Science.gov

Sample records for diabetes self-management education

  1. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels.

  2. Home-Based Diabetes Symptom Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated…

  3. Building a Virtual Environment for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Constance; Feenan, Kevin; Setliff, Glenn; Pereira, Katherine; Hassell, Nancy; Beresford, Henry F.; Epps, Shelly; Nicollerat, Janet; Tatum, William; Feinglos, Mark; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The authors developed an immersive diabetes community to provide diabetes self-management education and support for adults with type 2 diabetes. In this article the authors describe the procedures used to develop this virtual environment (VE). Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education & Self-Management (SLIDES), the VE for our diabetes community was built in Second Life. Social Cognitive Theory, behavioral principles and key aspects of virtual environments related to usability were applied in the development in this VE. Collaboration between researchers, clinicians and information technology (IT) specialists occurred throughout the development process. An interactive community was successfully built and utilized to provide diabetes self-management education and support. VEs for health applications may be innovative and enticing, yet it must be kept in mind that there are substantial effort, expertise, and usability factors that must be considered in the development of these environments for health care consumers. PMID:25699133

  4. Building a Virtual Environment for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Constance; Feenan, Kevin; Setliff, Glenn; Pereira, Katherine; Hassell, Nancy; Beresford, Henry F; Epps, Shelly; Nicollerat, Janet; Tatum, William; Feinglos, Mark; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    The authors developed an immersive diabetes community to provide diabetes self-management education and support for adults with type 2 diabetes. In this article the authors describe the procedures used to develop this virtual environment (VE). Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education & Self-Management (SLIDES), the VE for our diabetes community was built in Second Life. Social Cognitive Theory, behavioral principles and key aspects of virtual environments related to usability were applied in the development in this VE. Collaboration between researchers, clinicians and information technology (IT) specialists occurred throughout the development process. An interactive community was successfully built and utilized to provide diabetes self-management education and support. VEs for health applications may be innovative and enticing, yet it must be kept in mind that there are substantial effort, expertise, and usability factors that must be considered in the development of these environments for health care consumers.

  5. How can structured self-management patient education improve outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Jarvis, J; Skinner, T C; Carey, M E; Davies, M J

    2010-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a long-term chronic condition that is complex to manage, with the majority of management being done by the person with diabetes outside of the clinical setting. Because of its complexities, effective self-management requires skills, confidence and the ability to make decisions and choices about treatments and lifestyle on a day-to-day basis. Equipping a person with these self-management skills is in itself challenging and it is now widely accepted that structured education is an integral part of the management of T2DM. This paper explores whether structured self-management education can improve outcomes in people with diabetes. The authors explore what self-management education is, why it is needed and then go on to examine the recent evidence from clinical trials from 2006 onwards.

  6. Home-based diabetes symptom self-management education for Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    García, Alexandra A.; Brown, Sharon A.; Horner, Sharon D.; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L.

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated measures randomized controlled trial was conducted with 72 Mexican Americans aged 25–75 years with type 2 diabetes. Experimental condition participants received eight weekly, in-home, one-on-one educational and behavior modification sessions with a registered nurse focusing on symptom awareness, glucose self-testing and appropriate treatments, followed by eight biweekly support telephone sessions. Wait-listed control condition participants served as comparisons at three time points. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention between- and within groups on psychosocial, behavioral and clinical outcomes. Participants were predominantly female, middle-aged, moderately acculturated and in poor glycemic control. Experimental group participants (n = 39) significantly improved glycemic control, blood pressure, symptoms, knowledge, self-efficacy, empowerment and quality of life. Post intervention focus groups reported satisfaction with the symptom focus. Addressing symptoms led to clinical and psychosocial improvements. Symptoms seem to be an important motivator and a useful prompt to engage patients in diabetes self-management behaviors to relieve symptoms and prevent complications. PMID:25953971

  7. Home-based diabetes symptom self-management education for Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    García, Alexandra A; Brown, Sharon A; Horner, Sharon D; Zuñiga, Julie; Arheart, Kristopher L

    2015-06-01

    This pilot study evaluated an innovative diabetes symptom awareness and self-management educational program for Mexican Americans, a fast growing minority population experiencing a diabetes epidemic. Patients with diabetes need assistance interpreting and managing symptoms, which are often annoying and potentially life-threatening. A repeated measures randomized controlled trial was conducted with 72 Mexican Americans aged 25-75 years with type 2 diabetes. Experimental condition participants received eight weekly, in-home, one-on-one educational and behavior modification sessions with a registered nurse focusing on symptom awareness, glucose self-testing and appropriate treatments, followed by eight biweekly support telephone sessions. Wait-listed control condition participants served as comparisons at three time points. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention between- and within groups on psychosocial, behavioral and clinical outcomes. Participants were predominantly female, middle-aged, moderately acculturated and in poor glycemic control. Experimental group participants (n = 39) significantly improved glycemic control, blood pressure, symptoms, knowledge, self-efficacy, empowerment and quality of life. Post intervention focus groups reported satisfaction with the symptom focus. Addressing symptoms led to clinical and psychosocial improvements. Symptoms seem to be an important motivator and a useful prompt to engage patients in diabetes self-management behaviors to relieve symptoms and prevent complications.

  8. Promoting diabetes self-management among African Americans: an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Walker, Eleanor A; Stevens, Karen A; Persaud, Sabita

    2010-08-01

    Diabetes is a major national health problem that affects African Americans more seriously than other population groups. The purpose of this project was to increase knowledge and self-management of diabetes among African American adults 40 years of age and older diagnosed with type II diabetes. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test comparison group design was used. Three educational sessions were provided to participants in the intervention group. Content included information about diabetes and its complications, risk factors, proper diet, recommendations for exercise, medications, and monitoring blood glucose. Teaching strategies included discussion, games, and demonstrations. Patient navigators provided follow-up by phone at the scheduled intervals. Preliminary results indicated significantly increased knowledge among intervention group participants between the pre- and post-test and the pre-test and follow-up. Findings for HbA1c values, body mass index, and weight were not significant.

  9. [Evaluation of the educational practices in promoting self-management in type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho; Pereira, Flávia Rodrigues Lobo; Alexandre, Luciana Rodrigues

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this is study to evaluate the educational practices in promoting the self-management of diabetes mellitus. Subjects were twenty-six individuals with type 2 diabetes, who participated in the educational program at a teaching hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. The subjects were followed for four months in 2008. The educational group practices consisted of three monthly meetings, in which recreational and interactive dynamics were performed, and individual sessions were held using dialogic education. The evaluation was performed using a specific questionnaire: self-care and clinical exams in the beginning and four months after the intervention. The mean age of the subjects was 60.9 ±8.4 years; the mean time of disease was 8.7±6.7 years; most (55.6% or 27 individuals) had incomplete primary education and a family income between 1 and 3 minimum salaries. Satisfactory results were found in the self-care test. It was also observed that HbA1c levels dropped down and the educational practices improved self-care and self-management of the disease.

  10. Culturally Competent Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A.; Dougherty, James R.; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Hanis, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine in Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes the effects of a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention. Research Design and Methods A prospective, randomized, repeated measures study was conducted on the Texas-Mexico border in Starr County. 256 randomly selected persons with type 2 diabetes were: (1) between 35 and 70 years of age; (2) diagnosed with type 2 diabetes after the age of 35 years; and (3) accompanied by a family member or friend. The intervention consisted of 52 contact hours over 12 months and was provided by bilingual Mexican American nurses, dietitians, and community workers. The intervention involved : (1) 3 months of weekly instructional sessions on nutrition, self-monitoring of blood glucose, exercise, and other self-care topics; and (2) 6 months of biweekly support group sessions to promote behavior changes. The approach was culturally competent in terms of language, diet, social emphasis, family participation, and incorporation of cultural health beliefs. Indicators of metabolic control (HbA1c and FBS), diabetes knowledge, and diabetes-related health beliefs. Results Experimental groups showed significantly lower levels of HbA1c and FBS at 6 months and at 12 months and higher diabetes knowledge scores. At 6 months, the mean HbA1c of the experimental subjects was 1.4% below the mean of the control group; however, the mean level of the experimental subjects was still high (over 10%). Conclusions This study confirms the effectiveness of culturally competent diabetes self-management education on improving health outcomes of Mexican Americans, particularly for those individuals with HbA1c levels above 10%. PMID:11815493

  11. The Effects and Costs of a Group-Based Education Programme for Self-Management of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes. A Community-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B.; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients…

  12. An assessment of patient education and self-management in diabetes disease management--two case studies.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Greenwood, Deborah; Payne, Hildegarde; Thomson, John; Vukovljak, Lana; McCulloch, Amber; Specker, James E

    2008-12-01

    Diabetes affects 7.8% of Americans, nearly 24 million people, and costs $174 billion yearly. People with diabetes benefit from self-management; disease management (DM) programs are effective in managing populations with diabetes. Little has been published on the intersection of diabetes education and DM. Our hypothesis was that diabetes educators and their interventions integrate well with DM and effectively support providers' care delivery. A literature review was conducted for papers published within the past 3 years and identified using the search terms "diabetes educator" and "disease management." Those that primarily addressed community health workers or the primary care/community setting were excluded. Two case studies were conducted to augment the literature. Ten of 30 manuscripts identified in the literature review were applicable and indicate that techniques and interventions based on cognitive theories and behavioral change can be effective when coupled with diabetes DM. Better diabetes self-management through diabetes education encourages participation in DM programs and adherence to recommended care in programs offered by DM organizations or those that are provider based. Improved health outcomes and reduced cost can be achieved by blending diabetes education and DM. Diabetes educators are a critical part of the management team and, with their arsenal of goal setting and behavior change techniques, are an essential component for the success of diabetes DM programs. Additional research needs to be undertaken to identify effective ways to integrate diabetes educators and education into DM and to assess clinical, behavioral, and economic outcomes arising from such programs.

  13. Sustainability of Improved Glycemic Control After Diabetes Self-Management Education.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Katie G; Ramser, Kristie L; Campbell, Jennifer D; Suda, Katie J; Lee, Marilyn D; Wood, G Christopher; Sumter, Robert; Hamann, Gale L

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glycemic control as measured by A1C during a 2-year period after patients received diabetes self-management education (DSME). Methods. Patients who completed DSME in 2009 and received medical follow-up with A1C measurements for at least 2 years after DSME were included in the evaluation. Primary endpoints were changes in A1C from before to immediately after, 1 year after, and 2 years after DSME. Secondary outcomes included the effects of the following factors on change in A1C: sex, duration of diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes (A1C ≥ 9%), health insurance coverage, and self-reported education level. Results. Forty-three patients were included in the evaluation. Mean A1C before DSME was 10.2 ± 3.7%. Mean A1C after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.2% (P < 0.0001), a 23.5% reduction. Mean A1C at 1 and 2 years after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.1% for each year and remained unchanged from just after DSME to 1 and 2 years after DSME (P > 0.05). Patients with a duration of diabetes of < 1 year had a significantly greater reduction in mean A1C than those with a duration of diabetes ≥ 1 year (28.7 and 20.2%, respectively, P = 0.001). Conclusion. DSME improved glycemic control to a substantial degree, and the effect was sustained for up to 2 years. Although the reduction in A1C was significant for all patients receiving DSME, there was a significantly greater reduction for patients who had a duration of diabetes of < 1 year than for those with a duration of diabetes > 1 year.

  14. Diabetes Self-Management Education Enhanced by the Low Vision Professional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokol-McKay, Debra A.

