intervention focused on vitamin D bioavailability from white button mushrooms (WBM). All 37 had previously completed a 16-week study where they consumed 100 g of WBM daily and were then followed-up for one month during which no mushrooms were consumed. We analyzed differences in serum risk factors from baseline to 16-week, and from baseline to one-month follow-up. Measurement of serum diabetic risk factors included inflammatory and oxidative stress markers and the antioxidant component naturally rich in mushrooms, ergothioneine. Significant beneficial health effects were observed at 16-week with the doubling of ergothioneine from baseline, increases in the antioxidant marker ORAC (oxygen radical absorption capacity) and anti-inflammatory hormone, adiponectin and significant decreases in serum oxidative stress inducing factors, carboxymethyllysine (CML) and methylglyoxal (MG), but no change in the lipid oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane, leptin or measures of insulin resistance or glucose metabolism. We conclude that WBM contain a variety of compounds with potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant health benefits that can occur with frequent consumption over time in adults predisposed to T2D. Well-controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings and identify the specific mushroom components

  17. Comparison of Optimal Cardiovascular Risk Factor Management in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Who Attended Urban Medical Health Center with those Attended a Tertiary Care Center: Experiences from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Sedighe; Haji Ghanbari, Mohammad Javad; Ebrahimi, Hedyeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD accounts for primary cause of death among diabetic patients. Physicians, especially in the primary care setting, have effective role in the management of cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, we aimed to compare the prevalence of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in Type 2 diabetic patients attending to an urban health center as a primary care center with Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism Diabetes Clinic (IEMDC) as a tertiary center. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 200 adult diabetic patients attending urban health center (Abouzar Health Center) and 201 diabetic patients in a tertiary center. The patients’ cardiovascular risk factors including lipid profile, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), and smoking history were recorded. The number of patients who did not achieve the target according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines was determined and compared. Results: The patients in urban health center were older than those who attending IEMDC (P = 0.004). The duration of diabetes was longer among urban center patients (P < 0.001). Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors between two groups of patients showed a significant number of patients with poor-controlled low-density lipoprotein (75% vs. 44.7%) and triglyceride (74% vs. 51.7%) in patients attending primary center (P < 0.001). However, the prevalence of high diastolic BP (60.6% vs. 44.5%) was significantly higher in patients attending IEMDC (P = 0.001). There was no significant difference between the two centers’ findings in glycosylated hemoglobin level, high-density lipoprotein level, and systolic BP. Conclusions: Both centers have failure in target achievement in some risk factors; however, the inability of the primary care center in controlling hyperlipidemia in comparison with the tertiary center is a serious warning to provide training about managing

  18. Childhood type 2 diabetes: Risks and complications

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ying; Gao, Min; Gao, Yiqing

    2016-01-01

    The universal endocrine pathological state affecting young individuals and adults is type 2 diabetes mellitus, which has seen a significant increase in the last 30 years, particularly in children. Genetic and evnironmental factors are the causative agents for this pathological state in children. This rapid and wide spread of the disease can be controlled by enforcing amendments in environmental factors such as diet, physical activities and obesity. In young infants breastfeeding may be a key modulator of the disease. Associated disorders co-observed in the patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus include renal failure, heart problems and circulatory dysfunctionalities, such as cardiac failure and vision disability. These associated disorders become more pronounced in young patients when they reach puberty. To overcome the lethal outcomes of the disease, early screening of the disease is crucial. The present review focused on the latest updates in the field, as well as plausible risks and complications of this pathological state. PMID:27703500

  19. Hemostatic risk factors in patients with coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes - a two year follow-up of 243 patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Backgound Thrombosis is regarded to be a key factor in the development of acute coronary syndromes in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesize, that hemostatic and rheological risk factors may be of major relevance for the incidence and the risk stratification of these patients. Methods In 243 patients with coronary artery disease and stable angina pectoris parameters of metabolism, hemostasis, blood rheology and endogenous fibrinolysis were assessed. Patients were prospectively followed for 2 years in respect to elective revascularizations and acute coronary syndromes. Results During follow-up 88 patients presented with cardiac events, 22 of those were admitted to the hospital because of acute events, 5 Patients were excluded due to non- cardiac death. Patients with clinical events were found to be more frequently diabetic and presented with a more progressed coronary atherosclerosis. Even though patients with diabetes mellitus demonstrated a comparable level of multivessel disease (71% vs. 70%) the rate of elective revascularization was higher (41% vs. 28%, p < 0.05). The results were also unfavorable for the incidence of acute cardiovascular events (18% vs. 8%, p < 0.01). In comparison to non-diabetic patients diabetics demonstrated significantly elevated levels of fibrinogen (352 ± 76 vs. 312 ± 64 mg/dl, p < 0.01), plasma viscosity (1.38 ± 0.23 vs. 1.31 ± 0.16 mPas, p < 0.01), red blood cell aggregation (13.2 ± 2.5 vs. 12.1 ± 3.1 E, p < 0.05) and plasmin-activator-inhibitor (6.11 ± 3.4 vs. 4.7 ± 2.7 U/l, p < 0.05). Conclusion Pathological alterations of fibrinogen, blood rheology and plasminogen-activator-inhibtor as indicators of a procoagulant state are of major relevance for the short-term incidence of cardiac events, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2, and may be used to stratify patients to specific therapies. PMID:19735543

  20. Menopause and risk of diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Catherine; Edelstein, Sharon L.; Crandall, Jill P.; Dabelea, Dana; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Hamman, Richard F.; Montez, Maria G.; Perreault, Leigh; Foulkes, Mary A.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study objective was to examine the association between menopause status and diabetes risk among women with glucose intolerance and to determine if menopausal status modifies response to diabetes prevention interventions. Methods The study population included women in premenopause (n=708), natural postmenopause (n=328), and bilateral oophorectomy (n=201) in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a randomized placebo-controlled trial of lifestyle intervention and metformin among glucose intolerant adults. Associations between menopause and diabetes risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard models that adjusted for demographic variables (age, race/ethnicity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes mellitus), waist circumference, insulin resistance and corrected insulin response. Similar models were constructed after stratification by menopause type and hormone therapy (HT) use. Results After adjustment for age, there was no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk. Differences by study arm were observed in women who reported bilateral oophorectomy. In the lifestyle arm, women with bilateral oophorectomy had a lower adjusted hazard for diabetes (HR 0.19, 95% CI 0.04, 0.94), although observations were too few to determine if this was independent of HT use. No significant differences were seen in the metformin (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.63, 2.64) or placebo arms (HR 1.37, 95% CI 0.74, 2.55). Conclusions Among women at high-risk for diabetes, natural menopause was not associated with diabetes risk and did not affect response to diabetes prevention interventions. In the lifestyle intervention, bilateral oophorectomy was associated with decreased diabetes risk. PMID:21709591

  1. Alterations in left ventricular, left atrial, and right ventricular structure and function to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited. Echocardiography was performed in the last year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial (median 4.5 yr from diagnosis of T2D, average age 18 yr), incl...

  2. Long Term Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention on Weight and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes: Four Year Results of the Look AHEAD Trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective Lifestyle interventions produce short-term improvements in glycemia and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in individuals with type 2 diabetes, but no long-term data are available. We examined the effects of a lifestyle intervention on changes in weight, fitness and cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors over 4 years. Research Design and Methods Look AHEAD is a multi-center randomized clinical trial comparing the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) and diabetes support and education (DSE, control group) on the incidence of major CVD events in 5145 individuals with type diabetes, aged 45 to 76 years, who were overweight or obese (BMI > 25 kg/m2). Participants have ongoing intervention and annual assessments. Results Averaged across four years of follow-up, participants in ILI had greater percent weight losses than those in DSE (−6.15% vs −0.88%, p<.0001) and greater improvements in fitness (12.74% vs. 1.96%, p < .0001), HbA1c (A1c, −0.36% vs. 0.09%, p<.0001), systolic blood pressure (SBP, −5.33 vs. −2.97 mmHg, p<.0001), diastolic blood pressure (DBP, −2.92 vs. −2.48 mmHg, p<.012), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C, 3.67 vs. 1.97 mg/dl, p<.0001), and triglycerides (−25.56 vs. −19.75 mg/dl, p<.0006). Reductions in LDL-C were greater in DSE than ILI (−11.27 vs. −12.84 mg/dl, p=.009), but adjusted for medication use, changes in LDL-C did not differ between the two groups. Although the greatest benefits were often seen at 1 year, ILI participants still had greater improvements than DSE in weight, fitness, HbA1c, SBP, and HDL-C at 4 years. Conclusions Intensive lifestyle intervention can produce and maintain significant weight losses and improvements in fitness in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Across four years of follow-up, those in ILI had better overall levels of glycemic control, blood pressure, HDL-C and triglycerides, and thus spent considerable time with lower CVD risk. Whether this translates to reduction in CVD events will

  3. A comparison of customised and prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration: a participant-blinded randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neuropathic diabetic foot ulceration may be prevented if the mechanical stress transmitted to the plantar tissues is reduced. Insole therapy is one practical method commonly used to reduce plantar loads and ulceration risk. The type of insole best suited to achieve this is unknown. This trial compared custom-made functional insoles with prefabricated insoles to reduce risk factors for ulceration of neuropathic diabetic feet. Method A participant-blinded randomised controlled trial recruited 119 neuropathic participants with diabetes who were randomly allocated to custom-made functional or prefabricated insoles. Data were collected at issue and six month follow-up using the F-scan in-shoe pressure measurement system. Primary outcomes were: peak pressure, forefoot pressure time integral, total contact area, forefoot rate of load, duration of load as a percentage of stance. Secondary outcomes were patient perceived foot health (Bristol Foot Score), quality of life (Audit of Diabetes Dependent Quality of Life). We also assessed cost of supply and fitting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Results There were no differences between insoles in peak pressure, or three of the other four kinetic measures. The custom-made functional insole was slightly more effective than the prefabricated insole in reducing forefoot pressure time integral at issue (27% vs. 22%), remained more effective at six month follow-up (30% vs. 24%, p=0.001), but was more expensive (UK £656 vs. £554, p<0.001). Full compliance (minimum wear 7 hours a day 7 days per week) was reported by 40% of participants and 76% of participants reported a minimum wear of 5 hours a day 5 days per week. There was no difference in patient perception between insoles. Conclusion The custom-made insoles are more expensive than prefabricated insoles evaluated in this trial and no better in reducing peak pressure. We recommend that where clinically appropriate, the more cost effective prefabricated insole

  4. An integrative study identifies KCNC2 as a novel predisposing factor for childhood obesity and the risk of diabetes in the Korean population

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Lee, Hyo Jung; Go, Min Jin; Jang, Han Byul; Park, Sang Ick; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lee, Hye-Ja

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. To unravel the genetic determinants of obesity-associated diabetes, we performed a genome-wide study using the 1,000 Genomes-based imputation in a Korean childhood cohort (KoCAS-1, n = 484) and carried out de novo replication in an independent population (KoCAS-2, n = 1,548). A novel variant (rs10879834) with multiple diverse associations for obesity-related traits was also found to be replicated in an adult cohort (KARE, n = 8,842). Functional annotations using integrative epigenetic analyses identified biological significance and regulatory effects with an inverse methylation-expression correlation (cg27154343 in the 5′-UTR of the KCNC2 gene), tissue-specific enhancer mark (H3K4me1), and pathway enrichment (insulin signaling). Further functional studies in cellular and mouse models demonstrated that KCNC2 is associated with anti-obesogenic effects in the regulation of obesity-induced insulin resistance. KCNC2 shRNA transfection induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and hepatic gluconeogenesis. Overproduction of KCNC2 decreased ER stress, and treatment with metformin enhanced KCNC2 expression. Taken together, these data suggest that reduction of KCNC2 is associated with modified hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased ER stress on obesity-mediated diabetic risk. An integrative multi-omics analysis might reveal new functional and clinical implications related to the control of energy and metabolic homeostasis in humans. PMID:27623749

  5. Association between fish and shellfish, and omega-3 PUFAs intake and CVD risk factors in middle-aged female patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyesook; Park, Seokyung; Yang, Hyesu; Choi, Young Ju; Huh, Kap Bum

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This study was performed to investigate the association between the dietary intake of fish and shellfish, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the middle-aged Korean female patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D). SUBJECTS/METHODS A cross-sectional analysis was performed with 356 female patients (means age: 55.5 years), who were recruited from the Huh's Diabetes Clinic in Seoul, Korea between 2005 and 2011. The dietary intake was assessed by a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and analyzed using the Computer Aided Nutritional Analysis program (CAN-Pro) version 4.0 software. RESULTS In a multiple regression analysis after the adjustment for confounding factors such as age, BMI, duration of diagnosed T2D, alcohol consumption, fiber intake, sodium intake, and total energy intake, fish and shellfish intake of the subjects was negatively associated with triglyceride and pulse wave velocity (PWV). Omega-3 PUFAs intake was negatively associated with triglyceride, systolic blood pressures, diastolic blood pressures, and PWV. The multiple logistic regression analysis with the covariates showed a significant inverse relationship between the omega-3 PUFAs consumption and prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [OR (95% CI) for greater than the median compared to less than the median: 0.395 (0.207-0.753)]. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that the consumption of fish and shellfish, good sources of omega-3 PUFAs, may reduce the risk factors for CVD in the middle-aged female patients with T2D. PMID:26425279

  6. Insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes: what is 'double diabetes' and what are the risks?

    PubMed

    Cleland, S J; Fisher, B M; Colhoun, H M; Sattar, N; Petrie, J R

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we explore the concept of 'double diabetes', a combination of type 1 diabetes with features of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. After considering whether double diabetes is a useful concept, we discuss potential mechanisms of increased insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes before examining the extent to which double diabetes might increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We then go on to consider the proposal that weight gain from intensive insulin regimens may be associated with increased CV risk factors in some patients with type 1 diabetes, and explore the complex relationships between weight gain, insulin resistance, glycaemic control and CV outcome. Important comparisons and contrasts between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are highlighted in terms of hepatic fat, fat partitioning and lipid profile, and how these may differ between type 1 diabetic patients with and without double diabetes. In so doing, we hope this work will stimulate much-needed research in this area and an improvement in clinical practice. PMID:23613085

  7. Plasma IL-1Ra: linking hyperapoB to risk factors for type 2 diabetes independent of obesity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, S; Saint-Pierre, N; Lamantia, V; Cyr, Y; Wassef, H; Faraj, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective: Plasma apoB predicts the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, the link between apoB-linpoproteins and risks for T2D remain unclear. Insulin resistance (IR) and compensatory hyperinsulinemia characterize prediabetes, and the involvement of an activated interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, mainly IL-1β and its receptor antagonist (IL-Ra), is well documented. ApoB-lipoproteins were reported to promote IL-1β secretion in immune cells; however, in vivo evidence is lacking. We hypothesized that obese subjects with hyperapoB have an activated IL-1 system that explains hyperinsulinemia and IR in these subjects. Subjects/Methods: We examined 81 well-characterized normoglycemic men and postmenopausal women (⩾27 kg m−2, 45–74 years, non-smokers, sedentary, free of chronic disease). Insulin secretion and sensitivity were measured by the gold-standard Botnia clamp, which is a combination of a 1-h intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) followed by 3-h hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Results: Plasma IL-1β was near detection limit (0.071–0.216 pg ml−1), while IL-1Ra accumulated at 1000-folds higher (77–1068 pg ml−1). Plasma apoB (0.34–1.80 g l−1) associated significantly with hypersinsulinemia (totalIVGTT: C-peptide r=0.27, insulin r=0.22), IR (M/I=−0.29) and plasma IL-1Ra (r=0.26) but not with IL-1β. Plasma IL-1Ra associated with plasma IL-1β (r=0.40), and more strongly with hyperinsulinemia and IR than apoB, while the association of plasma IL-1β was limited to second phase and total insulin secretion (r=0.23). Adjusting the association of plasma apoB to hyperinsulinemia and IR for IL-1Ra eliminated these associations. Furthermore, despite equivalent body composition, subjects with hyperapoB (⩾80th percentile, 1.14 g l−1) had higher C-peptide secretion and lower insulin sensitivity than those with low plasma apoB (⩽20th percentile, 0.78 g l−1). Adjustment for plasma IL-1 Ra eliminated all

  8. Excess cardiovascular risk in diabetic women: a case for intensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Recarti, C; Sep, S J S; Stehouwer, C D A; Unger, T

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes is a common and rapidly growing disease that affects more than 380 million people worldwide and is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease with differential effects on women compared to men. While the general population of women, particularly young women, has more favourable cardiovascular risk profiles than men, this protective effect has been shown to be lost or even reversed in diabetic women. Several studies have demonstrated a significant diabetes-associated excess risk of cardiovascular disease in women. Sex-specific differences in risk factors associated with diabetes and their management may be responsible for the relative excess cardiovascular risk in women with diabetes. Diabetic women need intensive treatment in order to optimize management of cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the excess cardiovascular risk in diabetic women in order to tailor prevention and treatment strategies.

