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Sample records for diabetes risk factors

  1. Diabetes risk factors (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and type 2 diabetes typically begins in adulthood. Type 2 diabetes is becoming more common due to the growing number of older Americans and an increasing trend toward obesity and a sedentary lifestyle. Without proper ...

  2. Risk Factors For Diabetic Polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, Yüksel; KURT, Semiha; KARAER ÜNALDI, Hatice; ERKORKMAZ, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors for distal symmetric sensory-motor polyneuropathy (DSP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Method Sixty seven patients with type 2 DM (33 males and 34 females) were included in the study. In addition to a detailed neurological examination, the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument was administered to all patients and their total neuropathy scores were calculated. Nerve conduction examinations were performed for all patients. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.83±.87 years. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) value was 8.56±2.07% (normal: 3–6.5%). The total neuropathy score significantly correlated with diabetes duration, hypertension, retinopathy, and HbA1C. Conclusion This study confirms the previous reports regarding the association of neuropathy with poor glycaemic control and duration of the disease. The association of neuropathy with retinopathy and hypertension is important.

  3. Risk factors for diabetic foot ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Wasim; Khan, Ishtiaq Ali; Ghaffar, Salma; Al-Swailmi, Farhan Khasham; Khan, Ihsanullah

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot is one of the common complications of diabetes mellitus. Many risk factors are involved in its causation. This study was conducted to determine risk factors responsible for foot ulcer in diabetic patients. A total of 196 consecutive patients with diabetic foot were included in the study. Detailed history, clinical findings and investigations were recorded. Lesions were graded according to Wagner's classification, and appropriate medical and/or surgical treatment was carried out. Patients who did not consent to participate in the study had established gangrene of the foot, or had any medical co-morbidity especially chronic heart failure and chronic renal failure which could influence these risk factors were excluded from the study. Data were collected on a special proforma for analysis. Out of 196 patients 80.1% were male. One hundred and forty-six (74.48%) patients were in the range of 40-70) years. Right foot was more commonly involved (65.3%). 91.3% patients had diabetes of more than 5 years duration. No treatment had been received by 47.4% patients while 41.3% were on oral anti-diabetics; 11.2% patients were on insulin. All patients had type 2 diabetes mellitus. Neuropathy was present in 51% patients, 62.8% had absent or diminished peripheral pulses, 43.4% had poorly controlled diabetes. According to the Wagner classification 30.6% patients had grade 1, 26.5% had grade 2, and 42.9% had grade 3 diabetic foot. Evidence of infection was seen in 85.7% patients: staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 43.4% patients. Osteomyelitis was present in 42.9% patients. Surgical intervention was performed in 85.7% patients. Direct relation was found between the duration of diabetes, sugar control, peripheral neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease. grade of diabetic foot, evidence of osteomyelitis, intervention and the outcome of the disease. Neuropathy, peripheral arterial disease, duration of diseases and undlerlying osteomylitis are the major risk factors and

  4. Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163195.html Gestational Diabetes a Risk Factor for Postpartum Depression: Study It ... 23, 2017 MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational diabetes and a previous bout of depression can increase ...

  5. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rewers, Marian; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen considerably in the past 30 years due to changes in the environment that have been only partially identified. In this Series paper, we critically discuss candidate triggers of islet autoimmunity and factors thought to promote progression from autoimmunity to overt type 1 diabetes. We revisit previously proposed hypotheses to explain the growth in the incidence of type 1 diabetes in light of current data. Finally, we suggest a unified model in which immune tolerance to β cells can be broken by several environmental exposures that induce generation of hybrid peptides acting as neoautoantigens. PMID:27302273

  6. Pre-Diabetes Non-Modifiable Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pre-diabetes Non-modifiable Risk Factors Updated:Nov 9,2015 ... This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? Intro ...

  7. Diabetic Nephropathy: New Risk Factors and Improvements in Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Athyros, Vasilios G

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Patients with diabetic nephropathy have a high cardiovascular risk, comparable to patients with coronary heart disease. Accordingly, identification and management of risk factors for diabetic nephropathy as well as timely diagnosis and prompt management of the condition are of paramount importance for effective treatment. A variety of risk factors promotes the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, including elevated glucose levels, long duration of diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Most of these risk factors are modifiable by antidiabetic, antihypertensive, or lipid-lowering treatment and lifestyle changes. Others such as genetic factors or advanced age cannot be modified. Therefore, the rigorous management of the modifiable risk factors is essential for preventing and delaying the decline in renal function. Early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy is another essential component in the management of diabetes and its complications such as nephropathy. New markers may allow earlier diagnosis of this common and serious complication, but further studies are needed to clarify their additive predictive value, and to define their cost-benefit ratio. This article reviews the most important risk factors in the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy and summarizes recent developments in the diagnosis of this disease.

  8. Risk factor control is key in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gareth; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2014-02-01

    Prolonged duration of diabetes, poor glycaemic control and hypertension are major risk factors for both diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease. Optimising blood sugar control together with excellent control of blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy should be considered in any patient with diabetes when persistent albuminuria develops. Microalbuminuria is the earliest clinically detectable indicator of diabetic nephropathy risk. The majority of patients with diabetic nephropathy are appropriately diagnosed based on elevated urinary albumin excretion and/or reduced 0032-6518 renal function. Patients with type 2 diabetes should have annual urinary ACR measurements from the time of diabetes diagnosis while those with type 1 diabetes should commence five years after diagnosis. Blood pressure lowering to 130/80mmHg and reduction of proteinuria to <1 g/day retards progression of diabetic nephropathy and reduces the number of cardiovascular events. Drugs that block the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are effective in reducing proteinuria, managing hypertension and reducing cardiovascular risk. Unless there are clear contraindications or intolerance all patients with diabetic nephropathy should be prescribed an ACEI or ARB. Stopping an ACEI or ARB during intercurrent illness or times of volume depletion is critically important. Patients with diabetic nephropathy should have at least yearly measurements of blood pressure, renal function and urinary ACR.

  9. Risk factors for retinopathy in diabetes mellitus in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shriwas, S R; Rahman Isa, A B; Reddy, S C; Mohammad, M; Mohammad, W B; Mazlan, M

    1996-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to determine the risk factors for diabetic retinopathy which is a major cause of visual impairment and blindness. One hundred and forty patients of diabetes mellitus were studied to determine the prevalence and types of retinopathy, and its relation to various risk factors. Nearly half (48.6%) of the patients suffered from retinopathy. The significant associated risk factors were long duration of diabetes, proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine level. However, there was no significant association between the prevalence of retinopathy and high levels of serum cholesterol, C-peptide levels, associated hypertension, and glycaemic control of diabetes mellitus. An effective screening programme for detection of retinopathy in the patients of diabetes as a regular practice is encouraged.

  10. Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Hawaiians

    PubMed Central

    Aluli, N. Emmett; Jones, Kristina L.; Reyes, Phillip W.; Brady, S. Kalani; Tsark, JoAnn U.; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is an increasing health problem among Native Hawaiians. Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of death among Native Hawaiians. In this article, the prevalence of diabetes is reported and associations with CVD risk factors are examined. Design and Methods Cross-section of 862 Native Hawaiians, ages 19–88. Physical exam included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, glucose and lipid measures, and personal interview. Results Age-adjusted prevalences of diabetes (25.1% in men vs. 22.6% in women) and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) (47.8% vs. 39.3%) increased with age and were higher in men. Fasting glucose was higher in diabetic men than women (209 mg/dL vs. 179, p = .0117). BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were higher in diabetic participants (all p < .01), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was lower (p < .005). Conclusions Diabetes prevalence in Native Hawaiians is high. The high proportion with IFG and the increase in CVD risk factors with diabetes suggest that community-based programs are needed to focus on diabetes and diabetes-related CVD. PMID:19653416

  11. Metabolic factors and genetic risk mediate familial type 2 diabetes risk in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Sridharan; Porneala, Bianca; McKeown, Nicola; Fox, Caroline S.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Type 2 diabetes mellitus in parents is a strong determinant of diabetes risk in their offspring. We hypothesise that offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes is mediated by metabolic risk factors. Methods We studied initially non-diabetic participants of the Framingham Offspring Study. Metabolic risk was estimated using beta cell corrected insulin response (CIR), HOMA-IR or a count of metabolic syndrome components (metabolic syndrome score [MSS]). Dietary risk and physical activity were estimated using questionnaire responses. Genetic risk score (GRS) was estimated as the count of 62 type 2 diabetes risk alleles. The outcome of incident diabetes in offspring was examined across levels of parental diabetes exposure, accounting for sibling correlation and adjusting for age, sex and putative mediators. The proportion mediated was estimated by comparing regression coefficients for parental diabetes with (βadj) and without (βunadj) adjustments for CIR, HOMA-IR, MSS and GRS (percentage mediated = 1 – βadj / βunadj). Results Metabolic factors mediated 11% of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.96. GRS mediated 9% of risk, corresponding to a reduction in OR per diabetic parent from 2.13 to 1.99. Conclusions/interpretation Metabolic risk factors partially mediated offspring type 2 diabetes risk conferred by parental diabetes to a similar magnitude as genetic risk. However, a substantial proportion of offspring diabetes risk associated with parental diabetes remains unexplained by metabolic factors, genetic risk, diet and physical activity, suggesting that important familial influences on diabetes risk remain undiscovered. PMID:25619168

  12. Modifiable Lifestyle Risk Factors and Incident Diabetes in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Joshua J; Echouffo-Tcheugui, Justin B; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Effoe, Valery S; Okhomina, Victoria; Carnethon, Mercedes R; Hsueh, Willa A; Golden, Sherita H

    2017-08-14

    The associations of modifiable lifestyle risk factors with incident diabetes are not well investigated in African Americans (AAs). This study investigated the association of modifiable lifestyle risk factors (exercise, diet, smoking, TV watching, and sleep-disordered breathing burden) with incident diabetes among AAs. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors were characterized among 3,252 AAs in the Jackson Heart Study who were free of diabetes at baseline (2000-2004) using baseline questionnaires and combined into risk factor categories: poor (0-3 points), average (4-7 points), and optimal (8-11 points). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) for diabetes (fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, physician diagnosis, use of diabetes drugs, or glycosylated hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5%) were estimated using Poisson regression modeling adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, systolic blood pressure, and BMI. Outcomes were collected 2005-2012 and data analyzed in 2016. Over 7.6 years, there were 560 incident diabetes cases (mean age=53.3 years, 64% female). An average or optimal compared to poor risk factor categorization was associated with a 21% (IRR=0.79, 95% CI=0.62, 0.99) and 31% (IRR=0.69, 95% CI=0.48, 1.01) lower risk of diabetes. Among participants with BMI <30, IRRs for average or optimal compared to poor categorization were 0.60 (95% CI=0.40, 0.91) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.29, 0.97) versus 0.90 (95% CI=0.67, 1.21) and 0.83 (95% CI=0.51, 1.34) among participants with BMI ≥30. A combination of modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with a lower risk of diabetes among AAs, particularly among those without obesity. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Song, Brian J; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure-the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients.

  14. Presence and Risk Factors for Glaucoma in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Brian J.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus represents a growing international public health issue with a near quadrupling in its worldwide prevalence since 1980. Though it has many known microvascular complications, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is one of the most devastating for affected individuals. In addition, there is increasing evidence to suggest that diabetic patients have a greater risk for glaucoma as well. Though the pathophysiology of glaucoma is not completely understood, both diabetes and glaucoma appear to share some common risk factors and pathophysiologic similarities with studies also reporting that the presence of diabetes and elevated fasting glucose levels are associated with elevated intraocular pressure – the primary risk factor for glaucomatous optic neuropathy. While no study has completely addressed the possibility of detection bias, most recent epidemiologic evidence suggests that diabetic populations are likely enriched with glaucoma patients. As the association between diabetes and glaucoma becomes better-defined, routine evaluation for glaucoma in diabetic patients, particularly in the telemedicine setting, may become a reasonable consideration to reduce the risk of vision loss in these patients. PMID:27766584

  15. Global prevalence and major risk factors of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yau, Joanne W Y; Rogers, Sophie L; Kawasaki, Ryo; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Kowalski, Jonathan W; Bek, Toke; Chen, Shih-Jen; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Fletcher, Astrid; Grauslund, Jakob; Haffner, Steven; Hamman, Richard F; Ikram, M Kamran; Kayama, Takamasa; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Krishnaiah, Sannapaneni; Mayurasakorn, Korapat; O'Hare, Joseph P; Orchard, Trevor J; Porta, Massimo; Rema, Mohan; Roy, Monique S; Sharma, Tarun; Shaw, Jonathan; Taylor, Hugh; Tielsch, James M; Varma, Rohit; Wang, Jie Jin; Wang, Ningli; West, Sheila; Xu, Liang; Yasuda, Miho; Zhang, Xinzhi; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Y

    2012-03-01

    To examine the global prevalence and major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) among people with diabetes. A pooled analysis using individual participant data from population-based studies around the world was performed. A systematic literature review was conducted to identify all population-based studies in general populations or individuals with diabetes who had ascertained DR from retinal photographs. Studies provided data for DR end points, including any DR, proliferative DR, diabetic macular edema, and VTDR, and also major systemic risk factors. Pooled prevalence estimates were directly age-standardized to the 2010 World Diabetes Population aged 20-79 years. A total of 35 studies (1980-2008) provided data from 22,896 individuals with diabetes. The overall prevalence was 34.6% (95% CI 34.5-34.8) for any DR, 6.96% (6.87-7.04) for proliferative DR, 6.81% (6.74-6.89) for diabetic macular edema, and 10.2% (10.1-10.3) for VTDR. All DR prevalence end points increased with diabetes duration, hemoglobin A(1c), and blood pressure levels and were higher in people with type 1 compared with type 2 diabetes. There are approximately 93 million people with DR, 17 million with proliferative DR, 21 million with diabetic macular edema, and 28 million with VTDR worldwide. Longer diabetes duration and poorer glycemic and blood pressure control are strongly associated with DR. These data highlight the substantial worldwide public health burden of DR and the importance of modifiable risk factors in its occurrence. This study is limited by data pooled from studies at different time points, with different methodologies and population characteristics.

  16. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... is more common among American Indians, Hispanic Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders. Women who have had diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes) or have given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds are also more ...

  17. Italian risk factor-based screening for gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Corrado, F; Pintaudi, B; Di Vieste, G; Interdonato, M L; Magliarditi, M; Santamaria, A; D'Anna, R; Di Benedetto, A

    2014-09-01

    There is a debate about whether universal or risk factors-based screening is most appropriate for gestational diabetes diagnosis. The aim of our retrospective study was to compare in our population the universal screening test recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) panel and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) versus the selective screening proposed by the United Kingdom National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines (NICE) but modified by the Italian National Institute of Health. From May 2010 to October 2011 all consecutive pregnant women were screened for gestational diabetes according to the IADPSG's panel criteria, while all the risk factors for each patient were registered. Of the 1015 pregnant women included in the study, 113 (11%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes and 26 (23%) of them would not have been identified by the selective screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health. However, all the risk factors considered by the selective screening revealed a good predictive role except for maternal age ≥ 35 years (OR: 0.98). In the group without the risk factors considered, it was reported the predictive role for gestational diabetes of prepregnancy BMI and nulliparity. The selective risk factors-based screening proposed by the Italian National Institute of Health has detected 77% of gestational diabetes cases in our population, sparing the oral glucose tolerance test for more than 40% of pregnant women at the same time. More information on the clinical impact of this choice could be obtained by a strict analysis of treatment, perinatal outcome and follow-up of an adequate sample size of "missed" gestational diabetes.

  18. Risk factors for major amputation in hospitalised diabetic foot patients.

    PubMed

    Namgoong, Sik; Jung, Suyoung; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are the main cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients. Eight hundred and sixty diabetic patients were admitted to the diabetic wound centre of the Korea University Guro Hospital for foot ulcers between January 2010 and December 2013. Among them, 837 patients were successfully monitored until complete healing. Ulcers in 809 patients (96·7%) healed without major amputation and those in 28 patients (3·3%) healed with major amputation. Data of 88 potential risk factors including demographics, ulcer condition, vascularity, bioburden, neurology and serology were collected from patients in the two groups and compared. Among the 88 potential risk factors, statistically significant differences between the two groups were observed in 26 risk factors. In the univariate analysis, which was carried out for these 26 risk factors, statistically significant differences were observed in 22 risk factors. In a stepwise multiple logistic analysis, six of the 22 risk factors remained statistically significant. Multivariate-adjusted odds ratios were 11·673 for ulcers penetrating into the bone, 8·683 for dialysis, 6·740 for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, 6·158 for hind foot ulcers, 0·641 for haemoglobin levels and 1·007 for fasting blood sugar levels. The risk factors for major amputation in diabetic foot patients were bony invasions, dialysis, GI disorders, hind foot locations, low levels of haemoglobin and elevated fasting blood sugar levels. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Meat Consumption as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Neal; Levin, Susan; Trapp, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Disease risk factors identified in epidemiological studies serve as important public health tools, helping clinicians identify individuals who may benefit from more aggressive screening or risk-modification procedures, allowing policymakers to prioritize intervention programs, and encouraging at-risk individuals to modify behavior and improve their health. These factors have been based primarily on evidence from cross-sectional and prospective studies, as most do not lend themselves to randomized trials. While some risk factors are not modifiable, eating habits are subject to change through both individual action and broader policy initiatives. Meat consumption has been frequently investigated as a variable associated with diabetes risk, but it has not yet been described as a diabetes risk factor. In this article, we evaluate the evidence supporting the use of meat consumption as a clinically useful risk factor for type 2 diabetes, based on studies evaluating the risks associated with meat consumption as a categorical dietary characteristic (i.e., meat consumption versus no meat consumption), as a scalar variable (i.e., gradations of meat consumption), or as part of a broader dietary pattern. PMID:24566443

  20. Risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Carolino, Idalina Diair Regla; Molena-Fernandes, Carlos Alexandre; Tasca, Raquel Soares; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the risk factors of type 2 diabetic patients through sociodemographic data, habits of health, anthropometric and biochemist profiles, assisted at a basic public health care unit in Maringá, Paraná. Sixty-six patients, 56 women aged over than 50 years-old were interviewed. High prevalence factors for cardiovascular risk were observed, such as: overweight and obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, sedentariness and inadequate diet. Data suggested the need for multidisciplinary intervention programs in health care units associated to educative programs, adjusted diet intake and regular physical activity for these diabetic patients.

  1. Prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot complications

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohammed

    2007-01-01

    Background Foot complications are common in diabetic patients and are considered one of the most expensive diabetes (DM) complications to treat. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for foot complications among diabetic patients in Al-Ain district, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods The study was part of a general cross-sectional survey carried out to assess the prevalence of DM complications in Al-Ain district, UAE. A sample of 513 diabetic patients with a mean age of 53 years (SD: ± 13) were randomly selected during 2003/2004. All completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment including foot examination and assessment of presence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Results Forty nine percent of the study populations were diagnosed to have DM without presenting with symptoms of diabetes and 35% had hypertension. The majority (86%) had type 2 DM. Of the total sample, 39% (95% CI: 35.1-43.7%) had PN and 12% (95% CI: 8.8–14.4%) had PVD. There were no cases of amputation and only one case had previous history of lower extremity ulceration. Significant risk factors for PN and PVD were: male gender, poor level of education, UAE nationality, increased duration of diabetes, type 2 DM, presence of hypertension and microalbuminuria (MA). Conclusion Despite the low prevalence of foot ulceration and amputation among the study population, nevertheless, a substantial proportion had potential risk factors for foot complications. PMID:17927826

  2. Environmental Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Cats.

    PubMed

    Öhlund, M; Egenvall, A; Fall, T; Hansson-Hamlin, H; Röcklinsberg, H; Holst, B S

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes in cats resembles type 2 diabetes in people. The etiology is not fully understood, but both genetic and environmental factors are believed to contribute. To assess the associations of environmental risk factors with diabetes in cats. Cats with a diagnosis of diabetes (n = 396) insured by a Swedish insurance company during years 2009-2013, and a control group (n = 1,670) matched on birth year. A web-based questionnaire was used in a case-control study. An invitation to participate was sent to owners of 1,369 diabetic cats and 5,363 control cats. The survey contained questions related to the cat's breed, age, sex, neutering status, body condition, housing, access to the outdoors, activity level, diet, eating behavior, feeding routine, general health, stressful events, other pets in the household, medications, and vaccination status. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Response rate was 35% for the diabetic group and 32% for the control group. Indoor confinement, being a greedy eater, and being overweight were associated with an increased risk of diabetes. In cats assessed by owners as being normal weight, there was an association between eating predominantly dry food and an increased risk of diabetes (Odds ratio 3.8; 95% confidence intervals 1.3-11.2). Dry food is commonly fed to cats worldwide. The association found between dry food and an increased risk of diabetes in cats assessed as normal weight by owners warrants further attention. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  3. Modifying Risk Factors: Strategies That Work Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stryker, Louis S

    2016-08-01

    An estimated 29.1 million Americans are currently diagnosed with diabetes, and this number is expected to increase to 48.3 million Americans by 2050. Correspondingly, the present burden of diabetes among patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty is significant and rising. Diabetes as a chronic condition is a well-established risk factor for complication after total joint arthroplasty. A growing body of evidence also indicates that hyperglycemia in the perioperative period, and not the diagnosis of diabetes alone, is similarly associated with increased complication risk. As a result, a coordinated approach to preoperative screening and optimization, combined with judicious perioperative glycemic control, may present an opportunity to improve outcomes, reduce complications, and avoid complication-related costs for patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty.

  4. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  5. Bienestar: A Diabetes Risk-Factor Prevention Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, Robert P.; Pugh, Jacqueline A.; Hernandez, Arthur E.; Menchaca, Velma D.; Ramirez, Robert R.; Mendoza, Monica

    1998-01-01

    The Bienestar Health Program is a diabetes risk-factor prevention program targeting Mexican American fourth graders. Program goals are to decrease overweight and dietary fats. The program is based on social cognitive theory and uses culturally relevant material. Preliminary evaluation indicates the program significantly decreases dietary fat,…

  6. Bienestar: a diabetes risk-factor prevention program.

    PubMed

    Trevino, R P; Pugh, J A; Hernandez, A E; Menchaca, V D; Ramirez, R R; Mendoza, M

    1998-02-01

    The Bienester Health Program, a diabetes risk-factor prevention pilot program, targeted fourth grade Mexican American children. The primary goals are to decrease the two established risk factors for diabetes--overweight and dietary fats. Since the health program is based on Social Cognitive Theory, on social systems structure, and on culturally relevant material, it considers the child's social systems on both its health program and process evaluation. Learning activities were developed for four social systems that potentially influence children's health behaviors (parent, classroom, school cafeteria, and after-school care). Preliminary results show that the Bienestar Health Program significantly decreased dietary fat, increased fruit and vegetable servings, and increased diabetes health knowledge.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdullatif D; Mehrass, Amat Al-Khaleq O; Al-Adhroey, Abdulelah H; Al-Shammakh, Abdulqawi A; Amran, Adel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) continues to be a significant health disorder triggering harmful complications in pregnant women and fetuses. Our knowledge of GDM epidemiology in Yemen is largely based on very limited data. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of GDM among pregnant women in Dhamar governorate, Yemen. Patients and methods A total of 311 subjects were randomly selected for this cross sectional survey. Health history data and blood samples were collected using a pretested questionnaire. To determine the prevalence of GDM, the fasting and random blood glucose techniques were applied according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association, using alternative methods that are more convenient to the targeted population. Poisson’s regression model incorporating robust sandwich variance was utilized to assess the association of potential risk factors in developing GDM. Results The prevalence of GDM was found to be 5.1% among the study population. Multivariate analysis confirmed age ≥30 years, previous GDM, family history of diabetes, and history of polycystic ovary syndrome as independent risk factors for GDM prevalence. However, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 and previous macrosomic baby were found to be dependent risk factors. Conclusion This study reports new epidemiological information about the prevalence and risk factors of GDM in Yemen. Introduction of proper maternal and neonatal medical care and health education are important in order to save the mother and the baby. PMID:26869814

  8. Nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert P

    2016-12-01

    If we are to gain a full and complete understanding of mechanisms of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescent type 1 diabetes mechanistic risk markers must be developed that predict risk accurately and which can be used as endpoints for short or intermediate term intervention studies aimed at reducing risk. A variety of biochemical and vascular markers have potential to meet these requirements. Biochemical markers include markers of inflammation, oxidation, and endothelial damage. Vascular markers include static and dynamic measures of arterial function. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes demonstrate alterations in many of these markers. For many of the biochemical markers precise cut-off points with high sensitivity and specificity are not available and many of the vascular measures require specific equipment and are operator dependent.

  9. Environmental Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Development.

    PubMed

    Antonela, Boljat; Ivana, Gunjača; Ivan, Konstantinović; Nikolina, Vidan; Vesna, Boraska Perica; Marina, Pehlić; Veselin, Škrabić; Tatijana, Zemunik

    2017-09-01

    Background Although environmental factors induce development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in genetically susceptible individuals, many of those factors have been uncovered. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyze associations of T1DM with a wide range of environmental factors. Material and Methods A case-control study was conducted on 249 diabetic and 255 healthy individuals from the Dalmatian region of South Croatia. Data regarding risk factors during pregnancy and early life period of the child were evaluated. Results History of antihypertensive intake (p=0.04) and frequency of stressful life events during pregnancy (p=0.01) were associated with higher risk of T1DM, while hypertension was associated with lower risk of T1DM (p=0.01). Maternal age<25 years at delivery was associated with a higher risk of T1DM (p=0.01).Diabetic patients had a positive family history of T1DM or T2DM (p=0.002) more frequently than controls, while history of infectious diseases was inversely associated with the risk of T1DM (p=0.03). A higher risk of T1DM was significantly associated with earlier introduction of cow's milk (p=0.001), higher number of meals consumed per day (p=0.02), higher frequency of carbohydrate (p=0.001) and meat (p=0.01) consumption and stressful life events during childhood (p=0.02) while earlier introduction of fruit was associated with a lower risk of T1DM (p=0.03) Conclusion This case-control study confirmed associations of a large number of environmental factors with development of T1DM with emphasis on the association of mother's antihypertensive intake during pregnancy, which extends our knowledge about environmental factors related with development of T1DM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Diabetes mellitus as a novel risk factor for gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Herrigel, Dana J; Moss, Rebecca A

    2014-10-01

    Evidence of an emerging etiologic link between diabetes mellitus and several gastrointestinal malignancies is presented. Although a correlation between pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus has long been suspected, the potential role diabetes mellitus plays in the pathogenicity of both hepatocellular carcinoma and colon cancer is becoming increasingly well defined. Further supporting the prospect of etiologic linkage, the association of diabetes mellitus with colon cancer is consistently demonstrated to be independent of obesity. An increasing incidence of diabetes and obesity in the United States has led to a recent surge in incidence of hepatocellular cancer on the background of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and this disease is expected to commensurately grow in incidence. Widespread recognition of this emerging risk factor may lead to a change in screening practices. Although the mechanisms underlying the correlation are still under investigation, the role of insulin, the insulin-like growth factor-I, and related binding and signaling pathways as regulators of cell growth and cell proliferation are implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor growth. The potential role of metformin and other medications for diabetes mellitus in the chemoprevention, carcinogenesis, and treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies is also presented.

  11. Testosterone and modifiable risk factors associated with diabetes in men.

    PubMed

    Atlantis, Evan; Lange, Kylie; Martin, Sean; Haren, Matthew T; Taylor, Anne; O'Loughlin, Peter D; Marshall, Villis; Wittert, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    The role of endogenous testosterone in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus remains vague. We investigated whether associations between endogenous testosterone and diabetes prevalence in men could be partially explained by modifiable risk factors. A random population-based cross-sectional study of 1195 men aged 35-80 years living in the north-west regions of Adelaide, Australia. Data collections occurred between 2002 and 2005, and response rate was 45.1%. Diabetes (non-specific) was classified by either: (1) self-report for doctor diagnosis of diabetes; (2) prescription medication for diabetes; (3) fasting plasma glucose ≥ 7 mmol/L; or (4) glycosylated haemoglobin ≥ 6.2%. Logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (OR [with 95% confidence intervals]) for diabetes, with stepwise adjustments for demographic, lifestyle, and clinical factors. Diabetes prevalence was positively associated with age groups 45-54 years (2.8 [1.4, 5.8]), 55-64 years (3.9 [1.9, 8.3]) and ≥ 65 years (4.0 [1.8, 8.9]), lowest income group (1.8 [1.0, 3.4]), ex-smoker (1.8 [1.2, 2.9]), lowest (3.2 [1.9, 5.5]) and middle (1.9 [1.1, 3.4]) alcohol tertiles, cardiovascular disease (1.9 [1.2, 2.8]), metabolic syndrome (4.0 [2.6, 6.1]), and lowest plasma total testosterone tertile (1.8 [1.1, 3.0]), but negatively associated with middle (0.5 [0.3, 0.8]) and highest (0.4 [0.3, 0.7]) sugar intake tertiles, arthritis (0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), and elevated LDL cholesterol (0.5 [0.3, 0.8]); ORs showed an inverted 'U' shape for middle and highest voiding lower urinary tract symptoms tertiles. Body composition, muscle strength, and cardio-metabolic factors partially explained the association between low plasma total testosterone and diabetes. Plasma total testosterone was inversely and independently associated with diabetes prevalence, that might have been partially explained by several modifiable risk factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Diabetic retinopathy, duration of diabetes and risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Job, D; Eschwège, E; Tchobroutsky, G; Guyot-Argenton, C; Aubry, J P; Dérot, N

    1975-01-01

    The present study, concerning 145 insulin-dependent diabetics showed positive relationships between the severity of retinal disease on the one hand, and body weight, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol level on the other. These relationships remain significant when the duration of the clinical diabetes and the age of the patient are taken into account. Two interpretations are suggested. They are not incompatible. In diabetic subjects, either the increase in blood pressure and serum cholesterol level causes an aggravation of diabetic retinopathy or there exists a common factor at the origin of retinal lesions and of an increase in risk of cardiovascular disease through atherosclerosis.

  13. Predicting Risk of Type 2 Diabetes by Using Data on Easy-to-Measure Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, David M.; Grigsby-Toussaint, Diana S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Statistical models for assessing risk of type 2 diabetes are usually additive with linear terms that use non-nationally representative data. The objective of this study was to use nationally representative data on diabetes risk factors and spline regression models to determine the ability of models with nonlinear and interaction terms to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods We used 4 waves of data (2005–2006 to 2011–2012) on adults aged 20 or older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5,471) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to build risk models in 2015. MARS allowed for interactions among 17 noninvasively measured risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Results A key risk factor for type 2 diabetes was increasing age, especially for those older than 69, followed by a family history of diabetes, with diminished risk among individuals younger than 45. Above age 69, other risk factors superseded age, including systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The additive MARS model with nonlinear terms had an area under curve (AUC) receiver operating characteristic of 0.847, whereas the 2-way interaction MARS model had an AUC of 0.851, a slight improvement. Both models had an 87% accuracy in classifying diabetes status. Conclusion Statistical models of type 2 diabetes risk should allow for nonlinear associations; incorporation of interaction terms into the MARS model improved its performance slightly. Robust statistical manipulation of risk factors commonly measured noninvasively in clinical settings might provide useful estimates of type 2 diabetes risk. PMID:28278129

  14. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  15. Diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation: characteristics, outcome, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Vesco, L; Busson, M; Bedrossian, J; Bitker, M O; Hiesse, C; Lang, P

    1996-05-27

    The incidence and risk factors of posttransplant diabetes mellitus were evaluated in 1325 consecutive renal transplant recipients. Thirty-three (2.5%) patients developed diabetes mellitus requiring insulin therapy. Onset occurred a mean of 5.7 +/- 1.5 months following transplantation. The patients were compared with 33 paired-control kidney recipients. The patients were significantly older than the controls (46.8 +/- 1.9 vs. 40.6 +/- 2.1 years) (P<0.05), and chronic renal failure was more often related to interstitial nephritis (P<0.05). A family history of diabetes mellitus, the body mass index, ethnic origin, HLA phenotype, and the total doses of steroids and cyclosporine were similar in the two groups. The number of patients with at least one rejection episode was significantly higher among the diabetic patients (21 versus 9) but the number of episodes was similar. Diabetes occurred a mean of 1.1 +/- 0.3 months following rejection treatment. Intravenous pulsed prednisolone was always used for anti-rejection therapy. Insulin was withdrawn in 16 cases after a mean of 4 +/- 1 months, independently of steroid dosage reductions. Actuarial patient and graft survival rates were not significantly different, although 6-year outcome tended to be better in the controls (86% versus 93% for patient survival and 67% versus 93% for graft survival). This study suggests that pulsed steroid therapy might be the critical factor in the onset of posttransplant diabetes and that the risk is increased in older patients with chronic interstitial nephrititis.

  16. Knowledge of risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poor among individuals with risk factors for CVD

    PubMed Central

    Dunstan, Libby; Busingye, Doreen; Reyneke, Megan; Orgill, Mary; Cadilhac, Dominique A.

    2017-01-01

    Background There is limited evidence on whether having pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or risk factors for CVD such as diabetes, ensures greater knowledge of risk factors important for motivating preventative behaviours. Our objective was to compare knowledge among the Australian public participating in a health check program and their risk status. Methods Data from the Stroke Foundation ‘Know your numbers’ program were used. Staff in community pharmacies provided opportunistic health checks (measurement of blood pressure and diabetes risk assessment) among their customers. Participants were categorised: 1) CVD ± risk of CVD: history of stroke, heart disease or kidney disease, and may have risk factors; 2) risk of CVD only: reported having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or atrial fibrillation; and 3) CVD risk free (no CVD or risk of CVD). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed including adjustment for age and sex. Findings Among 4,647 participants, 12% had CVD (55% male, 85% aged 55+ years), 47% were at risk of CVD (40% male, 72% 55+ years) and 41% were CVD risk free (33% male, 27% 55+ years). Participants with CVD (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.80) or risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.73) had poorer knowledge of the risk factors for diabetes/CVD compared to those who were CVD risk free. After adjustment, only participants with risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) had poorer knowledge. Older participants (55+ years) and men had poorer knowledge of diabetes/CVD risk factors and complications of diabetes. Conclusions Participants with poorer knowledge of risk factors were older, more often male or were at risk of developing CVD compared with those who were CVD risk free. Health education in these high risk groups should be a priority, as diabetes and CVD are increasing in prevalence throughout the world. PMID:28245267

  17. Knowledge of risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease (CVD) is poor among individuals with risk factors for CVD.

    PubMed

    Kilkenny, Monique F; Dunstan, Libby; Busingye, Doreen; Purvis, Tara; Reyneke, Megan; Orgill, Mary; Cadilhac, Dominique A

    2017-01-01

    There is limited evidence on whether having pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) or risk factors for CVD such as diabetes, ensures greater knowledge of risk factors important for motivating preventative behaviours. Our objective was to compare knowledge among the Australian public participating in a health check program and their risk status. Data from the Stroke Foundation 'Know your numbers' program were used. Staff in community pharmacies provided opportunistic health checks (measurement of blood pressure and diabetes risk assessment) among their customers. Participants were categorised: 1) CVD ± risk of CVD: history of stroke, heart disease or kidney disease, and may have risk factors; 2) risk of CVD only: reported having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or atrial fibrillation; and 3) CVD risk free (no CVD or risk of CVD). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed including adjustment for age and sex. Among 4,647 participants, 12% had CVD (55% male, 85% aged 55+ years), 47% were at risk of CVD (40% male, 72% 55+ years) and 41% were CVD risk free (33% male, 27% 55+ years). Participants with CVD (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.55, 0.80) or risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.57, 0.73) had poorer knowledge of the risk factors for diabetes/CVD compared to those who were CVD risk free. After adjustment, only participants with risk factors for CVD (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.93) had poorer knowledge. Older participants (55+ years) and men had poorer knowledge of diabetes/CVD risk factors and complications of diabetes. Participants with poorer knowledge of risk factors were older, more often male or were at risk of developing CVD compared with those who were CVD risk free. Health education in these high risk groups should be a priority, as diabetes and CVD are increasing in prevalence throughout the world.

  18. [Foot ulceration risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Bustos-Saldaña, Rafael; Prieto-Miranda, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    To identify risk factor prevalence for development of foot ulcers in patients with type 2 diabetes (DM2). A cross sectional study, of 2067 patients with DM2 from seven primary care units was conducted. A questionnaire exploring age, sex, occupation, time from diabetes mellitus diagnosis (DMD), and data concerning neuropathy, vascular changes, and presence of infections, anthropometry, and gait was applied. We found mean age, 59.96 +/- 11.47 years and time from DMD, 10.2 +/- 8.09 years. From 1360 women, 65.8 % presented the following risk factors: age, 34.7 %; schooling, 49.5 %; time from DMD, 38.8 %; occupation, 20 %; smoking, 24.3 %; alcoholism, 4.6 %; fasting glucose disturbance, 78 %; ulcer history, 10 %. In relation to associated diseases, 67.5 % of patients had one or more antecedent. The presence of risk factors in the sample was 9.716 +/- 2.52, of which 6.259 +/- 1.59 were modifiable. Patients studied presented high risk factor prevalence for development of foot ulcer. The majority of RF is potentially modifiable by adjusting patients' customs and habits.

  19. Potential Effect of Opium Consumption on Controlling Diabetes and Some Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Najmeh; Gozashti, Mohamad Hossain; Najafipour, Hamid; Shokoohi, Mostafa; Marefati, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to this belief that opium may have beneficial effects on diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors, the present study aimed to assess the potential and possible effects of opium consumption on diabetes control and some cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients. Methods This study enrolled 374 diabetic subjects from diabetes care centers in Kerman, Iran, including opium user group (n = 179) and a non-opium user group (n = 195). The data were collected through a questionnaire completed by interviewing, physical examination and laboratory assessment. Findings Opium did not show any statistically significant effect on blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C), fasting blood sugar (FBS), low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and diastolic blood pressure. However, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and prevalence of high SBP were significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.050). In addition, lower serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and frequency of lower HDL was significantly higher in opium user group (P < 0.001). Conclusion According to this study, opium does not seem to have beneficial effects on diabetes control or cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, it would not be advisable to consume opium as an anti-diabetes or cardioprotective agent. PMID:25140211

  20. Air Pollution as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Patel, Priti; Puett, Robin; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in both humans and animals suggest that air pollution is an important risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the mechanism by which air pollution mediates propensity to diabetes is not fully understood. While a number of epidemiologic studies have shown a positive association between ambient air pollution exposure and risk for T2DM, some studies have not found such a relationship. Experimental studies in susceptible disease models do support this association and suggest the involvement of tissues involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM such as the immune system, adipose, liver, and central nervous system. This review summarizes the epidemiologic and experimental evidence between ambient outdoor air pollution and T2DM. PMID:25628401

  1. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2012-07-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients.

  2. Diabetes and cancer II: role of diabetes medications and influence of shared risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Jessica M.; Glurich, Ingrid; Stankowski, Rachel V.; Williams, Gail M.; Doi, Suhail A.

    2014-01-01

    An association between type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cancer has long been postulated, but the biological mechanism responsible for this association has not been defined. In part one of this review, we discussed the epidemiological evidence for increased risk of cancer, decreased cancer survival, and decreased rates of cancer screening in diabetic patients. Here we review the risk factors shared by cancer and DM and how DM medications play a role in altering cancer risk. Hyperinsulinemia stands out as a major factor contributing to the association between DM and cancer, and modulation of circulating insulin levels by DM medications appears to play an important role in altering cancer risk. Drugs that increase circulating insulin, including exogenous insulin, insulin analogs, and insulin secretagogues, are generally associated with an increased cancer risk. In contrast, drugs that regulate insulin signaling without increasing levels, especially metformin, appear to be associated with a decreased cancer risk. In addition to hyperinsulinemia, the effect of DM medications on other shared risk factors including hyperglycemia, obesity, and oxidative stress as well as demographic factors that may influence the use of certain DM drugs in different populations are described. Further elucidation of the mechanisms behind the association between DM, cancer, and the role of DM medications in modulating cancer risk may aid in the development of better prevention and treatment options for both DM and cancer. Additionally, incorporation of DM medication use into cancer prediction models may lead to the development of improved risk assessment tools for diabetic patients. PMID:22527174

  3. Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity as Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Eibl, Guido; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Korc, Murray; Petrov, Maxim S; Goodarzi, Mark O; Fisher, William E; Habtezion, Aida; Lugea, Aurelia; Pandol, Stephen J; Hart, Phil A; Andersen, Dana K

    2017-09-11

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the deadliest types of cancer. The worldwide estimates of its incidence and mortality in the general population are eight cases per 100,000 person-years and seven deaths per 100,000 person-years, and they are significantly higher in the United States than in the rest of the world. The incidence of this disease in the United States is more than 50,000 new cases in 2017. Indeed, total deaths due to PDAC are projected to increase dramatically to become the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths before 2030. Considering the failure to date to efficiently treat existing PDAC, increased effort should be undertaken to prevent this disease. A better understanding of the risk factors leading to PDAC development is of utmost importance to identify and formulate preventive strategies. Large epidemiologic and cohort studies have identified risk factors for the development of PDAC, including obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review highlights the current knowledge of obesity and type 2 diabetes as risk factors for PDAC development and progression, their interplay and underlying mechanisms, and the relation to diet. Research gaps and opportunities to address this deadly disease are also outlined. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Obesity and Hyperlipidemia are Risk Factors for Early Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A. Gordon; Singleton, J. Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The Utah Diabetic Neuropathy Study (UDNS) examined 218 type 2 diabetic subjects without neuropathy symptoms, or with symptoms of < 5 years, in order to evaluate risk factors for neuropathy development. Each subject completed symptom questionnaires, the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), nerve conduction studies (NCS), quantitative sensory testing (QST) for vibration and cold detection, quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART), and skin biopsy with measurement of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Those with abnormalities of ≥ 3 were classified as having probable, and those with 1–2 as possible neuropathy. The relationship between glycemic control, lipid parameters (high density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels), blood pressure, and obesity, and neuropathy risk was examined. There was a significant relationship between the number of abnormalities among these features and neuropathy status (p<0.01). Hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and 3 or more abnormalities increased neuropathy risk (risk ratios 2.1 p<0.03, 2.9 p>0.02 and 3.0 p<0.004 respectively). Multivariate analysis found obesity and triglycerides were related to loss of small unmyelinated axons based on IENFD whereas elevated hemoglobin A1c was related to large myelinated fiber loss (motor conduction velocity). These findings indicate obesity and hypertriglyceridemia significantly increase risk for peripheral neuropathy, independent of glucose control. Obesity/hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia may have differential effects on small versus large fibers. PMID:23731827

  5. Obesity and hyperlipidemia are risk factors for early diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, A Gordon; Singleton, J Robinson

    2013-01-01

    The Utah Diabetic Neuropathy Study (UDNS) examined 218 type 2 diabetic subjects without neuropathy symptoms, or with symptoms of<5 years, in order to evaluate risk factors for neuropathy development. Each subject completed symptom questionnaires, the Utah Early Neuropathy Scale (UENS), nerve conduction studies (NCS), quantitative sensory testing (QST) for vibration and cold detection, quantitative sudomotor axon reflex testing (QSART), and skin biopsy with measurement of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). Those with abnormalities of≥3 were classified as having probable, and those with 1-2 as possible neuropathy. The relationship between glycemic control, lipid parameters (high density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels), blood pressure, and obesity, and neuropathy risk was examined. There was a significant relationship between the number of abnormalities among these features and neuropathy status (p<0.01). Hypertriglyceridemia, obesity and 3 or more abnormalities increased neuropathy risk (risk ratios 2.1 p<0.03, 2.9 p>0.02 and 3.0 p<0.004 respectively). Multivariate analysis found obesity and triglycerides were related to loss of small unmyelinated axons based on IENFD whereas elevated hemoglobin A1c was related to large myelinated fiber loss (motor conduction velocity). These findings indicate obesity and hypertriglyceridemia significantly increase risk for peripheral neuropathy, independent of glucose control. Obesity/hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia may have differential effects on small versus large fibers.

  6. Novel Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in African-Americans.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ranee; Maruthur, Nisa M; Edelman, David

    2015-12-01

    In the USA, compared to whites, African-Americans are disproportionately impacted by the diabetes epidemic. Traditional diabetes risk factors, such as obesity, are more common among African-Americans, but these traditional risk factors do not explain all of the disparity in diabetes risk. Recent research has identified novel environmental, lifestyle, physiologic, and genetic risk factors for diabetes, some of which appear to impact African-Americans more than whites. This manuscript reviews the recent literature to highlight some of these novel risk factors that may be contributing to the racial disparity in diabetes risk. Further study is needed of the modifiable risk factors for development of interventions to reduce the risk of diabetes in African-Americans, as well as other high-risk populations.

  7. Diabetes Risk Factors, Diabetes Risk Algorithms, and the Prediction of Future Frailty: The Whitehall II Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Kim; Kivimäki, Mika; Hamer, Mark; Shipley, Martin J.; Akbaraly, Tasnime N.; Tabak, Adam; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Batty, G. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether established diabetes risk factors and diabetes risk algorithms are associated with future frailty. Design Prospective cohort study. Risk algorithms at baseline (1997–1999) were the Framingham Offspring, Cambridge, and Finnish diabetes risk scores. Setting Civil service departments in London, United Kingdom. Participants There were 2707 participants (72% men) aged 45 to 69 years at baseline assessment and free of diabetes. Measurements Risk factors (age, sex, family history of diabetes, body mass index, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, antihypertensive and corticosteroid treatments, history of high blood glucose, smoking status, physical activity, consumption of fruits and vegetables, fasting glucose, HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides) were used to construct the risk algorithms. Frailty, assessed during a resurvey in 2007–2009, was denoted by the presence of 3 or more of the following indicators: self-reported exhaustion, low physical activity, slow walking speed, low grip strength, and weight loss; “prefrailty” was defined as having 2 or fewer of these indicators. Results After a mean follow-up of 10.5 years, 2.8% of the sample was classified as frail and 37.5% as prefrail. Increased age, being female, stopping smoking, low physical activity, and not having a daily consumption of fruits and vegetables were each associated with frailty or prefrailty. The Cambridge and Finnish diabetes risk scores were associated with frailty/prefrailty with odds ratios per 1 SD increase (disadvantage) in score of 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.27) and 1.27 (1.17–1.37), respectively. Conclusion Selected diabetes risk factors and risk scores are associated with subsequent frailty. Risk scores may have utility for frailty prediction in clinical practice. PMID:24103860

  8. Pruritus induced self injury behavior: an overlooked risk factor for amputation in diabetic neuropathy?

    PubMed

    Dorfman, David; George, Mary Catherine; Tamler, Ronald; Lushing, Julia; Nmashie, Alexandra; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pruritus is a risk factor for self-injury behavior (SIB) in sensory polyneuropathies. Although diabetes patients have elevated risk for pruritus, there are no reports of SIB in diabetic neuropathy. We present the case of a diabetes patient with neuropathy, whose pruritus induced SIB, resulted in partial amputation of a toe.

  9. Vascular risk factors in the obliterative peripheral arteriopathy of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Fekete, T; Mösler, R; Panduru, V

    1985-01-01

    To estimate the role of some vascular risk factors in the obliterative arteriopathy of diabetic patients, 71 subjects have been investigated: diabetics without arteriopathy, diabetics with arteriopathy and non-diabetics with arteriopathy. Age, sex, body weight, smoking habits, blood pressure, sedentary life style, diabetes therapy, plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, total lipids, HDL-cholesterol, uric acid, and fibrinogen have been assessed, the parameters investigated. The results show that the risk factors studied maintain their role even in the obliterative peripheral arteriopathy of diabetic patients; however, there are differences in the relative importance of some of them.

  10. Risk factors of diabetes in North Indians with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pratyush, Daliparthy D; Tiwari, Shalbha; Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Surya K

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome progresses to diabetes and determinants of this progression like hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia and genetic factors have been speculative. The present study was aimed at quantifying the insulin resistance and influence of family history of diabetes in subjects with metabolic syndrome developing prediabetes and diabetes. Consecutive subjects attending the endocrine clinic were evaluated for metabolic syndrome as per definition of International Diabetes Federation, 2005. The family history of diabetes in their first degree relatives was ascertained and Homeostasis model assessment of Insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Homeostasis model assessment for beta cell function (HOMA-B) and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were calculated in 163 subjects enrolled. HOMA-IR was higher (p<0.05) but HOMA-B and QUICKI were lower (p<0.0001) in subjects with metabolic syndrome+prediabetes or diabetes compared to metabolic syndrome with normal glucose tolerance. HOMA-B was lower and prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes was higher in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes than in those without such family history (p<0.05). subjects with metabolic syndrome having prediabetes and diabetes had more severe insulin resistance than those with metabolic syndrome only. Beta cell dysfunction was remarkable and prevalence of prediabetes was high in metabolic syndrome subjects with family history of diabetes. Both the severity of the insulin resistance and family history of diabetes are therefore proposed to be determinants of diminished Beta cell function leading to diabetes in metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identifying risk factors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kamoi, Kyuzi; Takeda, Keiji; Hashimoto, Kaoru; Tanaka, Reiko; Okuyama, Shinya

    2013-05-01

    It is known that clinic blood pressure (BP), gender, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, anemia and thiazolidenediones (TZD) treatment are predictors for clinically significant diabetic macula edema (CSDME). We examined a most risky factor for CSDME in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic retinopathy (DR) confirmed using optical coherence tomography by multiple regression analysis (MRA). As the risk factors, wakening-up BP was added to such factors. Seven diabetic Japanese patients with CSDME (group 1) and 124 subjects without CSDME (group 2) assonated with DR using optical coherence tomography were studied. The durations of T2DM in groups 1 and 2 were 15±10 years and 20±15 years, respectively. There was no statistically difference in means of gender, duration, age, body mass index (BMI), HbA1c, TC, LDL and TC/HDL, serum creatinine, urinary albumin excretion rate, and clinic BP between two groups. Morning systolic home BP (MSHBP), cigarette smoking and foveal thickness were significantly (p<0.001) higher in group 1 than group 2, whereas visual acuity was significantly (p<0.00?) lower in group 1 than in group 2. The patients in both groups had received various kinds of drugs for hyperglycemia, hypertension and others. There were no significant differences in the variables in both groups. MRA revealed that MSHBP, cigarette smoking and pioglitazone as TZD treatment were significantly positive predictors for CSDME, while BMI had a significantly negative predictor. Other variables were not significantly correlated to CSDME. The review summarizes a multiple regression analysis revealed that MSHBP makes an addition to predictive factors for CSDME among risk factors reported previously in patient with T2DM.

  12. [Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: is comprehensive treatment required?].

    PubMed

    Nadal, Josep Franch; Gutiérrez, Pedro Conthe

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus, especially type 2, is a metabolic disease involving the coexistence of several cardiovascular risk factors. Affected patients are therefore at high cardiovascular risk (2-3 times higher than that of men in the general population and 2-6 times higher than that of women). Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in the diabetic population, followed by cancer. Cardiovascular risk cannot be compared between diabetic patients and persons who have already shown one or more manifestations of cardiovascular disease (such as myocardial infarction). Single risk factors should be evaluated in combination with other risk factors and a person's cardiovascular risk should be individually assessed. Cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with diabetes through current calculations methods is complex because their ability to predict risk in individuals is very low. Studies such as that by Steno have demonstrated the validity of a comprehensive strategy to control all the risk factors present in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus, which can reduce the development of micro- and macrovascular complications and mortality by almost 50%. The present article reviews each of the classical cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, obesity, sedentariness) in relation to diabetes, as well as their recommended targets and the benefits of their control. In view of the above, a comprehensive approach is recommended to control the multiple risk factors that can coexist in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. [Incidence and clinical risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in women with previous gestational diabetes].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Vigo, P; Álvarez-Silvares, E; Alves-Pérez M T; Domínguez-Sánchez, J; González-González, A

    2016-04-01

    Gestational diabetes is considered a variant of diabetes mellitus as they share a common pathophysiological basis: insulin resistance in target and insufficient secretion of it by pancreatic p-cell bodies. Pregnancy is a unique physiological situation provides an opportunity to identify future risk of diabetes mellitus. To determine the long-term incidence of diabetes mellitus in women who have previously been diagnosed with gestational diabetes and identifying clinical risk factors for developing the same. nested case-control cohort study. 671 patients between 1996 and 2009 were diagnosed with gestational diabetes were selected. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was estimated and 2 subgroups were formed: Group A or cases: women who develop diabetes mellitus after diagnosis of gestational diabetes. Group B or control: random sample of 71 women with a history of gestational diabetes in the follow-up period remained normoglycemic. Both groups were studied up to 18 years postpartum. By studying Kaplan Meier survival of the influence of different gestational variables it was obtained in the later development of diabetes mellitus with time parameter and COX models for categorical variables were applied. Significant variables were studied by multivariate Cox analysis. In all analyzes the Hazard ratio was calculated with confidence intervals at 95%. The incidence of diabetes mellitus was 10.3% in patients with a history of gestational diabetes. They were identified as risk factors in the index pregnancy to later development of diabetes mellitus: greater than 35 and younger than 27 years maternal age, BMI greater than 30 kg/m2, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, insulin therapy, poor metabolic control and more than a complicated pregnancy with gestational diabetes. Clinical factors have been identified in the pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes that determine a higher probability of progression to diabetes mellitus in the medium and long term.

  14. Importance of risk factor management in diabetic patients and reduction in Stage B heart failure.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, G; O Connell, J; O Connell, E; Tallon, E; Watson, C; Gallagher, J; Baugh, J; Patle, A; O Connell, L; Griffin, J; O'Hanlon, R; Voon, V; Ledwidge, M; O Shea, D; McDonald, K

    2015-04-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated the presence of a diabetic cardiomyopathy, increasing the risk of heart failure development in this population. Improvements in present-day risk factor control may have modified the risk of diabetes-associated cardiomyopathy. We sought to determine the contemporary impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on the prevalence of cardiomyopathy in at-risk patients with and without adjustment for risk factor control. A cross-sectional study in a population at risk for heart failure. Those with diabetes were compared to those with other cardiovascular risk factors, unmatched, matched for age and gender and then matched for age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In total, 1399 patients enrolled in the St Vincent's Screening to Prevent Heart Failure (STOP-HF) cohort were included. About 543 participants had an established history of DM. In the whole sample, Stage B heart failure (asymptomatic cardiomyopathy) was not found more frequently among the diabetic cohort compared to those without diabetes [113 (20.8%) vs. 154 (18.0%), P = 0.22], even when matched for age and gender. When controlling for these risk factors and risk factor control Stage B was found to be more prevalent in those with diabetes [88 (22.2%)] compared to those without diabetes [65 (16.4%), P = 0.048]. In this cohort of patients with established risk factors for Stage B heart failure superior risk factor management among the diabetic population appears to dilute the independent diabetic insult to left ventricular structure and function, underlining the importance and benefit of effective risk factor control in this population on cardiovascular outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Biomarkers and risk factors of cardiovascular system disease in diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Prystupiuk, O M

    2013-01-01

    The content of glycated hemoglobin, a biomarker of diabetes in patients with type 2 diabetes correlates with risk factors for cardiovascular disease: hypertension, BMI and ratio of total cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Therefore, increase in glycosylated hemoglobin should be considered a predictor of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a common disorder and an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The Framingham Heart Study (FHS) is a population-based epidemiologic study that has contributed to our knowledge of CVD and its risk factors. This review will focus on the contemporary contributions of the FHS to the field of diabetes epidemiology, including data on diabetes trends, genetics, and future advances in population-based studies. PMID:21130952

  17. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-08-15

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from "common soil". The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients.

  18. Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Have all risk factors the same strength?

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Timón, Iciar; Sevillano-Collantes, Cristina; Segura-Galindo, Amparo; del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition that occurs when the body cannot produce enough or effectively use of insulin. Compared with individuals without diabetes, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a considerably higher risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and are disproportionately affected by cardiovascular disease. Most of this excess risk is it associated with an augmented prevalence of well-known risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and obesity in these patients. However the improved cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients can not be attributed solely to the higher prevalence of traditional risk factors. Therefore other non-traditional risk factors may be important in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Cardiovascular disease is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus subjects due to a complex combination of various traditional and non-traditional risk factors that have an important role to play in the beginning and the evolution of atherosclerosis over its long natural history from endothelial function to clinical events. Many of these risk factors could be common history for both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, reinforcing the postulate that both disorders come independently from “common soil”. The objective of this review is to highlight the weight of traditional and non-traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in the setting of type 2 diabetes mellitus and discuss their position in the pathogenesis of the excess cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity in these patients. PMID:25126392

  19. Immunoglobulin E and Mast Cell Proteases Are Potential Risk Factors of Human Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Hong; Shen, Xu-Hui; Jin, Kui-Li; Ye, Guo-fen; Qian, Li; Li, Bo; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that mast-cell activation and inflammation are important in obesity and diabetes. Plasma levels of mast cell proteases and the mast cell activator immunoglobulin E (IgE) may serve as novel inflammatory markers that associate with the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. Methods and Results A total of 340 subjects 55 to 75 years of age were grouped according to the American Diabetes Association 2003 criteria of normal glucose tolerance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes mellitus. The Kruskal-Wallis test demonstrated significant differences in plasma IgE levels (P = 0.008) among groups with different glucose tolerance status. Linear regression analysis revealed significant correlations between plasma levels of chymase (P = 0.030) or IgE (P = 0.022) and diabetes mellitus. Ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that IgE was a significant risk factor of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR]: 1.674, P = 0.034). After adjustment for common diabetes risk factors, including age, sex, hypertension, body-mass index, cholesterol, homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) index, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and mast cell chymase and tryptase, IgE remained a significant risk factor (OR: 1.866, P = 0.015). Two-variable ordinal logistic analysis indicated that interactions between hs-CRP and IgE, or between IgE and chymase, increased further the risks of developing pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus before (OR: 2.204, P = 0.044; OR: 2.479, P = 0.033) and after (OR: 2.251, P = 0.040; OR: 2.594, P = 0.026) adjustment for common diabetes risk factors. Conclusions Both IgE and chymase associate with diabetes status. While IgE and hs-CRP are individual risk factors of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus, interactions of IgE with hs-CRP or with chymase further increased the risk of pre-diabetes and diabetes mellitus. PMID:22194960

  20. Persistent organic pollutants as risk factors for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Elvis Ndonwi; Kengne, Andre-Pascal; Tiedeu-Atogho, Barbara; Mofo-Mato, Edith-Pascale; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major and fast growing public health problem. Although obesity is considered to be the main driver of the pandemic of T2DM, a possible contribution of some environmental contaminants, of which persistent organic pollutants (POPs) form a particular class, has been suggested. POPs are organic compounds that are resistant to environmental degradation through chemical, biological, and photolytic processes which enable them to persist in the environment, to be capable of long-range transport, bio accumulate in human and animal tissue, bio accumulate in food chains, and to have potential significant impacts on human health and the environment. Several epidemiological studies have reported an association between persistent organic pollutants and diabetes risk. These findings have been replicated in experimental studies both in human (in-vitro) and animals (in-vivo and in-vitro), and patho-physiological derangements through which these pollutants exercise their harmful effect on diabetes risk postulated. This review summarizes available studies, emphasises on limitations so as to enable subsequent studies to be centralized on possible pathways and bring out clearly the role of POPs on diabetes risk.

  1. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  2. Statin use and cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients developing a first myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin Bødtker; Kulenovic, Imra; Falk, Erling

    2016-05-27

    The risk for a first myocardial infarction (MI) in people with diabetes has been shown to be as high as the risk for a new MI in non-diabetic patients with a prior MI. Consequently, risk-reducing statin therapy is recommended for nearly all patients with diabetes 40 years of age or older, regardless of cholesterol level. The purpose of this study was to assess the recommended and real-life use of statins for primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) in diabetic patients who develop ASCVD. In a cross-sectional multicenter study of consecutive patients without previous ASCVD hospitalized with a first MI in 2010-2012, we obtained information on diabetic status, statin use, and cardiovascular risk factors prior to MI. The study population consisted of 1622 patients with first MI (63 % men), 228 of whom had known diabetes before MI. All but three of the diabetic patients were ≥40 years of age. Diabetic patients were older (70 vs 68, p = 0.006), were more often women (43 vs 36 %, p = 0.05) and had a higher prevalence of statin use (47 vs 11 %, p < 0.001) compared with non-diabetic patients. Despite a high risk factor burden, the majority (53 %) of patients with known diabetes was not treated with statins before MI, and there was no relationship between the number of high-risk markers and statin use. Nearly all diabetic patients not treated with statins before first MI had at least one marker of very high cardiovascular risk, including hypertension (71 %), current smoking (37 %), and nephropathy (33 %). Primary prevention with statins had been initiated in less than half of diabetic patients destined for a first MI, despite the presence of one or more markers of very high cardiovascular risk in nearly all. These results highlight an urgent need for optimizing statin therapy and global risk factor control in diabetic patients.