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes currently affects 20.8 million people in the United States and is the leading cause of blindness in people between the ages of 20 and 74 years. The author uses a fictional but typical example to explain the ways in which low vision specialists can improve the diabetes self-management program of a person with low vision and demonstrates…

  15. An evaluation of Web-based education as an alternative to group lectures for diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Song, Misoon; Choe, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Keum Soon; Yi, Myung Sun; Lee, Insook; Kim, Jeongeun; Lee, Mira; Cho, Young Min; Shim, Young Suk

    2009-09-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Web-based diabetes self-management education for newly diagnosed patients with type II diabetes as an alternative to group lectures. Using a non-equivalent control group, pretest-post-test design, the participants in the Web group (n = 15) took part in a Web-based diabetes self-management program, while those in the lecture group (n = 16) attended 3 h of group lectures provided by health-care professionals specializing in diabetes care. The outcome variables were measured at the baseline (T0), and 6 weeks (T1) and 3 months (T2) after the interventions. The glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) percentage and diabetes care knowledge in the Web group improved significantly from T0 to T1, while the diabetes care behavior improved significantly from T0 to T1 and from T1 to T2. The diabetes care knowledge and diabetes care behavior in the lecture group improved significantly from T0 to T1, but the HbA1c percentage did not change significantly between any times. These results show the potential of the Web-based program as an alternative to group lectures for diabetes self-management education.

  16. Making and Maintaining Lifestyle Changes after Participating in Group Based Type 2 Diabetes Self-Management Educations: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rise, Marit B.; Pellerud, Anneli; Rygg, Lisbeth Ø.; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Background Disease management is crucial in type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education aims to provide the knowledge necessary to make and maintain lifestyle changes. However, few studies have investigated the processes after such courses. The aim of this study was to investigate how participants make and maintain lifestyle changes after participating in group-based type 2 diabetes self-management education. Methods Data was collected through qualitative semi-structured interviews with 23 patients who attended educational group programs in Central Norway. The participants were asked how they had used the advice given and what they had changed after the course. Results Knowledge was essential for making lifestyle changes following education. Three factors affected whether lifestyle changes were implemented: obtaining new knowledge, taking responsibility, and receiving confirmation of an already healthy lifestyle. Four factors motivated individuals to maintain changes: support from others, experiencing an effect, fear of complications, and the formation of new habits. Conclusion Knowledge was used to make and maintain changes in diet, medication and physical activity. Knowledge also acted as confirmation of an already adequate lifestyle. Knowledge led to no changes if diabetes appeared “not that scary” or if changes appeared too time consuming. Those involved in diabetes education need to be aware of the challenges in convincing asymptomatic patients about the benefits of adherence to self-management behaviour. PMID:23671705

  17. Culturally Competent Diabetes Self-Management Education for Mexican Americans: The Starr County Border Health Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sharon A.; Garcia, Alexandra A.; Kouzekanani, Kamiar; Hanis, Craig L.

    2002-01-01

    In a culturally competent diabetes self-management intervention in Starr County, Texas, bilingual Mexican American nurses, dieticians, and community workers provided weekly instruction on nutrition, self-monitoring, exercise and other self-care topics. A biweekly support group promoted behavior change. Interviews and examinations with 256 Mexican…

  18. Telehealth--an effective delivery method for diabetes self-management education?

    PubMed

    Fitzner, Karen; Moss, Gail

    2013-06-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease that is often comorbid with cardiovascular disease, hypertension, kidney disease, and neuropathy. Its management is complex, requiring ongoing clinical management, lifestyle changes, and self-care. This article examines recent literature on telehealth and emerging technological tools for supporting self-management of diabetes and identifies best practices. The authors conducted a PubMed search (January 2008-2012) that was supplemented by review of meeting materials and a scan of the Internet to identify emerging technologies. Fifty-eight papers were reviewed; 12 were selected for greater analysis. This review supports earlier findings that the delivery of diabetes self-management and training (DSME/T) via telehealth is useful, appropriate, and acceptable to patients and providers. Best practices are emerging; not all technology is appropriate for all populations--interactive technology needs to be appropriate to the patient's age, abilities, and sensitivities. Telehealth is scalable and sustainable provided that it adds value, does not add to the provider's workload, and is fairly reimbursed. However, there are multiple barriers (patient, provider, health system) to remotely provided DSME/T. DSME/T delivered via telehealth offers effective, efficient, and affordable ways to reach and support underserved minorities and other people with diabetes and related comorbidities. The new generation of smartphones, apps, and other technologies increase access, and the newest interventions are designed to meet patient needs, do not increase workloads, are highly appropriate, enhance self-management, and are desired by patients.

  19. Effect of peer education on self-management and psychological status in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Han, Ying; Shi, Jieli; Li, Ruixia; Li, Sufen; Jin, Nana; Gu, Yong; Guo, Honglei

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of peer education in type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders on the metabolic index and psychological status. Materials and Methods Educators use psychological scales to screen type 2 diabetes patients with emotional disorders. Participants were divided into usual and peer education groups. Both groups received usual diabetes education. Peer leaders were recruited to provide support with the peer education group for 6 months. The metabolic index, diabetes knowledge, self-management, diabetes-related distress, emotional status and quality of life were compared at the end of the study. Results A total of 127 patients participated in the study. There were 20 peer leaders engaged in the study as volunteers for peer education. All participants completed the study and fulfilled the scales. Improvements in the peer education group were significant compared with the usual education group with respect to anxiety (49.0 ± 9.65 vs 54.0 ± 8.48), depression (51.3 ± 7.97 vs 55.8 ± 7.52), diabetes knowledge (18.8 ± 2.46 vs 16.3 ± 2.08), distress (2.67 ± 0.55 vs 3.02 ± 0.56), self-management (66.5 ± 4.26 vs 62.4 ± 5.88) and quality of life (−1.98 ± 0.82 vs −2.50 ± 0.71), whereas no significant difference existed with respect to the metabolic index. Conclusions Peer education, providing more attention to diabetes patients with emotional disorders, is a preferred model for delivering care. PMID:26221528

  20. Evaluation of a peer-led self-management education programme PEP Talk: Diabetes, Healthy Feet and You.

    PubMed

    Woodbury, M Gail; Botros, Mariam; Kuhnke, Janet L; Greene, Julie

    2013-12-01

    PEP (Peer Education Programme) Talk: Diabetes, Healthy Feet and You is a peer-led self-management programme developed to address the problems of growing prevalence of diabetes and its complications, and limited health care dollars. An evaluation of the programme, how it might be situated within a public health perspective and potential bridges for its implementation in communities throughout Canada and worldwide, are presented. The programme consisted of workshops that were conducted by volunteer peer leaders and health care professionals in 12 communities in 10 Canadian provinces; the volunteers were supported through monthly mentoring teleconferences, on-line tips and discussion board conversations. A web portal was developed to be used by the team, volunteers and community participants. Workshop curriculum was developed based on diabetes footcare and self-management best practise guidelines. Community participants answered pre-and post-workshop statements that indicated that learning occurred, as indicated by an increase in the number of statements answered correctly. Participants' feedback about the workshops was positive. In telephone follow-up interviews, 97% of respondents reported having changed their foot self-management behaviours. The portal was commonly used according to website visits, but not as much as expected for registration of community participants. It is recommended that this programme be made widely available and tailored to the specific needs of the communities and that further evaluation be conducted.

  1. Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting patient engagement in diabetes self-management: perspectives of a certified diabetes educator.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kellie M

    2013-02-01

    Patients with diabetes are responsible for the vast majority of management requirements of their condition. However, their ability and motivation to engage in required self-management behaviors may be mitigated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Intrinsic barriers include attitudes and health beliefs, limited diabetes knowledge and technical skill, reduced functional health literacy, and inadequate self-efficacy to promote positive behavior change. Extrinsic barriers include financial considerations, inadequate family and community support systems, ineffective clinical relationships, and limited access to effective diabetes health care delivery. Diabetes providers have opportunities for enhancing patient engagement with clinical recommendations and diabetes self-management through effective communication, including efforts to contextually assess patients' perceptions of diabetes and how the condition fits within the context of their changing lives. This article provides a conceptual framework for establishing and building an effective clinical alliance with patients with the goal of empowering them to take more control of their diabetes and reduce their risks for poor diabetes outcomes.

  2. Integrating hospital medical care data with pharmaceutical education materials for diabetes self management.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shwu-Jiuan; Yeh, Yu-Ting; Li, Chun-Chuan; Chiu, Yuan-Ting; Huang, Juei-Fen; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2006-01-01

    Diabetic patients need long-term treatment and follow-up exams as well as appropriate self-care pharmaceutical education to get the disease under control and to prevent possible complications. Pharmaceutical treatment plays an essential role in diabetes. If patients don't understand the medicines and dosages they take, their blood glucose control may be affected. In addition, the possibility of developing hypoglycemia may be increased. In this paper, we enhance the POEM system, previously developed for diabetic patient education, by providing diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education. The new system integrates both diabetic patients' pharmaceutical education information and medical care information to provide them with more comprehensive personalized medication information so that they can access the on-line system afterwards. It also strengthens patients' understanding of pharmaceutical functions, side-effects and relevant knowledge thus increasing patients' adherence of medication orders and having better control in their blood glucose levels.

  3. Implementing diabetes self-management education (DSME) in a Nigerian population: perceptions of practice nurses and dieticians.

    PubMed

    Nwankwo, Clementina U; Ezenwaka, Chidum E; Onuoha, Philip C; Agbakoba, Nneka R

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycaemic complication is the most common cause of hospitalization amongst diabetes patients in Nigeria. Research showed that diabetes self-management education (DSME) assists in controlling hyperglycaemia in diabetes patients. We assessed the opinions of practice nurses and dieticians on implementing DSME in a Nigerian population. 517 nurses and dieticians completed a self-administered questionnaire tool. Results showed that the majority of the participants agreed that DSME in a Nigerian population will assist patients (88.3%) and assist to reduce diabetes complications (91.4%). While only 34% of all participants believed that their establishments were prepared to implement DSME, a large proportion of the participants agreed that their work places do not have enough qualified health personnel (62.4%), educational facilities (65.8%) and economic resources (65.6%) to embark on DSME. These constitute significant barriers for effective DSME and demand that strategic investment in human and material resources for DSME is needed in this population of a developing country.