  9. Identification of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors Using Phenotypes Consisting of Anthropometry and Triglycerides based on Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum Ju; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The hypertriglyceridemic waist (HW) phenotype is strongly associated with type 2 diabetes; however, to date, no study has assessed the predictive power of phenotypes based on individual anthropometric measurements and triglyceride (TG) levels. The aims of the present study were to assess the association between the HW phenotype and type 2 diabetes in Korean adults and to evaluate the predictive power of various phenotypes consisting of combinations of individual anthropometric measurements and TG levels. Between November 2006 and August 2013, 11,937 subjects participated in this retrospective cross-sectional study. We measured fasting plasma glucose and TG levels and performed anthropometric measurements. We employed binary logistic regression (LR) to examine statistically significant differences between normal subjects and those with type 2 diabetes using HW and individual anthropometric measurements. For more reliable prediction results, two machine learning algorithms, naive Bayes (NB) and LR, were used to evaluate the predictive power of various phenotypes. All prediction experiments were performed using a tenfold cross validation method. Among all of the variables, the presence of HW was most strongly associated with type 2 diabetes (p < 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.07 [95% CI, 1.72-2.49] in men; p < 0.001, adjusted OR = 2.09 [1.79-2.45] in women). When comparing waist circumference (WC) and TG levels as components of the HW phenotype, the association between WC and type 2 diabetes was greater than the association between TG and type 2 diabetes. The phenotypes tended to have higher predictive power in women than in men. Among the phenotypes, the best predictors of type 2 diabetes were waist-to-hip ratio + TG in men (AUC by NB = 0.653, AUC by LR = 0.661) and rib-to-hip ratio + TG in women (AUC by NB = 0.73, AUC by LR = 0.735). Although the presence of HW demonstrated the strongest association with type 2 diabetes, the predictive power of the combined

  10. Identification of Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors Using Phenotypes Consisting of Anthropometry and Triglycerides based on Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bum Ju; Kim, Jong Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The hypertriglyceridemic waist (HW) phenotype is strongly associated with type 2 diabetes; however, to date, no study has assessed the predictive power of phenotypes based on individual anthropometric measurements and triglyceride (TG) levels. The aims of the present study were to assess the association between the HW phenotype and type 2 diabetes in Korean adults and to evaluate the predictive power of various phenotypes consisting of combinations of individual anthropometric measurements and TG levels. Between November 2006 and August 2013, 11,937 subjects participated in this retrospective cross-sectional study. We measured fasting plasma glucose and TG levels and performed anthropometric measurements. We employed binary logistic regression (LR) to examine statistically significant differences between normal subjects and those with type 2 diabetes using HW and individual anthropometric measurements. For more reliable prediction results, two machine learning algorithms, naive Bayes (NB) and LR, were used to evaluate the predictive power of various phenotypes. All prediction experiments were performed using a tenfold cross validation method. Among all of the variables, the presence of HW was most strongly associated with type 2 diabetes (p < 0.001, adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.07 [95% CI, 1.72-2.49] in men; p < 0.001, adjusted OR = 2.09 [1.79-2.45] in women). When comparing waist circumference (WC) and TG levels as components of the HW phenotype, the association between WC and type 2 diabetes was greater than the association between TG and type 2 diabetes. The phenotypes tended to have higher predictive power in women than in men. Among the phenotypes, the best predictors of type 2 diabetes were waist-to-hip ratio + TG in men (AUC by NB = 0.653, AUC by LR = 0.661) and rib-to-hip ratio + TG in women (AUC by NB = 0.73, AUC by LR = 0.735). Although the presence of HW demonstrated the strongest association with type 2 diabetes, the predictive power of the combined

  11. Impact of socioeconomic and risk factors on cardiovascular disease and type II diabetes in Australia: comparison of results from longitudinal and cross-sectional designs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjing; Kinfu, Yohannes

    2016-01-01

    Objective Existing large-scale studies do not take into account comorbidity or control for selection and endogeneity biases. This study addresses these shortcomings. Participants We use information on individuals aged between 35 and 70 years from a nationally representative longitudinal survey conducted in Australia between 2001 and 2013. Participants were approached annually, and updates on their characteristics, including health status, were ascertained through self-reporting. Method We develop three different analytical designs. The first model is a cross-sectional analysis against which our improved models are compared. In the second model, we follow the same approach but control for prior health conditions. The last preferred model additionally adjusts for characteristics and risk profile of respondents prior to onset of conditions. It also allows for comorbidity and controls for selection bias. Results Once comorbidity and changes over time in the participant's characteristics are controlled for, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption and physical activity exhibit a stronger impact than in the models without these controls. A unit increase in BMI increases the risk of developing a cardiovascular disease (CVD) condition within 2 years by 1.3 percentage points (β=0.11, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.16) and regular alcohol intake increases the risk of CVD by 3.0 percentage points (β=0.24, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.39). Both factors lose significance without proper control for endogenous behavioural change. We also note that frequent physical activity reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 0.9 percentage point (β=−0.40, 95% CI −0.72 to −0.07). Conclusions Our result shows a greater importance of certain lifestyle and risk factors than was previously suggested. PMID:27053269

  12. A Combination of Prebiotic Inulin and Oligofructose Improve Some of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Women with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Khalili, Mohammad; Mirtaheri, Elham; Pourghassem Gargari, Bahram; Tavakoli, Farnaz; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Babaei, Hossein; Dehghan, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of oligofructose-enriched inulin on some of cardiovascular disease risk factors in women with type 2 diabetes. Methods: 52 females (25diabetes were randomly assigned to two groups. Participants received 10g/d oligofructose-enriched inulin (n=27) or 10g/d placebo (n=25) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken to measure metabolic profiles, malondialdehyd and antioxidant enzymes at baseline and after the 8 weeks intervention. Paired, unpaired sample t-test and analysis of covariance were used to comparison of quantitative variables. Results: After 8 weeks, in the oligofructose-enriched inulin group there was a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity (0.2 mmol/l, 20.0%) and a significant decrease in fasting plasma glucose (19.2 mg/dL, 9.4%) HbA1c (0.5%, 8.4%), total cholesterol (TC) (28.0 mg/dL, 14.1%), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) (22.0 mg/dL, 21.7%), TC/HDL-c ratio (0.73, 20.7%), LDL-c/HDL-c ratio (0.55, 27.5%) and malondialdehyd (1.7 nmol/ml, 39.7%) compared to the placebo group. Changes in concentrations of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were not significant in oligofructose-enriched inulin group compared to the placebo group. Conclusion: Oligofructose-enriched inulin may improve glycemic indices, lipid profile, antioxidant status and malondialdehyd in women with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26819923

  13. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, control of type 2 diabetes mellitus and risk factors in Chinese rural population: the RuralDiab study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaotian; Li, Yuqian; Li, Linlin; Zhang, Luning; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhou, Hao; Cui, Lingling; Mao, Zhenxing; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Chongjian

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to explore potential risk factors in rural areas of China. A total of 16413 individuals aged 18-74 years in rural districts were recruited from the Rural Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (RuralDiab) study for the epidemiological research. Meanwhile, a meta-analysis including 7 published studies was conducted to validate the result of the cross-sectional study. The rates of crude and age-standardized prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM were 12.19%, 67.00%, 62.35%, 22.20% and 6.98%, 60.11%, 54.85%, 18.77%, respectively. The prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM displayed increased trends with age (Ptrend < 0.01) and were strongly associated with education, drinking, more vegetable and fruit intake, physical activity, family history of diabetes, body mass index (BMI). The results of this meta-analysis showed that the pooled prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China countryside were 7.3% (5.3-9.4%), 57.3% (36.9-77.6%), 48.4% (32.4-64.5%) and 21.0% (9.9-32.1%), respectively. The prevalence of T2DM was high with inadequate awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China rural areas. Healthy lifestyles should be advocated to reduce prevalence and improve awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM in Chinese rural residents. PMID:27510966

  14. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, control of type 2 diabetes mellitus and risk factors in Chinese rural population: the RuralDiab study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaotian; Li, Yuqian; Li, Linlin; Zhang, Luning; Ren, Yongcheng; Zhou, Hao; Cui, Lingling; Mao, Zhenxing; Hu, Dongsheng; Wang, Chongjian

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and to explore potential risk factors in rural areas of China. A total of 16413 individuals aged 18–74 years in rural districts were recruited from the Rural Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle (RuralDiab) study for the epidemiological research. Meanwhile, a meta-analysis including 7 published studies was conducted to validate the result of the cross-sectional study. The rates of crude and age-standardized prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM were 12.19%, 67.00%, 62.35%, 22.20% and 6.98%, 60.11%, 54.85%, 18.77%, respectively. The prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM displayed increased trends with age (Ptrend < 0.01) and were strongly associated with education, drinking, more vegetable and fruit intake, physical activity, family history of diabetes, body mass index (BMI). The results of this meta-analysis showed that the pooled prevalence, awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China countryside were 7.3% (5.3–9.4%), 57.3% (36.9–77.6%), 48.4% (32.4–64.5%) and 21.0% (9.9–32.1%), respectively. The prevalence of T2DM was high with inadequate awareness, treatment and control of T2DM in China rural areas. Healthy lifestyles should be advocated to reduce prevalence and improve awareness, treatment, and control of T2DM in Chinese rural residents. PMID:27510966

  15. Predictive factors for diabetic foot ulceration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Soares, M; Boyko, E J; Ribeiro, J; Ribeiro, I; Dinis-Ribeiro, M

    2012-10-01

    Improving ability to predict and prevent diabetic foot ulceration is imperative because of the high personal and financial costs of this complication. We therefore conducted a systematic review in order to identify all studies of factors associated with DFU and assess whether available DFU risk stratification systems incorporate those factors of highest potential value. We performed a search in PubMed for studies published through April 2011 that analysed the association between independent variables and DFU. Articles were selected by two investigators-independently and blind to each other. Divergences were solved by a third investigator. A total of 71 studies were included that evaluated the association between diabetic foot ulceration and more than 100 independent variables. The variables most frequently assessed were age, gender, diabetes duration, BMI, HbA(1c) and neuropathy. Diabetic foot ulceration prevalence varied greatly among studies. The majority of the identified variables were assessed by only two or fewer studies. Diabetic neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, foot deformity and previous diabetic foot ulceration or lower extremity amputation - which are the most common variables included in risk stratification systems - were consistently associated with diabetic foot ulceration development. Existing diabetic foot ulceration risk stratification systems often include variables shown repeatedly in the literature to be strongly predictive of this outcome. Improvement of these risk classification systems though is impaired because of deficiencies noted, including a great lack of standardization in outcome definition and variable selection and measurement.

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factor Analysis for Lower-Extremity Amputations in Diabetic Patients With Foot Ulcer Complicated by Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Wen; Yang, Hui-Mei; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Chung-Huei; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of having diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) or necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The present study aims to examine the clinical characteristics and associated risk factors for lower-extremity amputation (LEA) in patients with DFU complicated by NF. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated at a major diabetic foot center in Taiwan between 2009 and 2014. Of the 2265 cases 110 had lower-extremity NF. Limb preservation outcomes were classified as major LEA, minor LEA, or limb-preserved. Clinical characteristics, laboratory data, and bacterial culture results were collected for analysis. Of the 110 patients with NF, 100 had concomitant DFUs (NF with DFU) and the remaining 10 had no DFU (NF without DFU). None of the NF patients without DFU died nor had their leg amputated. Two NF patients with DFU died of complications. The amputation rate in the surviving 98 NF patients with DFU was 72.4% (46.9% minor LEA and 25.5% major LEA). Seventy percent of the NF patients without DFU had monomicrobial infections (60% with Streptococcus species), and 81.4% NF patients with DFU had polymicrobial infections. Anaerobic organisms were identified in 66% of the NF patients with DFU. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed an association between high-grade Wagner wound classification (Wagner 4 and Wagner 5) and LEA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 21.856, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.625–203.947, P = 0.02 and aOR = 20.094, 95% CI = 1.968–205.216, P = 0.01 for major and minor LEA, respectively) for NF patients with DFU. In addition, a lower serum albumin level was associated with major LEA (OR = 0.066, P = 0.002). In summary, once DFUs were complicated by NF, the risk of amputation increased. Empirical treatment for NF patients with DFU should cover polymicrobial infections, including anaerobic organisms. The high-grade wound classification and low serum albumin level were associated with LEA

  17. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factor Analysis for Lower-Extremity Amputations in Diabetic Patients With Foot Ulcer Complicated by Necrotizing Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Wen; Yang, Hui-Mei; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Huang, Chung-Huei; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-11-01

    Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk of having diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) or necrotizing fasciitis (NF). The present study aims to examine the clinical characteristics and associated risk factors for lower-extremity amputation (LEA) in patients with DFU complicated by NF.We retrospectively reviewed patients treated at a major diabetic foot center in Taiwan between 2009 and 2014. Of the 2265 cases 110 had lower-extremity NF. Limb preservation outcomes were classified as major LEA, minor LEA, or limb-preserved. Clinical characteristics, laboratory data, and bacterial culture results were collected for analysis.Of the 110 patients with NF, 100 had concomitant DFUs (NF with DFU) and the remaining 10 had no DFU (NF without DFU). None of the NF patients without DFU died nor had their leg amputated. Two NF patients with DFU died of complications. The amputation rate in the surviving 98 NF patients with DFU was 72.4% (46.9% minor LEA and 25.5% major LEA). Seventy percent of the NF patients without DFU had monomicrobial infections (60% with Streptococcus species), and 81.4% NF patients with DFU had polymicrobial infections. Anaerobic organisms were identified in 66% of the NF patients with DFU. Multinomial logistic regression analysis revealed an association between high-grade Wagner wound classification (Wagner 4 and Wagner 5) and LEA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 21.856, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.625-203.947, P = 0.02 and aOR = 20.094, 95% CI = 1.968-205.216, P = 0.01 for major and minor LEA, respectively) for NF patients with DFU. In addition, a lower serum albumin level was associated with major LEA (OR = 0.066, P = 0.002).In summary, once DFUs were complicated by NF, the risk of amputation increased. Empirical treatment for NF patients with DFU should cover polymicrobial infections, including anaerobic organisms. The high-grade wound classification and low serum albumin level were associated with LEA. PMID:26554804

  18. The contribution of cardiorespiratory fitness and visceral fat to risk factors in Japanese patients with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nagano, M; Kai, Y; Zou, B; Hatayama, T; Suwa, M; Sasaki, H; Kumagai, S

    2004-05-01

    It is still unclear as to how cardiorespiratory fitness and visceral fat accumulation contribute to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors in patients with diabetes mellitus. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether cardiorespiratory fitness contributes to such risk factors independently of visceral fat accumulation. Two hundred Japanese patients (137 men and 63 women, aged 22 to 81 years) with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) without any intervention and pharmacological therapy participated in a cross-sectional study. The levels of fasting insulin, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and resting blood pressure were assessed. Maximal oxygen uptake (V.o(2max)), an index of cardiorespiratory fitness, was predicted by a graded exercise test using a cycle ergometer. Visceral fat area (VFA) was measured by computed tomography scan. The criteria for abnormalities of the risk factors were determined according to the standard values for Japanese. All subjects were divided equally into the following 3 groups according to their fitness level: low-fit (V.o(2max) < 32 mL/kg/min in men, V.o(2max) < 26 mL/kg/min in women), mid-fit (32 < or = V.o(2max) < 36 in men, 26 < or = V.o(2max) < 30 in women), and high-fit (V.o(2max) > or = 36 in men, V.o(2max) > or = 30 in women). The association between fitness level and the prevalence of abnormal values for these parameters was analyzed by a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for age and VFA. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the prevalence of hyperinsulinemia were significantly lower in the mid-fit (OR = 0.35, 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.78) and in the high-fit groups (OR = 0.40, 95% CI, 0.16 to 0.98) compared with the low-fit group. In addition, ORs for the prevalence of low HDL-C in the mid-fit and high-fit groups were significantly lower (OR = 0.35, 95% CI, 0.14 to 0.86; and OR = 0.19; 95% CI, 0

  19. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Remote Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Chubak, Jessica; O'Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation-dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes…