  3. Blue eyes as a risk factor for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Stasio, Enrico; Maggi, Daria; Berardesca, Enzo; Marulli, Georgiana Clare; Bizzarri, Carla; Lauria, Angelo; Portuesi, Rosalba; Cavallo, Maria Gisella; Costantino, Francesco; Buzzetti, Raffaella; Astorri, Elisa; Pitocco, Dario; Songini, Marco; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    A high frequency of blue eyes and fair skin are reported in northern European Caucasians with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Also there is an inverse relationship between latitude and T1D incidence. We determined whether iris colour and skin pigmentation are risk factors in a Caucasian population living in two Mediterranean regions located at the same latitude with higher ultraviolet B irradiance, but with different T1D incidence. We studied iris colour in 281 consecutive subjects with T1D and 298 controls. Skin type was evaluated by melanin quantification. In Lazio, blue eyes and fair skin type are significantly more common in T1D subjects than in controls (21 versus 9%, p = 0.002; 50 versus 35%, p < 0.001, respectively). In Sardinia, the frequency of blue eyes in T1D subjects is twice that in controls (5.8 versus 2.6% and significantly higher when compared to the expected calculated frequency in the entire population). By logistic regression analysis, only blue eyes are independent and significant predictors of T1D [odds ratio for blue eyes = 2.2; 95% confidence interval (1.1-4.4), p = 0.019]. As previously shown in a Caucasian population from northern Europe, blue eyes and a trend for fair skin increase the risk for T1D also in a Caucasian population born and residing in a Mediterranean region (Continental Italy). This finding may be relevant for explaining different T1D incidence as prevalence of blue eyes differ substantially between northern and southern European Caucasians. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Diabetes in Utah among adults: interaction between diabetes and other risk factors for microvascular and macrovascular complications.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, M C; Smith, K R

    1988-01-01

    From a telephone survey of the health status of a random sample of the general population of Utah, we identified 255 people with adult onset diabetes. We compared them to 622 non-diabetic controls, matched for age, sex, and urban/rural country of residence. We examined diabetes as a risk factor for heart diseases, stroke, and blindness and its interaction with other known risk factors. Diabetes interacted with smoking history so as to increase the risk of stroke, heart disease, and blindness. Diabetes also interacted with hypertension in their effect on the prevalence of blindness and, to a small extent, heart disease. Among the diabetics, duration of diabetes was associated with macrovascular and microvascular complications developing after the diagnosis of diabetes. Those with longer duration of disease showed an increase in risk for microvascular (kidney disease, blindness) and macrovascular (heart disease, stroke, amputations) complications. Although the estimates were imprecise, the effect of duration on macrovascular complications was greater among diabetics with a history of hypertension; the effect on microvascular complications was greater among smokers. The findings are compared to previous studies and the utility of diabetes prevalence data is discussed. PMID:3407819

  5. [Self care and risk factors of diabetic foot in patients with type II diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Moreno Hernández, M I; Trilla Soler, M; Espluga Capdevila, A; Mengual Miralles, N; Bundó Vidiella, M; Juanola Costa, J; Aubà Llambrich, J

    1997-09-15

    To find the amount of self-care (SC), health education (HE) received and the prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot (RFDF) in patients with type II Diabetes Mellitus (DM) attended in Primary Care. A descriptive crossover study. Primary Care Centre. 100 DM patients attending over 2 months (May and June 1995) to see the doctor or collect prescriptions. Questionnaire on HE, SC habits and social and demographic data, inspection of the feet and physical investigation of lower extremities. 36% had deficient or very deficient hygiene; 73% did not go regularly to the chiropodist, 76% used scissors, 75% did not check the inside of the shoe. 38% had signs of neuropathy and 17%, of peripheric vasculopathy. 25% were at high risk of diabetic foot. Women had more RFDF. The amount of self-care is very low, especially in hygiene, which did not improve over time. HE on foot care is extremely poor despite its being a priority. Educational interventions are required to motivate healthworkers and patients, especially those with most RFDF, in the area of SC.

  6. Age ≥ 60 years was an independent risk factor for diabetes-related complications despite good control of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon How; Ghazali, Sazlina Shariff; Ismail, Mastura; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Bujang, Mohd Adam

    2013-05-01

    Providing effective medical care for older patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) that may contribute to their active aging has always been challenging. We examined the independent effect of age ≥ 60 years on disease control and its relationship with diabetes-related complications in patients with T2D in Malaysia. This was a cross-sectional study using secondary data from the electronic diabetes registry database Adult Diabetes Control and Management (ADCM). A total of 303 centers participated and contributed a total of 70,889 patients from May 2008 to the end of 2009. Demographic data, details on diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia and their treatment modalities, various risk factors and complications were updated annually. Independent associated risk factors were identified using multivariate regression analyses. Fifty-nine percent were female. Malay comprised 61.9%, Chinese 19% and Indian 18%. There were more Chinese, men, longer duration of diabetes and subjects that were leaner or had lower BMI in the older age group. Patients aged ≥ 60 years achieved glycemic and lipid targets but not the desired blood pressure. After adjusting for duration of diabetes, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, disease control and treatment, a significantly higher proportion of patients ≥ 60 years suffered from reported diabetes-related complications. Age ≥ 60 years was an independent risk factor for diabetes-related complications despite good control of cardiovascular risk factors. Our findings caution against the currently recommended control of targets in older T2D patients with more longstanding diseases and complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for Type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in a mexican-american population: Proyecto VER.

    PubMed

    West, Sheila K; Munoz, Beatriz; Klein, Ronald; Broman, Aimee T; Sanchez, Rosario; Rodriguez, Jorge; Snyder, Robert

    2002-09-01

    Risk factors for type II diabetes and diabetic retinopathy were determined in a population-based study of Mexican-Americans. Proyecto VER (Vision, Evaluation, and Research) is a cross-sectional study in a random sample of the self-described Hispanic populations in Tucson and Nogales, Arizona, age 40 and older. Of 6,659 eligible subjects, 4,774 (72%) participated in the home questionnaire and clinic visit. Diabetes was defined as self-report of a physician diagnosis or hemoglobin A(1c) value of > or = 7.0%. Only type II diabetes was included. Diabetic retinopathy was assessed on stereo fundus photographs of all persons with diabetes. Questions were asked about demographic, personal, socioeconomic, and diabetes related variables. 1023 (21.4%) of the sample had type II diabetes, and 68% were in the low-income group (annual income less than $20,000). Diabetes was associated with Native-American ancestry, higher acculturation, low income, less education, and increasing body mass index after age and gender adjustment. Persons with previously undiscovered diabetes were more likely to have no regular source of care, no insurance, and currently smoke compared with persons with known diabetes. Only low income was related to proliferative retinopathy, once adjusted for other factors (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93, 95%, confidence limitations [CL] = 1.31-11.80). Several socioeconomic and other factors were associated with diabetes, but few were related to diabetic retinopathy. Persons in the low-income group appeared to be at greater risk of diabetes and the ocular complications of diabetes compared with those with more income. Further longitudinal studies in this population are needed to confirm the associations.

  8. Physical inactivity as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy? A review.

    PubMed

    Dirani, Mohamed; Crowston, Jonathan G; van Wijngaarden, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour have been identified as modifiable risk factors for diabetes. However, little is known of the associations between physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diabetic retinopathy. The development of diabetic retinopathy is associated with longer duration of diabetes, elevated blood pressure and poor glycaemic control. However these factors only explain a proportion of the risk of retinopathy in individuals with diabetes. Several studies have suggested a protective role for physical activity in diabetic retinopathy. Other work has shown that the time spent watching television is independently associated with abnormal retinal vascular signs. Limitations of the existing studies, such as the absence of objective measures of physical activity, a lack of sedentary behaviour measures, the inclusion of only those with type 1 diabetes and a lack of longitudinal data, make it difficult to draw firm conclusions about the strength of these associations.

  9. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  10. Academic Skills in Children with Early-Onset Type 1 Diabetes: The Effects of Diabetes-Related Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannonen, Riitta; Komulainen, Jorma; Riikonen, Raili; Ahonen, Timo; Eklund, Kenneth; Tolvanen, Asko; Keskinen, Paivi; Nuuja, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to assess the effects of diabetes-related risk factors, especially severe hypoglycaemia, on the academic skills of children with early-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Method: The study comprised 63 children with T1DM (31 females, 32 males; mean age 9y 11mo, SD 4mo) and 92 comparison children without diabetes (40…

  11. Metabolic Syndrome as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease, Mortality, and Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Thorn, Lena M.; Forsblom, Carol; Wadén, Johan; Saraheimo, Markku; Tolonen, Nina; Hietala, Kustaa; Groop, Per-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the predictive value of the metabolic syndrome in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients were from the prospective Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study (n = 3,783): mean age 37 ± 12 years and diabetes duration 23 ± 12 years. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to World Health Organization (WHO), National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. Follow-up time was median 5.5 years (interquartile range 3.7–6.7). Mortality data were complete, whereas morbidity data were available in 69% of the patients. RESULTS The WHO definition was associated with a 2.1-fold increased risk of cardiovascular events and a 2.5-fold increased risk of cardiovascular- and diabetes-related mortality, after adjustment for traditional risk factors and diabetic nephropathy. The NCEP definition did not predict outcomes when adjusted for nephropathy but markedly added to the risk associated with elevated albuminuria alone (P < 0.001). The IDF definition did not predict outcomes. CONCLUSIONS The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor, beyond albuminuria, for cardiovascular morbidity and diabetes-related mortality in type 1 diabetes. PMID:19196885

  12. [Clinical and pathophysiological features of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their risk factors for diabetic complication].

    PubMed

    Sone, Hirohito

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiological backgrounds as well as clinical phenotypes of Japanese or East Asian patients with type 2 diabetes are quite different from those in Western countries. According to results of East Asian large-scale studies such as the Japan Diabetes Complications Study (JDCS), which is a representative cohort of Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes, Japanese patients had a much lower body mass index and lower incidence of coronary heart disease compared with Caucasian diabetic patients. Other differences between Japanese and Caucasian patients with type 2 diabetes could be found in risk factors such as fruit intake on retinopathy and significance of triglycerides, or the effects of moderate alcohol drinking on cardiovascular disease. These results demonstrated a necessity of ethnic group-specific risk evaluations and care of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

  13. Prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and assessments of their risk factors in urban slums of Bangalore

    PubMed Central

    Dasappa, Hemavathi; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Prabhakar, Rugmani; Sarin, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes and to assess the risk factors associated with diabetes and pre-diabetes in the urban slums of Bangalore. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in four slums of Bangalore in the age group of 35 years and above comprising of total 2013 subjects. Risk factors like age, sex, family history, behavior, physical activity, BMI, waist hip ration, diet habits were assessed to find their association with diabetes. Results: Prevalence of diabetes was 12.33% and of pre-diabetes was 11.57%. Prevalence was more among the females compared to males. Increasing age, over weight and obesity, sedentary life style, tobacco consumption, diet habits showed statistically significant association with prevalence of diabetes and pre-diabetes. Conclusion: Physical activity like regular exercises both at the office and at home, fibers-rich diet, blood sugar estimation after 35 years are some of the recommendations which can control diabetes. PMID:26288781

  14. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending a rural Kenyan hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background The Diabetes Management and Information Center in Nairobi has conducted population surveys among rural and urban Kenyans during the last decade. They have reported a rise in the prevalence of diabetes among rural Kenyans from 3% in 2003 to 7% in 2007. Our study was undertaken to investigate rural factors for type 2 diabetes and determine those that could be responsible for this rise in prevalence. Objectives To describe the risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus among patients attending the outpatient clinics in a rural mission hospital in Kenya. Method Forty-five diabetics and forty-five non-diabetics, resident in this rural hospital's catchment area for at least 10 years, were randomly selected from patients attending outpatient clinics. Diabetics in a stable condition (not requiring hospitalisation), whose fasting blood sugars were below 6.1 mmol/L, were matched for age and gender with the non-diabetics who came to the hospital for outpatient services. A pilot-tested questionnaire on demography, current and past dietary habits, social habits, and family history was used to collect data. Waist circumference, height and weight were measured and BMI calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS for Windows. The Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the medians for the continuous variables, while the chi-squared test was used for the categorical variables. The z-test was used to calculate the relative risk. Results Ninety participants (26 males, 64 females). The mean age was 61.8 for diabetics and 61.4 for non-diabetics. Childhood starvation (relative risk 2.08, p = 0.0090) and use of cassava for sustenance during childhood starvation (relative risk 3.12, p = 0.0090) were identified as risk factors. Diabetes in close relatives, another risk factor for this population (relative risk 2.2, p = 0.0131). Abdominal obesity was a risk factor for this population (in females relative risk 2.0, p = 0.0010). Conclusion The risk factors for type 2 diabetes

  15. Diabetic kidney disease: world wide difference of prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Gheith, Osama; Farouk, Nashwa; Nampoory, Narayanan; Halim, Medhat A; Al-Otaibi, Torki

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease – which is defined by elevated urine albumin excretion or reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or both – is a serious complication that occurs in 20% to 40% of all diabetics. In this review we try to highlight the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy which is not uncommon complication of diabetes all over the world. The prevalence of diabetes worldwide has extended epidemic magnitudes and is expected to affect more than 350 million people by the year 2035. There is marked racial/ethnic besides international difference in the epidemiology of diabetic kidney disease which could be explained by the differences in economic viability and governmental infrastructures. Approximately one-third of diabetic patients showed microalbuminuria after 15 years of disease duration and less than half develop real nephropathy. Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is more frequent in African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans. Progressive kidney disease is more frequent in Caucasians patients with type 1 than type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), although its overall prevalence in the diabetic population is higher in patients with type 2 DM while this type of DM is more prevalent. Hyperglycemia is well known risk factor for in addition to other risk factors like male sex, obesity, hypertension, chronic inflammation, resistance to insulin, hypovitaminosis D, and dyslipidemia and some genetic loci and polymorphisms in specific genes. Management of its modifiable risk factors might help in reducing its incidence in the nearby future. PMID:28197499

  16. Diabetes in acromegaly, prevalence, risk factors, and evolution: data from the French Acromegaly Registry.

    PubMed

    Fieffe, Sandrine; Morange, Isabelle; Petrossians, Patrick; Chanson, Philippe; Rohmer, Vincent; Cortet, Christine; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Brue, Thierry; Delemer, Brigitte

    2011-06-01

    The French Acromegaly Registry records data of acromegalic patients' since 1992 in French, Belgian (Liège), and Swiss (Lausanne) centers. We studied the prevalence of diabetes in this population looking for risk factors. Patients from one of the centers (Reims) were then analyzed more thoroughly. This study has been conducted on all the patients recorded from 1999 until 2004 (519 patients). Evolution of cohorts' was reassessed in 2009. Of the different variables recorded in the registry: age, sex, body mass index (BMI), duration of acromegaly, GH, IGF1 and prolactin levels, pituitary tumor size, hormonal deficiencies, presence, duration and treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatological disease were analyzed. The prevalence of diabetes in the registry was 22.3%. Diabetic patients were older and had a higher BMI. Compared with the data of the French Social Security, acromegalic patients showed a more precocious apparition of diabetes and prevalence was higher in each age group. Compared with non-diabetic acromegalic subjects, diabetic patients had a more prolonged evolution of acromegaly before diagnosis. The levels of GH and IGF1 were not significantly different between the two groups. Only hypertension was significantly more frequent in diabetic patients. In our population, the prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 22.3%. The GH and IGF1 levels did not appear as predictive factors for the presence of diabetes. On the contrary, age, BMI, and hypertension were significant risk factors as in the general population of type 2 diabetics.

  17. Prevalence of Pre-Diabetes and Its Associated Risk Factors in Rural Areas of Ningbo, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Hongbo; Yuan, Yanyan; Wang, Fuyan; Xi, Yang; Wen, Li Ming; Shen, Peng; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of pre-diabetes and explore its associated risk factors in rural areas of Ningbo, China. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 4583 adult residents in rural areas of Ningbo, China between March and May 2013. The survey used a multi-stage, stratified, cluster sampling method. Data collected included demographics and medical history, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, blood lipid, and plasma glucose. After at least 10 h of overnight fasting, participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to identify pre-diabetes. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associated risk factors for pre-diabetes, and to estimate the effect of interaction between the factors. Results: There were 1307 survey participants having pre-diabetes (28.52%) and the age-standardized prevalence was 30.53%. Multivariate logistic regression results showed that overweight/obesity, hypertension, and higher triglycerides were the risk factors for developing pre-diabetes. There were positive interactions between overweight/obesity and triglycerides, and also between hypertension and triglycerides on the multiplicative scale, suggesting that they synergistically influenced the development of pre-diabetes. Conclusions: The rural areas in Ningbo had a high prevalence of pre-diabetes. Overweight and obesity, hypertension, and elevated triglycerides were the major risk factors. There is a need of early intervention for preventing pre-diabetes. PMID:27517947

  18. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Austria.

    PubMed

    Steigleder-Schweiger, Claudia; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Waldhör, Thomas; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Schwarz, Ines; Fritsch, Maria; Borkenstein, Martin; Schober, Edith

    2012-08-01

    Mortality of cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes is increased 2- to 20-fold compared to non-diabetic individuals. In young adults with type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular events are more often the cause of premature death than nephropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Austria. In a cross sectional study data of children with type 1 diabetes <18 years of age treated at the Children's department of the University Hospitals of Vienna and Graz were collected. We recorded body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to age, sex, age at manifestation, diabetes duration, and insulin requirement. From 264 patients (49.4% male) complete data were available. Of all patients, 76.1% had one or more risk factors, 20.8% had two or more, 10.2% had three or more, and 4.9% had four or more risk factors. Insufficient glycemic control was the most frequent risk factor, present in 60.6% of our patients, followed by elevated triglycerides (22.7%) and increased body mass index (20.1%). Higher prevalence of risk factors was correlated with increasing age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, and insulin requirement. In conclusion, children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes have a much higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to non-diabetic individuals. To prevent future cardiovascular events, achieving the best possible glycemic control, early detection of further risk factors, and adequate intervention are highly important.

  19. Risk factors of diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy: a cross-sectional study of 13 473 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Jiarui; Tao, Liyuan; Lv, Huibin; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Mingzhou; Li, Xuemin

    2017-09-01

    To explore the risk factors of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) among Chinese patients with diabetes. A cross-sectional investigation was performed in eight screening clinics in six provinces across mainland China. Information about the risk factors was recorded in screening clinics. Some risk factors (sex, age, diagnosis age, diabetes duration, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c)) were recorded in all eight clinics, while others were collected only in a subset of the clinics. The relationships between the risk factors and DR and between the risk factors and STDR were explored for the eight factors mentioned above and for all factors studied. Risk factors of DR and STDR were assessed, and a nomogram of the results was produced. Younger age, longer diabetes duration, higher SBP, higher FBG and higher HbA1c were found to be independent risk factors for both DR and STDR in the eight-factor analyses. In the all-factor analysis, younger age, longer diabetes duration, higher SBP, oral medicine use and insulin use were independent risk factors for both DR and STDR; higher postprandial blood glucose (PBG), HbA1c, triglyceride andlow-density lipoprotein were independent risk factors for DR only, and higher FBG was a risk factor for STDR only. In this cross-sectional investigation, several risk factors were found for DR and STDR. Notably, FBG, PBG and HbA1c were all risk factors for DR or STDR, suggesting that stricter blood glucose control in clinical practice is required. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults.

    PubMed

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-4.1). There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity.

  1. Relationship of Food Security with Type 2 Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Tehranian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hasan-Ghomi, Majid; Ejtahed, Hanieh-Sadat; Mirmiran, Parvin; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firozeh; Sarbazi, Narges; Azizi, Fereidoun; Sadeghian, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background: As food insecurity has negative effects on health, the aim of this study was to determine tahe relationship between household food security and type 2 diabetes mellitus and its related risk factors. Methods: In this case-control study, 200 individuals with and 200 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged over 40 years, were randomly selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The questionnaire on household food security proposed by the United States Department of Agriculture was completed for them by trained personnel. Logistic regression was used to determine the variable that had the most significant relationship with food security status. Results: The average of food security score was 2.38 ± 2.0 in non-diabetic and 2.25 ± 2.0 in diabetic individuals (P = 0.6). In both groups, the risk for food insecurity in women was more than in men. In the diabetic group, being single and having education levels below high school increased the risk of food insecurity. In the non-diabetic group, the risk of food insecurity in obese individuals was 3.3 times higher than normal individuals (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.2–4.1). Conclusions: There were no significant differences in food security levels of diabetic and non-diabetic groups. However, some risk factors of type 2 diabetes including sex, marital status, educational level, and obesity were associated with food insecurity. PMID:26605019

  2. Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in rural communities in Sudan: prevalence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Noor, S K M; Bushara, S O E; Sulaiman, A A; Elmadhoun, W M Y; Ahmed, M H

    2015-05-19

    Undiagnosed diabetes constitutes a challenge for health providers, especially in rural areas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and glucose intolerance among adults in rural communities in River Nile State, north Sudan. In a cross-sectional community-based study, blood glucose, anthropometric, demographic and clinical history data were obtained from 1111 individuals from 35 villages. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 2.6% (29 individuals); glucose intolerance was detected in 1.3% (14 individuals). Classic symptoms (polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss) were present in around half of the participants but were not more prevalent in those with diabetes. Lower educational level, increasing age, hypertension and unexplained weight loss were significant risk factors for diabetes. Other variables (obesity, sex, occupation, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking) were not significant risk factors. There is a low prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and glucose intolerance in the rural population of River Nile State.

  3. Updated risk factors should be used to predict development of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bethel, Mary Angelyn; Hyland, Kristen A; Chacra, Antonio R; Deedwania, Prakash; Fulcher, Gregory R; Holman, Rury R; Jenssen, Trond; Levitt, Naomi S; McMurray, John J V; Boutati, Eleni; Thomas, Laine; Sun, Jie-Lena; Haffner, Steven M

    2017-05-01

    Predicting incident diabetes could inform treatment strategies for diabetes prevention, but the incremental benefit of recalculating risk using updated risk factors is unknown. We used baseline and 1-year data from the Nateglinide and Valsartan in Impaired Glucose Tolerance Outcomes Research (NAVIGATOR) Trial to compare diabetes risk prediction using historical or updated clinical information. Among non-diabetic participants reaching 1year of follow-up in NAVIGATOR, we compared the performance of the published baseline diabetes risk model with a "landmark" model incorporating risk factors updated at the 1-year time point. The C-statistic was used to compare model discrimination and reclassification analyses to demonstrate the relative accuracy of diabetes prediction. A total of 7527 participants remained non-diabetic at 1year, and 2375 developed diabetes during a median of 4years of follow-up. The C-statistic for the landmark model was higher (0.73 [95% CI 0.72-0.74]) than for the baseline model (0.67 [95% CI 0.66-0.68]). The landmark model improved classification to modest (<20%), moderate (20%-40%), and high (>40%) 4-year risk, with a net reclassification index of 0.14 (95% CI 0.10-0.16) and an integrated discrimination index of 0.01 (95% CI 0.003-0.013). Using historical clinical values to calculate diabetes risk reduces the accuracy of prediction. Diabetes risk calculations should be routinely updated to inform discussions about diabetes prevention at both the patient and population health levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  5. The relationship between microalbuminuria, cardiovascular risk factors and disease management in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Udenze, I C; Azinge, E C; Ebuehi, O A T; Awolola, N A; Adekola, O O; Menkiti, I; Irurhe, N K

    2012-01-01

    In patients with type 2 diabetes, microalbuminuria is an early clinical sign suggestive of vascular damage to the glomerulus. Microalbuminuria has also been currently reported as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and becomes relevant in the management of type 2 diabetes. This study is to determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria, identify the risk factors associated with microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes, and to asses the achievement of treatment goals for cardiovascular risk reduction in type 2 diabetics. Seventy- two subjects with microalbuminuria were recruited from three hundred consecutively screened type 2 diabetics attending the Diabetic Clinic at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Clinical data were obtained by interviewing the participants. Anthropometric measurements were made and blood specimens were collected for analysis. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was twenty-four percent (24%) in type 2 diabetes. Multiple logistic regression identified duration of diabetes (odds ratio 1.3 (95% CI; 0.03-1.58), hypertension(odds ratio 5.2 (95% Cl; 1.24-18.62), Body mass index (BMI) (odds ratio 1.27 (95% CI; 1.0-1.6), waist/hip ratio (WHR) (odds ratio 1.9 (95% Cl; 1.3-3.5), andHbA,c (odds ratio 6.6 (95% Cl; 1.02-27) as independent risk factors associated with microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetics. Optimum blood pressure, glycemic and weight control were achieved in eighty five percent (85%), fifty eight percent (58%) and nineteen percent (19%) of the type 2 diabetes respectively. This study showed that microalbuminuria is common among patients with type 2 diabetes. It also showed improvement in glycemic control and modifiable cardiovascular risk factor control when compared with previous studies.

  6. Incidence and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in African Americans with diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study.

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Ayokanmi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Desvorieux, Moise; Pankow, James S.; Taylor, Herman

    2002-01-01

    To determine the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its association with conventional and less well-established risk factors in African Americans with diabetes, we studied 741 African Americans aged 45 to 64 years with diabetes, in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Risk factors were measured from 1987 to 1989, and incident CVD (n = 143 coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke events) was ascertained through 1998. The crude incidence rate (per 1000 person-years) of CVD was 22.5 (11.9 for CHD and 12.0 for stroke). After multivariate adjustments, total cholesterol, prevalent hypertension and current smoking were significantly and positively associated with incident CVD among these African Americans with diabetes. Among the non-conventional risk factors, serum creatinine, factor VIII, von Willebrand factor, and white blood cell count were positively and serum albumin negatively and independently associated with CVD incidence. Adjusted relative risks for highest versus lowest tertiles of these risk factors ranged from 1.77 to 2.13. This study confirms that the major risk factors (hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and smoking) are important determinants of CVD in African Americans with diabetes. In addition, several blood markers of hemostasis or inflammatory response and elevated serum creatinine also proved to be CVD risk factors in African Americans with diabetes. PMID:12510702

  7. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy and associated risk factors among Sioux Indians.

    PubMed

    Berinstein, D M; Stahn, R M; Welty, T K; Leonardson, G R; Herlihy, J J

    1997-05-01

    To estimate the prevalence of and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy among Sioux Indians of South Dakota. Strong Heart Study (SHS) participants with diabetes who are members of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and the Oglala Sioux Tribe were invited to have ophthalmological examinations in 1991. A total of 417 people had eye examinations out of the 488 diabetic SHS participants of the two tribes (85% participation rate). Fundus photographs were obtained of each eye and graded for severity of retinopathy using the modified Airlie House Classification Scheme. Risk factors for retinopathy were determined from the SHS database. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among participants from these tribes was 45.3%. Risk factors associated with severity of retinopathy include mean fasting glucose, level. HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio, renal dialysis, and duration of diabetes. The prevalence of diabetic retinopathy among diabetic Sioux Indians is similar to or higher than the prevalence in other diabetic Indian and non-Indian populations. Aggressive glycemic and blood pressure control is urgently needed to reduce this high rate, and annual eye examinations to detect and treat diabetic retinopathy should be emphasized.

  8. Control to goal of cardiometabolic risk factors among Nigerians living with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Okafor, C I; Ofoegbu, E N

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors contribute to morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. National and international guidelines on management of diabetes therefore emphasize control to goals of blood glucose, blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and obesity so as to minimize the development of complications and enhance the patients' quality of life. To evaluate the status of control to goals of cardiometabolic risk factors among the diabetic patients attending the Diabetes clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. A survey of 233 type 2 diabetic patients recruited from the Diabetes clinic of our hospital was carried out. Standard procedures as described in the WHO STEP instrument were used to determine the waist circumference, weight, height, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Fasting blood glucose and lipid profiles were also assessed. Therapeutic goals used to define risk or poor control were values adopted by expert groups such as American diabetes association (ADA), National cholesterol education program (NCEP), American association of clinical endocrinologist (AACE) and International diabetes federation (IDF). There were 98 males and 135 females with mean (SD) duration of diabetes mellitus (DM) of 6.7 (6.3) years. Suboptimal glycemic, blood pressure control and dyslipidemia were observed in 65.7%, 51.9%, 97.1% of the subjects respectively while 60.1% of the subjects were found to be overweight/obese. Comparing the mean indices of risk factors with the recommended therapeutic goals, status of control was optimal for HDL-cholesterol, waist circumference and triglycerides. All the other risk factors were suboptimal. Control to goals of cardiovascular risk factors is poor among the patients. There is the need to identify and tackle the possible contributing factors so as to reduce the morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  9. Relationship between amputation and risk factors in individuals with diabetes mellitus: A study with Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alessandra M; Fregonesi, Cristina E P T; Palma, Mariana R; Ribeiro, Fernanda E; Fernandes, Rômulo A; Christofaro, Diego G D

    Individuals with diabetes develop lower extremity amputation for several reasons. Investigations into pathways to the development of complications are important both for treatment and prevention. To evaluate the relationship between amputation and risk factors in people with diabetes mellitus. All participants included in this study (n=165) were recruited from the Diabetic Foot Program, developed in a Brazilian University, over seven years (2007-2014) and all information for this study was extracted from their clinical records. The prevalence of amputation in patients with diabetes with four risk factors was up to 20% higher when compared to those with only one risk factor. The main predictive risk factors for amputation in this population were the presence of an ulcer and smoking. The risk factors for amputation can be predicted for people with diabetes mellitus and, in the present study, the main factors were the presence of an ulcer and the smoking habit. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of knowledge, awareness, and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mahajerin, Arash; Fras, Andrew; Vanhecke, Thomas E; Ledesma, Jeremiah

    2008-08-01

    This study assessed adolescents' level of knowledge of and self-reported risk factors for type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We found adolescents had a relatively high level of knowledge and perception of health consequences from T2DM, but also had a high rate of self-reported risk factors.

  11. Physiological and behavioral risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in rural India

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Anamitra; Mazumdar, Sumit; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Rai, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background The dynamics of physiological and behavioral risk factors of diabetes in rural India is poorly understood. Using data from a health and demographic surveillance site of Birbhum district in West Bengal, India, this study aims to assess the risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Research design and methods A total of 7674 individuals aged ≥18 years participated in a cross-sectional study. Venous plasma glucose method was used for measuring and reporting glucose concentrations in blood, categorized as individuals with diabetes, pre-diabetes or impaired, and normoglycemic. Aside from a set of physiological and behavioral risk factors, a range of socioeconomic confounders of diabetes was computed. Bivariate analysis with χ2 test, and multivariate ordered logit regression methods were deployed to attain the study's objective. Results Overall 2.95% and 3.34% of study participants were diagnosed as individuals with diabetes and pre-diabetes or impaired, respectively. Compared to the poorest, the richest have higher probability (β: 0.730; 95% CI 0.378 to 1.083) of being diagnosed with diabetes. As compared to people with normal body mass index, overweight/obese people are more prone to being diagnosed with diabetes (β: 0.388; 95% CI 0.147 to 0.628). With a decreasing level of physical activity, people are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes. Conclusions To curb the level of diabetes, this study recommends a culturally sensitive, focused intervention for the adoption of physical activity with more traditional dietary practices, to control the level of overweight/obesity. Attention should be paid to relatively older patients with diabetes or adults with pre-diabetes. PMID:27547420

  12. [Diabetes mellitus and aging as a risk factor for cerebral vascular disease: epidemiology, pathophysiology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Mimenza-Alvarado, Alberto; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Older patients with diabetes have a high risk of vascular complications. They have an increase of approximately 3 times for developing stroke compared with subjects without diabetes. In addition, up to 75-80% of deaths in diabetic patients are associated with major cardiovascular events including stroke. The risk of stroke is high within 5 years of diagnosis for type 2 diabetes is 9% (mortality 21%), that is more than doubles the rate for the general population. From observational registries in a collaborative stroke study in Mexico, we analyzed clinical data, risk factors, and outcome of 1182 diabetic patients with cerebral ischemia, with focus in elderly subjects. There was a high frequency of hyperglycemia during the acute phase of stroke: the median value was 140 mg/dL and 40% had values higher than 180 mg/dL. Clinical outcome was usually unfavorable in elderly stroke patients with diabetes: case fatality rate was 30% at 30 days and survivors had moderate to severe disability, usually as consequence of the propensity to develop more systemic medical complications during hospital stay. Primary stroke prevention studies in patients with diabetes reveal that tight control of glucose is not associated with reduction in stroke risk. Therefore, proper control of other vascular risk factors is mandatory in patients with diabetes, in particular of arterial hypertension.

  13. A study of risk factors and foot care behavior among diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Nongmaithem, Mackson; Bawa, Arjinder Pal Singh; Pithwa, Abhilash Kumar; Bhatia, Simran Kaur; Singh, Gurjit; Gooptu, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetic foot results in considerable morbidity and mortality in developing countries and the prevalence of diabetes is expected to increase further in the next decades in these countries. Diabetic ulcers are the most common foot injuries leading to lower extremity amputation. Family physicians have a pivotal role in the prevention or early diagnosis of diabetic foot complications. Patient education regarding foot hygiene, nail care and proper footwear is crucial to reducing the risk of an injury that can lead to ulcer formation. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study carried out from July 2013 to September 2015. Fifty patients of Diabetes with foot ulcer and two hundred without foot ulcers were examined. Risk factors and clinical profile of patients were studied which included age, gender, duration of diabetes, BMI, smoking, random BSLs history, hypertension, glycated haemoglobin levels, lipid profile, history of loss of sensation and history of amputation. MNSI questionnaire and MNSI practical assessment for neuropathy were administered to diabetic patients along with a pre-structured questionnaire regarding foot care practices. Results: In this study significant risk factors were peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, gender, loss of sensation, duration of diabetes and smoking. MNSI questionnaire and practical assessment scores were higher in foot ulcer patients. Poor foot care practices were observed in patients with diabetic foot ulcer patients. Conclusion: Diabetic foot ulcers were more common in elderly males. Peripheral neuropathy, peripheral vascular disease, Smoking, trauma, duration of diabetes mellitus and high levels of glycated haemoglobin had significant association with occurrence of foot ulcers. MNSI scores had a high predictive value for development of foot ulcers amongst diabetics. Awareness regarding foot care was poor which underlines need to promote practice of foot care amongst diabetic population. PMID

  14. Population-Level Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes From Claims Data and Analysis of Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Razavian, Narges; Blecker, Saul; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Smith-McLallen, Aaron; Nigam, Somesh; Sontag, David

    2015-12-01

    We present a new approach to population health, in which data-driven predictive models are learned for outcomes such as type 2 diabetes. Our approach enables risk assessment from readily available electronic claims data on large populations, without additional screening cost. Proposed model uncovers early and late-stage risk factors. Using administrative claims, pharmacy records, healthcare utilization, and laboratory results of 4.1 million individuals between 2005 and 2009, an initial set of 42,000 variables were derived that together describe the full health status and history of every individual. Machine learning was then used to methodically enhance predictive variable set and fit models predicting onset of type 2 diabetes in 2009-2011, 2010-2012, and 2011-2013. We compared the enhanced model with a parsimonious model consisting of known diabetes risk factors in a real-world environment, where missing values are common and prevalent. Furthermore, we analyzed novel and known risk factors emerging from the model at different age groups at different stages before the onset. Parsimonious model using 21 classic diabetes risk factors resulted in area under ROC curve (AUC) of 0.75 for diabetes prediction within a 2-year window following the baseline. The enhanced model increased the AUC to 0.80, with about 900 variables selected as predictive (p < 0.0001 for differences between AUCs). Similar improvements were observed for models predicting diabetes onset 1-3 years and 2-4 years after baseline. The enhanced model improved positive predictive value by at least 50% and identified novel surrogate risk factors for type 2 diabetes, such as chronic liver disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.71), high alanine aminotransferase (OR 2.26), esophageal reflux (OR 1.85), and history of acute bronchitis (OR 1.45). Liver risk factors emerge later in the process of diabetes development compared with obesity-related factors such as hypertension and high hemoglobin A1c. In conclusion

  15. Risk Factors Contributing to Type 2 Diabetes and Recent Advances in the Treatment and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanling; Ding, Yanping; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a serious and common chronic disease resulting from a complex inheritance-environment interaction along with other risk factors such as obesity and sedentary lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes and its complications constitute a major worldwide public health problem, affecting almost all populations in both developed and developing countries with high rates of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been increasing exponentially, and a high prevalence rate has been observed in developing countries and in populations undergoing “westernization” or modernization. Multiple risk factors of diabetes, delayed diagnosis until micro- and macro-vascular complications arise, life-threatening complications, failure of the current therapies, and financial costs for the treatment of this disease, make it necessary to develop new efficient therapy strategies and appropriate prevention measures for the control of type 2 diabetes. Herein, we summarize our current understanding about the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes, the roles of genes, lifestyle and other factors contributing to rapid increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes. The core aims are to bring forward the new therapy strategies and cost-effective intervention trials of type 2 diabetes. PMID:25249787

  16. Is autoimmune thyroid dysfunction a risk factor for gestational diabetes?

    PubMed

    Pascual Corrales, Eider; Andrada, Patricia; Aubá, María; Ruiz Zambrana, Alvaro; Guillén Grima, Francisco; Salvador, Javier; Escalada, Javier; Galofré, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    Some recent studies have related autoimmune thyroid dysfunction and gestational diabetes (GD). The common factor for both conditions could be the existence of pro-inflammatory homeostasis. The study objective was therefore to assess whether the presence of antithyroid antibodies is related to the occurrence of GD. Fifty-six pregnant women with serum TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL during the first trimester were retrospectively studied. Antithyroid antibodies were measured, and an O'Sullivan test was performed. GD was diagnosed based on the criteria of the Spanish Group on Diabetes and Pregnancy. Positive antithyroid antibodies were found in 21 (37.50%) women. GD was diagnosed in 15 patients, 6 of whom (10.71%) had positive antibodies, while 9 (16.07%) had negative antibodies. Data were analyzed using exact logistic regression by LogXact-8 Cytel; no statistically significant differences were found between GD patients with positive and negative autoimmunity (OR = 1.15 [95%CI = 0.28-4.51]; P=1.00). The presence of thyroid autoimmunity in women with TSH above the recommended values at the beginning of pregnancy is not associated to development of GD. However, GD prevalence was higher in these patients as compared to the Spanish general population, suggesting the need for closer monitoring in pregnant women with TSH levels ≥ 2.5 mU/mL. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Diabetes mellitus abolishes ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk factors: lessons from a multi-ethnic population.

    PubMed

    Tan, C E; Emmanuel, S C; Tan, B Y; Tai, E S; Chew, S K

    2001-03-01

    To compare cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic subjects of different ethnic groups, and between new and known diabetic subjects, in the Singapore National Health Survey '92. Disproportionate stratified sampling followed by systematic sampling were used in 3568 (total) respondents of whom 2743 were non-diabetics, 179 newly diagnosed diabetics and 150 known diabetics. Amongst the diabetics, there were 185 Chinese, 66 Malays and 78 Asian Indians. Diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) was based on the 2 h glucose alone, after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. Blood pressure (BP), lipid profile, glucose, insulin and anthropometric indices were obtained from all subjects. Subjects with diabetes (new and known) exhibited significantly higher triglyceride (TG), lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density lipoprotein (LDL)/apolipoprotein B (apo B) ratio (LDL size) compared with normoglycaemic subjects. They were more obese (generalised and central) and had higher systolic and diastolic BP. There was no difference in lipid risk factors between the two groups with diabetes although those with new diabetes were more obese whilst those with known diabetes had higher fasting glucose. Amongst subjects with diabetes, there were no significant differences between ethnic groups in TG, HDL-C, LDL/apo B ratio, or waist to hip ratio (WHR). Female Malays with diabetes had higher total cholesterol and were more obese whilst male Asian Indians with diabetes had higher fasting insulin. Asian Indians had lower HDL-C and LDL/apo B ratio than Chinese or Malays amongst normoglycaemic subjects. However, these differences between ethnic groups were not seen in subjects with DM.

  18. Thyroid Dysfunction and Associated Risk Factors among Nepalese Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwada, Saroj; KC, Rajendra; Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khan, Seraj Ahmed; Chaudhari, Rajendra Kumar; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To assess thyroid function and associated risk factors in Nepalese diabetes mellitus patients. Methods. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 419 diabetes mellitus patients at B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal. Information on demographic and anthropometric variables and risk factors for thyroid dysfunction was collected. Blood samples were analysed to measure thyroid hormones, blood sugar, and lipid profile. Results. Prevalence rate of thyroid dysfunction was 36.03%, with subclinical hypothyroidism (26.5%) as the most common thyroid dysfunction. Thyroid dysfunction was much common in females (42.85%) compared to males (30.04%) (p = 0.008) and in type 1 diabetes (50%) compared to type 2 diabetes mellitus (35.41%) (p = 0.218). Diabetic patients with thyroid dysfunction had higher total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol in comparison to patients without thyroid dysfunction. Significant risk factors for thyroid dysfunction, specifically hypothyroidism (overt and subclinical), were smoking (relative risk of 2.56 with 95% CI (1.99–3.29, p < 0.001)), family history of thyroid disease (relative risk of 2.57 with 95% CI (2.0–3.31, p < 0.001)), and female gender (relative risk of 1.44 with 95% CI (1.09–1.91, p = 0.01)). Conclusions. Thyroid dysfunction is common among Nepalese diabetic patients. Smoking, family history of thyroid disease, and female gender are significantly associated with thyroid dysfunction. PMID:26435714

  19. Diabetes and cancer: two diseases with obesity as a common risk factor.

    PubMed

    Garg, S K; Maurer, H; Reed, K; Selagamsetty, R

    2014-02-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support a connection between diabetes (predominantly type 2), obesity and cancer. Multiple meta-analyses of epidemiological data show that people with diabetes are at increased risk of developing many different types of cancers, along with an increased risk of cancer mortality. Several pathophysiological mechanisms for this relationship have been postulated, including insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced inflammatory processes, dysregulation of sex hormone production and hyperglycaemia. In addition to these potential mechanisms, a number of common risk factors, including obesity, may be behind the association between diabetes and cancer. Indeed, obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer and diabetes. Abdominal adiposity has been shown to play a role in creating a systemic pro-inflammatory environment, which could result in the development of both diabetes and cancer. Here, we examine the relationship between diabetes, obesity and cancer, and investigate the potential underlying causes of increased cancer risk in individuals with diabetes. Current treatment recommendations for reducing the overall disease burden are also explored and possible areas for future research are considered. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Trends in Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Individuals with and without Diabetes in the Framingham Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Preis, Sarah Rosner; Pencina, Michael J.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Savage, Peter J.; Levy, Daniel; Fox, Caroline S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals with diabetes are at two to three-fold increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) relative to those without diabetes. Our objective was to examine CVD risk factor level changes among individuals with and without type 2 diabetes from 1970–2005 in the Framingham Heart Study. Methods and Results We included 4,195 participants (3,990 non-diabetes/205 diabetes) aged 50 and 3,495 participants (3,178 non- diabetes/317 diabetes) aged 60. Contemporaneous CVD risk factor levels were measured; linear regression models were used to assess the interaction between diabetes status and calendar year on CVD risk factor levels. Among 50-year olds, for non-diabetes, there was an increase in body mass index (BMI) of 0.39 kg/m2 per 10 years whereas for diabetes there was an increase of 2.52 kg/m2 (p-value for the diabetes by calendar year interaction [p-interaction] <0.0001). For LDL cholesterol, the mean decrease was −7.43 mg/dL per decade [non-diabetes] and −15.5 mg/dL for diabetes (p-interaction=0.002). For systolic blood pressure, the mean decrease was −3.35 mmHg per decade [non-diabetes] and −3.50 mmHg for diabetes (p-interaction=0.97). The direction of the trends for those with diabetes relative to those without diabetes was similar for 60-year olds. Conclusions Individuals with diabetes experienced a greater increase in BMI, a greater decrease in LDL-C, and a similar magnitude of decline in systolic blood pressure as compared to those without diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have not experienced the necessary declines in CVD risk factors to overcome their increased risk of CVD. Further efforts are needed to aggressively control CVD risk factors among individuals with diabetes. PMID:19581493

  1. The impact of diabetes and associated cardiometabolic risk factors on members: strategies for optimizing outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Thomas J; Ahmann, Andrew J

    2008-02-01

    In the past decade, the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome has increased exponentially. Estimated national spending on direct costs related to these conditions exceeds $90 billion for overweight and obesity, $90 billion for diabetes, and $250 billion for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Spending on prescription drugs that are used to modify cardiometabolic risk (CMR) is both a major component of all spending on prescription drugs and a leading cause of the increase in such spending. Also, spending on antihyperglycemic agents is projected to become the largest single component of all spending on prescription drugs in the near future. As the use of antihyperglycemic agents continues to increase, there is a growing need to evaluate the relative and comparative cost-effectiveness of these products. As new antihyperglycemic agents appear, physicians and health plans may begin differentiating products in this category not only on the basis of their use in achieving glycemic control, but also in the context of their effect on global CMR factor modification. To describe the effect of overall CMR on clinical outcomes and costs in patients with diabetes. Metabolic syndrome is defined as a clustering of risk factors that identify those at increased risk of CVD and diabetes. Although the exact definition and clinical use of the term "metabolic syndrome" are debated, the clinical community is united in identifying its individual risk factors as important contributors to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Two of the most important points of consensus are that diabetes significantly increases the risk of CVD and that the CVD risk associated with metabolic syndrome is greater than the sum of its measured risk factors. Therefore, it is increasingly recognized that the risk of CVD is greater in patients with diabetes and other CMR factors than in those with diabetes alone. Diabetes treatment goals extend beyond glycemic control to include other risk factor

  2. Type 2 Diabetes in Canadian Aboriginal Adolescents: Risk Factors and Prevalence.

    PubMed

    Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Bullin, Carol; Trinder, Krista

    To identify the risk factors and prevalence rates of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes among northern Canadian Aboriginal adolescents. In this novel exploratory, quantitative study, 160 high school students (aged 13-21) from three northern, predominantly Canadian Aboriginal communities were screened for risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes including demographic data, family medical history, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Descriptive and inferential statistics, in addition to chi-square analysis, were used to establish risk and prevalence rates for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes in Aboriginal adolescents. At least half of the adolescents presented with multiple risk factors for type 2 diabetes. In this sample, 10% had an HbA1c>5.7%, 22.5% were overweight, 17.5% were obese, and 26.6% had prehypertension or hypertension. Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are emerging as serious health concerns for young Aboriginal Canadians. This is troubling because both result from modifiable risk factors. As this study is the first to examine the prevalence of prediabetes in Canadian Aboriginal adolescents in the last decade, the findings underscore the necessity for early screening of Aboriginal adolescents for both prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Recommendations toward positive health outcomes include the introduction of early age screening programs, followed by culturally relevant interventions, specific to the modifiable risk factors (overweight/obesity and hypertension), and developed in collaboration with the communities. Such approaches have the potential to prevent the progression of prediabetes to diabetes and reduce complications related to type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteinuria is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke among diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mondol, G; Rahman, K M; Uddin, M J; Bhattacharjee, M; Dey, S K; Israil, A; Miah, A H; Sarkar, U K; Islam, S S; Rahman, M M; Hossain, F; Bhuiya, M M; Bhowmik, R; Chowdhury, A H; Kabir, M S; Uddin, M S

    2012-07-01

    This study was done to assess the relationship between proteinuria and ischemic stroke in subjects with diabetes mellitus, and to determine whether proteinuria is an independent risk factor for stroke. This comparative study was conducted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to June 2010. It was done to establish the relationship between proteinuria (Microalbuminuria) and ischemic stroke among diabetic patients. Other risk factors were also assessed. Patients were divided in Group A - diabetic patients with ischemic stroke (n=50) and Group B diabetic patients without stroke (n=50). Mean age of the Group A & B were 60.16±8.33 and 57.19±7.73 years (p=0.068). Mean Blood sugar (2 hours after Break Fast) was 14.68±4.32mmol/L in Group A and 14.75±4.02mmol/L in Group B (p>0.05). Albumin Creatinine ratio was abnormal in 84.0% in Group A and 22.0% in Group A (p=0.001) [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 18.61 (6.78-51.09)]. Logistic regression analysis has also shown that microalbuminuria (ACR) is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke (p=0.001), [Odds ratio (95%CI) = 19.811(5.915-66.348)]. In diabetic patients increased urinary protein is a risk factor for stroke. Estimation of urinary protein (Microalbuminuria) may be used as a predictor for ischemic stroke in patients with diabetes.

  4. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor for delayed graft function after deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Parekh, J; Bostrom, A; Feng, S

    2010-02-01

    Early graft function is a major determinant of long-term outcomes after renal transplantation. Recently, recipient diabetes was identified as a risk factor for poor initial graft function in living donor renal transplantation. To further explore this association, we performed a paired analysis of deceased donor renal transplants from January 1994 to December 2005. A total of 25,523 transplant pairs were analyzed via conditional logistic regression. Diabetic recipients were older (53.16 vs. 46.75 years, p < 0.01), had a lower average panel reactive antibody (12% vs. 15%, p < 0.01) and fewer prior transplants (0.07 vs. 0.12, p < 0.01). Recipient diabetes, age, male gender, African American race, elevated peak panel reactive antibody and increased cold ischemia time were independent risk factors for delayed graft function. Specifically, diabetic recipients had increased risk of DGF on univariate analysis (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-1.42, p < 0.01). Multivariable analysis confirmed this association but the risk differed by recipient gender; with diabetes having a greater effect in women (OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.45-1.91, p < 0.01) compared to men (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.15-1.43, p < 0.01). It is unknown whether the deleterious impact of recipient diabetes on graft function after renal transplantation results from perioperative hyperglycemia or the chronic sequelae of diabetes.

  5. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  6. Noninvasive Screening for Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Young, Rural, Caucasian Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharon; Sheffer, Sarah; Long Roth, Sara; Bennett, Paul A.; Lloyd, Les

    2010-01-01

    School nurses play an important role in identifying students who are at risk for Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Few studies have screened Caucasian students, and none have targeted rural, low-income, elementary children. The five noninvasive risk factors used for this study were family history, high body mass index (BMI) for age/sex,…

  7. Risk factors associated with falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Yuko; Kimbara, Yoshiyuki; Kodera, Remi; Tsuboi, Yuki; Sato, Ken; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Mori, Seijiro; Ito, Hideki; Araki, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated risk factors of falls in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A total of 211 patients aged ≧60years (168 diabetic patients and 43 non-diabetic control subjects) were studied. Factors associated with falls in the past year were retrospectively examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of patients who had a history of falls in the past year was twice as high as in diabetic patients compared in control subjects (36.9% vs. 18.6%, P<0.05). When diabetic patients were exclusively analyzed, the presence of any level of hypoglycemia and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG) scores correlated with patients' falls. The presence of hypoglycemia (OR 3.62, 95% CI: 1.242-10.534, P=0.018), cognitive impairment (OR 3.63, 95% CI: 1.227-10.727, P=0.020), and high Fall Risk Index scores (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.010-1.425, P=0.039) was independently correlated with the presence of multiple falls. When the diabetic patients were divided into three groups according to the frequency of hypoglycemia episodes, the prevalence of falls increased as the frequency of hypoglycemia increased. Hypoglycemia was a risk factor of falls in elderly type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Maternal and neonatal risk factors for childhood type 1 diabetes: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Lynn; Harrild, Kirsten

    2010-05-27

    An interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to be involved in the aetiology of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate maternal and neonatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes in children under 15 years old in Grampian, Scotland. A matched case-control study was conducted by record linkage. Cases (n = 361) were children born in Aberdeen Maternity Hospital from 1972 to 2002, inclusive, who developed type 1 diabetes, identified from the Scottish Study Group for the Care of Diabetes in the Young Register. Controls (n = 1083) were randomly selected from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank, matched by year of birth. Exposure data were obtained from the Aberdeen Maternity Neonatal Databank. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between various maternal and neonatal factors and the risk of type 1 diabetes. There was no evidence of statistically significant associations between type 1 diabetes and maternal age, maternal body mass index, previous abortions, pre-eclampsia, amniocentesis, maternal deprivation, use of syntocinon, mode of delivery, antepartum haemorrhage, baby's sex, gestational age at birth, birth order, birth weight, jaundice, phototherapy, breast feeding, admission to neonatal unit and Apgar score (P > 0.05). A significantly decreased risk of type 1 diabetes was observed in children whose mothers smoked at the booking appointment compared to those whose mothers did not, with an adjusted OR of 0.67, 95% CI (0.46, 0.99). This case-control study found limited evidence of a reduced risk of the development of type 1 diabetes in children whose mothers smoked, compared to children whose mothers did not. No evidence was found of a significant association between other maternal and neonatal factors and childhood type 1 diabetes.

  9. Diabetes and cancer: two diseases with obesity as a common risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Garg, S K; Maurer, H; Reed, K; Selagamsetty, R

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support a connection between diabetes (predominantly type 2), obesity and cancer. Multiple meta-analyses of epidemiological data show that people with diabetes are at increased risk of developing many different types of cancers, along with an increased risk of cancer mortality. Several pathophysiological mechanisms for this relationship have been postulated, including insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced inflammatory processes, dysregulation of sex hormone production and hyperglycaemia. In addition to these potential mechanisms, a number of common risk factors, including obesity, may be behind the association between diabetes and cancer. Indeed, obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer and diabetes. Abdominal adiposity has been shown to play a role in creating a systemic pro-inflammatory environment, which could result in the development of both diabetes and cancer. Here, we examine the relationship between diabetes, obesity and cancer, and investigate the potential underlying causes of increased cancer risk in individuals with diabetes. Current treatment recommendations for reducing the overall disease burden are also explored and possible areas for future research are considered. PMID:23668396

  10. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  11. The Presence of Family History and the Development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Rural Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Barnett Lammon, Carol Ann

    2007-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is reaching epidemic proportions among children and adolescents. School health fairs offer an opportunity to identify children with risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study identified selected risk factors (i.e., high-risk racial/ethnic group, obesity, elevated blood pressure, elevated…

  12. Cardiovascular risk factors in pre-pubertal Malays: effects of diabetic parentage.

    PubMed

    Choo, Keng Ee; Lau, Kim Bee; Davis, Wendy A; Chew, Peng Hong; Jenkins, Alicia J; Davis, Timothy M E

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes prevalence is increasing rapidly in Asian populations but the influence of a family history of diabetes on cardiovascular risk is unknown. To assess this relationship, 120 urban-dwelling Malays were recruited to a cross-sectional case-control study. Sixty were pre-pubertal children, 30 of diabetic parentage (Group 1) and 30 with no diabetes family history (Group 2). Group 1 and 2 subjects were the offspring of adults with (Group 3) or without (Group 4) type 2 diabetes. Subjects were assessed for clinical and biochemical variables defining cardiovascular risk. Principal component analysis assessed clustering of variables in the children. Group 1 subjects had a higher mean waist:hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure and HbA(1c) than those in Group 2, and a lower HDL:total cholesterol ratio (P<0.03). Although there were no correlations between Group 1 and 3 subjects for cardiovascular risk variables, significant associations were found in Groups 2 and 4, especially HbA(1c) and insulin sensitivity (P< or =0.004). Of five separate clusters of variables (factors) identified amongst the children, the strongest comprised diabetic parentage, HbA(1c), insulin sensitivity and blood pressure. Features of the metabolic syndrome are becoming evident in the young non-obese children of diabetic Malays, suggesting that lifestyle factors merit particular attention in this group.

  13. Plasma prekallikrein as a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Karolina; Ciechanowski, Kazimierz; Gołembiewska, Edyta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Domański, Leszek; Myślak, Marek; Róźański, Jacek

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that in diabetes there is an increased activation of coagulation system leading in consequence to diabetic retinopathy. Thirty three healthy subjects (controls, 16 males and 17 females) and 35 patients with diabetes type 1 (15 males and 20 females) were examined. We monitored plasma prekallikrein (PPK), glycemia, fructosamine, glycosylated hemoglobin, activated partial thromboplastin time (PTT), INR, fibrinolysis in euglobulins time (FET), level of antithrombin III (AT III), fibrinogen (Fb) and fibrinogen degradation products (FDP). In diabetic patients without retinopathy, PKK concentration was 16% higher (p <0.005), in patients with background retinopathy 33% higher (p <0.001), and in patients with proliferative retinopathy PKK concentration was 50% higher (p <0.001) than in controls. In the subgroup of patients with proliferative retinopathy PTT was significantly shorter (p <0.001), and FET was significantly longer (p <0.001) than in control. In patients with diabetes higher FDP concentrations were found than in controls (p <0.05). Significant correlations were found between PPK and fructosamine levels in all diabetic patients (R(S)=+0.57 p <0.001), in diabetic patients without retinopathy (R(S)=+0.61, p <0.05), and in diabetic patients with retinopathy (R(S)=+0.62, p <0.005). We found negative correlation between PPK concentration and PTT (R(S)=-0.43, p <0.001) and positive correlation between PPK concentration and FET (R(S)=+0.59, p <0.00001) in the entire study group. The occurrence of diabetic retinopathy is connected with higher levels of plasma prekallikrein.

  14. [Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for dementia in the Mexican elder population].

    PubMed

    Mejía-Arango, Silvia; Zúñiga-Gil, Clemente

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes and dementia are growing problems throughout the world and especially in developing countries. To determine the risk of developing dementia in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Diabetic elders free of dementia from the Mexican Health and Aging study, a prospective community-based cohort research were followed after two years. Socio-demographic factors, comorbid conditions and type of diabetes treatment were analyzed in subjects who become demented. At baseline, 749 participants (13.8%) had diabetes mellitus. During the follow-up period (mean: 2.02 years; range: 1-3 years), 306 of 749 persons with diabetes mellitus developed dementia, yielding a relative risk (RR) of 2.08 (95% confidence interval, 95% CI = 1.59-2.73). The effect was strongest in persons aged 80 years or older with a RR of 2.44 (95% CI = 1.46-4.08), men had a greater relative risk than women (RR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.46-3.49 vs. RR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.08-1.11) and subjects with low education (< 7 years of schooling) had a significant RR while those with higher education didn't. Individuals treated with insulin where at highest risk of dementia (RR = 2.83; 95% CI = 1.58-5.06). Hypertension (RR = 2.75; 95% CI = 1.86-4.06) and depression (RR = 3.78; 95% CI = 2.37-6.04) where the two comorbidities which increased the risk of dementia. Subjects with diabetes mellitus have an increased risk of developing dementia. Sociodemographic factors and other co-morbidities highly prevalent in the Mexican population contribute to the diabetes-dementia association.