  4. Influence of the Duration of Diabetes on the Outcome of a Diabetes Self-Management Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Park, Sin-Ae; Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Ko, Sun-Hye; Shin, Kyung-Mi; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Song, Ki-Ho; Park, Yong-Moon

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes education and lifestyle modification are critical components in controlling blood glucose levels of people with type 2 diabetes. Until now, available data on the effectiveness of education with respect to the duration of diabetes are limited. We investigated whether adherence to lifestyle behavior modification prompted by diabetes education was influenced by the duration of diabetes. Methods Two hundred and twenty-five people with type 2 diabetes were recruited for an intensive, collaborative, group-based diabetes education program with annual reinforcement. We divided the patients into two groups based on the duration of their diabetes prior to the education program (≤1 year [≤1Y] vs. ≥3 years [≥3Y]). Dietary habits, physical activity, and the frequency of blood glucose self-monitoring were evaluated with a questionnaire prior to education and at the follow-up endpoint. Results The mean follow-up period was 32.2 months. The mean hemoglobin A1c (A1C) value was significantly lower in the ≤1Y group. Self-care behaviors, measured by scores for dietary habits (P=0.004) and physical activity (P<0.001), were higher at the endpoint in the ≤1Y group than in the ≥3Y group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that a longer diabetes duration before education was significantly associated with mean A1C levels greater than or equal to 7.0% (53 mmol/mol). Conclusion Diabetes duration influenced the effectiveness of diabetes education on lifestyle behavior modification and glycemic control. More-intense, regular, and sustained reinforcement with encouragement may be required for individuals with longstanding type 2 diabetes. PMID:22737662

  5. Is adherence a relevant issue in the self-management education of diabetes? A mixed narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Debussche, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    While therapeutic patient education is now recognized as essential for optimizing the control of chronic diseases and patient well-being, adherence to treatment and medical recommendations is still a matter of debate. In type 2 diabetes, the nonadherence to therapy, estimated at more than 40%, is perceived as a barrier for improving the prognosis despite recent therapeutic advances. Interventional studies have barely begun to demonstrate the effectiveness of technical and behavioral actions. The aim of this review is to question the concept of adherence in terms of therapeutic education based on quantitative and qualitative data. The research on therapeutic education has shown the effectiveness of structured actions in type 2 diabetes, but adherence is rarely an end point in randomized trials. A positive but inconsistent or moderate effect of education actions on adherence has been shown in heterogeneous studies of varying quality. Program types, outlines, theoretical bases, and curricula to set up for action effectiveness are still being discussed. Qualitative studies, including sociological studies, provide a useful and constructive focus on this perspective. Adherence is a soft and flexible tool available to the patient in his/her singular chronic disease trajectory, and as such, integrates into individual therapeutic strategies, including socio-cultural interactions, beyond the medical explanation of the disease and the patient. Four key elements for the development of structured therapeutic education are discussed: 1) the access to health literacy, 2) the contextualization of education activities, 3) the long-term chronic dimension of self-management, and 4) the organizational aspects of health and care. Rather than focusing the objective on behavioral changes, structured therapeutic education actions should attempt to provide tools and resources aimed at helping individuals to manage their disease in their own context on a long-term basis, by developing

  6. The effects and costs of a group-based education programme for self-management of patients with Type 2 diabetes. A community-based study.

    PubMed

    Molsted, Stig; Tribler, Jane; Poulsen, Peter B; Snorgaard, Ole

    2012-10-01

    The worldwide epidemic of Type 2 diabetes necessitates evidence-based self-management education programmes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and costs of an empowerment-based structured diabetes self-management education programme in an unselected group of patients with Type 2 diabetes. Seven hundred and two patients undergoing treatment by general practitioners (GPs) were included. The education comprised three modules over a 12-month period. It was based on the empowerment philosophy. The education followed a written curriculum, and the educators were given special training in its use. Glycemic control (HbA1c) was found to improve from 7.34 ± 1.34 to 6.88 ± 1.09%, P < 0.001 and body weight decreased from 90.9 ± 19.3 to 87.1 ± 18.1 kg, P < 0.001, following the education programme. Moreover, significant improvements were found in terms of fasting blood glucose, blood pressure, female waist circumference, lipid profile, quality of life, physical activity and the patients' knowledge of diabetes whilst the number of visits to GPs declined. This study supports the use of an empowerment vision as a basis for an interdisciplinary group-based education programme with individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Moreover, the costs of implementing this education programme were found to be minimal.

  7. Educating professionals to support self-management in people with asthma or diabetes: protocol for a systematic review and scoping exercise

    PubMed Central

    McCleary, Nicola; Andrews, Amanda; Morrow, Susan; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Fletcher, Monica; Steed, Liz; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Pinnock, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Supported self-management for asthma helps people adjust their treatment in response to symptom changes. This improves day-to-day control and reduces the risk of asthma attacks and the need for emergency healthcare. However, implementation remains poor in routine clinical practice. This systematic review is part of a programme of work developing an intervention to help primary care practice teams embed self-management support into routine asthma care. The aim of the review is to synthesise the evidence regarding the effectiveness of educational interventions for professionals supporting self-management in people with asthma or diabetes (type 1 and type 2). These two conditions have the most robust evidence base for the effectiveness of implementing supported self-management. Methods and analysis Electronic searches will be conducted in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO, AMED, Global Health, WHO Global Health Library, ERIC, BNI, RDRB/CME and Google Scholar. Eligible studies are randomised controlled trials or controlled clinical trials published between 1990 and 2016 which evaluated professional education interventions facilitating asthma or diabetes supported self-management. Further relevant work will be identified from trial registries, citation searching and through contact with authors of included studies. This will be supplemented by scoping potentially relevant educational packages described in English language policy literature or health service websites. Screening, data extraction and risk of bias assessment (using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool) will be completed by two independent reviewers, with a third reviewer arbitrating where necessary. We plan a theoretically informed narrative synthesis of the aggregated data as heterogeneity is likely to preclude meta-analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required for this systematic review. The results will be described in a paper submitted for peer

  8. Group based diabetes self-management education compared to routine treatment for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education (DSME) can be delivered in many forms. Group based DSME is widespread due to being a cheaper method and the added advantages of having patient meet and discuss with each other. assess effects of group-based DSME compared to routine treatment on clinical, lifestyle and psychosocial outcomes in type-2 diabetes patients. Methods A systematic review with meta-analysis. Computerised bibliographic database were searched up to January 2008 for randomised controlled trials evaluating group-based DSME for adult type-2 diabetics versus routine treatment where the intervention had at least one session and =/>6 months follow-up. At least two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Results In total 21 studies (26 publications, 2833 participants) were included. Of all the participants 4 out of 10 were male, baseline age was 60 years, BMI 31.6, HbA1c 8.23%, diabetes duration 8 years and 82% used medication. For the main clinical outcomes, HbA1c was significantly reduced at 6 months (0.44% points; P = 0.0006, 13 studies, 1883 participants), 12 months (0.46% points; P = 0.001, 11 studies, 1503 participants) and 2 years (0.87% points; P < 0.00001, 3 studies, 397 participants) and fasting blood glucose levels were also significantly reduced at 12 months (1.26 mmol/l; P < 0.00001, 5 studies, 690 participants) but not at 6 months. For the main lifestyle outcomes, diabetes knowledge was improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.83; P = 0.00001, 6 studies, 768 participants), 12 months (SMD 0.85; P < 0.00001, 5 studies, 955 participants) and 2 years (SMD 1.59; P = 0.03, 2 studies, 355 participants) and self-management skills also improved significantly at 6 months (SMD 0.55; P = 0.01, 4 studies, 534 participants). For the main psychosocial outcomes, there were significant improvement for empowerment/self-efficacy (SMD 0.28, P = 0.01, 2 studies, 326

  9. Consultation and Collaboration on Health Self-Management for People Who Are Visually Impaired from Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Margaret E.

    1993-01-01

    The expertise of rehabilitation teachers and diabetes nurse educators can complement each other in components of diabetes management for people who have become visually impaired. The role of each professional involves education; integration of diabetes self-management into a comprehensive rehabilitation program; nutrition; exercise; medication,…

  10. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-09-10

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population.

  11. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  12. Diabetes: Christian Worldview, Medical Distrust & Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbuah, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To inform development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N=44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical mistrust, and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  13. Diabetes: Christian worldview, medical distrust and self-management.

    PubMed

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbauh, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-06-01

    To inform the development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N = 44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical distrust and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest that diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African-American community to improve health outcomes.

  14. Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

    PubMed Central

    El-Gayar, Omar; Timsina, Prem; Nawar, Nevine; Eid, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Background Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions. Methods The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period from January 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor. Results Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records. Conclusions Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs. PMID:23439183

  15. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  16. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  17. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  18. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  19. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  20. Use of Gaming in Self-Management of Diabetes in Teens.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; El-Zein, Ashley; Deyo, Patricia; Sweenie, Rachel; Streisand, Randi

    2016-07-01

    With the growing prevalence of diabetes in teens and frequent concomitant problems with adherence, adolescents are a frequent target for diabetes self-management support and education. Due to widespread use of technology among teens in general, the use of serious games, games used for purposes beyond entertainment with the intention to educate and support health behavior for teens with diabetes self-management, is an emerging and promising practice. This report explores games intended for teens with diabetes, how the use of games may enhance clinical practice, and provides suggestions for future research and better utilization of these technologies. Current research on the use of gaming for promoting diabetes management in teens is fairly limited, with some initial support for improvements in both behavioral and clinical outcomes among teens. More research is clearly needed in order to further determine how gaming can best be utilized to impact health outcomes in these teens, as well as potential mechanisms of change.

  1. The Influence of Health Literacy and Depression on Diabetes Self-Management: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Everett, B.; Astorga, C.; Yogendran, D.; Salamonson, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on health literacy in the clinical setting and in the literature, there is still ongoing debate about its influence on diabetes self-management. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships of sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological factors on health literacy and diabetes self-management. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken on 224 patients with type 2 diabetes at two diabetes centres in Sydney, Australia. Findings showed that people with low health literacy were more likely to (a) have lower educational attainment; (b) be migrants; and (c) have depressed mood. Unexpectedly, those who met HbA1c threshold of good glucose control were more likely to have low health literacy. Predictors of low diabetes self-management included (a) younger age group (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI: 1.24–4.64); (b) having postsecondary education (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.05–5.01); (c) low knowledge of diabetes management (AOR: 2.29, 95% CI: 1.25–4.20); and (d) having depressed mood (AOR: 2.30, 95% CI: 1.30–4.06). The finding that depressed mood predicted both low health literacy and low diabetes self-management stresses the importance of screening for depression. Increasing people's understanding of diabetes self-management and supporting those with depression are crucial to enhance participation in diabetes self-management. PMID:27595113

  2. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use as Health Self-Management: Rural Older Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This study describes complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among rural older adults with diabetes, delineates the relationship of health self-management predictors to CAM therapy use, and furthers conceptual development of CAM use within a health self-management framework. Methods Survey interview data were collected from a random sample of 701 community dwelling African American, Native American, and White elders residing in two rural North Carolina counties. We summarize CAM use for general use and for diabetes care and use multiple logistic modeling to estimate the effects of health self-management predictors on use of CAM therapies. Results The majority of respondents used some form of CAM for general purpose, whereas far fewer used CAM for diabetes care. The most widely used CAM categories were food home remedies, other home remedies, and vitamins. The following health self-management predictors were related to the use of different categories of CAM therapies: personal characteristics (ethnicity), health status (number of health conditions), personal resources (education), and financial resources (economic status). Discussion CAM is a widely used component of health self-management among rural among older adults with diabetes. Research on CAM use will benefit from theory that considers the specific behavior and cognitive characteristics of CAM therapies. PMID:16497962

  3. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  4. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  5. A theoretical framework for a virtual diabetes self-management community intervention.

    PubMed

    Vorderstrasse, Allison; Shaw, Ryan J; Blascovich, Jim; Johnson, Constance M

    2014-10-01

    Due to its high prevalence, chronic nature, potential complications, and self-management challenges for patients, diabetes presents significant health education and support issues. We developed and pilot-tested a virtual community for adults with type 2 diabetes to promote self-management education and provide social support. Although digital-based programs such as virtual environments can address significant barriers to reaching patients (i.e., child care, transportation, location), they must be strongly grounded in a theoretical basis to be well-developed and effective. In this article, we discuss how we synthesized behavioral and virtual environment theoretical frameworks to guide the development of SLIDES (Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education and Support).