  20. Effects of krill oil on endothelial function and other cardiovascular risk factors in participants with type 2 diabetes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lobraico, Jessika M; DiLello, Lauren C; Butler, Amber D; Cordisco, Marie Elena; Petrini, Joann R; Ahmadi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of krill oil supplementation, a source of ω-3 fatty acids, on cardiovascular disease risk factors and blood glucose control among participants with type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods A randomized, double-blind controlled cross-over trial was employed. Outcomes assessed were: endothelial function, blood lipids, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, serum antioxidant level, C peptide, and calculated Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) scores. Participants were randomized to either krill oil or olive oil supplementation for 4 weeks, underwent a 2-week washout period, and then crossed to the other supplementation for 4 weeks. All participants were then offered an additional 17 weeks of krill supplementation. Testing occurred at 3 time points: baseline, after first supplementation, and after second supplementation. Testing also occurred after an optional 17 weeks of krill oil supplementation. Difference scores were calculated for each participant in both sequences (ie, differences in outcome measures in the first and second period of the sequence). The mean and SD of the scores in the 2 sequence groups were used to test for differences between treatment effects at a significance level of p<0.05. Results A total of 47 participants were included in the initial cross-over study. Participants who received krill oil for 4 weeks had an improvement in their endothelial function and a reduction in blood C peptide levels and HOMA scores as compared with the olive oil. A total of 34 participants completed the additional 17-week supplementation period. When compared with their respective baseline measures, these participants had a statistically significant improvement in endothelial function and blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Conclusions Krill oil may lead to moderate improvement of cardiovascular risks, specifically endothelial dysfunction and HDL in patients with type 2

  1. Growth Factors in Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zia Ali

    2003-01-01

    Many growth factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Alteration of growth factors and their receptors in diabetes has been shown in both experimental and clinical studies. Sustained hyperglycemia resulting from long-standing diabetes leads to several biochemical abnormalities that consequently result in retinal hypoxia. Retinal oxygenation state regulates various growth factors that promote angiogenesis in order to meet the oxygen demands of the tissue. However, unregulated expression of these growth factors and induction of complex cascades leading to augmentation of other proangiogenic factors, which may not be regulated by tissue oxygenation, leads to uncontrolled retinal neovascularization and blindness in diabetic patients. PMID:14668050

  2. Relationship between adherence to diet, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes: a nationwide survey in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the relationship between adherence to the diet reported by patients with type 1 diabetes under routine clinical care in Brazil, and demographic, socioeconomic status, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. The data was obtained from 3,180 patients, aged 22 ± 11.8 years (56.3% females, 57.4% Caucasians and 43.6% non-Caucasians). The mean time since diabetes diagnosis was 11.7 ± 8.1 years. Results Overall, 1,722 (54.2%) of the patients reported to be adherent to the diet without difference in gender, duration of diabetes and socioeconomic status. Patients who reported adherence to the diet had lower BMI, HbA1c, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, non HDL-cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure and had more HbA1c at goal, performed more frequently self-monitoring of blood glucose (p < 0.001), and reported less difficulties to follow specific schedules of diet plans (p < 0.001). Less patients who reported to be adherent were obese or overweight (p = 0.005). The quantity of food and time schedule of the meals were the most frequent complaints. Logistic regression analysis showed that ethnicity, (Caucasians, (OR 1.26 [1.09-1.47]), number of medical clinical visits in the last year (OR 1.10 [1.06-1.15]), carbohydrate counting, (OR 2.22 [1.49-3.30]) and diets recommended by diabetes societies’, (OR 1.57 [1.02-2.41]) were related to greater patients’ adherence (p < 0.05) and age, [adolescents (OR 0.60 [0.50-0.72]), high BMI (OR 0.58 [0.94-0.98]) and smoking (OR 0.58 [0.41-0.84]) with poor patients’ adherence (p < 0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that it is necessary to rethink medical nutrition therapy in order to help patients to overcome barriers that impair an optimized adherence to the diet. PMID:24607084

  3. Treatment gaps in the management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Manoela FB; Casanova, Amparo; Teoh, Hwee; Dawson, Keith G; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Fitchett, David H; Harris, Stewart B; Honos, George; McFarlane, Philip A; Steele, Andrew; Ur, Ehud; Yale, Jean-François; Langer, Anatoly; Goodman, Shaun G; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate vascular protection treatment patterns and attainment of the 2003 Canadian Diabetes Association’s recommended targets in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Between 2005 and 2006, 3002 outpatients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled by 229 primary health care settings across Canada. Baseline characteristics, therapeutic regimens and treatment success – defined as the achievement of a blood pressure (BP) of 130/80 mmHg or lower, glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) of 7% or lower, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lower than 2.5 mmol/L and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio lower than 4.0 – are reported. RESULTS: Overall, 46% of individuals had a BP that was above the Canadian Diabetes Association’s recommended target. Of these, 11% were untreated, 28% were receiving monotherapy, 38% were not receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor and 16% were not receiving either an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. Optimal A1C levels were achieved in 53% of patients. Of those who did not attain A1C targets, 3% were not on glucose-lowering pharmacotherapy and 27% were receiving monotherapy. A total of 74% of patients were treated with statins. Overall, 64% and 62%, respectively, met the target LDL-C and the target total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. Statins were not prescribed to 43% of patients with LDL-C above target. Antiplatelet therapy was implemented in 81% of patients. In total, 21% achieved the combined targets for BP, A1C and LDL-C. INTERPRETATION: A substantial proportion of patients did not achieve guideline-recommended targets and were not receiving evidence-based therapy for vascular protection two years after publication of the Canadian guidelines. More research is warranted, and novel and effective strategies must be tested and implemented to correct this ongoing treatment gap. PMID:20548975

  4. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  5. Pre-existing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is an Independent Risk Factor for Mortality and Progression in Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vavallo, Antonio; Simone, Simona; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Rutigliano, Monica; Galleggiante, Vanessa; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Gesualdo, Loreto; Campagna, Marcello; Cariello, Marica; Ranieri, Elena; Pertosa, Giovanni; Lastilla, Gaetano; Selvaggi, Francesco Paolo; Ditonno, Pasquale; Battaglia, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Malignancies are one of the main causes of mortality in diabetic patients; however, to date, very limited data have been reported on the specific influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on the survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In the present long-term retrospective study, we investigated whether T2DM may influence the overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with surgically treated RCC. Medical records of 924 patients treated by radical or partial nephrectomy for sporadic, unilateral RCC were reviewed. Patients with type-1 DM and with T2 DM receiving insulin treatment were excluded. Survival estimates were calculated according to the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox regression model. Of the 924 RCC patients, 152 (16.5%) had T2DM. Mean follow-up was 68.5 months. Mean OS was 41.3 and 96.3 months in T2DM and non-T2DM patients, respectively (P < 0.0001). The estimated CSS rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in T2DM versus non-T2DM patients were 63.4% versus 76.7%, 30.4% versus 56.6%, and 16.3% versus 48.6%, respectively (P = 0.001). Mean PFS was significantly lower (31.5 vs 96.3 months; P < 0.0001) in the T2DM group. At multivariate analysis, T2DM was an independent adverse prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.40–4.92), CSS (HR = 6.39; 95% CI: 3.78–10.79), and PFS (HR = 4.71; 95% CI: 3.11–7.15). In conclusion, our findings suggest that patients with RCC and pre-existing T2DM have a shorter OS, increased risk of recurrence, and higher risk for kidney cancer mortality than those without diabetes. PMID:25501064

  6. Centenarians as super-controls to assess the biological relevance of genetic risk factors for common age-related diseases: a proof of principle on type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Garagnani, Paolo; Giuliani, Cristina; Pirazzini, Chiara; Olivieri, Fabiola; Bacalini, Maria Giulia; Ostan, Rita; Mari, Daniela; Passarino, Giuseppe; Monti, Daniela; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Boemi, Massimo; Ceriello, Antonio; Genovese, Stefano; Sevini, Federica; Luiselli, Donata; Tieri, Paolo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; Vijg, Jan; Suh, Yousin; Delledonne, Massimo; Testa, Roberto; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-05-01

    Genetic association studies of age-related, chronic human diseases often suffer from a lack of power to detect modest effects. Here we propose an alternative approach of including healthy centenarians as a more homogeneous and extreme control group. As a proof of principle we focused on type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assessed /genotypic associations of 31 SNPs associated with T2D, diabetes complications and metabolic diseases and SNPs of genes relevant for telomere stability and age-related diseases. We hypothesized that the frequencies of risk variants are inversely correlated with decreasing health and longevity. We performed association analyses comparing diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls followed by association analyses with extreme phenotypic groups (T2D patients with complications and centenarians). Results drew attention to rs7903146 (TCF7L2 gene) that showed a constant increase in the frequencies of risk genotype (TT) from centenarians to diabetic patients who developed macro-complications and the strongest genotypic association was detected when diabetic patients were compared to centenarians (p_value = 9.066*10⁻⁷). We conclude that robust and biologically relevant associations can be obtained when extreme phenotypes, even with a small sample size, are compared.

  7. Cardiovascular risk stratification and management in pre-diabetes.

    PubMed

    Færch, Kristine; Vistisen, Dorte; Johansen, Nanna Borup; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-06-01

    Prediabetes, covering individuals with impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, or high-risk HbA1c levels, is associated with a ∼20 % increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with normoglycemic individuals. It is well-known that lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions can prevent diabetes in prediabetic people; however, the evidence is less clear regarding prevention of CVD. Most diabetes prevention trials have failed to show beneficial effects on CVD morbidity and mortality despite significant improvements of CVD risk factors in individuals with prediabetes. Another challenge is how to estimate CVD risk in prediabetic people. In general, prediction models for CVD do not take glucose levels or prediabetes status into account, thereby underestimating CVD risk in these high-risk individuals. More evidence within risk stratification and management of CVD risk in prediabetes is needed in order to recommend useful and effective strategies for early prevention of CVD.

  8. Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159557.html Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death Study points to need for better coordinated ... are much more likely to die after a heart attack than people without the blood sugar condition, a ...

  9. The role of NOS2A -954G/C and vascular endothelial growth factor +936C/T polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic nonproliferative retinopathy risk management.

    PubMed

    Porojan, Mihai Dumitru; Cătană, Andreea; Popp, Radu A; Dumitrascu, Dan L; Bala, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains one of the major health problems in Europe. Retinopathy is one of the major causes of morbidity in T2DM, strongly influencing the evolution and prognosis of these patients. In the last 2 decades, several studies have been conducted to identify the possible genetic susceptibility factors involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, there is little data related to the involvement of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene polymorphisms in the T2DM Caucasian population. The objective of this study was to identify a possible connection between NOS2A -954G/C (rs2297518) and VEGF +936C/T (rs3025039) polymorphisms and the risk of developing T2DM and nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy in a Caucasian population group. We investigated 200 patients diagnosed with T2DM and 208 controls. Genotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Statistical and comparative analyses (Fisher's exact test) for dominant and recessive models of NOS2A -954G/C and VEGF +936C/T polymorphisms revealed an increased risk of T2DM (χ (2)=8.14, phi =0.141, P=0.004, odds ratio [OR] =2.795, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.347-5.801; χ (2)=18.814, phi =0.215, P<0.001, OR =2.59, 95% CI =1.675-4.006, respectively). Also, comparative analysis for the recessive model (using Pearson's chi-square test [χ (2)] and the phi coefficient [phi]) reveals that the variant CC genotype of NOS2A gene is more frequently associated with T2DM without retinopathy (χ (2)=3.835, phi =-0.138, P=0.05, OR =0.447, 95% CI =0.197-1.015). In conclusion, the results of the study place VEGF +936C/T polymorphisms among the genetic risk factor for T2DM, whereas NOS2A -954G/C polymorphisms act like a protective individual factor for nonproliferative retinopathy. PMID:26664124

  10. Low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a residual risk factor associated with long-term clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with stable coronary artery disease who achieve optimal control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Manabu; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Miyazaki, Tadashi; Naito, Ryo; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Dohi, Tomotaka; Kasai, Takatoshi; Yokoyama, Takayuki; Okazaki, Shinya; Kurata, Takeshi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is recognized an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality. Clinical trials have shown that statins significantly reduce cardiovascular events in diabetic patients. However, residual cardiovascular risk persists despite the achievement of target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels with statin. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is an established coronary risk factor that is independent of LDL-C levels. We evaluated the impact of HDL-C on long-term mortality in diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieved optimal LDL-C. We enrolled 438 consecutive diabetic patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention between 2004 and 2007 at our institution. We identified 165 patients who achieved target LDL-C <100 mg/dl. Patients were stratified into two groups according to HDL-C levels (low HDL-C group, baseline HDL-C <40 mg/dl; high HDL-C group, ≥40 mg/dl). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) that included all-cause death, acute coronary syndrome, and target lesion revascularization were evaluated between the two groups. The median follow-up period was 946 days. The rate of MACE was significantly higher in diabetic patients with low-HDL-C who achieved optimal LDL-C (6.9 vs 17.9 %, log-rank P = 0.030). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that HDL-C is significantly associated with clinical outcomes (adjusted hazard ratio for MACE 1.33, 95 % confidence interval 1.01-1.75, P = 0.042). Low HDL-C is a residual risk factor that is significantly associated with long-term clinical outcomes among diabetic patients with stable CAD who achieve optimal LDL-C levels.

  11. Association of changes in self-efficacy, voluntary physical activity, and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in a behavioral treatment for obese preadolescents: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice E; Annesi, James J; Walsh, Ann M; Lennon, Vivian; Bell, Ruth A

    2010-10-01

    Childhood obesity is increasing in the United States; thus, physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals seek to refer patients to interventions that will reliably improve physical activity and nutrition behaviors. The present 12-week, two-session-per-week protocol, based on social cognitive theory, was given preliminary testing with 23 obese children (M(age) = 11.7 years) with risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. A significant within-group improvement in number of days per week of 60 or more minutes of voluntary physical activity was reported. Changes in measures of both task self-efficacy (beta = .39) and self-regulatory efficacy (beta = .44) significantly contributed to the significant portion of the variance explained in change in voluntary physical activity (R(2) = .40). Significant improvements in total cholesterol and body mass index (kg/m(2)) were also found. Correlations between changes in physical activity and changes in each physiological factor tested were each in the expected direction but did not reach statistical significance. Results suggest that replications and extensions of this pilot study, with greater experimental power, are warranted. PMID:20816562

  12. Association of changes in self-efficacy, voluntary physical activity, and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in a behavioral treatment for obese preadolescents: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice E; Annesi, James J; Walsh, Ann M; Lennon, Vivian; Bell, Ruth A

    2010-10-01

    Childhood obesity is increasing in the United States; thus, physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals seek to refer patients to interventions that will reliably improve physical activity and nutrition behaviors. The present 12-week, two-session-per-week protocol, based on social cognitive theory, was given preliminary testing with 23 obese children (M(age) = 11.7 years) with risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. A significant within-group improvement in number of days per week of 60 or more minutes of voluntary physical activity was reported. Changes in measures of both task self-efficacy (beta = .39) and self-regulatory efficacy (beta = .44) significantly contributed to the significant portion of the variance explained in change in voluntary physical activity (R(2) = .40). Significant improvements in total cholesterol and body mass index (kg/m(2)) were also found. Correlations between changes in physical activity and changes in each physiological factor tested were each in the expected direction but did not reach statistical significance. Results suggest that replications and extensions of this pilot study, with greater experimental power, are warranted.