  15. Risk factors of diabetic foot Charcot arthropathy: a case-control study at a Malaysian tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Fauzi, Aishah Ahmad; Chung, Tze Yang; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to determine the risk factors of diabetic Charcot arthropathy of the foot among diabetic patients with and without foot problems. METHODS This was a case-control study involving diabetic patients attending the Diabetic Foot Care and Wound Management Clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, from June 2010 to June 2011. Data on sociodemographic profiles, foot factors and diabetes characteristics was collected and analysed. RESULTS A total of 48 diabetic patients with Charcot arthropathy of the foot were identified. Data from these 48 patients was compared with those of 52 diabetic patients without foot problems. Up to 83.3% of patients with diabetic Charcot arthropathy presented with unilateral Charcot foot, most commonly located at the midfoot (45.8%). Patients with a history of foot problems, including foot ulcer, amputation, surgery or a combination of problems, had the highest (26-time) likelihood of developing Charcot arthropathy (odds ratio 26.4; 95% confidence interval 6.4–109.6). Other significant risk factors included age below 60 years, more than ten years’ duration of diabetes mellitus and the presence of nephropathy. CONCLUSION A history of prior diabetic foot problems is the greatest risk factor for developing diabetic Charcot arthropathy, compared with other risk factors such as diabetes characteristics and sociodemographic profiles. Preventive management of diabetic foot problems in the primary care setting and multidisciplinary care are of paramount importance, especially among chronic diabetic patients. PMID:27075668

  16. Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2 diabetes. Results National guidelines recommend the aggressive management of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes, including weight loss and achieving lipid and blood pressure treatment goals. All antidiabetes pharmacotherapies lower glucose; however, effects on cardiovascular risk factors vary greatly among agents. While thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas, and insulin are associated with weight gain, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are considered weight neutral and metformin can be weight neutral or associated with a small weight loss. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists and amylinomimetics (e.g. pramlintide) result in weight loss. Additionally, metformin, thiazolidinediones, insulin, and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists have demonstrated beneficial effects on lipid and blood pressure parameters. Conclusion Management of the cardiovascular risk factors experienced by patients with type 2 diabetes requires a multidisciplinary approach with implementation of treatment strategies to achieve not only glycemic goals but to improve and/or correct the underlying cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:20804556

  17. Endothelial Dysfunction as a Link Between Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Peripheral Neuropathy in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Loader, Jordan; Deusenbery, Carly; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    Context: Cardiovascular risk factors are well-known predictors of the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), which has traditionally been considered as a manifestation of diabetes-associated microangiopathy. Because endothelial dysfunction is strongly associated with all cardiovascular risk factors, we hypothesized that it may be a link between cardiovascular risk factors and DPN. Objective: The primary objective of this study was to test whether endothelial dysfunction is a predictor of DPN. Design and Setting: This is a cross-sectional analysis of a cohort composed of patients followed at the Microcirculatory Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Patients: Participants with diabetes without DPN (n = 192) and with DPN (n = 166), subjects with prediabetes (n = 75), and nondiabetic controls (n = 59) were included. Interventions: Endothelial function was assessed with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. Inflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of endothelial function (soluble intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules) were quantified using a multiplex bead-based immunoassay. Neurological assessment included the neuropathy disability score (NDS). Main Outcome Measure: The relationship between FMD and NDS assessed using multiple linear regression. Results: In addition to already known risk factors of DPN, FMD was strongly associated with NDS (β = −0.24; P < .001). Sensitivity analysis that removed FMD from the model provided similar results for soluble intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, another biomarker of endothelial function. Confirmatory factor analysis further showed that endothelial dysfunction is a significant mediator between glycosylated hemoglobin and diabetes duration and diabetic complications. Conclusions: This study shows that endothelial dysfunction occurs early in the pathophysiology of diabetes and is a link between cardiovascular risk factors and DPN. PMID:27399351

  18. Racial-ethnic disparities in the association between risk factors and diabetes: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Kulick, Erin R; Moon, Yeseon P; Cheung, Ken; Willey, Joshua Z; Sacco, Ralph L; Elkind, Mitchell S V

    2016-02-01

    To identify risk factors (RF) for diabetes within a multiethnic cohort and to examine whether race-ethnicity modified their effects. Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study without diabetes at baseline were studied from 1993 to 2014 (n=2430). Weibull regression models with interval censoring data were fit to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for incident diabetes. We tested for interactions between RF and race-ethnicity. During a mean follow-up period of 11years, there were 449 diagnoses of diabetes. Being non-Hispanic black (HR 1.69 95% CI 1.11-2.59) or Hispanic (HR 2.25 95% CI 1.48-3.40) versus non-Hispanic white, and body mass index (BMI; HR 1.34 per SD 95% CI 1.21-1.49) were associated with greater risk of diabetes; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HR 0.75 95% CI 0.66-0.86) was protective. There were interactions by race-ethnicity. In stratified models, the effects of BMI, current smoking, and C-reactive protein (CRP) on risk of diabetes differed by race-ethnicity (p for interaction <0.05). The effects were greater among non-Hispanic whites than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Although Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks had a greater risk of diabetes than whites, there were variations by race-ethnicity in the association of BMI, smoking, and CRP with risk of diabetes. Unique approaches should be considered to reduce diabetes as traditional RF may not be as influential in minority populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Racial-Ethnic Disparities in the Association between Risk Factors and Diabetes: the Northern Manhattan Study

    PubMed Central

    Kulick, Erin R.; Moon, Yeseon P.; Cheung, Ken; Willey, Joshua Z.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify risk factors (RF) for diabetes within a multiethnic cohort and to examine whether race-ethnicity modified their effects. Methods Participants in the Northern Manhattan Study without diabetes at baseline were studied from 1993–2014 (n=2, 430). Weibull regression models with interval censoring data were fit to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for incident diabetes. We tested for interactions between RF and race-ethnicity. Results During a mean follow-up period of 11 years, there were 449 diagnoses of diabetes. Being non-Hispanic black (HR 1.69 95%CI 1.11–2.59) or Hispanic (HR 2.25 95%CI 1.48–3.40) versus non-Hispanic white, and body mass index (BMI; HR 1.34 per SD 95%CI 1.21–1.49) were associated with greater risk of diabetes; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HR 0.75 95%CI 0.66–0.86) was protective. There were interactions by race-ethnicity. In stratified models, the effects of BMI, current smoking, and C-reactive protein (CRP) on risk of diabetes differed by race-ethnicity (p for interaction <0.05). The effects were greater among non-Hispanic whites than non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Conclusions Although Hispanics and non-Hispanic blacks had a greater risk of diabetes than whites, there were variations by race-ethnicity in the association of BMI, smoking, and CRP with risk of diabetes. Unique approaches should be considered to reduce diabetes as traditional RF may not be as influential in minority populations. PMID:26658025

  20. [Prevalence and related risk factors among residents with diabetes in urban and rural areas in Chengdu].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gaiping; Dai, Tingting; Liu, Yuan; Liao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jiankang; Ren, Changjiu; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2014-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and related risk factors among residents in the urban and rural area of Chengdu. A cluster sampling was used to establish a study population of inhabitants aged 30 to 70. Totally, 1 847 participants were enrolled in this study. Questionnaire including general information and dietary information in the past year was used to collect related data. Height, body weight and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were measured. Factor analysis was used to analyze the dietary pattern while multivariate unconditional logistic regression used for risk factors in total population, urban and rural residents, respectively. The population standardized prevalence rates of diabetes in the overall, urban and rural residents were 20.2% , 28.7% , 11.1% , respectively. Among total population, middle-aged (OR = 2.337, 95%CI:1.305-4.185) and the elderly (OR = 5.990, 95%CI:3.389-10.586) residents had higher diabetes risk than the younger ones. Administrators (OR = 1.434, 95% CI:1.000-2.057) and ordinary clerks (OR = 2.870, 95% CI:1.653-4.980) were more vulnerable to diabetes than peasants. Similarly, middle-aged (OR = 2.973, 95% CI:1.101-8.031) and elderly (OR = 5.972, 95% CI: 2.267-15.730) turned out to be more predisposed than young people in the urban area. Compared with peasants, ordinary clerks (OR = 2.196, 95%CI:1.213-3.975) seemed to be more liable to diabetes. In the rural areas, dietary pattern with higher energy and protein (OR = 1.404, 95% CI:1.113-1.772) could be subject to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes in Chengdu was relatively high. Age, career and dietary pattern are mainly risk factors. The factors in different districts are various. Intervention on nutrition should be different, area-wise.

  1. Prevalence, awareness and risk factors of diabetes in Ahvaz (South West of Iran).

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, L; Shahbazian, H B; Moravej Aleali, A; Jahanshahi, A; Ghanbari, S; Latifi, S M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the prevalence of diabetes in people aged over 20 years in Ahvaz, Iran. The study population was chosen by cluster sampling. A checklist included: age, sex, weight, height, blood pressure, waist circumference, educational level, smoking status and previous history of diabetes was completed for each patient. Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) ≥126mg/dl and/or oral hypoglycemic treatment and/or insulin consumption was defined as diabetes, FPG=100-125mg/dl as Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG) and FPG <100mg/dl as normal. Study population was 944 persons. Mean age of population was 42.2±14 years. Diabetes was detected in 15.1% of population. Only 40.4% of cases were aware of their disease. Diabetes was detected in 14.7% of female and 15.7% of male participants. Diabetes was related to age, waist circumference, family history of diabetes, hypertension, waist to hip ratio, educational level, marital status, serum triglyceride, cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) in both genders. But by using logistic regression analysis, age, family history of diabetes, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, and marital status had significant effect on diabetes. This study showed that using FPG criteria or current medication 15.1% of this population had diabetes and about 60% of patients were unaware of their disease. Age, hypertension, family history of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and marital status are the risk factors of diabetes in Ahvaz population. IFG have high prevalence and diabetes screening should be intensified in this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. [Relationship diabetes mellitus-periodontal disease: etiology and risk factors].

    PubMed

    Foia, Liliana; Toma, Vasilica; Ungureanu, Didona; Aanei, Carmen; Costuleanu, M

    2007-01-01

    The interrelation between diabetes mellitus and inflammatory periodontal disease has been intensively studied for more than 50 years, a real bidirectional influence existing between patient's glycemic level disorder and periodontal territories alteration. Several studies developed in this direction emerged to the evidences that reveal a general increase of prevalence, extent and severity of gingivitis and periodontitis. Inflammation plays an important role in this interrelation, orchestrating both the periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus pathogeny and complications. Conversely, periodontal disease--infectious disease characterized by a significant inflammatory component--can seriously impair metabolic control of some diabetic patient. Moreover, treatment of periodontal disease and reduction of oral signs of inflammation may have a beneficial result on the diabetic condition (1). Less clear are the mechanisms governing this interrelation (even the literature is abundant in this direction), and, very probably, periodontal diseases serve as initiators of insulin resistance (in a way similar to obesity), thereby aggravating glycemic control. Further research is so imposed in order to clarify this aspect of the relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District.

    PubMed

    Amarasinghe, S; Balakumar, S; Arasaratnam, V

    2015-09-01

    A cross sectional descriptive study was carried out to determine the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes mellitus among adults in Jaffna District. Multistage stratified cluster sampling technique was employed to select 544 participants. An interviewer administrated questionnaire was used. Anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measurements were recorded and biochemical parameters were analysed. Response rate was 95.3%. Of them, 224 (43.8%) were male. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 16.4% (95% CI: 13.3- 19.9); in males 19.6% (95% CI: 14.6-25.4) and in females 13.9% (95% CI: 10.1-18.5). Of the diabetics, 27.4% were previously undiagnosed. In the final multivariable model, participants with family history of diabetes were 3.5 times (p<0.001) more likely and those with high waist hip ratio were 2 times (p=0.009) more likely to develop diabetes mellitus.

  4. Risk Factors for Foot Amputation in Patients Hospitalized for Diabetic Foot Infection.

    PubMed

    Quilici, Maria Teresa Verrone; Del Fiol, Fernando de Sá; Vieira, Alexandre Eduardo Franzin; Toledo, Maria Inês

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for amputation in diabetic patients hospitalized for foot infections. This cross-sectional study comprised 100 patients with diabetic infectious complications in the lower limbs. The variables investigated were related to diabetes, infection, and treatment compliance. Multiple Cox regression analysis was performed to identify the variables independently associated with the outcome of amputation. The most prevalent chronic complications were neuropathy and hypertension. Most patients presented with a neuroischemic foot (86%). The Morisky test showed that 72% were not compliant with diabetes treatment. Regarding patient outcome, 61% progressed to amputation, 14% to debridement, and 9% to revascularization. The results showed a 42% higher risk for progression to amputation in patients with previous use of antimicrobials. Also, the amputation risk was 26% higher for those less compliant with diabetes treatment. An increase of one point in the Wagner ulcer classification criteria corresponded to a 65% increase in the risk of amputation. Undergoing conservative, nonsurgical procedures prior to admission provided a 63% reduction in the risk of amputation. Knowledge of these factors is critical to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop treatment plans for these patients so as to prevent the need for amputation.

  5. Undiagnosed Diabetes in Breast, Colorectal, Lung, and Prostate Cancer: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Lindquist, Karla J.; O'Malley, Cynthia D.; Gleeson, Michelle L.; Duryea, Jennifer L.; Valderas, José M.; Danese, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Our study describes the incidence and risk factors for undiagnosed diabetes in elderly cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data, we followed patients with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer from 24 months before to 3 months after cancer diagnosis. Medicare claims were used to exclude patients with diabetes 24 to 4 months before cancer (look-back period), identify those with diabetes undiagnosed until cancer, and construct indicators of preventive services, physician contact, and comorbidity during the look-back period. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes. Overall, 2,678 patients had diabetes undiagnosed until cancer. Rates were the highest in patients with both advanced-stage cancer and low prior primary care/medical specialist contact (breast 8.2%, colorectal 5.9%, lung 4.4%). Nonwhite race/ethnicity, living in a census tract with a higher percent of the population in poverty and a lower percent college educated, lower prior preventive services use, and lack of primary care and/or medical specialist care prior to cancer all were associated with higher (P ≤ 0.05) adjusted odds of undiagnosed diabetes. Undiagnosed diabetes is relatively common in selected subgroups of cancer patients, including those already at high risk of poor outcomes due to advanced cancer stage. PMID:24729897

  6. Multiple factors in the prediction of risk of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Rand, L I; Krolewski, A S; Aiello, L M; Warram, J H; Baker, R S; Maki, T

    1985-12-05

    To identify risk factors for the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, we compared 111 patients with longstanding insulin-dependent diabetes who had proliferative retinopathy (cases) with 81 patients with diabetes of similar duration (an average of 26 years) who did not have proliferative diabetic retinopathy (controls). The cases had diabetes that was more difficult to manage, as evidenced by their more frequent blood sugar levels above 200 mg per deciliter (11 mmol per liter) on routine clinic visits (odds ratio, 1.6 for each increment of 10 per cent in the relative frequency), and they expended less effort in managing their diabetes, as indicated by their less frequent testing of urine for sugar (odds ratio, 0.3). Among those who did not have myopia, the cases also had an excess of the HLA-DR phenotypes 4/0, 3/0, or X/X (odds ratio, 10.0). Among those with myopia, these phenotypes did not carry an increased risk of proliferative retinopathy. These results support a multifactorial model for the development of proliferative diabetic retinopathy; however, the mechanisms of action of the identified factors remain unknown.

  7. Medicare Star excludes diabetes patients with poor CVD risk factor control.

    PubMed

    Schmittdiel, Julie; Raebel, Marsha; Dyer, Wendy; Steiner, John; Goodrich, Glenn; Karter, Andy; Nichols, Gregory

    2014-12-01

    CMS recently added medication adherence to antihypertensives, antihyperlipidemics, and oral antihyperglycemics to its Medicare Star quality measures. These CMS metrics exclude patients with <2 medication fills (ie, "early nonadherence") and patients concurrently taking insulin. This study examined the proportion of patients with diabetes prescribed cardiovascular disease (CVD) medications excluded from Star adherence metrics and assessed the relationship of both Star-defined adherence and exclusion from Star metrics with CVD risk factor control. Cross-sectional, population-based analysis of 129,040 patients with diabetes aged ≥65 years in 2010 from 3 Kaiser Permanente regions. We estimated adjusted risk ratios to assess the relationship between achieving Star adherence and being excluded from Star adherence metrics, with CVD risk factor control (glycated hemoglobin [A1C]<8.0%, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]<100 mg/dL, and systolic blood pressure [SBP]<130 mm Hg) in patients with diabetes. Star metrics excluded 27% of patients with diabetes prescribed oral medications. Star-defined nonadherence was negatively associated with CVD risk factor control (risk ratio [RR], 0.95, 0.84, 0.96 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; P<.001). Exclusion from Star metrics due to early nonadherence was also strongly associated with poor control (RR, 0.83, 0.56, 0.87 for A1C, LDL-C, and SBP control, respectively; P<.001). Exclusion for insulin use was negatively associated with A1C control (RR, 0.78; P<.0001). Medicare Star adherence measures underestimate the prevalence of medication nonadherence in diabetes and exclude patients at high risk for poor CVD outcomes. Up to 3 million elderly patients with diabetes may be excluded from these measures nationally. Quality measures designed to encourage effective medication use should focus on all patients treated for CVD risk.

  8. Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation in a general Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guozhe; Ma, Mingfeng; Ye, Ning; Wang, Jun; Chen, Yintao; Dai, Dongxue; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-09-01

    To explore the association between atrial fibrillation (AF) and diabetes mellitus in a general Chinese population, and the influence of hypertension. From January 2013 to August 2013, we carried out a cross-sectional study involving 11,956 permanent residents aged ≥35 years from the general population in the Liaoning province of China (response rate 85.3%). Each participant completed a questionnaire, had a physical examination, and underwent an electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. AF was diagnosed on the basis of the electrocardiogram findings. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to estimate the associations between diabetes mellitus and AF. The associations were also analyzed in hypertensive and normotensive subgroups. There was a higher prevalence of AF in participants with diabetes mellitus than those without diabetes mellitus (1.2 vs 0.5%; P = 0.004). In the hypertensive subgroup, the prevalence of AF in participants with diabetes mellitus was significantly higher than in participants without diabetes mellitus (1.5 vs 0.6%; P = 0.008); however, the prevalences were similar in the normotensive subgroup (0.3 vs 0.4%; P = 1.000). Similar trends were present in both men and women. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, the independent association between diabetes mellitus and AF remained in the total sample (odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.54) and hypertensive subgroup (odds ratio 3.15, 95% confidence interval 1.52-6.56), but not in the normotensive subgroup (odds ratio 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.08-5.31). Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for AF in the general population in China, this association was present in total and hypertensive participants, but not in normotensive participants. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Considerable disturbances of cardiovascular risk factors in women with diabetes and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Dotevall, Annika; Wilhelmsen, Lars; Lappas, Georg; Rosengren, Annika

    2005-01-01

    To investigate to which extent differences in cardiovascular risk factors explain the increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and complication rate in women with diabetes mellitus (DM). Case-control study. We compared women with diabetes and previous MI (n=29), diabetes but no MI (n=46), prior MI but no diabetes (n=64), and healthy controls (n=125). Smoking habits, physical activity, blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio (WHR), serum lipids, plasma fibrinogen, and serum sex hormones. Despite the fact that diabetic women had similar BMI, those with a past MI, compared to diabetic women without MI, had significantly higher WHR (mean, 95% CI) [0.89 (0.87, 0.92) vs. 0.84 (0.81, 0.86) mmol/l, P=.001] and very high S-triglycerides [3.03 (2.23, 3.83) vs. 1.69, (1.39, 1.99) mmol/l, P=.001] and low HDL-cholesterol [1.09 (0.94, 1.24) vs. 1.56 (1.41, 1.71) mmol/l, P<.001], indicating pronounced metabolic disturbances. Women with MI but no diabetes had intermediate values for WHR, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol. Furthermore, women with diabetes and MI had significantly higher p-fibrinogen, were smokers, and lived a more sedentary life than the other women. Over half of all women with prior MI were on lipid-lowering therapy and tended to have nonsignificantly lower S-cholesterol than women without MI. Women with diabetes who have manifested an MI carry a very substantial cardiovascular risk factor burden, which probably explain their increased morbidity and mortality. In order to improve prognosis, studies targeted at investigating treatment modalities for these abnormalities are needed.

  10. Treatment and risk factor analysis of hypoglycemia in diabetic rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    He, Sirong; Chen, Younan; Wei, Lingling; Jin, Xi; Zeng, Li; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2011-02-01

    In order to anticipate and promptly treat hypoglycemia in diabetic monkeys treated with insulin or other glucose-lowering drugs, the relationships between the incidence and symptoms of hypoglycemia in these animals, and many factors involved in model development and sustainment were analyzed. Different procedures were performed on 22 monkeys for the induction of diabetes. The monkey models were evaluated by blood glucose, insulin, C-peptide levels and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. A glucose treatment program for the diabetic monkeys was administered and laboratory tests were regularly performed. A standard procedure of hypoglycemia treatment was established and the risk factors of hypoglycemia were analyzed by a logistic regression model. Furthermore, the relationships between the four methods of diabetes induction, renal function, glycemic control and hypoglycemia were studied using one-way analysis of variance and t-test. We found that the hypoglycemic conditions of diabetic monkeys were improved rapidly by our treatment. The statistical analysis suggested that the modeling methods, renal function and glycemic control were related to the incidence of hypoglycemia. In detail, the progress of diabetes, effects of glycemic control and, particularly, the severity of the hypoglycemia differed according to the induction strategy used. The models induced by partial pancreatectomy with low-dose streptozotocin were not prone to hypoglycemia and their glycemic controls were stable. However, the models induced by total pancreatectomy were more vulnerable to severe hypoglycemia and their glycemic controls were the most unstable. Moreover, the levels of blood creatinine and triglyceride increased after the development of diabetes, which was related to the occurrence of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, we suggested that total pancreatectomy and renal impairment are two important risk factors for hypoglycemia in diabetic monkeys. More attention should be paid to daily care

  11. Type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: Current therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kalofoutis, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Harris, Fred; Phoenix, David; Singh, Jaipaul

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 200 million people currently have type II diabetes mellitus (DM), a prevalence that has been predicted to increase to 366 million by 2030. Rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity are particularly high in this population, representing a significant cost for health care systems. Type II DM patients generally carry a number of risk factors for CVD, including hyperglycemia, abnormal lipid profiles, alterations in inflammatory mediators and coagulation/thrombolytic parameters, as well as other ‘nontraditional’ risk factors, many of which may be closely associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, successful management of CVD associated with diabetes represents a major challenge to the clinicians. An effective way of tackling this problem is to detect the associated risk factors and to target treatment toward their improvement. Targeting hyperglycemia alone does not reduce the excess risk in diabetes, highlighting the need for aggressive treatment of other risk factors. Although the current use of statin therapy is effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, residual risk remains for other independent lipid and nonlipid factors. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ appears to be closely involved in regulating risk markers at multiple levels. A relatively new class of therapeutic agents that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, the thiazolidinedione insulin-sensitizing agents, is currently used to manage type II DM. These agents display a number of potential antiatherogenic properties, including effects on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as other beneficial nonlipid effects, such as regulating levels of mediators involved in inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Research data suggest that simple strategies combining thiazolidinediones and statins could have complementary effects on CVD risk-factor profiles in diabetes, alongside the

  12. Range of Risk Factor Levels: Control, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rawshani, Aidin; Rawshani, Araz; Franzén, Stefan; Eliasson, Björn; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Miftaraj, Mervete; McGuire, Darren K; Sattar, Naveed; Rosengren, Annika; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia

    2017-04-18

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have a high risk of cardiovascular complications, but it is unknown to what extent fulfilling all cardiovascular treatment goals is associated with residual risk of mortality and cardiovascular outcomes in those with T1DM compared with the general population. We included all patients ≥18 years of age with T1DM who were registered in the Swedish National Diabetes Register from January 1, 1998, through December 31, 2014, a total of 33 333 patients, each matched for age and sex with 5 controls without diabetes mellitus randomly selected from the population. Patients with T1DM were categorized according to number of risk factors not at target: glycohemoglobin, blood pressure, albuminuria, smoking, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Risk of all-cause mortality, acute myocardial infarction, heart failure hospitalization, and stroke was examined in relation to the number of risk factors at target. The mean follow-up was 10.4 years in the diabetes group. Overall, 2074 of 33 333 patients with diabetes mellitus and 4141 of 166 529 controls died. Risk for all outcomes increased stepwise for each additional risk factor not at target. Adjusted hazard ratios for patients achieving all risk factor targets compared with controls were 1.31 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.93-1.85) for all-cause mortality, 1.82 (95% CI, 1.15-2.88) for acute myocardial infarction, 1.97 (95% CI, 1.04-3.73) for heart failure hospitalization, and 1.17 (95% CI, 0.51-2.68) for stroke. The hazard ratio for patients versus controls with none of the risk factors meeting target was 7.33 (95% CI, 5.08-10.57) for all-cause mortality, 12.34 (95% CI, 7.91-19.48) for acute myocardial infarction, 15.09 (95% CI, 9.87-23.09) for heart failure hospitalization, and 12.02 (95% CI, 7.66-18.85) for stroke. A steep-graded association exists between decreasing number of cardiovascular risk factors at target and major adverse cardiovascular outcomes among

  13. Awareness of diabetes risk factors and prevention strategies among a sample of low-income Latinos with no known diagnosis of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rosal, Milagros C; Borg, Amy; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Tellez, Trinidad; Ockene, Ira S

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed awareness of type 2 diabetes risk and severity, perceived risk factors, knowledge of diabetes prevention strategies, and challenges of and opportunities for prevention among low-income Latinos in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Qualitative research design. Latinos with no known diagnosis of diabetes participated in 4 focus groups, conducted in Spanish, which were recorded and transcribed for systematic analysis. The sample, (N = 41) was largely female (85%) with a wide age range (22-76 years), most (71%) had an educational level of high school or less, and less than half (46%) were employed. Participants had basic knowledge of diabetes, but gaps were apparent. Many perceived family history of diabetes, poor diet, emotional distress, and stress associated with the United States as risk factors for diabetes. There was little or no awareness of risk associated with Latino ethnicity, gestational diabetes, hypertension, lipid abnormalities, or obesity. Few cited physical activity or weight loss as diabetes prevention strategies. More than half the participants perceived themselves at low risk for diabetes. This Latino sample had limited knowledge of diabetes risk factors and lifestyle changes that can prevent or delay diabetes onset. Insights for intervening for diabetes prevention are offered.

  14. Risk factors for diabetes, but not for cardiovascular disease, are associated with family history of Type 2 diabetes in subjects from central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Ginez, Irma; Pérez-Fuentes, Ricardo; Baez-Duarte, Blanca G; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Brambila, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Independent of obesity, family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus (FHT2DM) is another important risk factor for developing diabetes. To establish the association among FHT2DM, risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease in subjects from central Mexico. Clinical and biochemical studies were performed in 383 first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes and 270 subjects unrelated to patients with type 2 diabetes-all subjects were from the city of Puebla in central Mexico. Logistic regressions were used to assess the association between FHT2DM and metabolic parameters. Cardiovascular risk was classified by dyslipidemia and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). FHT2DM was associated with risk factors for diabetes, such as increased fasting insulin levels (OR = 1.731, 95% CI = 1.041-2.877), decreased insulin sensitivity (OR = 1.951, 95% CI = 1.236-3.080) and pre-diabetes (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.14-2.33). FHT2DH was not associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as dyslipidemia (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.70-1.79) and FRS (OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.40-1.36) when adjusted for gender, age, smoking and obesity. Diabetic risk factors, but not cardiovascular disease risk factors, are associated with a positive family history of diabetes in subjects from central Mexico, independent of the presence of obesity.

  15. Preeclampsia as a risk factor for diabetes: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Feig, Denice S; Shah, Baiju R; Lipscombe, Lorraine L; Wu, C Fangyun; Ray, Joel G; Lowe, Julia; Hwee, Jeremiah; Booth, Gillian L

    2013-01-01

    Women with preeclampsia (PEC) and gestational hypertension (GH) exhibit insulin resistance during pregnancy, independent of obesity and glucose intolerance. Our aim was to determine whether women with PEC or GH during pregnancy have an increased risk of developing diabetes after pregnancy, and whether the presence of PEC/GH in addition to gestational diabetes (GDM) increases the risk of future (postpartum) diabetes. We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study for 1,010,068 pregnant women who delivered in Ontario, Canada between April 1994 and March 2008. Women were categorized as having PEC alone (n=22,933), GH alone (n=27,605), GDM alone (n=30,852), GDM+PEC (n=1,476), GDM+GH (n=2,100), or none of these conditions (n=925,102). Our main outcome was a new diagnosis of diabetes postpartum in the following years, up until March 2011, based on new records in the Ontario Diabetes Database. The incidence rate of diabetes per 1,000 person-years was 6.47 for women with PEC and 5.26 for GH compared with 2.81 in women with neither of these conditions. In the multivariable analysis, both PEC alone (hazard ratio [HR]=2.08; 95% CI 1.97-2.19) and GH alone (HR=1.95; 95% CI 1.83-2.07) were risk factors for subsequent diabetes. Women with GDM alone were at elevated risk of developing diabetes postpartum (HR=12.77; 95% CI 12.44-13.10); however, the co-presence of PEC or GH in addition to GDM further elevated this risk (HR=15.75; 95% CI 14.52-17.07, and HR=18.49; 95% CI 17.12-19.96, respectively). Data on obesity were not available. Women with PEC/GH have a 2-fold increased risk of developing diabetes when followed up to 16.5 years after pregnancy, even in the absence of GDM. The presence of PEC/GH in the setting of GDM also raised the risk of diabetes significantly beyond that seen with GDM alone. A history of PEC/GH during pregnancy should alert clinicians to the need for preventative counseling and more vigilant screening for diabetes. Please see later in the

  16. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  17. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    El Eter, E; Al-Masri, A A

    2015-05-01

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors.

  18. Mexican American Parents' Perceptions of Childhood Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Head, Barbara J.; Barr, Kathleen L.; Baker, Sharon K.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify the norms, values, and perceptions of urban immigrant Mexican American (MA) parents of school children relative to physical activity, healthy eating, and child risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Investigators facilitated five focus groups in an urban elementary school setting and analyzed data using qualitative…

  19. Peroxiredoxin isoforms are associated with cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El Eter, E.; Al-Masri, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The production of oxygen free radicals in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to the development of complications, especially the cardiovascular-related ones. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are antioxidant enzymes that combat oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between the levels of PRDX isoforms (1, 2, 4, and 6) and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Fifty-three patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (28F/25M) and 25 healthy control subjects (7F/18M) were enrolled. We measured the plasma levels of each PRDX isoform and analyzed their correlations with cardiovascular risk factors. The plasma PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 levels were higher in the diabetic patients than in the healthy control subjects. PRDX2 and -6 levels were negatively correlated with diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and hemoglobin A1c. In contrast, PRDX1 levels were positively correlated with low-density lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels. PRDX4 levels were negatively correlated with triglycerides. In conclusion, PRDX1, -2, -4, and -6 showed differential correlations with a variety of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. These results should encourage further research into the crosstalk between PRDX isoforms and cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25742636

  20. Exposure to Shift Work as a Risk Factor for Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Using telephone survey data from 1111 retired older adults (≥65 years; 634 male, 477 female), we tested the hypothesis that exposure to shift work might result in increased self-reported diabetes. Five shift work exposure bins were considered: 0 years, 1-7 years, 8-14 years, 15-20 years, and >20 years. Shift work exposed groups showed an increased proportion of self-reported diabetes (χ2 = 22.32, p < 0.001), with odds ratios (ORs) of about 2 when compared to the 0-year group. The effect remained significant after adjusting for gender and body mass index (BMI) (OR ≥ 1.4; χ2 = 10.78, p < 0.05). There was a significant shift work exposure effect on BMI (χ2 = 80.70, p < 0.001) but no significant gender effect (χ2 = 0.37, p > 0.50). PMID:24132061

  1. Awareness, treatment, control of diabetes mellitus and the risk factors: survey results from northeast China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang; Yu, Yaqin; Zhang, Xiangyang; Li, Yong; Kou, Changgui; Li, Bo; Tao, Yuchun; Zhen, Qing; He, Huan; Kanu, Joseph Sam; Huang, Xufeng; Han, Mei; Liu, Yawen

    2014-01-01

    The awareness, treatment and control of diabetes mellitus (DM) can effectively reflect on the social status of diabetes conditions. Although several researchers have investigated the awareness, treatment and control rates of diabetes mellitus in China, little is known about their association with risk factors. This study aims to examine the relationship between risk factors and awareness, treatment and control of diabetes mellitus in northeast China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2012. Multistage stratified random cluster sampling design was used to select participants aged 18 to 79 years old. The analysis was based on a representative sample of 1,854 adult subjects. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to examine socio-demographic factors associated with the levels of awareness, treatment and control of diabetes mellitus. The awareness, treatment, and control rates of diabetes mellitus were 64.1%, 52.9% and 44.2%, respectively. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, family history of diabetes was significantly positively associated with awareness (OR, 2.145; 95% CI, 1.600-2.875) and treatment (OR, 2.021; 95% CI, 1.559-2.619) of diabetes mellitus, while negatively associated with control (OR, 0.671; 95% CI, 0.529-0.951). Cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers were less likely than non-smokers and non-drinkers to be aware of their blood glucose levels (OR, 0.895, 0.614; 95% CI, 0.659-1.216, 0.446-0.844, respectively). Participants who frequently exercise were more likely to be aware of their diabetic conditions than people who never or rarely exercise (OR, 2.003; 95% CI, 1.513-2.651). We found that the awareness and treatment of diabetes mellitus were positively associated with age and were high in participants with a family history of diabetes and those who exercise frequently, but low for cigarette smokers and alcohol drinkers. Participants with a family history of diabetes had their diabetic condition poorly controlled.

  2. Risk factors for dementia with type 2 diabetes mellitus among elderly people in China.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ma; Yan Ping, Zhang; Ru Juan, Miao; Ning Ning, Lin; Lin, Gao

    2013-05-01

    to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of diabetes to dementia and its subtypes such as Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) among the Chinese elderly population. among 8,213 Chinese people aged 65 years and older, 1,109 subjects with type 2 diabetes millitus (T2DM) were ascertained by interview and direct glucose testing. All diabetic subjects were initially screened with the "DSM-IV criteria" for dementia and its subtypes. We compared the prevalence of dementia in diabetic patients with that in ordinary subjects, and analyzed the association of the status of diabetes with dementia including AD and VD. Logistic regression was used to assess OR of dementia and its subtypes with T2DM. after a comprehensive geriatric and cognitive assessment, 132 diabetic subjects were diagnosed with all-cause dementia. The prevalence rate for dementia with T2DM was 1.61%. Of demented subjects, 37 subjects had AD, 30 subjects had VD. The prevalence rates for AD with T2DM and VD with T2DM were 4.51% and 3.65%, respectively. In the univariate analyses, among all diabetic subjects, compared with cognitive intactly subjects, the demented subjects, including AD and VD subjects, were older, more female had higher percentage of current smoking, had a greater duration of diabetes, took more frequent use of diabetes medications, and stronger effect of APOE ε4 status. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, variables including age, APOE ε4 allele, duration from onset of diabetes, using oral hypoglycemic agents, HMG-CoA reductase (statins) were significantly associated with increased risk for dementia with T2DM (all P < 0.05). the present study shows that T2DM is associated with dementia and its subtypes amongst elderly people in the Chinese population.

  3. High body mass index is an important risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Hironobu; Yokokawa, Hirohide; Yoneda, Minoru; Yatabe, Junichi; Sasaki Yatabe, Midori; Williams, Scott M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a causal relationship between excess body weight and the onset of diabetes in a retrospective cohort study. This 10-year observational cohort study investigated 969 men and 585 women (23 to 80 years of age), who underwent voluntary complete medical check-ups and an annual 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (75 g-OGTT). Participants with fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL, 2-h glucose level in a 75 g-OGTT ≥200 mg/dL and/or received medical treatment for type 2 diabetes during the previous year were considered as new-onset diabetics. We assessed the independent contribution of increased BMI to the risk of developing type 2 diabetes with Cox proportional hazard model. During the follow-up period, we diagnosed 86 men and 49 women with new-onset type 2 diabetes. In the Cox proportional hazards model, the risk of diabetes mellitus increased with increasing BMI, even after adjusting for age, sex, blood pressure, metabolic profiles, and insulin resistance. In the final model, setting BMI less than 25 as a reference group, the Hazard ratios for diabetes mellitus was 3.12 for those with a BMI of 25-27.4 and it was increased to 3.80 for participants with a BMI of 27.5 or higher. Overweight/obesity (high BMI) is an independent and dose-dependent risk factor for type 2 diabetes in overweight Japanese patients. Our results confirmed the usefulness of BMI as a classic parameter, and the importance of lifestyle modification and better management among people with overweight/obesity for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. A Korean multicenter study of prenatal risk factors for overt diabetes during the postpartum period after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na-Ri; Yoon, So-Yeon; Cho, Geum Joon; Choi, Suk-Joo; Kwon, Han-Sung; Hong, Soon Cheol; Kwon, Ja-Young; Oh, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    To identify prenatal risk factors for postpartum diabetes among pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). In a retrospective study, baseline characteristics and data from a postpartum 75-g glucose tolerance test (GTT) were reviewed for patients with GDM who had delivered in four Korean tertiary institutions from 2006 to 2012. Clinical characteristics were compared between women with and those without postpartum diabetes. Cutoffs to predict postpartum diabetes and diagnostic values were calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Of 1637 patients with GDM, 498 (30.4%) underwent a postpartum 75-g GTT. Postpartum diabetes was diagnosed in 40 (8.0%) patients and impaired glucose intolerance in 157 (31.5%). Women with postpartum diabetes had higher glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at GDM diagnosis (P=0.008) and higher 100-g GTT values (P<0.05 for all). In ROC curve analysis, optimal cutoffs for predicting postpartum diabetes were 0.058 for HbA1c level and 5.3 mmol/L (fasting), 10.9 mmol/L (1h), 10.2 mmol/L (2h), and 8.6 mmol/L (3h) for 100-g GTT. The highest sensitivity was observed for 3-h 100-g GTT (76.9%) and the highest positive predictive value was for HbA1c at diagnosis (15.2%). HbA1c level at GDM diagnosis and 100-g GTT values could be used to identify patients at high risk of postpartum diabetes who should undergo postpartum screening. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Is it a risk factor for diabetic retinopathy?].

    PubMed

    Baba, A; Zbiba, W; Bouayed, E; Korbi, M; Ghrairi, H

    2016-02-01

    The goal of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in type 2 diabetic patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. We performed a comparative study including 60 type 2 diabetics separated into 2 groups: a 1st group composed of 20 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and a 2nd group composed of 40 patients without this syndrome. The two groups were matched for age and length of diabetes. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. In both groups, the mean patient age was 59 years, the diabetes had been present for an average of 10 years, and the HbA1c was 10%. Diabetic retinopathy was diagnosed in 11 patients from the 1st group (55%) and 6 cases from the 2nd group (15%) (P=0.03). Non-proliferative and proliferative retinopathy were found in 7 cases (35%) and 4 cases (20%), respectively, in the 1st group and in 3 cases (7.5%) in the 2nd group for both types (P=0.03 and P=0.042, respectively). Diabetic macular edema was observed in 4 patients (20%) in the 1st group and 2 patients (5%) in the 2nd group (P=0.04). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is an independent risk factor for the appearance and aggravation of diabetic retinopathy. This underscores the importance of systematic screening for, and timely management of, sleep apnea. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gestational Diabetes in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JAFARI-SHOBEIRI, Mehri; GHOJAZADEH, Morteza; AZAMI-AGHDASH, Saber; NAGHAVI-BEHZAD, Mohammad; PIRI, Reza; POURALI-AKBAR, Yasmin; NASROLLAH-ZADEH, Raheleh; BAYAT-KHAJEH, Parvaneh; MOHAMMADI, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gestational Diabetes (GD) is one of the major public health issues. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the risk factors and prevalence rate of this disorder in Iran. Methods: This systematic review and meta- analysis article was prepared using the databases of Science Direct, Pub-Med, Scopus, Magiran, Iranmedex and SID, Google search engine, Gray Literature, reference lists check and hand searching using keywords such as “prevalence”, “gestational diabetes mellitus”, “GDM”, “risk factor*”, “Iran” and “Postpartum Diabetes”. The selected papers were fully reviewed and the required information for the systematic review was extracted and summarized using extraction table in Microsoft Office Excel software. Results: Twenty-four of 1011 papers were quite relevant to the objectives of the review so they were included. The mean age of the participants was 29.43±4.97 yr and the prevalence of GDM was 3.41% (the highest and the lowest prevalence rates were 18.6% and 1.3% respectively). Among the influential factors mentioned in the literature, potential causes of GDM are gestational age, history of gestational diabetes, family history of diabetes, body mass index, abortions and parity, and history of macrosomia. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of postpartum diabetes and its related factors in Iran, strategic planning for disease prevention and reduction is inevitable. PMID:26587467

  7. Ischemic Stroke and Its Risk Factors in a Registry-Based Large Cross-Sectional Diabetic Cohort in a Country Facing a Diabetes Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Al-Sharqawi, Ahmad H.; Ibrahim, Heba M.

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and risk factors of ischemic stroke among diabetic patients registered in the Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR) database. A cross-sectional sample of 62,681 diabetic patients aged ≥25 years was used to calculate ischemic stroke prevalence and its risk factors. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the roles of different risk factors. The prevalence of ischemic stroke was 4.42% and was higher in the older age group with longer diabetes duration. Poor glycemic control and the presence of chronic diabetes complications were associated with a high risk of ischemic stroke. History of smoking and type 2 diabetes were more frequent among stroke patients. Obesity significantly decreased the risk for ischemic stroke. Regression analysis for ischemic stroke risk factors proved that age ≥45 years, male gender, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD), diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, and hyperlipidemia were significant independent risk factors for ischemic stroke. We conclude that ischemic stroke is prevalent among diabetic individuals, particularly among those with type 2 diabetes. Good glycemic, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia control, in addition to smoking cessation, are the cornerstones to achieve a significant reduction in ischemic stroke risk. PMID:26989695

  8. Risk factors of hypertensive pregnancies in women with diabetes and the influence on their future life.

    PubMed

    Gordin, Daniel; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Teramo, Kari; Kaaja, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Diabetic women carry a 2-4 times increased risk of a hypertensive pregnancy compared to non-diabetic people. This risk is related to presence of diabetic nephropathy, but also poor glycaemic control. Efforts to improve glycaemic control have decreased perinatal morbidity and mortality related to diabetic nephropathy. Despite good glycaemic control, overt nephropathy is associated with a variety of pregnancy complications, such as fetal growth restriction and pre-eclampsia. General population studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia are more prone to develop cardiovascular disease later in life than women with a history of normotensive pregnancy. Furthermore, recent data regarding the long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications indicate that these women should be followed and treatment should be started early. In this review we summarize data on risk factors and long-term effects of hypertensive pregnancies on late diabetic complications that may be of clinical relevance in the prevention of these complications.

  9. Lifestyle risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetic risk in a sedentary occupational group: the Galway taxi driver study.

    PubMed

    Martin, W P; Sharif, F; Flaherty, G

    2016-05-01

    Taxi drivers are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), something which persists after correcting for the overrepresentation of traditional risk factors for CVD in this cohort. The contribution of lifestyle risk factors to this residually elevated CVD risk remains under-evaluated. We aimed to determine the prevalence of lifestyle risk factors for CVD, self-reported medical risk factors for CVD, and future risk of type 2 diabetes amongst Irish taxi drivers. Male taxi drivers with no history of CVD and type 2 diabetes and working in Galway city in the west of Ireland were invited to participate. Physical activity levels, dietary patterns, anthropometry, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, and Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) values were recorded in a cross-sectional manner. 41 taxi drivers (mean age 56.7 ± 9.8 years) participated. 37 % were insufficiently active based on self-report, although only 8 % objectively achieved 10, 000 steps per day. Mean modified Mediterranean diet score (mMDS) was 4.6 ± 2.2, and only 13 % of participants had a normal body mass index (BMI) or waist circumference (WC). Those who worked for taxi companies tended to have a higher BMI (p = .07) and WC (p = .04) by multivariable regression. 22 % were current smokers, although a quit rate of 72 % was observed amongst the 78 % of taxi drivers who had ever smoked. 25 % were at high or very high risk of future type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle risk factors for CVD and dysglycaemia are prevalent amongst Irish taxi drivers.

  10. Weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for diabetes complications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Jinliang; Cai, Yuping; Yang, Zhengguo

    2016-12-01

    Our goal was to investigate the relationship between weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic complications among hospitalized patients with T2DM.We conducted a cross-sectional study and evaluated 347 and 642 hospitalized patients with T2DM who experienced and did not experienced weight loss before T2DM diagnosis, respectively. We used propensity score matching to reduce the confounding bias between the groups. In addition, a logistic regression analysis of the matched data was performed to evaluate the risk of diabetic complications.A total of 339 patients who experienced weight loss were matched to 339 patients who did not experience weight loss. After adjusting for age, gender, origin, occupation, smoking history, alcohol use, and duration of diabetes, the logistic regression analysis showed that compared with patients who did not experience weight loss, patients who lost ≤5 kg had a higher risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35-3.10) and diabetic retinopathy (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.11-2.87). However, we did not observe a dose-response relationship in terms of weight loss.We found that weight loss before a diagnosis of T2DM might serve as a risk factor for DN and diabetic retinopathy. Our findings demonstrate that we should strengthen the management and prevention of complications in patients who experience weight loss of ≤5 kg prior to a T2DM diagnosis, particularly those who are centrally obese.

  11. Weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus is a risk factor for diabetes complications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shanshan; Wang, Shuang; Yang, Bo; Zheng, Jinliang; Cai, Yuping; Yang, Zhengguo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Our goal was to investigate the relationship between weight loss before a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and diabetic complications among hospitalized patients with T2DM. We conducted a cross-sectional study and evaluated 347 and 642 hospitalized patients with T2DM who experienced and did not experienced weight loss before T2DM diagnosis, respectively. We used propensity score matching to reduce the confounding bias between the groups. In addition, a logistic regression analysis of the matched data was performed to evaluate the risk of diabetic complications. A total of 339 patients who experienced weight loss were matched to 339 patients who did not experience weight loss. After adjusting for age, gender, origin, occupation, smoking history, alcohol use, and duration of diabetes, the logistic regression analysis showed that compared with patients who did not experience weight loss, patients who lost ≤5 kg had a higher risk of diabetic nephropathy (DN) (odds ratio [OR]: 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.35–3.10) and diabetic retinopathy (OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.11–2.87). However, we did not observe a dose–response relationship in terms of weight loss. We found that weight loss before a diagnosis of T2DM might serve as a risk factor for DN and diabetic retinopathy. Our findings demonstrate that we should strengthen the management and prevention of complications in patients who experience weight loss of ≤5 kg prior to a T2DM diagnosis, particularly those who are centrally obese. PMID:27930591

  12. The effectiveness of screening for diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors in a community pharmacy setting.

    PubMed

    Willis, Andrew; Rivers, Peter; Gray, Laura J; Davies, Melanie; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for cardiovascular disease including diabetes have seen a large rise in prevalence in recent years. This has prompted interest in prevention through the identifying individuals at risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has seen increased investment in screening interventions taking place in primary care. Community pharmacies have become increasingly involved in the provision of such interventions and this systematic review and meta-analysis aims to gather and analyse the existing literature assessing community pharmacy based screening for risk factors for diabetes and those with a high cardiovascular disease risk. We conducted systematic searches of electronic databases using MeSH and free text terms from 1950 to March 2012. For our analysis two outcomes were assessed. They were the percentage of those screened who were referred for further assessment by primary care and the uptake of this referral. Sixteen studies fulfilled our inclusion criteria comprising 108,414 participants screened. There was significant heterogeneity for all included outcomes. Consequently we have not presented summary statistics and present forest plots with I2 and p values to describe heterogeneity. We found that all included studies suffered from high rates of attrition between pharmacy screening and follow up. We have also identified a strong trend towards higher rates for referral in more recent studies. Our results show that pharmacies are feasible sites for screening for diabetes and those at risk of cardiovascular disease. A significant number of previously unknown cases of cardiovascular disease risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes are identified, however a significant number of referred participants at high risk do not attend their practitioner for follow up. Research priorities should include methods of increasing uptake to follow up testing and early intervention, to maximise the efficacy of screening interventions based

  13. Diabetic Foot Complications and Their Risk Factors from a Large Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid; Al Derwish, Mohammad; Ouizi, Samir; Youssef, Amira M.; Subhani, Shazia N.; Ibrahim, Heba M.; Alamri, Bader N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Foot complications are considered to be a serious consequence of diabetes mellitus, posing a major medical and economical threat. Identifying the extent of this problem and its risk factors will enable health providers to set up better prevention programs. Saudi National Diabetes Registry (SNDR), being a large database source, would be the best tool to evaluate this problem. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of a cohort of 62,681 patients aged ≥25 years from SNDR database, selected for studying foot complications associated with diabetes and related risk factors. Results The overall prevalence of diabetic foot complications was 3.3% with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of (3.16%–3.44%), whilst the prevalences of foot ulcer, gangrene, and amputations were 2.05% (1.94%–2.16%), 0.19% (0.16%–0.22%), and 1.06% (0.98%–1.14%), respectively. The prevalence of foot complications increased with age and diabetes duration predominantly amongst the male patients. Diabetic foot is more commonly seen among type 2 patients, although it is more prevalent among type 1 diabetic patients. The Univariate analysis showed Charcot joints, peripheral vascular disease (PVD), neuropathy, diabetes duration ≥10 years, insulin use, retinopathy, nephropathy, age ≥45 years, cerebral vascular disease (CVD), poor glycemic control, coronary artery disease (CAD), male gender, smoking, and hypertension to be significant risk factors with odds ratio and 95% CI at 42.53 (18.16–99.62), 14.47 (8.99–23.31), 12.06 (10.54–13.80), 7.22 (6.10–8.55), 4.69 (4.28–5.14), 4.45 (4.05–4.89), 2.88 (2.43–3.40), 2.81 (2.31–3.43), 2.24 (1.98–2.45), 2.02 (1.84–2.22), 1.54 (1.29–1.83), and 1.51 (1.38–1.65), respectively. Conclusions Risk factors for diabetic foot complications are highly prevalent; they have put these complications at a higher rate and warrant primary and secondary prevention programs to minimize morbidity and mortality in addition to economic impact

  14. Prevalence of risk factors for diabetic foot complications in a Chinese tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liaofang; Hou, Qian; Zhou, Qiuhong; Peng, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To determine the prevalency of risk factors for diabetic foot complications in diabetic patients free of active ulceration in a hospital setting and to investigate the knowledge of foot care of the patients. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on a cohort of 296 patients with diabetes hospitalized in a tertiary hospital. A convenience sampling was adopted to recruit subjects during 2012/2013. All completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire and underwent medical assessment including foot examination and assessment of presence of peripheral sensory neuropathy (PSN) and peripheral arterial disease (PVD). The patients were assigned to a foot risk category which was developed by the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot (IWGDF). Results: 296 inpatients were evaluated. Foot deformity was noticed in 124 patients (42%), hallux valgus was the most prevalent abnormality, found in 65% of patients. Prevalency of neuropathy hypertension, nephropathy and retinopathy were 66.2%, 57.1%, 48.3% and 44.9% respectively. 37 (12.5%) patients had a history of ulceration (n = 33) and/or toe amputation (n = 4). According to the classification system of the IWGDF, 35.1% of patients were considered as having low-risk by the modified IWGDF classification (group 0), and 49% of the study population were at high risk for pedal ulceration (group 2 and 3). There was a clear trend between the increasing severity of the staging and HbA1c, duration of diabetes, prevalence of hypertension, nephropathy and retinopathy and absent of physical activity. The mean knowledge score of foot care was 21.21±3.84. Conclusion: The risk factors for foot ulceration and lack of fool care knowledge was rather common in a hospital-based diabetic population, emphasizing the importance of implementing simple and affordable screening tools and methods to identify high-risk patients and providing foot care education for them. PMID:26064275

  15. Perinatal risk factors increase the risk of being affected by both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, Emma H; Wingren, Carl Johan; Vincente, Raquel P; Merlo, Juan; Agardh, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated whether perinatal factors influenced the risk of a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. We used multinomial logistic regression models to study the associations between perinatal factors, gender, mode of delivery, season of birth and the risk of type 1 diabetes, coeliac disease or both, in Swedish-born singleton children. We found that 4327 of the 768 395 children (0.6%) had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, 3817 (0.5%) had been diagnosed with coeliac disease and 191 (0.02%) were affected by both diseases. If the children already had type 1 diabetes (n = 4518), the absolute risk of being affected by coeliac disease increased to 4.2% (n = 191). Children with both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease were more likely to be female (OR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.01-1.97), delivered by Caesarean section (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.07-2.39), have native-born Swedish mothers (OR = 4.84, 95% CI = 1.96-11.97) or be born during the summer months (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.07-1.92). The increased risk of being affected by a double diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease was modulated by perinatal risk factors. This suggests that early life events are important when it comes to children with type 1 diabetes also developing coeliac disease. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Does ethnicity contribute to the control of cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping Yein; Cheong, Ai Theng; Zaiton, Ahmad; Mastura, Ismail; Chew, Boon-How; Sazlina, Sharrif G; Adam, Bujang Mohamad; Syed Alwi, Syed Abdul Rahman; Jamaiyah, Haniff; Sriwahyu, Taher

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to examine the control of cardiovascular risk factors among the ethnic groups with type 2 diabetes in Malaysia. The authors analyzed the data of 70 092 adults from the Malaysian diabetes registry database. Malays had the worst achievement of target for most of the risk factors. Indians had poor achievement of control for waist circumference (odds ratio [OR] = 0.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.6-0.7) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.4-0.5). As compared with the Malays, the Chinese had a better achievement of target control for the risk factors, including the following: body mass index (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.4), blood pressure (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.3-1.4), total cholesterol (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.6-1.8), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.6-1.8), glycated hemoglobin A1c (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.3-1.4) and fasting blood glucose (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.3-1.5). Ethnicity, sociocultural factors, and psychobehavioral factors should be addressed in designing and management strategies for the control of cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetes patients.

  17. Lifestyle Risk Factors and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kamineni, Aruna; Carnethon, Mercedes; Djoussé, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Siscovick, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The combined impact of lifestyle factors on incidence of diabetes mellitus later in life is not well established. The objective of this study was to determine how lifestyle factors, assessed in combination, relate to new-onset diabetes in a broad and relatively unselected population of older adults. Methods We prospectively examined associations of lifestyle factors, measured using repeated assessments later in life, with incident diabetes mellitus during a 10-year period (1989–1998) among 4883 men and women 65 years or older (mean [SD] age at baseline, 73[6] years) enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Low-risk lifestyle groups were defined by physical activity level (leisure-time activity and walking pace) above the median; dietary score (higher fiber intake and polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio, lower trans-fat intake and lower mean glycemic index) in the top 2 quintiles; never smoked or former smoker more than 20 years ago or for fewer than 5 pack-years; alcohol use (predominantly light or moderate); body mass index less than 25 (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared); and waist circumference of 88 cm for women or 92 cm for men. The main outcome measure was incident diabetes defined annually by new use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications. We also evaluated fasting and 2-hour postchallenge glucose levels. Results During 34 539 person-years, 337 new cases of drug-treated diabetes mellitus occurred (9.8 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for age, sex, race, educational level, and annual income, each lifestyle factor was independently associated with incident diabetes. Overall, the rate of incident diabetes was 35% lower (relative risk, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.59–0.71) for each 1 additional lifestyle factor in the low-risk group. Participants whose physical activity level and dietary, smoking, and alcohol habits were all in the low-risk group had an 82% lower incidence of diabetes

  18. Risk Factors and Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Back to Patient Resources Risk Factors & Prevention Even people who look healthy and ... Blood Pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, and thyroid disease. Risk Factors For Arrhythmias and Heart Disease The following ...

  19. "It is not possible for me to have diabetes"-community perceptions on diabetes and its risk factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-06-12

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as 'sugar' or 'sweet-pee' disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture's concepts of diseases and risk factors.

  20. Footwear and foot care knowledge as risk factors for foot problems in Indian diabetics.

    PubMed

    Chandalia, H B; Singh, D; Kapoor, V; Chandalia, S H; Lamba, P S

    2008-10-01

    We assessed 300 diabetic and 100 age- and sex-matched controls for correlating foot wear practices and foot care knowledge and the presence of foot complications. A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease. Clinical evaluation was done by inspection of feet for presence of any external deformities, assessment of sensory function (vibration perception threshold, VPT), vascular status (foot pulses and ankle brachial ratio) and presence of any infection.In the diabetes category, 44.7% patients had not received previous foot care education. 0.6% walked barefoot outdoors and 45% walked barefoot indoors. Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors. Average duration of diabetes in the high-risk and low-risk diabetes group was 10.85 +/- 6.53 and 9.83 +/- 7.99 years, respectively. In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 +/- 11.26 and 15.20 +/- 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 +/- 0.19 and 1.14 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively.In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 +/- 10.39 and 8.36 +/- 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 +/- 0.18 and 1.15 +/- 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively.In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes.

  1. Environmental Risk Factors and Type 1 Diabetes: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Butalia, Sonia; Kaplan, Gilaad G; Khokhar, Bushra; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that results from the destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. The excess morbidity and mortality resulting from its complications, coupled with its increasing incidence, emphasize the importance of better understanding the causes of this condition. Over the past several decades, a substantive amount of work has been done and, although many advances have occurred in identifying disease-susceptibility genes, there has been a lag in understanding the environmental triggers. Several putative environmental risk factors have been proposed, including infections, dietary factors, air pollution, vaccines, location of residence, family environment and stress. However, most of these factors have been inconclusive, thus supporting the need for further study into the causes of type 1 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fracture risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and possible risk factors: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moayeri, Ardeshir; Mohamadpour, Mahmoud; Mousavi, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Shirzadpour, Ehsan; Mohamadpour, Safoura; Amraei, Mansour

    2017-01-01

    Aim Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have an increased risk of bone fractures. A variable increase in fracture risk has been reported depending on skeletal site, diabetes duration, study design, insulin use, and so on. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between T2DM with fracture risk and possible risk factors. Methods Different databases including PubMed, Institute for Scientific Information, and Scopus were searched up to May 2016. All epidemiologic studies on the association between T2DM and fracture risk were included. The relevant data obtained from these papers were analyzed by a random effects model and publication bias was assessed by funnel plot. All analyses were done by R software (version 3.2.1) and STATA (version 11.1). Results Thirty eligible studies were selected for the meta-analysis. We found a statistically significant positive association between T2DM and hip, vertebral, or foot fractures and no association between T2DM and wrist, proximal humerus, or ankle fractures. Overall, T2DM was associated with an increased risk of any fracture (summary relative risk =1.05, 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.06) and increased with age, duration of diabetes, and insulin therapy. Conclusion Our findings strongly support an association between T2DM and increased risk of overall fracture. These findings emphasize the need for fracture prevention strategies in patients with diabetes. PMID:28442913

  3. Risk factors associated to diabetes in Mexican population and phenotype of the individuals who will convert to diabetes.

    PubMed

    González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Dávila-Cervantes, Claudio Alberto; Zamora-Macorra, Mireya; Trejo-Valdivia, Belem; González-Villalpando, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    To describe risk factors associated to the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Mexican population and to define phenotypic (clinical, anthropometric, metabolic) characteristics present in the individual who will convert to diabetes, regardless of time of onset. The Mexico City Diabetes Study began in 1990, with 2 282 participants, and had three subsequent phases: 1994, 1998, and 2008. A systematic evaluation with an oral glucose tolerance test was performed in each phase. For diagnosis of T2D, American Diabetes Association criteria were used. The population at risk was 1939 individuals. Subjects who were in the converter stage (initially non diabetic that eventually converted to T2D) had, at baseline, higher BMI (30 vs 27), systolic blood pressure (119 vs 116 mmHg), fasting glucose (90 vs 82mg/dl), triglycerides (239 vs 196mg/dl), and cholesterol (192 vs 190mg/dl), compared with subjects who remained non converters (p<0.05). The phenotype described represents a potentially identifiable phase and a target for preventive intervention.

  4. [Control of cardiovascular risk factors among patients with diabetes with and without cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Herrero, A; Garzón, G; Gil, A; García, I; Vargas, E; Torres, N

    2015-10-01

    There is evidence that cardiovascular goals are beneficial in diabetes. To determine the distribution of cardiovascular risk levels in patients with diabetes and the clinical interventions they have received. Descriptive cross-sectional study. SERMAS (Madrid) 2010. All patients with diabetes. (n=41,096). Patients in primary or secondary prevention, metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors control, pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. Patient and professional variables. Around one-fifth (21.5%) (95%CI: 21.1% -21.9%) in secondary prevention (very high cardiovascular risk). HbA1c was under control in 31% (95%CI: 30.1%-32%), with 49.9% (95%CI: 48.8%-50.9%) with BP under control, and 39.4% (95% CI: 38.4%-40.4%) with LDL controlled. Only 8.9% (95%CI: 8.3%-9.5%) had a well-controlled HdA1c, BP and LDL, and in 19.8% (95%CI: 19%-20.6%) none of these were under control. Of those with an uncontrolled BP, 23.6% (95% CI: 23.2%-24%) had antihypertensive drugs. There was better control in patients older than 70 years, and those who lived in an urban center, or a lower number of patients per day. In diabetic patients with very high cardiovascular risk (secondary prevention), just half of them had good control of cardiovascular risk factors (BP and LDL). An association was found between better control and older than 70, urban center or lower number of patients per day. This suggests developing strategies to promote a comprehensive control of cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients in secondary prevention. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Scanning laser edema index: a reliable tool to correlate with diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors?

    PubMed

    Peyman, Mohammadreza; Tajunisah, Iqbal; Loo, Angela; Chuah, Khai Choon; Subrayan, Visvaraja

    2012-01-01

    To correlate Heidelberg Retina Tomograph (HRT) derived macular edema (DME) index with severity of diabetic retinopathy and systemic factors. A total of 300 diabetic patients were recruited for the study for each of them a value for the macular edema index was obtained using the HRT II. Patients' age, gender, duration and type of diabetes mellitus, latest HbA1c result and presence or absence of co-morbid factors (hypertension, ischemic heart disease, nephropathy) were recorded together with the stage of diabetic retinopathy. These were correlated with DME. Out of 300 patients, HRT defined macula edema was seen in 68 patients (22.6%). There is a wider and higher range (95% percentile) of macula edema index in the severe non proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group. Independent samples t test showed significant difference between the severe NPDR group and no DR group (p<0.001), mild NPDR group (p<0.05) and moderate NPDR group (p<0.05). A higher macula edema index was also found to have a low degree of correlation with more advanced stages of retinopathy (r=0.310; p<0.001). Also nephropathy showed a strong and significant correlation with DME. Hypertension had moderately significant correlation with DME. This study found no correlation between ischemic heart disease and DME. HRT derived scanning laser edema index is a reliable objective tool to evaluate diabetic retinopathy and systemic risk factors.