  6. A case study of type 2 diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsin-i

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been established that careful diabetes self-management is essential in avoiding chronic complications that compromise health. Disciplined diet control and regular exercise are the keys for the type 2 diabetes self-management. An ability to maintain one's blood glucose at a relatively flat level, not fluctuating wildly with meals and hypoglycemic medical intervention, would be the goal for self-management. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or simply A1c) is a measure of a long-term blood plasma glucose average, a reliable index to reflect one's diabetic condition. A simple regimen that could reduce the elevated A1c levels without altering much of type 2 diabetic patients' daily routine denotes a successful self-management strategy. Methods A relatively simple model that relates the food impact on blood glucose excursions for type 2 diabetes was studied. Meal is treated as a bolus injection of glucose. Medical intervention of hypoglycaemic drug or injection, if any, is lumped with secreted insulin as a damping factor. Lunch was used for test meals. The recovery period of a blood glucose excursion returning to the pre-prandial level, the maximal reach, and the area under the excursion curve were used to characterize one's ability to regulate glucose metabolism. A case study is presented here to illustrate the possibility of devising an individual-based self-management regimen. Results Results of the lunch study for a type 2 diabetic subject indicate that the recovery time of the post-prandial blood glucose level can be adjusted to 4 hours, which is comparable to the typical time interval for non-diabetics: 3 to 4 hours. A moderate lifestyle adjustment of light supper coupled with morning swimming of 20 laps in a 25 m pool for 40 minutes enabled the subject to reduce his A1c level from 6.7 to 6.0 in six months and to maintain this level for the subsequent six months. Conclusions The preliminary result of this case study is encouraging. An individual life

  7. Effectiveness of the diabetes education and self management for ongoing and newly diagnosed (DESMOND) programme for people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a structured group education programme on biomedical, psychosocial, and lifestyle measures in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Design Multicentre cluster randomised controlled trial in primary care with randomisation at practice level. Setting 207 general practices in 13 primary care sites in the United Kingdom. Participants 824 adults (55% men, mean age 59.5 years). Intervention A structured group education programme for six hours delivered in the community by two trained healthcare professional educators compared with usual care. Main outcome measures Haemoglobin A1c levels, blood pressure, weight, blood lipid levels, smoking status, physical activity, quality of life, beliefs about illness, depression, and emotional impact of diabetes at baseline and up to 12 months. Main results Haemoglobin A1c levels at 12 months had decreased by 1.49% in the intervention group compared with 1.21% in the control group. After adjusting for baseline and cluster, the difference was not significant: 0.05% (95% confidence interval −0.10% to 0.20%). The intervention group showed a greater weight loss: −2.98 kg (95% confidence interval −3.54 to −2.41) compared with 1.86 kg (−2.44 to −1.28), P=0.027 at 12 months. The odds of not smoking were 3.56 (95% confidence interval 1.11 to 11.45), P=0.033 higher in the intervention group at 12 months. The intervention group showed significantly greater changes in illness belief scores (P=0.001); directions of change were positive indicating greater understanding of diabetes. The intervention group had a lower depression score at 12 months: mean difference was −0.50 (95% confidence interval −0.96 to −0.04); P=0.032. A positive association was found between change in perceived personal responsibility and weight loss at 12 months (β=0.12; P=0.008). Conclusion A structured group education programme for patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes resulted in greater

  8. Learning to do better: the transactional model of diabetes self-management integration.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Heather A

    2015-07-01

    In this article I examine the process by which low-income (mostly minority) women develop the skills to integrate diabetes self-management into daily life and the conditions that affect the process. I present and describe a multimethod approach, including semistructured interviews, photo elicitation, time geographic diaries, and a standardized assessment which were used to collect data from 10 low-income women with type 2 diabetes, ages 40 to 64 years, between July and December 2012. I describe the grounded theory approach to data analysis which facilitated the development of the Transactional Model of Diabetes Self-Management (DSM) Integration. The model depicts the theorized process whereby low-income women accept aspects of diabetes education and training as congruent with their circumstances, act on them, and practice with them until they become integrated into daily life. Inquiry and practice play key roles in assimilating DSM. I discuss the study's implications for facilitating better health-management programs.

  9. The influence of cognition on self-management of type 2 diabetes in older people

    PubMed Central

    Tomlin, Ali; Sinclair, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a growing public health issue, increasing in prevalence, eroding quality of life, and burdening health care systems. The complications of diabetes can be avoided or delayed by maintaining good glycemic control, which is achievable through self-management and, where necessary, medication. Older people with diabetes are at increased risk for cognitive impairment. This review aims to bring together current research that has investigated both cognition and diabetes self-management together. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (Cinahl), Excerpta Medica Database (Embase), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (Medline), and Psychological Information (PsychInfo) databases were searched. Studies were included if they featured older people with type 2 diabetes and had looked for associations between at least one distinct measure of cognition and at least one distinct measure of diabetes self-management. English language publications from the year 2000 were included. Cognitive measures of executive function, memory, and low scores on tests of global cognitive functioning showed significant correlations with multiple areas of diabetes self-management, including diabetes-specific numeracy ability, diabetes knowledge, insulin adjustment skills, ability to learn to perform insulin injections, worse adherence to medications, decreased frequency of self-care activities, missed appointments, decreased frequency of diabetes monitoring, and increased inaccuracies in reporting blood glucose monitoring. The nature of the subjects studied was quite variable in terms of their disease duration, previous medical histories, associated medical comorbidities, and educational level attained prior to being diagnosed with diabetes. The majority of studies were of an associational nature and not findings confirmed by repeat testing or by the effects of an intervention, neither were the majority of studies designed to give a view or conclusion on the clinical

  10. Women’s experiences of factors that facilitate or inhibit gestational diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gestational diabetes rates have increased dramatically in the past two decades and this pattern of increase appears to relate primarily to the obesity epidemic, older maternal age and migration from world areas of high GDM risk. Women from disadvantaged and migrant backgrounds are most at risk of developing and of mismanaging this condition. The aim of the study was to explore the factors that facilitated or inhibited gestational diabetes self-management among women in a socially deprived area. Methods Fifteen pregnant women, with a diagnosis of gestational diabetes, were purposively recruited for this study. Qualitative semi structured interviews and 1 focus group were conducted when participants were approximately 28–38 weeks gestation. The study’s theoretical framework was based on interpretative phenomenology and data was analysed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Women in this study identified a number of factors that complicated their task of GDM self-management. Barriers included: (1) time pressures; (2) physical constraints; (3) social constraints; (4) limited comprehension of requirements, and (5) insulin as an easier option. Factors facilitating GDM self-management included: thinking about the baby and psychological support from partners and families. Conclusion Women from low socio economic and migrant backgrounds often struggle to comprehend GDM self-management requirements. To improve adherence to management plans, these women require educational and supportive services that are culturally appropriate and aimed at a low level of literacy. PMID:22988897

  11. Effectiveness of two interventions based on improving patient-practitioner communication on diabetes self-management in patients with low educational level: study protocol of a clustered randomized trial in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last decades the presence of social inequalities in diabetes care has been observed in multiple countries, including Spain. These inequalities have been at least partially attributed to differences in diabetes self-management behaviours. Communication problems during medical consultations occur more frequently to patients with a lower educational level. The purpose of this cluster randomized trial is to determine whether an intervention implemented in a General Surgery, based in improving patient-provider communication, results in a better diabetes self-management in patients with lower educational level. A secondary objective is to assess whether telephone reinforcement enhances the effect of such intervention. We report the design and implementation of this on-going study. Methods/Design The study is being conducted in a General Practice located in a deprived neighbourhood of Granada, Spain. Diabetic patients 18 years old or older with a low educational level and inadequate glycaemic control (HbA1c > 7%) were recruited. General Practitioners (GPs) were randomised to three groups: intervention A, intervention B and control group. GPs allocated to intervention groups A and B received training in communication skills and are providing graphic feedback about glycosylated haemoglobin levels. Patients whose GPs were allocated to group B are additionally receiving telephone reinforcement whereas patients from the control group are receiving usual care. The described interventions are being conducted during 7 consecutive medical visits which are scheduled every three months. The main outcome measure will be HbA1c; blood pressure, lipidemia, body mass index and waist circumference will be considered as secondary outcome measures. Statistical analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions will include multilevel regression analysis with three hierarchical levels: medical visit level, patient level and GP level. Discussion The results of

  12. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  13. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  14. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  15. Behavioural Change in Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Valerie L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the communication process between diabetes health professionals and people intensively self-managing their type 1 diabetes influenced behavioural change. Design: Telephone interviews to provide insight into the communication process and its influence on diabetes intensive self-management behaviour. Setting:…

  16. Self-Management Abilities of Diabetes in People with an Intellectual Disability Living in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Leigh A.; Trip, Henrietta T.; Whitehead, Lisa; Conder, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is encouraged; however, it is not an easy task and requires a good understanding of the disease. To determine how to improve the self-management abilities of diabetes in people with an intellectual disability (ID), this study explored the knowledge and understanding of diabetes held by a select group of adults with…

  17. Contribution of income to self-management and health outcomes in pediatric type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rechenberg, Kaitlyn; Whittemore, Robin; Grey, Margaret; Jaser, Sarah

    2016-03-01

    Low income has been established as a risk factor for poorer outcomes in youth with type 1 diabetes; however, the effect of moderate income has not been studied. The purpose of this secondary analysis of baseline data from a multi-site study was to compare glycemic control, self-management, and psychosocial outcomes [depression, stress, and quality of life (QOL)] at different income levels in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Youth (n = 320, mean age = 12.3 + 1.1, 55% female, 64% white, mean A1C = 8.3 ± 1.4) completed established self-management and psychosocial measures. A1C levels were collected from medical records. Caregivers reported annual family income, categorized as high (>$80K), moderate ($40-80K), or low (<$40K). Youth from high-income families had significantly lower A1C (mean = 7.9 ± 1.2) than those from the moderate-income group (8.6 ± 1.7, p < 0.001) or the low-income group (mean A1C = 8.6 ± 1.5, p = 0.003). Youth from the high-income group reported significantly better diabetes problem solving and more self-management goals than those from the moderate- or low-income groups (both p < 0.01). Youth from the high-income group also reported significantly fewer symptoms of depression, lower levels of perceived stress, and better QOL than those in the moderate or low-income groups (all p < 0.05). Multivariate linear regression models were used to test psychological and behavioral predictors of A1C and QOL. Parents' education status (p < 0.05) and self-management activities (p < 0.01) were significant predictors of hemoglobin A1c, while income (p < 0.01) and self-management activities (p < 0.05) were significant predictors of QOL.

  18. Self-management education and support in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    With the changing health care environment, prevalence of chronic health conditions, and burgeoning challenges of health literacy, obesity, and homelessness, self-management support provides an opportunity for clinicians to enhance effectiveness and, at the same time, to engage patients to participate in managing their own personal care. This article reviews the differences between patient education and self-management and describes easy-to-use strategies that foster patient self-management and can be used by health care providers in the medical setting. It also highlights the importance of linking patients to nonmedical programs and services in the community.