  13. Failure to initiate early insulin therapy – A risk factor for diabetic retinopathy in insulin users with Type 2 diabetes mellitus: Sankara Nethralaya-Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS, Report number 35)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditi; Delhiwala, Kushal S; Raman, Rajiv P G; Sharma, Tarun; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Kulothungan, Vaitheeswaran

    2016-01-01

    Context: Insulin users have been reported to have a higher incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Aim: The aim was to elucidate the factors associated with DR among insulin users, especially association between duration, prior to initiating insulin for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and developing DR. Materials and Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional observational study included 1414 subjects having Type 2 DM. Insulin users were defined as subjects using insulin for glycemic control, and insulin nonusers as those either not using any antidiabetic treatment or using diet control or oral medications. The duration before initiating insulin after diagnosis was calculated by subtracting the duration of insulin usage from the duration of DM. DR was clinically graded using Klein's classification. SPSS (version 9.0) was used for statistical analysis. Results: Insulin users had more incidence of DR (52.9% vs. 16.3%, P < 0.0001) and sight threatening DR (19.1% vs. 2.4%, P < 0.0001) in comparison to insulin nonusers. Among insulin users, longer duration of DM (odds ratio [OR] 1.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.25, P = 0.044) and abdominal obesity (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.02–1.29, P = 0.021) was associated with DR. The presence of DR was significantly associated with longer duration (≥5 years) prior to initiating insulin therapy, overall (38.0% vs. 62.0%, P = 0.013), and in subjects with suboptimal glycemic control (32.5% vs. 67.5%, P = 0.022). Conclusions: The presence of DR is significantly associated with longer duration of diabetes (>5 years) and sub-optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin <7.0%). Among insulin users, abdominal obesity was found to be a significant predictor of DR; DR is associated with longer duration prior to initiating insulin therapy in Type 2 DM subjects with suboptimal glycemic control. PMID:27488152

  14. An Assessment of Non-Communicable Diseases, Diabetes, and Related Risk Factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Kwajelein Atoll, Ebeye Island: A Systems Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Seremai, Johannes; Trinidad, Richard; Paul, Irene; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been declared a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted on Ebeye Island of Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) to describe the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); assess the system of service capacity and activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting; and identify the key issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that impact the morbidity and mortality of the population. Population survey of the RMI show that 62.5% of the total population is overweight or obese with a dramatic increase from the 15–24 year old (10.6%) and the 25–64 year old (41.9%) age groups. The leading causes of death were septicemia, renal failure, pneumonia, cancer, and myocardial infarction. Other findings show gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. All health care in Ebeye is provided in one setting and there is collaboration, coordination, and communication among medical and health care providers. The Book of Protocols for the Kwajalein Atoll Health Care Bureau provides the guidelines, standards, and policy and procedures for the screening, diagnosis, and management of diabetes and other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified. PMID:23901366

  15. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Kwajelein Atoll, Ebeye Island: a systems perspective.

    PubMed

    Ichiho, Henry M; Seremai, Johannes; Trinidad, Richard; Paul, Irene; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been declared a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted on Ebeye Island of Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) to describe the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); assess the system of service capacity and activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting; and identify the key issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that impact the morbidity and mortality of the population. Population survey of the RMI show that 62.5% of the total population is overweight or obese with a dramatic increase from the 15-24 year old (10.6%) and the 25-64 year old (41.9%) age groups. The leading causes of death were septicemia, renal failure, pneumonia, cancer, and myocardial infarction. Other findings show gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. All health care in Ebeye is provided in one setting and there is collaboration, coordination, and communication among medical and health care providers. The Book of Protocols for the Kwajalein Atoll Health Care Bureau provides the guidelines, standards, and policy and procedures for the screening, diagnosis, and management of diabetes and other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified. PMID:23901366

  16. Structural equation model for estimating risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Middle Eastern setting: evidence from the STEPS Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Faleh Mohamed Hussain; Reka, Husein; Renwick, Matthew J; Roman, Gabriela D; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Aims Understanding type 2 diabetes mellitus is critical for designing effective diabetes prevention policies in Qatar and the Middle East. Methods Using the Qatar 2012 WHO STEPwise approach to surveillance survey, a subsample of 1224 Qatari participants aged 18–64 years was selected. Subjects had their fasting blood glucose levels tested, had not been diagnosed with or treated for diabetes, had a fasting time >12 hours and were not pregnant. We applied a hypothesized structural equation model (SEM) to assess sociodemographic, behavioral, anthropometric and metabolic variables affecting persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results There is a direct effect of triglyceride levels (0.336) and body mass index (BMI) (0.164) on diabetes status. We also found that physical activity levels negatively affect BMI (−0.148) and positively affect high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (0.106); sociodemographic background negatively affects diet (−0.522) and BMI (−0.352); HDL positively affects total cholesterol (0.230) and has a negative effect on BMI (−0.108), triglycerides (−0.128) and waist circumference (−0.104). Diet has a positive effect on triglycerides (0.281) while family history of diabetes negatively affects total cholesterol (−0.104). BMI has a positive effect on waist circumference (0.788) and mediates the effects of physical activity over diabetes status (−0.028). BMI also mediates the effects that sociodemographic factors (−0.058) and physical activity (−0.024) have on diabetes status. BMI and HDL (−0.002) together mediate the effect of physical activity on diabetes status and similarly HDL and tryglycerides (−0.005) also mediate the effect of physical activity on diabetes status. Finally diet and tryglycerides mediate the effects that sociodemographic factors have on diabetes status (−0.049). Conclusions This study's main finding is that triglyceride levels and BMI are the main variables directly affecting diabetes status in the Qatari

  17. Risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes with tumor necrosis factor-α 308G/A gene polymorphism in metabolic syndrome and coronary artery disease subjects.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir Chander; Kler, Rupinder; Sharma, Yash Paul; Talwar, Kewal Krishan; Singh, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and obesity. The increased expression of TNF-α in adipose tissue is known to induce insulin resistance, and a polymorphism at position -308 in the promoter region of TNF-α gene may lead to its increased transcription in adipocytes. The objective of this work was to determine the role of TNFα-308G/A gene polymorphism in metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 250 MetS and 224 CAD patients and 214 controls were studied. TNFα-308G/A polymorphism was detected from the whole blood genomic DNA using PCR-amplification refractory mutation system. The 2 × 2 contingency tables and multiple regression analysis were used for determining the association of genotypes with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in MetS and CAD subjects. In CAD subjects with T2DM, the AG genotypes showed a very strong association (P < 0.0001; OR 0.194, 95%CI 0.103-0.365). In CAD subjects with obesity, the AA (P = 0.049; OR 2.449) and AG genotypes showed a strong association (P < 0.0001; OR 0.206). In both males and females, AG genotype and G allele (P < 0.0001) showed a strong association with T2DM. In MetS subjects with T2DM, there was a strong association with AG (P = 0.002; OR 4.483) as well as AA+AG genotypes (P = 0.002; OR 4.255). The AA and AG genotype (P = 0.001; OR 5.497) in males showed a strong 4.6- and 5.4-fold risks, respectively, with obesity. In females, only AG genotype showed a strong 4.5-fold risk with obesity (P = 0.001). In MetS subjects with obesity, the AA genotype (P = 0.043; OR 3.352) as well as AG showed a very strong association (P = 0.001; OR 5.011). The AG genotypes showed a high 3.5-fold risk with T2DM in females (P = 0.011). In CAD subjects, AG genotype showed a protective effect in both obese males and females (P < 0.0001). Heterozygous TNFα-308G/A gene variant may be an important

  18. Survival Association Rule Mining Towards Type 2 Diabetes Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Gyorgy J.; Schrom, John; Castro, M. Regina; Li, Peter W.; Caraballo, Pedro J.

    2013-01-01

    Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is a growing epidemic that often leads to severe complications. Effective preventive measures exist and identifying patients at high risk of diabetes is a major health-care need. The use of association rule mining (ARM) is advantageous, as it was specifically developed to identify associations between risk factors in an interpretable form. Unfortunately, traditional ARM is not directly applicable to survival outcomes and it lacks the ability to compensate for confounders and to incorporate dosage effects. In this work, we propose Survival Association Rule (SAR) Mining, which addresses these shortcomings. We demonstrate on a real diabetes data set that SARs are naturally more interpretable than the traditional association rules, and predictive models built on top of these rules are very competitive relative to state of the art survival models and substantially outperform the most widely used diabetes index, the Framingham score. PMID:24551408

  19. [Growth factors in proliferative diabetic retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Ioniţă, M

    1997-01-01

    This work presents the possible implications of the angiogenic growth factors and some cell mediators in the initiation and development of the neovascular proliferation in diabetic retinopathy. According to the physiopathologic theories stated above, that are implied in the generation of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, here are some therapeutic experiments based on the action of the angiogenic growth factors. PMID:9409959

  20. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D. PMID:22528676

  1. Cardiovascular disease risk in young people with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K; Nadeau, Kristen

    2012-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequent cause of death in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D), despite modern advances in glycemic control and CVD risk factor modification. CVD risk identification is essential in this high-risk population, yet remains poorly understood. This review discusses the risk factors for CVD in young people with T1D, including hyperglycemia, traditional CVD risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, physical activity, hypertension), as well as novel risk factors such as insulin resistance, inflammation, and hypoglycemia. We present evidence that adverse changes in cardiovascular function, arterial compliance, and atherosclerosis are present even during adolescence in people with T1D, highlighting the need for earlier intervention. The methods for investigating cardiovascular risk are discussed and reviewed. Finally, we discuss the observational studies and clinical trials which have thus far attempted to elucidate the best targets for early intervention in order to reduce the burden of CVD in people with T1D.

  2. The Swedish childhood diabetes study. Vaccinations and infections as risk determinants for diabetes in childhood.

    PubMed

    Blom, L; Nyström, L; Dahlquist, G

    1991-03-01

    In a nationwide incident case referent study we have evaluated vaccinations, early and recent infections and the use of medicines as possible risk determinants for Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in childhood. A total of 339 recently onset diabetic and 528 referent children, age 0-14 years, were included. Information about infections was collected from a mailed questionnaire and about vaccinations from childhood health care centres and schools. When vaccinations were considered as possible risk factors for diabetes, a significant decrease in relative risk estimated as odds ratio (OR) was noted for measles vaccination (OR = 0.69; 95% confidence limits 0.48-0.98). For vaccination against tuberculosis, smallpox, tetanus, whooping cough, rubella and mumps no significant effect on OR for diabetes was found. The odds ratios for Type 1 diabetes for children exposed to 0.1-2 or over 2 infections during the last year before diagnosis of diabetes revealed a linear increase (OR = 1.0, 1.96 and 2.55 for 0, 1-2 and over 2 infections, respectively). The trend was still significant when standardized for possible confounders such as age and sex of the children, maternal age and education and intake of antibiotics and analgetics. In conclusion, a protective effect of measles vaccination for Type 1 diabetes in childhood is indicated as well as a possible causal relationship between the onset of the disease and the total load of recent infections.

  3. Treatment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Women.

    PubMed

    Gouni-Berthold, I; Berthold, H K

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death for both women and men. Common traditional risk factors for CVD, such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and smoking have a high prevalence in women and in some cases a greater health impact compared with men. Nevertheless, risk factors are treated less often and less aggressively in women than in men, partly due to decreased awareness on the part of public health opinion makers, patients and physicians. About seventy five percent of all coronary heart disease deaths among women could be avoided if CVD risk factors like hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and smoking are adequately treated. This narrative review discusses the treatment of the 4 CVD risk factors, namely hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, smoking and diabetes. These risk factors were examined in the Framingham Heart study and years later they were found in the INTERHEART study to be the 4 most important risk factors for the development of CVD.

  4. Liver enzymes, race, gender and diabetes risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, A. L. C.; Lazo, M.; Ndumele, C. E.; Pankow, J. S.; Coresh, J.; Clark, J. M.; Selvin, E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the associations of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase with diabetes risk and to determine whether associations differ by race and/or gender. We hypothesized that all liver enzymes would be associated with diabetes risk and that associations would differ by race and gender. Methods Prospective cohort of 7495 white and 1842 black participants without diabetes in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Poisson and Cox models adjusted for demographic, socio-behavioural, and metabolic and health-related factors were used. Results During a median of 12 years of follow-up, 2182 incident cases of diabetes occurred. Higher liver enzyme levels were independently associated with diabetes risk: adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 1.68 (1.49–1.89), 1.16 (1.02–1.31) and 1.95 (1.70–2.24) comparing the highest with the lowest quartiles of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), respectively. gamma-Glutamyl transferase was most strongly related to diabetes risk, even at levels considered within normal range (≤ 60 U/l) in clinical practice. Adjusted incidence rates by quartiles of liver enzymes were similar by gender but higher in black versus white participants. Nonetheless, relative associations of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) with diabetes were similar by race (P for interactions > 0.05). Conclusions Compared with aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase was more strongly associated with diabetes risk. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in liver enzymes precede the diagnosis of diabetes by many years and that individuals with elevated liver enzymes, even within the normal range as defined in clinical practice, are at high risk for diabetes. PMID:23510198

  5. Modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Moucha, Calin S; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risk factors for orthopaedic surgical site infection have been identified. Some of these factors directly affect the wound-healing process, whereas others can lead to blood-borne sepsis or relative immunosuppression. Modifying a patient's medications; screening for comorbidities, such as HIV or diabetes mellitus; and advising the patient on options to diminish or eliminate adverse behaviors, such as smoking, should lower the risk for surgical site infections.

  6. Lifestyle interventions to reduce risk of diabetes among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by >50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, nine studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM.

  7. Lifestyle Interventions to Reduce Risk of Diabetes among Women with Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    While lifestyle interventions involving exercise and a healthy diet in high-risk adults have been found to reduce progression to type 2 diabetes by more than 50%, little attention has been given to the potential benefits of such strategies in women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We conducted a literature search of PubMed for English-language studies of randomized controlled trials of lifestyle interventions among women with a history of GDM. In total, 9 studies were identified which fulfilled the eligibility criteria. The majority of randomized trials of lifestyle interventions in women with GDM have been limited to pilot or feasibility studies. However, preliminary findings suggest that such interventions can improve diabetes risk factors in women with a history of GDM. Larger, well-designed controlled randomized trials are needed to assess the effects of lifestyle interventions on preventing subsequent progression to type 2 diabetes among women with GDM. PMID:25220104

  8. Factors in risk perception

    PubMed

    Sjoberg

    2000-02-01

    Risk perception is a phenomenon in search of an explanation. Several approaches are discussed in this paper. Technical risk estimates are sometimes a potent factor in accounting for perceived risk, but in many important applications it is not. Heuristics and biases, mainly availability, account for only a minor portion of risk perception, and media contents have not been clearly implicated in risk perception. The psychometric model is probably the leading contender in the field, but its explanatory value is only around 20% of the variance of raw data. Adding a factor of "unnatural risk" considerably improves the psychometric model. Cultural Theory, on the other hand, has not been able to explain more than 5-10% of the variance of perceived risk, and other value scales have similarly failed. A model is proposed in which attitude, risk sensitivity, and specific fear are used as explanatory variables; this model seems to explain well over 30-40% of the variance and is thus more promising than previous approaches. The model offers a different type of psychological explanation of risk perception, and it has many implications, e.g., a different approach to the relationship between attitude and perceived risk, as compared with the usual cognitive analysis of attitude. PMID:10795334

  9. Factors associated with consumption of diabetic diet among type 2 diabetic subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur; Patel, Ina M; Patel, Yash M; Rathi, Suresh K

    2012-12-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the current situation of and factors associated with consumption of diabetic diet among 399 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects from Ahmedabad, Western India. The study was performed with diagnosed (at least one year old) diabetic subjects who attended the Department of Diabetology, All India Institute of Diabetes and Research and Yash Diabetes Specialties Centre (Swasthya Hospital), Ahmedabad during July 2010-November 2010. The subjects completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included variables, such as sociodemographic factors, family history of diabetes, behavioural profile, risk profile (glycaemic status, hypertension, and obesity), and diet-related history (consumption of diabetic diet, consumption of low fat/skimmed milk, method of cooking, and sources for diet advice). Blood pressure, body mass index, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and fasting lipid profile were measured. All analyses including multivariate logistic regression were conducted using SPSS, version 11.5. In total, 399 T2DM subjects (65% male, 35% female) with mean age of 53.16 +/- 7.95 years were studied. Although 73% of T2DM subjects were consuming diabetic diet, the good glycaemic control (HbA1c level < 7%) was achieved only in 35% of the subjects. The majority (75%) of the subjects had a positive family history of diabetes, and 52% were obese. In 77%, the main source of dietary advice was doctor. In 36%, the main methods of cooking were: boiling and roasting. The final multivariate model showed that visit to dietician, level of education, intake of low fat, and family history of diabetes were independent predictors for diabetic diet consumption among T2DM subjects. However, longitudinal and cohort studies are required to establish the association between consumption of diabetic diet and glycaemic control.

  10. Study design and methods for a randomized crossover trial substituting brown rice for white rice on diabetes risk factors in India.