  6. [Risk factors for the development of persistent proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Kulenović, Indira

    2002-01-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy is well defined in type 1 diabetes, but to a lesser degree in type 2 diabetes, possibly due to diversity of involved risk-factors. The main aim of the study was to assess modifiable and nonmodifiable risk-factors in the development of persistent proteinuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A random sample of 90 diabetic patients, regularly checked up at the Department of Endocrinology, was selected and followed up in a period of 5 years. There were 46 males and 44 females, aged 51.8 +/- 9.9 years, with average duration of disease of 6.8 +/- 5.2 years, including 58 (64.4%) hypertensive patients and 58 (64.4%) smokers. All the participants had fasting and postprandial glycaemia, Hbalc, 24/hour proteinuria and blood pressure measured. Only 4 (4.4%) persons had 24/h proteinuria > 200 mg/d at the beginning of the study. In a 5 year period, 21 (23.3%) patient developed proteinuria of > 200 mg/d. The main prognostic factors were Hbalc values (RR 3.5, p = 0.03), duration of the disease (RR 3.1, p = 0.02), hypertension (RR 2.9, p = 0.02), with stronger impact of diastolic than systolic values (RR 2.01 vs RR 1.83), age (RR 1.35, p = 0.02), glycaemia with stronger correlation of postprandial than fasting values (RR 1.52 vs 1.34), smoking (RR 1.26, p = 0.06) while sex and BMI values were not strongly associated with the development of the proteinuria (RR 1.09 and RR 1.01 respectively). Results indicate that, in addition to glycemic control, control of additional modifiable risk-factors, particularly hypertension and smoking, is of utmost importance in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Utility of Childhood Glucose Homeostasis Variables in Predicting Adult Diabetes and Related Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quoc Manh; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Xu, Ji-Hua; Chen, Wei; Kieltyka, Lyn; Berenson, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examines the usefulness of childhood glucose homeostasis variables (glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance index [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance {HOMA-IR}]) in predicting pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes and related cardiometabolic risk factors in adulthood. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This retrospective cohort study consisted of normoglycemic (n = 1,058), pre-diabetic (n = 37), and type 2 diabetic (n = 25) adults aged 19–39 years who were followed on average for 17 years since childhood. RESULTS At least 50% of the individuals who ranked highest (top quintile) in childhood for glucose homeostasis variables maintained their high rank by being above the 60th percentile in adulthood. In a multivariate model, the best predictors of adulthood glucose homeostasis variables were the change in BMI Z score from childhood to adulthood and childhood BMI Z score, followed by the corresponding childhood levels of glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR. Further, children in the top decile versus the rest for insulin and HOMA-IR were 2.85 and 2.55 times, respectively, more likely to develop pre-diabetes; children in the top decile versus the rest for glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR were 3.28, 5.54, and 5.84 times, respectively, more likely to develop diabetes, independent of change in BMI Z score, baseline BMI Z score, and total-to-HDL cholesterol ratio. In addition, children with adverse levels (top quintile versus the rest) of glucose homeostasis variables displayed significantly higher prevalences of, among others, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Adverse levels of glucose homeostasis variables in childhood not only persist into adulthood but also predict adult pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes and relate to cardiometabolic risk factors. PMID:20009096

  8. Diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for cancer: stress or viral etiology?

    PubMed

    Cebioglu, Melanie; Schild, Hans H; Golubnitschaja, Olga

    2008-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder. Currently over 230 million patients demonstrate already an epidemic scale of the disease. It is a lifelong progressive disease with a high mortality worldwide: every 10 seconds one patient dies on DM-related consequences. Whereas cardio-vascular complications are well-known for DM, it is relatively new consideration that diabetic patients are highly predisposed to cancer. Particularities of molecular pathomechanisms of cancer in diabetes are currently largely unclear. Disturbed glucose/insulin homeostasis is DM-specific stress factor resulting in increased production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and oxidative damage to chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA frequently observed in diabetic patients. Long-term accumulation of DNA mutations is well-acknowledged as triggering cancer. DNA-repair is highly energy consuming process which provokes increased mitochondrial activity. Particularly dangerous is a provoked activity of damaged mitochondria which leads to the "vicious circle" lowing energy supply and potentiating ROS production. Mitochondrial dysfunction is the well-acknowledged risk factor for neuro/degenerative diseases--one of possible pathomechanisms for various complications developed secondary to diabetes. At the same time, mitochondrial dysfunction might be implicated in pathomechanisms of diabetes-provoked cancer. There is a growing body of evidence that DM predisposes to almost all cancer types with some particular preferences. Frequently suffering from compromised immune response, diabetic patients is high-risk group for infectious disorders including viral infections. In its turn, viral infections are known to be implicated in cancer pathology. This review considers both stress and viral infections as possible etiology of cancer in diabetes.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetes and diabetic retinopathy: results from the Nigeria national blindness and visual impairment survey.

    PubMed

    Kyari, Fatima; Tafida, Abubakar; Sivasubramaniam, Selvaraj; Murthy, Gudlavalleti V S; Peto, Tunde; Gilbert, Clare E

    2014-12-18

    In Nigeria, urbanisation and increasing life expectancy are likely to increase the incidence of non-communicable diseases. As the epidemic of diabetes matures, visual loss from diabetic retinopathy (DR) will increase unless mechanisms for early detection and treatment improve, and health systems respond to the growing burden of non-communicable diseases. A nationally-representative population-based sample of 13,591 participants aged ≥40 years selected by multistage-stratified-cluster-random-sampling with probability-proportional-to-size procedures were examined in 305 clusters in Nigeria between January 2005 to June 2007. All were asked about history of diabetes and underwent basic eye examination. Visual acuity (VA) was measured using logMAR E-chart. Participants with VA<6/12 and/or DR detected underwent detailed eye examination including dilated retinal examination and retinal photography. Systematic sampling of 1-in-7 gave a subsample (n=1759) examined in detail regardless of VA; and had random blood glucose (RBG) testing. Images were graded by Moorfields Eye Hospital Reading Centre. Participants were defined as having diabetes if they were previously diagnosed or RBG>11.1mmol/l or had DR. Data in the subsample were used to estimate the prevalence and to analyse risk factors for diabetes and DR using multivariable logistic regression. Additional information on the types of DR was obtained from participants not in the subsample. In the subsample, 164 participants were excluded due to missing data; and 1,595 analysed. 52/1,595 had diabetes, a prevalence of 3.3% (95%CI 2.5-4.3%); and 25/52(48%) did not know. Media opacity in 8/52 precluded retinal examination. 9/44(20.5%) had DR. Higher prevalence of diabetes was associated with urban residence (Odds ratio [OR]1.87) and overweight/obesity (OR3.02/4.43 respectively). Although not statistically significant, DR was associated with hypertension (OR3.49) and RBG>15.0mmol/L (OR8.10). Persons with diabetes had 3 times

  10. Estimating risk factors and perinatal outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in teen mothers.

    PubMed

    Baker, Arthur M; Haeri, Sina

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to identify potentially modifiable risk factors and outcomes for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in a contemporary American teen population. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of all teenage deliveries (≤18 years old) at one institution over a 4-year period with documented oral glucose tolerance testing. All cases of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance were identified using the Carpenter and Coustan diagnostic criteria and compared with teenage mothers with normal glucose tolerance testing. Of the 670 included teen deliveries, 668 were either African American or Hispanic/Latino; 31 (5%) were diagnosed with gestational diabetes (n = 5) or impaired glucose tolerance (n = 26). Higher maternal prepregnancy body mass index (34.3 ± 7.8 vs 30.3 ± 6.4, p = 0.001) and morbid obesity (body mass index ≥ 35 kg/m(2) , RR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) were associated with gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance. There was no association with weight gain above the Institute of Medicine recommended levels (RR 1.6, 95% CI 0.77-3.4). On postpregnancy follow up, three of the five (60%) teens with gestational diabetes and none of the 26 (0%) teens with impaired glucose tolerance were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Higher prepregnancy body mass index, especially morbid obesity, places the gravid teen at higher risk for development of gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy. The potentially modifiable nature of these risk factors coupled with the emerging teen obesity epidemic underscores the need for increased public health focus on this problem. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Diabetic retinopathy: global prevalence, major risk factors, screening practices and public health challenges: a review.

    PubMed

    Ting, Daniel Shu Wei; Cheung, Gemmy Chui Ming; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of vision loss in middle-aged and elderly people globally. Early detection and prompt treatment allow prevention of diabetes-related visual impairment. Patients with diabetes require regular follow-up with primary care physicians to optimize their glycaemic, blood pressure and lipid control to prevent development and progression of DR and other diabetes-related complications. Other risk factors of DR include higher body mass index, puberty and pregnancy, and cataract surgery. There are weaker associations with some genetic and inflammatory markers. With the rising incidence and prevalence of diabetes and DR, public health systems in both developing and developed countries will be faced with increasing costs of implementation and maintenance of a DR screening program for people with diabetes. To reduce the impact of DR-related visual loss, it is important that all stakeholders continue to look for innovative ways of managing and preventing diabetes, and optimize cost-effective screening programs within the community. © 2015 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  12. Diabetic nephropathy--a review of the natural history, burden, risk factors and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Ayodele, Olugbenga E.; Alebiosu, C. Olutayo; Salako, Babatunde L.

    2004-01-01

    The earliest clinical evidence of diabetic nephropathy is microalbuminuria. Progression from microalbuminuria to overt nephropathy occurs in 20-40% within a 10-year period with approximately 20% of these patients progressing to end-stage renal disease. End-stage renal disease develops in 50% of type-1 diabetes patients with overt nephropathy within 10 years and in more than 75% by 20 years in the absence of treatment. In type-2 diabetes, a greater proportion of patients have microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy at or shortly after diagnosis of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes is increasing worldwide, with subsequent increase in the incidence of diabetic nephropathy. The risk factors identified in the development of DN from longitudinal and cross-sectional studies include race, genetic susceptibility, hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperfiltration, smoking, advanced age, male sex, and high-protein diet. Treatment interventions in diabetic nephropathy include glycemic control, treatment of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cessation of smoking, protein restriction, and renal replacement therapy. Multifactorial approach includes combined therapy targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, microalbuminuria, and dyslipidemia. PMID:15586648

  13. Evaluation of oxidative stress markers and vascular risk factors in patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    El Boghdady, Noha Ahmed; Badr, Gamal Ali

    2012-06-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common diabetic chronic complications. The pathogenesis of DPN is complex and involves an intertwined array of mechanisms. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the association of oxidative stress and vascular risk factors with the prevalence of DPN and to determine the role of these biochemical parameters in the prognosis of DPN. One hundred patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 40 clinically healthy individuals were evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 included 40 diabetic patients without peripheral neuropathy, and group 2 consisted of 60 patients with DPN. Erythrocytes glutathione (GSH) level, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrite/nitrate (NOx) and homocysteine (Hcy) levels as well as serum ceruloplasmin (Cp), total antioxidants (TAO), endothelin-1 (ET-1) levels and γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) activity were estimated. A significant decrease of erythrocyte GSH was observed in groups 1 and 2 relative to the controls. An increase in glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), MDA, NOx, GGT, Cp, TAO, Hcy and ET-1 was noted in patients with DPN. In conclusion, oxidative stress biomarkers and vascular risk factors could be important in the pathogenesis of DPN. The measurement of serum GGT and Hcy in addition to HbA1c and disease duration could facilitate the early detection of neuropathy in diabetic patients.

  14. [Cardiovascular risk factors in children with type 1 diabetes and their relationship with the glycemic control].

    PubMed

    Abregu, Adela V; Carrizo, Teresita del R; Prado, Maria M; Velarde, Maria S; Diaz, Elba I; Perez Aguilar, Rossana C; Fonio, Maria C; Bazan, Maria C

    2005-01-01

    Diabetics have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this work was to evaluate the cardiovascular risk factors in infant-juvenile type 1 diabetics and their association with the degree of glycemic control. A total of 52 patients, aged 5-15 years, were studied and compared with 37 control subjects. The degree of glycemic control, lipid profile, plasma fibrinogen, microalbuminuria and blood pressure were investigated. The patients were grouped in diabetics with good glycemic control [DGGC, glycosilated hemoglobin (HbA1c) < 8%] and poor glycemic control [DPGC, HA1c > or = 8%]. Diabetic patients presented incremented values of total cholesterol (4.1 +/- 0.9 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/l, p = 0.0008), LDL-cholesterol (2.4 +/- 0.9 vs. 1.7 +/- 0.7 mmol/l, p = 0.0001), HDL-cholesterol (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.2 mmol/l, p = 0.0002), with respect to control group. Eighty three per cent of diabetics showed a poor glycemic control. There were not significant differences in lipid profile between DGGC and DPGC, excepting HDL-cholesterol which was higher in DPGC group (p = 0.007). Plasma fibrinogen levels were similar in diabetics and controls, but they were higher in DPGC than in DGGC (265 +/- 46 vs. 229 +/- 22 mg/dl, p = 0.02). Three patients with microalbuminuria and none with hypertension were detected. In these patients the most pronounced risk factors for CVD were dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, which justify the need for the early detection of these factors as well as strict metabolic control.

  15. [Risk factors for fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    García-De la Torre, J I; Rodríguez-Valdez, A; Delgado-Rosas, A

    2016-03-01

    Fetal macrosomia is birth weight of 4,000 grams or more, regardless of gestational age, in Mexico representing about 5.4%. Associated with multiple demographic, physiological, metabolic and genetic factors of each population. Determine the risk factors associated with the development of fetal macrosomia in patients without gestational diabetes mellitus. Retrospective, descriptive and comparative study of patients who came to delivery from January 2012 to June 2014, 88 patients, 23 patients with diagnosis of macrosomia, and 65 patients without macrosomia without gestational diabetes mellitus were included. An incidence of fetal macrosomia of 18.6%. Risk factors such as parity, history of fetal macrosomia, maternal age, maternal height more to 1.70 meters showed no difference, the percentage of overweight 105% showed 69% vs 52% on the control group and gestational diabetes screening altered that present 30.4 vs 20%. Increased incidence of macrosomia was demonstrated in patients with metabolic factors such as the percentage of overweight and screening altered gestational diabetes mellitus, as they showed higher prevalence in the study group, all modifiable with preconception nutritional management and during pregnancy, to reduce initial weight and weight gain, improved fasting and postprandial blood glucose in patients with positive screening and negative tolerance curve carbohydrates to maintain fetal growth curve with in the percentiles.

  16. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Increase the Risks of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to examine whether poor glycemic control, measured by glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) and other cardiovascular risk factors, can predict diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM).Patients aged ≥30 years with type 2 DM, enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, and free of DPN (n = 37,375) in the period 2002 to 2004 were included and followed up until 2011. The related factors were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression models.For an average follow-up of 7.00 years, 8379 cases of DPN were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 32.04/1000 person-years. After multivariate adjustment, patients with HbA1c levels 7 to 8%, 8 to 9%, 9 to 10%, and ≥10% exhibited higher risk of DPN (adjusted HR: 1.11 [1.04-1.20], 1.30 [1.21-1.40], 1.32 [1.22-1.43], and 1.62 [1.51-1.74], respectively) compared with patients with HbA1c level 6 to 7%. There was a significant linear trend in DPN incidence with increasing HbA1c (P < 0.001) and significant HRs of DPN for patients with HbA1c level ≥7%, blood pressure ≥130/85 mm Hg, triglycerides (TG) ≥150 mg/dL, high density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) <40 mg/dL in males and <50 mg/dL in females, low density of lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥100 mg/dL, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min/1.73 m.Patients with type 2 DM and HbA1c ≥7.0% exhibit increased risk of DPN, demonstrating a linear relationship. The incidence of DPN is also associated with poor glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension, hyper-triglyceridemia, low HDL-C, high LDL-C, and decreased eGFR.

  17. Antidepressant Medication as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Katharine; Peveler, Robert C.; Holt, Richard I.G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Antidepressant use has risen sharply over recent years. Recent concerns that antidepressants may adversely affect glucose metabolism require investigation. Our aim was to assess the risk of type 2 diabetes associated with antidepressants through a systematic review. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data sources were MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, meeting abstracts of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, American Diabetes Association, and Diabetes UK, Current Controlled Trials, ClinicalTrials.gov, U.K. Clinical Research Network, scrutiny of bibliographies of retrieved articles, and contact with relevant experts. Relevant studies of antidepressant effects were included. Key outcomes were diabetes incidence and change in blood glucose (fasting and random). RESULTS Three systemic reviews and 22 studies met the inclusion criteria. Research designs included 1 case series and 21 observational studies comprising 4 cross-sectional, 5 case-control, and 12 cohort studies. There was evidence that antidepressant use is associated with type 2 diabetes. Causality is not established, but rather, the picture is confused, with some antidepressants linked to worsening glucose control, particularly with higher doses and longer duration, others linked with improved control, and yet more with mixed results. The more recent, larger studies, however, suggest a modest effect. Study quality was variable. CONCLUSIONS Although evidence exists that antidepressant use may be an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, long-term prospective studies of the effects of individual antidepressants rather than class effects are required. Heightened alertness to potential risks is necessary until these are complete. PMID:24065841

  18. Diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors at the university hospital in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, Lizette

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of diabetic retinopathy and its risk factors in diabetic patients attending the eye clinic at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). This was a prospective cohort study of diabetic outpatients attending the Eye Clinic at the UHWI. Data were collected on age, gender, type of diabetes mellitus (DM), type of diabetic retinopathy, other ocular diseases, visual acuity, blood glucose and blood pressure. There were 104 patients (208 eyes) recruited for this study. There were 58.6% (61/104) females (mean age 53.6 ± 11.9 years) and 41.4% (43/104) males (mean age 61.7 ± 12.1 years). Type II DM was present in 68.3% (56% were females) of the patients and Type I DM was present in 31.7% (69.7% were females). Most patients (66%) were compliant with their diabetic medications. The mean blood glucose was 11.4 ± 5.3 mmol/L. Elevated blood pressure (<130/80) was present in 82.7% of patients. The mean visual acuity was 20/160 (logMAR 0.95 ± 1.1). The frequency of diabetic retinopathy was 78%; 29.5% had background retinopathy, and 50.5% of eyes had proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) of which 34% had tractional retinal detachments. The odds ratio of developing PDR was 1.88 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.02-3.3) for Type I DM compared to 0.74 (95% CI: 0.55-0.99) for Type II DM. PDR was more prevalent in females (χ(2), P = 0.009) in both Type I and II DM. Jamaica has a high frequency of PDR which is more common in Type I diabetics and females. This was associated with poor glucose and blood pressure control.

  19. Diabetic retinopathy in Tanzania: prevalence and risk factors at entry into a regional screening programme.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Charles R; Burton, Matthew J; Hall, Claudette; Hall, Anthony; Courtright, Paul; Makupa, William U; Philippin, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    The number of adults with diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is expected to almost double by 2035. This study investigated the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and its risk factors at entry into a community-based screening programme. All persons with diabetes screened for retinopathy at entry into a screening programme in Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania between November 2010 and December 2014 were included. Fundus photographs were taken with a Topcon retinal camera following pupil dilation. Data were collected on BP, random blood sugar, duration of diabetes, BMI and visual acuity on entry. A total of 3187 persons were screened for DR. The prevalence of any DR was 27.9% (95%CI 26.4-29.5%) with background diabetic retinopathy (BDR), pre-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PPDR) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) having a prevalence of 19.1% (95% CI 17.7-20.4%), 6.0% (95%CI 5.2-6.8%) and 2.9% (95%CI 2.3-3.5%), respectively. Maculopathy was present in 16.1% (95%CI 14.8-17.4%) of participants. Multivariable logistic regression analysis for the presence of any DR found independent associations with duration of diabetes (P < 0.0001), systolic BP (P < 0.0001), random blood sugar (P < 0.0001) and attending a government hospital diabetic clinic (P = 0.0339). This study is the first to present data from a DR screening programme in SSA. The results will provide policymakers with data to aid planning of DR screening and treatment services in the African region. The study highlights the importance of managing comorbidities within DR screening programmes. © 2015 The Authors Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Changing Impact of Modifiable Risk Factors on the Incidence of Major Outcomes of Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Rachel G.; Secrest, Aaron M.; Ellis, Demetrius; Becker, Dorothy J.; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The incidence of type 1 diabetes complications appears to be decreasing, but relative contributions of risk factors are unclear. We thus estimated the effect of modifiable risk factors on the incidence of a composite end point, major outcomes of diabetes (MOD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) Study was used to derive two cohorts based on diabetes diagnosis year (1960–1969 and 1970–1980). Baseline exam data in the current analysis for the 1960s group were collected in 1986–1988 and for the 1970s in 1996–1998. Each group was followed for 8 years for MOD incidence (diabetes-related death, myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure/blockage ≥50%, stroke, end-stage renal disease, blindness, and amputation). Assessed risk factors include the following: HbA1c, hypertension, microalbuminuria, BMI, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking. Accelerated failure time models were used to estimate the acceleration factor. RESULTS MOD incidence decreased in the 1970s cohort (15.8% [95% CI 11.6–21.4]) compared with the 1960s (22.6% [17.0–29.1]) over the 8-year follow-up (P = 0.06). Hypertension and microalbuminuria were associated with significantly accelerated MOD incidence in both cohorts (P < 0.01 for both). High HbA1c (P = 0.0005), hypercholesterolemia (P = 0.01), and current smoking (P = 0.003) significantly accelerated the incidence of MOD in the 1960s but not 1970s cohort. BMI was not associated with MOD in either cohort. CONCLUSIONS These results suggest that hypertension and microalbuminuria remain important predictors of complications that are not being adequately addressed. PMID:24170748

  1. Risk factors for cardiovascular calcifications in non-diabetic Caucasian haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Schlieper, Georg; Brandenburg, Vincent; Djuric, Zivka; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Markovic, Natasa; Schurgers, Leon; Kruger, Thilo; Westenfeld, Ralf; Ackermann, Diana; Haselhuhn, Angelika; Dimkovic, Sinisa; Ketteler, Markus; Floege, Jurgen; Dimkovic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis patients display an increased mortality which is associated with cardiovascular calcifications. Diabetes mellitus and ethnicity are known factors that affect the extent of cardiovascular calcifications. However, most studies have investigated mixed cohorts with diabetics and/or mixed ethnicity. Cardiovascular calcifications were assessed in non-diabetic Caucasian haemodialysis patients by the semiquantitative Adragao calcification score (X-ray pelvis and hands) and a novel composite calcification score encompassing the Adragao score as well as calcifications detected by X-ray of the fistula arm, echocardiography of heart valves and carotid ultrasound. Using multivariate analysis, age, male gender, dialysis vintage, lower Kt/V, calcium-phosphate product, smoking and high-sensitivity CRP were independent risk factors for cardiovascular calcifications as assessed by the Adragao or the composite score. Pulse wave velocity was independently related to both calcification scores. Body mass index, cholesterol, triglycerides, iPTH and serum levels of fetuin-A and uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein were not associated with cardiovascular calcifications. In our cohort of non-diabetic Caucasian haemodialysis patients, age, male gender, dialysis vintage, smoking, calcium-phosphate product, high-sensitivity CRP and lower Kt/V were independent risk factors for cardiovascular calcifications. Whether lowering the calcium-phosphate product and increasing dialysis efficiency can reduce cardiovascular calcifications in dialysis patients remains to be determined. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The New Zealand Diabetes Passport Study: a randomized controlled trial of the impact of a diabetes passport on risk factors for diabetes-related complications.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D; Gamble, G D; Foote, S; Cole, D R; Coster, G

    2004-03-01

    To assess the efficacy (change in HbA1c) of a patient-held communication, self-empowerment and educational device for people with diabetes (the New Zealand Diabetes Passport) in patients with poor glycaemic control. A 12-month, multicentre, general practice-based randomized controlled trial in urban, provincial and rural New Zealand involving 398 people with poorly controlled Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. The intervention included a specifically designed and piloted New Zealand Diabetes Passport including information relating to diabetes knowledge, self-assessments, and guidance concerning how to engage with diabetes health professionals. The primary end point was change in HbA1c. Assessments were made at 0, 6 and 12 months. Two hundred and twenty-two patients received the Passport, 176 the control booklet, coming from 69 and 66 general practitioners, respectively. Use of the Passport was associated with a relative reduction in HbA1c of 0.4% (P = 0.017) and a relative increase in weight of 1.0 kg/m2 (P = 0.028), but no changes in diabetes knowledge, attitudes to diabetes or risk factors for diabetic tissue damage. The dissemination of the New Zealand Diabetes Passport, in isolation, was not associated with improvements in either diabetes knowledge or self-empowerment. While a small improvement in glycaemic control occurred, this was probably due to changes in insulin therapy in the intervention group. It is possible that linking the use of the Passport with other behavioural and educational interventions may make the Passport more useful. Further study is required to confirm the effect of such multifaceted interventions.

  3. Childhood maltreatment as a risk factor for diabetes: findings from a population-based survey of Canadian adults.

    PubMed

    Shields, Margot E; Hovdestad, Wendy E; Pelletier, Catherine; Dykxhoorn, Jennifer L; O'Donnell, Siobhan C; Tonmyr, Lil

    2016-08-25

    It is well established that childhood maltreatment (CM) is a risk factor for various mental and substance use disorders. To date, however, little research has focused on the possible long-term physical consequences of CM. Diabetes is a chronic disease, for which an association with CM has been postulated. Based on data from a sample of 21,878 men and women from the 2012 Canadian Community Health Survey - Mental Health (CCHS - MH), this study examines associations between three types of CM (childhood physical abuse (CPA), childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and childhood exposure to intimate partner violence (CEIPV)) and diabetes in adulthood. Multiple logistic regression models were used to examine associations between CM and diabetes controlling for the effects of socio-demographic characteristics and risk factors for type 2 diabetes. When controlling socio-demographic characteristics, diabetes was significantly associated with reports of severe and frequent CPA (OR = 1.8) and severe and frequent CSA (OR = 2.2). A dose-response relationship was observed when co-occurrence of CSA and CPA was considered with the strongest association with diabetes being observed when both severe and frequent CSA and CPA were reported (OR = 2.6). Controlling for type 2 diabetes risk factors attenuated associations particularly for CPA. CEIPV was not significantly associated with having diabetes in adulthood. CPA and CSA are risk factors for diabetes. For the most part, associations between CPA and diabetes are mediated via risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Failure to consider severity and frequency of abuse may limit our understanding of the importance of CM as a risk factor for diabetes.

  4. Risk factors of diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dafaalla, Mohamed D; Nimir, Mohammed N; Mohammed, Mosab I; Ali, Omer A; Hussein, Abbashar

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to stratify the possible risk factors for diabetic cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN). We did a meta-analysis of risk factors of CAN. We did a web-based search for literature in MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus database and CENTRAL database up to August 2015. We included clinical trials or cohort studies that provide data about relationship between CAN and variables of interest. Our risk factors of interest were age, sex, duration of diabetes, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (sBP) and diastolic blood pressure (dBP), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (HDL and LDL), triglycerides, retinopathy and nephropathy. We generated Forest plots, χ(2) test and I(2) as tests for heterogeneity, risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), CIs and p values by ReVMan V.5.3 software. We found a total of 882 related items. We excluded 873 studies from the title and abstract and 4 studies after review of full reports. Four studies were included. Our meta-analysis showed significant association between CAN and age (MD=4.94 (3.46 to 6.42)), duration of diabetes (MD=4.51 (2.51 to 6.52)), HbA1c (MD=0.48 (0.28 to 0.67)), BMI (MD=0.55 (0.08 to 1.01)), serum triglycerides (MD=0.09 (0.01 to 0.17)), proliferative retinopathy (RR=3.69 (1.20 to 11.34)), microalbuminuria (RR=2.47 (1.43 to 4.29)), hypertension (RR=4.18 (2.52 to 6.91)) and sBP (MD=4.10 (2.20 to 6.00)). We neither discovered the absence of significant association between the development of CAN and male sex (RR=1.57 (0.45 to 5.39)), dBP (MD=0.89 (-0.36 to 2.14)), cholesterol level (MD=1.19 (-0.99 to 3.36)), LDL (MD=0.12 (-0.15 to 0.39)), nor HDL level (MD=-0.28 (-0.58 to 0.03)). Age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c, BMI, serum triglycerides, proliferative retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hypertension and sBP are directly related to the risk of development of diabetic CAN.

  5. Revision Rate and Risk Factors After Lower Extremity Amputation in Diabetic or Dysvascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Wanivenhaus, Florian; Mauler, Flavien; Stelzer, Teresa; Tschopp, Alois; Böni, Thomas; Berli, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the revision rate and possible risk factors for lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were collected from 421 patients with diabetes mellitus or PAD who underwent amputations of the lower extremity at the authors' institution from 2002 to 2012. There was a 25.2% overall revision rate. Mean time from amputation to revision was 244 days (range, 2-2590 days). Patients with diabetes mellitus had a significantly higher rate of revision to a more proximal level compared with patients without diabetes mellitus (type 1: odds ratio [OR]=3.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-11.52; P=.022; and type 2: OR=2.3; 95% CI, 1.07-4.95; P=.033). A significant increase in revision rates was observed from Fontaine stage 0 to IV (stage 0: 17.9%; stage IV, 34.7%; P=.03). Risk factors for revision were diabetic nephropathy (OR=2.26; 95% CI, 1.4-3.63; P=.001) and polyneuropathy (OR=1.68; 95% CI, 1.03-2.73; P=.037). Patients who underwent revision amputation had a significantly younger mean age than patients who did not undergo revision amputation (65.23 years [range, 40-92 years] vs 68.52 years [range, 32-96 years]; P=.013). Anticipated amputation in this patient population requires a multidisciplinary approach with optimization of the patient's health. In the authors' clinical practice, the determination of the appropriate amputation level is performed individually for each patient, considering the risk factors identified in this study and the patient's expected mobilization potential, social background, and acceptance of a more proximal primary amputation level.

  6. [Risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Xu, B; Yang, C Z; Wu, S B; Zhang, D; Wang, L N; Xiao, L; Chen, Y; Wang, C R; Tong, A; Zhou, X F; Li, X H; Guan, X H

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore the risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot. Methods: The clinical data of 1 771 patients with diabetic foot at the Air Force General Hospital of PLA from November 2001 to April 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into the non-amputation and amputation groups. Within the amputation group, subjects were further divided into the minor and major amputation subgroups. Binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between risk factors and lower extremity amputation. Results: Among 1 771 patients with diabetic foot, 323 of them (18.24%) were in the amputation group (major amputation: 41; minor amputation: 282) and 1 448 (81.76%) in the non-amputation group. Compared with non-amputation patients, those in the amputation group had a longer hospital stay and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate(eGFR)levels. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), C-reaction protein (CRP), ESR, ferritin, fibrinogen and WBC levels of the amputation group were higher, while hemoglobin albumin, transferrin, TC, TG, HDL-C and LDL-C were lower than those of the non-amputation group (all P<0.05). The proportion of hypertension(52.48% vs 59.98%), peripheral vascular disease (PAD)(68.11% vs 25.04%), and coronary heart disease(21.33% vs 28.71%)were different between the amputation and non-amputation groups (all P<0.05). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed that Wagner's grade, PAD and CRP were the independent risk factors associated with lower extremity amputation in hospitalized patients with diabetic foot. Conclusion: Wagner's grade, ischemia of lower limbs and infection are closely associated with amputation of diabetic foot patients.

  7. Risk factors for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables1

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adman Câmara Soares; Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; de Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; de Almeida, Paulo César; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables. Method cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected. Results the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000), age (p=0.004) and marital status (p=0.012), as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018) and marital status (p=0.007) and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033). Conclusion distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight. PMID:25029061

  8. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students: association with sociodemographic variables.

    PubMed

    Lima, Adman Câmara Soares; Araújo, Márcio Flávio Moura; Freitas, Roberto Wagner Júnior Freire de; Zanetti, Maria Lúcia; Almeida, Paulo César de; Damasceno, Marta Maria Coelho

    2014-01-01

    identify the modifiable risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus in college students and associate these factors with their sociodemographic variables. cross-sectional study, involving 702 college students from Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, physical exercise data and blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose levels were collected. the most prevalent risk factor was sedentariness, followed by overweight, central obesity, high fasting plasma glucose and arterial hypertension. A statistically significant association was found between overweight and sex (p=0.000), age (p=0.004) and marital status (p=0.012), as well as between central obesity and age (p=0.018) and marital status (p=0.007) and between high fasting plasma glucose and sex (p=0.033). distinct risk factors were present in the study population, particularly sedentariness and overweight.

  9. Obesity, Diabetes, and Other Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Native Populations of South America.

    PubMed

    Ingaramo, Roberto A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in both developed and developing countries. In South America, the native population comprises a great number of different ethnic groups. The cardiovascular risk factors observed in these groups have proved similar to and even higher than those found in general non-native populations. Relatively recent epidemiologic information reveals that many native communities have healthy habits with low prevalence of risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes, while their prevalence is higher in those who have kept close contact with non-native populations and have westernized their habits. The differences in the presence of risk factors in these populations have been explained as the result of several interacting factors including genetic to environmental, socioeconomic, and cultural causes.

  10. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Gestational Diabetes Prevalence and Contribution of Common Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Pu, Jia; Zhao, Beinan; Wang, Elsie J; Nimbal, Vani; Osmundson, Sarah; Kunz, Liza; Popat, Rita A; Chung, Sukyung; Palaniappan, Latha P

    2015-09-01

    The White House, the American Heart Association, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute have all recently acknowledged the need to disaggregate Asian American subgroups to better understand this heterogeneous racial group. This study aims to assess racial/ethnic differences in relative contribution of risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) among Asian subgroups (Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese), Hispanics, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanic whites. Pregnant women in 2007-2012 were identified through California state birth certificate records and linked to the electronic health records in a large mixed-payer ambulatory care organisation in Northern California (n = 24 195). Relative risk and population attributable fraction (PAF) for specific racial/ethnic groups were calculated to assess the contributions of advanced maternal age, overweight/obesity (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) standards and World Health Organization (WHO)/American Diabetes Association (ADA) body mass index cut-offs for Asians), family history of type 2 diabetes, and foreign-born status. GDM was most prevalent among Asian Indians (19.3%). Relative risks were similar across all race/ethnic groups. Advanced maternal age had higher PAFs in non-Hispanic whites (22.5%) and Hispanics (22.7%). Meanwhile family history (Asian Indians 22.6%, Chinese 22.9%) and foreign-borne status (Chinese 40.2%, Filipinos 30.2%) had higher PAFs in Asian subgroups. Overweight/obesity was the most important GDM risk factor for non-Hispanic whites, Hispanics, Asian Indians, and Filipinos when the WHO/ADA cut-off points were applied. Advanced maternal age was the only risk factor studied that was modified by race/ethnicity, with non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women being more adversely affected than other racial/ethnic groups. Overweight/obesity, advanced maternal age, family history of type 2

  11. Prevalence and risk factors accounting for true silent myocardial ischemia: a pilot case-control study comparing type 2 diabetic with non-diabetic control subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Given the elevated risk of cardiovascular events and the higher prevalence of silent coronary artery disease (CAD) in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients, the need to screen asymptomatic diabetic patients for CAD assumes increasing importante. The aims of the study were to assess prospectively the prevalence and risk factor predictors of true silent myocardial ischemia (myocardial perfusion defects in the absence of both angina and ST-segment depression) in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Stress myocardial perfusion gated SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) was carried out in 41 type 2 diabetic patients without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 41 nondiabetic patients matched by age and gender. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding either the classic CVD risk factors or left ventricular function. True silent ischemia was detected in 21.9% of diabetic patients but only in 2.4% of controls (p < 0.01). The presence of myocardial perfusion defects was independently associated with male gender and the presence of diabetic retinopathy (DR). The probability of having myocardial perfusion defects in an asymptomatic diabetic patient with DR in comparison with diabetic patients without DR was 11.7 [IC95%: 3.7-37]. Conclusions True silent myocardial ischemia is a high prevalent condition in asymptomatic type 2 diabetic patients. Male gender and the presence of DR are the risk factors related to its development. PMID:21255408

  12. [A brief of gestational diabetes mellitus, risk factors and current criteria of diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Al-Aissa, Zahra; Hadarits, Orsolya; Rosta, Klára; Zóka, András; Rigó, János; Firneisz, Gábor; Somogyi, Anikó

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic disorders that may cause pathological pregnancy. Treating diabetes recognized during pregnancy results in lowering maternal and fetal complications. These patients present higher risk for excessive weight gain, preeclampsia, delivery with cesarean sections, high risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in the future. Fetuses of mothers with gestational diabetes are at higher risk for macrosomia and birth trauma, after delivery they present higher risk of developing neonatal hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and respiratory distress syndrome. There is still no consensus in the recommendations for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus by expert committees. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(8), 283-290.

  13. Diabetes mellitus type II as a risk factor for depression: a lower than expected risk in a general practice setting.

    PubMed

    Aarts, S; van den Akker, M; van Boxtel, M P J; Jolles, J; Winkens, B; Metsemakers, J F M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (DM) in a primary setting is associated with an increased risk of subsequent depression. A retrospective cohort design was used based on the Registration Network Family Practice (RNH) database. Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus at or after the age of 40 and who were diagnosed between 01-01-1980 and 01-01-2007 (N = 6,140), were compared with age-matched controls from a reference group (N = 18,416) without a history of diabetes. Both groups were followed for an emerging first diagnosis of depression (and/or depressive feelings) until January 1, 2008. 2.0% of the people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus developed a depressive disorder, compared to 1.6% of the reference group. After statistical correction for confounding factors diabetes mellitus was associated with an increased risk of developing subsequent depression (HR 1.26; 95% CI: 1.12-1.42) and/or depressive feelings (HR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.18-1.46). After statistical adjustment practice identification code, age and depression preceding diabetes, were significantly related to a diagnosis of depression. Patients with diabetes mellitus are more likely to develop subsequent depression than persons without a history of diabetes. Results from this large longitudinal study based on a general practice population indicate that this association is weaker than previously found in cross-sectional research using self-report surveys. Several explanations for this dissimilarity are discussed

  14. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy in Youth With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Divers, Jasmin; Dabelea, Dana; Isom, Scott; Bell, Ronny A; Martin, Catherine L; Pettitt, David J; Saydah, Sharon; Pihoker, Catherine; Standiford, Debra A; Dolan, Lawrence M; Marcovina, Santica; Linder, Barbara; Liese, Angela D; Pop-Busui, Rodica; Feldman, Eva L

    2017-09-01

    We assessed the prevalence of and risk factors for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) enrolled in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth (SEARCH) study. The Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) was used to assess DPN in 1,734 youth with T1D (mean ± SD age 18 ± 4 years, T1D duration 7.2 ± 1.2 years, and HbA1c 9.1 ± 1.9%) and 258 youth with T2D (age 22 ± 3.5 years, T2D duration 7.9 ± 2 years, and HbA1c 9.4 ± 2.3%) who were enrolled in the SEARCH study and had ≥5 years of diabetes duration. DPN was defined as an MNSI exam score of >2. Glycemic control over time was estimated as area under the curve for HbA1c. The prevalence of DPN was 7% in youth with T1D and 22% in youth with T2D. Risk factors for DPN in youth with T1D were older age, longer diabetes duration, smoking, increased diastolic blood pressure, obesity, increased LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, and lower HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). In youth with T2D, risk factors were older age, male sex, longer diabetes duration, smoking, and lower HDL-c. Glycemic control over time was worse among those with DPN compared with those without for youth with T1D (odds ratio 1.53 [95% CI 1.24; 1.88]) but not for youth with T2D (1.05 [0.7; 1.56]). The high rates of DPN among youth with diabetes are a cause of concern and suggest a need for early screening and better risk factor management. Interventions in youth that address poor glycemic control and dyslipidemia may prevent or delay debilitating neuropathic complications. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Neighborhood level risk factors for type 1 diabetes in youth: the SEARCH case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background European ecologic studies suggest higher socioeconomic status is associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. Using data from a case-control study of diabetes among racially/ethnically diverse youth in the United States (U.S.), we aimed to evaluate the independent impact of neighborhood characteristics on type 1 diabetes risk. Data were available for 507 youth with type 1 diabetes and 208 healthy controls aged 10-22 years recruited in South Carolina and Colorado in 2003-2006. Home addresses were used to identify Census tracts of residence. Neighborhood-level variables were obtained from 2000 U.S. Census. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were applied. Results Controlling for individual risk factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, infant feeding, birth weight, maternal age, number of household residents, parental education, income, state), higher neighborhood household income (p = 0.005), proportion of population in managerial jobs (p = 0.02), with at least high school education (p = 0.005), working outside the county (p = 0.04) and vehicle ownership (p = 0.03) were each independently associated with increased odds of type 1 diabetes. Conversely, higher percent minority population (p = 0.0003), income from social security (p = 0.002), proportion of crowded households (0.0497) and poverty (p = 0.008) were associated with a decreased odds. Conclusions Our study suggests that neighborhood characteristics related to greater affluence, occupation, and education are associated with higher type 1 diabetes risk. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms underlying the influence of neighborhood context. PMID:22230476

  16. Understanding perceived risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy middle-aged adults: a cross-sectional study of associations with modelled risk, clinical risk factors, and psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Godino, Job G; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Sutton, Stephen; Griffin, Simon J

    2014-12-01

    To determine the perceived risk of type 2 diabetes in a sample of healthy middle-aged adults and examine the association between perceived risk and modelled risk, clinical risk factors, and psychological factors theorised to be antecedents of behaviour change. An exploratory, cross-sectional analysis of perceived risk of type 2 diabetes (framed according to time and in comparison with peers) was conducted using baseline data collected from 569 participants of the Diabetes Risk Communication Trial (Cambridgeshire, UK). Type 2 diabetes risk factors were measured during a health assessment and the Framingham Offspring Diabetes Risk Score was used to model risk. Questionnaires assessed psychological factors including anxiety, diabetes-related worry, behavioural intentions, and other theory-based antecedents of behaviour change. Multivariable regression analyses were used to examine associations between perceived risk and potential correlates. Participants with a high perceived risk were at higher risk according to the Framingham Offspring Diabetes Risk Score (p<0.001). Higher perceived risk was observed in those with a higher body fat percentage, lower self-rated health, higher diabetes-related worry, and lower self-efficacy for adhering to governmental recommendations for physical activity (all p<0.001). The framing of perceived risk according to time and in comparison with peers did not influence these results. High perceived risk of type 2 diabetes is associated with higher risk of developing the disease, and a decreased likelihood of engagement in risk-reducing health behaviours. Risk communication interventions should target high-risk individuals with messages about the effectiveness of prevention strategies. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Understanding perceived risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy middle-aged adults: A cross-sectional study of associations with modelled risk, clinical risk factors, and psychological factors

    PubMed Central

    Godino, Job G.; van Sluijs, Esther M.F.; Sutton, Stephen; Griffin, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To determine the perceived risk of type 2 diabetes in a sample of healthy middle-aged adults and examine the association between perceived risk and modelled risk, clinical risk factors, and psychological factors theorised to be antecedents of behaviour change. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional analysis of perceived risk of type 2 diabetes (framed according to time and in comparison with peers) was conducted using baseline data collected from 569 participants of the Diabetes Risk Communication Trial (Cambridgeshire, UK). Type 2 diabetes risk factors were measured during a health assessment and the Framingham Offspring Diabetes Risk Score was used to model risk. Questionnaires assessed psychological factors including anxiety, diabetes-related worry, behavioural intentions, and other theory-based antecedents of behaviour change. Multivariable regression analyses were used to examine associations between perceived risk and potential correlates. Results Participants with a high perceived risk were at higher risk according to the Framingham Offspring Diabetes Risk Score (p < 0.001). Higher perceived risk was observed in those with a higher body fat percentage, lower self-rated health, higher diabetes-related worry, and lower self-efficacy for adhering to governmental recommendations for physical activity (all p < 0.001). The framing of perceived risk according to time and in comparison with peers did not influence these results. Conclusions High perceived risk of type 2 diabetes is associated with higher risk of developing the disease, and a decreased likelihood of engagement in risk-reducing health behaviours. Risk communication interventions should target high-risk individuals with messages about the effectiveness of prevention strategies. PMID:25467619

  18. Prevalence of and Racial Disparities in Risk Factor Control in Older Adults With Diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study.

    PubMed

    Parrinello, Christina M; Rastegar, Ina; Godino, Job G; Miedema, Michael D; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Controversy surrounds appropriate risk factor targets in older adults with diabetes. We evaluated the proportion of older adults with diabetes meeting different targets, focusing on possible differences by race, and assessed whether demographic and clinical characteristics explained disparities. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5,018 participants aged 67-90 years (1,574 with and 3,444 without diagnosed diabetes) who attended visit 5 of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (2011-2013). Risk factor targets were defined using both stringent (and less stringent) goals: hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <7%, <53 mmol/mol (<8%, <64 mmol/mol); LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) <100 mg/dL (<130 mg/dL); and blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg (<150/90 mmHg). We used Poisson regression to obtain prevalence ratios (PRs). Most older adults with diabetes met stringent (and less stringent) targets: 72% (90%) for HbA1c, 63% (86%) for LDL-c, and 73% (87%) for BP; but only 35% (68%) met all three. A higher proportion of whites than blacks met targets, however defined. Among people treated for risk factors, racial disparities in prevalence of meeting stringent targets persisted even after adjustment: PRs (whites vs. blacks) were 1.03 (95% CI 0.91, 1.17) for HbA1c, 1.21 (1.09, 1.35) for LDL-c, 1.10 (1.00, 1.21) for BP, and 1.28 (0.99, 1.66) for all three. Results were similar but slightly attenuated using less stringent goals. Black women were less likely than white women to meet targets for BP and all three risk factors; this disparity was not observed in men. Black-white disparities in risk factor control in older adults with diabetes were not fully explained by demographic or clinical characteristics and were greater in women than men. Further study of determinants of these disparities is important. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Awareness of Gestational Diabetes and its Risk Factors among Pregnant Women in Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lucy Anne; Lock, Lauren Jade; Archer, Lucy Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a subtype of diabetes mellitus defined as the development, or first recognition, of glucose intolerance during pregnancy. The risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is greater in mothers with GDM compared to the general population. Preventing the development of GDM could help lower the prevalence of T2DM and long-term morbidity in children of affected mothers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the awareness of GDM and its risk factors among pregnant women in Samoa, exploring where participants obtained information, and understanding their attitudes towards diet and physical activity. A quantitative cross-sectional study of 141 women attending Tupua Tamasese Meaole (TTM) hospital in Apia, Samoa in May 2015 was performed. Fifty-eight percent women were aware diabetes can occur for the first time during pregnancy. The greatest information source was from doctors (37%, n=44) followed by family members (22%, n=28), based on 118 respondents. Only one woman correctly identified all four risk factors for GDM. Most women recognized eating a healthy diet (79%) and regular physical activity (78%) to be appropriate lifestyle changes to help prevent GDM. These findings suggest awareness of GDM among pregnant women in Samoa is mixed, with a very small proportion having good knowledge (based on the number of risk factors identified). We conclude that increased education about GDM is necessary, both in hospital clinics and within the community. By increasing awareness of GDM, it may be possible to decrease the prevalence of T2DM in Samoa. PMID:28210529

  20. Association of DASH diet with cardiovascular risk factors in youth with diabetes mellitus: the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study.

    PubMed

    Liese, Angela D; Bortsov, Andrey; Günther, Anke L B; Dabelea, Dana; Reynolds, Kristi; Standiford, Debra A; Liu, Lenna; Williams, Desmond E; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Bell, Ronny; Marcovina, Santica

    2011-04-05

    We have shown that adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet is related to blood pressure in youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. We explored the impact of the DASH diet on other cardiovascular disease risk factors. Between 2001 and 2005, data on total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein particle density, apolipoprotein B, body mass index, waist circumference, and adipocytokines were ascertained in 2130 youth aged 10 to 22 years with physician-diagnosed diabetes mellitus. Dietary intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire, categorized into the DASH food groups, and assigned an adherence score. Among youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus, higher adherence to the DASH diet was significantly and inversely associated with low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and A(1c) in multivariable-adjusted models. Youth in the highest adherence tertile had an estimated 0.07 lower low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio and 0.2 lower A(1c) levels than those in the lowest tertile adjusted for confounders. No significant associations were observed with triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein particle density, adipocytokines, apolipoprotein B, body mass index Z score, or waist circumference. Among youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus, associations were observed with low-density lipoprotein particle density and body mass index Z score. The DASH dietary pattern may be beneficial in the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease risk in youth with diabetes mellitus.

  1. Factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes and incipient nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nelaj, E; Gjata, M; Lilaj, I; Burazeri, G; Sadiku, E; Collaku, L; Bare, O; Tase, M

    2008-01-01

    Background: Microalbuminuria was originally established as a predictor of renal failure and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus as well as in general population. The aim of our study is to assess the relationship between microalbuminuria and the other risk factors in diabetics and their prevalence. Methods: Sixty five patients, 22 men and 43 women with mean age 58.6 ±10.09, with type 2 diabetes, were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine in the University Hospital Center "Mother Teresa" in Tirana, Albania, between March 2007 and February 2008. These patients with a mean duration of diabetes 6.09±5.41 were divided in two groups: with (Group A: 24 patients) and without (Group B: 41 patients) microalbuminuria and each group was evaluated for left ventricular mass index (LVMI), body mass index (BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), lipid profile and intima media thickness (IMT). Results: The prevalence of microalbuminuria in our study was 32.3%. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in males was 37.5 and in females 62.5%. The microalbuminuric patients were older ( 59.71±9.87 vs 57.07±10.32) and had a longer duration of diabetes (7.74±5.74 vs 4.45±5.08) compared with normoalbuminuric patients.(p=0.01). The Group A had significantly higher LVMI compared with Group B ( p= 0.02). The prevalence of obesity (BMI >30kg/m2) in our sample was 44.6%. In Group A the mean BMI (30.13±4.98) was significantly higher compared with Group B (28.00±3.72, p= 0.04). Diabetic retinopathy was more frequent in Group A compared with Group B ( 33.3% vs 14.6%, p=0.05). The mean value of IMT was higher in Group A compared with Group B (1.28±0.35 vs 1.09±0.28, p=0.03) Conclusion: In patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria LVMI, IMT, BMI, duration of diabetes was significantly higher compared with patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria. PMID:19158965

  2. Factors of cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes and incipient nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nelaj, E; Gjata, M; Lilaj, I; Burazeri, G; Sadiku, E; Collaku, L; Bare, O; Tase, M

    2008-01-01

    Microalbuminuria was originally established as a predictor of renal failure and an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus as well as in general population. The aim of our study is to assess the relationship between microalbuminuria and the other risk factors in diabetics and their prevalence. Sixty five patients, 22 men and 43 women with mean age 58.6+/-10.09, with type 2 diabetes, were hospitalized in the Department of Internal Medicine in the University Hospital Center "Mother Teresa" in Tirana, Albania, between March 2007 and February 2008. These patients with a mean duration of diabetes 6.09+/-5.41 were divided in two groups: with (Group A: 24 patients) and without (Group B: 41 patients) microalbuminuria and each group was evaluated for left ventricular mass index (LVMI), body mass index (BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), lipid profile and intima media thickness (IMT). The prevalence of microalbuminuria in our study was 32.3%. The prevalence of microalbuminuria in males was 37.5 and in females 62.5%. The microalbuminuric patients were older ( 59.71+/-9.87 vs 57.07+/-10.32) and had a longer duration of diabetes (7.74+/-5.74 vs 4.45+/-5.08) compared with normoalbuminuric patients (p=0.01). The Group A had significantly higher LVMI compared with Group B ( p=0.02). The prevalence of obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) in our sample was 44.6%. In Group A the mean BMI (30.13+/-4.98) was significantly higher compared with Group B (28.00+/-3.72, p=0.04). Diabetic retinopathy was more frequent in Group A compared with Group B ( 33.3% vs 14.6%, p=0.05). The mean value of IMT was higher in Group A compared with Group B (1.28+/-0.35 vs 1.09+/-0.28, p=0.03). In patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria LVMI, IMT, BMI, duration of diabetes was significantly higher compared with patients with type 2 diabetes and normoalbuminuria.

  3. Predictability and Risk Factors for Development of New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus After Transplant in the Saudi Population.

    PubMed

    Alshamsi, Shaikha; Basri, Nawal; Flaiw, Ahmed; Ghamdi, Ghormullah; Hejaili, Fayez; Shaheen, Faissal A M; Sheayria, Foud; Jaradat, Maha; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2016-06-01

    The study objective was to investigate the predictability and risk factors for the development of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant in the Saudi population. This was a retrospective observational cohort study in adult kidney transplant recipients who developed new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant. Patients with and without new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant were compared for demographic factors, blood glucose levels at 4-hour intervals for 24 hours after transplant, and serum creatinine levels at 6 and 12 months after transplant. Of 279 patients included in our study, 15.5% developed new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after a mean follow-up of 4.6 ± 2.1 years after transplant. Patients with new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant were significant older (P = .001), had a higher body mass index (P = .001), and had higher fasting blood glucose levels 24 hours after transplant (P = .03). No significant differences were observed regarding sex, transplant type, or serum creatinine levels at 6 and 12 months. Risk factors for new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus after transplant are body mass index (P = .001; relative risk of 1.26), fasting blood glucose at 24 hours (P = .001; relative risk of 1.3), age (P = .001; relative risk of 1.44), and family history of diabetes mellitus (P = .001; relative risk of 31.3). Risk factors for developing new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus were age, heavier weight, body mass index, family history of diabetes mellitus, and having higher fasting blood glucose levels 24 hours after transplant, with family history of diabetes mellitus being an especially very high significant risk factor.

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in a Nigerian population with impaired fasting blood glucose level and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Oguoma, Victor M; Nwose, Ezekiel U; Ulasi, Ifeoma I; Akintunde, Adeseye A; Chukwukelu, Ekene E; Bwititi, Phillip T; Richards, Ross S; Skinner, Timothy C

    2017-01-06

    Diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and there are reports of increasing prevalence of prediabetes in Nigeria. This study therefore characterised CVDs risk factors in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes. Data from 4 population-based cross-sectional studies on 2447 apparently healthy individuals from 18 - 89 years were analysed. Anthropometric, blood pressure and biochemical parameters were collected and classified. Individuals with IFG (prediabetes) and diabetes were merged each for positive cases of dyslipidaemia, high blood pressure (HBP) or obesity. Optimal Discriminant and Hierarchical Optimal Classification Tree Analysis (HO-CTA) were employed. Overall prevalence of IFG and diabetes were 5.8% (CI: 4.9 - 6.7%) and 3.1% (CI: 2.4 - 3.8%), respectively. IFG co-morbidity with dyslipidaemia (5.0%; CI: 4.1 - 5.8%) was the highest followed by overweight/obese (3.1%; CI: 2.5 - 3.8%) and HBP (1.8%; CI: 1.3 - 2.4%). The predicted age of IFG or diabetes and their co-morbidity with other CVD risk factors were between 40 - 45 years. Elevated blood level of total cholesterol was the most predictive co-morbid risk factor among IFG and diabetes subjects. Hypertriglyceridaemia was an important risk factor among IFG-normocholesterolaemic-overweight/obese individuals. The higher prevalence of co-morbidity of CVD risk factors with IFG than in diabetes plus the similar age of co-morbidity between IFG and diabetes highlights the need for risk assessment models for prediabetes and education of individuals at risk about factors that mitigate development of diabetes and CVDs.

  5. Does high sugar consumption exacerbate cardiometabolic risk factors and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed Central

    Sonestedt, Emily; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Laaksonen, David E.; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of sugar has been relatively high in the Nordic countries; the impact of sugar intake on metabolic risk factors and related diseases has been debated. The objectives were to assess the effect of sugar intake (sugar-sweetened beverages, sucrose and fructose) on association with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and related metabolic risk factors (impaired glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, blood pressure, uric acid, inflammation markers), and on all-cause mortality, through a systematic review of prospective cohort studies and randomised controlled intervention studies published between January 2000 and search dates. The methods adopted were as follows: the first search was run in PubMed in October 2010. A second search with uric acid as risk marker was run in April 2011. The total search strategy was rerun in April 2011 in SveMed+. An update was run in PubMed in January 2012. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusion from the 2,743 abstracts according to predefined eligibility criteria. The outcome was that out of the 17 studies extracted, 15 were prospective cohort studies and two were randomised controlled crossover trials. All of the studies included only adults. With respect to incident type 2 diabetes (nine studies), four of six prospective cohort studies found a significant positive association for sugar-sweetened beverage intake. In general, larger cohort studies with longer follow-up more often reported positive associations, and BMI seemed to mediate part of the increased risk. For other metabolic or cardiovascular risk factors or outcomes, too few studies have been published to draw conclusions. In conclusion, data from prospective cohort studies published in the years 2000–2011 suggest that sugar-sweetened beverages probably increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For related metabolic risk factors, cardiovascular disease or all-cause mortality and other types of sugars, too few studies were available

  6. Risk Factors for Retinopathy and DME in Type 2 Diabetes-Results from the German/Austrian DPV Database.

    PubMed

    Hammes, Hans-Peter; Welp, Reinhard; Kempe, Hans-Peter; Wagner, Christian; Siegel, Erhard; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and risk factors for early and severe diabetic retinopathy and macular edema in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes Retinopathy grading (any retinopathy, severe retinopathy, diabetic macular edema) and risk factors of 64784 were prospectively recorded between January 2000 and March 2013 and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier analysis and logistic regression. Retinopathy was present in 20.12% of subjects, maculopathy was found in 0.77%. HbA1c > 8%, microalbuminuria, hypertension, BMI > 35 kg/m2 and male sex were significantly associated with any retinopathy, while HbA1c and micro- and macroalbuminuria were the strongest risk predictors for severe retinopathy. Presence of macroalbuminuria increased the risk for DME by 177%. Retinopathy remains a significant clinical problem in patients with type 2 diabetes. Metabolic control and blood pressure are relevant factors amenable to treatment. Concomitant kidney disease identifies high risk patients and should be emphasized in interdisciplinary communication.

  7. New-onset diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation in children - Incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Swati; Bock, Matthew J; Louks Palac, Hannah; Brickman, Wendy J; Gossett, Jeffrey G; Marino, Bradley S; Backer, Carl L; Pahl, Elfriede

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a recognized complication of SOT in adults and is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Little is known about NOD in pediatric HT recipients. We aimed to characterize the incidence and describe risk factors for development of NOD after HT in children. Children who developed diabetes after HT were identified from the OPTN database. Demographic and clinical data before and after transplant were compared between patients with and without NOD. A total of 2056 children were included, 56% were male, 54% were Caucasian, and 62% had cardiomyopathy prior to HT. NOD developed in 219 children (11%) after HT. The incidence of NOD was 2.4, 9.0, and 10.4% at one, five, and 10 yr after HT, respectively. Obesity (HR: 4.32), dialysis prior to transplant (HR: 2.38), African American race (HR: 1.86), transplant before year 2000 (HR: 1.82), female gender (HR: 1.68), and older age at transplant (HR: 1.28) were independent predictors of NOD. The major modifiable risk factor for NOD is obesity, imparting the maximum hazard. Improved surveillance for diabetes in high-risk patients and specific prevention and intervention strategies are imperative in this population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of type 2 diabetes in older Vietnam-born Australians.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duong Thuy; Jorm, Louisa R; Johnson, Maree; Bambrick, Hilary; Lujic, Sanja

    2014-02-01

    Vietnamese immigrants in Australia represent the second largest Vietnamese community in developed countries, following the United States. However, limited information is available about prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relative roles of socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and Vietnamese ethnicity per se in this population. This study investigated the prevalence of T2D and its risk factors in older Vietnam-born Australians, in comparison to native-born Australians. The study used baseline questionnaire data from 787 Vietnam- and 196,866 Australia-born individuals (≥45 years), who participated in the 45 and Up Study, which is Australia's largest population-based cohort study. Country of birth specific prevalence of T2D and its risk factors were age-standardised to the 2006 Australian population (≥45 years). Multivariable logistic regression models were built for each group to assess the relationship between T2D and socio-demographic characteristics, family history of diabetes, lifestyle factors and health status. Compared to Australia-born counterparts, Vietnam-born individuals had significantly (p < 0.001) higher age-standardised prevalence of T2D (14.7 vs 7.4 %) and significantly (p < 0.001) lower levels of vegetable consumption (≥5 serves/day, 19.4 vs 33.5 %), physical activity (≥5 sessions/week, 68.7 vs 78.5 %) and overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2), 21.5 vs 62.7 %). The increased risk of T2D associated with a family history of diabetes for Vietnam-born people [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 7.14, 95 % CI 4.15-12.28] was almost double that for Australia-born people (OR 3.77, 95 % CI 3.63-3.90). The patterns of association between T2D and other factors were similar between the two groups. The findings suggest a genetic predisposition to T2D in people of Vietnamese ethnicity. Reducing lifestyle risk factors for diabetes and better management of diabetes are priorities for Vietnam-born populations.

  9. [Risk factors for infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococci in diabetic foot patients].