  19. Factors contributing to attrition behavior in diabetes self-management programs: A mixed method approach

    PubMed Central

    Gucciardi, Enza; DeMelo, Margaret; Offenheim, Ana; Stewart, Donna E

    2008-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education is a critical component in diabetes care. Despite worldwide efforts to develop efficacious DSME programs, high attrition rates are often reported in clinical practice. The objective of this study was to examine factors that may contribute to attrition behavior in diabetes self-management programs. Methods We conducted telephone interviews with individuals who had Type 2 diabetes (n = 267) and attended a diabetes education centre. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with attrition behavior. Forty-four percent of participants (n = 118) withdrew prematurely from the program and were asked an open-ended question regarding their discontinuation of services. We used content analysis to code and generate themes, which were then organized under the Behavioral Model of Health Service Utilization. Results Working full and part-time, being over 65 years of age, having a regular primary care physician or fewer diabetes symptoms were contributing factors to attrition behaviour in our multivariable logistic regression. The most common reasons given by participants for attrition from the program were conflict between their work schedules and the centre's hours of operation, patients' confidence in their own knowledge and ability when managing their diabetes, apathy towards diabetes education, distance to the centre, forgetfulness, regular physician consultation, low perceived seriousness of diabetes, and lack of familiarity with the centre and its services. There was considerable overlap between our quantitative and qualitative results. Conclusion Reducing attrition behaviour requires a range of strategies targeted towards delivering convenient and accessible services, familiarizing individuals with these services, increasing communication between centres and their patients, and creating better partnerships between centres and primary care physicians. PMID:18248673

  20. The role of peer support in diabetes care and self-management.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Carol A; Heisler, Michele

    2009-03-01

    In light of the growing prevalence and healthcare costs of diabetes mellitus, it is critically important for healthcare providers to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their diabetes care. A key element of effective disease management for diabetes is support for patient self-management. Barriers to care exist for both patients and healthcare systems. As a result, many people with diabetes do not get the care and support needed to successfully manage their diabetes.Disease management approaches that incorporate peer support may be a promising way to help provide self-management support to patients with diabetes. Trained peers provide emotional support, instrumental (tangible or material) support, education, and skills training to those they serve, and outreach and care coordination for provider systems. They play a unique role that complements and supports clinical care.To describe how peers are currently supporting diabetes care, a number of databases were searched for studies describing the roles of peers using relevant key words. This paper reviews current literature that describes the roles and duties of peers in interventions to improve diabetes care, with a focus on their contributions to six essential elements of self-management support: (i) access to regular, high-quality clinical care; (ii) an individualized approach to assessment and treatment; (iii) patient-centered collaborative goal setting; (iv) education and skills training; (v) ongoing follow-up and support; and (vi) linkages to community resources.Peers worked under a variety of titles, which did not define their duties. The scope of their work ranged from assisting health professionals to playing a central role in care. Providing education and follow-up support were the two most common roles. In all but one study, these roles were carried out during face-to-face contact, most frequently in community sites.A growing body of literature supports the value of peer models for diabetes

  1. [Support of diabetes dietary management and self-management using mobile applications].

    PubMed

    Szálka, Brigitta; Kósa, István; Vassányi, István; Mák, Erzsébet

    2016-07-01

    The key components of successful diabetes therapy are pharmacotherapy, hospital care and lifestyle education. Lifestyle education, self-management, and composing the right diet can be effectively supported with mobile applications. In this paper Hungarian mobile applications are reviewed and compared to some international competitors. Besides plenty of useful functions some deficiencies are identified, based on dietary recommendations. The related improvements together with clinical trials validating effectiveness and reliability can strengthen medical evidence as well as the penetration of such mobile applications. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1147-1153.

  2. Six-month Outcomes of Mobile Phone Application-based Self-management in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mi Kyeong; Cho, Young Yun; Rha, Mi Yong; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the case in order to examine the effect of a mobile application program ("Diabetes & Nutrition") developed in 2011-2012 for self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and to recommend important considerations when the mobile application program is developed. A 46-year-old man was newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2013 and had no complications. The height of the patient was 168 cm and the body weight was 75.6 kg. Nutrition education was conducted according to a medical prescription, and follow-up nutrition education was conducted after 3 and 6 months. After nutrition education, the patient was engaged in self-management using "Diabetes & Nutrition" program during 3 months. At 3 months, the body weight had decreased by 4.4 kg (from 75.6 to 71.2 kg), waist circumference by 5 cm (from 88 to 83 cm) and HbA1c level from 7.9% to 6.1%. Also at 3 months, the medication was reduced from from the dose of 850 mg to the dose of 500 mg metformin per twice a day. Since then, the patient did not continue to use the "Diabetes & Nutrition" because the level of blood glucose had stabilized, and the patient felt inconvenient and annoying to use the program. At 6 months, no significant change in the body weight and body composition was observed in comparison with those at 3 months. The present case demonstrates that the early use of "Diabetes & Nutrition" could be helpful for self-management of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Developing self-management mobile application programs in the future will require strategies of how to promote continuous use of application program and self-management of type 2 diabetes.

  3. Patient Self-Management of Diabetes Care in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Arti D.; Rushakoff, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes by inpatients can be problematic. People with type 1 diabetes often prefer to self-manage their diabetes in the inpatient setting. We report the case of a patient admitted to the surgical service who was self-administering his home insulin, often without telling his nurse or physician. He was aiming for tight glycemic control, which resulted in life-threatening hypoglycemia. While patients can often self-manage their diabetes in the outpatient setting, inpatient management of diabetes is very different. Patients may not be familiar with common scenarios requiring adjustments of insulin therapy. Therefore, we recommend against self-management of diabetes in the hospital. However, the patients should be involved in discussions about management of their diabetes in the hospital to allay their concerns about changes made to their insulin regimens. An example of successful cooperative management is with use of protocols that allow continued use of insulin pumps in the hospital. PMID:25990293

  4. Spirituality in African Americans with diabetes: self-management through a relationship with God.

    PubMed

    Polzer, Rebecca L; Miles, Margaret S

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model about how the spirituality of African Americans affects their self-management of diabetes. The sample consisted of 29 African American men and women, ages 40 to 75, with type 2 diabetes. The authors used a grounded theory design and collected data using minimally structured interviews. The method of analysis was constant comparison. The core concept identified was Self-Management Through a Relationship With God. Participants fell into one of three typologies: (a) Relationship and Responsibility: God Is in Background; (b) Relationship and Responsibility: God Is in Forefront: (c) Relationship and Relinquishing of Self-Management: God Is Healer. These typologies varied according to how participants viewed their relationship with God and the impact of this relationship on their self-management. The spirituality of these African Americans was an important factor that influenced the self-management of their diabetes.

  5. Parent and teacher perceptions of the impact of school nurse interventions on children's self-management of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peery, Annette I; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S

    2012-08-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this relationship in a sample of 69 school-age children who received case management from school nurses. Our findings suggest that teachers and parents do not always agree on how well a child manages their illness. When school nurses provide more education and counseling, parents are more likely to perceive an improvement in their child's self-management. Teachers are more likely to perceive an improvement when the nurse provides more classroom visits and includes the physical education teacher and guidance counselor. These findings suggest that the roles of educator, counselor, and collaborator are important for school nurses who provide care to school-age children with diabetes.

  6. Understanding Cultural Issues in Diabetes Self-Management Behaviors of Korean Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Yang, Kyeongra; Lee, Jia; Min, Jiwon; Kim, Kevin H.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Jennings, Bonnie Mowinski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to explore potential factors affecting self-management behaviors in Korean immigrants with type 2 diabetes mellitus (KIT2Ds). Methods A qualitative descriptive design guided this study. Semi-structured interviews lasting 45-60 minutes were conducted with 20 KIT2Ds in the participant’s preferred language; in all cases this was Korean. Each interview was audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data analysis was performed in two steps. The data written in Korean were initially analyzed by three bilingual researchers. A qualitative researcher then participated in the analysis to refine the findings for presentation to an English speaking audience while staying true to the data and preserving the nuanced Korean meanings. Results The mean age of the sample was 64. 5 ± 11.6 years (9 men and 11 women). The mean years of staying in the U. S. and age at diabetes mellitus diagnosis were 23.6 ± 9.7 years and 52.5 ± 12.3 years, respectively. Three major ideas were identified: (a) issues on treatment regimen related to both medications and diet, (b) resources that helped or hindered their ability to manage diabetes, and (c) the physician/patient relationship. Conclusions There were important cultural nuances that need to be addressed to better prepare KIT2Ds to manage their diabetes more effectively. A culture specific program should extend beyond a diabetes self-management education delivered in Korean language. Rather, content and education methods need to consider acculturation effects on diabetes management behaviors. PMID:23019236

  7. Evolution of a web-based, prototype Personal Health Application for diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Fonda, Stephanie J; Kedziora, Richard J; Vigersky, Robert A; Bursell, Sven-Erik

    2010-10-01

    Behaviors carried out by the person with diabetes (e.g., healthy eating, physical activity, judicious use of medication, glucose monitoring, coping and problem-solving, regular clinic visits, etc.) are of central importance in diabetes management. To assist with these behaviors, we developed a prototype PHA for diabetes self-management that was based on User-Centered Design principles and congruent with the anticipatory vision of Project Health Design (PHD). This article presents aspects of the prototype PHA's functionality as conceived under PHD and describes modifications to the PHA now being undertaken under new sponsorship, in response to user feedback and timing tests we have performed. In brief, the prototype Personal Health Application (PHA) receives data on the major diabetes management domains from a Personal Health Record (PHR) and analyzes and provides feedback based on clinically vetted educational content. The information is presented within "gadgets" within a portal-based website. The PHR used for the first implementation was the Common Platform developed by PHD. Key changes include a re-conceptualization of the gadgets by topic areas originally defined by the American Association of Diabetes Educators, a refocusing on low-cost approaches to diabetes monitoring and data entry, and synchronization with a new PHR, Microsoft® HealthVault™.

  8. A Community Health Worker Intervention for Diabetes Self-Management Among the Tz'utujil Maya of Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Micikas, Mary; Foster, Jennifer; Weis, Allison; Lopez-Salm, Alyse; Lungelow, Danielle; Mendez, Pedro; Micikas, Ashley

    2015-07-01

    Despite the high prevalence of diabetes in rural Guatemala, there is little education in diabetes self-management, particularly among the indigenous population. To address this need, a culturally relevant education intervention for diabetic patients was developed and implemented in two rural communities in Guatemala. An evaluative research project was designed to investigate if the structured, community-led diabetes self-management intervention improved selected health outcomes for participants. A one-group, pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational intervention by comparing measures of health, knowledge, and behavior in patients pre- and postintervention. A survey instrument assessed health beliefs and practices and hemoglobin A1c (HgA1c) measured blood glucose levels at baseline and 4 months post initiation of intervention (n = 52). There was a significant decrease (1.2%) in the main outcome measure, mean HgA1c from baseline (10.1%) and follow-up (8.9%; p = .001). Other survey findings were not statistically significant. This study illustrates that a culturally specific, diabetes self-management program led by community health workers may reduce HgA1c levels in rural populations of Guatemala. However, as a random sample was not feasible for this study, this finding should be interpreted with caution. Limitations unique to the setting and patient population are discussed in this article.

  9. Comparison of a Mindful Eating Intervention to a Diabetes Self-Management Intervention among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Kristeller, Jean L.; Headings, Amy; Nagaraja, Haikady

    2014-01-01

    Mindful eating may be an effective intervention for increasing awareness of hunger and satiety cues, improving eating regulation and dietary patterns, reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety, and promoting weight loss. Diabetes self-management education (DSME), which addresses knowledge, self-efficacy, and outcome expectations for improving…

  10. Tools For Interactive Learning And Self-Management Of Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelo, Rita; Baptista, Carla; Figueiredo, Júlia; Carrilho, Francisco; Furtado, Pedro

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a widespread disease and its control is dependent upon the patient. Although there is no permanent cure for diabetes, there are several available treatments which, when followed regularly, allow the patient to have a good quality of life. Patient education, especially about eating habits, is key to keep glucose levels stable both in the short and in the long term. This should include nutritional counselling, physical exercise, and the self monitoring of glucose levels. The University of Coimbra and the Serviço de Endocrinologia, Diabetes e Metabolismo of Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra started a collaboration to develop interactive tools for the learning and improvement of carbohydrate counting by patients. The approach presented in this paper is an interactive multimedia tool, available to patients through either the web or a smartphone. It helps them to learn how to maintain a healthy diet and how to monitor their insulin levels correctly by measuring the carbo-hidrate “equivalents” in meals. This application will create a more dynamic and interactive way of educating patients, improving solutions currently used in the Serviço de Endocrinologia, Diabetes e Metabolismo of the Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra.