    PubMed

    Wedick, Nicole M; Sudha, Vasudevan; Spiegelman, Donna; Bai, Mookambika Ramya; Malik, Vasanti S; Venkatachalam, Siva Sankari; Parthasarathy, Vijayalaksmi; Vaidya, Ruchi; Nagarajan, Lakshmipriya; Arumugam, Kokila; Jones, Clara; Campos, Hannia; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Willett, Walter; Hu, Frank B; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    India has the second largest number of people with diabetes in the world following China. Evidence indicates that consumption of whole grains can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. This article describes the study design and methods of a trial in progress evaluating the effects of substituting whole grain brown rice for polished (refined) white rice on biomarkers of diabetes risk (glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, inflammation). This is a randomized controlled clinical trial with a crossover design conducted in Chennai, India among overweight but otherwise healthy volunteers aged 25-65 y with a body mass index ≥23 kg/m(2) and habitual rice consumption ≥200 g/day. The feasibility and cultural appropriateness of this type of intervention in the local environment will also be examined. If the intervention is efficacious, the findings can be incorporated into national-level policies which could include the provision of brown rice as an option or replacement for white rice in government institutions and food programs. This relatively simple dietary intervention has the potential to substantially diminish the burden of diabetes in Asia and elsewhere.

  11. Study design and methods for a randomized crossover trial substituting brown rice for white rice on diabetes risk factors in India

    PubMed Central

    Wedick, Nicole M.; Vasudevan, Sudha; Spiegelman, Donna; Bai, Ramya; Malik, Vasanti; Venkatachalam, Siva Sankari; Parthasarathy, Vijayalaksmi; Vaidya, Ruchi; Nagarajan, Lakshmipriya; Arumugam, Kokila; Jones, Clara; Campos, Hannia; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Willett, Walter; Hu, Frank B.; Mohan, Anjana Ranjit; Viswanathan, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    India has the second largest number of people with diabetes in the world following China. Evidence indicates that consumption of whole grains can reduce risk of type 2 diabetes. This manuscript describes the study design and methods of a trial in progress evaluating the effects of substituting whole grain brown rice for polished (refined) white rice on biomarkers of diabetes risk (glucose metabolism, dyslipidemia, inflammation). This is a randomized controlled clinical trial with a crossover design conducted in Chennai, India among overweight but otherwise healthy volunteers aged 25–65y with a body mass index ≥23kg/m2 and habitual rice consumption ≥200grams/day. The feasibility and cultural appropriateness of this type of intervention in the local environment will also be examined. If the intervention is efficacious, the findings can be incorporated into national-level policies which could include the provision of brown rice as an option or replacement for white rice in government institutions and food programs. This relatively simple dietary intervention has the potential to substantially diminish the burden of diabetes in Asia and elsewhere. PMID:26017321

  12. Community-Based Diabetes Screening and Risk Assessment in Rural West Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ranjita; Fitch, Cindy; Roberts, David; Wright, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This project utilized a cross-sectional study design to assess diabetes risk among 540 individuals from 12 counties using trained extension agents and community organizations in West Virginia. Individuals were screened for diabetes using (1) the validated 7-item diabetes risk assessment survey and (2) hemoglobin A1c tests. Demographic and lifestyle behaviors were also collected. The average age, body mass index, and A1c were 51.2 ± 16.4, 31.1 ± 7.5, and 5.8 ± 0.74, respectively. The majority were females, Non-Hispanic Whites with no prior diagnosis of diabetes. Screenings showed that 61.8% of participants were at high risk for diabetes. Family history of diabetes (siblings or parents), overweight or obese status, sedentary lifestyle, and older age were commonly prevalent risk factors. Higher risk scores computed from the 7-item questions correlated positively with higher A1c (r = 0.221, P < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analyses, higher diabetes risk was predicted by obesity, older age, family history of hypertension, and gestational diabetes. Females were 4 times at higher risk than males. The findings indicated that community-based screenings were an effective way to assess diabetes risk in rural West Virginia. Linking diabetes screenings with referrals to lifestyle programs for high risk individuals can help reduce the burden of diabetes in the state. PMID:26881242

  13. Increased Circulating ANG II and TNF-α Represents Important Risk Factors in Obese Saudi Adults with Hypertension Irrespective of Diabetic Status and BMI

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Bindahman, Lotfi S.; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Saleem, Tahia H.; Alokail, Majed S.; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Draz, Hossam M.; Yakout, Sobhy; Mohamed, Amany O.; Harte, Alison L.; McTernan, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Central adiposity is a significant determinant of obesity-related hypertension risk, which may arise due to the pathogenic inflammatory nature of the abdominal fat depot. However, the influence of pro-inflammatory adipokines on blood pressure in the obese hypertensive phenotype has not been well established in Saudi subjects. As such, our study investigated whether inflammatory factors may represent useful biomarkers to delineate hypertension risk in a Saudi cohort with and without hypertension and/or diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMT2). Subjects were subdivided into four groups: healthy lean controls (age: 47.9±5.1 yr; BMI: 22.9±2.1 Kg/m2), non-hypertensive obese (age: 46.1±5.0 yr; BMI: 33.7±4.2 Kg/m2), hypertensive obese (age: 48.6±6.1 yr; BMI: 36.5±7.7 Kg/m2) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (age: 50.8±6.0 yr; BMI: 35.3±6.7 Kg/m2). Anthropometric data were collected from all subjects and fasting blood samples were utilized for biochemical analysis. Serum angiotensin II (ANG II) levels were elevated in hypertensive obese (p<0.05) and hypertensive obese with DMT2 (p<0.001) compared with normotensive controls. Systolic blood pressure was positively associated with BMI (p<0.001), glucose (p<0.001), insulin (p<0.05), HOMA-IR (p<0.001), leptin (p<0.01), TNF-α (p<0.001) and ANG II (p<0.05). Associations between ANG II and TNF-α with systolic blood pressure remained significant after controlling for BMI. Additionally CRP (p<0.05), leptin (p<0.001) and leptin/adiponectin ratio (p<0.001) were also significantly associated with the hypertension phenotype. In conclusion our data suggests that circulating pro-inflammatory adipokines, particularly ANG II and, TNF-α, represent important factors associated with a hypertension phenotype and may directly contribute to predicting and exacerbating hypertension risk. PMID:23251471

  14. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  15. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Martha Nydia; Valenzuela, Fabrizio; Robles, Alma E.; Artalejo, Elizabeth; Aguilar, David; Andersen, Catherine J.; Valdez, Herlindo; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-01-01

    There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35–65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:25970149

  16. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Martha Nydia; Valenzuela, Fabrizio; Robles, Alma E; Artalejo, Elizabeth; Aguilar, David; Andersen, Catherine J; Valdez, Herlindo; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-05-01

    There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35-65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. PMID:25970149

  17. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Martha Nydia; Valenzuela, Fabrizio; Robles, Alma E; Artalejo, Elizabeth; Aguilar, David; Andersen, Catherine J; Valdez, Herlindo; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2015-05-11

    There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35-65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation.

  18. Population ancestry and genetic risk for diabetes and kidney, cardiovascular, and bone disease: modifiable environmental factors may produce the cures.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Barry I; Divers, Jasmin; Palmer, Nicholette D

    2013-12-01

    Variable rates of disease observed between members of different continental population groups may be mediated by inherited factors, environmental exposures, or their combination. This article provides evidence in support of differential allele frequency distributions that underlie the higher rates of nondiabetic kidney disease in the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis spectrum of disease and lower rates of coronary artery calcified atherosclerotic plaque and osteoporosis in populations of African ancestry. With recognition that these and other common complex diseases are affected by biological factors comes the realization that targeted manipulation of environmental exposures and pharmacologic treatments will have different effects based on genotype. The present era of precision medicine will couple one's genetic makeup with specific therapies to reduce rates of disease based on the presence of disease-specific alleles.

  19. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality

    PubMed Central

    LeRoith, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  20. Obesity and Diabetes: The Increased Risk of Cancer and Cancer-Related Mortality.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Emily Jane; LeRoith, Derek

    2015-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide, and both are associated with an increased incidence and mortality from many cancers. The metabolic abnormalities associated with type 2 diabetes develop many years before the onset of diabetes and, therefore, may be contributing to cancer risk before individuals are aware that they are at risk. Multiple factors potentially contribute to the progression of cancer in obesity and type 2 diabetes, including hyperinsulinemia and insulin-like growth factor I, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, adipokines and cytokines, and the gut microbiome. These metabolic changes may contribute directly or indirectly to cancer progression. Intentional weight loss may protect against cancer development, and therapies for diabetes may prove to be effective adjuvant agents in reducing cancer progression. In this review we discuss the current epidemiology, basic science, and clinical data that link obesity, diabetes, and cancer and how treating obesity and type 2 diabetes could also reduce cancer risk and improve outcomes. PMID:26084689

  1. Risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rohini; Dent, Tom; Meads, Catherine; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate current risk models and scores for type 2 diabetes and inform selection and implementation of these in practice. Design Systematic review using standard (quantitative) and realist (mainly qualitative) methodology. Inclusion criteria Papers in any language describing the development or external validation, or both, of models and scores to predict the risk of an adult developing type 2 diabetes. Data sources Medline, PreMedline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched. Included studies were citation tracked in Google Scholar to identify follow-on studies of usability or impact. Data extraction Data were extracted on statistical properties of models, details of internal or external validation, and use of risk scores beyond the studies that developed them. Quantitative data were tabulated to compare model components and statistical properties. Qualitative data were analysed thematically to identify mechanisms by which use of the risk model or score might improve patient outcomes. Results 8864 titles were scanned, 115 full text papers considered, and 43 papers included in the final sample. These described the prospective development or validation, or both, of 145 risk prediction models and scores, 94 of which were studied in detail here. They had been tested on 6.88 million participants followed for up to 28 years. Heterogeneity of primary studies precluded meta-analysis. Some but not all risk models or scores had robust statistical properties (for example, good discrimination and calibration) and had been externally validated on a different population. Genetic markers added nothing to models over clinical and sociodemographic factors. Most authors described their score as “simple” or “easily implemented,” although few were specific about the intended users and under what circumstances. Ten mechanisms were identified by which measuring diabetes risk might improve outcomes. Follow-on studies that applied a risk score as part of an

  2. Thyroid Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and radiation fallout from power plant accidents or nuclear weapons. Having had head or neck radiation treatments in childhood is a risk factor for ... should be done using the lowest dose of radiation that still provides a clear ... from nuclear weapons or power plant accidents. For instance, thyroid ...

  3. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Among Remote Reservation–Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Chubak, Jessica; O’Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation–dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes who are at high risk for CVD. Enrollment on a rolling basis of 180 planned participants began during 2009; an average 18-month follow-up was completed by June 2011. The primary outcome variable is change in glycosylated hemoglobin level after an average 18-month follow-up period. Secondary outcome variables include changes in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, and smoking status, as well as an evaluation of intervention cost-effectiveness. If effective, the LOWPK trial may serve as a guide for future chronic disease intervention trials in remote, technologically challenged settings. PMID:23001642

  4. Patient beliefs and behaviors about genomic risk for type 2 diabetes: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Patrick; King, Heather A; Haga, Susanne B; Orlando, Lori A; Joy, Scott V; Trujillo, Gloria M; Scott, William Michael; Bembe, Marylou; Creighton, Dana L; Cho, Alex H; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a major health burden in the United States, and population trends suggest this burden will increase. High interest in, and increased availability of, testing for genetic risk of type 2 diabetes presents a new opportunity for reducing type 2 diabetes risk for many patients; however, to date, there is little evidence that genetic testing positively affects type 2 diabetes prevention. Genetic information may not fit patients' illness representations, which may reduce the chances of risk-reducing behavior changes. The present study aimed to examine illness representations in a clinical sample who are at risk for type 2 diabetes and interested in genetic testing. The authors used the Common Sense Model to analyze survey responses of 409 patients with type 2 diabetes risk factors. Patients were interested in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes risk and believed in its importance. Most patients believed that genetic factors are important to developing type 2 diabetes (67%), that diet and exercise are effective in preventing type 2 diabetes (95%), and that lifestyle changes are more effective than drugs (86%). Belief in genetic causality was not related to poorer self-reported health behaviors. These results suggest that patients' interest in genetic testing for type 2 diabetes might produce a teachable moment that clinicians can use to counsel behavior change. PMID:25844569

  5. First Genome-Wide Association Study in an Australian Aboriginal Population Provides Insights into Genetic Risk Factors for Body Mass Index and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Richard W.; Syn, Genevieve; Scaman, Elizabeth S. H.; Davis, Elizabeth; Miles, Simon J.; McLeay, Toby; Jamieson, Sarra E.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.

    2015-01-01

    A body mass index (BMI) >22kg/m2 is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Aboriginal Australians. To identify loci associated with BMI and T2D we undertook a genome-wide association study using 1,075,436 quality-controlled single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped (Illumina 2.5M Duo Beadchip) in 402 individuals in extended pedigrees from a Western Australian Aboriginal community. Imputation using the thousand genomes (1000G) reference panel extended the analysis to 6,724,284 post quality-control autosomal SNPs. No associations achieved genome-wide significance, commonly accepted as P<5x10-8. Nevertheless, genes/pathways in common with other ethnicities were identified despite the arrival of Aboriginal people in Australia >45,000 years ago. The top hit (rs10868204 Pgenotyped = 1.50x10-6; rs11140653 Pimputed_1000G = 2.90x10-7) for BMI lies 5’ of NTRK2, the type 2 neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) that regulates energy balance downstream of melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R). PIK3C2G (rs12816270 Pgenotyped = 8.06x10-6; rs10841048 Pimputed_1000G = 6.28x10-7) was associated with BMI, but not with T2D as reported elsewhere. BMI also associated with CNTNAP2 (rs6960319 Pgenotyped = 4.65x10-5; rs13225016 Pimputed_1000G = 6.57x10-5), previously identified as the strongest gene-by-environment interaction for BMI in African-Americans. The top hit (rs11240074 Pgenotyped = 5.59x10-6, Pimputed_1000G = 5.73x10-6) for T2D lies 5’ of BCL9 that, along with TCF7L2, promotes beta-catenin’s transcriptional activity in the WNT signaling pathway. Additional hits occurred in genes affecting pancreatic (KCNJ6, KCNA1) and/or GABA (GABRR1, KCNA1) functions. Notable associations observed for genes previously identified at genome-wide significance in other populations included MC4R (Pgenotyped = 4.49x10-4) for BMI and IGF2BP2 Pimputed_1000G = 2.55x10-6) for T2D. Our results may provide novel functional leads in understanding disease

  6. Challenges in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors in obese subjects: what is the evidence and what are the myths?

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Lovely; Liti, Besiana; Kuraganti, Gayatri; Kaul, Sudesh; Trivedi, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    The increasing worldwide prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity has projected concerns for increasing burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The dangers of obesity in adults and children have received more attention than ever in the recent years as more research data becomes available regarding the long-term health outcomes. Weight loss in obese and overweight subjects can be induced via intensive lifestyle modifications, medications, and/or bariatric surgery. These methods have been shown to confer overall health benefits; however, their effect on remission of preexisting diabetes mellitus and reduction in cardiovascular risk has been variable. Recent research data has offered a much better understanding of the pathophysiology and outcomes of these management strategies in obese patients. In this paper, the authors have summarized the results of major studies on remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus and reduction of cardiovascular events by weight loss induced by different methods. Furthermore, the paper aims to clarify various prevailing myths and practice patterns about obesity management among clinicians.

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-05-16

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients.

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-05-16

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors for acute stroke: Risk profiles in the different subtypes of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià

    2015-01-01

    Timely diagnosis and control of cardiovascular risk factors is a priority objective for adequate primary and secondary prevention of acute stroke. Hypertension, atrial fibrillation and diabetes mellitus are the most common risk factors for acute cerebrovascular events, although novel risk factors, such as sleep-disordered breathing, inflammatory markers or carotid intima-media thickness have been identified. However, the cardiovascular risk factors profile differs according to the different subtypes of ischemic stroke. Atrial fibrillation and ischemic heart disease are more frequent in patients with cardioembolic infarction, hypertension and diabetes in patients with lacunar stroke, and vascular peripheral disease, hypertension, diabetes, previous transient ischemic attack and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with atherothrombotic infarction. This review aims to present updated data on risk factors for acute ischemic stroke as well as to describe the usefulness of new and emerging vascular risk factors in stroke patients. PMID:25984516

  10. Association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet with glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 diabetes: The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Victor W.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Couch, Sarah C.; Liese, Angela D.; The, Natalie S.; Tzeel, Benjamin A.; Dabelea, Dana; Lawrence, Jean M.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Kim, Grace; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study aimed to determine the association between a Mediterranean diet and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects/Methods Incident T1D cases aged <20 years at diagnosis between 2002 and 2005 were included. Participants were seen at baseline (N=793), 1-year (N=512) and 5-year follow-up visits (N=501). Mediterranean diet score was assessed using a modified KIDMED index (mKIDMED). Multivariate linear regression and longitudinal mixed model were applied to determine the association between mKIDMED score and log-HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure (BP), and obesity. Results In cross-sectional analyses using baseline data, for individuals with an HbA1c of 7.5%, a two-point higher mKIDMED score (one standard deviation) was associated with 0.15% lower HbA1c (P=0.02). A two-point higher mKIDMED score was associated with 4.0 mg/dL lower total cholesterol (TC) (P=0.006), 3.4 mg/dL lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C (P=0.004), 3.9 mg/dL lower non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL)-C (P=0.004), and 0.07 lower LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (P=0.02). Using longitudinal data, a two-point increase in mKIDMED score was associated with 0.01% lower log-HbA1c (P=0.07), 1.8 mg/dL lower TC (P=0.05), 1.6 mg/dL lower LDL-C (P=0.03), and 1.8 mg/dL lower non-HDL-C (P=0.03) than would otherwise have been expected. HbA1c mediated about 20% of the association for lipids in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. An unexpected positive association between mKIDMED score and systolic BP was found among non-Hispanic white youth in cross-sectional analyses (P=0.009). Mediterranean diet was not associated with obesity. Conclusions Mediterranean diet may improve glycemic control and cardiovascular health in T1D youth. PMID:26908421

  11. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function.