    PubMed

    Ding, Qun; Li, Dai-qing; Wang, Peng-hua; Chu, Yue-jie; Meng, Shu-you; Sun, Qian

    2012-01-31

    To examine the distribution patterns of pathogens isolated from the patients with diabetic foot ulcers and explore the risk factors for infections of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE). A total of 388 diabetic-foot patients hospitalized at Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital between January 2008 and June 2010 were recruited. The distribution profiles of pathogens isolated from diabetic foot ulcers were summarized. The patients with S. aureus infections were divided into MRSA and MSSA groups while those with S. epidermidis infections into MRSE and MSSE groups. The clinical features of these patients were compared between all groups. Logistic regression was employed to identify the risk factors for the MRSA/MRSE infections. A total of 362 pathogens were isolated from them. And the Gram-positive bacteria were the most predominant (57.2%, 207/362), followed by Gram-negative bacilli (39.2%, 142/362) and true fungi (3.6%, 13/362). The three most frequently isolated pathogens were S. aureus (27.1%), S. epidermidis (18.8%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.5%). Statistically significant differences existed in antibiotic usage in 6 months prior to hospitalization, course of ulcer, ulcer size, deep ulcer, osteomyelitis, hypertension, anemia, hypoproteinemia and erythrocyte sedimentation rate between the patients infected with MRSA and MSSA (P < 0.05). The MRSE infection was correlated with recurrent ulcer, osteomyelitis, hypoproteinemia, HbA1c and lower total serum protein (P < 0.05). Multiple Logistic regression analysis revealed that antibiotic usage in 6 months prior to hospitalization, long course of ulcer, osteomyelitis, hypertension and hypoproteinemia were risk factors for the MRSA infection. And HbA1c was a risk factor for the MRSE infection. In the present study, the Gram-positive cocci are the main pathogens isolated from diabetic foot ulcers. And S. aureus and S. epidermidis are the most frequently isolated pathogens

  10. Type 2 diabetes in Asians: prevalence, risk factors, and effectiveness of behavioral intervention at individual and population levels.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary Beth; Oza-Frank, Reena; Staimez, Lisa R; Ali, Mohammed K; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2012-08-21

    This review summarizes the current data on diabetes risk factors, prevalence, and prevention efforts in Asia and Asian migrant populations. Studies indicate that type 2 diabetes mellitus is a large and growing threat to public health in Asian populations. Furthermore, Asian subgroups (e.g., South Asians/Asian Indians, Chinese) have unique risk factor profiles for developing diabetes, which differ from other populations and between Asian ethnic groups. Lifestyle intervention programs are effective in preventing diabetes in Asians, as with other ethnicities. The strength of these findings is lessened by the lack of systematically collected data using objective measurements. Large epidemiologic studies of diabetes prevalence and risk factor profiles and translational trials identifying sustainable and culturally acceptable lifestyle programs for Asian subgroups are needed.

  11. Footwear and foot care knowledge as risk factors for foot problems in Indian diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Chandalia, H. B.; Singh, D.; Kapoor, V.; Chandalia, S. H.; Lamba, P. S.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed 300 diabetic and 100 age- and sex-matched controls for correlating foot wear practices and foot care knowledge and the presence of foot complications. A structured questionnaire evaluated the knowledge about foot care, type of footwear used, education level, association of tobacco abuse, and any associated symptoms of foot disease. Clinical evaluation was done by inspection of feet for presence of any external deformities, assessment of sensory function (vibration perception threshold, VPT), vascular status (foot pulses and ankle brachial ratio) and presence of any infection. In the diabetes category, 44.7% patients had not received previous foot care education. 0.6% walked barefoot outdoors and 45% walked barefoot indoors. Fourteen (4.7%) patients gave history of foot ulceration in the past and comprised the high risk group; only 2 out of 14 had received foot care education, 6 gave history of tobacco abuse, 8 had symptoms of claudication, 9 had paresthesias, 2 walked barefoot indoors. Average duration of diabetes in the high-risk and low-risk diabetes group was 10.85 ± 6.53 and 9.83 ± 7.99 years, respectively. In the high- and low-risk diabetic groups, VPT was 19.57 ± 11.26 and 15.20 ± 10.21V (P < 0.02), ankle brachial ratio was 1.05 ± 0.19 and 1.14 ± 0.18 (P < 0.05), and the questionnaire scores was 40.8% and 57%, respectively. In the diabetic and the control group, VPT was 15.62 ± 10.39 and 8.36 ± 3.61 V (P < 0.01), ankle brachial ratio was 1.14 ± 0.18 and 1.15 ± 0.12, and the questionnaire scores were 57% and 40.3%, respectively. In conclusion, poor knowledge of foot care and poor footwear practices were important risk factors for foot problems in diabetes. PMID:20165597

  12. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Diabetic Lower Limb Amputation: A Clinic-Based Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Beverly T; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Malabu, Usman H

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for lower limb amputation in a specialist foot clinic-based setting. Methods. A retrospective quantitative study was conducted, using clinical and biochemical profiles of diabetic foot patients attending the High Risk Foot Clinic at The Townsville Hospital, Australia, between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2013. Results. The total study sample included 129 subjects, comprising 81 males and 48 females with M : F ratio of 1.7 : 1. Twenty-three subjects were Indigenous Australians, representing 17.8% of the study population. The average age of the cohort was 63.4 years ± 14.1 years [CI 90.98-65.89]. Lower limb amputation was identified as a common and significant outcome (n = 44), occurring in 34.1%, more commonly amongst the Indigenous Australians (56.5% versus 29.2%; p = 0.94, OR 0.94). Risk factors most closely associated with amputation included diabetic retinopathy (p = 0.00, OR 4.4), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery (p = 0.01, OR 4.1), Charcot's arthropathy (p = 0.01, OR 2.9), and Indigenous ethnicity (p = 0.01, OR 3.4). Although average serum creatinine, corrected calcium, and glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (Hba1c) levels were higher amongst amputees they were statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Lower limb amputation is a common outcome and linked to ethnicity and neurovascular diabetic complications amongst subjects with diabetic foot ulcer. Further research is needed to identify why risk of lower limb amputation seems to differ according to ethnicity.

  13. Risk factors for microvascular atherosclerotic changes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Simić, Iveta; Pećin, Ivan; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia; Zrinsćak, Ozren; Sućur, Nediljko; Reiner, Zeljko

    2013-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder primarily characterized by elevated blood glucose levels and by microvascular and macrovascular complications which increase the morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to assess whether in high risk patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus whose blood pressure and lipid levels are well controlled still exist risk factors for microvascular changes and target organ damage (nephropathy and retinopathy). In this case control retrospective study 326 patients (111 with nephropathy and/or retinopathy and 215 controls) were enrolled. Nephropathy or retinopathy was present in 10.1% and 26.9% cases, respectively. Only 71% of patients (no significant difference between cases and controls) were treated with antidiabetic drugs. Therefore their diabetes was not properly controlled (hemoglobin A1c was 7.96% in cases and 7.58% in controls). Patients with microvascular changes had significantly longer diabetes than the controls (p < 0.05) but there were no significant differences between these two groups concerning lipids concentrations. Statins and fibrates were used by significantly less (p < 0.05) patients with microvascular complications than by those without them (21.6% vs. 36.3% and 1.8% vs. 17.2% respectively). The results of this study suggest that the duration of the disease and adequate control of glycaemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are more important for microvascular complications than the serum lipoproteins levels. Lipid-lowering treatment might have an impact on microvascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes, irrespectively of their serum lipid levels.

  14. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Are Associated With Increased Arterial Stiffness in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dabelea, Dana; Talton, Jennifer W.; D’Agostino, Ralph; Wadwa, R. Paul; Urbina, Elaine M.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Daniels, Stephen R.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Hamman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if presence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and their clustering as metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and accelerated progression over time among youth with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Longitudinal study of 298 youth with type 1 diabetes (age 14.5 years; 46.3% female; duration 4.8 years), with two research visits conducted 5 years apart. CV factors included: waist circumference, blood pressure (BP), fasting lipids (HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol [LDL-c], triglycerides), albumin/creatinine ratio, and HbA1c. MetS was based on Adult Treatment Panel III criteria modified for youth. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the carotid–femoral segment was measured by tonometry. Mixed models were used to assess the rate of progression in PWV and the association between CV factors and PWV over time. RESULTS PWV increased significantly over time (0.145 m/s/year; P < 0.0001). MetS (P = 0.0035), large waist (P < 0.0001), and elevated BP (P = 0.0003) at baseline were each associated with worse PWV over time. These baseline factors, however, did not significantly influence the rate of progression. Increases in waist circumference (P < 0.0001), LDL-c levels (P = 0.0156), and declining glucose control (HbA1c; P = 0.0419) were independently associated with higher PWV over time. CONCLUSIONS Presence, clustering, and worsening of CV risk factors are associated with increased arterial stiffness over time in youth with type 1 diabetes. Whether improvement in CV risk factors early in life will slow the progression of arterial stiffness and reduce the burden of CV disease in this population requires further study. PMID:24101697

  15. Spontaneous and indicated preterm delivery in pregestational diabetes mellitus: etiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Nir; Chen, Rony; Soiberman, Uri; Ben-Haroush, Avi; Hod, Moshe; Yogev, Yariv

    2008-08-01

    To characterize the indications for preterm delivery and identify risk factors predicting preterm delivery in pregnancies complicated by pregestational diabetes (PGDM). A retrospective cohort study of all women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus followed from preconception to delivery at our institute from 1996 to 2004 (study group). Rates of spontaneous and indicated preterm delivery were compared with a control group of nondiabetic women. Rates of preterm delivery were 26.6% (119/448) and 6.0% (1,038/17,370) in the study and control groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The PGDM group had higher rates of both spontaneous (6.9% vs. 4.8%, P < 0.001) and indicated (19.6% vs. 1.2%, P < 0.001) preterm deliveries. Most of the preterm deliveries in the PGDM group were indicated (73.9%) compared with 20.1% in the control group (P < 0.001). Preeclampsia was the most significant factor associated with indicated preterm delivery in the PGDM group (OR = 11.7, 95% CI = 3.3-41.7), followed by nephropathy, nulliparity, HbA1c levels prior to conception and prior to delivery, duration of diabetes, prepregnancy body mass index and weight gain during pregnancy. Spontaneous preterm delivery was related to duration of diabetes, presence of nephropathy, and previous preterm delivery. The risk of both spontaneous and indicated preterm delivery is increased in pregnancies complicated by PGDM. Except for glycemic control, none of the risk factors identified is modifiable by preconception or antenatal care.

  16. Eating Disorders in children and adolescents with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: prevalence, risk factors, warning signs.

    PubMed

    Racicka, Ewa; Bryńska, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk for eating disorders, various dependent on type of diabetes. Binge eating disorder is more common in patient with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Whereas, intentional omission of insulin doses for the purpose of weight loss occurs mainly in patient with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), however, in some patients with type 2 diabetes omission of oral hypoglycemic drugs can be present. Risk factors for the development of eating disorders in patients with diabetes include: age, female gender, greater body weight, body image dissatisfaction, history of dieting and history of depression. Poor glycemic control, recurrent episodes of ketoacidosis or recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia, secondary to intentional insulin overdose, missed clinical appointments, dietary manipulation and low self-esteem should raise concern. The consequence of eating disorders or disordered eating patterns in patients with diabetes is poor glycemic control and hence higher possibility of complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy and premature death.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods: Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p < 0.001). In adults without DM, risk factors for periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Conclusions: Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM. PMID:27604799

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis among adults with or without diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mihee; Kim, Hee Yeon; Seok, Hannah; Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Young Soo; Song, Jae Yen; Lee, Young Bok; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Jae-Im; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Ahn, Hyo-Suk; Ko, Yoon Ho; Jeong, Seong Cheol; Chae, Hiun Suk; Sohn, Tae Seo

    2016-09-01

    This study examined prevalence and risk factors of periodontitis in representative samples of Korean adults, with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 4,477 adults (≥ 30 years old) were selected from 8,057 individuals who completed a nutrition survey, a self-reported general health behavior questionnaire, an oral examination, an oral hygiene behaviors survey, and laboratory tests. DM was defined as a fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, or self-reported diagnosed diabetes, or current use of oral hypoglycemic agents and/or insulin. The community periodontal index was used to assess periodontitis status and comparisons between the periodontitis and the non-periodontitis group, were performed, according to the presence of DM. Risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM and without DM were evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in adults with DM (43.7%) than in those without DM (25%, p < 0.001). In adults without DM, risk factors for periodontitis were older age, male, urban habitation, waist circumference, smoking, oral pain, and less frequent tooth brushing. Significant risk factors for periodontitis in adults with DM were the smoking, oral pain, and not-using an oral hygiene product. Adults with DM have an increased risk of periodontitis than those without DM. Current smoking and oral pain increase this risk. Using an oral hygiene product can reduce risk of periodontal disease in adults with DM.

  19. Modulation of human monocyte CD36 by type 2 diabetes mellitus and other atherosclerotic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Lopez, Rosa M; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta; López-Carmona, Dolores; Mayas, Dolores M; Gomez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Badimon, Lina

    2011-08-01

    The pathophysiological role of CD36 in atherosclerosis seems to be largely dependent on its pro-inflammatory function and ability to take up oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Controversy exists concerning the potential beneficial/harmful effects of vascular CD36 inhibition in atherosclerosis. However, as atherosclerosis in murine models does not result in clinical end points such as plaque rupture and thrombotic ischaemia, typical of human disease, clinical studies are required to understand the functional role of CD36 in human atherosclerosis. Our aim was to investigate whether CD36 expression in monocytes is modulated by the presence of an increasing number of atherosclerotic risk factors, and specifically by hyperglycaemia because of diabetes mellitus. The study included 33 patients with advanced atherosclerosis and eight healthy blood donors, as controls. The patients were classified according to the presence of atherosclerotic risk factors. Diabetes mellitus was classified as either well-controlled or poorly controlled. Monocytes were exposed in vitro to low (5·5mM) or high glucose (26mM) concentrations for increasing times. Our results demonstrated that protein levels of glycated CD36 were significantly higher in patients with 3-4 atherosclerotic risk factors than in those with 0-2 atherosclerotic risk factors or in subjects with no atherosclerotic symptoms (P=0·04, in both cases). However, when we analysed just the poorly controlled diabetic patients, their glycated CD36 levels were lower. These data were corroborated by in vitro studies demonstrating that increasing glucose concentrations reduced glycated protein levels (P<0·05). Our results demonstrate that CD36 expression is altered by hyperglycaemia in atherosclerotic patients. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  20. Microbiological Features and Risk Factors in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Hossien; Samani, Simin

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 25% of people with diabetes will experience diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) during their lifetime. The present study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of diabetic foot infection among patients with DFUs and to identify the microorganisms isolated from the DFUs. This study also aimed to determine predisposing factors contributing to these infections at the authors' wound care clinic at the Rajaii and Velayat University Hospitals in Qazvin, Iran. This cross-sectional descriptive study included 500 patients with diabetes mellitus between May 2011 and April 2013 at the authors' wound care clinic in Qazvin, Iran. All demographic, clinical, and laboratory data such as age, sex, duration of diabetes (years), duration of DFUs before inclusion in the study, size of ulcer (cm2), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and results of ulcer culture were collected for each case. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, IL). A P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Overall, 54 (11%) patients with infected ulcers were found in the present study. Among patients with infected DFUs, the most commonly isolated microorganism was Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which infected 35% of patients, followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 19% of patients, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in 6% of patients. Additionally, in the multivariable logistic regression model, age > 65 years, ulcer size > 2 cm2, and HbA1c > 7% were associated with the occurrence of an infection in DFUs. Periodic examination of the feet of patients with diabetes is necessary. In addition, to decrease the prevalence of infected DFUs, more attention to the described risk factors is recommended.

  1. Association of Major Dietary Patterns with Cardio-metabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    SHADMAN, Zhaleh; AKHOUNDAN, Mahdieh; POORSOLTAN, Nooshin; LARIJANI, Bagher; QORBANI, Mostafa; HEDAYATI, Mehdi; KHOSHNIAT NIKOO, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Role of dietary modifications on the treatment and management of diabetes and complications was shown by many researchers. This study was designed to examine the association of major dietary patterns with diabetes-related cardio-metabolic risk factors in Iranian diabetes. Methods: Totally, 525 type 2 diabetic subjects with mean age 55 ± 10 yr were included in this cross-sectional study in 2014 that followed for at least two years by the Diabetes and Metabolic disease Clinic of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Blood samples were collected after 12 h fasting for glycemic and lipid profiles. Information on the general characteristics, anthropometric, blood pressure measurements and physical activity level was collected. Dietary data were obtained by a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary patterns were obtained factor analysis (principal component analysis). Results: Three major dietary patterns retained through principal component analysis: Western like (high in sweets, fast foods, carbonated drinks, red meat, mayonnaise, nuts, refined grains, potato and visceral meat), Asian like (high in vegetables, low-fat dairy, fish, poultry and egg), and Traditional like (high in high fat dairy, oils, whole grains, vegetables and fruits). Western like dietary pattern was positively associated with fasting serum glucose (P=0.05), total cholesterol (P=0.005) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P=0.008). After extensive adjustment for potential confounders, the association of serum total cholesterol and Western like dietary pattern remained significant (P=0.03). Conclusion: Modifications in dietary pattern, especially in those who have a Western dietary pattern, may be effective in preventing or delaying diabetes-associated cardio metabolic complications. PMID:28032067

  2. Dietary factors and the risk of developing insulin dependent diabetes in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlquist, G G; Blom, L G; Persson, L A; Sandström, A I; Wall, S G

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study different nutrients and food additives as risk factors for insulin dependent diabetes mellitus in childhood. DESIGN--Prospective case-control study. Parents of the children being studied were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the children's frequency of consumption of various foods. Parents of children with diabetes were asked about the period before onset of the disease. SETTING--Population based study throughout Sweden. SUBJECTS--339 Children aged 0-14 who had recently developed insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 528 control children matched for age, sex, and county of residence who were traced through the official Swedish population register. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Foods were classified according to their content of protein, fat, carbohydrates, monosaccharides or disaccharides, nitrosamines, nitrates or nitrites, vitamin C, and fibres. The frequency of intake was categorised as high, medium, and low and the relative risk for developing insulin dependent diabetes was estimated for the three frequencies of intake and calculated as odds ratios. RESULTS--Significant linear trends for dose response in odds ratios by frequency of intake were shown for solid foods containing high amounts of protein (odds ratio for low frequency of intake 1.0; medium 2.3; and high 5.5), and nitrosamines (1.0; 1.7; 2.6) and significant but non-linear trends were found for carbohydrates (1.0; 1.3; 4.4) and nitrates or nitrites (1.0; 0.8; 2.4). The significant trends were not affected when the results were standardised for possible confounders. No significant increases in odds ratios were found for protein, monosaccharides and disaccharides, vitamin C, and fibres. CONCLUSION--Nutrients and food additives such as protein, carbohydrate, and nitrosamine compounds may influence the risk of developing insulin dependent diabetes in childhood and significant trends in odds ratios indicate a causal relation. PMID:2369660

  3. Prevalence of and Racial Disparities in Risk Factor Control in Older Adults With Diabetes: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Parrinello, Christina M.; Rastegar, Ina; Godino, Job G.; Miedema, Michael D.; Matsushita, Kunihiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Controversy surrounds appropriate risk factor targets in older adults with diabetes. We evaluated the proportion of older adults with diabetes meeting different targets, focusing on possible differences by race, and assessed whether demographic and clinical characteristics explained disparities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional study of 5,018 participants aged 67–90 years (1,574 with and 3,444 without diagnosed diabetes) who attended visit 5 of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study (2011–2013). Risk factor targets were defined using both stringent (and less stringent) goals: hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) <7%, <53 mmol/mol (<8%, <64 mmol/mol); LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) <100 mg/dL (<130 mg/dL); and blood pressure (BP) <140/90 mmHg (<150/90 mmHg). We used Poisson regression to obtain prevalence ratios (PRs). RESULTS Most older adults with diabetes met stringent (and less stringent) targets: 72% (90%) for HbA1c, 63% (86%) for LDL-c, and 73% (87%) for BP; but only 35% (68%) met all three. A higher proportion of whites than blacks met targets, however defined. Among people treated for risk factors, racial disparities in prevalence of meeting stringent targets persisted even after adjustment: PRs (whites vs. blacks) were 1.03 (95% CI 0.91, 1.17) for HbA1c, 1.21 (1.09, 1.35) for LDL-c, 1.10 (1.00, 1.21) for BP, and 1.28 (0.99, 1.66) for all three. Results were similar but slightly attenuated using less stringent goals. Black women were less likely than white women to meet targets for BP and all three risk factors; this disparity was not observed in men. CONCLUSIONS Black-white disparities in risk factor control in older adults with diabetes were not fully explained by demographic or clinical characteristics and were greater in women than men. Further study of determinants of these disparities is important. PMID:25852205

  4. Dietary Patterns in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Predict Cardiometabolic Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Mathe, Nonsikelelo; Pisa, Pedro T; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Steven T

    2016-08-01

    Examining the diets of people living with type 2 diabetes may improve understanding of how diet affects disease progression. We derived dietary patterns in adults living with type 2 diabetes and explored associations among patterns, sociodemographic variables and cardiometabolic risk factors. Dietary patterns were derived from food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) in 196 adults with type 2 diabetes using principal components analysis (PCA). Multilinear regression models were fitted for the differing dietary pattern scores so as to estimate the marginal contribution of each variable explaining variations in diet. Differences in clinical variables across dietary patterns, adjusting for sex, smoking and total energy intake, were assessed. Three principal components (PCs), or patterns, were identified, explaining 56.5% of the total variance in diet: (PC1) fried foods, cakes and ice cream; (PC2) fish and vegetables; and (PC3) pasta, potatoes and breads. Female sex, current smoker and total energy were significant associated with patterns. Total energy accounted for the greatest amount of variance in each pattern (11.2% for fried foods, cakes and ice cream, 3.89% for fish and vegetables and 9.21% for pasta, potatoes and breads). After adjustment for sex, smoking and total energy, the pasta, potatoes and breads pattern was inversely associated with systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Of the 3 distinct diet patterns characterized, the carbohydrate-based pattern was most closely associated with cardiometabolic risk factors. To better understand and improve self-management by people living with type 2 diabetes through dietary modifications, further improvements in measuring and assessing diet using comparable instruments and comparisons with apparently healthy populations is required. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health risk factor modification predicts incidence of diabetes in an employee population: results of an 8-year longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Lori; Byrne, Daniel W; McGown, Paula W; Goetzel, Ron Z; Elasy, Tom A; Yarbrough, Mary I

    2013-04-01

    To understand risk factor modification effect on Type 2 diabetes incidence in a workforce population. Annual health risk assessment data (N = 3125) in years 1 through 4 were used to predict diabetes development in years 5 through 8. Employees who reduced their body mass index from 30 or more to less than 30 decreased their chances of developing diabetes (odds ratio = 0.22, 95% confidence interval: 0.05 to 0.93), while those who became obese increased their diabetes risk (odds ratio = 8.85, 95% confidence interval: 2.53 to 31.0). Weight reduction observed over a long period can result in clinically important reductions in diabetes incidence. Workplace health promotion programs may prevent diabetes among workers by encouraging weight loss and adoption of healthy lifestyle habits.

  6. Health Risk Factor Modification Predicts Incidence of Diabetes in an Employee Population: Results of an 8-Year Longitudinal Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Rolando, Lori; Byrne, Daniel W.; McGown, Paula W.; Goetzel, Ron Z.; Elasy, Tom; Yarbrough, Mary I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand risk factor modification effect on Type 2 Diabetes incidence in a workforce population. Methods Annual Health Risk Assessment (HRA) data (n=3125) in years 1 through 4 were used to predict diabetes development in years 5 through 8. Results Employees who reduced their BMI from ≥30 to < 30 decreased their chances of developing diabetes (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.93), while those who became obese increased their diabetes risk (OR 8.85, 95% CI 2.53 to 31.0). Conclusions Weight reduction observed over a long period can result in clinically important reductions in diabetes incidence. Workplace health promotion programs may prevent diabetes among workers by encouraging weight loss and adoption of healthy lifestyle habits. PMID:23532193

  7. Prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors in a type 2 diabetic population of the North Catalonia diabetes study.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Jeronimo; Ybarra, Juan; Solanas, Pascual; Caula, Jacint; Gich, Ignasi; Pou, Jose M; Romeo, June Hart

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs), and their control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at primary care settings from the North Catalonia Diabetes Study (NCDS). In this multicentre cross-sectional descriptive study, data were collected from a random sample of 307 patients with T2DM. The prevalence of CVD, CVRF, metabolic syndrome (MS), coronary heart disease (CHD) risk at 10 years (Framingham Point Scores), and CVRF control was evaluated. MS and lipid profiles were established according to Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. CVD prevalence was 22.0% (CHD: 18.9% and peripheral ischemia: 4.5%) and more frequent in men. The prevalence of selected CVRF was: hypertension: 74.5%; dyslipidemia: 77.7%; smoking: 14.9%; obesity 44.9%, and familial CVD: 38.4%. Three or more CVRFs, including T2DM, were observed in 91.3%. MS prevalence was 68.7%. Framingham score was 10.0%, higher in men than in women. CVD prevalence was related to: age, number of CVRFs, duration of diabetes, familial history of CVD, waist circumference, hypertension, lipid profile, kidney disease, and Framingham score, but not to MS by itself. Correct lipid profiles and blood pressure were only observed in 18.9% and 24.0%, respectively, whereas platelet aggregation inhibitors were only recorded in 16.1% of the patient cohort. MS presence was not an independent risk factor of CVD in our study. The high prevalence of CVD and an inadequate control of CVRF, which were apparent in the NCDS population, would suggest that advanced practice nurses should consider incorporating specific cardiovascular assessment in their routine care of persons with T2DM.

  8. A Prelimenary Result of the Cardiovascular Risk factors Intervention Study (Pikom Study): Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension and their Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mafauzy; Winn, Than; Rampal, GR Lekhraj; Abdul Rashid, AR; Mustaffa, BE

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death since the last three decades in Malaysia and diabetes mellitus and hypertension are considered as major risk factors. A study to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the community (PIKOM) through education and lifestyle changes was undertaken. The study population was from four different areas in Peninsular Malaysia – Kota Bharu and Bachok in Kelantan ; Raub in Pahang; Gunung Besout in Perak and Felda Palong in Negri Sembilan. The subjects invited to participate in this study ware aged between 30 – 65 years, did not have any debilitating illnesses and no known history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Subjects were asked to come to the local clinic in a fasting state and after physical examination, blood was taken for plasma glucose and lipids. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was then performed. A total of 4,121 subjects participated in the study. The proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus was highest in Felda Palong area (20.3%) and lowest in Raub area (7.1%). The proportion of subjects with hypertension was also highest in Felda Palong area (38.6%) and lowest in Raub area (29.1%). This could be attributable to the subjects in Felda Palong having the highest mean Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR). There were significant associations between diabetes and hypertension with age and obesity. Subjects with diabetes mellitus and hypertension also had the highest mean age, BMI, WHR and plasma cholesterol. In conclusion, the proportion of patients with risk factors for CVD was high and intervention studies through education and lifestyle changes were being carried out to see their effectiveness. PMID:22605943

  9. A Prelimenary Result of the Cardiovascular Risk factors Intervention Study (Pikom Study): Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension and their Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mafauzy; Winn, Than; Rampal, Gr Lekhraj; Abdul Rashid, Ar; Mustaffa, Be

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death since the last three decades in Malaysia and diabetes mellitus and hypertension are considered as major risk factors. A study to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in the community (PIKOM) through education and lifestyle changes was undertaken. The study population was from four different areas in Peninsular Malaysia - Kota Bharu and Bachok in Kelantan ; Raub in Pahang; Gunung Besout in Perak and Felda Palong in Negri Sembilan. The subjects invited to participate in this study ware aged between 30 - 65 years, did not have any debilitating illnesses and no known history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Subjects were asked to come to the local clinic in a fasting state and after physical examination, blood was taken for plasma glucose and lipids. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was then performed. A total of 4,121 subjects participated in the study. The proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus was highest in Felda Palong area (20.3%) and lowest in Raub area (7.1%). The proportion of subjects with hypertension was also highest in Felda Palong area (38.6%) and lowest in Raub area (29.1%). This could be attributable to the subjects in Felda Palong having the highest mean Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist-to-Hip Ratio (WHR). There were significant associations between diabetes and hypertension with age and obesity. Subjects with diabetes mellitus and hypertension also had the highest mean age, BMI, WHR and plasma cholesterol.In conclusion, the proportion of patients with risk factors for CVD was high and intervention studies through education and lifestyle changes were being carried out to see their effectiveness.

  10. Fruit and vegetable intake and cardiovascular risk factors in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, M J E; Griffin, S J; Sharp, S J; Cooper, A J M

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The cardiovascular benefit of increasing fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake following diagnosis of diabetes remains unknown. We aimed to describe how quantity and variety of F&V intake, and plasma vitamin C, change after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and examine whether these changes are associated with improvements in cardiovascular risk factors. Subjects/Methods: A total of 401 individuals with screen-detected diabetes from the ADDITION-Cambridge study were followed up over 5 years. F&V intake was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and plasma vitamin C at baseline, at 1 year and at 5 years. Linear mixed models were used to estimate associations of changes in quantity and variety of F&V intake, and plasma vitamin C, with cardiovascular risk factors and a clustered cardiometabolic risk score (CCMR), where a higher score indicates higher risk. Results: F&V intake increased in year 1 but decreased by year 5, whereas variety remained unchanged. Plasma vitamin C increased at 1 year and at 5 years. Each s.d. increase (250g between baseline and 1 year and 270g between 1 and 5 years) in F&V intake was associated with lower waist circumference (−0.92 (95% CI: −1.57, −0.27) cm), HbA1c (−0.11 (−0.20, −0.03) %) and CCMR (−0.04 (−0.08, −0.01)) at 1 year and higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (0.04 (0.01, 0.06) mmol/l) at 5 years. Increased plasma vitamin C (per s.d., 22.5 μmol/l) was associated with higher HDL-cholesterol (0.04 (0.01, 0.06) mmol/l) and lower CCMR (−0.07 (−0.12, −0.03)) between 1 and 5 years. Conclusions: Increases in F&V quantity following diagnosis of diabetes are associated with lower cardiovascular risk factors. Health promotion interventions might highlight the importance of increasing, and maintaining increases in, F&V intake for improved cardiometabolic health in patients with diabetes. PMID:27759070

  11. ADAMTS13 activity as a novel risk factor for incident type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Paul S; van Herpt, Thijs T W; Ligthart, Symen; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; van Hoek, Mandy; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Franco, Oscar H; de Maat, Moniek P M; Leebeek, Frank W G; Dehghan, Abbas

    2017-02-01

    ADAMTS13 is a protease that breaks down von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers into smaller, less active particles. VWF has been associated with an increased risk of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here, we determine whether ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen are associated with incident diabetes. This study included 5176 participants from the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Participants were free of diabetes at baseline and followed up for more than 20 years. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the association of ADAMTS13 activity and VWF antigen with incident diabetes. ADAMTS13 activity was associated with an increased risk of incident diabetes (HR 1.17 [95% CI 1.08, 1.27]) after adjustment for known risk factors and VWF antigen levels. Although ADAMTS13 activity was positively associated with fasting glucose and insulin, the association with incident diabetes did not change when we adjusted for these covariates. ADAMTS13 activity was also associated with incident prediabetes (defined on the basis of both fasting and non-fasting blood glucose) after adjustment for known risk factors (HR 1.11 [95% CI 1.03, 1.19]), while the VWF antigen level was not. VWF antigen was associated with incident diabetes, but this association was attenuated after adjustment for known risk factors. ADAMTS13 activity appears to be an independent risk factor for incident prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. As the association between ADAMTS13 and diabetes did not appear to be explained by its cleavage of VWF, ADAMTS13 may have an independent role in the development of diabetes.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of type 2 diabetes in an urbanizing rural community of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mafuzar; Rahim, Md Abdur; Nahar, Quamrun

    2007-08-01

    This cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its' risk factors in an urbanizing rural community of Bangladesh. Two villages were randomly selected from the rural areas of Gazipur district and total 975 subjects (> or =20 years), were included following simple random procedure. Capillary blood glucose levels, fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels and 2-hour after 75 g oral glucose load (OGTT) were measured. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences and blood pressure were measured. The study population was lean with mean body mass index (BMI) of 20.48. The total prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 8.5%, men showed higher prevalence (9.4%) compare to women (8.0%). Increasing age and higher BMI were found to be significant risk factors following both FBG and OGTT. The study has shown that prevalence of diabetes has increased in the populations who are in transitional stage of urbanization, and may indicate an epidemiological transition due to fast expanding urbanization.

  13. Sociodemographic Risk Factors to Intellectual and Academic Functioning in Children with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overstreet, Stacy; Holmes, Clarissa S.; Dunlap, William P.; Frentz, Johnette

    1997-01-01

    The independent contributions of ethnicity and socioeconomic status to intellectual and academic functioning in children with diabetes were studied with 58 diabetic children and 58 comparisons. Findings indicate that black children with diabetes, regardless of social class, are at greater risk for intellectual deficits and learning problems than…

  14. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (P<0.0001 both). BDNF improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the diabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; P<0.01) and for VDTR from 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.92) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98; P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common risk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  15. Active use of cocaine: an independent risk factor for recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis in a city hospital.

    PubMed

    Nyenwe, Ebenezer A; Loganathan, Raghu S; Blum, Steve; Ezuteh, Donald O; Erani, David M; Wan, Jim Y; Palace, Marcia R; Kitabchi, Abbas E

    2007-01-01

    To identify the risk factors for recurrent diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in a city hospital. We performed a retrospective analysis of sequential adult admissions for DKA at Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center in New York between July 1, 2001, and June 30, 2004. The patients were divided into cohorts, which were compared with use of analysis of variance and X2 tests. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed where indicated. In 168 patients (96 men and 72 women), 219 episodes of DKA occurred. The mean age (+/- SD) of the overall study group was 38.6 +/- 14.8 years. Fifty-four patients (32%) had type 2 diabetes, and 44 patients (26%) had new-onset diabetes. The recurrence rate of DKA was 169% in cocaine users and 39% in nonusers (P<0.0001). Active use of cocaine, noncompliance, and Hispanic ethnicity emerged as independent risk factors for recurrent DKA-odds ratio (OR) = 4.38, P = 0.001; OR = 1.96, P = 0.05; and OR = 0.40, P = 0.005, respectively. The commonest precipitants of DKA were noncompliance (44%) and infection (26%). Noncompliance was associated with use of cocaine, use of cannabis, and cigarette smoking (P = 0.008, 0.04, and 0.01, respectively). In 91 of the hospital admissions for DKA (42%), the patients were active smokers. Active use of cocaine is an independent risk factor for recurrent DKA, as are noncompliance and Hispanic ethnicity. Of these 3 factors, cocaine showed the strongest association with DKA. Therefore, toxicology screening in patients with recurrent DKA may be prudent and worthwhile.

  16. Identification of Risk Factors Affecting Impaired Fasting Glucose and Diabetes in Adult Patients from Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yutian; Han, Weiqing; Wang, Yuhan; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Shili; Zhang, Huiping; Jiang, Lingling; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Yaqin; Li, Bo

    2015-10-12

    Besides genetic factors, the occurrence of diabetes is influenced by lifestyles and environmental factors as well as trace elements in diet materials. Subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore risk factors affecting IFG and diabetes in patients from Northeast China. A population-based, cross-sectional survey of chronic diseases and related risk factors was conducted in Jilin Province of Northeast China. All adult residents, aged 18-79, were invited to participate in this survey using the method of multistage stratified random cluster sampling. One hundred thirty-four patients with IFG or DM and 391 healthy control subjects were recruited. We compared demographic factors, body size measurements, healthy-related behaviors, and hair metallic element contents between IFG/diabetes patients and healthy individuals. IFG/diabetes patients had a greater weight, waist, hip, and body mass index (BMI) than control subjects. Significant differences in the content of zinc (Zn), potassium (K), copper (Ca), and sodium (Na) as well as Cu/Zn ratios between IFG or DM patients and control subjects (p < 0.05) were also observed. Hair Cu, selenium (Se), and Na contents were positively correlated with blood glucose levels (Cu: rs = 0.135, p = 0.002; Se: rs = 0.110, p = 0.012; Na: rs = 0.091, p = 0.038). Polytomous logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, family history of diabetes and BMI, showed that subjects with high BMI were more likely to develop IFG and DM (IFG: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.02-1.29; DM: OR = 1.15, OR 95% CI = 1.01-1.33). Moreover, rarely or never eating fruits was a risk factor for DM (OR = 5.46, OR 95% CI = 1.87-15.98) but not for IFG (OR = 1.70, OR 95% CI = 0.72-4.02). Subjects with abdominal obesity or DM history were more susceptible to DM (abdominal obesity: OR = 2.99, OR 95% CI = 1.07-8.37; DM history: OR = 2.69, OR 95% CI = 1.01-7.20). We found that subjects living in

  17. Psychosocial Illness in Children with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevalence, Pattern and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sengar, Ghanshyam Singh; Sharma, Monika; Choudhary, Shyama; Nagaraj, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and psychosocial illness influence each other in multiple ways. The extent of psychosocial disorders in children with T1DM remains largely unstudied in India. Aim To assess the prevalence, severity, pattern and variables affecting psychosocial illness in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Material and Methods This observational study included 84 children (6-14 years of age) having T1DM at least for 1 year and 100 non diabetic children for comparison. “DSM-5 parent/guardian-Rated Level 1 & 2 Cross-Cutting Symptom Measure –Child age 6-17” was used to assess psychosocial illness, specific domains and severity. Socio-demographic variables were studied and HbA1c levels were measured. Results Significantly higher prevalence of psychosocial illness was observed in children with T1DM as compared with non diabetic group (55.95% vs 20%; p<0.0001). The prevalence for mild, moderate and severe psychosocial illness was 8.33%, 27.38% and 20.24% respectively in diabetic children. Most common psychosocial abnormality was irritation (38.1%), followed by depression (36.9%) and anxiety (32.1%). The prevalence of psychosocial illness was significantly higher in T1DM patients with poorer metabolic control (HbA1c>7.5, p=0.014). Significant association of psychosocial illness was also noticed with poor dietary compliance (p=0.021) and higher mean HbA1c level (p<0.001). Conclusion This study established T1DM as a risk factor for development of psychosocial illness. Irritation, depression and anxiety were most common abnormalities. Significant association of psychosocial illness with poor dietary compliance and poor metabolic control was observed. Psychosocial assessment of every diabetic child is suggested for optimal management. PMID:27790539

  18. Inadequacy of the risk factor based approach to detect gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dahanayaka, N J; Agampodi, S B; Ranasinghe, O R; Jayaweera, P M; Wickramasinghe, W A; Adhikari, A N; Chathurani, H K; Dissanayaka, U T

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the present risk factor based approach in diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in Sri Lanka in comparison with new guidelines proposed by the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG). A community based cross sectional descriptive study was conducted among pregnant women with gestational age of 24-28 weeks and residing in Anuradhapura district. All eligible pregnant women from selected Medical Officers of Health areas were invited to participate. The 75 g oral glucose tolerance test was carried out among all participants. According to IADPSG criteria, 36 (8.9%) of pregnant women had GDM, compared to 29 (7.2%) according to WHO criteria. Prevalence of GDM in the study population (positive by one or both methods) was 10.6% (n=43) (95% CI 7.9-13.9%). Of these 43 women,22 (51.1%) had positive results by both methods. Seven (16.3%) and 14 (32.6%) mothers were positive only according to WHO and IADPSG criteria respectively. Out of 29 mothers who fulfilled WHO criteria, only one had an abnormal fasting plasma glucose, but 28 had abnormal 2 hour values. A total of 170 (42.0%) participants had at least one risk factor or early indicator of GDM. A risk based approach would have detected only 22 GDM patients according to IADPSG criteria, missing 14 cases (38.9%) who did not have any of the risk factors for GDM. The risk factor based approach misses more than one third of GDM cases. Urgent revision of current GDM screening guidelines is recommended.

  19. Urinary tract infections in Romanian patients with diabetes: prevalence, etiology, and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Chiţă, Teodora; Timar, Bogdan; Muntean, Delia; Bădiţoiu, Luminiţa; Horhat, Florin; Hogea, Elena; Moldovan, Roxana; Timar, Romulus; Licker, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Aim Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have an increased risk of infections, especially urinary tract infections (UTIs). The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and etiology of UTIs and identify the risk factors for their development in patients with DM. Patients and methods In this retrospective, noninterventional study, the medical records of 2,465 adult patients with DM who were hospitalized in a Diabetes Clinic were reviewed. Data regarding the presence of UTI and possible associated risk factors were collected and their possible relation was analyzed. The study protocol and procedures were approved by the Ethics Committee of Timișoara Emergency Hospital. All data were collected and analyzed using SPSS v.17 statistical software. Results The prevalence of UTIs in patients with DM was 12.0% (297 cases), being higher in females than in males and higher in patients with type 2 DM compared with patients with type 1 DM. In univariate logistic regression analysis, risk factors associated with UTIs were female gender, age, type 2 DM, longer duration of DM, and the presence of chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. Multivariate analysis identified age, duration of DM, and metabolic control (hemoglobin A1c levels) as independent risk factors for UTIs. The gram-negative bacilli from the Enterobacteriaceae family were predominant, with Escherichia coli being the most frequent of them (70.4%). Conclusion UTIs are a frequent condition associated with DM. It is necessary to improve the care and the screening of UTIs in patients with DM to prevent the occurrence of possible associated severe renal complications. PMID:28031715

  20. Diabetes and Cirrhosis Are Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma After Successful Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, Magnus; Nangarhari, Ali; Weiland, Ola; Aleman, Soo

    2016-09-15

    Successful treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection reduces the risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but a risk remains. Current guidelines recommend continued HCC surveillance after sustained virologic response (SVR) has been achieved. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and incidence rates for HCC after SVR in HCV patients with pretreatment advanced liver disease (Metavir stage F3/F4). All patients with advanced liver disease successfully treated for HCV at Karolinska University Hospital during 1992-2013 (n = 399) were followed up for a median of 7.8 years. Data from national registries were used to minimize loss to follow-up. Incidence rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for development of HCC were calculated by Cox regression analysis. Seventeen patients developed HCC during 3366 person-years (PY) of follow-up. The HCC incidence rate was 0.95 (95% confidence interval [CI], .57-1.6) and 0.15 (95% CI, .05-.49) per 100 PY for patients with pretreatment F4 and F3, respectively. Patients with pretreatment cirrhosis and diabetes had a HR to develop HCC of 6.3, and an incidence rate of 7.9 per 100 PY (95% CI, 3.3-19) during the first 2 years of follow-up. The risk for HCC decreased significantly 2 years after SVR had been achieved. Diabetes mellitus and cirrhosis are strong risk factors for HCC development after SVR has been achieved. The risk to develop HCC diminishes significantly 2 years after SVR. Patients without cirrhosis have a low risk to develop HCC after SVR, and the benefit of HCC surveillance for this group is questionable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Using Multistate Observational Studies to Determine Role of Hypertension and Diabetes as Risk Factors for Dementia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mitasha; Raj, Des; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Gandhi, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Vishav

    2016-12-01

    Evidence suggests that modifiable risk factors which can be targeted by prevention are vascular diseases, such as diabetes, midlife hypertension (HTN), midlife obesity, midlife cholesterol, mid- and late-life depression as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and poor diet. A comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database and Google Scholar was conducted. A combinations of medical subject headings and free text words that included search terms related to the exposure (e.g., prevalence, HTN, raised BP, high BP, diabetes, high blood sugar, DM, India, state), were combined with search terms related to the outcomes (e.g., prevalence, disease burden, estimate, dementia, India). The filters included were English for the language category and humans for the study category. The PubMed search initially identified 269 references, and a total of 204 abstracts were screened by inclusion criteria. Full-text assessment of 136 articles on prevalence of dementia resulted in 20 relevant articles from which the different regions of the country were identified. Based on the search conducted according to the regions; 287abstracts of the prevalence of HTN and 577 on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were screened. There were 43 full-text articles on the prevalence of HTN and diabetes from the regions where the prevalence of dementia was available. Of these potentially relevant articles were 14 in number. Despite the uncertainty in the role, the data analysis, therefore, points to a role in the prevention of HTN and diabetes to prevent dementia.

  2. Using Multistate Observational Studies to Determine Role of Hypertension and Diabetes as Risk Factors for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mitasha; Raj, Des; Raina, Sunil Kumar; Gandhi, Manoj Kumar; Chander, Vishav

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that modifiable risk factors which can be targeted by prevention are vascular diseases, such as diabetes, midlife hypertension (HTN), midlife obesity, midlife cholesterol, mid- and late-life depression as well as lifestyle factors such as smoking, physical inactivity, and poor diet. Methods: A comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database and Google Scholar was conducted. A combinations of medical subject headings and free text words that included search terms related to the exposure (e.g., prevalence, HTN, raised BP, high BP, diabetes, high blood sugar, DM, India, state), were combined with search terms related to the outcomes (e.g., prevalence, disease burden, estimate, dementia, India). The filters included were English for the language category and humans for the study category. Results: The PubMed search initially identified 269 references, and a total of 204 abstracts were screened by inclusion criteria. Full-text assessment of 136 articles on prevalence of dementia resulted in 20 relevant articles from which the different regions of the country were identified. Based on the search conducted according to the regions; 287abstracts of the prevalence of HTN and 577 on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus were screened. There were 43 full-text articles on the prevalence of HTN and diabetes from the regions where the prevalence of dementia was available. Of these potentially relevant articles were 14 in number. Conclusion: Despite the uncertainty in the role, the data analysis, therefore, points to a role in the prevention of HTN and diabetes to prevent dementia. PMID:28163495

  3. Diabetes risk factors in children: a partnership between nurse practitioner and high school students.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Terri H; Schucker, Mary McGrath; Ratcliffe, Sarah J; Holmberg, Tyler; Baier, Scott; Deatrick, Janet A

    2011-01-01

    This project was a 4-year university/community collaboration to (1) screen for diabetes risk factors in children from in an inner-city community; (2) assess children's knowledge of nutrition and measure their physical endurance; and (3) survey parents about barriers to healthy living. Descriptive cross-sectional study utilizing a community participatory-based research approach. For a 4-week period each year, nurse practitioner students and high school students partnered in an evaluation of elementary school children that included assessment of (1) height, weight, waist circumference, BMI, and acanthosis nigricans; (2) scores on a nutrition knowledge test; and (3) recovery heart rate after a dance activity. Parents of the children were surveyed regarding barriers to healthy eating and activity. A total of 240 African American children were evaluated: 25% were obese, 24% had a waist circumference >95th percentile, and 14% had acanthosis nigricans. The mean score of a nutrition knowledge test was 65%, and recovery heart rates were significantly higher than preexercise heart rates. Of 48 parents surveyed, the most common barrier to eating healthy reported was the children's picky eating (62%), and most common barrier to activity was lack of access to safe places to play (54%). Nurses working with children from inner-city communities should be especially aware of the children's many risk factors for diabetes. Clinicians who hope to make a difference in altering these risks should collaborate with the community to target high-risk populations for diabetes screening, promote good nutrition and exercise, and address barriers to healthy living. When developing plans of care for children, regardless of setting, it is critical to understand the community and incorporate the families as partners in developing culturally relevant interventions.

  4. Diabetes mellitus in Jamaica: sex differences in burden, risk factors, awareness, treatment and control in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Myrie, Colette; Younger-Coleman, Novie; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall; McFarlane, Shelly; Francis, Damian; Ferguson, Trevor; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana; Wilks, Rainford

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to provide valid estimates of the burden of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus by sex in Jamaica, a predominantly Black, middle-income and developing country. The Jamaica Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008 examined a nationally representative sample of 2848 Jamaicans aged 15-74. Parameter estimates and 95% confidence intervals [CI] were weighted for non-response as well as age and sex of the source population. Sex differences in risk factors and diabetes prevalence, awareness, treatment and control were estimated in multivariable models. Population-attributable fractions (PAFs) of obesity on diabetes mellitus were estimated in both sexes. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 7.9% (95% CI: 6.7-9.1%), significantly higher in women than men 9.3% vs. 6.4% (P = 0.02) and increasing with age. Seventy-six percentage of persons with diabetes mellitus were aware of their status; urban women and rural men were less likely to be aware. Diabetes control (43% overall) was less common in higher-income men, but more common in higher-income women. Persons without health insurance were less likely to control their diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes risk factors was higher in women than men. Increased waist circumference (≥94 cm [men]/≥80 cm [women]), overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and low physical activity/inactivity were associated with PAFs for diabetes mellitus of 27%, 37% and 15%, respectively, in men and 77%, 54% and 24%, respectively, in women. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus and its risk factors is high in Jamaica, especially among women, and national programmes to stem the diabetes mellitus epidemic should take these sex differences into consideration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Canine diabetes mellitus risk factors: A matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pöppl, Alan Gomes; de Carvalho, Guilherme Luiz Carvalho; Vivian, Itatiele Farias; Corbellini, Luis Gustavo; González, Félix Hilário Díaz

    2017-08-04

    Different subtypes of canine diabetes mellitus (CDM) have been described based on their aetiopathogenesis. Therefore, manifold risk factors may be involved in CDM development. This study aims to investigate canine diabetes mellitus risk factors. Owners of 110 diabetic dogs and 136 healthy controls matched by breed, sex, and age were interviewed concerning aspects related to diet, weight, physical activity, oral health, reproductive history, pancreatitis, and exposure to exogenous glucocorticoids. Two multivariate multivariable statistical models were created: The UMod included males and females without variables related to oestrous cycle, while the FMod included only females with all analysed variables. In the UMod, "Not exclusively commercial diet" (OR 4.86, 95%CI 2.2-10.7, P<0.001) and "Overweight" (OR 3.51, 95%CI 1.6-7.5, P=0.001) were statistically significant, while in the FMod, "Not exclusively commercial diet" (OR 4.14, 95%CI 1.3-12.7, P=0.01), "Table scraps abuse" (OR 3.62, 95%CI 1.1-12.2, P=0.03), "Overweight" (OR 3.91, 95%CI 1.2-12.6, P=0.02), and "Dioestrus" (OR 5.53, 95%CI 1.9-16.3, P=0.002) were statistically significant. The findings in this study support feeding not exclusively balanced commercial dog food, overweight, treats abuse, and diestrus, as main CDM risk factors. Moreover, those results give subside for preventive care studies against CDM development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Kidney dysfunction and related cardiovascular risk factors among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    De Cosmo, Salvatore; Rossi, Maria Chiara; Pellegrini, Fabio; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Bacci, Simonetta; Gentile, Sandro; Ceriello, Antonio; Russo, Giuseppina; Nicolucci, Antonio; Giorda, Carlo; Viazzi, Francesca; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Kidney dysfunction is a strong predictor of end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular (CV) events. The main goal was to study the clinical correlates of diabetic kidney disease in a large cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) attending 236 Diabetes Clinics in Italy. Clinical data of 120 903 patients were extracted from electronic medical records by means of an ad hoc-developed software. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increased urinary albumin excretion were considered. Factors associated with the presence of albuminuria only, GFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) only or both conditions were evaluated through multivariate analysis. Mean age of the patients was 66.6 ± 11.0 years, 58.1% were male and mean duration of diabetes was 11.1 ± 9.4 years. The frequency of albuminuria, low GFR and both albuminuria and low GFR was 36.0, 23.5 and 12.2%, respectively. Glycaemic control was related to albuminuria more than to low GFR, while systolic and pulse pressure showed a trend towards higher values in patients with normal kidney function compared with those with both albuminuria and low GFR. Multivariate logistic analysis showed that age and duration of disease influenced both features of kidney dysfunction. Male gender was associated with an increased risk of albuminuria. Higher systolic blood pressure levels were associated with albuminuria, with a 4% increased risk of simultaneously having albuminuria and low GFR for each 5 mmHg increase. In this large cohort of patients with T2DM, reduced GFR and increased albuminuria showed, at least in part, different clinical correlates. A worse CV risk profile is associated with albuminuria more than with isolated low GFR.

  7. Risk factors and healing impact of multidrug-resistant bacteria in diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Richard, J-L; Sotto, A; Jourdan, N; Combescure, C; Vannereau, D; Rodier, M; Lavigne, J-P

    2008-09-01

    To determine the risk factors for acquiring multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) and their impact on outcome in infected diabetic foot ulcers. Patients hospitalized in our diabetic foot unit for an episode of infected foot ulcer were prospectively included. Diagnosis of infection was based on clinical findings using the International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot-Infectious Diseases Society of America (IWGDF-ISDA) system, and wound specimens were obtained for bacterial cultures. Each patient was followed-up for 1 year. Univariate analysis was performed to compare infected ulcers according to the presence or absence of MDRO; logistic regression was used to identify explanatory variables for MDRO presence. Factors related to healing time were evaluated by univariate and multivariate survival analyses. MDRO were isolated in 45 (23.9%) of the 188 patients studied. Deep and recurrent ulcer, previous hospitalization, HbA(1c) level, nephropathy and retinopathy were significantly associated with MDRO-infected ulceration. By multivariate analysis, previous hospitalization (OR=99.6, 95% CI=[19.9-499.0]) and proliferative retinopathy (OR=7.4, 95% CI=[1.6-33.7]) significantly increased the risk of MDRO infection. Superficial ulcers were associated with a significant decrease in healing time, whereas neuroischaemic ulcer, proliferative retinopathy and high HbA(1c) level were associated with an increased healing time. In the multivariate analysis, presence of MDRO had no significant influence on healing time. MDRO are pathogens frequently isolated from diabetic foot infection in our foot clinic. Nevertheless, their presence appears to have no significant impact on healing time if early aggressive treatment, as in the present study, is given, including empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment, later adjusted according to microbiological findings.

  8. Trans-Palmitoleic Acid, Metabolic Risk Factors, and New-Onset Diabetes in US Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Cao, Haiming; King, Irena B.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Song, Xiaoling; Siscovick, David S.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Palmitoleic acid (cis-16:1n-7), produced by endogenous fat synthesis, has been linked to both beneficial and deleterious metabolic effects, potentially confounded by diverse determinants and tissue sources of endogenous production. Trans-palmitoleate (trans-16:1n-7) represents a distinctly exogenous source of 16:1n-7, unconfounded by endogenous synthesis or its determinants, that may be uniquely informative. Objective We investigated whether circulating trans-palmitoleate was independently related to lower metabolic risk and incident type2 diabetes. Design Prospective cohort study (1992–2006). Setting Four US communities. Patients 3,736 adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Measurements Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, anthropometry, blood lipids, inflammatory markers, and glucose-insulin levels were measured at baseline in 1992; and diet, 3 years earlier. In multivariable-adjusted models, we investigated how demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors independently related to trans-palmitoleate; how trans-palmitoleate related to major metabolic risk factors; and how trans-palmitoleate related to new-onset diabetes (304 incident cases). We validated findings for metabolic risk factors in an independent cohort of 327 women. Results In multivariable-analyses, whole-fat dairy consumption was most strongly associated with higher trans-palmitoleate. Higher trans-palmitoleate was associated with slightly lower adiposity and, independently, higher high-density-lipoprotein(HDL)-cholesterol (across quintiles: +1.9%, P=0.04), lower triglycerides (−19.0%, P<0.001), lower total:HDL-cholesterol (−4.7%, P<0.001), lower C-reactive protein (−13.8%, P=0.05), and lower insulin resistance (−16.7%, P<0.001). Trans-palmitoleate was associated with substantially lower incidence of diabetes, with multivariable-hazard-ratios=0.41 (95%CI=0.27–0.64) and 0.38 (95%CI=0.24–0.62) in quintile-4 and quintile-5, versus quintile-1 (P-trend<0.001). Findings were

  9. Impact of clinical inertia on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Whitford, David L; Al-Anjawi, Hussam A; Al-Baharna, Marwa M

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether clinical inertia is associated with simpler interventions occurring more often than complex changes and the association between clinical inertia and outcomes. Prevalence of clinical inertia over a 30 month period for hyperglycaemia, hypertension and dyslipidaemia was calculated in a random sample (n=334) of patients attending a diabetes clinic. Comparisons between prevalence of clinical inertia and outcomes for each condition were examined using parametric tests of association. There was less clinical inertia in hyperglycaemia (29% of consultations) compared with LDL (80% of consultations) and systolic BP (68% of consultations). Consultations where therapy was intensified had a greater reduction in risk factor levels than when no change was made. No association was found between treatment intensity scores and changes in HbA1c, LDL or blood pressure over 30 months. Physicians are no more likely to intervene in conditions where simple therapeutic changes are necessary as opposed to complex changes. Greater clinical inertia leads to poorer outcomes. There continues to be substantial clinical inertia in routine clinical practice. Physicians should adopt a holistic approach to cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with diabetes, adhere more closely to established management guidelines and emphasize personal individualized target setting. Copyright © 2013 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Malaysia: current trends and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Tee, E-S; Yap, R W K

    2017-07-01

    This review discussed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in Malaysia and the associated major risk factors, namely overweight/obesity, dietary practices and physical activity in both adults and school children. Detailed analyses of such information will provide crucial information for the formulation and implementation of programmes for the control and prevention of T2DM in the country. National studies from 1996-2015, and other recent nation-wide studies were referred to. The current prevalence of DM in 2015 is 17.5%, over double since 1996. Females, older age group, Indians, and urban residents had the highest risk of DM. The combined prevalence of overweight/obesity in 2015 is 47.7% for adults. Adults did not achieve the recommended intakes for majority of the foods groups in the Malaysian Food Pyramid especially fruits and vegetables. Adults also had moderate physical activity level. Three nation-wide studies showed a prevalence ranging from 27 to 31% for combined overweight/obesity in school children. The prevalence was higher among boys, primary school age, Indian ethnicity, and even rural children are not spared. Physical activity level was also low among school children. There must be serious systematic implementation of action plans to combat the high prevalence of diabetes and associated risk factors.

  11. TCF7L2 type 2 diabetes risk variant, lifestyle factors, and incidence of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drake, Isabel; Wallström, Peter; Hindy, George; Ericson, Ulrika; Gullberg, Bo; Bjartell, Anders; Sonestedt, Emily; Orho-Melander, Marju; Wirfält, Elisabet

    2014-09-01

    Variation in transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), the strongest genetic risk factor for type 2 diabetes (T2D), may play a role in prostate cancer (PCa) depending on lifestyle factors. The aims of this study were to determine if TCF7L2 rs7903146 is associated with risk of PCa and if the association is modified by lifestyle factors independently of T2D status. We prospectively followed 8,558 men in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study from baseline 1991-1996 until end of 2009. Cox regression models were used to assess the association between rs7903146 T2D-risk allele (T) and PCa. Effect modification by incident T2D status, fasting glucose levels, dietary, and lifestyle risk factors were tested. During follow-up 855 incident PCa cases were registered. We observed a non-significant tendency for the TCF7L2 variant to associate with higher risk of PCa, which was unaffected by adjustment for incident T2D (HR = 1.24; 95% CI: 0.96, 1.60; P = 0.079) but more pronounced among subjects who developed T2D (HR = 1.91, 95% CI: 0.88, 4.14; P = 0.064). In a sub-sample of hyperglycemic men we observed an increased risk of PCa among T-allele carriers (HR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.22, 6.04; P = 0.014; P(interaction)  = 0.056). T-allele carriers with higher number of lifestyle risk factors had an increased risk of PCa (P(interaction)  = 0.006). We found no independent association between TCF7L2 rs7903146 and PCa risk. However, among hyperglycemic men we observed that the risk allele may increase risk of PCa. The association between rs7903146 and PCa risk may also be modified by lifestyle factors. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Time trends and risk factors for diabetes mellitus in cats presented to veterinary teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Prahl, Annalisa; Guptill, Lynn; Glickman, Nita W; Tetrick, Mark; Glickman, Larry T

    2007-10-01

    Veterinary Medical Data Base records of cats with diabetes mellitus (DM) from 1970 through 1999 were reviewed to identify trends in hospital prevalence of DM and potential host risk factors. Hospital prevalence increased from eight cases per 10,000 in 1970 to 124 per 10,000 in 1999 (P < 0.001). Case fatality percent at first visit decreased from 40% to 10% (P < 0.001). Hospital prevalence increased in all age groups (P < 0.002). There was no apparent seasonal pattern in hospital prevalence. Significant risk factors included male gender, increasing age for both genders (P < 0.001), increasing weight for males (P < 0.001), and mixed vs pure breed for females (P = 0.006).