  11. An empirical study of self-efficacy and social support in diabetes self-management: implications for home healthcare nurses.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Caralise W; Grant, Joan S; Pritchard, David A

    2012-04-01

    This pilot study was conducted to evaluate relationships among self-efficacy, social support, social problem solving, and diabetes self-management in people living with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Self-efficacy, social support, and social problem solving were significantly correlated with diabetes self-management. These relationships indicate the importance of including interventions to promote self-efficacy, social support, and social problem solving in diabetes self-management programs.

  12. A Qualitative Exploration of Motivation to Self-Manage and Styles of Self-Management amongst People Living with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula; Scambler, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the motives that people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) had for self-managing their condition and ways they used to assess the success of their self-management efforts. Using semistructured interviews (N = 25), focus groups (3 ×  N = 12 participants), and open-ended questionnaires (N = 6), people living with and self-managing T2D were recruited from a community-based T2D participation group. Most participants were older (aged 60+) and lived in a socioeconomically deprived area in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed thematically using framework analysis. Patients' motives for self-management included (i) concern about the anticipative effects of T2D; (ii) wishing to “stay well”; (iii) maintaining independence; (iv) reducing the need for healthcare professionals; and (v) improving quality of life. Six self-management styles were found and pertained to self-managing: (i) through routinisation; (ii) as a burden; (iii) as maintenance; (iv) through delegation; (v) through comanagement; and (vi) through autonomy. Motivators for self-management shaped the criteria people used to judge the success of their self-management practices and influenced their self-management style. The findings show that styles of T2D self-management are mediated and moderated by sociocontextual issues. Healthcare professionals should take these into account when supporting people living with T2D. PMID:26075285

  13. A Qualitative Exploration of Motivation to Self-Manage and Styles of Self-Management amongst People Living with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula; Scambler, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the motives that people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) had for self-managing their condition and ways they used to assess the success of their self-management efforts. Using semistructured interviews (N = 25), focus groups (3 × N = 12 participants), and open-ended questionnaires (N = 6), people living with and self-managing T2D were recruited from a community-based T2D participation group. Most participants were older (aged 60+) and lived in a socioeconomically deprived area in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed thematically using framework analysis. Patients' motives for self-management included (i) concern about the anticipative effects of T2D; (ii) wishing to "stay well"; (iii) maintaining independence; (iv) reducing the need for healthcare professionals; and (v) improving quality of life. Six self-management styles were found and pertained to self-managing: (i) through routinisation; (ii) as a burden; (iii) as maintenance; (iv) through delegation; (v) through comanagement; and (vi) through autonomy. Motivators for self-management shaped the criteria people used to judge the success of their self-management practices and influenced their self-management style. The findings show that styles of T2D self-management are mediated and moderated by sociocontextual issues. Healthcare professionals should take these into account when supporting people living with T2D.

  14. Participatory approach to the development of a knowledge base for problem-solving in diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Lewis, Heather J.; Smaldone, Arlene M.; Davidson, Patricia R.; Kukafka, Rita; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Cassells, Andrea; Mynatt, Elizabeth D.; Hripcsak, George; Mamykina, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop an expandable knowledge base of reusable knowledge related to self-management of diabetes that can be used as a foundation for patient-centric decision support tools. Materials and methods The structure and components of the knowledge base were created in participatory design with academic diabetes educators using knowledge acquisition methods. The knowledge base was validated using scenario-based approach with practicing diabetes educators and individuals with diabetes recruited from Community Health Centers (CHCs) serving economically disadvantaged communities and ethnic minorities in New York. Results The knowledge base includes eight glycemic control problems, over 150 behaviors known to contribute to these problems coupled with contextual explanations, and over 200 specific action-oriented self-management goals for correcting problematic behaviors, with corresponding motivational messages. The validation of the knowledge base suggested high level of completeness and accuracy, and identified improvements in cultural appropriateness. These were addressed in new iterations of the knowledge base. Discussion The resulting knowledge base is theoretically grounded, incorporates practical and evidence-based knowledge used by diabetes educators in practice settings, and allows for personally meaningful choices by individuals with diabetes. Participatory design approach helped researchers to capture implicit knowledge of practicing diabetes educators and make it explicit and reusable. Conclusion The knowledge base proposed here is an important step towards development of new generation patient-centric decision support tools for facilitating chronic disease self-management. While this knowledge base specifically targets diabetes, its overall structure and composition can be generalized to other chronic conditions. PMID:26547253

  15. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided. PMID:27853384

  16. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

  17. A Diabetes Self-Management Program: 12-Month Outcome Sustainability From a Nonreinforced Pragmatic Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lorig, Kate; Turner, Ralph M; English, Kathleen; Laurent, Diana D; Greenberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes self-management education has been shown to be effective in controlled trials. The 6-week Better Choices, Better Health-Diabetes (BCBH-D) self-management program was also associated with an improvement in health outcomes in a 6-month translation study. Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether a national translation of the BCBH-D self-management program, offered both Web-based and face-to-face, was associated with improvements in health outcomes (including HbA1c) and health behaviors (including recommended medical tests) 1 year after intervention Methods Web-based programs were administered nationally, whereas face-to-face workshops took place in Atlanta, Indianapolis, and St Louis. Self-report questionnaires were either Web-based or administered by mail, at baseline and 1 year, and collected health and health-behavior measures. HbA1c blood samples were collected via mailed kits. A previous 6-month study found statistically significant improvements in 13 of 14 outcome measures, including HbA1c. For this study, paired t test compared baseline with 1-year outcomes. Subgroup analyses determined whether participants with specific conditions improved (high HbA1c, depression, hypoglycemia, nonadherence to medication, no aerobic exercise). The percentage of participants with improvements in effect size of at least 0.4 in at least 1 of the 5 measures was calculated. Results A total of 857 participants with 1-year data (69.7% of baseline participants) demonstrated statistically significant 1-year improvements in 13 of 15 outcome measures; 79.9% (685/857) of participants showed improvements in effect size of 0.4 or greater in at least 1 of the 5 criterial measures. Conclusions Participants had small but significant benefits in multiple measures. Improvements previously noted at 6 months were maintained or amplified at 1 year. PMID:27979790

  18. Type 2 Diabetes Self-management Among Spanish-Speaking Hispanic Immigrants.

    PubMed

    Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Berry, Diane C; DeWalt, Darren; Miller, Cass T

    2016-12-01

    This article describes the quantitative findings of a mixed-methods study that examined the relationship among knowledge, self-efficacy, health promoting behaviors, and type 2 diabetes self-management among recent Spanish-speaking, limited English proficient immigrants to the US. This population is at risk for both a higher incidence of disease and increased barriers to successful disease management compared to the general US population. Distinguishing aspects of this study compared to the available literature are the comprehensive nature of the data collected, the theoretical component, and the analysis and modeling approach. Social cognitive theory provides the framework for the study design and analysis. An innovative community-based recruiting strategy was used, a broad range of physiological measures related to health were observed, and instruments related to knowledge, self-efficacy, and healthy lifestyle behaviors were administered orally in Spanish to 30 participants. A broad range of statistical analysis methods was applied to the data, including a set of three structural equation models. The study results are consistent with the importance of education, health knowledge, and healthy lifestyle practices for type 2 diabetes self-management. With the usual cautions associated with applying structural equation modeling to modest sample sizes, multiple elements of the posited theoretical model were consistent with the data collected. The results of the investigation of this under-studied population indicate that, on average, participants were not effectively managing their disease. The results suggest that clinical interventions focused on improving knowledge, nutrition, and physical activity, reducing stress, and leveraging the importance of interpersonal relations could be effective intervention strategies to improve self-management among this population.

  19. The role of social support in the self-management of diabetes mellitus among a Hispanic population.

    PubMed

    Gleeson-Kreig, JoAnn; Bernal, Henrietta; Woolley, Steve

    2002-01-01

    The rising incidence of diabetes mellitus continues to be a major health concern among Hispanic Americans. Social support has been found to be a relevant factor in diabetes self-management, however, it has not been explored within a Hispanic community. This cross-sectional study was therefore conducted with 95 insulin-requiring Hispanic adults to explore the composition of the support network, the type of assistance needed, the degree of satisfaction with support received, and the relationship between social support and diabetes self-management. Overall, the participants had fairly large networks, composed primarily of family members. The greatest need for assistance was associated with transportation or interactions that involved speaking English, and the assistance offered in these areas was viewed as highly satisfactory. Participants were least satisfied with the help they received for diabetes-related self-care, personal care, and financial assistance. Social support was not strongly related to diabetes self-management. Community health nurses must be aware that this population may have needs that are unsatisfactorily met. They should provide education and resources for support persons and carefully evaluate the support network, not only for availability, but also for satisfaction. Effort should also be directed toward developing alternative support for those without available family.

  20. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self-management

  1. Social barriers to Type 2 diabetes self-management: the role of capital.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; Wilson, Christine; Roberts, Louise; Munt, Rebecca; Crotty, Mikaila

    2014-12-01

    Approaches to self-management traditionally focus upon individual capacity to make behavioural change. In this paper, we use Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and capital to demonstrate the impact of structural inequalities upon chronic illness self-management through exploring findings from 28 semi-structured interviews conducted with people from a lower socioeconomic region of Adelaide, South Australia who have type 2 diabetes. The data suggests that access to capital is a significant barrier to type 2 diabetes self-management. While many participants described having sufficient cultural capital to access and assess health information, they often lacked economic capital and social capital in the form of support networks who promote health. Participants were often involved in social networks in which activities which are contrary to self-management have symbolic value. As a consequence, they entered relationships with health professionals at a disadvantage. We conclude that structural barriers to self-management arising from habitus resulting in the performance of health behaviours rooted in cultural and class background and limited access to capital in the form of economic resources, social networks, health knowledge and prestige may have a negative impact on capacity for type 2 diabetes self-management.

  2. Changing patterns of self-management in youth with type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Lynne S; Knafl, Kathleen A; Grey, Margaret

    2006-12-01

    Self-management of type I diabetes is key to good physical and psychosocial outcomes of the disease, yet little is known about how youth and their parents share responsibility for illness management. This study describes the division of labor between youth and their parents, self-management conflict, and three patterns of self-management in youth across four developmental stages: preadolescence, early adolescence, mid-adolescence, and late adolescence. Twenty-two youth (8-19 years) with type I diabetes and one of their parents were interviewed using semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results indicated that parents of preadolescents (8-11 years) performed much of their children's diabetes care. Dyads reported some conflicts, particularly over food, amount of bolus, and blood glucose testing. The dyads demonstrated a self-management pattern that we identified as parent-dominant. Most early adolescents (11-15 years) performed much of their own daily care, but parents actively participated in their self-management and oversaw it. The majority of dyads reported conflict over food and blood glucose testing. Most early adolescents demonstrated a transitional self-management pattern whereby they managed their own daily care, with varying amounts of parental oversight. In mid-adolescence (15-17 years), youth managed nearly all of their diabetes care; however, some dyads reported that parental oversight of illness care was still considerable. Exercise was conflictual for the majority of these dyads. Over half of the youth and, by late adolescence (17-19 years), all youth demonstrated a pattern of adolescent-dominant self-management. In adolescent-dominant self-management, youth independently managed their diabetes. Half of the dyads reported that there were sometimes conflicts over food and blood glucose testing. Understanding the nature of sharing self-management responsibilities, the nature of conflict in carrying out such

  3. Concepts of diabetes self-management in Mexican American and African American low-income patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, E B; Fernandez, A; Lighthouse, N; Mendenhall, E; Jacobs, E

    2012-10-01

    The goal of the study was to explore low-income minority patients' concepts of diabetes self-management and assess the extent to which patient beliefs correspond to evidence-based recommendations. African American and Mexican American patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited from safety net clinics that serve the uninsured and under-insured in Chicago and San Francisco to participate in focus group discussions. Grounded theory was used to identify themes related to diabetes self-management. Strategies participants mentioned for diabetes self-care were medication use, diet, weight loss and exercise. Eating more fruit and vegetables and consuming smaller portions were the most commonly mentioned dietary behaviors to control diabetes. African Americans expressed skepticism about taking medications. Mexican Americans discussed barriers to acquiring medications and use of herbal remedies. Mexican Americans frequently mentioned intentional exercise of long duration as a management strategy, whereas African Americans more frequently described exercise as regular activities of daily living. Blood glucose self-monitoring and reducing risks of diabetes complications were rarely mentioned as diabetes self-management behaviors. African American and Mexican American patients have different concepts of diabetes self-management, especially with regard to medication use and physical activity. Consideration of these differences may facilitate design of effective self-management interventions for these high-risk populations.