  12. Risk assessment and management of post-transplant diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Yu Seun; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-10-01

    The success rate of organ transplantation has been increasing with advances in surgical and pharmacological techniques. However, the number of solid organ transplant recipients who require metabolic disease management is also growing. Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a common complication after solid organ transplantation and is associated with risks of graft loss, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Other risk factors for PTDM include older age, genetic background, obesity, hepatitis C virus infection, hypomagnesemia, and use of immunosuppressant agents (corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor). Management of PTDM should be started before the transplantation plan to properly screen high-risk patients. Even though PTDM management is similar to that of general type 2 diabetes, therapeutic approaches must be made with consideration of drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents, glucose-lowering medications, and graft rejection and function. PMID:27621191

  13. Modifications of coronary risk factors.

    PubMed

    Albu, Jeanine; Gottlieb, Sheldon H; August, Phyllis; Nesto, Richard W; Orchard, Trevor J

    2006-06-19

    In addition to the revascularization and glycemic management interventions assigned at random, the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) design includes the uniform control of major coronary artery disease risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, central obesity, and sedentary lifestyle. Target levels for risk factors were adjusted throughout the trial to comply with changes in recommended clinical practice guidelines. At present, the goals are low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <2.59 mmol/L (<100 mg/dL) with an optional goal of <1.81 mmol/L (<70 mg/dL); plasma triglyceride level <1.70 mmol/L (<150 mg/dL); blood pressure level <130 mm Hg systolic and <80 mm Hg diastolic; and smoking cessation treatment for all active smokers. Algorithms were developed for the pharmacologic management of dyslipidemia and hypertension. Dietary prescriptions for the management of glycemia, plasma lipid profiles, and blood pressure levels were adapted from existing clinical practice guidelines. Patients with a body mass index >25 were prescribed moderate caloric restriction; after the trial was under way, a lifestyle weight-management program was instituted. All patients were formally prescribed both endurance and resistance/flexibility exercises, individually adapted to their level of disability and fitness. Pedometers were distributed as a biofeedback strategy. Strategies to achieve the goals for risk factors were designed by BARI 2D working groups (lipid, cardiovascular and hypertension, and nonpharmacologic intervention) and the ongoing implementation of the strategies is monitored by lipid, hypertension, and lifestyle intervention management centers.

  14. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  15. Dietary factors in the development of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Suvi M

    2016-07-01

    There are several indicators concerning the putative importance of dietary factors during the fetal period lactation, infancy and childhood in the etiology of type 1 diabetes. Among foods, cow's milk consumption has been associated with an increased risk of preclinical and/or clinical type 1 diabetes and sugars with a progression from preclinical to clinical disease. Breast milk, on the other hand, may be protective. Processed foods may be related to a greater risk of type 1 diabetes because they contain higher amounts of advanced glycation end-products. Nitrites or N-nitroso compounds in processed meat products could increase the risk of this disease. Among nutrients, n-3 fatty acids, vitamins D and E, and zinc may protect from preclinical and/or clinical type 1 diabetes. The microbial composition of foods or food's other effects on gut microbiota are receiving increasing attention, also due to their putative role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Still the number of prospective studies in this research field is limited and most of the findings remain to be replicated. PMID:27411437

  16. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  17. Risk Factors for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review research on risk factors for eating disorders, restricting their focus to studies in which clear precedence of the hypothesized risk factor over onset of the disorder is established. They illustrate how studies of sociocultural risk factors and biological factors have progressed on parallel tracks and propose that major advances…

  18. Anxiety and risk of type 2 diabetes: Evidence from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lauren E.; Mezuk, Briana

    2012-01-01

    Objective Depression is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly comorbid with anxiety. However, few studies have examined whether anxiety is predictive of diabetes risk. The objectives of this study are to examine the prospective relationship between anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and agoraphobia) and risk of type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period, and to investigate the association between anxiety and risk of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes. Methods Data come from the 1993/6 and 2004/5 waves of the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (N=1920), a population-based prospective cohort. Anxiety disorders were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule. The prospective association between anxiety and incident type 2 diabetes was evaluated using a series of nested multivariable logistic regression models. Results At baseline, 315 participants (21.8%) had an anxiety disorder. The relationship between anxiety and risk of developing type 2 diabetes was not statistically significant after controlling for demographic characteristics (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.28, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.75, 2.18). There was no relationship between anxiety and diabetes risk after controlling for health behaviors and depression status (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 0.53, 1.89). There was no significant relationship between anxiety and development of diabetes-related complications among those with prevalent type 2 diabetes (OR: 2.02, 95% CI: 0.61, 6.74). Conclusion Anxiety disorders are not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes or risk of diabetes complications among those who have diabetes in the present study. PMID:23148808

  19. The role of red blood cell deformability and Na,K-ATPase function in selected risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in humans: focus on hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Radosinska, J; Vrbjar, N

    2016-09-19

    Deformability of red blood cells (RBC) is the ability of RBC to change their shape in order to pass through narrow capillaries in circulation. Deterioration in deformability of RBC contributes to alterations in microcirculatory blood flow and delivery of oxygen to tissues. Several factors are responsible for maintenance of RBC deformability. One of them is the Na,K-ATPase known as crucial enzyme in maintenance of intracellular ionic homeostasis affecting thus regulation of cellular volume and consequently RBC deformability. Decreased deformability of RBC has been found to be the marker of adverse outcomes in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors influences rheological properties of the blood. This review summarizes knowledge concerning the RBC deformability in connection with selected risk factors of CVD, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus, based exclusively on papers from human studies. We attempted to provide an update on important issues regarding the role of Na,K-ATPase in RBC deformability. In patients suffering from hypertension as well as diabetes mellitus the Na,K-ATPase appears to be responsible for the changes leading to alterations in RBC deformability. The triggering factor for changes of RBC deformability during hypercholesterolemia seems to be the increased content of cholesterol in erythrocyte membranes. PMID:27643939

  20. [Cardiovascular risk factors in young people].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Contreras, Mónica; Moreno-Gómez, Germán A; Marín-Grisales, Marta E; García-Ortiz, Luis H

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) involves several disorders related to the formation and development of atherosclerotic processes. Several risk factors are involved in CVD aetiology; some of them (i.e. age, hypertension, obesity, dislipidemia and diabetes) have been clearly associated, whereas others have a variable level of association. An increase in cardiovascular risk factors has been recently reported in the young population; studies of cardiovascular risk factors in this population have shown that its cardiovascular risk profile could be different from that presented by older populations. This review presents a summary of reported cardiovascular risk factors in the young population and their causes which have been released and indexed in different databases. Most factors discussed are life-habit risk factors and represent direct targets for clinical intervention. We propose that primary CVD prevention should include a more detailed knowledge of the nature of the risk factors concerning the young population and could have a positive impact on CVD prevalence during the next few years.

  1. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah and Allison ... most common adverse effects, and recent concerns about new-onset diabetes mellitus to help patients and providers ...

  2. When Diabetes Strikes, Get Moving to Lower Risk to Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... finds association between inactivity and heightened odds for diabetic retinopathy To use the sharing features on this page, ... lifestyle does seem to raise the risk for diabetic retinopathy. According to the U.S. National Eye Institute, the ...

  3. Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Early Puberty Linked to Higher Type 2 Diabetes Risk Alexandria, Virginia October 10, 2013 Early puberty ... 08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org Shopdiabetes.org: Take the Guesswork out of ...

  4. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset. Results Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658847

  5. Factors associated with diabetes mellitus prediction among pregnant Arab subjects with gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aljohani, Naji; Al Serehi, Amal; Ahmed, Amjad M; Buhary, Badr Aldin M; Alzahrani, Saad; At-Taras, Eeman; Almujally, Najla; Alsharqi, Maha; Alqahtani, Mohammed; Almalki, Mussa

    2015-01-01

    There is scarcity of available information on the possible significant risk factors related to diabetes mellitus (DM) prediction among expectant Saudi mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The present study is the first to identify such risk factors in the Arab cohort. A total of 300 pregnant subjects (mean age 33.45 ± 6.5 years) were randomly selected from all the deliveries registered at the Obstetrics Department of King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh Saudi Arabia from April 2011 to March 2013. Demographic and baseline glycemic information were collected. A total of 7 highly significant and independent risk factors were identified: age, obesity, and family history of DM, GDM < 20 weeks, macrosomia, insulin therapy and recurrent GDM. Among these factors, subjects who had insulin therapy use are 5 times more likely to develop DMT2 (p-value 3.94 × 10(-14)) followed by recurrent GDM [odds-ratio 4.69 (Confidence Interval 2.34-4.84); P = 1.24 × 10(-13)). The identification of the risk factors mentioned with their respective predictive powers in the detection of DMT2 needs to be taken seriously in the post-partum assessment of Saudi pregnant patients at highest risk.

  6. Potassium intake and risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study

    PubMed Central

    Colangelo, L. A.; Yeh, H. C.; Anderson, C. A.; Daviglus, M. L.; Liu, K.; Brancati, F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Serum potassium has been found to be a significant predictor of diabetes risk, but the effect of dietary potassium on diabetes risk is not clear. We sought to determine if dietary potassium is associated with risk of incident type 2 diabetes in young adults. Methods We used data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Potassium intake was measured by (1) an average of three 24 h urinary potassium collections at the 5-year study visit, and (2) the CARDIA dietary assessment instrument at baseline. Incident type 2 diabetes cases were ascertained on the basis of use of diabetes medication and laboratory measurements. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders including intake of fruit and vegetables and other dietary factors. Results Of 1,066 participants with urinary potassium measurements, 99 (9.3%) developed diabetes over 15 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, adults in the lowest urinary potassium quintile were more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as their counterparts in the highest quintile (HR 2.45; 95% CI 1.08, 5.59). Of 4,754 participants with dietary history measurements, 373 (7.8%) developed diabetes over 20 years of follow-up. In multivariate models, African-Americans had a significantly increased risk of diabetes with lower potassium intake, which was not found in whites. Conclusions/interpretation Low dietary potassium is associated with increased risk of incident diabetes in African-Americans. Randomised clinical trials are needed to determine if potassium supplementation, from either dietary or pharmacological sources, could reduce the risk of diabetes, particularly in higher-risk populations. PMID:22322920

  7. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  8. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Megan L.; Garnett, Sarah P.; Baur, Louise A.; Lister, Natalie B.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  9. The Effectiveness of Different Diet Strategies to Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk in Youth.

    PubMed

    Gow, Megan L; Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Lister, Natalie B

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes in children and adolescents has become a prominent clinical issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of young people have risk factors for type 2 diabetes, particularly obesity, indicating the need for effective type 2 diabetes prevention strategies. The aim of this review was to identify specific dietary strategies that optimize improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes in youth and hence reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes development. Our review of the current literature indicates that dietary interventions lead to weight loss when intervention adherence is high. However, in addition to weight loss, a diet that is reduced in carbohydrates may optimize improvements in other type 2 diabetes risk factors, including insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. While further research is needed to confirm this finding, reduced carbohydrate diets may include a very low-carbohydrate diet, a very low-energy diet, a lower-glycemic-index diet, and/or an intermittent fasting diet. This array of dietary strategies provides a suite of intervention options for clinicians to recommend to young people at risk of type 2 diabetes. However, these findings are in contrast to current guidelines for the prevention of type 2 diabetes in adults which recommends a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. PMID:27517953

  10. Modifiable risk factors for schizophrenia and autism--shared risk factors impacting on brain development.

    PubMed

    Hamlyn, Jess; Duhig, Michael; McGrath, John; Scott, James

    2013-05-01

    Schizophrenia and autism are two poorly understood clinical syndromes that differ in age of onset and clinical profile. However, recent genetic and epidemiological research suggests that these two neurodevelopmental disorders share certain risk factors. The aims of this review are to describe modifiable risk factors that have been identified in both disorders, and, where available, collate salient systematic reviews and meta-analyses that have examined shared risk factors. Based on searches of Medline, Embase and PsycINFO, inspection of review articles and expert opinion, we first compiled a set of candidate modifiable risk factors associated with autism. Where available, we next collated systematic-reviews (with or without meta-analyses) related to modifiable risk factors associated with both autism and schizophrenia. We identified three modifiable risk factors that have been examined in systematic reviews for both autism and schizophrenia. Advanced paternal age was reported as a risk factor for schizophrenia in a single meta-analysis and as a risk factor in two meta-analyses for autism. With respect to pregnancy and birth complications, for autism one meta-analysis identified maternal diabetes and bleeding during pregnancy as risks factors for autism whilst a meta-analysis of eight studies identified obstetric complications as a risk factor for schizophrenia. Migrant status was identified as a risk factor for both autism and schizophrenia. Two separate meta-analyses were identified for each disorder. Despite distinct clinical phenotypes, the evidence suggests that at least some non-genetic risk factors are shared between these two syndromes. In particular, exposure to drugs, nutritional excesses or deficiencies and infectious agents lend themselves to public health interventions. Studies are now needed to quantify any increase in risk of either autism or schizophrenia that is associated with these modifiable environmental factors.

  11. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Malondialdehyde as Potential Predictors of Vascular Risk Complications in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Cross-Sectional Case Control Study in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Morsi, Heba Kamal; Ismail, Manar Mohammad; Gaber, Hassan Abdelaziz Hassan; Elbasmy, Amani Abdelhamid

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malondialdehyde (MDA) has been implicated in the development of many acute inflammatory, autoimmune diseases as well as chronic inflammatory metabolic disorders. Involvement of inflammatory response and oxidative stress is currently suggested as a mechanism underlying development of diabetes and its complications. Objective. To evaluate the clinical utility of MDA, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), LDL-C/HDL-C, and TG/HDL-C ratio as noninvasive laboratory markers for prediction of T2DM vascular complications. Method. 63 Saudi T2DM patients and 16 age and sex matched controls were included. Serum MDA and MIF were assayed by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and ELISA, respectively. TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were calculated. Results. Uncontrolled DM patients had significantly higher levels of MDA, MIF, TG/HDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios when compared with controlled DM patients and control group (p < 0.001). MDA had 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity. MIF showed 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity and LDL-C/HDL-C had 97% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Meanwhile, TG/HDL-C had the lowest sensitivity and specificity in identifying diabetic patients who would suffer from vascular complications. Conclusion. MDA, MIF, and LDL-C/HDL-C could be new predictors of metabolic disturbance which promote vascular complications in T2DM. PMID:27298517

  12. Atrial fibrillation: relation between clinical risk factors and transoesophageal echocardiographic risk factors for thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Illien, S; Maroto-Järvinen, S; von der Recke, G; Hammerstingl, C; Schmidt, H; Kuntz-Hehner, S; Lüderitz, B; Omran, H

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To correlate clinical risk factors for thromboembolism with transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE) markers of a thrombogenic milieu. Design: Clinical risk factors for thromboembolism and TOE markers of a thrombogenic milieu were assessed in consecutive patients with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation. The following TOE parameters were assessed: presence of spontaneous echo contrast, thrombi, and left atrial appendage blood flow velocities. A history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, or thromboembolic events, patient age > 65 years, and chronic heart failure were considered to be clinical risk factors for thromboembolism. Setting: Tertiary cardiac care centre. Patients: 301 consecutive patients with non-rheumatic atrial fibrillation scheduled for TOE. Results: 255 patients presented with clinical risk factors. 158 patients had reduced left atrial blood flow velocities, dense spontaneous echo contrast, or both. Logistic regression analysis showed that a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and age > 65 years were the only independent predictors of a thrombogenic milieu (both p < 0.0001). The probability of having a thrombogenic milieu increased with the number of clinical risk factors present (p < 0.0001). 17.4% of the patients without clinical risk factors had a thrombogenic milieu whereas 41.2% of the patients presenting one or more clinical risk factors had none. Conclusion: There is a close relation between clinical risk factors and TOE markers of a thrombogenic milieu. In addition, TOE examination allows for the identification of patients with a thrombogenic milieu without clinical risk factors. PMID:12527668

  13. Applicability of the Existing CVD Risk Assessment Tools to Type II Diabetics in Oman: A Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem; Lee, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and it is considered to be a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in these patients. Many traditional risk factors such as age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, glycemic control, diabetes duration, renal dysfunction, obesity, and smoking have been studied and identified as independent factors for CVD. Quantifying the risk of CVD among diabetics using the common risk factors in order to plan the treatment and preventive measures is important in the management of these patients as recommended by many clinical guidelines. Therefore, several risk assessment tools have been developed in different parts of the world for this purpose. These include the tools that have been developed for general populations and considered T2DM as a risk factor, and the tools that have been developed for T2DM populations specifically. However, due to the differences in sociodemographic factors and lifestyle patterns, as well as the differences in the distribution of various CVD risk factors in different diabetic populations, the external applicability of these tools on different populations is questionable. This review aims to address the applicability of the existing CVD risk models to the Omani diabetic population.