  13. Diabetes mellitus in Zambia and the Western Cape province of South Africa: Prevalence, risk factors, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Sarah Lou; Ayles, Helen; Beyers, Nulda; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Muyoyeta, Monde; du Toit, Elizabeth; Yudkin, John S; Floyd, Sian

    2016-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus and examine its diagnosis and management in the study communities. This is a population-based cross-sectional study among adults in 24 communities from Zambia and the Western Cape (WC) province of South Africa. Diabetes is defined as a random blood glucose concentration (RBG)⩾11.1mmol/L, or RBG<11.1mmol/L but with a self-reported prior diabetes diagnosis. For individuals with a prior diagnosis of diabetes, RBG<7.8mmol/L was considered to be an acceptable level of glycaemia. Among 45,767 Zambian and 12,496 WC participants the age-standardised prevalence of diabetes was 3.5% and 7.2% respectively. The highest risk groups identified were those of older age and those with obesity. Of those identified to have diabetes, 34.5% in Zambia and 12.7% in WC were previously unaware of their diagnosis. Among Zambian participants with diabetes, this proportion was lower among individuals with better education or with higher household socio-economic position. Of all those with previously diagnosed diabetes, 66.0% in Zambia and 59.4% in WC were not on any diabetes treatment, and 34.4% in Zambia and 32.7% in WC had a RBG concentration beyond the recommended level, ⩾7.8mmol/L. The diabetes risk factor profile for our study communities is similar to that seen in high-income populations. A high proportion of individuals with diabetes are not on diabetes treatment and of those on treatment a high proportion have high glycaemic concentrations. Such data may assist in healthcare planning to ensure timely diagnosis and management of diabetes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Gestational diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for long-term maternal renal disease.

    PubMed

    Beharier, Ofer; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Pariente, Gali; Sergienko, Ruslan; Kessous, Roy; Baumfeld, Yael; Szaingurten-Solodkin, Irit; Sheiner, Eyal

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was found to be an independent risk factor for recurrent long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular morbidity, and vascular endothelial dysfunction. However, data on the link between GDM and future risk for long-term maternal renal disease are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether GDM poses a risk for subsequent long-term maternal renal morbidity. A population-based noninterventional study compared the incidence of future renal morbidity in a cohort of women with and without previous GDM. Deliveries occurred during a 25-year period, with a mean follow-up duration of 11.2 years. The study was conducted at the Soroka University Medical Center. The study population was composed of all singleton pregnancies in women who delivered between January 1988 and December 2013. The main outcome was diagnosis of renal morbidities. Of 97,968 women who met the inclusion criteria, 9542 (9.7%) had at least 1 previous pregnancy with GDM. Using a Kaplan-Meier survival curve, we show that women with GDM had higher rates of total renal morbidity (0.1% vs 0.2%, for no GDM and with GDM, respectively; odds ratio, 2.3, 95% confidence interval, 1.4-3.7; P < .001). In addition, we found a significant dose-response association (using the χ(2) test for trends) between the number of pregnancies with GDM and future risk for renal morbidity (0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.4% for no GDM, 1 episode of GDM, and 2 episodes of GDM, respectively; P < .001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, adjusted for confounders, GDM was independently associated with future renal morbidity. GDM is a significant risk factor for future maternal renal morbidity. The risk is more substantial for patients with recurrent episodes of GDM.

  15. Association between diagnosed diabetes and serious psychological distress among U.S. adults: the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2007.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaoyang; Ford, Earl S; Zhao, Guixiang; Strine, Tara W; Dhingra, Satvinder; Barker, Lawrence; Berry, Joyce T; Mokdad, Ali H

    2009-06-01

    To estimate the prevalence of serious psychological distress (SPD) according to diabetes status and to assess the association of diabetes-related risks and conditions with SPD among U.S. adults. We analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2007. SPD was determined by a score of > or = 13 on the Kessler-6 scale. We used log-binomial regression analysis to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). We estimated the prevalence of SPD to be 7.6 % and 3.6 % among U.S. adults with and without diagnosed diabetes (unadjusted PR: 2.09; 95 % CI: 1.87, 2.34). The association of diagnosed diabetes with SPD was attenuated after adjustments for potential confounding effects of cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular comorbid conditions (adjusted PR, 1.12; 95 % CI: 0.99, 1.27). Significant correlates of SPD among persons with diagnosed diabetes were young age, low education levels, low household income, obesity, current smoking, no leisure-time physical activity, presence of one or more micro- or macro-vascular complications, and disability. The crude prevalence of SPD among adults with diagnosed diabetes was twice as high as that among those without diabetes. The increased prevalence of SPD may be accounted for by the excessive rates of cardiovascular risks and comorbid conditions among people with diagnosed diabetes.

  16. [Cardiovascular risk factor control in a population with longstanding diabetes attending endocrinology departments].

    PubMed

    Comi-Diaz, Cristina; Miralles-García, José M; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Pérez, María; Masramon, Xavier; De Pablos-Velasco, Pedro

    2010-12-01

    To determine the degree of control of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in a sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) attending Endocrinology and Nutrition Departments in Spain. An epidemiological, cross-sectional, multicenter and observational study involving 41 Departments of Endocrinology and Nutrition in Spain. Each department selected patients with DM with over 10 years of evolution, which were treated in outpatient settings. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical data, including medication, were collected for each participant. 1159 patients who met the inclusion criteria were recruited. 52% of the participants were patients with type 2 DM. The mean duration of DM was 19.6 years. A proportion of 37%, 44%, 27.6% and 25.5% had good control of their blood pressure (BP), low density cholesterol (LDLc), lipids and glucose, respectively, and only 4.3% did well in all factors evaluated. The percentage of poorly controlled BP was four times higher in type 2 than in type 1 DM. Obesity, low cultural level and aggregation of cardiovascular risk factors were associated with poorer control. The degree of control of CVRF in diabetic patients with long disease duration is insufficient. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Radzeviciene, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas

    2017-01-13

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. In a case-control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35-86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2) were matched by gender and age (±5 years). A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when "it is not enough" or "almost every time without tasting" (1.82; 95% CI 1.19-2.78; p = 0.006) compared with never adding salt. Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

  18. Adding Salt to Meals as a Risk Factor of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Radzeviciene, Lina; Ostrauskas, Rytas

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is thought to arise from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. It is important to identify modifiable risk factors that may help to reduce the risk of diabetes. Data on salt intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes are limited. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between adding salt to prepared meals and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Methods: In a case–control study, we included 234 cases, all of whom were patients aged 35–86 years with a newly confirmed diagnosis of T2DM, and 468 controls that were free of the disease. Cases and controls (ratio 1:2) were matched by gender and age (±5 years). A questionnaire was used to collect information on possible risk factors for diabetes. Adding salt to prepared meals was assessed according to: Never, when there was not enough, or almost every time without tasting. The odds ratios (OR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for type 2 diabetes was calculated using a conditional logistic regression. Results: The cases had a higher body mass index and a significantly lower education level compared to the controls. Variables such as waist circumference, body mass index, eating speed, smoking, family history of diabetes, arterial hypertension, plasma triglycerides, educational level, occupational status, morning exercise, marital status, daily urine sodium excretion, and daily energy intake were retained in the models as confounders. After adjusting for possible confounders, an approximately two-fold increased risk of type 2 diabetes was determined in subjects who add salt to prepared meals when “it is not enough” or “almost every time without tasting” (1.82; 95% CI 1.19–2.78; p = 0.006) compared with never adding salt. Conclusion: Presented data suggest the possible relationship between additional adding of salt to prepared meals and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:28098780

  19. Albuminuria, cardiovascular risk factors and disease management in subjects with type 2 diabetes: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meisinger, Christa; Heier, Margit; Landgraf, Rüdiger; Happich, Michael; Wichmann, H-Erich; Piehlmeier, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that microalbuminuria is an important risk factor for arteriosclerosis, coronary heart disease and other vascular diseases in persons with type 2 diabetes. In the present study we examined the prevalence and risk factors for micro- and macroalbuminuria and examined glycemic control as well as treatment of modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in persons with known type 2 diabetes in Germany. Methods The presented data were derived from the 'KORA Augsburg Diabetes Family Study', conducted between October 2001 and September 2002. Participants were adults aged 29 years and older with previously diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 581). Microalbuminuria was defined as an albumin-creatinine ratio of 30 to 300 mg/g, and macroalbuminuria as an albumin-creatinine ratio of more than 300 mg/g. Results Microalbuminuria was revealed in 27.2% and macroalbuminuria in 9.0% of the 581 included diabetic persons. Multivariable regression analysis identified HBA1c, duration of diabetes, systolic blood pressure, serum creatinine, smoking and waist circumference as independent risk factors associated with albuminuria (micro- or macroalbuminuria). Relatively few persons with type 2 diabetes achieved treatment targets of HbA1c < 7% (46.6%), total cholesterol < 200 mg/dl (44.1%), and LDL cholesterol < 100 mg/dl (16.0%). Optimal HDL cholesterol values (> 45 mg/dl in men, > 55 mg/dl in women) were found in 55.8%, and blood pressure values < 130 and < 85 mmHg in 31.3% of the persons Conclusion Albuminuria is common among German persons with known type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence-based guidelines, only a small proportion of type 2 diabetic persons achieved the recommended levels of glycemic control and control of cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:18986536

  20. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Recurrence in Immunosuppressed Recipients of Simultaneous Pancreas–Kidney Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Vendrame, F.; Hopfner, Y‐Y.; Diamantopoulos, S.; Virdi, S. K.; Allende, G.; Snowhite, I. V.; Reijonen, H. K.; Chen, L.; Ruiz, P.; Ciancio, G.; Hutton, J. C.; Messinger, S.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are recipients of pancreas transplants are believed to rarely develop T1D recurrence in the allograft if effectively immunosuppressed. We evaluated a cohort of 223 recipients of simultaneous pancreas–kidney allografts for T1D recurrence and its risk factors. With long‐term follow‐up, recurrence was observed in approximately 7% of patients. Comparing the therapeutic regimens employed in this cohort over time, lack of induction therapy was associated with recurrence, but this occurs even with the current regimen, which includes induction; there was no influence of maintenance regimens. Longitudinal testing for T1D‐associated autoantibodies identified autoantibody positivity, number of autoantibodies, and autoantibody conversion after transplantation as critical risk factors. Autoantibodies to the zinc transporter 8 had the strongest and closest temporal association with recurrence, which was not explained by genetically encoded amino acid sequence donor–recipient mismatches for this autoantigen. Genetic risk factors included the presence of the T1D‐predisposing HLA‐DR3/DR4 genotype in the recipient and donor–recipient sharing of HLA‐DR alleles, especially HLA‐DR3. Thus, T1D recurrence is not uncommon and is developing in patients treated with current immunosuppression. The risk factors identified in this study can be assessed in the transplant clinic to identify recurrent T1D and may lead to therapeutic advances. PMID:26317167

  1. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-12-18

    To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥ 25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01-0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made in the 2011 Rio Political Declaration, to

  2. Comparison of Some Risk Factors for Diabetes Across Different Social Groups: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A; Rathod, HK; Konda, M; Bhawalkar, JS

    2014-01-01

    Background: In fast, developing economies such as India, the population is undergoing rapid social transition, which can increase the risk profile for diabetes. Market forces promoting lifestyles such as sedentary habits, alcohol and tobacco use, which earlier were more prevalent among affluent urban populations are now trickling into the urban poor and rural populations. Aim: The aim of the present research was to compare the prevalence of risk factors for diabetes among three distinct social groups-the urban affluent, the urban poor and the rural poor. Subjects and Methods: A total of 775 adult population over 18 years and belonging to both genders were surveyed for prevalence of some of the risk factors for diabetes such as physical inactivity, obesity, alcohol, and tobacco use. The sample comprised of three distinct social groups as follows; 125 medical students representing the affluent, 400 subjects from urban slums, and 250 subjects from rural areas. Obesity was measured by body mass index (BMI) while central obesity was ascertained by waist hip ratio (WHR). Alcohol and tobacco use were elicited by interview. Results: The overall response rate was 88.52% (686/775). Medical students were more sedentary with mean hours spent each day sitting or reclining at 10.47 (3.25) h, compared to corresponding figures of 6.34 (3.1) h and 7.49 (3.74) h for the rural and urban slum residents respectively (P < 0.001). However, all types of leisure time physical activities were significantly more among the medical students compared to the other groups (P < 0.001). BMI was significantly highest among the rural population with mean of 24.22 (4.17) kg/m2 when compared to the other groups, (P < 0.001). Villagers also had higher WHR and had a higher proportion of persons above the WHR cut-off for gender (P < 0.001). Experimentation with alcohol was more prevalent among the medical students while the urban slum residents were more frequent and heavy drinkers. Smoking was most

  3. Social distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related risk factors in Barbados: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Howitt, Christina; Hambleton, Ian R; Rose, Angela M C; Hennis, Anselm; Samuels, T Alafia; George, Kenneth S; Unwin, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the distribution of diabetes, hypertension and related behavioural and biological risk factors in adults in Barbados by gender, education and occupation. Design Multistage probability sampling was used to select a representative sample of the adult population (≥25 years). Participants were interviewed using standard questionnaires, underwent anthropometric and blood pressure measurements, and provided fasting blood for glucose and cholesterol measurements. Standard WHO definitions were used. Data were weighted for sampling and non-response, and were age and sex standardised to the 2010 Barbados population. Weighted prevalence estimates were calculated, and prevalence ratios were calculated for behavioural and biological risk factors by demographic and socioeconomic group. Results Study response rate was 55.0%, with 764 women, 470 men. Prevalence of obesity was 33.8% (95% CI 30.7% to 37.1%); hypertension 40.6% (95% CI 36.5% to 44.9%); and diabetes 18.7% (95% CI 16.2% to 21.4%). Compared with women, men were less likely to be obese (prevalence ratio 0.5; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.7), or physically inactive (0.5; 0.4 to 0.6), but more likely to smoke tobacco (4.1; 2.5 to 6.7) and consume large amounts of alcohol in a single episode (4.6; 2.7 to 7.6). Both diabetes (0.83; 0.65 to 1.05) and hypertension (0.89; 0.79 to 1.02) were lower in men, but not significantly so. In women, higher educational level was related to higher fruit and vegetable intake, more physical activity, less diabetes and less hypercholesterolaemia (p 0.01–0.04). In men, higher education was related only to less smoking (p 0.04). Differences by occupation were limited to smoking in men and hypercholesterolaemia in women. Conclusions In this developing country population, sex appears to be a much stronger determinant of behavioural risk factors, as well as obesity and its related risks, than education or occupation. These findings have implications for meeting the commitments made

  4. Risk factors of severe hypoglycemia requiring medical assistance and neurological sequelae in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ja Young; Kim, Se Ran; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Lee, Kwan-Woo; Lee, Jung-Dong; Han, Seung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypoglycemia commonly occurs in patients who are being treated for diabetes. In some cases, these patients suffer from severe hypoglycemia that requires medical assistance and which can unfortunately result in long-term disabilities. Therefore, we investigated risk factors associated with severe hypoglycemia requiring medical assistance (HMA) and the resulting neurological sequelae in patients with diabetes. This investigation was a case–control study that assessed 129 patients with diabetes and documented hypoglycemia from a single tertiary hospital between February 2013 and May 2015. They were treated with oral hypoglycemic agents alone (54%) or with insulin with/without oral hypoglycemic agents (46%). If a patient with diabetes visited the emergency department due to hypoglycemia, this was defined as HMA. The control group was composed of patients with documented, nonsevere hypoglycemia who visited the outpatient clinic during the same period. The degree of neurological disability in the HMA patients was measured using the modified Rankin Scale. A multivariate analysis revealed that independent risk factors of HMA were associated with a lack of the self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and previous episodes of severe hypoglycemia. In the HMA group, 15 patients (22%) had neurological sequelae at the time of discharge. Patients with neurological sequelae were older than those without sequelae (74.3 years vs 65.8 years, P = 0.006) and had increased psychological evidence of disorders such as insomnia, dementia, and depression (40% vs 11%, P = 0.017). Patients with sequelae were also more likely to live in rural areas (47% vs 19%, P = 0.04) and to have a longer time from last seen normal till glucose administration (5.2 hours vs 1.6 hours, P = 0.027). In the present study, absence of SMBG and previous severe hypoglycemic episodes were independent risk factors of HMA and patients with an older age, a psychological disorder, a rural

  5. Prevention of gestational diabetes in pregnant women with risk factors for gestational diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Govinden, Gemma; Bustani, R; Song, S; Farrell, TA

    2015-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes mellitus can be defined as ‘glucose intolerance or hyperglycaemia with onset or first recognition during pregnancy.’ Objective The objective of our systematic review was to see if there was any intervention that could be used for primary prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Search strategy Major databases were searched from 1966 to Aug 2012 without language restriction. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing intervention with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes were included. Meta-analysis was performed in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. The primary outcome assessed was the incidence of gestational diabetes. Data collection and analysis Data from included trials were extracted independently by two authors and analysed using Rev-Man 5. Main results A total of 2422 women from 14 randomised trials were included; which compared diet (four randomised trials), exercise (three randomised trials), lifestyle changes (five randomised trials) and metformin (two randomised trials) with standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. Dietary intervention was associated with a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes (Odds ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.76) and gestational hypertension (Odds ratio 0.28, 95% CI 0.09, 0.86) compared to standard care. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus or in the secondary outcomes with exercise, lifestyle changes or metformin use compared to standard care. Conclusions The use of dietary intervention has shown a statistically significantly lower incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus and gestational hypertension compared to standard care in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:27512459

  6. Impact of classical risk factors of type 2 diabetes among Asian Indian, Chinese and Japanese populations.

    PubMed

    He, L; Tuomilehto, J; Qiao, Q; Söderberg, S; Daimon, M; Chambers, J; Pitkäniemi, J

    2015-11-01

    This review investigated the population impact of major modifiable type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk factors, with special focus on native Asian Indians, to estimate population attributable risks (PARs) and compare them with estimates from Chinese and Japanese populations. Information was obtained on risk factors in 21,041 Asian Indian, 17,774 Chinese and 17,986 Japanese populations from multiple, large, cross-sectional studies (the DECODA project) of T2D. Crude and adjusted PARs were estimated for the major T2D risk factors. Age had the highest crude and adjusted PARs among Asian Indians and Chinese in contrast to waist-hip ratio among Japanese. After adjusting for age, the PAR for body mass index (BMI) in Asian Indians (41.4% [95% CI: 37.2%; 45.4%]) was second only to triglycerides (46.4% [95% CI: 39.5%; 52.8%]) compared with 35.8% [95% CI: 29.9%; 41.4%] in Japanese and 38.4% [95% CI: 33.5%; 43.2%] in Chinese people. The PAR for BMI adjusted for age, LDL and triglycerides (39.7% [95% CI: 31.6%; 47.2%]) was higher than for any other factor in Asian Indians, and was much higher than in the Chinese (16.8% [95% CI: 3.0%; 30.9%]) and Japanese (30.4% [95% CI: 17.5%; 42.2%]) populations. This review provides estimates of the association between major risk factors and prevalences of T2D among Asian populations by examining their PARs from large population-based samples. From a public-health point of view, the importance of BMI in Asian Indians is especially highlighted in comparison to the other Asian populations. Given these results and other recent findings on the causality link between BMI and T2D, it can be postulated that obesity may be involved in the aetiology of T2D through interaction with ethnic-specific genetic factors, although ethnicity itself is not a direct risk factor for T2D as people of all ethnic backgrounds develop diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The risk factors and incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome in women with previous gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Majid; Alavi, Nooshin; Mazloomzadeh, Saeideh; Piri, Zahra; Amirmoghadami, Hamidreza

    2015-04-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects nearly 5% of pregnancies. Significant proportion of the women with previous GDM develops type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the next years, which indicates a higher risk in them than in the general population. We conducted this study to determine the risk factors and incidence of abnormal glucose level and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in women with a history of GDM in a long period after delivery in our region. We extracted the demographic characteristics of 110 women with GDM who had delivered during 2004 - 2010 in three main hospitals of Zanjan City, Iran. The patients were recalled to perform oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and other necessary tests for MetS diagnosis. Anthropometric measurements were recorded of all the participants. In this study, 110 women with a history of GDM were studied at one to six years since delivery. Among these women, 36 (32.7%) developed T2DM and 11 (10%) had impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Moreover, 22 women (20%) had developed MetS. among those with abnormal results in glycemic test, 93.6% had fasting blood sugar (FBS) ≥ 95 mg/dL (≥ 5.27 mmol/L)at the time of GDM diagnosis in the index pregnancy that was significantly higher than the normal glycemic test (NGT) group with 42.9% being affected (OR, 19.55; P < 0.0001). There was a significant difference between those with abnormal results and NGT group in interval between delivery and performing laboratory tests (27 ± 18.8 and 18.5 ± 17.7 months, respectively; OR, 1.02; P = 0.02). No insulin use during pregnancy was discovered as a protective factor in women with a history of GDM (OR, 0.35; P = 0.01). Those with abnormal results were significantly different from NGT group in the number of parities (2.61 ± 1.4 vs. 2.05 ± 1.1, respectively; OR, 1.4; P = 0.03). The most common component of MetS among women with a history of GDM was FBS > 100 mg/dL (> 5.55 mmol/L). Regarding the high incidence of the

  8. Comparing Two Waist-to-Height Ratio Measurements with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Youth with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lenna L.; Kahn, Henry S.; Pettitt, David J.; Fino, Nora F.; Morgan, Tim; Maahs, David M.; Crimmins, Nancy A.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Liese, Angela D.; D’Agostino, Ralph B.; Bell, Ronny A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Waist circumference (WC) is commonly measured by either the World Health Organization (WHO) or National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) protocol. Objective Compare the associations of WHO vs. NHANES WC-to-height ratio (WHtR) protocols with cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs) in a sample of youth with diabetes. Methods For youth (10–19 years old with type 1 [N=3082] or type 2 [N=533] diabetes) in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study, measurements were obtained of WC (by two protocols), weight, height, fasting lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, Non-HDL cholesterol) and blood pressures. Associations of CMRFs with WHO and NHANES WHtR were modeled stratified by body mass index (BMI) percentiles for age/sex: lower BMI (<85th BMI percentile; N=2071) vs. higher BMI (≥85th percentile; N=1594). Results Among lower-BMI participants, both NHANES and WHO WHtR were associated (p<0.005) with all CMRFs except blood pressure. Among higher-BMI participants, both NHANES and WHO WHtR were associated (p<0.05) with all CMRFs. WHO WHtR was more strongly associated (p<0.05) than NHANES WHtR with triglycerides, non-HDL cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure in lower-BMI participants. Among high-BMI participants, WHO WHtR was more strongly associated (p<0.05) than NHANES WHtR with triglycerides and systolic blood pressure. Conclusion Among youth with diabetes, WHtR calculated from either WC protocol captures cardiometabolic risk. The WHO WC protocol may be preferable to NHANES WC. PMID:28232855

  9. UKPDS 59: hyperglycemia and other potentially modifiable risk factors for peripheral vascular disease in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amanda I; Stevens, Richard J; Neil, Andrew; Stratton, Irene M; Boulton, Andrew J M; Holman, Rury R

    2002-05-01

    To determine the role of hyperglycemia in prospective analyses of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) in type 2 diabetes, taking into account other potential risk factors. Potential risk factors for the development of PVD were examined in 3,834 of 5,102 individuals enrolled in the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) without PVD at diagnosis of diabetes, followed for 6 years, and for whom relevant data were available. PVD was defined as two of the following: ankle-arm blood pressure index < 0.8, absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses to palpation in one or both legs, and intermittent claudication. Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between potential risk factors measured 3-4 months after diagnosis of diabetes and incident PVD. The prevalence of PVD at 3-year intervals to 18 years was determined. Hyperglycemia, assessed as HbA(1c), was associated with an increased risk for incident PVD, independent of other risk factors including age, increased systolic blood pressure, reduced HDL cholesterol, smoking, prior cardiovascular disease, peripheral sensory neuropathy, and retinopathy. Each 1% increase in HbA(1c) was associated with a 28% increased risk of PVD (95% CI 12-46), and each 10-mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure with a 25% increase in risk (95% CI 10-43). Hyperglycemia, as well as smoking, dyslipidemia, and blood pressure are potentially modifiable risk factors for the development of PVD.

  10. Diabetes mellitus is associated with early chronic venous disorder of the lower extremities in Chinese patients with cardiometabolic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jian; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-gang; He, Hong-bo; Yan, Zhen-cheng; Liu, Dao-yan; Zhu, Zhi-ming; Ni, Yin-xing

    2014-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome has received great attention because it poses a potential cardiovascular hazard, which increases the risk of lower extremity atherosclerosis. However, the relationship between the components of metabolic syndrome and the onset of chronic venous disorder of the lower extremities remains unexplained. This study investigated the characteristics of cardiometabolic risk factors of early chronic venous disorder of the lower extremities in subjects with cardiometabolic risk. The characteristics of risk factors and diabetes-related complications in diabetic patients with early chronic venous disorder of the lower extremities were also investigated. In addition, the association between early chronic venous disorder and atherosclerosis of the lower extremities was analysed. The study examined 782 subjects with cardiometabolic risk factors, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and dyslipidaemia. Lower extremity venous function was measured by digital photoplethysmography. Women had a higher prevalence of early chronic venous disorder than did men (p < 0.01). Male subjects with early chronic venous disorder had a higher systolic blood pressure than those with normal venous function (p < 0.01), and female subjects with early chronic venous disorder had a higher fasting plasma glucose level than did controls (p < 0.05). The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is also significantly higher in female patients with early chronic venous disorder (p = 0.000). Diabetic patients with early chronic venous disorder not only had higher fasting plasma glucose and total cholesterol levels but also had more serious macrovascular complications than the control group. The independent risk factors of early chronic venous disorder in female subjects with cardiometabolic risks were age and fasting plasma glucose in men it was only age Women face a two times greater risk than men. The independent risk factors of early chronic venous disorder in diabetic

  11. Meaning of Illness and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Cheryl P; Strom Williams, Joni; Voronca, Delia; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between meaning of illness and cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. The sample population was recruited from primary care clinics in the southeastern United States. The meaning of illness was assessed by a validated questionnaire with 5 subscales. The primary outcomes were cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, assessed by A1C, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP, respectively), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Multivariate linear regression models investigated associations between the clinical outcomes and the 5 MIQ factors, controlling for possible confounders. The sample comprised 302 black and white participants of whom more than half were elderly (65+ years) and the vast majority were male (98%). Systolic blood pressure was positively associated with non-anticipated vulnerability. Diastolic blood pressure was negatively associated with degree of stress/change in commitments and positively associated with challenge/motivation/hope and non-anticipated vulnerability. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly and negatively associated with degree of stress/change in commitments. Meaning of illness had a significant effect on measured outcomes of CVD risk. The specific factor included in the overarching concept of meaning of illness differed in its influence, with more positive views of stress/commitments associated with lower blood pressure and LDL but more positive views of the challenge/hope/motivation and negative views of non-anticipated vulnerability associated with diabetes associated with higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Trends for type 2 diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors in Mexico from 1993-2006.

    PubMed

    Villalpando, Salvador; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rojas, Rosalba; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    To describe the trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and other cardiovascular risk factors in three national health surveys (1993, 2000 and 2006). The databases of three surveys: ENEC 1993, ENSA 2000 and ENSANUT 2006 were gathered. Calculations of published data were reprocessed to do appropriate adjustments to assure comparability among surveys. From 1993 to 2006 the prevalence of type 2 diabetes (6.7-14.4%), metabolic syndrome (26.6-36.8%), hypertension (23.8-30.7%), hypercholesterolemia (27-43.6%), and high LDL-cholesterol (31.6-46%) increased rapidly. The prevalence of low HDL cholesterol was very high (60.5-63%) in all surveys and remained remarkably unchanged among surveys. This increasing trends for the prevalence of T2D and cardiovascular risk factors predicts larger increments in the near future for T2D and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intensification of the preventive and remedy strategies is mandatory in order curve the foreseen dramatic increment in the disease burden.

  13. Dietary Magnesium and Genetic Interactions in Diabetes and Related Risk Factors: A Brief Overview of Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hruby, Adela; McKeown, Nicola M.; Song, Yiqing; Djoussé, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional genomics has exploded in the last decade, yielding insights—both nutrigenomic and nutrigenetic—into the physiology of dietary interactions and our genes. Among these are insights into the regulation of magnesium transport and homeostasis and mechanisms underlying magnesium’s role in insulin and glucose handling. Recent observational evidence has attempted to examine some promising research avenues on interaction between genetics and dietary magnesium in relation to diabetes and diabetes risk factors. This brief review summarizes the recent evidence on dietary magnesium’s role in diabetes and related traits in the presence of underlying genetic risk, and discusses future potential research directions. PMID:24322525

  14. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M.; Ingul, Charlotte B.

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min-1·kg-1, 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min-1·kg-1 (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key points Low volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetes The weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  15. Can Time Efficient Exercise Improve Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Type 2 Diabetes? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Revdal, Anders; Hollekim-Strand, Siri M; Ingul, Charlotte B

    2016-06-01

    Exercise is considered a cornerstone in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes, but few individuals with type 2 diabetes exercise according to guidelines. We investigated the effect of two time efficient high intensity exercise interventions on exercise capacity, glycemic control and other cardiometabolic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-one individuals with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to low volume high intensity interval exercise (HIIE; 27 minutes/bout; 10x1-minute at 90 % of HRmax; n = 10) or extremely low volume sprint interval exercise (SIE; 10 minutes/bout; 2x20 seconds at maximum achievable intensity; n = 11) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood pressure and body composition were measured at baseline and post test. Both HIIE and SIE improved VO2peak (3.3 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1), 10.4 %), p < 0.01, and 1.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) (4.6 %), p = 0.03, respectively). Only HIIE reduced body fat percentage (4.5 %, p = 0.04) and two minute heart rate recovery (11.0 bpm, p = 0.02). Neither HIIE nor SIE improved HbA1c. In conclusion, this study indicates that substantially lower exercise volumes than recommended in current guidelines can improve aerobic exercise capacity in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, 12 weeks of time efficient high intensity exercise did not improve glycemic control, and interventions of longer duration should be investigated. Key pointsLow volume high-intensity interval exercise can improve peak oxygen uptake in previously sedentary individuals with type 2 diabetesThe weekly exercise volumes in the two intervention groups of 81 and 30 minutes respectively, is substantially lower than recommended in current exercise guidelines and could reduce the time-barrier associated with exercise among patients with type 2 diabetes.However, 12 weeks of structured, supervised low-volume exercise did not improve glycemic control, indicating a need for

  16. Retinopathy and risk factors in diabetic patients from Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El-Bab, Mohamed F; Shawky, Nashaat; Al-Sisi, Ali; Akhtar, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is accompanied by chronic and dangerous microvascular changes affecting most body systems, especially the eye, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy without appropriate management is emerging as one of the leading causes of blindness. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy, reduce the risk of blindness, and identify relevant risk factors. This descriptive study was designed to estimate the prevalence of retinopathy and its staging in diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic at King Fahd Hospital in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from 2008 to 2010. Patients completed a questionnaire, underwent a full medical assessment carried out by the treating clinicians, and were examined for evidence of diabetic retinopathy using standard ophthalmic outpatient instruments. In total, 690 randomly selected diabetic patients of mean age 46.10 ± 11.85 (range 16-88) years were included, comprising 395 men (57.2%) of mean age 46.50 ± 11.31 years and 295 women (42.8%) of mean age 45.55 ± 12.53 years. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 11.91 ± 7.92 years in the women and 14.42 ± 8.20 years in the men, and the mean total duration of known diabetes mellitus was 13.35 ± 8.17 years. Glycated hemoglobin was higher in men (8.53% ± 1.81%) than in women (7.73% ± 1.84%), and this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.0001). Of the 690 diabetic patients, 249 (36.1%) had retinopathy. Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 13.6% of patients, being of moderate grade in 8% and of severe grade in 8.1%. A further 6.4% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Regular screening to detect diabetic retinopathy is strongly recommended because early detection has the best chance of preventing retinal complications.

  17. Is gestational diabetes mellitus an independent risk factor for macrosomia: a meta-analysis?

    PubMed

    He, Xiu-Jie; Qin, Feng-Yun; Hu, Chuan-Lai; Zhu, Meng; Tian, Chao-Qing; Li, Li

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to explore whether gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is an independent risk factor for macrosomia or not. Three databases were systematically reviewed and reference lists of relevant articles were checked. Meta-analysis of published epidemiological studies (cohort and case-control studies) comparing whether GDM was associated with macrosomia. Calculations of pooled estimates were conducted in random-effect models. Heterogeneity was tested by using Chi square test and I (2) statistics. Publication bias was estimated from Egger's test (linear regression method) and Begg's test (rank correlation method). Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, including five cohort studies and seven case-control studies. The meta-analysis showed that GDM was associated with macrosomia independent of other risk factors. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.71, 95% CI (1.52, 1.94) in random-effect model, stratified analyses showed no differences regarding different study design, quality grade, definition of macrosomia, location of study and number of confounding factors adjusted for. There was no indication of a publication bias either from the result of Egger's test or Begg's test. Our findings indicate that GDM should be considered as an independent risk factor for newborn macrosomia. To adequately evaluate the clinical evolution of GDM need to be carefully assessed and monitored.

  18. Functional Investigations of HNF1A Identify Rare Variants as Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Najmi, Laeya Abdoli; Aukrust, Ingvild; Flannick, Jason; Molnes, Janne; Burtt, Noel; Molven, Anders; Groop, Leif; Altshuler, David; Johansson, Stefan; Bjørkhaug, Lise; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus

    2017-02-01

    Variants in HNF1A encoding hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α (HNF-1A) are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young form 3 (MODY 3) and type 2 diabetes. We investigated whether functional classification of HNF1A rare coding variants can inform models of diabetes risk prediction in the general population by analyzing the effect of 27 HNF1A variants identified in well-phenotyped populations (n = 4,115). Bioinformatics tools classified 11 variants as likely pathogenic and showed no association with diabetes risk (combined minor allele frequency [MAF] 0.22%; odds ratio [OR] 2.02; 95% CI 0.73-5.60; P = 0.18). However, a different set of 11 variants that reduced HNF-1A transcriptional activity to <60% of normal (wild-type) activity was strongly associated with diabetes in the general population (combined MAF 0.22%; OR 5.04; 95% CI 1.99-12.80; P = 0.0007). Our functional investigations indicate that 0.44% of the population carry HNF1A variants that result in a substantially increased risk for developing diabetes. These results suggest that functional characterization of variants within MODY genes may overcome the limitations of bioinformatics tools for the purposes of presymptomatic diabetes risk prediction in the general population. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. Relevance of hemostatic risk factors on coronary morphology in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Jax, Thomas W; Peters, Ansgar J; Plehn, Gunnar; Schoebel, Frank-Chris

    2009-05-06

    The influence hemostatitc parameters on the morphological extent and severity of coronary artery disease were studied in patients with and without DM type 2. It is known that patients with diabetes (DM) have abnormal metabolic and hemostatic parameters Of 150 consecutive patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease 29 presented with DM. Additionally to parameters of lipid-metabolism fibrinogen, tissue-plasminogenactivator (t-PA), plasminogen-activator-inhibitor (PAI), plasmin-a-antiplasmin (PAP), prothrombin-fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin (TAT), von-willebrand-factor (vWF), platelet factor 4 (PF4), glykomembranproteine 140 (GMP140) and the rheologic parameters plasma viscosity and red blood cell aggregation were evaluated. The extent and severity of CAD was evaluated according to the criteria of the American Heart Association. Patients with DM presented with a higher number of conventional risk factors as compared to non-diabetic patients. Additionally there were significant differences for F1+2, red blood cell aggregation and PAI. Diabetic patients showed a more severe extent of coronary arteriosclerosis, which also could be found more distally. A significant relationship between blood-glucose, thrombocyte-activation (vWF), endogenous fibrinolysis (PAI) and the severity of CAD and a more distal location of stenoses could be found (r = 0.6, p < 0.001). Patients with coronary artery disease and DM type 2 showed marked alterations of metabolic, hemostatic, fibrinolytic and rheologic parameters, which can produce a prothrombogenic state. A direct association of thrombogenic factors on coronary morphology could be shown. This can be the pathophysiologic mechanism of more severe and distal pronounced coronary atherosclerosis in these patients.

  20. An accurate risk score based on anthropometric, dietary, and lifestyle factors to predict the development of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Matthias B; Hoffmann, Kurt; Boeing, Heiner; Linseisen, Jakob; Rohrmann, Sabine; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Spranger, Joachim; Thamer, Claus; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Fritsche, Andreas; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2007-03-01

    We aimed to develop a precise risk score for the screening of large populations for individuals at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes based on noninvasive measurements of major risk factors in German study populations. A prospective cohort study (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition [EPIC]-Potsdam study) of 9,729 men and 15,438 women aged 35-65 years was used to derive a risk score predicting incident type 2 diabetes. Multivariate Cox regression model coefficients were used to weigh each variable in the calculation of the score. Data from the EPIC-Heidelberg, the Tübingen Family Study for Type 2 Diabetes (TUF), and the Metabolic Syndrome Berlin Potsdam (MeSyBePo) study were used to validate this score. Information on age, waist circumference, height, history of hypertension, physical activity, smoking, and consumption of red meat, whole-grain bread, coffee, and alcohol formed the German Diabetes Risk Score (mean 446 points [range 118-983]). The probability of developing diabetes within 5 years in the EPIC-Potsdam study increased from 0.3% for 300 to 23.2% for 750 score points. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.84 in the EPIC-Potsdam and 0.82 in the EPIC-Heidelberg studies. Correlation coefficients between the German Diabetes Risk Score and insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic individuals were -0.56 in the TUF and -0.45 in the MeSyBePo studies. ROC values for undiagnosed diabetes were 0.83 in the TUF and 0.75 in the MeSyBePo studies. The German Diabetes Risk Score (available at www.dife.de) is an accurate tool to identify individuals at high risk for or with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes.

  1. Vitamin D deficiency: a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes?.

    PubMed

    Mezza, T; Muscogiuri, G; Sorice, G P; Prioletta, A; Salomone, E; Pontecorvi, A; Giaccari, A

    2012-01-01

    Recent compelling evidence suggests a role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and insulin secretion derangements, with a consequent possible interference with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanism of this link is incompletely understood. In fact, vitamin D deficiency is usually detected in obesity in which insulin resistance is also a common finding. The coexistence of insulin resistance and vitamin D deficiency has generated several hypotheses. Some cross-sectional and prospective studies have suggested that vitamin D deficiency may play a role in worsening insulin resistance; others have identified obesity as a risk factor predisposing individuals to exhibit both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance. The available data from intervention studies are largely confounded, and inadequate considerations of seasonal effects on 25(OH)D concentrations are also a common design flaw in many studies. On the contrary, there is strong evidence that obesity might cause both vitamin D deficiency and insulin resistance, leaving open the possibility that vitamin D and diabetes are not related at all. Although it might seem premature to draw firm conclusions on the role of vitamin D supplementation in reducing insulin resistance and preventing type 2 diabetes, this manuscript will review the circumstances leading to vitamin D deficiency and how such a deficiency can eventually independently affect insulin sensitivity.

  2. Addressing risk factors, screening, and preventative treatment for diabetic retinopathy in developing countries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lin, Stephanie; Ramulu, Pradeep; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2016-05-01

    The number of people with diabetic retinopathy (DR) has increased with the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus worldwide, especially in developing countries. In recent years, the successful implementation of public health programs in developed countries has been thought to contribute to decreases in blindness from DR. Developing countries, however, have not seen the same improvements, and their public health interventions still face significant challenges. In this review we describe the current state of public health approaches including risk factor control, screening and treatment techniques for DR in developing countries, and suggest recommendations. While the awareness of DR is variable, specific knowledge about DR is low, such that many patients have already experienced vision loss by the time they are screened. Attempts to improve rates of screening, in particular through non-mydriatic cameras and tele-screening, are ongoing and promising, although challenges include collaboration with healthcare systems and technology failures. Laser treatment is the most readily available, with anti-VEGF therapy and vitreo-retinal surgery increasingly sought after and provided. Recommendations include the use of 'targeted mydriasis' for fundus imaging to address high rates of ungradable images, increased communication with diabetes management services to improve patient retention and mobilization of access to DR treatments.

  3. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization. PMID:25521362

  4. Pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics of thiazolidinediones: role in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Della-Morte, David; Palmirotta, Raffaele; Rehni, Ashish K; Pastore, Donatella; Capuani, Barbara; Pacifici, Francesca; De Marchis, Maria Laura; Dave, Kunjan R; Bellia, Alfonso; Fogliame, Giuseppe; Ferroni, Patrizia; Donadel, Giulia; Cacciatore, Francesco; Abete, Pasquale; Dong, Chuanhui; Pileggi, Antonello; Roselli, Mario; Ricordi, Camillo; Sbraccia, Paolo; Guadagni, Fiorella; Rundek, Tatjana; Lauro, Davide

    2014-12-01

    The most important goal in the treatment of patients with diabetes is to prevent the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), the first cause of mortality in these subjects. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), a class of antidiabetic drugs, act as insulin sensitizers increasing insulin-dependent glucose disposal and reducing hepatic glucose output. TZDs including pioglitazone, rosiglitazone and troglitazone, by activating PPAR-γ have shown pleiotropic effects in reducing vascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. However, troglitazone was removed from the market due to its hepatoxicity, and rosiglitazone and pioglitazone both have particular warnings due to being associated with heart diseases. Specific genetic variations in genes involved in the pathways regulated by TDZs have demonstrated to modify the variability in treatment with these drugs, especially in their side effects. Therefore, pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics are an important tool in further understand intersubject variability per se but also to assess the therapeutic potential of such variability in drug individualization and therapeutic optimization.

  5. Low educational status is a risk factor for mortality among diabetic people.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, P M; Johansson, S E; Sundquist, J

    1998-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are an important cause of mortality in Western populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between self-reported diabetes mellitus, gender, attained level of education, and socio-economic resources to all-cause mortality risk in a simple random sample of 39055 subjects, aged 25 to 74 years. Follow-up data were obtained for a maximum of 16 years, from baseline (1979-1985) to 31 December 1995. Diabetic males (2.2% of the male study group) had a relative risk (RR) for total mortality of 2.24 (CI = 1.96-2.57), adjusted for age, education, marital status, housing tenure, and car ownership, compared with non-diabetic males. The corresponding figure for females with diabetes (1.9%) was RR = 3.67 (CI = 3.16-4.27). Diabetic women had the highest age-adjusted mortality risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) of 8 compared with non-diabetic women. The corresponding RR for men was just below 3 (p<0.0001). Males and females (with and without diabetes) of low attained educational level had a RR = 1.26 (CI = 1.15-1.39) and RR = 1.54 (CI = 1.31-1.81), respectively. When analysing all people with diabetes separately, adjusting for sex and age, low-educated subjects had a 40% excess all-cause mortality compared with high-educated subjects. We conclude that diabetic women have a very high relative risk for CHD mortality compared to non-diabetic women. Furthermore, diabetic people with a low attained level of education, have an increased vulnerability to, and a higher total mortality.

  6. Association of Parental History of Diabetes with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Children with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jennifer R; Stafford, Jeanette M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Badaru, Angela; Crume, Tessa L; Dabelea, Dana; Dolan, Lawrence M; Lawrence, Jean M; Pettitt, David J; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Aims Determine if parental diabetes(DM) is associated with unhealthier cardiovascular disease(CVD) risk profiles in youth with type 2 diabetes(T2D), and whether associations differed by race/ethnicity. Methods Family history was available for 382 youth with T2D from 2001 prevalent and 2002–2005 incident SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth cohorts. Parental DM was evaluated two ways two-category— any parent vs. no parent DM (evaluated overall and stratified by race/ethnicity); four-category— both parents, mother only, father only, or no parent DM (evaluated overall only). Associations with hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c), fasting lipids, blood pressure(BP), and urine albumin:creatinine ratio(ACR) were examined using regression models. Results Overall, sample characteristics included: 35.9% male, 19.1% non-Hispanic white(NHW), mean T2D duration 26.6 ± 22.2 months, mean HbA1c 7.9 ± 2.5% (62.6 ± 27.8mmol/mol). Unadjusted two-category comparisons showed youth with parental DM had higher HbA1c, higher DBP, and higher frequency of elevated ACR. Adjusted two-category comparisons showed associations remaining in non-stratified analysis for ACR [OR95%CI)=2.3(1.1, 5.0)] and in NHW youth for HbA1c [6.8% ± 0.4 v. 8.0 ± 0.4 (51.1±4.8mmol/mol v.63.9 ± 4.2), p=.015], DBP (67.7% ± 4.5 v. 76.9 ± 4.4 mmHg, p=.014) and lnTG (4.7±0.3 v. 5.3±0.3, p=.008). There were no significant findings in the adjusted four-category evaluation. Conclusions Parental history of diabetes may be associated with unhealthier CVD risk factors in youth with T2D. PMID:25784087

  7. Association of parental history of diabetes with cardiovascular disease risk factors in children with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Law, Jennifer R; Stafford, Jeanette M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Badaru, Angela; Crume, Tessa L; Dabelea, Dana; Dolan, Lawrence M; Lawrence, Jean M; Pettitt, David J; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Determine if parental diabetes (DM) is associated with unhealthier cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profiles in youth with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and whether associations differed by race/ethnicity. Family history was available for 382 youth with T2D from 2001 prevalent and 2002-2005 incident SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth cohorts. Parental DM was evaluated in two ways: two-category-any parent vs. no parent DM (evaluated overall and stratified by race/ethnicity); and four-category-both parents, mother only, father only, or no parent DM (evaluated overall only). Associations with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting lipids, blood pressure (BP), and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) were examined using regression models. Overall, sample characteristics included: 35.9% male, 19.1% non-Hispanic white (NHW), mean T2D duration 26.6±22.2months, mean HbA1c 7.9%±2.5% (62.6±27.8mmol/mol). Unadjusted two-category comparisons showed that youth with parental DM had higher HbA1c, higher DBP, and higher frequency of elevated ACR. Adjusted two-category comparisons showed associations remaining in non-stratified analysis for ACR [OR (95% CI)=2.3 (1.1, 5.0)] and in NHW youth for HbA1c [6.8%±0.4 vs. 8.0±0.4 (51.1±4.8 vs. 63.9±4.2mmol/mol), p=.015], DBP (67.7%±4.5 vs. 76.9±4.4mm Hg, p=.014) and lnTG (4.7±0.3 vs. 5.3±0.3, p=.008). There were no significant findings in the adjusted four-category evaluation. Parental history of diabetes may be associated with unhealthier CVD risk factors in youth with T2D. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Prevalence and risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult obese population in Tianjin].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-hui; Wang, Jian-hua; Zhi, Xin-yue; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Xin-min

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) prevalence and related risk factors in adult population with obesity in Tianjin. With stratified cluster randomized sampling, 2888 obese people with BMI ≥ 28 kg/m(2), aged 18 years old and over were selected from three urban and three rural regions of Tianjin, in 2006. Information on risk factors was collected with questionnaire through face-to-face interview by trained workers and data on fasting blood glucose (FBG) was collected at the same time. 2hrPPG was tested among the people who's FBG ≥ 6.1 mmol/L at the hospital. Prevalence of T2DM was calculated and the distribution of T2DM in the described subgroups and the risk factors analyzed with SPSS software. The prevalence of T2DM in adult population with obesity was 11.74%, with females (13.90%) higher than males (8.75%). The prevalence rates of T2DM were statistically different among different groups, classified by age, education, occupation, district and BMI. Results from the univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the risk factors of T2DM were age (OR = 1.383, 95%CI: 1.254 - 1.525) and sex (OR = 1.591, 95%CI: 1.230 - 2.059) while the protective factor was fruit intake (OR = 0.867, 95%CI: 0.774 - 0.971). The prevalence of T2DM in adult with obesity was considered to be high. The distribution of T2DM in different subgroups and affecting factors of T2DM in obese adults were different from general population.

  9. Reduction of cardiovascular risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes by Pycnogenol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zibadi, Sherma; Rohdewald, Peter J; Park, Danna; Watson, Ronald Ross

    2008-05-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes are at considerable risk of excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the clinical effectiveness of Pycnogenol, a flavonoid-rich dietary supplement, in reducing antihypertensive medication use and CVD risk factors in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Forty-eight individuals were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel-group design. Patients were diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes and mild to moderate hypertension and were undergoing treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either Pycnogenol pill (125 mg daily) or matched placebo for 12 weeks. According to the values of blood pressure (BP) measured at 2-week intervals, the pretrial ACE inhibitor dosage was left unchanged, reduced by 50%, or brought back to the pretrial dosage until a stable BP was obtained. Fasting plasma glucose, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), serum endothelin-1, and urinary albumin were evaluated monthly. Pycnogenol treatment achieved BP control in 58.3% of subjects at the end of the 12 weeks with 50% reduction in individual pretrial dose of ACE-inhibitors (P <.05). Plasma endothelin-1 decreased by 3.9 pg/mL in Pycnogenol-treated group vs 0.5 pg/mL increase in control group (P < .001). Mean HbA1c dropped by 0.8% in Pycnogenol-treated group (P < .05), whereas it decreased by 0.1% in control group. Fasting plasma glucose declined by 23.7 mg/dL in Pycnogenol-treated group vs 5.7 mg/dL in control group (P < .0001). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved significantly in Pycnogenol-treated group, declining by 12.7 mg/dL (P < .001). A significant decrease in urinary albumin level was observed at week 8 compared with the control group (P < .05). However, this reduction was not significant at 12th week. After 12 weeks of supplementation, Pycnogenol resulted in improved diabetes

  10. Risk factor modification in diabetic patients following angiographic identification of multi-vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Hee, Leia; Thomas, Liza; Ang, Xinhui; Yang, Lihua; Lo, Sidney; Juergens, Craig P; Mussap, Christian J; Dignan, Rebecca; French, John K

    2013-08-20

    There is little information on whether identification of multi-vessel disease (MVD) in patients with diabetic mellitus (DM) affects risk factor management. From 1125 consecutively screened patients between June 2006 and March 2010, we examined 227 diabetic patients with MVD on coronary angiography. Diabetic control and cholesterol levels were assessed by glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and total cholesterol (TC) respectively which were evaluated at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Patients were grouped by age into <55(n=33), 55-65(n=75), 66-75(n=75) and >75(n=44). Target levels were defined as HbA1c<7% and TC<4.0 mmol/L. Patients <55 years had the highest HbA1c at 9.1[7.6-11.2]% with the lowest proportion of patients (n=3; 11.1%) within target at baseline, while 66-75 years had the best HbA1c at 7.1[6.4-7.8]% with the highest proportion (n=28, 45.2%) reaching target (p<0.0001). At 1-year, the poorest HbA1c control was again observed in the age <55 with fewer patients achieving target compared to the 66-75 age group (HbA1c: 8.5% vs 6.9%; % of patients at target: 20.7% vs 54.5%; p<0.0001). Furthermore, the group <55 years demonstrated the worst TC control at 1-year with a significant increase compared to the baseline TC (p=0.01). Patients with a lower body mass index (BMI) were likely to have an improvement in HbA1c and reach target (p=0.01). Paradoxically, patients who were current smokers demonstrated a beneficial effect on optimal TC control (29.2% vs 15.4%, p=0.027). In younger diabetic patients, risk factor modification at 1-year was poor despite identification of MVD. Developing an effective education and monitoring programme to improve glycaemic control in this high risk group should be a priority.

  11. Bromelain and cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes: An exploratory randomized, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ley, Chit Moy; Ni, Qing; Liao, Xing; Gao, Huai-Lin; Robinson, Nicola

    2016-10-01

    To assess whether the dietary supplement (bromelain) has the potential to reduce plasma fibrinogen and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in patients with diabetes. This randomized placebo controlled, double blind, parallel design, efficacy study was carried out in China and investigated the effect of 12 weeks of bromelain (1,050 mg/day) on plasma fibrinogen. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) recruited 68 Chinese diabetic patients [32 males and 36 females; Han origin, mean age of 61.26 years (standard deviation (SD), 12.62 years)] with at least one CVD risk factor. Patients were randomized into either bromelain or placebo group. While bromelain group received bromelain capsule, the placebo group received placebo capsule which consisted inert ingredient and has no treatment effect. Subjects were required to take 1,050 mg (3×350 mg) of either bromelain or starch-filled placebo capsules, two to be taken (2×350 mg) after breakfast and another (350 mg) after dinner, daily for 12 weeks. Plasma fibrinogen, CVD risk factors and anthropometric indicators were determined at baseline and at 12 weeks. The change in the fibrinogen level in the bromelain group at the end of the study showed a mean reduction of 0.13 g/L (standard deviation (SD) 0.86g/L) compared with the mean reduction of 0.36 g/L (SD 0.96 g/L) for the placebo group. However, there was no significant difference in the mean change in fibrinogen between the placebo and bromelain groups (mean difference=0.23g/L (SD 0.22 g/L), =0.291). Similarly, the difference in mean change in other CVD risk factors (blood lipids, blood pressure), blood glucose, C-reactive protein and anthropometric measures between the bromelain and placebo groups was also not statistically significant. Statistical differences in fibrinogen between bromelain and placebo groups before the trial despite randomization may have influenced the results of this study. This RCT failed to show a beneficial effect in reducing fibrinogen

  12. Challenges and Opportunities in the Management of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Lifestyle and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Michelle; Giani, Elisa; Laffel, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Specific risk factors associated with diabetes, such as hyperglycemia and kidney disease, have been demonstrated to increase the incidence and progression of CVD. Nevertheless, few data exist on the effects of traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, obesity and hypertension on CVD risk in youth with T1D. Improvements in understanding and approaches to the evaluation and management of CVD risk factors, specifically for young persons with T1D, are desirable. Recent advances in non-invasive techniques to detect early vascular damage, such as the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction and aortic or carotid intima media thickness, provide new tools to evaluate the progression of CVD in childhood. In the present review, current CVD risk factor management, challenges, and potential therapeutic interventions in youth with T1D are described. PMID:26520142

  13. Identification of risk factors for suffering fear of hypoglycemia in type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Anarte, María Teresa; Carreira, Mónica; Machado, Alberto; Domínguez, Marta; Tapia, María José; Valdés, Sergio; Ruiz de Adana, María Soledad; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-12-01

    Hypoglycemia is one of the main burdens for type I Diabetes Mellitus (DM I) patients. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite unpleasant due to the variety of disagreeable physical and psychological symptoms it triggers. The patient's previous experience with hypoglycemia episodes will condition his psychological reaction to future episodes, promoting behavioral modifications that associate with poor glycemic control and worse prognosis, and even with developing psychological disorders, leading to fear of hypoglycemia (FH). To be able to provide tailored prevention and treatment of patients with FH it is necessary to identify the risk factors in DM I patients. We developed and validated the FH-15 scale, a novel instrument to assess FH, which showed good concurrent and predictive validity in DM I patients. In this work we aim to identify the risk factors for suffering FH by detecting DM I patients with FH using the FH-15 scale and then analyzing the association of clinical and sociodemographic variables. We found that age, needing help to resolve an episode of hypoglycemia, and a perceived lack of social support are risk factors for suffering FH. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Risk factors for amputation in patients with diabetic foot infection: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Serhat; Arda, Bilgin; Taşbakan, Meltem I; Çetinkalp, Şevki; Şimşir, Ilgın Y; Öztürk, Anıl M; Uysal, Ayşe; Ertam, İlgen

    2017-07-19

    There is a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms for diabetic foot infections (DFIs). Some of them are too difficult to be applied in routine clinical approach. In the routine clinical approach, it is necessary to find new risk factors and end up with a quick and easy assessment of DFIs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the independent risk factors for osteomyelitis, amputation and major amputation in patients with DFI using standard scoring procedures. We prospectively studied 379 patients with DFI. The variables were analysed using logistic analysis. A total of 126 cases (33·2%) underwent amputation. The odds ratios in the amputation model were 3·09 for osteomyelitis (P < 0·001), 4·90 for arterial stenosis (AS) (P < 0·001), 3·67 for the history of DFI (P = 0·001), 2·47 for ulcer duration >60 days (P = 0·001), 3·10 for ulcer depth > 15 mm (P < 0·001) and 10·28 for fungal DFI (P = 0·015). In this study, the unusual result of well-known literature was fungal DFI as an independent risk factor for amputation in patients with DFI. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Cohort of 2,011 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun; Xin, Lei; Wang, Dan; Liao, Zhuan; Lin, Jin-Huan; Li, Bai-Rong; Du, Ting-Ting; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increases the mortality. The identification of risk factors for DM development may contribute to the early detection and potential risk reduction of DM in patients with CP.Patients with CP admitted to Changhai Hospital (Shanghai, China) from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of DM after the onset of CP were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression model.A total of 2011 patients with CP were enrolled. During follow-up (median duration, 22.0 years), 564 patients developed DM. Cumulative rates of DM 20 and 50 years after the onset of CP were 45.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.8%-50.0%) and 90.0% (95% CI, 75.4%-97.7%), respectively. Five risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified: male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.08-2.11), alcohol abuse (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), steatorrhea (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.11), biliary stricture (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43-3.52), and distal pancreatectomy (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.80-6.44).In conclusion, the risk of developing DM in patients with CP is not only influenced by the development of biliary stricture and steatorrhea indicating disease progression, and inherent nature of study subjects such as male sex, but also by modifiable factors including alcohol abuse and distal pancreatectomy.

  16. Risk Factors for Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: A Cohort of 2011 Patients.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jun; Xin, Lei; Wang, Dan; Liao, Zhuan; Lin, Jin-Huan; Li, Bai-Rong; Du, Ting-Ting; Ye, Bo; Zou, Wen-Bin; Chen, Hui; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and increases the mortality. The identification of risk factors for DM development may contribute to the early detection and potential risk reduction of DM in patients with CP.Patients with CP admitted to Changhai Hospital (Shanghai, China) from January 2000 to December 2013 were enrolled. Cumulative rates of DM after the onset of CP were calculated by Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified by Cox proportional hazards regression model.A total of 2011 patients with CP were enrolled. During follow-up (median duration, 22.0 years), 564 patients developed DM. Cumulative rates of DM 20 and 50 years after the onset of CP were 45.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.8%-50.0%) and 90.0% (95% CI, 75.4%-97.7%), respectively. Five risk factors for DM development after the diagnosis of CP were identified: male sex (hazard ratio [HR], 1.51; 95% CI, 1.08-2.11), alcohol abuse (HR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.43-2.79), steatorrhea (HR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.11), biliary stricture (HR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43-3.52), and distal pancreatectomy (HR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.80-6.44).In conclusion, the risk of developing DM in patients with CP is not only influenced by the development of biliary stricture and steatorrhea indicating disease progression, and inherent nature of study subjects such as male sex, but also by modifiable factors including alcohol abuse and distal pancreatectomy .

  17. Change in DASH diet score and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study.

    PubMed

    Barnes, T L; Crandell, J L; Bell, R A; Mayer-Davis, E J; Dabelea, D; Liese, A D

    2013-10-14

    Youth with diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet has been shown to improve CVD risk. In this study, we evaluated whether changes in diet quality as characterized by DASH are associated with changes in CVD risk factors in youth with diabetes over time. Longitudinal mixed models were applied to data from 797 participants in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth Study representing three time points: baseline, 12- and 60-month follow-up. Data were restricted to youth whose diabetes was first diagnosed in 2002-2005. DASH-related adherence was poor and changed very little over time. However, an increase in DASH diet score was significantly associated with a decrease in HbA1c levels in youth with type 1 diabetes (β=-0.20, P-value=0.0063) and a decrease in systolic blood pressure among youth with type 2 diabetes (β=-2.02, P-value=0.0406). Improvements in dietary quality may be beneficial in youth with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. However, further work in larger groups of youth with type 1 and 2 diabetes is desirable.

  18. Subclinical neuropathy in diabetic patients: a risk factor for bilateral lower limb neurological deficit following spinal anesthesia?

    PubMed

    Angadi, Darshan S; Garde, Ajit

    2012-02-01

    Total knee arthroplasty performed under spinal or general anesthesia is a common successful orthopedic procedure. Nonetheless, in patients with diabetes mellitus this procedure can present unique challenges to orthopedic surgeon and anesthesiologist alike. We describe a case of an elderly male diabetic patient who developed bilaterally symmetrical lower limb neurological deficit following an uneventful total knee arthroplasty performed under spinal anesthesia. Postoperative nerve conduction study with electromyography confirmed symmetrical extensive denervation of lower limb muscles, including low-voltage fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. These findings were consistent with a preexisting neuropathy, thereby suggesting a subclinical neuropathy as a potential risk factor for this neurological complication. Our case highlights the fact that patients with longstanding comorbidities, namely peripheral vascular disease and diabetes mellitus, may be at an increased risk of neurological injury following regional anesthesia. Hence, we believe that preoperative evaluation of diabetic patients should include neurophysiological studies to identify subclinical neuropathy and minimize the risk of neurological injury.