  4. Challenges of Diabetes Self-Management in Adults Affected by Food Insecurity in a Large Urban Centre of Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chan, Justine; DeMelo, Margaret; Gingras, Jacqui; Gucciardi, Enza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how food insecurity affects individuals' ability to manage their diabetes, as narrated by participants living in a large, culturally diverse urban centre. Design. Qualitative study comprising of in-depth interviews, using a semistructured interview guide. Setting. Participants were recruited from the local community, three community health centres, and a community-based diabetes education centre servicing a low-income population in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants. Twenty-one English-speaking adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and having experienced food insecurity in the past year (based on three screening questions). Method. Using six phases of analysis, we used qualitative, deductive thematic analysis to transcribe, code, and analyze participant interviews. Main Findings. Three themes emerged from our analysis of participants' experiences of living with food insecurity and diabetes: (1) barriers to accessing and preparing food, (2) social isolation, and (3) enhancing agency and resilience. Conclusion. Food insecurity appears to negatively impact diabetes self-management. Healthcare professionals need to be cognizant of resources, skills, and supports appropriate for people with diabetes affected by food insecurity. Study findings suggest foci for enhancing diabetes self-management support.

  5. Challenges of Diabetes Self-Management in Adults Affected by Food Insecurity in a Large Urban Centre of Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Justine; DeMelo, Margaret; Gingras, Jacqui; Gucciardi, Enza

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how food insecurity affects individuals' ability to manage their diabetes, as narrated by participants living in a large, culturally diverse urban centre. Design. Qualitative study comprising of in-depth interviews, using a semistructured interview guide. Setting. Participants were recruited from the local community, three community health centres, and a community-based diabetes education centre servicing a low-income population in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Participants. Twenty-one English-speaking adults with a diagnosis of diabetes and having experienced food insecurity in the past year (based on three screening questions). Method. Using six phases of analysis, we used qualitative, deductive thematic analysis to transcribe, code, and analyze participant interviews. Main Findings. Three themes emerged from our analysis of participants' experiences of living with food insecurity and diabetes: (1) barriers to accessing and preparing food, (2) social isolation, and (3) enhancing agency and resilience. Conclusion. Food insecurity appears to negatively impact diabetes self-management. Healthcare professionals need to be cognizant of resources, skills, and supports appropriate for people with diabetes affected by food insecurity. Study findings suggest foci for enhancing diabetes self-management support. PMID:26576154

  6. Diabetes Self-Management Interventions for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Living in Rural Areas: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lepard, Morgan Griesemer; Joseph, Alessandra L.; Agne, April A.; Cherrington, Andrea L.

    2017-01-01

    In rural communities, high rates of diabetes and its complications are compounded by limited access to health care and scarce community resources. We systematically reviewed the evidence for the impact of diabetes self-management education interventions designed for patients living in rural areas on glycemic control and other diabetes outcomes. Fifteen studies met inclusion criteria. Ten were randomized controlled trials. Intervention strategies included in-person diabetes (n=9) and telehealth (n=6) interventions. Four studies demonstrated between group differences for biologic outcomes, four studies demonstrated changes in behavior, and three studies demonstrated changes in knowledge. Intervention dose was associated with improved A1c or weight loss in two studies and session attendance in one study. Interventions that included collaborative goal-setting were associated with improved metabolic outcomes and self-efficacy. Telehealth and face-to-face diabetes interventions are both promising strategies for rural communities. Effective interventions included collaborative goal-setting. Intervention dose was linked to better outcomes and higher attendance. PMID:25948497

  7. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn…

  8. Understanding Challenges, Strategies, and the Role of Support Networks in Medication Self-management Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Gerda; Ose, Dominik; Baudendistel, Ines; Seidling, Hanna M; Stützle, Marion; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Wensing, Michel; Mahler, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    Purpose The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the challenges and strategies of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) regarding daily management of their medication regimen focusing on the role of their support networks. Methods A purposeful sample of 25 patients with T2DM was recruited from local self-help groups, general practitioner practices, and a university hospital in southwestern Germany. Four semi-structured focus groups were conducted to identify the challenges patients experienced, the strategies they used, and their collaboration with support networks to assist them in self-managing their medication regimen. Sessions were audio- and video-recorded, fully transcribed, and subjected to computer-aided qualitative content analysis, guided by the Self- and Family Management Framework (SFMF). Results Patients with T2DM experienced numerous challenges affecting medication self-management arising from their personal situation, health status and resources, characteristics of their regimen, and how health care is currently organized. Patients' self-initiated strategies included activating health care, community, social, and online resources; taking ownership of medication-related needs; and integrating medication-taking into daily life. Patients drew on self-help groups, family, and friends to discuss concerns regarding medication safety and receive experience-based information and advice for navigating within the health care system as well as practical hands-on support with daily medication self-management. Conclusions Understanding the challenges and building on strategies patients with T2DM devised help diabetes educators to better address patients' needs and priorities and guide patient-centered interventions to support patients' self-management activities. Community and social support networks operating in patients' lives need to be engaged in the self-management support.

  9. Predictors of Diabetes Self-Management among Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern in Malaysia. Treatment of diabetes is costly and can lead to complications if disease is poorly controlled. Diabetes self-management (DSM) is found to be essential for optimal glycemic control. This cross-sectional study was conducted among samples from four randomly selected diabetes clinics in Sarawak, Malaysia. The aim was to determine the predictors for DSM. Face-to-face interview using questionnaire was used to collect data. Four hundred respondents with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were recruited. Majority of the respondents were Sarawak Bumiputra (Iban and Bidayuh, 48.6%) and female (68.6%). The mean age was 58.77 years (SD = 11.46) and approximately half of the respondents (50.6%) had T2DM for six years (SD = 4.46). The mean fasting blood glucose (FBG) was 8.06 mmol/L (SD = 2.94), with majority (76.1%) having the level higher than 6.1 mmol/L. Multiple logistic regression tests showed significant linear relationship between DSM and belief in treatment effectiveness (p = 0.001), family support (p = 0.007), and self-efficacy (p = 0.027). Health care personnel must convince patients with T2DM of the effectiveness of the treatment, empower and enhance their self-efficacy, and enlist the family support so as to ensure patients sustain their DSM efforts. PMID:27563681

  10. Are Self-Management Interventions Suitable for All? Comparing Obese Versus Nonobese Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroese, Floor M.; Adriaanse, Marieke A.; De Ridder, Denise T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the current study was to compare obese and nonobese type 2 diabetes patients at baseline and after participating in an existing self-management intervention (i.e., "Beyond Good Intentions") on cognitive, self-care, and behavioral measures to examine whether both groups are equally prepared and able to adopt…

  11. EMPOWER--pathways for supporting the self-management of diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Plößnig, Manuela; Kabak, Yildiray; Lamprinos, Ilias; Pabst, Alexander; Hildebrand, Claudia; Mantwill, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a serious world-wide medical challenge and there is a recognised need for improved diabetes care outcomes. This paper describes results of the EMPOWER project, to foster the self-management of diabetes patients by integration of existing and new services offered to patients after having been diagnosed with diabetes. The Self-Management Pathway described in this paper helps patients in the specification of personalized activities based on medical recommendations and personal goals, as well as self-monitoring of the results. The whole process is supported by innovative ICT services that motivate patients to change their lifestyle and adhere to defined medication and activity plans. We describe the approach and present the findings of the validation phase in Germany and Turkey.

  12. The Use of Videogames, Gamification, and Virtual Environments in the Self-Management of Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Evidence.

    PubMed

    Theng, Yin-Leng; Lee, Jason W Y; Patinadan, Paul V; Foo, Schubert S B

    2015-10-01

    The use of videogames in healthcare interventions is gaining popularity, but there is still a gap in the understanding on how these types of interventions are used for the management of diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine published research on the use of videogames for diabetes management. With the increased use of mobile technology, the review was expanded to understand whether games, gamification, and virtual environments can be used for diabetes self-management. Out of the 307 articles identified, only 10 articles met the inclusion criteria of the study. The duration of most studies was short, with small sample sizes. All interventions targeted behavioral changes examining risk reduction of diabetes-related risk and promotion of healthy behavior among study participants. Videogames appeared to be helpful tools for education in some interventions, whereas gamification and virtual environments increased extrinsic motivation and provided positive reinforcement. This review concludes by discussing the potential of using videogames and gamification for the self-management of diabetes.

  13. Video games for diabetes self-management: examples and design strategies.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Debra A

    2012-07-01

    The July 2012 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology includes a special symposium called "Serious Games for Diabetes, Obesity, and Healthy Lifestyle." As part of the symposium, this article focuses on health behavior change video games that are designed to improve and support players' diabetes self-management. Other symposium articles include one that recommends theory-based approaches to the design of health games and identifies areas in which additional research is needed, followed by five research articles presenting studies of the design and effectiveness of games and game technologies that require physical activity in order to play. This article briefly describes 14 diabetes self-management video games, and, when available, cites research findings on their effectiveness. The games were found by searching the Health Games Research online searchable database, three bibliographic databases (ACM Digital Library, PubMed, and Social Sciences Databases of CSA Illumina), and the Google search engine, using the search terms "diabetes" and "game." Games were selected if they addressed diabetes self-management skills.