  14. HEALTHY study rationale, design and methods: Moderating risk of type 2 diabetes in multi-ethnic middle school students

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The HEALTHY primary prevention trial was designed and implemented in response to the growing numbers of children and adolescents being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The objective was to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Modifiable risk factors measured were indicators of adiposity and gly...

  15. Cardiovascular and Diabetes Risk Perception in a Hispanic Community Sample

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Vanessa A.; Mainous, Arch G.; Williamson, Deborah; Johnson, Sharleen P.; Knoll, Michele E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined perceptions of 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk or likelihood of having undiagnosed diabetes or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) with actual risk in a community sample of Hispanic adults. Methods We conducted a survey of 183 Hispanic adults (≥18 years) recruited at community events around Charleston, SC. Likelihood of having undiagnosed diabetes/IFG as well as 10-year CHD risk were calculated. Perceived risk was assessed with questions based on the Risk Perception Survey-Diabetes Mellitus. Results Over half of respondents (54.8%) underestimated their likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes/IFG and 14.8% underestimated their 10-year CHD risk. Older and overweight respondents were more likely to underestimate their likelihood of undiagnosed diabetes/IFG. Respondents with family history of diabetes were the least likely to underestimate their likelihood of current undiagnosed diabetes/IFG. Respondents with diagnosed hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol or a family history of heart attack were more likely to underestimate their 10-year CHD risk. Men were more likely to underestimate their risk for diabetes/IFG and CHD risk. Conclusions Health education to improve accurate risk perception could improve health promotion for this population. PMID:22774302

  16. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  17. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients.

  18. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  19. Comment on: Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Eren, Mehmet Ali; Sabuncu, Tevfik; Karaaslan, Hüseyin

    2016-04-25

    In manuscript named "Statin use and risk of diabetes mellitus" by Chogtu et al, authors defined that pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced the risk of diabetes by 30% in West of Scotland Coronary Prevention study. In fact, pravastatin 40 mg/dL reduced coronary heart disease risk approximately 30% in mentioned study. PMID:27114756

  20. Lactate and Risk of Incident Diabetes in a Case-Cohort of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    PubMed Central

    Juraschek, Stephen P.; Shantha, Ghanshyam Palamaner Subash; Chu, Audrey Y.; Miller, Edgar R.; Guallar, Eliseo; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Schmidt, Maria Inês; Pankow, James S.; Young, J. Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxidative capacity is decreased in type 2 diabetes. Whether decreased oxidative capacity is a cause or consequence of diabetes is unknown. Our purpose is to evaluate whether lactate, a marker of oxidative capacity, is associated with incident diabetes. Methods and Findings We conducted a case-cohort study in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study at year 9 of follow-up. We evaluated lactate’s association with diabetes risk factors at baseline and estimated the hazard ratio for incident diabetes by quartiles of plasma lactate in 544 incident diabetic cases and 533 non-cases. Plasma lactate showed a graded positive relationship with fasting glucose and insulin (P<0.001). The relative hazard for incident diabetes increased across lactate quartiles (P-trend ≤0.001). Following adjustment for demographic factors, medical history, physical activity, adiposity, and serum lipids, the hazard ratio in the highest quartile was 2.05 times the hazard in the lowest quartile (95% CI: 1.28, 3.28). After including fasting glucose and insulin the association became non-significant. Conclusions Lactate, an indicator of oxidative capacity, predicts incident diabetes independent of many other risk factors and is strongly related to markers of insulin resistance. Future studies should evaluate the temporal relationship between elevated lactate and impaired fasting glucose and insulin resistance. PMID:23383072

  1. Novel Metabolic Markers for the Risk of Diabetes Development in American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Hyun, Noorie; Zeng, Donglin; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh T.; Yu, Tianwei; Jones, Dean; He, Jiang; Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify novel metabolic markers for diabetes development in American Indians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Using an untargeted high-resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we conducted metabolomics analysis of study participants who developed incident diabetes (n = 133) and those who did not (n = 298) from 2,117 normoglycemic American Indians followed for an average of 5.5 years in the Strong Heart Family Study. Relative abundances of metabolites were quantified in baseline fasting plasma of all 431 participants. Prospective association of each metabolite with risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) was examined using logistic regression adjusting for established diabetes risk factors. RESULTS Seven metabolites (five known and two unknown) significantly predict the risk of T2D. Notably, one metabolite matching 2-hydroxybiphenyl was significantly associated with an increased risk of diabetes, whereas four metabolites matching PC (22:6/20:4), (3S)-7-hydroxy-2′,3′,4′,5′,8-pentamethoxyisoflavan, or tetrapeptides were significantly associated with decreased risk of diabetes. A multimarker score comprising all seven metabolites significantly improved risk prediction beyond established diabetes risk factors including BMI, fasting glucose, and insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS The findings suggest that these newly detected metabolites may represent novel prognostic markers of T2D in American Indians, a group suffering from a disproportionately high rate of T2D. PMID:25468946

  2. The association of hypertension and diabetes: prevalence, cardiovascular risk and protection by blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Mancia, G

    2005-04-01

    Diabetes and hypertension frequently coexist, and their combination provides additive increases in the risk of life-threatening cardiovascular events. Recent guidelines agree on the need for early, aggressive reduction of blood pressure, with a goal of <130/80 mmHg, in patients with diabetes. The mechanism that underpins the increased sensitivity of diabetic subjects to hypertension is not known, but may involve impaired autoregulation or attenuated nocturnal decrease of blood pressure. All classes of antihypertensive agents are effective in reducing blood pressure in diabetic subjects, and all show evidence of a concomitant reduction in cardiovascular risk. Although there is some evidence that agents that interrupt the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) provide greater protective effects, the data are not conclusive. However, most diabetic subjects will require combination therapy to reach goal blood pressure. Antihypertensive drugs can also significantly influence the probability that otherwise healthy individuals will develop metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes. While diuretics and betablockers have a prodiabetic effect, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers may prevent diabetes more effectively than the metabolically neutral calcium channel blockers. Given that diabetes is an important cardiovascular risk factor, there is the potential for reductions in risk due to reduced blood pressure to be offset by an increased risk due to the development of diabetes. Such concerns should be considered in the selection of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:15868115

  3. Prepregnancy Diabetes and Offspring Risk of Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lars J.; Leirgul, Elisabeth; Boyd, Heather A.; Priest, James; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.; Quertermous, Thomas; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Background— Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of offspring congenital heart defects (CHD); however, the causal mechanism is poorly understood. We further investigated this association in a Danish nationwide cohort. Methods and Results— In a national cohort study, we identified 2 025 727 persons born from 1978 to 2011; among them were 7296 (0.36%) persons exposed to maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus. Pregestational diabetes mellitus was identified by using the National Patient Register and individual-level information on all prescriptions filled in Danish pharmacies. Persons with CHD (n=16 325) were assigned to embryologically related cardiac phenotypes. The CHD prevalence in the offspring of mothers with pregestational diabetes mellitus was 318 per 10 000 live births (n=232) in comparison with a baseline risk of 80 per 10 000; the adjusted relative risk for CHD was 4.00 (95% confidence interval, 3.51–4.53). The association was not modified by year of birth, maternal age at diabetes onset, or diabetes duration, and CHD risks associated with type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (insulin-independent) diabetes mellitus did not differ significantly. Persons born to women with previous acute diabetes complications had a higher CHD risk than those exposed to maternal diabetes mellitus without complications (relative risk, 7.62; 95% confidence interval, 5.23–10.6, and relative risk, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.91–4.13, respectively; P=0.0004). All specific CHD phenotypes were associated with maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus (relative risk range, 2.74–13.8). Conclusions— The profoundly increased CHD risk conferred by maternal pregestational diabetes mellitus neither changed over time nor differed by diabetes subtype. The association with acute pregestational diabetes complications was particularly strong, suggesting a role for glucose in the causal pathway. PMID:27166384

  4. Prevalence of Risk for Type 2 Diabetes in School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urrutia-Rojas, Ximena; Menchaca, John

    2006-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 3 children born in 2000 in the United States will become diabetic. The odds are higher for African American and Hispanic children as nearly 50% of them will develop diabetes. Random screening is not effective in identifying children at risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM);…

  5. Virus infections and type 1 diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Merja; Klingel, Karin

    2010-10-01

    Common intestinal infections caused by human enteroviruses (HEVs) are considered major environmental factors predisposing to type 1 diabetes (T1D). In spite of the active research of the field, the HEV-induced pathogenetic processes are poorly understood. Recently, after the first documented report on HEV infections in the pancreatic islets of deceased T1D patients, several groups became interested in the issue and studied valuable human material, the autopsy pancreases of diabetic and/or autoantibody-positive patients for HEV infections. In this review, the data on HEV infections in human pancreatic islets are discussed with special reference to the methods used. Likewise, mechanisms that could increase viral access to the pancreas are reviewed and discussed.

  6. Low Economic Status Is Identified as an Emerging Risk Factor for Diabetes Mellitus in Korean Men Aged 30 to 59 Years in Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bo Kyung; Kim, Sang Wan; Yi, Ka Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background We compared the association between economic status and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) using large nationwide datasets covering the previous 10 years in Korea. Methods We analyzed the association between economic status and DM using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data from 2001 to 2010 weighted to represent the Korean population between 30 and 59 years of age. The economic status of participants was classified into quartiles according to monthly family income with an equivalence scale. Results In men, the prevalence of diabetes in the lowest income quartile (Q1) was significantly higher than that in the other quartiles in 2008 (age and body mass index-adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.846; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.126 to 3.027; P=0.015), 2009 (OR, 1.706; 95% CI, 1.094 to 2.661; P=0.019), and 2010 (OR, 1.560; 95% CI, 1.024 to 2.377; P=0.039) but not in 2001 or 2005. The data indicated that classification in the lowest economic status was an independent risk factor for diabetes even after adjusting for abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and education level in men of KNHANES 2008 to 2010. Although economic status was significantly associated with abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension in women (P<0.001), there was no significant association between economic status and DM in women. Conclusion Korean men between 30 and 59 years of age with the lowest economic status had a significantly higher prevalence of DM in 2008 to 2010 even after adjusting for other risk factors. PMID:25922808

  7. Signal Detection Analysis of Factors Associated with Diabetes among Semirural Mexican American Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanni, K. D.; Ahn, D. A.; Winkleby, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Signal detection analysis was used to evaluate a combination of sociodemographic, acculturation, mental health, health care, and chronic disease risk factors potentially associated with diabetes in a sample of 4,505 semirural Mexican American adults. Overall, 8.9% of adults had been diagnosed with diabetes. The analysis resulted in 12 mutually…

  8. Cardiovascular risk factors following renal transplant

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Jill; Smith, Alice C

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) remain at an increased risk of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular (CV) events compared to the general population, although rates are lower than those patients on maintenance haemodialysis. Death with a functioning graft is most commonly due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and therefore this remains an important therapeutic target to prevent graft failure. Conventional CV risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and renal dysfunction remain a major influence on CVD in RTRs. However it is now recognised that the morbidity and mortality from CVD are not entirely accounted for by these traditional risk-factors. Immunosuppression medications exert a deleterious effect on many of these well-recognised contributors to CVD and are known to exacerbate the probability of developing diabetes, graft dysfunction and hypertension which can all lead on to CVD. Non-traditional CV risk factors such as inflammation and anaemia have been strongly linked to increased CV events in RTRs and should be considered alongside those which are classified as conventional. This review summarises what is known about risk-factors for CVD in RTRs and how, through identification of those which are modifiable, outcomes can be improved. The overall CV risk in RTRs is likely to be multifactorial and a complex interaction between the multiple traditional and non-traditional factors; further studies are required to determine how these may be modified to enhance survival and quality of life in this unique population. PMID:26722646

  9. Ethnic disparities in the association of body mass index with the risk of hypertension and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Robert J; Chou, Christina; Sinha, Sidhartha R; Kamal, Ahmad; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2014-06-01

    Despite having lower body mass index (BMI) compared to other ethnic groups, Asians continue to develop significant metabolic diseases such as hypertension and diabetes. To evaluate the disparate association of BMI and risk of hypertension and diabetes in Asians. We retrospectively studied 150,753 adults from the 1985-2011 California Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Trends in prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes were stratified by ethnicity. Multivariate logistic regression models evaluated the incremental effect of one unit BMI increase on risk of hypertension and diabetes and the disparate risks of hypertension and diabetes at different BMI thresholds. Asians had the lowest BMI among all groups. However, the impact of increasing BMI on risk of hypertension and diabetes was significantly greater in Asians. For each one unit increase in BMI, Asians were significantly more likely to have hypertension (OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18) compared to non-Hispanic whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Similar trends were seen for diabetes (Asians: OR 1.15; 95% CI 1.13-1.18). The risk of hypertension in Asians with BMI ≥ 22 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 27 and blacks with BMI ≥ 28. The risk of diabetes in Asians with BMI ≥ 28 was similar to non-Hispanic whites with BMI ≥ 30. Despite lower overall BMI compared to other groups, weight gain in Asians is associated with significantly higher risks of hypertension and diabetes. Compared to other ethnic groups, similar risks of hypertension and diabetes are seen in Asians at much lower BMI.

  10. Genetic Mapping at 3-Kilobase Resolution Reveals Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Receptor 3 as a Risk Factor for Type 1 Diabetes in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Deutsch, Kerry; Li, Sarah; Siegel, Andrew F.; Bekris, Lynn M.; Einhaus, Derek C.; Sheridan, Colleen M.; Glusman, Gustavo; Hood, Leroy; Lernmark, Åke; Janer, Marta

    2006-01-01

    We mapped the genetic influences for type 1 diabetes (T1D), using 2,360 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in the 4.4-Mb human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus and the adjacent 493 kb centromeric to the MHC, initially in a survey of 363 Swedish T1D cases and controls. We confirmed prior studies showing association with T1D in the MHC, most significantly near HLA-DR/DQ. In the region centromeric to the MHC, we identified a peak of association within the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 3 gene (ITPR3; formerly IP3R3). The most significant single SNP in this region was at the center of the ITPR3 peak of association (P=1.7×10-4 for the survey study). For validation, we typed an additional 761 Swedish individuals. The P value for association computed from all 1,124 individuals was 1.30×10-6 (recessive odds ratio 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7–3.9). The estimated population-attributable risk of 21.6% (95% CI 10.0%–31.0%) suggests that variation within ITPR3 reflects an important contribution to T1D in Sweden. Two-locus regression analysis supports an influence of ITPR3 variation on T1D that is distinct from that of any MHC class II gene. PMID:16960798

  11. Risk and potential risk reduction in diabetes type 2 patients in Germany.

    PubMed

    Häussler, Bertram; Berger, Ursula; Mast, Oliver; Thefeld, Wolfgang

    2005-06-01

    Avoiding serious complications such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and amputations in diabetes patients is the main interest of long-term treatment. Given the considerable prevalence of diabetes type 2 in industrialized countries this is a major public health concern as well as a burden to health care systems. The present study estimated the current risk of major complications occurring in the German diabetes type 2 population and explored the potential for further risk reduction. Risk reduction can be achieved when physiological and behavioral parameters (HbAlc, blood pressure, cholesterol level, body mass index, smoking) are set to target values recommended in guidelines. To estimate individual risk and potential risk reduction the multifactor disease model Mellibase was employed. Data were obtained from the German Health Survey of 1998, which includes a sample of 7,124 individuals representative of the German population. The survey shows a prevalence rate of 6.3% for diabetes type 2 in persons older than 35 years. The analyses reveal that the overall potential for risk reduction is moderate (e.g., the average reduction potential of the 10-year risk of stroke is 5.7%). A majority of parameter ranges found in the patient population are either already close to the recommended values (HbA1c), are not alarmingly higher than in the general population (blood pressure) or have little impact on risk reduction. In addition nonmodifiable risk factors such as duration of the illness and advanced age constrain possible improvements. However, there is a wide variation in the actual risk between individuals (e.g., the 10-year risk of stroke varies between 2.2% and 79.8%), and thus a wide variation in potential risk reduction (the risk reduction potential for stroke varies between 0% and 53.4%). Intensified treatment should therefore (a) focus on relevant subgroups of patients taking their risk reduction potential into account and (b) aim at improvement in the overall

  12. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient: The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Budoff, Matthew J; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A; Berman, Daniel S; Druz, Regina S; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H; Weigold, Wm Guy; Soman, Prem

    2016-02-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a "coronary risk equivalent," implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data. PMID:26846937

  13. [Causality: risk factors and interventions].