  19. Carotid artery intima media thickness in relation with atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gayathri, R; Chandni, R; Udayabhaskaran, V

    2012-09-01

    The present study was carried out to study the correlation between carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT) with risk factors for atherosclerosis and atherosclerotic events in Type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients. The predictive value of CIMT as an indicator of early atherosclerosis was determined and the various atherosclerotic risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus were studied. Our study showed that CIMT was significantly higher in those type 2 diabetic patients who had atherosclerotic events than in those patients who had no atherosclerotic events. It was also found that waist hip ratio showed a significant positive correlation and independent association with CIMT emphasizing the emerging concept of central obesity. Duration of diabetes, urinary albumin excretion rate, hypertension and glycated hemoglobin had positive correlation with CIMT, but could not assume statistical significance. Age, smoking and dyslipidemia did not show any association with CIMT.

  20. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Complications of Diabetes in the Kilimanjaro Region: A Population-Based Study from Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Stanifer, John W; Cleland, Charles R; Makuka, Gerald Jamberi; Egger, Joseph R; Maro, Venance; Maro, Honest; Karia, Francis; Patel, Uptal D; Burton, Matthew J; Philippin, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, diabetes is a growing burden, yet little is known about its prevalence, risk factors, and complications. To address these gaps and help inform public health efforts aimed at prevention and treatment, we conducted a community-based study assessing diabetes epidemiology. We conducted a stratified, cluster-designed, serial cross-sectional household study from 2014-2015 in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to randomly select individuals. To estimate prevalence, we screened individuals for glucose impairment, including diabetes, using hemoglobin A1C. We also screened for hypertension and obesity, and to assess for potential complications, individuals with diabetes were assessed for retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. We enrolled 481 adults from 346 urban and rural households. The prevalence of glucose impairment was 21.7% (95% CI 15.2-29.8), which included diabetes (5.7%; 95% CI 3.37-9.47) and glucose impairment with increased risk for diabetes (16.0%; 95% CI 10.2-24.0). Overweight or obesity status had an independent prevalence risk ratio for glucose impairment (2.16; 95% CI 1.39-3.36). Diabetes awareness was low (35.6%), and few individuals with diabetes were receiving biomedical treatment (33.3%). Diabetes-associated complications were common (50.2%; 95% CI 33.7-66.7), including renal (12.0%; 95% CI 4.7-27.3), ophthalmic (49.6%; 95% CI 28.6-70.7), and neurological (28.8%; 95% CI 8.0-65.1) abnormalities. In a northern region of Tanzania, diabetes is an under-recognized health condition, despite the fact that many people either have diabetes or are at increased risk for developing diabetes. Most individuals were undiagnosed or untreated, and the prevalence of diabetes-associated complications was high. Public health efforts in this region will need to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, which appear to include obesity, as well as early detection that includes increasing

  1. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Complications of Diabetes in the Kilimanjaro Region: A Population-Based Study from Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Makuka, Gerald Jamberi; Egger, Joseph R.; Maro, Venance; Maro, Honest; Karia, Francis; Patel, Uptal D.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa, diabetes is a growing burden, yet little is known about its prevalence, risk factors, and complications. To address these gaps and help inform public health efforts aimed at prevention and treatment, we conducted a community-based study assessing diabetes epidemiology. Methods and Findings We conducted a stratified, cluster-designed, serial cross-sectional household study from 2014–2015 in the Kilimanjaro Region, Tanzania. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to randomly select individuals. To estimate prevalence, we screened individuals for glucose impairment, including diabetes, using hemoglobin A1C. We also screened for hypertension and obesity, and to assess for potential complications, individuals with diabetes were assessed for retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. We enrolled 481 adults from 346 urban and rural households. The prevalence of glucose impairment was 21.7% (95% CI 15.2–29.8), which included diabetes (5.7%; 95% CI 3.37–9.47) and glucose impairment with increased risk for diabetes (16.0%; 95% CI 10.2–24.0). Overweight or obesity status had an independent prevalence risk ratio for glucose impairment (2.16; 95% CI 1.39–3.36). Diabetes awareness was low (35.6%), and few individuals with diabetes were receiving biomedical treatment (33.3%). Diabetes-associated complications were common (50.2%; 95% CI 33.7–66.7), including renal (12.0%; 95% CI 4.7–27.3), ophthalmic (49.6%; 95% CI 28.6–70.7), and neurological (28.8%; 95% CI 8.0–65.1) abnormalities. Conclusions In a northern region of Tanzania, diabetes is an under-recognized health condition, despite the fact that many people either have diabetes or are at increased risk for developing diabetes. Most individuals were undiagnosed or untreated, and the prevalence of diabetes-associated complications was high. Public health efforts in this region will need to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors, which appear to include

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a risk factor for type 2 diabetes: a nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles T-C; Mao, I-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Lin, Sheng-Hao; Hsieh, Ming-Chia

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common medical disorder and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was the risk factor for type 2 diabetes in an Asian population. From Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database, we collected data from 16,088 patients, including 8044 COPD patients and 8044 age- and gender- matched control subjects. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to evaluate independent risk factors for type 2 diabetes in all patients and identify risk factors in patients with COPD. During the 5.5-year follow-up, patients with COPD were found to have a significantly higher rate of incident type 2 diabetes than the control group (P < 0.001). COPD was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes hazard ratio (HR : 1.41, 1.23-1.63, P < 0.001) after adjusting sex, age, residential area, insurance premium, steroid use, hypertriglycemia, hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and cerebrovascular disease. Cox regression analysis showed that hypertension (HR : 1.55, 1.33-1.80, P < 0.001) and hypertriglycemia (HR : 1.48, 1.15-1.90, P = 0.002) were important risk factors for type 2 diabetes in patients with COPD. Patients with COPD have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes compared with control subjects after adjusting for confounding factors such as sex, age, residential area, insurance premium, steroid use, hypertriglycemia, hypertension, CAD and cerebrovascular disease. Continuous surveillance of signals of dysglycemia may be incorporated into care programmes for patients with COPD. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Prevalence of Hypertension in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II) and its Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha; Pathak, Rahul; Kotian, Mangalore Shashidhar; Ullal, Sheetal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension is a major public health problem in India and worldwide. Since hypertension is often asymptomatic, it commonly remains undetected, leading to serious complications if untreated. Hypertension is one of the leading causes of end stage renal disease. It doubles the risk of developing coronary artery disease, increases the risk of congestive heart failure by four folds and that of cerebrovascular disease and stroke by seven folds. Hypertension is directly responsible for 57% of all stroke deaths and 42% of coronary heart disease deaths in India. Aim To identify prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a semi urban population of Mangalore, who participated in Boloor Diabetes Study (BDS-II). Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 551 subjects aged ≥ 20 years who were randomly selected. Hypertension was diagnosed and classified according to Joint National Committee 7 (JNC) criteria. Blood pressure was measured by a doctor using calibrated sphygmomanometer. Anthropometric measurements, lipid and glucose estimations were done for all subjects. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and student’s t-test (unpaired). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done using hypertension as dependent variable and the various risk factors as independent variables. Results Overall prevalence of hypertension in the community was 41% (227/551) (40.9% in men, 41.3% in women). Prehypertension was found in 40% (223/551) (45.4% in men, 38.1% in women), and only 18.3% (101/551) had normal blood pressure. Stage I hypertension was seen in 29.7% (164/551) (28.9% in men, 30.1% in women). Stage II hypertension was seen in 11.4% (63/551) (12% in men, 11% in women). Age, obesity, diabetes, serum cholesterol and serum triglycerides were strongly associated with hypertension. Only 46% (254/551) of the hypertensive subjects were aware that they were hypertensive. Conclusion Prevalence of hypertension was high in this

  4. Immortal time bias in the study of stillbirth risk factors: the example of gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Kuret, Verena; Joseph, K S; Sabr, Yasser; Lim, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Current understanding of the increased risk for stillbirth in gestational diabetes mellitus is often based on large cohort studies in which the risk of stillbirth in women with this disease is compared with the risk in women without. However, such studies could be susceptible to immortal time bias because, although many cohorts begin at 20 weeks' gestation, pregnancies must "survive" until 24-28 weeks in order to be screened and diagnosed with gestational diabetes. We describe the theoretical potential for immortal time bias in studies of stillbirth and gestational diabetes and then quantify the magnitude of the bias using 2006 United States vital statistics data. Although gestational diabetes was protective against stillbirth when including all births (relative risk = 0.88 [95% confidence interval = 0.79-0.99]), restricting analyses to births at >28 weeks' gestation reversed the effect and diabetes became associated with an increased risk of stillbirth (1.25 [1.11-1.41]). Immortal time before diagnosis of gestational diabetes may bias our understanding of the stillbirth risk associated with this condition.

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats.

    PubMed

    Sallander, Marie; Eliasson, Johanna; Hedhammar, Ake

    2012-10-31

    The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000-2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2-15). Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05). Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50%) reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2-15), as compared to five out of twenty (25%) controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0) for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg) for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3-18), a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05). A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05).The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05). Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h/d, respectively; P≤0.05). The results indicate that the

  6. Are hypertension and diabetes mellitus risk factors for pelvic organ prolapse?

    PubMed

    Isık, Hatice; Aynıoglu, Oner; Sahbaz, Ahmet; Selimoglu, Refika; Timur, Hakan; Harma, Muge

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is an important problem for women with multifactorial etiology. This study aims to determine the role of hypertension (HT) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in POP. The study included 586 women admitted to Bulent Ecevit University Hospital between September 2013 and April 2015 for hysterectomy, comprising 186 patients with POP and 400 patients without. The demographic characteristics, age, body mass index (BMI), obstetrical history, type of delivery, associated medical diseases, and benign gynecological diseases were recorded. HT, DM, or both together were particularly considered as coexisting medical diseases. Median gravida, parity, and live birth numbers were significantly higher in POP patients (4 vs. 3, 3 vs. 2, and 3 vs. 2 respectively, p<0.001). POP patients were more obese than POP-absent patients (p<0.001). Vaginal history of birth increased POP frequency to 25.8% with statistical significance (p<0.001). There was no significant difference between groups regarding coexisting endometritis, endometrial polyp, endometriosis, endometrial hyperplasia (p>0.05). There was a significant difference between groups regarding comorbid diseases (p<0.001). Logistic regression analysis for risk factors of POP revealed age, BMI, vaginal parturition, and co-morbidity with HT+DM together significantly increased POP risk (p<0.05). HT+DM together significantly increased risks with OR of 1.9 (1.1-3.16). In addition to multiple factors increasing POP risk, comorbidities as HT+DM together should be considered as risk factors. Patients with these comorbidities should be encouraged to change their lifestyles to prevent POP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of risk factors and their interactions in type 2 diabetes mellitus: A cross-sectional survey in Guilin, China.

    PubMed

    Zou, Disha; Ye, Yao; Zou, Nina; Yu, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, and is associated with the effects of genetic and environmental factors. The present study aimed to not only analyze the influence of a single factor for type 2 diabetes, but also to investigate the interaction effects between risk factors. A total of 6,660 individuals selected by the method of cluster random sampling accepted a cross-sectional survey (questionnaire investigation, physical measurement, laboratory examination and liver ultrasound examination). The classification tree was used to analyze the risk factors and their interactions in type 2 diabetes. The clinical and metabolic characteristics were compared between type 2 diabetes patients and controls, and the non-conditional logistic regression model was used to quantitatively analyze the interactions. A total of 338 participants were classified as type 2 diabetes (217 men and 121 women), the classification tree model showed three variables with close associations with type 2 diabetes: age, triglycerides (TG) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Type 2 diabetes patients had higher age and incidences of high TG, NAFLD, hypertension, high body mass index, high uric acid, high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the following factors had interactions in type2 diabetes: high TG × advanced age (odds ratio 2.499, 95% confidence interval 1.868-3.344, P = 0.000), NAFLD × advanced age (odds ratio 1.250, 95% confidence interval 1.048-1.491, P = 0.013) and NAFLD × high TG (odds ratio 1.349, 95% confidence interval 1.144-1.590, P = 0.000). The present study showed that type 2 diabetes resulted from the interactions of many factors; the interactions among age, TG and NAFLD are important risk factors for type 2 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian

  8. Racial/ethnic Differences in Clinical and Biochemical Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Risk Factors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Fennoy, Ilene; Accacha, Siham; Altshuler, Lisa; Carey, Dennis E.; Holleran, Steven; Rapaport, Robert; Shelov, Steven P.; Speiser, Phyllis W.; Ten, S.; Bhangoo, Amrit; Boucher-Berry, Claudia; Espinal, Yomery; Gupta, Rishi; Hassoun, Abeer A.; Iazetti, Loretta.; Jacques, Fabien J.; Jean, Amy M.; Klein, Michelle. L.; Levine, Robert; Lowell, Barbara; Michel, Lesley; Rosenfeld, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine whether peri-adolescent children demonstrate the significant racial/ethnic differences in body fatness relative to BMI and in the prevalence and relationship of body composition to risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as in adults. Design and Methods We examined family history of obesity and T2DM, anthropometry, insulin sensitivity and secretory capacity, lipids, and cytokines (IL-6, CRP, TNF-α, and adiponectin) in a cohort of 994 middle school students (47% male, 53%, female; 12% African American, 14% East Asian, 13% South Asian, 9% Caucasian, 44% Hispanic, and 8% other). Results Fractional body fat content was significantly greater at any BMI among South Asians. There were racial/ethnic specific differences in lipid profiles, insulin secretory capacity, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers corrected for body fatness that are similar to those seen in adults. Family history of T2DM was associated with lower insulin secretory capacity while family history of obesity was more associated with insulin resistance. Conclusion Children show some of the same racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for adiposity-related co-morbidities as adults. BMI and waist circumference cutoffs to identify children at-risk for adiposity-related co-morbidities should be adjusted by racial/ethnic group as well as other variables such as birthweight and family history. PMID:23596082

  9. Racial/ethnic differences in clinical and biochemical type 2 diabetes mellitus risk factors in children.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Michael; Fennoy, Ilene; Accacha, Siham; Altshuler, Lisa; Carey, Dennis E; Holleran, Stephen; Rapaport, Robert; Shelov, Steven P; Speiser, Phyllis W; Ten, S; Bhangoo, Amrit; Boucher-Berry, Claudia; Espinal, Yomery; Gupta, Rishi; Hassoun, Abeer A; Iazetti, Loretta; Jean-Jacques, Fabienne; Jean, Amy M; Klein, Michelle L; Levine, Robet; Lowell, Barbara; Michel, Lesley; Rosenfeld, Warren

    2013-10-01

    To examine whether periadolescent children demonstrate the significant racial/ethnic differences in body fatness relative to BMI and in the prevalence and relationship of body composition to risk factors for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) as in adults. Family history of obesity and T2DM, anthropometry, insulin sensitivity and secretory capacity, lipids, and cytokines (IL-6, CRP, TNF-α, and adiponectin) were examined in a cohort of 994 middle school students (47% male, 53%, female; 12% African American, 14% East Asian, 13% South Asian, 9% Caucasian, 44% Hispanic, and 8% other). Fractional body fat content was significantly greater at any BMI among South Asians. There were racial/ethnic specific differences in lipid profiles, insulin secretory capacity, insulin sensitivity, and inflammatory markers corrected for body fatness that are similar to those seen in adults. Family history of T2DM was associated with lower insulin secretory capacity while family history of obesity was more associated with insulin resistance. Children show some of the same racial/ethnic differences in risk factors for adiposity-related comorbidities as adults. BMI and waist circumference cutoffs to identify children at-risk for adiposity-related comorbidities should be adjusted by racial/ethnic group as well as other variables such as birthweight and family history. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  10. Modifiable lifestyle and social factors affect chronic kidney disease in high-risk individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dunkler, Daniela; Kohl, Maria; Heinze, Georg; Teo, Koon K; Rosengren, Annika; Pogue, Janice; Gao, Peggy; Gerstein, Hertzel; Yusuf, Salim; Oberbauer, Rainer; Mann, Johannes F E

    2015-04-01

    This observational study examined the association between modifiable lifestyle and social factors on the incidence and progression of early chronic kidney disease (CKD) among those with type 2 diabetes. All 6972 people from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) with diabetes but without macroalbuminuria were studied. CKD progression was defined as decline in GFR of more than 5% per year, progression to end-stage renal disease, microalbuminuria, or macroalbuminuria at 5.5 years. Lifestyle/social factors included tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, stress, financial worries, the size of the social network and education. Adjustments were made for known risks such as age, diabetes duration, GFR, albuminuria, gender, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-receptor blockers use. Competing risk of death was considered. At study end, 31% developed CKD and 15% had died. The social network score (SNS) was a significant independent risk factor of CKD and death, reducing the risk by 11 and 22% when comparing the third to the first tertile of the SNS (odds ratios of CKD 0.89 and death 0.78). Education showed a significant association with CKD but stress and financial worries did not. Those with moderate alcohol consumption had a significantly decreased CKD risk compared with nonusers. Regular physical activity significantly decreased the risk of CKD. Thus, lifestyle is a determinant of kidney health in people at high cardiovascular risk with diabetes.

  11. Associations of symptoms of anxiety and depression with diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors in older people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    de Winter, C F; Hermans, H; Evenhuis, H M; Echteld, M A

    2015-02-01

    Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic syndrome. But also the effects of diabetes, metabolic syndrome and subsequent cardiovascular disease may affect mood and anxiety. This study investigated the association between depression, anxiety and diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors in older people with ID. The healthy ageing in intellectual disability-study (HA-ID study) is a cross-sectional study among people aged 50 years and over with ID, receiving formal ID care. Screening instruments for symptoms of anxiety and depression were completed and physical examination and vena-puncture were performed to establish components of the metabolic syndrome, peripheral arterial disease and c-reactive protein. Of the 990 people who participated, 17% had symptoms of depression and 16% had symptoms of anxiety. Type I diabetes was present in 1%, type II diabetes in 13% of the study population. Metabolic syndrome, central obesity, hypercholesterolemia and hypertension were present in 45%, 48%, 23% and 53% respectively. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis a significant association was found between increased anxiety symptoms and diabetes only (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.2-4.9). Increased anxiety symptoms and diabetes are related in older people with ID. This association may be bidirectional. No other associations of depression and anxiety symptoms with cardiovascular risk factors could be proven to be significant. Therefore, more research is needed to unravel the mechanisms of stress, mood disorders and cardiovascular disease in older people with ID. To provide comprehensive care for older people with ID, screening for diabetes and components of the metabolic syndrome in people with anxiety

  12. Effects of Exenatide on Diabetes, Obesity, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Hepatic Biomarkers in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Loretta L.; Okerson, Ted; Holcombe, John; Hoogwerf, Byron

    2008-01-01

    Obesity increases the risk of diabetes up to 90-fold and worsens hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. For patients with type 2 diabetes, weight loss can trigger improvements in all these conditions and decrease the need for glucose-lowering agents. The incretin mimetic exenatide shares many glucoregulatory properties with native glucagon-like peptide-1, including enhancement of glucose-dependent insulin secretion, glucose-dependent suppression of inappropriately high glucagon secretion, slowing of gastric emptying, and reduction of food intake in patients with type 2 diabetes. Exenatide treatment was associated with progressive weight loss in the majority of patients in clinical trials. In addition, patients with elevated markers of liver injury at baseline showed improvements. Therefore, exenatide represents a unique option for adjunctive therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes not achieving adequate glycemic control on oral antidiabetic agents, especially in patients for whom weight gain would be an additional contraindication. PMID:19885351

  13. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and its risk factors among the rural Fulanis of Northern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Anas; Ohwovoriole, Augustine; Isezuo, Simeon; Fasanmade, Olufemi; Abubakar, Sani; Iwuala, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Information about diabetes mellitus (DM) from the rural populations in Nigeria, particularly among the rural Fulanis is limited. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in two rural districts of Sokoto State in Northern Nigeria. Using a modification of the WHO STEP wise approach to surveillance (STEPS) instrument, information on sociodemographic and anthropometric data was obtained. Either a casual or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level was obtained in all subjects while oral glucose tolerance test was performed in a randomly selected group of 50 of the study participants. Three hundred and ninety-three subjects participated in the study. The prevalence rates of DM, impaired fasting glycemia (IFG), and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were 0.8, 6.9, and 8%, respectively. The mean (SD) FPG was higher in males (5.1 ± 0.6 mmol/L) than in females (4.9 ± 0.6 mmol/l), but not statistically significantly (P = 0.20). The major risk factors for DM among the rural Fulani were obesity and increasing age. The prevalence rates of DM and its principal risk factor obesity are low among the rural Nigerian Fulani. However, the prevalence of prediabetes is relatively high, a factor that may predispose to the future development of DM.

  14. Diabetic Risk Factors Promote Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Misfolding by a Common, Membrane-mediated Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Alan K.; Teranishi, Kazuki; Isas, J. Mario; Bedrood, Sahar; Chow, Robert H.; Langen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The current diabetes epidemic is associated with a diverse set of risk factors including obesity and exposure to plastics. Notably, significant elevations of negatively charged amphiphilic molecules are observed in obesity (e.g. free fatty acids and phosphatidic acid) and plastics exposure (monophthalate esters). It remains unclear whether these factors share pathogenic mechanisms and whether links exist with islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) misfolding, a process central to β-cell dysfunction and death. Using a combination of fluorescence, circular dichroism and electron microscopy, we show that phosphatidic acid, oleic acid, and the phthalate metabolite MBzP partition into neutral membranes and enhance IAPP misfolding. The elevation of negative charge density caused by the presence of the risk factor molecules stabilizes a common membrane-bound α-helical intermediate that, in turn, facilitates IAPP misfolding. This shared mechanism points to a critical role for the membrane-bound intermediate in disease pathogenesis, making it a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27531121

  15. Low heart rate variability is a risk factor for sudden cardiac death in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Ito, Chikako; Sasaki, Hideo; Yamane, Kiminori; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the association between sudden cardiac death (SCD) and heart rate variability (HRV) in subjects with and without type 2 diabetes and to determine whether low HRV can predict SCD in type 2 diabetes. Subjects were 8917 consecutively examined persons (3089 diabetic, and 5828 nondiabetic subjects) aged 35-69 years who underwent a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) together with electrocardiography (ECG). HRV was calculated from the 12-lead ECG as the coefficient of variance for 100 R-R intervals (CV(R-R)). During a median observation period of 5.2 years, SCD occurred in 56 subjects (33 diabetic, and 23 nondiabetic). Among diabetic subjects, mortality from SCD tended to be higher in subjects with a low CV(R-R) (P=0.004). After adjustment for age, gender, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), BMI, ischemic ECG change, and smoking history, relative risk (RR) of SCD was 2.07 (95% CI 1.02-4.17) in diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% compared with those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2%. Diabetic subjects with a CV(R-R) <2.2% had significantly higher cumulative mortality from SCD than those with a CV(R-R) > or =2.2% (P=0.007). In type 2 diabetes, a low CV(R-R) carried an increased risk of SCD.

  16. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L

    2017-02-17

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p < 0.20 in univariate analyses. Sixty patients (38 men, 22 women) completed the protocol; they were 60 ± 17 years old, 50% had a history of diabetes mellitus (DM) and 33% had hyperphosphatemia (PO₄ > 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value < 0.2 were male gender (p = 0.13), younger age (0.07), presence of DM (0.005), higher dose of calcium carbonate (0.08), higher parathyroid serum concentration (0.08), lower phosphate intake (0.03), lower measured glomerular filtration rate (0.15), higher phosphate excretion (0.11), and a higher body mass index (0.15). After multivariable logistic regression analysis, younger age (odds ratio (OR) 0.023 per decade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00065 to 0.455; p = 0.012), presence of diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Younger Age Are Risk Factors for Hyperphosphatemia in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Rameez; Hawken, Steven; McCormick, Brendan B.; Leung, Simon; Hiremath, Swapnil; Zimmerman, Deborah L.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperphosphatemia has been associated with adverse outcomes in patients with end stage kidney disease (ESKD). The purpose of this study was to determine risk factors for hyperphosphatemia in ESKD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). This information will be used to develop a patient specific phosphate binder application to facilitate patient self-management of serum phosphate. Adult PD patients documented their food, beverage, and phosphate binder intake for three days using a dietitian developed food journal. Phosphate content of meals was calculated using the ESHA Food Processor SQL Software (ESHA Research, Salem, UT, USA). Clinic biochemistry tests and an adequacy assessment (Baxter Adequest program) were done. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of serum phosphate >1.78 mmol/L. A multivariable logistic regression model was then fit including those variables that achieved a significance level of p < 0.20 in univariate analyses. Sixty patients (38 men, 22 women) completed the protocol; they were 60 ± 17 years old, 50% had a history of diabetes mellitus (DM) and 33% had hyperphosphatemia (PO4 > 1.78 mmol/L). In univariate analysis, the variables associated with an increased risk of hyperphosphatemia with a p-value < 0.2 were male gender (p = 0.13), younger age (0.07), presence of DM (0.005), higher dose of calcium carbonate (0.08), higher parathyroid serum concentration (0.08), lower phosphate intake (0.03), lower measured glomerular filtration rate (0.15), higher phosphate excretion (0.11), and a higher body mass index (0.15). After multivariable logistic regression analysis, younger age (odds ratio (OR) 0.023 per decade, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00065 to 0.455; p = 0.012), presence of diabetes (OR 11.40, 95 CI 2.82 to 61.55; p = 0.0003), and measured GFR (OR 0.052 per mL/min decrease; 95% CI 0.0025 to 0.66) were associated with hyperphosphatemia. Our results support that younger age and diabetes mellitus are

  18. [Cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients: risk factors, clinical history and prevention].

    PubMed

    Avogaro, Angelo

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) in which there is a rapid evolution and widespread early atherosclerosis, whose causes are manifold. In the presence of hyperglycemia there is the activation of multiple signaling responses involving, first endothelial activation and later dysfunction, which are the first detectable step toward the atherosclerotic disease. A healthy lifestyle is the cornerstone for the prevention and control of CVD in patients with DM, in whom we must pursue the control, not only of blood sugar levels, but also of all risk factors for CVD. The choice for an antidiabetic agent is based not only on its effectiveness but also on its safety. The data obtained from the recent cardiovascular outcome studies such as the LEADER and SUSTAIN-6 for liraglutide and semaglutide, respectively, and the EMPA-REG OUTCOME for empagliflozin, testify the need for the diabetologist of new therapeutic approaches to control glucose levels.

  19. Prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Costa Rica: Costa Rican National Cardiovascular Risk Factors Survey, 2010.

    PubMed

    Wong-McClure, Roy; Gregg, Edward W; Barcelo, Alberto; Sanabria-Lopez, Laura; Lee, Kahye; Abarca-Gomez, Leandra; Cervantes-Loaiza, Marvin; Luman, Elizabeth T

    2016-09-01

    The projected rising prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in developing countries warrants careful monitoring. The aim of this study was to present the results of the Costa Rican National Cardiovascular Risk Factors Surveillance System, which provides the first national estimates of diabetes and IFG prevalence among adults in Costa Rica. A cross-sectional survey of 3653 non-institutionalized adults aged ≥20 years (87.8% response rate) following the World Health Organization STEPwise approach was built on a probabilistic sample of the non-institutionalized population during 2010. Known diabetes was defined as self-reported diagnosis, the use of insulin, or hypoglycemic oral treatment as consequence of diabetes during at least the previous 2 weeks before the survey. Unknown diabetes was defined no self-reported diabetes but with venous blood concentrations of fasting glucose >125 mg/dL determined by laboratory testing. Impaired fasting glucose was defined as fasting glucose between 100 and 125 mg/dL among those without diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes and IFG prevalence was estimated according gender, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), educational level, and physical activity level. Overall diabetes prevalence was 10.8% (9.5% known and 1.3% unknown diabetes) and IFG prevalence was 16.5%. The prevalence of known diabetes was higher among women >65 years compared with men of the same age group. Both known and unknown diabetes were significantly associated with higher BMI, increased WC, and low education level (P = 0.01). The prevalence of diabetes and IFG in Costa Rica is comparable to that in developed countries and indicates an urgent need for effective preventive interventions. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and associated risk factors in a national survey in the US population: SHIELD (Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes)

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E; Bazata, Debbra D; Clark, Nathaniel G; Gavin, James R; Green, Andrew J; Lewis, Sandra J; Reed, Michael L; Stewart, Walter; Chapman, Richard H; Fox, Kathleen M; Grandy, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background Studies derived from continuous national surveys have shown that the prevalence of diagnosed diabetes mellitus in the US is increasing. This study estimated the prevalence in 2004 of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes and other conditions in a community-based population, using data from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD). Methods The initial screening questionnaire was mailed in 2004 to a stratified random sample of 200,000 households in the US, to identify individuals, age ≥ 18 years of age, with diabetes or risk factors associated with diabetes. Follow-up disease impact questionnaires were then mailed to a representative, stratified random sample of individuals (n = 22,001) in each subgroup of interest (those with diabetes or different numbers of risk factors for diabetes). Estimated national prevalence of diabetes and other conditions was calculated, and compared to prevalence estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2002. Results Response rates were 63.7% for the screening, and 71.8% for the follow-up baseline survey. The SHIELD screening survey found overall prevalence of self-reported diagnosis of diabetes (either type 1 or type 2) was 8.2%, with increased prevalence with increasing age and decreasing income. In logistic regression modeling, individuals were more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes if they had abdominal obesity (odds ratio [OR] = 3.50; p < 0.0001), BMI ≥28 kg/m2 (OR = 4.04; p < 0.0001), or had been diagnosed with dyslipidemia (OR = 3.95; p < 0.0001), hypertension (OR = 4.82; p < 0.0001), or with cardiovascular disease (OR = 3.38; p < 0.0001). Conclusion The SHIELD design allowed for a very large, community-based sample with broad demographic representation of the population of interest. When comparing results from the SHIELD screening survey (self-report only) to those from NHANES 1999–2002 (self

  1. Risk factors for development of incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus: prospective, observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Gall, M. A.; Hougaard, P.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Parving, H. H.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate putative risk factors for the development of incipient diabetic nephropathy (persistent microalbuminuria) and overt diabetic nephropathy (persistent macroalbuminuria) in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes. DESIGN: Prospective, observational study of a cohort of white, non-insulin dependent diabetic patients followed for a median period of 5.8 years. SETTING: Outpatient clinic in tertiary referral centre. SUBJECTS: 191 patients aged under 66 years with non-insulin dependent diabetes and normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate < 30 mg/24 h) who attended the clinic during 1987. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy. RESULTS: Fifteen patients were lost to follow up. Thirty six of the 176 remaining developed persistent microalbuminuria (30-299 mg/24 h in two out of three consecutive 24 hour urine collections) and five developed persistent macroalbuminuria (> or = mg/24 h in two out of three consecutive collections) during follow up. The five year cumulative incidence of incipient diabetic nephropathy was 23% (95% confidence interval 17% to 30%). Cox's multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed the following risk factors for the development of incipient or overt diabetic nephropathy: increased baseline log urinary albumin excretion rate (relative risk 11.1 (3.4 to 35.9); P < 0.0001); male sex (2.6 (1.2 to 5.4); P < 0.02); presence of retinopathy (2.4 (1.3 to 4.7); P < 0.01); increased serum cholesterol concentration (1.4 (1.1 to 1.7); P < 0.01); haemoglobin A1c concentration (1.2 (1.0 to 1.4); P < 0.05); and age (1.07 (1.02 to 1.12); P < 0.01). Known duration of diabetes, body mass index, arterial blood pressure, serum creatinine concentration, pre-existing coronary heart disease, and history of smoking were not risk factors. CONCLUSION: Several potentially modifiable risk factors predict the development of incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy in normoalbuminuric patients with non

  2. Additive effect of pretransplant obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors on outcomes after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dare, Anna J; Plank, Lindsay D; Phillips, Anthony R J; Gane, Edward J; Harrison, Barry; Orr, David; Jiang, Yannan; Bartlett, Adam S J R

    2014-03-01

    The effects of pretransplant obesity, diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary artery disease (CAD), and hypertension (HTN) on outcomes after liver transplantation (LT) are controversial. Questions have also been raised about the appropriateness of the body mass index (BMI) for assessing obesity in patients with end-stage liver disease. Both issues have implications for organ allocation in LT. To address these questions, we undertook a cohort study of 202 consecutive patients (2000-2010) undergoing LT at a national center in New Zealand. BMI and body fat percentage (%BF) values (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured before transplantation, and the methods were compared. The influence of pretransplant risk variables (including obesity, DM, CAD, and HTN) on the 30-day postoperative event rate, length of hospital stay, and survival were analyzed. There was agreement between the calculated BMI and the measured %BF for 86.0% of the study population (κ coefficient = 0.73, 95% confidence interval = 0.61-0.85), and this was maintained across increasing Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. Obesity was an independent risk factor for the postoperative event rate [count ratio (CR) = 1.03, P < 0.001], as was DM (CR = 1.4, P < 0.001). Obesity with concomitant DM was the strongest predictor of the postoperative event rate (CR = 1.75, P < 0.001) and a longer hospital stay (5.81 days, P < 0.01). Independent metabolic risk factors had no effect on 30-day, 1-year, or 5-year patient survival. In conclusion, BMI is an adequate tool for assessing obesity-associated risk in LT. Early post-LT morbidity is highest for patients with concomitant obesity and DM, although these factors do not appear to influence recipient survival. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  3. Residual Risk Factors to Predict Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Patients with and without Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Ju; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Jaw-Wen; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2017-08-23

    A prospective observational study was conducted to investigate the residual risk factors to predict recurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) patients with a high prevalence under lipid-lowering therapy, particularly in the subpopulations of diabetic and nondiabetic individuals. A total of 5,483 adults (with a mean age of 66.4 and 73.3% male) with established coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, or peripheral artery disease were identified from the T-SPARCLE multi-center registry. Of them, 38.6% had diabetes. The residual risk factors for MACE are divergent in these atherosclerotic patients with and without diabetes. In diabetic subpopulation, the risk of MACE was significantly increased with heart failure (HF), chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 4-5 (vs. stage 1-2), without beta blocker use, and higher non-HDL-C, after controlling for covariates including statin use and the intensity of therapy. Increased LDL-C and TG levels were also associated with increased risk, but to a much less extent. Among nondiabetic individuals, HF, CKD stage 4-5, and history of myocardial infarction were the significant independent predictors of MACE. It is suggested that ASCVD patients with concomitant diabetes need stricter control of lipid, particularly non-HDL-C levels, to reduce cardiovascular risk when on statin therapy.

  4. Contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies to Uncovering Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Genetics.

    PubMed

    Ley, Sylvia H; Ardisson Korat, Andres V; Sun, Qi; Tobias, Deirdre K; Zhang, Cuilin; Qi, Lu; Willett, Walter C; Manson, JoAnn E; Hu, Frank B

    2016-09-01

    To review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and the NHS II to addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for type 2 diabetes. We carried out a narrative review of 1976 to 2016 NHS and NHS II publications. The NHS and NHS II have uncovered important roles in type 2 diabetes for individual nutrients, foods, dietary patterns, and physical activity independent of excess body weight. Up to 90% of type 2 diabetes cases are potentially preventable if individuals follow a healthy diet and lifestyle. The NHS investigations have also identified novel biomarkers for diabetes, including adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, nutrition metabolites, and environmental pollutants, offering new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Global collaborative efforts have uncovered many common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and improved our understanding of gene-environment interactions. Continued efforts to identify epigenetic, metagenomic, and metabolomic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have the potential to reveal new pathways and improve prediction and prevention. Over the past several decades, the NHS and NHS II have made major contributions to public health recommendations and strategies designed to reduce the global burden of diabetes.

  5. Contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies to Uncovering Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes: Diet, Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Sylvia H.; Ardisson Korat, Andres V.; Sun, Qi; Tobias, Deirdre K.; Zhang, Cuilin; Qi, Lu; Willett, Walter C.; Manson, JoAnn E.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHS II to addressing hypotheses regarding risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Methods. We carried out a narrative review of 1976 to 2016 NHS and NHS II publications. Results. The NHS and NHS II have uncovered important roles in type 2 diabetes for individual nutrients, foods, dietary patterns, and physical activity independent of excess body weight. Up to 90% of type 2 diabetes cases are potentially preventable if individuals follow a healthy diet and lifestyle. The NHS investigations have also identified novel biomarkers for diabetes, including adipokines, inflammatory cytokines, nutrition metabolites, and environmental pollutants, offering new insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Global collaborative efforts have uncovered many common genetic variants associated with type 2 diabetes and improved our understanding of gene–environment interactions. Continued efforts to identify epigenetic, metagenomic, and metabolomic risk factors for type 2 diabetes have the potential to reveal new pathways and improve prediction and prevention. Conclusions. Over the past several decades, the NHS and NHS II have made major contributions to public health recommendations and strategies designed to reduce the global burden of diabetes. PMID:27459454

  6. Impact of Leisure-Time Physical Activity on Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Fukuoka Diabetes Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kaizu, Shinako; Kishimoto, Hiro; Iwase, Masanori; Fujii, Hiroki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Ide, Hitoshi; Jodai, Tamaki; Kikuchi, Yohei; Idewaki, Yasuhiro; Hirakawa, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Udai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The effects of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) on glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors are not fully understood in Asian type 2 diabetic patients, who are typically non-obese. We studied associations between LTPA and glycemia and cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods A total of 4,870 Japanese type 2 diabetic patients aged ≥20 years were divided into eight groups according to their LTPA. We investigated associations between the amount and intensity levels of physical activity (PA) and glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular risk factors, and low-grade systemic inflammation in a cross-sectional study. Results LTPA was dose-dependently associated with body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, but not with blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol or adiponectin. The amount of PA required to lower HbA1c was greater than that required to improve cardiovascular risk factors. LTPA was inversely associated with HbA1c in non-obese participants but not in obese participants after multivariate adjustments for age, sex, duration of diabetes, current smoking, current drinking, energy intake, cardiovascular diseases, depressive symptoms, and treatment of diabetes. Higher-intensity LTPA, not lower-intensity LTPA was associated with HbA1c after multivariate adjustments with further adjustment including BMI. Conclusions/interpretation LTPA was dose-dependently associated with better glycemic control and amelioration of some cardiovascular risk factors in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. In addition, increased higher-intensity LTPA may be appropriate for glycemic control. PMID:24897110

  7. Selective contribution of diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors to cardiac autonomic dysfunction in the general population.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, D; Zentai, C; Perz, S; Rathmann, W; Haastert, B; Meisinger, C; Löwel, H

    2006-04-01

    Both cardiac autonomic dysfunction adn cardiovascular risk factors are related to and excess risk of mortality. We sought to determine whether the major cardiovascular risk factors are associated with diminished heart rate variability (HRV), prolonged QTc interval, or increased QT dispersion (QTD). Male (n = 1030) and female (n = 957) subjects, aged 55-74 years, who participated in the population-based MONICA Augsburg survey 1989/90 were assessed for the presence of cardiovascular risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, smoking, and low physical activity. Lowest quartiles for time domain indexes of HRV (SD of R-R intervals [SDNN], max-min difference), QTc > 440 ms, and QTD > 60 ms determined from 12-lead resting ECG were used as cutpoints. In men, after adjustment for age and alcohol consumption, significant independent determinants for the lowest quartiles of SDNN were diabetes, obesity, and smoking. Independent contributors to prolonged QTc were hypertension, obesity, smoking, and low physical activity, whereas for increased QTD it was only hypertension. In women, diabetes was the only contributor to low SDNN, and hypertension was the only determinant of prolonged QTc. In conclusion, diabetes is the primary determinant of reduced HRV in the general population, while hypertension is the primary contributor to prolonged QTc in both sexes. However, obesity and smoking contribute to autonomic dysfunction in men but not women. Thus, a selectivity and sex-related differences exist among the various cardiovascular risk factors as to their influence on autonomic dysfunction.

  8. Is Glycaemia or Insulin Dose the Stronger Risk Factor for Coronory Artery Disease (CAD) in Type 1 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Baqiyyah; Costacou, Tina; Orchard, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Though Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), the mechanisms responsible for the greatly increased risk are poorly understood. In particular the role of glycaemic control is controversial with one study suggesting it predicts CAD mortality but not incidence. In this analysis, of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications study cohort of T1D, we examine whether risk factors differ for CAD morbidity and mortality, with a specific focus on HbA1c and insulin dose. Participants (n=592) were followed for 18 years for incident non-fatal and fatal CAD. Cox stepwise regression was used to determine the independent risk factors for non-fatal and fatal CAD. Mean age and diabetes duration at study baseline were 29 and 20 years, respectively. There were 109 incident non-fatal and 48 fatal CAD events. Baseline HbA1c was an independent risk factor for fatal CAD, along with duration of diabetes and albuminuria. In contrast, baseline lower insulin dose was strongly predictive of non-fatal CAD, as was lower renal function, higher diastolic blood pressure, and lipids. HbA1c predicts CAD mortality while lower insulin dose and standard CAD risk factors predict CAD morbidity. PMID:20368215

  9. Genetic Sharing with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Diabetes Reveals Novel Bone Mineral Density Loci

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Wesley K.; McEvoy, Linda K.; Schork, Andrew J.; Zuber, Verena; LeBlanc, Marissa; Bettella, Francesco; Mills, Ian G.; Desikan, Rahul S.; Djurovic, Srdjan; Gautvik, Kaare M.; Dale, Anders M.; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is a highly heritable trait, but genome-wide association studies have identified few genetic risk factors. Epidemiological studies suggest associations between BMD and several traits and diseases, but the nature of the suggestive comorbidity is still unknown. We used a novel genetic pleiotropy-informed conditional False Discovery Rate (FDR) method to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with BMD by leveraging cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated disorders and metabolic traits. By conditioning on SNPs associated with the CVD-related phenotypes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, triglycerides and waist hip ratio, we identified 65 novel independent BMD loci (26 with femoral neck BMD and 47 with lumbar spine BMD) at conditional FDR < 0.01. Many of the loci were confirmed in genetic expression studies. Genes validated at the mRNA levels were characteristic for the osteoblast/osteocyte lineage, Wnt signaling pathway and bone metabolism. The results provide new insight into genetic mechanisms of variability in BMD, and a better understanding of the genetic underpinnings of clinical comorbidity. PMID:26695485

  10. Insulin therapy, glycemic control, and cardiovascular risk factors in young Latin Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Santa, Larissa; Salinas, Karin; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Raskin, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes has been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease, but this risk has not been well documented in young patients, especially of Latin American descent. Also, the potential CV benefits of insulin therapy have not been evaluated in young patients with type 2 diabetes. The objectives of this study were to determine any gender-related difference in the presence of CV risk factors in young Latin Americans with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and the effect of intensive insulin therapy on these CV risk factors. Fifty-seven Latin American patients with type 2 diabetes between the ages 18 and 45 years were evaluated at baseline. All women were premenopausal and had regular menstrual periods. The mean body mass index (BMI) was > 30 kg/m2 in both genders. Percent body fat, percent hemoglobin A1c, and lipoprotein profiles were similar between genders. Highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated and similar between genders (p = .4). Leukocyte adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule 1, vascular adhesion molecule 1, E-selectin) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 were elevated, whereas adiponectin levels were below normal in both gender groups. Urinary albumin excretion was similar between genders and did not show any relationship with any of the variables. In women, there was a direct relationship between waist circumference and high-sensitivity CRP levels (rho = .53, p = .01). No other significant relationships were observed. Eighteen Latin American patients with type 2 diabetes completed up to 104 weeks of post-intervention with insulin monotherapy. In these patients, glycemic, lipoprotein, and anthropometric measurements were obtained every 12 weeks. Highly sensitive CRP, leukocyte adhesion molecules, and urinary albumin excretion, among other tests, were obtained every 52 weeks. At 52 and 104 weeks, body weight, BMI, waist circumference, and percent body fat increased in a parallel and significant manner

  11. Diabetes Status and Being Up-to-Date on Colorectal Cancer Screening, 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Porter, Nancy R; Eberth, Jan M; Samson, Marsha E; Garcia-Dominic, Oralia; Lengerich, Eugene J; Schootman, Mario

    2016-02-04

    Although screening rates for colorectal cancer are increasing, 22 million Americans are not up-to-date with recommendations. People with diabetes are an important and rapidly growing group at increased risk for colorectal cancer. Screening status and predictors of being up-to-date on screening are largely unknown in this population. This study used logistic regression modeling and data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to examine the association between diabetes and colorectal cancer screening predictors with being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening according to criteria of the US Preventive Services Task Force for adults aged 50 or older. State prevalence rates of up-to-date colorectal cancer screening were also calculated and mapped. The prevalence of being up-to-date with colorectal cancer screening for all respondents aged 50 or older was 65.6%; for respondents with diabetes, the rate was 69.2%. Respondents with diabetes were 22% more likely to be up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening than those without diabetes. Among those with diabetes, having a routine checkup within the previous year significantly increased the odds of being up-to-date on colorectal cancer screening (odds ratio, 1.90). Other factors such as age, income, education, race/ethnicity, insurance status, and history of cancer were also associated with up-to-date status. Regardless of diabetes status, people who had a routine checkup within the past year were more likely to be up-to-date than people who had not. Among people with diabetes, the duration between routine checkups may be of greater importance than the frequency of diabetes-related doctor visits. Continued efforts should be made to ensure that routine care visits occur regularly to address the preventive health needs of patients with and patients without diabetes.

  12. Risk Factors for the Requirement of Antenatal Insulin Treatment in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Akihiro; Kagawa, Hidetoshi; Ogawa, Daisuke; Wada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Poor maternal glycemic control increases maternal and fetal risk for adverse outcomes, and strict management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is recommended to prevent neonatal and maternal complications. However, risk factors for the requirement of antenatal insulin treatment (AIT) are not well-investigated in the pregnant women with GDM. We enrolled 37 pregnant women with GDM and investigated the risk for AIT by comparing the patients with AIT (AIT group; n = 10) and without insulin therapy (Diet group; n = 27). The 1-h and 2-h plasma glucose levels and the number of abnormal values in 75 g OGTT were significantly higher in AIT group compared with Diet group. By logistic regression analysis, plasma glucose level at 1-h was significant predictor for AIT and the odds ratios were 1.115 (1.004–1.239) using forward selection method and 1.192 (1.006–1.413) using backward elimination method. There were no significant differences in obstetrical outcomes and neonatal complications. 1-h plasma glucose levels in 75 g OGTT are useful parameters in predicting the requirement for AIT in GDM. Both maternal and neonatal complications are comparable in GDM patients with and without insulin therapy. PMID:27995150

  13. Incidence of and risk factors for diabetes mellitus in cats that have undergone renal transplantation: 187 cases (1986-2005).

    PubMed

    Case, Joseph B; Kyles, Andrew E; Nelson, Richard W; Aronson, Lillian; Kass, Philip H; Klose, Tyler C; Bailiff, Nathan L; Gregory, Clare R

    2007-03-15

    To compare incidence of diabetes mellitus in cats that had undergone renal transplantation with incidence in cats with chronic renal failure, compare mortality rates in cats that underwent renal transplantation and did or did not develop diabetes mellitus, and identify potential risk factors for development of posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) in cats. Retrospective case series. 187 cats that underwent renal transplantation. Medical records were reviewed. 26 of the 187 (13.9%) cats developed PTDM, with the incidence of PTDM being 66 cases/1,000 cat years at risk. By contrast, the incidence of diabetes mellitus among a comparison population of 178 cats with chronic renal failure that did not undergo renal transplantation was 17.9 cases/1,000 cat years at risk, and cats that underwent renal trans-plantation were 5.45 times as likely to develop diabetes mellitus as were control cats with chronic renal failure. The mortality rate among cats with PTDM was 2.38 times the rate among cats that underwent renal transplantation but did not develop PTDM. Age, sex, body weight, and percentage change in body weight were not found to be significantly associated with development of PTDM. Results suggest that cats that undergo renal transplantation have an increased risk of developing diabetes mellitus, compared with cats with chronic renal failure, and that mortality rate is higher for cats that develop PTDM than for cats that do not.

  14. Investigation of factors contributing to diabetes risk in american indian/alaska native youth.

    PubMed

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not significantly differ in BMI compared to peers. However, children with a parental history of diabetes had significantly higher BMIs than children without.

  15. Associated risk factors and management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers exceeding 6 months’ duration

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Hassan Gubara; Ahmed, Mohamed ElMakki

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) poses a great challenge to the treating physician and surgeon. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors, clinical presentation, and outcomes associated with chronic DFU>6 months’ duration. Methods This prospective study was performed in Jabir Abu Eliz Diabetic Centre (JADC), Khartoum, Sudan. A total of 108 patients who had DFU for >6 months were included. Recorded data included patient's demographics, DFU presentation, associated comorbidities, and outcomes. DFU description included size, depth, protective sensation, perfusion, and presence of infection. Comorbidities assessed included eye impairment, renal and heart disease. All patients received necessary local wound care with sharp debridement of any concomitant necrotic and infected tissues and off-loading with appropriate shoe gear and therapeutic devices. Results The mean age of the studied patients was 56+SD 9 years with a male to female ratio of 3:3.3. The mean duration of DFU was 18±SD 17 months (ranging from 6 to 84 months). Ulcer healing was significantly associated with off-loading, mainly the use of total contact cast (TCC) (p=0.013). Non-healing ulcerations were significantly associated with longer duration of the chronic DFU>12 months (p=0.002), smoking (p=0.000), poor glycemic control as evidenced by an elevated HbA1c (>7%), large size (mean SD 8+4 cm), increased depth (p<0.001), presence of skin callus (p<0.000), impaired limb perfusion (p=0.001), impaired protective sensation as measured by 10 g monofilament (p=0.002), neuroischemia (p=0.002), and Charcot neuroarthropathy (p=0.017). Discussion Risk factors associated with chronic DFU of>6 months’ duration included the presentation of an ulcer with increased size and depth, with associated skin callus and neuroischemia, in a diabetic patient with a history of smoking and increased HbA1c >7%. Off-loading mainly with the use of TCC is an effective method of managing

  16. Job Strain as a Risk Factor for Type 2 Diabetes: A Pooled Analysis of 124,808 Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Fransson, Eleonor I.; Heikkilä, Katriina; Ahola, Kirsi; Alfredsson, Lars; Bjorner, Jakob B.; Borritz, Marianne; Burr, Hermann; Dragano, Nico; Goldberg, Marcel; Hamer, Mark; Jokela, Markus; Knutsson, Anders; Koskenvuo, Markku; Koskinen, Aki; Kouvonen, Anne; Leineweber, Constanze; Madsen, Ida E.H.; Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.; Marmot, Michael G.; Nielsen, Martin L.; Nordin, Maria; Oksanen, Tuula; Pejtersen, Jan H.; Pentti, Jaana; Rugulies, Reiner; Salo, Paula; Siegrist, Johannes; Steptoe, Andrew; Suominen, Sakari; Theorell, Töres; Väänänen, Ari; Vahtera, Jussi; Virtanen, Marianna; Westerholm, Peter J.M.; Westerlund, Hugo; Zins, Marie; Batty, G. David; Brunner, Eric J.; Ferrie, Jane E.; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The status of psychosocial stress at work as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes is unclear because existing evidence is based on small studies and is subject to confounding by lifestyle factors, such as obesity and physical inactivity. This collaborative study examined whether stress at work, defined as “job strain,” is associated with incident type 2 diabetes independent of lifestyle factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We extracted individual-level data for 124,808 diabetes-free adults from 13 European cohort studies participating in the IPD-Work Consortium. We measured job strain with baseline questionnaires. Incident type 2 diabetes at follow-up was ascertained using national health registers, clinical screening, and self-reports. We analyzed data for each study using Cox regression and pooled the study-specific estimates in fixed-effect meta-analyses. RESULTS There were 3,703 cases of incident diabetes during a mean follow-up of 10.3 years. After adjustment for age, sex, and socioeconomic status (SES), the hazard ratio (HR) for job strain compared with no job strain was 1.15 (95% CI 1.06–1.25) with no difference between men and women (1.19 [1.06–1.34] and 1.13 [1.00–1.28], respectively). In stratified analyses, job strain was associated with an increased risk of diabetes among those with healthy and unhealthy lifestyle habits. In a multivariable model adjusted for age, sex, SES, and lifestyle habits, the HR was 1.11 (1.00–1.23). CONCLUSIONS Findings from a large pan-European dataset suggest that job strain is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes in men and women independent of lifestyle factors. PMID:25061139

  17. Serum vitamin D levels, diabetes and cardio-metabolic risk factors in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low levels of serum 25–hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D), have been associated with development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD); however there are limited data on serum 25(OH)D in Indigenous Australians, a population at high risk for both diabetes and CVD. We aimed to assess levels of serum 25(OH)D in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians and to explore relationships between 25(OH)D and cardio-metabolic risk factors and diabetes. Methods 592 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Australian participants of The eGFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) Study, a cross-sectional analysis of a cohort study performed in 2007–2011, from urban and remote centres within communities, primary care and tertiary hospitals across Northern Territory, Far North Queensland and Western Australia. Assessment of serum 25(OH)D, cardio-metabolic risk factors (central obesity, diabetes, hypertension, history of cardiovascular disease, current smoker, low HDL-cholesterol), and diabetes (by history or HbA1c ≥6.5%) was performed. Associations were explored between 25(OH)D and outcome measures of diabetes and number of cardio-metabolic risk factors. Results The median (IQR) serum 25(OH)D was 60 (45–77) nmol/L, 31% had 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L. For participants with 25(OH)D < 50 vs ≥50 nmol/L, cardio-metabolic risk profile differed for: diabetes (54%, 36% p < 0.001), past history of cardiovascular disease (16%, 9%, p = 0.014), waist-hip ratio (0.98, 0.92, p < 0.001), urine albumin-creatinine ratio (2.7, 1.5 mg/mmol, p < 0.001). The OR (95% CI) for diabetes was 2.02 (1.03 – 3.95) for people in the lowest vs highest tertiles of 25(OH)D (<53 vs >72 nmol/L, respectively) after adjusting for known cardio-metabolic risk factors. Conclusion The percentage of 25(OH)D levels <50 nmol/L was high among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians from Northern and Central Australia. Low 25(OH)D level was associated with

  18. Frequency and risk factors for urinary tract infection in cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bailiff, N L; Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Westropp, J L; Ling, G V; Jang, S S; Kass, P H

    2006-01-01

    Identification and control of infections are important in the management of diabetic cats. Urinary tract infections have not been well characterized in diabetic cats. This retrospective study was performed to review and characterize urinary tract infections in diabetic cats. Urinary tract infections are common in diabetic cats. A review was made of the medical records of 141 diabetic cats that had had urine obtained for culture by antepubic cystocentesis and that had not been treated with antibiotics, undergone urinary tract catheterization or urinary tract surgery within 2 weeks of urine collection or had urethral obstruction at the time of urine collection. A review of medical records. Urinary tract infection was identified in 18 of 141 diabetic cats. Escherichia coli was the most common isolate (67%). Female cats were at increased risk (prevalence odds ratios [POR], 3.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 10.2; P = .013). Clinical signs of lower urinary tract disease and findings on urine sediment examination were good predictors of positive urine cultures. Urinary tract infections are common in diabetic cats regardless of status of diabetic control, suggesting routine monitoring with urine sediment exams or urine culture is warranted.

  19. [A study on risk factors and perceptions of diabetes among urban and suburban residents from six provinces in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghua; Li, Li; Nie, Xueqiong; Sun, Siwei; Huang, Xianggang; Shi, Mingfei; Li, Fangbo; Wei, Wei

    2014-07-01

    To study the epidemiological status of diabetes' risk factors among urban and suburban residents and their perceptions of their own health status and risk of diabetes. Stratified multi-stage sampling method was used to conduct the survey among 18-60 years old residents from Zhejiang, Jiangsu, Shanxi, Henan, Yunnan, and Qinghai provinces in China from March to May in 2013. The Questionnaire of Health Literacy of Diabetes Mellitus of the Public in China was used to conduct the survey, and then the data were analyzed. The main contents of the questionnaire included diabetes mellitus knowledge, diabetes mellitus risk factors and diabetes mellitus risk self-assessment. The results of the survey were standardized by the 6(th) national census data. A total of 4 416 respondents were surveyed, and 4 282 valid questionnaires were successfully collected during the survey and the response rate was 97.0%. After weighted adjustment, the overweight and obesity rate of the residents in 6 provinces was 35.3%, abdominal obesity rate was 54.7%. 77.8% of the residents without diabetes had more than one risk factor, but only 8.5% thought they might got diabetes. The residents with high risk behavior possessing rates of diabetes were in eastern areas (79.7%), urban areas (80.7%), men (84.1%), aged from 45 to 60(100.0%), below primary school education level (83.4%) and enterprise personnel (79.7%). The residents with high risk consciousness of getting diabetes were in eastern areas (11.0%), urban areas (9.7%), men (9.7%), aged from 45 to 60 (12.3%), over college education level (12.7%) and the offices (14.7%). The results of logistic regression showed that residents in the middle areas (OR = 2.148, 95% CI: 1.633-2.920), urban residents (OR = 2.100, 95% CI: 1.611-2.738), male (OR = 2.488, 95% CI: 1.962-3.154), the older (OR = 1.102, 95% CI: 1.090-1.115) had a higher risk behavior rate of diabetes mellitus. Urban residents (OR = 2.784, 95% CI: 1.497-5.175), male (OR = 1.522, 95% CI: 1

  20. Gene-environment interaction between adiponectin gene polymorphisms and environmental factors on the risk of diabetic retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Wu, Qun Hong; Jiao, Ming Li; Fan, Xiao Hong; Hu, Quan; Hao, Yan Hua; Liu, Ruo Hong; Zhang, Wei; Cui, Yu; Han, Li Yuan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether the adiponectin gene is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) risk and interaction with environmental factors modifies the DR risk, and to investigate the relationship between serum adiponectin levels and DR. Four adiponectin polymorphisms were evaluated in 372 DR cases and 145 controls. Differences in environmental factors between cases and controls were evaluated by unconditional logistic regression analysis. The model-free multifactor dimensionality reduction method and traditional multiple regression models were applied to explore interactions between the polymorphisms and environmental factors. Using the Bonferroni method, we found no significant associations between four adiponectin polymorphisms and DR susceptibility. Multivariate logistic regression found that physical activity played a protective role in the progress of DR, whereas family history of diabetes (odds ratio 1.75) and insulin therapy (odds ratio 1.78) were associated with an increased risk for DR. The interaction between the C-11377 G (rs266729) polymorphism and insulin therapy might be associated with DR risk. Family history of diabetes combined with insulin therapy also increased the risk of DR. No adiponectin gene polymorphisms influenced the serum adiponectin levels. Serum adiponectin levels did not differ between the DR group and non-DR group. No significant association was identified between four adiponectin polymorphisms and DR susceptibility after stringent Bonferroni correction. The interaction between C-11377G (rs266729) polymorphism and insulin therapy, as well as the interaction between family history of diabetes and insulin therapy, might be associated with DR susceptibility.

  1. Thyroid function is associated with insulin resistance markers in healthy adolescents with risk factors to develop diabetes.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Garcia, José de Jesús; Camarillo Romero, Eneida; Loe Ochoa, Ana; Romero-Figueroa, Socorro; Huitron Bravo, Gerardo; Torres García, Roció; Montenegro-Morales, Patricia; Mendieta-Zerón, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among children and adolescents is rising. Thyroid function has been associated with insulin resistance. There is scarce information about how thyroid function could be related with cardiovascular risk or glucose homeostasis in adolescent. To analyze how thyroid function is associated with insulin resistance and another cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adolescents with risk factors to develop diabetes. A prospective cross-sectional analysis was carried out on euthyroid, adolescents. considered at high risk to develop Type 2 diabetes. Fasting blood samples were obtained. Thyroid function test and another cardiometabolic parameters were assessed. A 75 grams oral glucose tolerance test was performed to calculate insulin resistance. One hundred adolescents were evaluated. The mean age was 15.9 ± 0.8 years, There is a negative correlation between Fasting insulin, post glucose load insulin and HOMA IR. There were no correlation with Matsuda index. We could not found any correlation with TSH values. We found a correlation between fasting insulin, HOMA IR and serum thyroid hormones, we did not find any relation with serum TSH. In euthyroid adolescents with risk factors to develop diabetes.

  2. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  3. Associations of Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression with Diabetes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, C. F.; Hermans, H.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depression, anxiety, diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors are frequent health problems among older people with intellectual disability (ID). These conditions may be bidirectionally related. Depression and anxiety may have biological effects causing glucose intolerance, fat accumulation and also lifestyle changes causing metabolic…

  4. Influence of Age at Diagnosis and Time-Dependent Risk Factors on the Development of Diabetic Retinopathy in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Forga, Luis; Goñi, María José; Cambra, Koldo; García-Mouriz, Marta; Iriarte, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine the influence of age at onset of type 1 diabetes and of traditional vascular risk factors on the development of diabetic retinopathy, in a cohort of patients who have been followed up after onset. Methods. Observational, retrospective study. The cohort consists of 989 patients who were followed up after diagnosis for a mean of 10.1 (SD: 6.8) years. The influence of age at diagnosis, glycemic control, duration of diabetes, sex, blood pressure, lipids, BMI, and smoking is analyzed using Cox univariate and multivariate models with fixed and time-dependent variables. Results. 135 patients (13.7%) developed diabetic retinopathy. The cumulative incidence was 0.7, 5.9, and 21.8% at 5-, 10-, and 15-year follow-up, respectively. Compared to the group with onset at age <10 years, the risk of retinopathy increased 2.5-, 3-, 3.3-, and 3.7-fold in the groups with onset at 10–14, 15–29, 30–44, and >44 years, respectively. During follow-up we also observed an association between diabetic retinopathy and HbA1c levels, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion. The rate of diabetic retinopathy is higher in patients who were older at type 1 diabetes diagnosis. In addition, we confirmed the influence of glycemic control, HDL-cholesterol, and diastolic blood pressure on the occurrence of retinopathy. PMID:27213158

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetes-related foot complications in Translating Research Into Action for Diabetes (TRIAD)

    PubMed Central

    McEwen, Laura N.; Ylitalo, Kelly R.; Herman, William H.; Wrobel, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims The objective was to describe the prevalence of diabetes-related foot complications in a managed care population and to identify the demographic and biological risk factors. Methods We assessed the period prevalence of foot complications on 6,992 patients using ICD-9 diagnosis codes from health plan administrative data. Demographic and biological variables were ascertained from surveys and medical record reviews. We defined four mutually exclusive groups: any Charcot foot, DFU with debridement, amputation ± DFU and debridement, and no foot conditions. Results Overall, 55 (0.8%) patients had Charcot foot, 205 (2.9%) had DFU with debridement, and 101 (1.4%) had a lower-extremity amputation. There were 6,631 patients with no prevalent foot conditions. Racial/ethnic minorities were less likely to have Charcot foot (OR=0.21; 95%CI: 0.10, 0.46) or DFU (OR=0.61; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.84) compared to non-Hispanic Whites, but there were no racial/ethnic differences in amputation. Histories of micro- or macrovascular disease were associated with a two- to four-fold increase in the odds of foot complications. Conclusion In managed care patients with uniform access to health care, we found a relatively high prevalence of foot complications, but attenuation of the racial/ethnic differences of rates reported in the literature. PMID:24035357

  6. Assessment of the Effects of Rehabilitation After Cerebrovascular Accident in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension as Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Tanovic, Edina; Selimovic, Senad; Tanovic, Haris

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the results of rehabilitation, to determine the prevalence of major risk factors in cerebrovascular accident and their consequences, as well as to propose measures and procedures that will affect the better rehabilitation. Methods: The survey analyzed: age, sex, duration of rehabilitation, activities in daily life through the Barthel index at admission and at discharge, presence of risk factors HTA and DM. The study included a total of 116 patients, the majority of patients are older than 61 years. We had 49% of male patients and 51% of female patients and they spent 31-40 days at the rehabilitation. Results: The most common risk factor is HTA (83%) and diabetes (33%). Most of the patients at admission had a BI from 0 to 4 (32.7%), and at discharge BI in the range 17-20 (36.2%). Statistical analysis shows that there is a statistically significant correlation between the BI at admission, BI at discharge and risk factors of HTA and diabetes mellitus. Conclusions: the rehabilitation results in most patients is good results of rehabilitation. The most important risk factors in patients are HTA, DM and directly affect on results of rehabilitation. For the better results we should have energetic fight against risk factors for HTA and DM through primary and secondary prevention and patient education about early detection and treatment of these risk factors. PMID:24937938

  7. Prediabetes, diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, their risk factors and association with knowledge of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: The Bangladesh Population-based Diabetes and Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Islam, Fakir M Amirul; Chakrabarti, Rahul; Islam, M Tauhidul; Wahab, Mohammad; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Finger, Robert P; Shaw, Jonathan E

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of prediabetes and diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (DM) in rural Bangladesh. Using a population-based cluster random sampling strategy, 3104 adults aged ≥30 years were recruited. Fasting capillary blood glucose, blood pressure, height, weight, waist circumference, and knowledge, attitudes, and practice related to diabetes were recorded. Diabetes was defined as fasting glucose (FG) ≥7.0 mmol/L or a self-reported diagnosis of diabetes; impaired FG (IFG) was defined as FG ≥ 6.1 and <7.0 mmol/L. The overall crude prevalence of DM was 7.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.3%-8.1%; n = 222), of which 55% (n = 123) was previously undiagnosed (UDM). The prevalence of IFG was 5.3% (95% CI 4.5%-6.1%; n = 163). The age-standardized prevalence of DM and IFG was 6.6% and 5.0%, respectively. The prevalence of UDM was higher in people of lower socioeconomic status (59% vs. 31%; P < 0.001). Of those with known DM, 56% had poor glycemic control (FG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L) and 37% were not on medication. Overall knowledge of DM was poor; only 16.3%, 17.8%, and 13.4% of those with UDM, IFG, and normal FG knew that diabetes causes eye disease, compared with 55.6% of those with known DM (Ptrend  < 0.001). In this rural Bangladeshi community, UDM was high. Lower socioeconomic status was associated with a higher risk of UDM. Overall knowledge of DM was poor. Public health programmes should target those of low socioeconomic status and aim to increase knowledge of DM in rural Bangladesh. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. [Evaluation of a protocol to monitor cardiovascular risk factors in diabetic patients attended in primary care].

    PubMed

    Gosalbes Soler, Victoria; Bonet Plá, Alvaro; Sanchis Doménech, Carlos; Fornos Garrigós, Antonio; Fluixá Carrascosa, Carlos; Ajenjo Navarro, Asunción

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate a primary care protocol for intensive monitoring of cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors in type-2 diabetes patients versus usual care. Randomised trial with clusters. Primary care clinics. Sixty family physicians. Participants were randomised between following a protocol of intensive monitoring of CVR factors and maintaining their habitual practice with DM2 patients. Follow-up lasted 12 months. Data on HbA1C, CVR factors and CVR were collected at the start of the study and at 12 months. In all, 188 patients (94 intervention group and 94 control group) were included. At baseline measurement, CVR in control group (CG) was 36.3% (95% CI, 33.9%-38.6%); and in intervention group (IG), 35.9% (95% CI, 33.5%-38.4%), with no significant differences between groups. At one year, CVR in CG was 33.1% (95% CI, 30%-36.1%) and in IG 30.5% (95% CI, 27.8%-33.2%). The CVR difference between baseline and 1-year measurements was 2.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-5.7%) in CG and 5.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-7.1%) in IG. Although improvement of CVR is greater in the IG, the difference between the two groups is not significant. The characteristics of the doctors chosen may have meant that the patients of the two groups received similar treatment.

  9. Risk accuracy of type 2 diabetes in middle aged adults: Associations with sociodemographic, clinical, psychological and behavioural factors.

    PubMed

    Silarova, Barbora; Douglas, Fiona E; Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Godino, Job G; Griffin, Simon J

    2017-07-21

    To identify the proportion of individuals with an accurate perception of their risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) prior to, immediately after and eight weeks after receiving a personalised risk estimate. Additionally, we aimed to explore what factors are associated with underestimation and overestimation immediately post-intervention. Cohort study based on the data collected in the Diabetes Risk Communication Trial. We included 379 participants (mean age 48.9 (SD 7.4) years; 55.1% women) who received a genotypic or phenotypic risk estimate for T2D. While only 1.3% of participants perceived their risk accurately at baseline, this increased to 24.7% immediately after receiving a risk estimate and then dropped to 7.3% at eight weeks. Those who overestimated their risk at baseline continued to overestimate it, whereas those who underestimated their risk at baseline improved their risk accuracy. We did not identify any other characteristics associated with underestimation or overestimation immediately after receiving a risk estimate. Understanding a received risk estimate is challenging for most participants with many continuing to have inaccurate risk perception after receiving the estimate. Individuals who overestimate or underestimate their T2D risk before receiving risk information might require different approaches for altering their risk perception. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Prevalence and control of cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in southern region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alavudeen, Sirajudeen S; Dhanapal, C K; Khan, Noohu Abdulla; Al Akhali, Khalid M; Paulliah, Sam Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Dyslipidemia is a significant predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality in diabetes patients. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence rates, characteristics of dyslipidemia and their control in outpatient population in a Diabetic Centre. A cross sectional prospective study design was used to collect data from 255 patients which included patient characteristics, past medical history of CVD, medications and parameters related to DM and cardiovascular risk factor control. Blood pressure and laboratory measurements for glycosylated hemoglobin and lipoprotein panel were recorded. Body mass index (BMI) of the dyslipidemic diabetic patients was significantly higher for females. In terms of age, duration of diabetes, family history, diabetes treatment offered did not differed significantly among genders. Clinical characteristics of HDL values were significantly higher for female in comparison to men (P = 0.02) whereas glycosylated hemoglobin and blood pressure appeared not to differ significantly. Among the three factors studied BMI, duration of diabetes mellitus and drug therapy on lipoprotein levels of diabetes patients, except for the influence of drug therapy which influenced significantly the total cholesterol level (P = 0.02). Number of females with normolipid were more than males (P = 0.009) and number of males with abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride patients were significantly more than females (0.0002). Dyslipidemia among males were higher than females which could be a significant risk factor for causing low glycemic control culminating in cardiovascular events. Control of hyperglycaemia and other CVD risk factor appears to be suboptimal in Saudi Arabia. Addressing health system components such as providing medical staff training, incentive to health professionals and better patient education may improve quality of DM care.

  11. Differences in risk factors of malignancy between men and women with type 2 diabetes: A retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz; Szymańska-Garbacz, Elektra; Miszczyszyn, Zofia; Dereziński, Tadeusz; Czupryniak, Leszek

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this multicenter, retrospective, case-control study was to identify differences in risk factors of malignancy between men and women with type 2 diabetes. Among women the most prevalent malignancies were: breast and uterine cancers (35.6% and 14.4% respectively), while among men there were: colorectal and prostate cancers (24.5% and 13.3% respectively). In both gender metformin use was associated with lower cancer risk. Obesity and insulin treatment in dose-dependent and time-varying manner were associated with significantly increased risk of malignancy in females. In men, unexpectedly, cardiovascular disease was more prevalent in control group. Other variables did not show significant association with malignancy risk. 118 women and 98 men with type 2 diabetes mellitus who developed cancer after diagnosis of diabetes and the same number of strictly age matched controls with type 2 diabetes and without malignancy were included into the study. Diabetes duration, antidiabetic medications use, glycated hemoglobin level, body mass index, smoking habits, occupation, presence of comorbidities and aspirin use were included into analyses. Metformin demonstrated protective effect against cancer in both sexes. Obesity and insulin treatment seem to have greater impact on cancer risk among women.

  12. Small dense low-density lipoprotein as a potential risk factor of nephropathy in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Allha, Essam; Hassan, Basma Badr; Abduo, Mohamad; Omar, Seham Ahmed; Sliem, Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The risk for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes is about 30-40%, and it is considered the leading cause of end-stage renal disease. Small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL) particles are believed to be atherogenic, and its predominance has been accepted as an emerging cardiovascular risk factor. This study aimed to assess small dense LDL as a potential risk factor and a possible predictor for diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. Patients and Methods: According to microalbuminuria test, 40 diabetic patients were categorized into two groups: Diabetic patients without nephropathy (microalbuminuria negative group) and diabetic patients with nephropathy (microalbuminuria positive group), each group consists of 20 patients and all were non-obese and normotensive. The patients were re-classified into three sub-groups depending on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Results: The mean of small dense LDL level in the microalbuminuria positive group was higher than that in the microalbuminuria negative group, but without statistical significance. It was significantly higher in patients with either mild or moderate decrease in estimated GFR than in patients with normal estimated GFR. There was statistically significant correlation between small dense LDL and albuminuria and significant inverse correlation between small dense LDL and estimated GFR in all patients in the study. Based on microalbuminuria, the sensitivity and specificity of small dense LDL in the diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy was 40% and 80%, respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >55.14 mg/dl. On the other hand, based on GFR, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.24% and 73.91% respectively, with cutoff values of small dense LDL >41.89 mg/dl. Conclusion: Small dense LDL is correlated with the incidence and severity of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetic patients. It should be considered as a potential risk factor and as a diagnostic biomarker to be used in

  13. Risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in the refugee population in Gaza Strip: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    AlKasseh, A S M; Zaki, N M; Aljeesh, Y I; Soon, L K

    2014-01-09

    To determine the risk factors of gestational diabetes mellitus in refugee populations in the Gaza Strip, a retrospective case-control study was performed between March and June 2011 in the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics. Data were collected on maternal sociodemographics and the prevalence of diagnosed GDM according to World Health Organization criteria from clinics where postnatal Palestinian refugee women had been diagnosed with GDM during previous pregnancies, and non-GDM women were used as controls. Sociodemographic characteristics, pre-pregnancy body-mass index (BMI), obstetrics history and family history of diabetes were used as study variables. In total, 189 incident cases of GDM were identified. The most significant risk factors for GDM were: history of miscarriage more than once; overweight before pregnancy; history of stillbirth; history of caesarean birth; and positive family history of diabetes mellitus.

  14. Melatonin ameliorates metabolic risk factors, modulates apoptotic proteins, and protects the rat heart against diabetes-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali H; El-Missiry, Mohamed A; Othman, Azza I

    2015-01-15

    The present study investigated the ability of melatonin in reducing metabolic risk factors and cardiac apoptosis induced by diabetes. Streptozotocin (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into male rats, and after diabetic induction melatonin (10mg/kg i.g.) was administered orally for 21 days. Diabetic hearts showed increased number of apoptotic cells with downregulation of Bcl-2 and activation of p53 and CD95 as well as the caspases 9, 8 and 3. In addition, there was a significant decrease in insulin level, hyperglycemia, elevated HOMA-IR, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total lipids, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low and very low-density lipoprotein and decreased high-density lipoprotein. These changes were coupled with a significant increase in the activities of creatin kinase-MB (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the serum of the diabetic rats indicating myocardium injury. Oral administration of melatonin for 3 weeks after diabetes induction ameliorated the levels of hyperglycemia, insulin, HbA1c, lipids profile and HOMA-IR. The oral melatonin treatment of diabetic rats significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells in the heart compared to diabetic rats. It enhanced Bcl-2 expression and blocked the activation of CD95 as well as caspases 9, 8 and 3. These changes were accompanied with significant improvement of CK-MB and LDH in the serum indicating the ameliorative effect of melatonin on myocardium injury. Melatonin effectively ameliorated diabetic myocardium injury, apoptosis, reduced the metabolic risk factors and modulated important steps in both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Thus, melatonin may be a promising pharmacological agent for ameliorating potential cardiomyopathy associated with diabetes.

  15. Retrospective cohort study on risk factors for development of gestational diabetes among mothers attending antenatal clinics in Nairobi County

    PubMed Central

    Adoyo, Maureen Atieno; Mbakaya, Charles; Nyambati, Venny; Kombe, Yeri

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization estimates that deaths resulting from diabetes will rise above 50% by the year 2020; hence urgent action is needed to reverse the trend notably through nutrition and lifestyle intervention among populations at risks. Studies have established that nutritional environment and physiology of the mother affects neonate's health at infancy and later in life thus this study sought to investigate the risk factors for development of gestational diabetes focusing age, weight, family history and pre-existing medical condition which could be modified to improve population health. Methods A retrospective cohort study design was used. Subjects were sampled from selected maternity facilities in Nairobi and were subjected to oral glucose test to ascertain Gestational Diabetes mellitus (GDM) status. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 238 respondents. Quantitative data was then analyzed as descriptive statistic, univariate and multivariate regression. Results Average age for mothers with GDM was high with a mean of 33.06 (95% C.I: 31.59-34.52) compared to a mean of 27.9 (95% C.I: 27.01-28.78) for non-GDM mothers. Weight before pregnancy was high with mean of 74.04 (95% C.I: 70.82-77.30) among mothers with GDM compared to mean of 60.27 (95% C.I:58.59-61.96) among non-GDM mothers. Mothers with diabetic history in the family had twice the risk of developing GDM (OR= 2.27; 95% C.I: 1.23-4.17) compared to those who did not observe diabetic history in the family. Conclusion Gestational diabetes cases are relatively high. Age advancement; high weight and diabetic history in family are determining factors for development of diabetes among pregnant women. PMID:27795753

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Raška, Ivan; Rašková, Mária; Zikán, Vít; Škrha, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are at increased risk of fractures. The aim of this study is to analyze the prevalence and risk factors of osteoporosis and osteoporosis related fractures in postmenopausal women with T2DM. A total of 112 postmenopausal women with T2DM and 171 control nondiabetic women received a standardized questionnaire on osteoporosis risk factors, and were evaluated for bone mineral density (BMD, by using a dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), biochemical markers of bone and glucose metabolism, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) and its gene polymorphisms (rs1800625 or rs2070600). In T2DM patients the prevalence of osteoporosis was 25% and low trauma vertebral (Vfx) and non-vertebral fractures were found in 8% and 19% women, respectively. When compared between subjects with and without fractures, there were no significant differences in BMD at any site between the groups, except for distal radius, which was significantly lower in T2DM women with Vfx (p<0.05 vs.non-fractured without osteoporosis). We found no associations between bone and glucose metabolism variables, sRAGE and BMD. No significant differences were observed in sRAGE levels according to their rs1800625, rs 2070600 genotype or fracture prevalence. Serum osteocalcin was significantly lower in T2DM women (p<0.01 vs. controls) and in T2DM women with Vfx (p<0.05) vs. non-fractured without osteoporosis. T2DM women with low daily walking activity (< 2 h daily) had significantly higher serum sclerostin levels (p<0.05 vs. those who were walking > 2 h daily). Diabetes-specific parameters as well as RAGE polymorphisms did not associate with BMD or fractures in T2DM postmenopausal women. Lower levels of osteocalcin, namely in those with Vfx and higher sclerostin levels in those with low daily walking activity suggest lower bone remodeling and/or decreased bone quality in T2DM.

  17. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Roh, Young Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m2): no DKD (uACR <30 and eGFR ≥60), non-severe DKD (uACR ≥30 or eGFR <60), and severe DKD (uACR ≥30 and eGFR <60). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and HbA1c variability (standard deviation [SD] of serial HbA1c values or HbA1c-SD) were calculated for the preceding 2 years. Results The prevalence of no DKD, non-severe DKD, and severe DKD was 37.2% (n=118), 37.0% (n=117), and 25.8% (n=82), respectively. HbA1c-SD and the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. Conclusion The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients. PMID:27766790

  18. Risk Factors for the Development and Progression of Diabetic Kidney Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Advanced Diabetic Retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Kyung Jin; Kim, Hye Ji; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Kwon, Hyuk Sang; Baek, Ki Hyun; Roh, Young Jung; Song, Ki Ho

    2016-12-01

    Some patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) do not develop diabetic kidney disease (DKD) despite the presence of advanced diabetic retinopathy (DR). We aimed to investigate the presence of DKD and its risk factors in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 317 patients with T2DM and advanced DR. The phenotypes of DKD were divided into three groups according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR, mg/g) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, mL/min/1.73 m²): no DKD (uACR <30 and eGFR ≥60), non-severe DKD (uACR ≥30 or eGFR <60), and severe DKD (uACR ≥30 and eGFR <60). Mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, and HbA1c variability (standard deviation [SD] of serial HbA1c values or HbA1c-SD) were calculated for the preceding 2 years. The prevalence of no DKD, non-severe DKD, and severe DKD was 37.2% (n=118), 37.0% (n=117), and 25.8% (n=82), respectively. HbA1c-SD and the triglyceride/high density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio correlated positively with uACR and negatively with eGFR. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the HbA1c-SD and TG/HDL-C ratio were significantly related with eGFR. Multiple logistic regression analyses after adjusting for several risk factors showed that HbA1c-SD and the TG/HDL-C ratio were significant risk factors for severe DKD. The prevalence of DKD was about 60% in patients with T2DM and advanced DR. HbA1c variability and TG/HDL-C ratio may affect the development and progression of DKD in these patients.

  19. Earlier age at menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in Brazilian adults: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Early menarche has been linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Western and Asian societies, yet whether age at menarche is associated with diabetes in Latin America, where puberty and diabetes may have different life courses, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk in Brazilian adults. Methods We used data from 8,075 women aged 35-74 years in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) who had complete information on age at menarche, diabetes status, and covariates. Diabetes was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis, medication use, and laboratory variables (fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, and glycated hemoglobin). Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Menarche onset < 11 years [vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher risk of diabetes (RR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, maternal education, maternal and paternal diabetes, and birth weight. This persisted after further control for BMI at age 20 years and relative leg length. Additionally, among those not taking diabetes medications, earlier menarche [<11 years vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher % glycated hemoglobin (p < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.001), C-reactive protein (p = 0.003), waist circumference (p < 0.001), and BMI measured at baseline exam (p < 0.001). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with greater risk for adult diabetes and cardiometabolic disease in the Brazilian context. PMID:24438044

  20. Work Disability among Employees with Diabetes: Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors in Three Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Head, Jenny; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Okuloff, Annaleena; Tabak, Adam G; Goldberg, Marcel; Ervasti, Jenni; Jokela, Markus; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Pentti, Jaana; Zins, Marie; Kivimäki, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Studies of work disability in diabetes have examined diabetes as a homogeneous disease. We sought to identify subgroups among persons with diabetes based on potential risk factors for work disability. Participants were 2,445 employees with diabetes from three prospective cohorts (the Finnish Public Sector study, the GAZEL study, and the Whitehall II study). Work disability was ascertained via linkage to registers of sickness absence and disability pensions during a follow-up of 4 years. Study-specific latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups according to prevalent comorbid disease and health-risk behaviours. Study-specific associations with work disability at follow-up were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. Separate latent class analyses for men and women in each cohort supported a two-class solution with one subgroup (total n = 1,086; 44.4%) having high prevalence of chronic somatic diseases, psychological symptoms, obesity, physical inactivity and abstinence from alcohol and the other subgroup (total n = 1,359; 55.6%) low prevalence of these factors. In the adjusted meta-analyses, participants in the 'high-risk' group had more work disability days (pooled rate ratio = 1.66, 95% CI 1.38-1.99) and more work disability episodes (pooled rate ratio = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.46). These associations were similar in men and women, younger and older participants, and across occupational groups. Diabetes is not a homogeneous disease in terms of work disability risk. Approximately half of people with diabetes are assigned to a subgroup characterised by clustering of comorbid health conditions, obesity, physical inactivity, abstinence of alcohol, and associated high risk of work disability; the other half to a subgroup characterised by a more favourable risk profile.

  1. Adherence to healthy lifestyle factors and risk of death in men with diabetes mellitus: The Physicians' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yash R; Gadiraju, Taraka V; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2016-11-11

    The relationship between healthy lifestyle factors and mortality in people with type 2 diabetes is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine whether healthy lifestyle factors are associated with mortality in people with type 2 diabetes. We prospectively studied 1163 men with type 2 diabetes from the Physicians' Health Study. Lifestyle factors consisted of currently not smoking, moderate drinking (1-2 drinks/day), vigorous exercise (1+/week), BMI < 25 kg/m(2), and being in the top 2 quintiles of the alternate healthy eating index-2010 (AHEI-2010). Multivariate Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mortality. At baseline, average age was 69 years and mean follow up was 9 years. About 22% of study participants had ≤1 healthy lifestyle factor, 37% had two, 29% had three, and 12% had four or more healthy lifestyle factors. An inverse relationship was found between the number of lifestyle factors and total mortality. Compared with participants who had ≤1 healthy lifestyle factor, the risk of death was 42% (95% CI; 19%-58%) lower for those with two healthy lifestyle factors, 41% (95% CI; 18%-58%) lower for those with three, and 44% (95% CI; 12%-64%) lower for those with 4 or more healthy lifestyle factors. Adherence to modifiable healthy lifestyle factors is associated with a lower risk of death among adult men with type 2 diabetes. Our study emphasizes the importance of educating individuals with diabetes to adhere to healthy lifestyle factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving Employee Health: Evaluation of a Worksite Lifestyle Change Program to Decrease Risk Factors for Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, M; Molenaar, D; Arena, V; Venditti, E; Meehan, R; Miller, R; Vanderwood, K; Eaglehouse, Y; Kriska, Andrea M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if an evidence-based, behavioral lifestyle intervention program delivered at a worksite setting is effective in improving type 2 diabetes and CVD risk factors. Methods A randomized six-month delayed control design was utilized, with two-thirds of the participants assigned to begin intervention immediately and one-third beginning six months later. The year-long program (weekly for 3 months transitioning to monthly) focused on weight loss and increasing physical activity. Results The immediate intervention group had greater mean weight loss (−10.4 lbs., 5.1%, vs. −2.3 lbs., 1%, p=0.0001) than the delayed control group at 6 months and relatively greater improvements in activity, HbA1c and other risk factors. The delayed group experienced similar improvements after completing the intervention program. Conclusions A worksite behavioral lifestyle intervention is feasible and effective in significantly improving risk factors for diabetes and CVD. PMID:25742535

  3. The effect of participatory community-based diabetes cares on the control of diabetes and its risk factors in western suburb of Yasouj, Iran.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, B; Safari, M; Yazdanpanah, Sh; Angha, P; Karami, M; Emadi, M; Yazdanpanah, S; Poorbehesht, A

    2012-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether a community-based participatory diabetes care program could efficiently improve diabetic care and reduce its risk factors. To induce a participatory approach, a local group was established in partnership with academics, local leaders, health providers and public representatives. The group conducted community needs assessment and priority setting process. Diabetes was identified as the first priority health problem in this area. A total of 2569 30- to 65-year-old residents were screened for diabetes and 405 of them took part in a 13-week nutrition education and physical exercise intervention. Out of 1336 high-risk individuals, 17% had fasting blood sugar (FBS) ≥126 mg/dl and 13.5% with FBS between 110 and 125 mg/dl. Percentages of participants with triglycerides (TG) ≥150 mg/dl and cholesterol ≥200 mg/dl were 33.8% and 23.5%, respectively. After completion of the intervention, the mean FBS, HbA1C, TG and cholesterol were decreased significantly. Although systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index were decreased too, the differences were not statistically significant. The mean physical activity increased and consumption of fried foods and saturated oil decreased significantly. The results suggest that participatory community-based care could be a feasible model for control of diabetes and its risk factors.

  4. [To face up the disease strategy as a risk factor for the life style in type 2 diabetics].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Rocha, Santiago Aritio; Galicia-Rodríguez, Liliana; Vargas-Daza, Emma Rosa; Martínez-González, Lidia; Villarreal-Ríos, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    To identify to the life style as a risk factor after the strategy of facing the disease in type 2 diabetic patients. A study of cases and controls was made in patients with type 2 diabetes of five primary care units in the metropolitan area of Queretaro city. The sample size was of 48 patients by group. They were chosen by quota in the waiting room. Sociodemographic variables and health aspects were included in the questionnaire. The life style was investigated by the Instrument to Measure the Style of Life in Diabetics (IMEVID). For the evaluation of type of facing the scale of Strategy of Facing was used as opposed to extreme risks. Measures of central tendency, χ² and odds ratio were included. The type of active facing was a risk factor for the style of life with a p = 0.0001. The strategy of active facing disease is a risk factor for the style of life in the type 2 diabetic patient.

  5. Reversal of type 2 diabetes mellitus and improvements in cardiovascular risk factors after surgical weight loss in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Inge, Thomas H; Miyano, Go; Bean, Judy; Helmrath, Michael; Courcoulas, Anita; Harmon, Carroll M; Chen, Mike K; Wilson, Kimberly; Daniels, Stephen R; Garcia, Victor F; Brandt, Mary L; Dolan, Lawrence M

    2009-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, all well-known risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Surgical weight loss has resulted in a marked reduction of these risk factors in adults. We hypothesized that gastric bypass would improve parameters of metabolic dysfunction and cardiovascular risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eleven adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at 5 centers were included. Anthropometric, hemodynamic, and biochemical measures and surgical complications were analyzed. Similar measures from 67 adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were treated medically for 1 year were also analyzed. Adolescents who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass were extremely obese (mean BMI of 50 +/- 5.9 kg/m(2)) with numerous cardiovascular risk factors. After surgery there was evidence of remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus in all but 1 patient. Significant improvements in BMI (-34%), fasting blood glucose (-41%), fasting insulin concentrations (-81%), hemoglobin A1c levels (7.3%-5.6%), and insulin sensitivity were also seen. There were significant improvements in serum lipid levels and blood pressure. In comparison, adolescents with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were followed during 1 year of medical treatment demonstrated stable body weight (baseline BMI: 35 +/- 7.3 kg/m(2); 1-year BMI: 34.9 +/- 7.2 kg/m(2)) and no significant change in blood pressure or in diabetic medication use. Medically managed patients had significantly improved hemoglobin A1c levels over 1 year (baseline: 7.85% +/- 2.3%; 1 year: 7.1% +/- 2%). Extremely obese diabetic adolescents experience significant weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Improvements in insulin resistance, beta-cell function, and cardiovascular risk factors support Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as an intervention that improves the health of these adolescents. Although the long-term efficacy of Roux

  6. A longitudinal study of structural risk factors for obesity and diabetes among American Indian young adults, 1994-2008.

    PubMed

    Marley, Tennille L; Metzger, Molly W

    2015-05-07

    American Indian young adults have higher rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes than the general US population. They are also more likely than the general population to have higher rates of structural risk factors for obesity and diabetes, such as poverty, frequent changes of residence, and stress. The objective of this study was to investigate possible links between these 2 sets of problems. Data from the American Indian subsample of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) were used to examine potential links between obesity and type 2 diabetes and structural risk factors such as neighborhood poverty, housing mobility, and stress. We used logistic regression to explore explanatory factors. American Indians in the subsample had higher rates of poor health, such as elevated hemoglobin A1c levels, self-reported high blood glucose, self-reported diabetes, and overweight or obesity. They also had higher rates of structural risk factors than non-Hispanic whites, such as residing in poorer and more transient neighborhoods and having greater levels of stress. Self-reported stress partially mediated the increased likelihood of high blood glucose or diabetes among American Indians, whereas neighborhood poverty partially mediated their increased likelihood of obesity. Neighborhood poverty and stress may partially explain the higher rates of overweight, obesity, and type 2 diabetes among American Indian young adults than among non-Hispanic white young adults. Future research should explore additional neighborhood factors such as access to grocery stores selling healthy foods, proximity and safety of playgrounds or other recreational space, and adequate housing.

  7. Smoking, Radiotherapy, Diabetes and Osteoporosis as Risk Factors for Dental Implant Failure: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Nizhou; Xu, Xinchen; Qu, Xinhua; Lu, Eryi

    2013-01-01

    Background There are conflicting reports as to the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. We undertook a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between smoking, radiotherapy, diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of dental implant failure. Methods A comprehensive research on MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to January 2013, was conducted to identify potential studies. References of relevant studies were also searched. Screening, data extraction and quality assessment were conducted independently and in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to pool estimates of relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 51 studies were identified in this meta-analysis, with more than 40,000 dental implants placed under risk-threatening conditions. The pooled RRs showed a direct association between smoking (n = 33; RR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.67–2.21) and radiotherapy (n = 16; RR = 2.28; 95% CI, 1.49–3.51) and the risk of dental implant failure, whereas no inverse impact of diabetes (n = 5; RR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.62–1.32) on the risk of dental implant failure was found. The influence of osteoporosis on the risk of dental implant failure was direct but not significant (n = 4; RR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.79–1.52). The subgroup analysis indicated no influence of study design, geographical location, length of follow-up, sample size, or mean age of recruited patients. Conclusions Smoking and radiotherapy were associated with an increased risk of dental implant failure. The relationship between diabetes and osteoporosis and the risk of implant failure warrant further study. PMID:23940794

  8. Retinopathy and risk factors in diabetic patients from Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El-Bab, Mohamed F; Shawky, Nashaat; Al-Sisi, Ali; Akhtar, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is accompanied by chronic and dangerous microvascular changes affecting most body systems, especially the eye, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy without appropriate management is emerging as one of the leading causes of blindness. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the early diagnosis of diabetic retinopathy, reduce the risk of blindness, and identify relevant risk factors. Methods This descriptive study was designed to estimate the prevalence of retinopathy and its staging in diabetic patients attending the diabetes clinic at King Fahd Hospital in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, from 2008 to 2010. Patients completed a questionnaire, underwent a full medical assessment carried out by the treating clinicians, and were examined for evidence of diabetic retinopathy using standard ophthalmic outpatient instruments. Results In total, 690 randomly selected diabetic patients of mean age 46.10 ± 11.85 (range 16–88) years were included, comprising 395 men (57.2%) of mean age 46.50 ± 11.31 years and 295 women (42.8%) of mean age 45.55 ± 12.53 years. The mean duration of diabetes mellitus was 11.91 ± 7.92 years in the women and 14.42 ± 8.20 years in the men, and the mean total duration of known diabetes mellitus was 13.35 ± 8.17 years. Glycated hemoglobin was higher in men (8.53% ± 1.81%) than in women (7.73% ± 1.84%), and this difference was statistically significant (P ≤ 0.0001). Of the 690 diabetic patients, 249 (36.1%) had retinopathy. Mild nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy was present in 13.6% of patients, being of moderate grade in 8% and of severe grade in 8.1%. A further 6.4% had proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Conclusion Regular screening to detect diabetic retinopathy is strongly recommended because early detection has the best chance of preventing retinal complications. PMID:22368446

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for the development of diabetes mellitus in Swedish cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence and risk factors for the development of feline diabetes mellitus (FDM) in Swedish cats have not previously been reported. The objective of the present pilot study was to indicate prevalence and possible risk factors for FDM in Swedish cats. Twenty diabetic cats from the database at the University Animal Hospital in Uppsala participated in the study, and these were matched with 20 healthy controls on sex and age. A mail-and-telephone questionnaire focusing on diet, activity and obesity was used. Results The prevalence of FDM during the years 2000–2004 based on the results of the hospital records in the present study was 21 per 10,000 cats. The diabetic cats were on average 9 years old when the disease signs were discovered (median, min-max 2–15). Among FDM cases, it was more common to be male (n=17 males vs n=3 females; P≤0.05). Ten out of twenty owners to cases (50%) reported their cats to be obese at the time of the diagnosis (median 9 years, min-max 2–15), as compared to five out of twenty (25%) controls at the same age. The median BW at the time for diagnosis was 5.5 kg (min-max 2.0-9.0) for cases, and 5.0 kg (min-max 3.0-8.0 kg) for controls, respectively. Despite that both cases and controls had the same median age at the time of the study (13 years, min-max 3–18), a significantly higher number of controls were alive at that age (n=16 controls vs 8 cases; P≤0.05). A significantly higher proportion of cases that were obese at the time of the FDM diagnosis were dead at the time of the study compared to the proportion of controls that were obese at a similar age (P≤0.05). The diets given at the time for diagnosis for cases compared to diet of the controls at a similar time were mainly commercial foods, and controls consumed a higher proportion of dry foods compared to cases (medians 79 vs 44% of DM intake/d, respectively; P≤0.05). Cases were less active compared to the controls (2.3 and 3.2 h/d, respectively; P≤0

  10. “It is not possible for me to have diabetes”–Community Perceptions on Diabetes and Its Risk Factors in Rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Pujilestari, Cahya Utamie; Ng, Nawi; Hakimi, Mohammad; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that negative perceptions towards diabetes can limit the management and prevention of the disease. The negative perceptions towards diabetes are prevalent in many different settings, especially among rural communities. Few qualitative studies have been performed to understand how the community views diabetes and its associated risk factors. This study aimed to explore general community perceptions of diabetes and its risk factors in rural Indonesia. A total of 68 participants were recruited to 12 focus group discussions (FGDs) comprised of different age groups and sexes. The FGDs were conducted in six villages in rural Purworejo District, Central Java, Indonesia, from 2011 to 2012. All FGDs were recorded and transcribed. Qualitative content analysis was performed to describe and analyse how the rural community perceived diabetes and its risk factors. Diabetes was perceived as a visible and scary sugar disease, and the affected individuals themselves were blamed for getting the disease. Recognised as ‘sugar’ or ‘sweet-pee’ disease with terrifying effects, diabetes was believed to be a disease with no cure. The participants seemed to have an unrealistic optimism with regards to the diabetes risk factors. They believed that diabetes would not affect them, only others, and that having family members with diabetes was necessary for one to develop diabetes. Our findings demonstrate that rural communities have negative perceptions about diabetes and at the same time individuals have unrealistic optimism about their own risk factors. Understanding how such communities perceive diabetes and its risk factors is important for planning prevention strategies. Health messages need to be tailored to health-related behaviours and the local culture’s concepts of diseases and risk factors. PMID:25168994

  11. A population-based risk factor scoring will decrease unnecessary testing for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Eray; Kayikcioglu, Fulya; Oztürk, Nilgun; Koc, Sevgi; Haberal, Ali

    2004-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a population-based risk factor scoring to decrease unnecessary testing for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We formed a risk factor scoring over five, which questions maternal age, body mass index and first-degree relatives with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, a prior macrosomic fetus and adverse outcome during the previous pregnancies. All participants underwent a 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) followed by a 100-g oral glucose tolerence test (OGTT). We opened the 50-g GCT envelope if the participant had a risk score > or = 1 and opened the 100-g OGTT envelope if the 50-g GCT value was > or = 7.2 mmol/l. After all patients delivered we also built other strategies and tested their detection rates. Fourteen patients (3.3%) were diagnosed as having gestational diabetes mellitus via a 100-g OGTT. None of the patients with a score of zero had gestational diabetes mellitus. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an increase in the score by one caused a three times increase in gestational diabetes mellitus risk (OR = 3, CI = 1.9-5). Compared with the universal screening, our strategy to screen if the risk score was > or = 1, followed by a 50-g GCT with a 7.2-mmol/l cut-off value, decreased the number of women to be screened by 30% and diagnosed all cases with GDM. Screening the patients with a score > or = 2 would have decreased the number of women to be screened by 63%, still diagnosing 85% of cases with GDM. Also, risk factor-based screening strategies cause a 50% and 53% reduction in the number of OGTT applied, respectively. A well integrated, population-based scoring will decrease the number of unnecessary testing but still diagnose 85-100% of GDM cases.

  12. Lipid and non-lipid cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal type 2 diabetic women with and without coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Russo, G T; Giandalia, A; Romeo, E L; Marotta, M; Alibrandi, A; De Francesco, C; Horvath, K V; Asztalos, B; Cucinotta, D

    2014-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in diabetic women. In addition to hyperglycemia, other factors may contribute to the excessive cardiovascular risk. In this study we evaluated common and emerging risk factors in a selected group of postmenopausal type 2 diabetic women with (n = 36) and without CHD (n = 59), not taking lipid-lowering medications. Clinical and lifestyle data were collected, and metabolic and lipid profile, as well as fasting plasma levels of total homocysteine (tHcy), folate, vitamin B12, C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were measured in all participants. Age, menopause and diabetes duration, family history for cardiovascular disease, prevalence of hypertension and current insulin use were greater in diabetic women with than without CHD (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). CHD women also showed higher levels of triglycerides, small dense LDL (sdLDL), remnant-like particle cholesterol, tHcy, and VCAM-1, and a lower creatinine clearance (P < 0.05 all). Conversely, the two groups were comparable for BMI, waist circumference, smoking habit, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL cholesterol, folate, vitamin B12, hsCRP and IL-6 levels. At multivariate analysis, lower creatinine clearance (OR = 0.932, P = 0.017) and higher sdLDL serum concentration (OR = 1.224, P = 0.037) were the strongest risk factors associated with CHD in this population, whereas no significant association was noted with LDL-C. Our data suggest that beyond LDL-C, a lower creatinine clearance and more subtle alterations of LDL particles, together with a constellation of several well known and emerging cardiovascular risk factors, are stronger contributors to the high CHD risk of diabetic women.

  13. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Zare, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. This is a cross-sectional study. This case-control study was performed during 2012-2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. A total of 50 patients (15.2%) were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1%) in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4%) in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10%) in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls (P < 0.0001). Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  14. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Zare, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. STUDY DESIGN This is a cross-sectional study. METHODS This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. RESULTS A total of 50 patients (15.2%) were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1%) in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4%) in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10%) in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls (P < 0.0001). Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. CONCLUSIONS There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27168730

  15. Work Disability among Employees with Diabetes: Latent Class Analysis of Risk Factors in Three Prospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi; Head, Jenny; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Okuloff, Annaleena; Tabak, Adam G.; Goldberg, Marcel; Ervasti, Jenni; Jokela, Markus; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Pentti, Jaana; Zins, Marie; Kivimäki, Mika

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies of work disability in diabetes have examined diabetes as a homogeneous disease. We sought to identify subgroups among persons with diabetes based on potential risk factors for work disability. Methods Participants were 2,445 employees with diabetes from three prospective cohorts (the Finnish Public Sector study, the GAZEL study, and the Whitehall II study). Work disability was ascertained via linkage to registers of sickness absence and disability pensions during a follow-up of 4 years. Study-specific latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups according to prevalent comorbid disease and health-risk behaviours. Study-specific associations with work disability at follow-up were pooled using fixed-effects meta-analysis. Results Separate latent class analyses for men and women in each cohort supported a two-class solution with one subgroup (total n = 1,086; 44.4%) having high prevalence of chronic somatic diseases, psychological symptoms, obesity, physical inactivity and abstinence from alcohol and the other subgroup (total n = 1,359; 55.6%) low prevalence of these factors. In the adjusted meta-analyses, participants in the ‘high-risk’ group had more work disability days (pooled rate ratio = 1.66, 95% CI 1.38–1.99) and more work disability episodes (pooled rate ratio = 1.33, 95% CI 1.21–1.46). These associations were similar in men and women, younger and older participants, and across occupational groups. Conclusions Diabetes is not a homogeneous disease in terms of work disability risk. Approximately half of people with diabetes are assigned to a subgroup characterised by clustering of comorbid health conditions, obesity, physical inactivity, abstinence of alcohol, and associated high risk of work disability; the other half to a subgroup characterised by a more favourable risk profile. PMID:26569491

  16. Prevalence of coronary risk factors and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy abnormalities in asymptomatic diabetic outpatients.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Francisco das Chagas; Cunha, Fhabyula da Silva; Salgado Filho, Natalino; Barbosa, José Bonifácio; Furtado, João Ribeiro; Ferreira, Pedro Antônio Muniz; Nina, Vinícius; Lages, Joyce; Santana, Nilton

    2007-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors (RF) and myocardial ischemia in a sample of asymptomatic diabetic patients treated on an outpatient basis. From 80 type 2 diabetic patients initially recruited at an university outpatient endocrinology clinic, with no symptoms and/or CAD diagnosis, only 61 patients completed the study protocol, being 52,5% females, with a mean age of 56.3 +/- 10.9 years. The patients were interviewed searching for RF and underwent electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and perfusional myocardial scintigraphy (PMS) at rest and under stress. According to the PMS results they were divided into two groups: an ischemic and a normal one . The RF identified were: male gender (48%), age > or = 55 years (51%), family history of premature atherosclerotic disease (16%), history of smoking (46%), hypertension (44%), sedentary lifestyle (62%), overweight/obesity (67%), HDL- cholesterol < 45 mg/dl (69%), LDL- cholesterol > or = 100 mg/dl (85%) and triglycerides > or = 150 mg/dl (54%). Ischemic MPS were diagnosed in 15% of the patients. The variables associated with this diagnosis were: male gender (p=0.007), low HDL levels (p=0.046), history of smoking (p=0.038), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) (p=0.043) and left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) < 60% (p=0.01). A high prevalence of associated RF was observed, as well as a significant prevalence of 15% for myocardial ischemia. The variables identified as predictors of a myocardial ischemia diagnosis were: male gender, low HDL-cholesterol, past smoking, LVH and LVEF < 60%.

  17. Investigation of Factors Contributing to Diabetes Risk in American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam-Zwart, Kayleen; Cawston, Alvina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between family history, sedentary behaviors, and childhood risk for type 2 diabetes. Participants were 480 students attending schools on or near an American Indian reservation. Data were collected through survey and BMI measurement. Children who frequently watched television or played video games did not…

  18. Prevalence, Awareness, and Risk Factors of Diabetic Retinopathy among Adults with Known Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in an Urban Community in China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chen-Wei; Wang, Shan; Qian, Deng-Juan; Xu, Cailian; Song, E

    2017-06-01

    To understand the prevalence, awareness, and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) among Chinese with known type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in eastern China communities. A community-based survey including 913 patients with known T2DM was conducted in Suzhou, China. Diabetes was defined as hemoglobin A1c (hbA1c) ≥6.5%, use of diabetic medication or a physician diagnosis of diabetes. Retinal photographs were graded for the presence of DR using the Airlie House classification system. Binary logistic regression models were established to examine the associations of risk factors with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR). The overall prevalence of any DR was 18.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15.5-20.6%) in this population. VTDR affected 4.4% (95% CI: 3.1-5.8%) of the study participants. In multivariate analysis, the presence of DR among T2DM patients was associated with decreased age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97; p = 0.01; per year increase), longer durations of diabetes (OR = 1.02; per year increase; p = 0.03), higher blood levels of hbA1c (OR = 1.15; per unit increase; p = 0.03). Of the 158 participants with DR, only 12 (8%) had been aware of their condition or had been diagnosed previously as having DR. The prevalence of DR among diabetes patients in eastern China was lower than those in northern China. The awareness of DR was poor, which emphasizes the pressing need for increasing the public awareness of this vision-threatening eye disorder and routine eye screening should be performed among T2DM patients in the communities.

  19. Risk factors for the development of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Takayuki; Sada, Ken-Ei; Namba, Sayaka; Watanabe, Haruki; Katsuyama, Eri; Yamanari, Toshio; Wada, Jun; Makino, Hirofumi

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the incidence of glucocorticoid-induced diabetes mellitus (GC-DM) by repeated measurements of the postprandial glucose and detect predictors for the development of GC-DM. Inpatients with rheumatic or renal disease who received glucocorticoid therapy were enrolled in this study. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters of the GC-DM group with the non-GC-DM group and performed a multivariate analysis to identify risk factors. During a four-week period, 84 of the 128 patients (65.6%) developed GC-DM. All patients were diagnosed based on the detection of postprandial hyperglycemia. The GC-DM group had an older age (65.2 vs. 50.4 years, p<0.0001), higher levels of fasting plasma glucose (93.3 vs. 89.0mg/dl, p=0.027) and HbA1c (5.78 vs. 5.50%, 39.7 vs. 36.6 mmol/mol, p=0.001) and lower eGFR values (54.0 vs. 77.1 ml/min/1.73 m(2), p=0.0003) than the non-GC-DM group. According to the multivariate analysis, an older age (more than or equal to 65 years), higher HbA1c level (more than or equal to 6.0%) and lower eGFR (<40 ml/min/1.73m(2)) were identified as independent risk factors for GC-DM (OR 2.95, 95% CI 1.15-7.92, OR: 3.05, 95% CI 1.11-9.21, OR: 3.42, 95% CI: 1.22-10.8, respectively). The risk ratio for the development of GC-DM in the patients with at least one of these three risk factors was 2.28. The dose of glucocorticoids was not statistically related to the development of GC-DM. Patients with an older age, higher HbA1c level and lower eGFR require close monitoring for the development of GC-DM, regardless of the dose of glucocorticoids being administered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Admixture in Mexico City: implications for admixture mapping of type 2 diabetes genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marignac, Veronica L; Valladares, Adan; Cameron, Emily; Chan, Andrea; Perera, Arjuna; Globus-Goldberg, Rachel; Wacher, Niels; Kumate, Jesús; McKeigue, Paul; O'Donnell, David; Shriver, Mark D; Cruz, Miguel; Parra, Esteban J

    2007-02-01

    Admixture mapping is a recently developed method for identifying genetic risk factors involved in complex traits or diseases showing prevalence differences between major continental groups. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is at least twice as prevalent in Native American populations as in populations of European ancestry, so admixture mapping is well suited to study the genetic basis of this complex disease. We have characterized the admixture proportions in a sample of 286 unrelated T2D patients and 275 controls from Mexico City and we discuss the implications of the results for admixture mapping studies. Admixture proportions were estimated using 69 autosomal ancestry-informative markers (AIMs). Maternal and paternal contributions were estimated from geographically informative mtDNA and Y-specific polymorphisms. The average proportions of Native American, European and, West African admixture were estimated as 65, 30, and 5%, respectively. The contributions of Native American ancestors to maternal and paternal lineages were estimated as 90 and 40%, respectively. In a logistic model with higher educational status as dependent variable, the odds ratio for higher educational status associated with an increase from 0 to 1 in European admixture proportions was 9.4 (95%, credible interval 3.8-22.6). This association of socioeconomic status with individual admixture proportion shows that genetic stratification in this population is paralleled, and possibly maintained, by socioeconomic stratification. The effective number of generations back to unadmixed ancestors was 6.7 (95% CI 5.7-8.0), from which we can estimate that genome-wide admixture mapping will require typing about 1,400 evenly distributed AIMs to localize genes underlying disease risk between populations of European and Native American ancestry. Sample sizes of about 2,000 cases will be required to detect any locus that contributes an ancestry risk ratio of at least 1.5.

  1. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of diabetic foot ulcer with multidrug-resistant organism infection.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaoyan; Jin, Peng; Chu, Yuejie; Feng, Shuhong; Wang, Penghua

    2014-03-01

    The objective was to determine multidrug-resistant organisms' (MDROs) profile in diabetic foot ulcers (DFU), antibiotic resistance of MDROs, and to find the potential risk factors for infection with MDROs. In 157 patients with DFU admitted to Tianjin Metabolic Disease Hospital, China, from January 2011 to January 2012, microbiological specimens were taken on admission. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the infection of MDROs. Potential risk factors for MDRO-positive specimens were examined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Seventy-eight MDRO strains were isolated from patients in the MDRO+ group, among which the top 3 were Staphylococcus aureus (16.7%), Enterobacter spp (16.7%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.4%). Most of the MDROs were resistant to at least 8 kinds of commonly used antibiotics. Gram-negative MDROs showed 23% to 50% resistance to third-generation cephalosporins. The resistant rates of Gram-positive MDROs to fluoroquinolone were more than 70%; penicillin and semisynthetic penicillin were 57% to 100% resistant. Previous hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 3.000; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.100-8.182; P = .032), previous duration of antibiotic therapy (OR = 1.078; 95% CI = 1.001-1.160; P = .046), ulcer type (OR = 7.185; 95% CI = 2.115-24.408; P = .002), ulcer size (OR = 1.403; 95% CI = 1.042-1.888; P = .026), and osteomyelitis (OR = 3.390; 95% CI = 1.178-9.756; P = .024) were associated with MDRO infection in patients with DFU.

  2. Effects of regular exercise on cardiovascular risk factors profile and oxidative stress in obese type 2 diabetic patients in regard to SCORE risk.

    PubMed

    Lazarevic, Gordana; Antic, Slobodan; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Djordjevic, Vidosava; Vlahovic, Predag; Stefanovic, Vladisav

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate not only the effects of aerobic exercise on overall cardiovascular risk factors profile and oxidative stress in obese, type 2 diabetic patients, but to elucidate if those effects depended on the previously estimated Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) risk. Changes in several well-established cardiovascular risk factors and oxidative stress-defense parameters were measured in a total of 30 previously sedentary, obese type 2 diabetic patients, including 16 low-risk (SCORE < 5%, aged 48.8 +/- 6.0 years, with a mean BMI of 33.28 +/- 2.94 kg/m2) and 14 high-risk (SCORE > or = 5%, aged 56.3 +/- 6.9 years, with a mean BMI of 31.40 +/- 1.13 kg/m2) patients, in regard to the SCORE model, during six months of regular aerobic exercise, performed under supervision. Significant improvement was observed in the majority of cardiovascular risk factors, including body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, glycaemia, glycated haemoglobin, median blood glucose and lipid profile parameters in both diabetic subgroups during the exercise programme. However, the benefits of exercise on the majority of examined parameters became more evident in the low-risk subgroup, compared to the high-risk subgroup from baseline to 3 months. Regular exercise markedly reduced oxidative stress in both subgroups as well, as demonstrated for glutathione, plasma malondialdehyde, sulphydryl groups and catalase. Regular aerobic exercise, performed under supervision, has many beneficial effects in improving overall cardiovascular risk factors profile and reducing oxidative stress in both low-risk and high-risk (according to SCORE model), previously sedentary and obese type 2 diabetic patients.

  3. Serum potassium is an age-dependent risk factor for pre-diabetes and diabetes in the Israeli population.

    PubMed

    Doenyas-Barak, Keren; Beberashvili, Ilia; Vinker, Shlomo

    2014-03-01

    We analysed the association between serum potassium, within the normal range, and early signs of diabetes in an Israeli population. A computerized database of the Clalit Health Services was used for obtaining information regarding patients' baseline serum potassium levels. The main study outcome was dysglycaemia, defined as fasting glucose > 100 mg/dL, HbA1C > 6.5 gr% (48 mmol/mol) or a new diagnosis of diabetes. A secondary outcome was overt diabetes. Included in the study were 71,597 patients, mean age 40.8 ± 13.4 years. After a mean follow-up period of 5.3 ± 2.2 years, dysglycaemia decreased [odds ratio (OR) = 0.95; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.906-0.997; p = 0.038], as did the incidence of overt diabetes (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.793-0.934; p = 0.0001), for every 1 mmol/L elevation in serum potassium in the normal range. But analysis of subpopulation reveals that when elevated serum potassium was associated with low adjusted ORs for predicting dysglycaemia (OR = 0.904 with a 95% CI of 0.849-0.963; p = 0.002), the opposite effect was demonstrated over the age of 41 years (OR = 1.113 with a 95% CI of 1.048-1.104; p < 0.001). This study demonstrates age-related association between serum potassium and the risk of dysglycaemia.

  4. Prenatal exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus as an independent risk factor for long-term neuropsychiatric morbidity of the offspring.

    PubMed

    Nahum Sacks, Kira; Friger, Michael; Shoham-Vardi, Ilana; Abokaf, Hanaa; Spiegel, Efrat; Sergienko, Ruslan; Landau, Daniella; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-09-01

    obesity, maternal preeclampsia and fertility treatments, maternal gestational diabetes mellitus was found to be an independent risk factor for long-term neuropsychiatric disease of the offspring (gestational diabetes mellitus A1 [adjusted odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.53-2.19] and gestational diabetes mellitus A2 [adjusted odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-2.27]). Within the limits of our database, our findings also point to a possible association between in utero exposure to gestational diabetes mellitus and autistic spectrum disorder of the offspring (adjusted odds ratio, 4.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-12.69), which was found significant also after controlling for time-to-event, maternal age, gestational age at delivery, and offspring weight at birth. Exposure to maternal gestational diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for long-term neuropsychiatric morbidity in the offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diabetes in the Cape Coast metropolis of Ghana: an assessment of risk factors, nutritional practices and lifestyle changes.

    PubMed

    Gato, Worlanyo E; Acquah, Samuel; Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel T; Boakye, Blessed K

    2017-09-01

    Despite the significant increase in the incidence of diabetes in Ghana, research in this area has been lagging. The purpose of the study was to assess the risk factors associated with diabetes in the Cape Coast metropolis of Ghana, and to describe nutritional practices and efforts toward lifestyle change. A convenient sample of 482 adults from the Cape Coast metropolis was surveyed using a self-reported questionnaire. The survey collected information on the demographic, socioeconomic characteristics, health status and routine nutritional practices of respondents. The aims of the study were addressed using multivariable regression analyses. A total of 8% of respondents reported that they had been diagnosed with diabetes. Older age and body weight were found to be independently associated with diabetes. Individuals living with diabetes were no more likely than those without diabetes to have taken active steps at reducing their weight. The percentage of self-reported diabetes in this population was consistent with what has been reported in previous studies in Ghana. The findings from this study highlight the need for more patient education on physical activity and weight management.

  6. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in China: a multi-hospital-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guihua; Chen, Haoyu; Chen, Weiqi; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2017-08-30

    To determine the prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR) and sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy (STDR) in a multi-hospital-based DR screening programme among patients with diabetes in China, the Lifeline Express Diabetic Retinopathy Screening Program. Patients with diabetes in eight hospitals across mainland China (both southern and northern) from January 2014 to July 2016 were recruited in this programme. All participants underwent a standardised interview and examinations and received digital fundus photography. DR severity was graded from retinal fundus photographs by retina specialists in the reading centre of Joint Shantou International Eye Center, according to the grading standards of the English National Screening Programme. STDR was defined as the presence of preproliferative DR (R2), proliferative DR (R3) and/or maculopathy (M1). 16 305 patients with diabetes were screened for DR in total. Fundus photographs were gradable for 15 078 patients (92.5%). The age-gender-standardised prevalence of any DR and STDR was 27.9% (95% CI, 27.2% to 28.6%) and 12.6% (95% CI, 12.1% to 13.1%), respectively. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, younger age (OR, 0.967), longer duration of diabetes (OR, 1.093), higher haemoglobin A1c (OR, 1.115), higher fasting plasma glucose (OR, 1.074), higher systolic blood pressure (OR, 1.014), faster heart rate (OR, 1.010), higher low-density lipoprotein (OR, 1.149), lower triglycerides (OR, 0.975), higher blood urea nitrogen (BUN) (OR, 1.012) and elevated serum creatinine level (OR, 1.003) were associated with the presence of DR. Similar risk factors, except for BUN and triglycerides, were found for STDR. The prevalence of DR and STDR in diabetes was 27.9% and 12.6%, respectively in this multi-hospital-based population across China. Compared with Western population with diabetes, similar risk factors for DR and STDR were found in Chinese patients with diabetes. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  7. Gestational diabetes and gestational impaired glucose tolerance in 1653 teenage pregnancies: prevalence, risk factors and pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Buyukkaragoz, Bahar; Kandemir, Omer; Yalvac, Serdar; Kıykac-Altınbaş, Sadiman; Haberal, Ali

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and gestational impaired glucose tolerance (GIGT) in adolescent pregnancies, associated risk factors, and pregnancy complications. Retrospective study. Community-based teaching hospital. Results of 1653 pregnant women age ≤ 19 years in 2005-2007 were reviewed. All pregnant women screened with 50-g glucose challenge test (GCT) and patients with a GCT result ≥ 140 mg/dl underwent a 3-hour 100-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). GDM was diagnosed with at least two abnormal results and GIGT was diagnosed with one abnormal result. GDM and GIGT cases were evaluated for the presence of any associated risk factors and effects of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes. The prevalence of GDM was 0.85% (95% CI, 0.41-1.29), GIGT was 0.5% (95% CI, 0.15-0.81) and GDM+GIGT was 1.35% (95% CI, 0.78-1.88) by Carpenter and Coustan criteria. 68% of patients had at least one of the risk factors including body mass index ≥ 25, family history of diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Only 9.1% (n = 2) of them required insulin for glucose regulation during pregnancy with 9.1% (n = 2) macrosomia rate. All patients were primiparous and cesarean delivery rate was 27.3% (n = 6). We could not find any effect of presence of risk factors on pregnancy outcomes in GDM and GIGT cases. We demonstrated that GDM and GIGT are strongly associated with high BMI before pregnancy, PCOS, and family history of diabetes. Since GDM is a state of prediabetes, it is important to diagnose in adolescent pregnancies considering their life expectancy to take preventive measures to avoid diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Risk factors for diabetes mellitus in women with primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kulaksizoglu, Mustafa; Ipekci, Suleyman Hilmi; Kebapcilar, Levent; Kebapcilar, Ayse Gul; Korkmaz, Huseyin; Akyurek, Fikret; Baldane, Suleyman; Gonen, Mustafa Sait

    2013-09-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is not only a gynecological problem but also has serious effects on women's health such as changes in hormone levels that can trigger fluctuations in blood sugar level and inflammation status. The present study was designed to determine vitamin D, copper, zinc, metabolic parameters [insulin, homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)], inflammation parameters such as procalcitonin and high sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP), and lipid profile in POI patients and control subjects with normal menstrual cycles. A total of 43 patients with nondiabetic POI were studied in order to evaluate and compare the findings with those of the control group, which comprised 33 women with normal menstrual cycles. The women with POI had higher levels of serum copper, serum insulin, glucose, LDL-cholesterol, total cholesterol, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, and procalcitonin, whereas serum vitamin D and zinc levels were lower compared with the healthy control group. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were positively correlated with insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR, hs-CRP, procalcitonin, and copper and negatively correlated with vitamin D and zinc levels. In multivariate statistic analyses with body mass index and FSH as dependent variables, FSH was positively associated with copper and HOMA-IR negatively with vitamin D levels. The present study demonstrated that women with POI have traditional risk factors for diabetes mellitus, including lower levels of vitamin D, whereas higher levels of copper and HOMA-IR.

  9. Diabetes mellitus and arthritis: is it a risk factor or comorbidity?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qing; Liu, Hua; Yang, Daren; Zhang, Yunyan

    2017-05-01

    Investigators have explored the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis for a long time; however, there are uncertainties and inconsistencies among various studies. In this study, we tried to explore the relationship between diabetes mellitus and the overall risk of arthritis, as well as the potential modifiers for this relationship. We conducted a comprehensive literature search through PubMed and identified 36 eligible studies. The overall analyses, subgroup analyses, as well as sensitivity analyses, were conducted