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Olaf M; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    A risk factor has a causal effect on a disease when the disease would not have occurred in the absence of the risk factor. Analogous reasoning applies to the effect of a particular therapy. Thinking in terms of contrasts is fundamental to causal reasoning in medicine. The contrast determines the content of the causal claim; the most important assumption here is that the prognosis between groups is comparable. Causal effects of risk factors are not always the same as the causal effect of an intervention: removal of a risk factor (e.g. smoking) for a disease does not necessarily mean that the risk will subsequently normalize. A second problem is that risk factors cannot always easily be translated into interventions. This applies to factors that cannot be changed (e.g. gender) or that can have multiple causes themselves (e.g. obesity).

  14. Metformin use and lung cancer risk in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sakoda, Lori C.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Achacoso, Ninah S.; Peng, Tiffany; Ehrlich, Samantha F.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Habel, Laurel A.

    2015-01-01

    Methodologic biases may explain why observational studies examining metformin use in relation to lung cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. We conducted a cohort study to further investigate this relationship, accounting for potential biases. For 47,351 patients with diabetes aged ≥40 years, who completed a health-related survey administered between 1994 and 1996, data on prescribed diabetes medications were obtained from electronic pharmacy records. Follow-up for incident lung cancer occurred from January 1, 1997, until June 30, 2012. Using Cox regression, we estimated lung cancer risk associated with new use of metformin, along with total duration, recency, and cumulative dose (all modeled as time-dependent covariates), adjusting for potential confounding factors. During 428,557 person-years of follow-up, 747 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer. No association was found with duration, dose, or recency of metformin use and overall lung cancer risk. Among never smokers, however, ever use was inversely associated with lung cancer risk (hazard ratio (HR) 0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.33-0.99), and risk appeared to decrease monotonically with longer use (≥5 years: HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.21-1.09). Among current smokers, corresponding risk estimates were >1.0, although not statistically significant. Consistent with this variation in effect by smoking history, longer use was suggestively associated with lower adenocarcinoma risk (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.40-1.17), but higher small cell carcinoma risk (HR, 1.82; 95% CI, 0.85-3.91). In this population, we found no evidence that metformin use affects overall lung cancer risk. The observed variation in association by smoking history and histology requires further confirmation. PMID:25644512

  15. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: Epidemiology, microbiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruna; Ferreira, Carina; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Silva, Sónia

    2016-11-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by Candida species that affects millions of women every year. Although Candida albicans is the main cause of VVC, the identification of non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, especially Candida glabrata, as the cause of this infection, appears to be increasing. The development of VVC is usually attributed to the disturbance of the balance between Candida vaginal colonization and host environment by physiological or nonphysiological changes. Several host-related and behavioral risk factors have been proposed as predisposing factors for VVC. Host-related factors include pregnancy, hormone replacement, uncontrolled diabetes, immunosuppression, antibiotics, glucocorticoids use and genetic predispositions. Behavioral risk factors include use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine device, spermicides and condoms and some habits of hygiene, clothing and sexual practices. Despite a growing list of recognized risk factors, much remains to be elucidated as the role of host versus microorganisms, in inducing VVC and its recurrence. Thus, this review provides information about the current state of knowledge on the risk factors that predispose to VVC, also including a revision of the epidemiology and microbiology of VVC, as well as of Candida virulence factors associated with vaginal pathogenicity. PMID:26690853

  16. Vulvovaginal candidiasis: Epidemiology, microbiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruna; Ferreira, Carina; Alves, Carlos Tiago; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Silva, Sónia

    2016-11-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) is an infection caused by Candida species that affects millions of women every year. Although Candida albicans is the main cause of VVC, the identification of non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species, especially Candida glabrata, as the cause of this infection, appears to be increasing. The development of VVC is usually attributed to the disturbance of the balance between Candida vaginal colonization and host environment by physiological or nonphysiological changes. Several host-related and behavioral risk factors have been proposed as predisposing factors for VVC. Host-related factors include pregnancy, hormone replacement, uncontrolled diabetes, immunosuppression, antibiotics, glucocorticoids use and genetic predispositions. Behavioral risk factors include use of oral contraceptives, intrauterine device, spermicides and condoms and some habits of hygiene, clothing and sexual practices. Despite a growing list of recognized risk factors, much remains to be elucidated as the role of host versus microorganisms, in inducing VVC and its recurrence. Thus, this review provides information about the current state of knowledge on the risk factors that predispose to VVC, also including a revision of the epidemiology and microbiology of VVC, as well as of Candida virulence factors associated with vaginal pathogenicity.

  17. Human parechovirus and the risk of type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kolehmainen, P; Koskiniemi, M; Oikarinen, S; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Ilonen, J; Knip, M; Hyöty, H; Tauriainen, S

    2013-09-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeVs) are RNA viruses associated mainly with mild gastrointestinal and respiratory infections in children and also cause neonatal sepsis and CNS infections. Human enteroviruses, close relatives of HPeVs, associate with the development of type 1 diabetes. In this study, the potential role of HPeV infections in promoting beta cell autoimmunity was investigated by analyzing stool samples of 54 prediabetic case and 134 healthy control children for the presence of HPeV RNA and comparing the derived infection frequencies. All 188 children were participants of the Finnish prospective Diabetes Prediction and Prevention study. Viral RNA was screened for using an HPeV-specific RT-PCR method coupled to liquid hybridization of the PCR product. The overall HPeV infection frequency did not differ between prediabetic case and control children. However, case boys had more HPeV positive samples in the 6-month period before becoming autoantibody positive, when compared to the matching time-period in controls (P < 0.01). HPeV infection at a young age does not appear to play a major role in the development of beta-cell autoimmunity. In boys, however, HPeVs showed time-dependent association with the first detection of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. Thus, in boys, HPeV infections cannot be excluded as a gender-specific risk factor which promotes the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:23852688

  18. The impact of dietary habits and metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular and diabetes mortality in countries of the Middle East and North Africa in 2010: a comparative risk assessment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Shi, Peilin; Powles, John; Singh, Gitanjali; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Abdollahi, Morteza; Al-Hooti, Suad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Houshiar-rad, Anahita; Hwalla, Nahla; Koksal, Eda; Musaiger, Abdulrahman; Pekcan, Gulden; Sibai, Abla Mehio; Zaghloul, Sahar; Danaei, Goodarz; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-01-01

    Objective/design We conducted a comparative risk assessment analysis to estimate the cardiometabolic disease (CMD) mortality attributable to 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors in 20 countries of the Middle East by age, sex and time. The national exposure distributions were obtained from a systematic search of multiple databases. Missing exposure data were estimated using a multilevel Bayesian hierarchical model. The aetiological effect of each risk factor on disease-specific mortality was obtained from clinical trials and observational studies. The number of disease-specific deaths was obtained from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease mortality database. Mortality due to each risk factor was determined using the population attributable fraction and total number of disease-specific deaths. Setting/population Adult population in the Middle East by age, sex, country and time. Results Suboptimal diet was the leading risk factor for CMD mortality in 11 countries accounting for 48% (in Morocco) to 72% (in the United Arab Emirates) of CMD deaths. Non-optimal systolic blood pressure was the leading risk factor for CMD deaths in eight countries causing 45% (in Bahrain) to 68% (in Libya) of CMD deaths. Non-optimal body mass index and fasting plasma glucose were the third and fourth leading risk factors for CMD mortality in most countries. Among individual dietary factors, low intake of fruits accounted for 8% (in Jordan) to 21% (in Palestine) of CMD deaths and low intake of whole grains was responsible for 7% (in Palestine) to 22% (in the United Arab Emirates) of CMD deaths. Between 1990 and 2010, the CMD mortality attributable to most risk factors had decreased except for body mass index and trans-fatty acids. Conclusions Our findings highlight key similarities and differences in the impact of the dietary and metabolic risk factors on CMD mortality in the countries of the Middle East and inform priorities for policy measures to prevent CMD. PMID:25995236

  19. Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Linda

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment have been associated with adipose tissue changes and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism. The proportion of HIV-infected adults over the age of 50 is also growing placing HIV-infected adults at particular risk for metabolic perturbations and cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults has been increasingly studied but whether HIV is associated with greater risk remains unclear, likely because of the interplay of host, viral and antiretroviral factors that are associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome. While the Framingham Risk Score is a well-accepted measure of 10-year cardiovascular risk in the general population, it may not accurately predict risk in the HIV setting due to HIV-related factors such as inflammation that are not accounted for. The relationship between HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) risk has also been debated. We summarize the recent literature on metabolic syndrome, DM, and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25027062

  20. Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Premashis

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of death all over the world, more so in Asia and Africa. The representative data on epidemiology of HCC in India is very scanty and cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. 45 million people who are suffering from chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 15 million people who are afflicted with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India. HBV and HCV infection is considered an important etiologic factor in HCC. Positive association between HCC and consumption of alcohol where alcohol contribute as a cofactor for hepatotoxins and hepatitis viruses. Aflatoxin contamination in the diets, Hepatitis B virus infection and liver cirrhosis in Andhra Pradesh, India and direct chronic exposure to aflatoxins was shown to cause liver cirrhosis. Cirrhosis of liver of any cause lead to develop about 70%–90% of HCC. Aflatoxin interact synergistically with Hepatitis B virus (HBV)/Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection which increase the risk of HCC. HBV infection, HBV infection with Aflatoxin exposure, viral infection and alcohol consumption leading to overt cirrhosis of the liver, alcohol consumption leading to cirrhosis of the liver with viral infection are the predominant risk factor for the development of HCC. HCV and alcohol are also associated with HCC in India. Indians develop diabetes at younger age, Asians have strong genetic susceptibility for type II diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is identified as a risk factor for HCC. Prevention of viral infection by universal vaccination against hepatitis virus, HCC surveillance program, preventing alcoholic liver diseases, fungal contamination of grains and ground crops to prevent basically Aflatoxin exposure are important measures to prevent liver diseases and HCC among those at risk. PMID:25755609

  1. Are We in the Same Risk of Diabetes Mellitus? Gender- and Age-Specific Epidemiology of Diabetes in 2001 to 2014 in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    In the early 2000s, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years in Korea was about 9% to 10%, and it remained stable. However, a nationwide survey showed that this prevalence increased over the past few years. After age-standardization using the Korean population of the year 2010, the prevalence of diabetes in adults aged ≥30 years was 10.0% to 10.8% between 2001 and 2012, which increased to 12.5% in 2013 and 11.6% in 2014. During that period, there have been changes in the gender- and age-specific prevalence of diabetes in Korean adults. The prevalence of diabetes in the elderly population increased significantly, while this prevalence in young adults, especially in young women, did not change significantly. The contribution of each diabetic risk factor, such as obesity, β-cell dysfunction, sarcopenia, and socioeconomic status, in developing diabetes has also changed during that period in each gender and age group. For young women, obesity was the most important risk factor; by contrast, for elderly diabetic patients, sarcopenia was more important than obesity as a risk factor. Considering the economic burden of diabetes and its associated comorbidities, a public health policy targeting the major risk factors in each population might be more effective in preventing diabetes. PMID:27273907

  2. A School-Based Intervention for Diabetes Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We examined the effects of a multicomponent, school-based program addressing risk factors for diabetes among children whose race or ethnic group and socioeconomic status placed them at high risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes. METHODS Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 42 schools to either a multicomponent school-based intervention (21 schools) or assessment only (control, 21 schools). A total of 4603 students participated (mean [±SD] age, 11.3±0.6 years; 54.2% Hispanic and 18.0% black; 52.7% girls). At the beginning of 6th grade and the end of 8th grade, students underwent measurements of body-mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and fasting glucose and insulin levels. RESULTS There was a decrease in the primary outcome — the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity — in both the intervention and control schools, with no significant difference between the school groups. The intervention schools had greater reductions in the secondary outcomes of BMI z score, percentage of students with waist circumference at or above the 90th percentile, fasting insulin levels (P = 0.04 for all comparisons), and prevalence of obesity (P = 0.05). Similar findings were observed among students who were at or above the 85th percentile for BMI at baseline. Less than 3% of the students who were screened had an adverse event; the proportions were nearly equivalent in the intervention and control schools. CONCLUSIONS Our comprehensive school-based program did not result in greater decreases in the combined prevalence of overweight and obesity than those that occurred in control schools. However, the intervention did result in significantly greater reductions in various indexes of adiposity. These changes may reduce the risk of childhood-onset type 2 diabetes. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00458029.) PMID:20581420

  3. Nutritional fats and the risk of type 2 diabetes and cancer.

    PubMed

    Stoeckli, R; Keller, U

    2004-12-30

    Dietary factors are important predictors for the risk of diabetes type 2. Increased consumption of fibre-rich foods, fruits and vegetables as well as limited amounts of total and saturated fats are essential elements in the prevention of diabetes type 2. The association between these dietary factors and the appearance of diabetes was not only present in cohort studies but were also major elements in the dietary part of the two large diabetes prevention trials (Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, Diabetes Prevention Program). There is also strong evidence for a relation between obesity and total fat intake and the incidence of certain types of cancers. There is a significant correlation between total fat intake and the risk of cancer; however, it is much weaker than that of the effect of red meat. Recommendations to decrease red meat intake, particularly processed meat, may decrease the risk of colorectal and prostate cancer and may have beneficial effects on breast cancer as well, although this evidence is less compelling. Overall, recommendations focused on controlling or reducing body weight by regular physical activity and avoidance of excessive energy intake from all sources, particularly from fat and saturated fats, by increasing consumption of fibre-rich carbohydrates, vegetables and fruits are effective in decreasing the risk for type 2 diabetes by more than 50% in high-risk individuals. Similar dietary patterns are likely to diminish the manifestation of certain forms of cancers. These conclusions are in agreement with current recommendations for cancer prevention as propagated by the American Cancer Society.

  4. [Diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk: Working group recommendations of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease of the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED, 2015)].

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Francisco; Iglesias, Pedro; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Tébar, Francisco Javier; Ortega, Emilio; Nubiola, Andreu; Pardo, Jose Luis; Maldonado, Gonzálo Fernando; Obaya, Juan Carlos; Matute, Pablo; Petrecca, Romina; Alonso, Nuria; Sarabia, Elena; Sánchez-Margalet, Victor; Alemán, José Juan; Navarro, Jorge; Becerra, Antonio; Duran, Santiago; Aguilar, Manuel; Escobar-Jiménez, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The present paper updates the Clinical Practice Recommendations for the management of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in diabetes mellitus. This is a medical consensus agreed by an independent panel of experts from the Spanish Society of Diabetes (SED). Several consensuses have been proposed by scientific and medical Societies to achieve clinical goals. However, the risk score for general population may lack sensitivity for individual assessment or for particular groups at risk, such as diabetics. Traditional risk factors together with non-traditional factors are reviewed throughout this paper. Intervention strategies for managing CVRF in the diabetic patient are reviewed in detail: balanced food intake, weight reduction, physical exercise, smoking cessation, reduction in HbA1c, therapy for high blood pressure, obesity, lipid disorders, and platelet anti-aggregation. It is hoped that these guidelines can help clinicians in the decisions of their clinical activity. This regular update by the SED Cardiovascular Disease Group of the most relevant concepts, and of greater practical and realistic clinical interest, is presented in order to reduce CVR of diabetics.