  14. Patient attitudes about financial incentives for diabetes self-management: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Blondon, Katherine S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the acceptability of incentives for behavior changes in individuals with diabetes, comparing financial incentives to self-rewards and non-financial incentives. METHODS: A national online survey of United States adults with diabetes was conducted in March 2013 (n = 153). This survey was designed for this study, with iterative testing and modifications in a pilot population. We measured the demographics of individuals, their interest in incentives, as well as the perceived challenge of diabetes self-management tasks, and expectations of incentives to improve diabetes self-management (financial, non-financial and self-rewards). Using an ordered logistic regression model, we assessed the association between a 32-point score of the perceived challenge of the self-management tasks and the three types of rewards. RESULTS: Ninety-six percent of individuals were interested in financial incentives, 60% in non-financial incentives and 72% in self-rewards. Patients were less likely to use financial incentives when they perceived the behavior to be more challenging (odds ratio of using financial incentives of 0.82 (95%CI: 0.72-0.93) for each point of the behavior score). While the effectiveness of incentives may vary according to the perceived level of challenge of each behavior, participants did not expect to need large amounts to motivate them to modify their behavior. The expected average amounts needed to motivate a 5 lb weight loss in our population and to maintain this weight change for a year was $258 (interquartile range of $10-100) and $713 (interquartile range of $25-250) for a 15 lb weight loss. The difference in mean amount estimates for 5 lb and 15 lb weight loss was significant (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Individuals with diabetes are willing to consider financial incentives to improve diabetes self-management. Future studies are needed to explore incentive programs and their effectiveness for diabetes. PMID:26069724

  15. Diabetes LIVE (Learning in Virtual Environments): Testing the Efficacy of Self-Management Training and Support in Virtual Environments (RCT Protocol)

    PubMed Central

    Vorderstrasse, Allison A.; Melkus, Gail; Pan, Wei; Lewinski, Allison A.; Johnson, Constance M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ongoing self-management improves outcomes for those with type 2 diabetes (T2D); however, there are many barriers to patients receiving assistance in this from the healthcare system and peers. Findings from our pilot study showed that a virtual diabetes community on the Internet with real-time interaction among peers with T2D—and with healthcare professionals—is feasible and has the potential to influence clinical and psychosocial outcomes. Objective The purpose of this paper is to present the protocol for the Diabetes Learning in Virtual Environments (LIVE) trial. Protocol Diabetes LIVE is a two-group, randomized, controlled trial to compare effects of a virtual environment (VE) and traditional website on diet and physical activity. Our secondary aims will determine the effects on: metabolic outcomes; effects of level of engagement and social network formation in LIVE on behavioral outcomes; potential mediating effects of changes in self-efficacy; diabetes knowledge, diabetes-related distress, and social support on behavior change and metabolic outcomes. We will enroll 300 subjects at two sites (Duke/Raleigh-Durham and NYU/New York) who have T2D and do not have serious complications or comorbidities. Those randomly assigned to the intervention group have access to the LIVE site where they can find information, synchronous classes with diabetes educators, and peer support to enhance self-management. Those in the control group have access to the same informational and educational content in a traditional asynchronous web format. Measures of self-management, clinical outcomes, and psychosocial outcomes are assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Discussion Should LIVE prove effective in improved self-management of diabetes, similar interventions could be applied to other prevalent chronic diseases. Innovative programs such as LIVE have potential for improving healthcare access in an easily disseminated alternative model of care that potentially

  16. Development and testing of the Diabetes Self-management Instrument: a confirmatory analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Anderson, Robert M; Chang, Chao-Sung; Hagerty, Bonnie M; Loveland-Cherry, Carol J

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and psychometrically test a new instrument for measuring self-management of adults with type 2 diabetes. Data were collected from 634 diabetic adults recruited from three teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Construct validity was determined by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Tests of internal consistency and test-retest were used to assess the reliability of the diabetes self-management instrument (DSMI). Initial results of CFA did not fully support the proposed five-factor model. After the model was modified, the fit indices indicated that this model fits the data best. This model was further cross validated in a second sample. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the DSMI total scale was .94. The test-retest correlations for the DSMI total scale were acceptable (r = .73, p < .01).

  17. Video Games for Diabetes Self-Management: Examples and Design Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Debra A.

    2012-01-01

    The July 2012 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology includes a special symposium called “Serious Games for Diabetes, Obesity, and Healthy Lifestyle.” As part of the symposium, this article focuses on health behavior change video games that are designed to improve and support players’ diabetes self-management. Other symposium articles include one that recommends theory-based approaches to the design of health games and identifies areas in which additional research is needed, followed by five research articles presenting studies of the design and effectiveness of games and game technologies that require physical activity in order to play. This article briefly describes 14 diabetes self-management video games, and, when available, cites research findings on their effectiveness. The games were found by searching the Health Games Research online searchable database, three bibliographic databases (ACM Digital Library, PubMed, and Social Sciences Databases of CSA Illumina), and the Google search engine, using the search terms “diabetes” and “game.” Games were selected if they addressed diabetes self-management skills. PMID:22920805

  18. Peer support for self-management of diabetes improved outcomes in international settings.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Edwin B; Boothroyd, Renée I; Coufal, Muchieh Maggy; Baumann, Linda C; Mbanya, Jean Claude; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Sanguanprasit, Boosaba; Tanasugarn, Chanuantong

    2012-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is essential to reducing the risks of associated disabilities. But effective self-management is often short-lived. Peers can provide the kind of ongoing support that is needed for sustained self-management of diabetes. In this context, peers are nonprofessionals who have diabetes or close familiarity with its management. Key functions of effective peer support include assistance in daily management, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and ongoing availability of support. Using these four functions as a template of peer support, project teams in Cameroon, South Africa, Thailand, and Uganda developed and then evaluated peer support interventions for adults with diabetes. Our initial assessment found improvements in symptom management, diet, blood pressure, body mass index, and blood sugar levels for many of those taking part in the programs. For policy makers, the broader message is that by emphasizing the four key peer support functions, diabetes management programs can be successfully introduced across varied cultural settings and within diverse health systems.

  19. Towards a Conceptual Model of Diabetes Self-Management among Chinese Immigrants in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bin; Sun, Wenjie; Gary, Rebecca A.; Li, Changwei; Liu, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chinese immigrants have been disproportionally affected by type 2 diabetes. This paper presents the state of science regarding the factors that may influence diabetes self-management among Chinese immigrants in the US and the potential health outcomes. Design: Using Walker and Avant’s techniques, a search of the literature was conducted from CINAHL, PubMed, OVID, and Web of Science. Findings: Factors most relevant to diabetes self-management were grouped under five categories: socio-demographic characteristics, behavioral and psychological characteristics, social support, linguistic barriers, and cultural characteristics. Potential outcomes derived from improved diabetes self-management include quality of life, glycosylated hemoglobin, and blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors. Discussion: A conceptual model was provided to guide future research. Based on the review of the literature, specific research topics that need to fill the gaps in the literature were provided, including family-focused interventions for Chinese immigrant patients with diabetes and the effectiveness of these interventions to improve family functioning. PMID:24978878

  20. Instrument for assessing mobile technology acceptability in diabetes self-management: a validation and reliability study

    PubMed Central

    Frandes, Mirela; Deiac, Anca V; Timar, Bogdan; Lungeanu, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Background Nowadays, mobile technologies are part of everyday life, but the lack of instruments to assess their acceptability for the management of chronic diseases makes their actual adoption for this purpose slow. Objective The objective of this study was to develop a survey instrument for assessing patients’ attitude toward and intention to use mobile technology for diabetes mellitus (DM) self-management, as well as to identify sociodemographic characteristics and quality of life factors that affect them. Methods We first conducted the documentation and instrument design phases, which were subsequently followed by the pilot study and instrument validation. Afterward, the instrument was administered 103 patients (median age: 37 years; range: 18–65 years) diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 DM, who accepted to participate in the study. The reliability and construct validity were assessed by computing Cronbach’s alpha and using factor analysis, respectively. Results The instrument included statements about the actual use of electronic devices for DM management, interaction between patient and physician, attitude toward using mobile technology, and quality of life evaluation. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.9 for attitude toward using mobile technology and 0.97 for attitude toward using mobile device applications for DM self-management. Younger patients (Spearman’s ρ=−0.429; P<0.001) with better glycemic control (Spearman’s ρ=−0.322; P<0.001) and higher education level (Kendall’s τ=0.51; P<0.001) had significantly more favorable attitude toward using mobile assistive applications for DM control. Moreover, patients with a higher quality of life presented a significantly more positive attitude toward using modern technology (Spearman’s ρ=0.466; P<0.001). Conclusion The instrument showed good reliability and internal consistency, making it suitable for measuring the acceptability of mobile technology for DM self-management. Additionally, we found that even

  1. Mobile Applications for Control and Self Management of Diabetes: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Brzan, Petra Povalej; Rotman, Eva; Pajnkihar, Majda; Klanjsek, Petra

    2016-09-01

    Mobile applications (apps) can be very useful software on smartphones for all aspects of people's lives. Chronic diseases, such as diabetes, can be made manageable with the support of mobile apps. Applications on smartphones can also help people with diabetes to control their fitness and health. A systematic review of free apps in the English language for smartphones in three of the most popular mobile app stores: Google Play (Android), App Store (iOS) and Windows Phone Store, was performed from November to December 2015. The review of freely available mobile apps for self-management of diabetes was conducted based on the criteria for promoting diabetes self-management as defined by Goyal and Cafazzo (monitoring blood glucose level and medication, nutrition, physical exercise and body weight). The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) was followed. Three independent experts in the field of healthcare-related mobile apps were included in the assessment for eligibility and testing phase. We tested and evaluated 65 apps (21 from Google Play Store, 31 from App Store and 13 from Windows Phone Store). Fifty-six of these apps did not meet even minimal requirements or did not work properly. While a wide selection of mobile applications is available for self-management of diabetes, current results show that there are only nine (5 from Google Play Store, 3 from App Store and 1 from Windows Phone Store) out of 65 reviewed mobile apps that can be versatile and useful for successful self-management of diabetes based on selection criteria. The levels of inclusion of features based on selection criteria in selected mobile apps can be very different. The results of the study can be used as a basis to prvide app developers with certain recommendations. There is a need for mobile apps for self-management of diabetes with more features in order to increase the number of long-term users and thus influence better self-management of the disease.

  2. Challenges to developing diabetes self-management skills in a low-income sample in North Carolina, USA.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Heather Ann

    2017-01-01

    High rates of diabetes diagnosis and poor diabetes outcomes are particularly significant in low-income, socially disadvantaged populations. Although many social and economic predictors of poor self-management outcomes are known, few studies have examined how these elements impact the ability to develop self-management capacities in low-income populations. This article presents new insights into low-income women's challenges and successes to becoming more adept self-managers. Interview data were collected in 2012 with a sample of low-income, middle-age women with type II diabetes recruited from a non-profit medical clinic serving low-income clients in North Carolina, United States. Data were analysed using a grounded theory approach. Developing self-management skills within disadvantaged life contexts involved negotiating three related, overlapping sub-processes: negotiating access to care systems, negotiating disruptions to diabetes self-management patterns, and negotiating self-care knowledge. Developing diabetes self-management skills is a long and arduous process. Data and analysis presented here help explain how disadvantaged life contexts can impact self-managers' efforts to develop self-management skills and why continued support is important for reducing and preventing future problems. These initial findings suggest that future studies and intervention development on the topic are warranted.

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Based, Self-Management Tool for People Recently Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Alison O.; Lowis, Carole; Hunter, Steven J.; Dean, Moira; Cardwell, Chris R.; McKinley, Michelle C.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a computer-based, dietary, and physical activity self-management program for people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Methods. The computer-based program was developed in conjunction with the target group and evaluated in a 12-week randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were randomised to the intervention (computer-program) or control group (usual care). Primary outcomes were diabetes knowledge and goal setting (ADKnowl questionnaire, Diabetes Obstacles Questionnaire (DOQ)) measured at baseline and week 12. User feedback on the program was obtained via a questionnaire and focus groups. Results. Seventy participants completed the 12-week RCT (32 intervention, 38 control, mean age 59 (SD) years). After completion there was a significant between-group difference in the “knowledge and beliefs scale” of the DOQ. Two-thirds of the intervention group rated the program as either good or very good, 92% would recommend the program to others, and 96% agreed that the information within the program was clear and easy to understand. Conclusions. The computer-program resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in diet-related knowledge and user satisfaction was high. With some further development, this computer-based educational tool may be a useful adjunct to diabetes self-management. This trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov NCT number NCT00877851. PMID:27446961

  4. Self-Management Patient Education and Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stombaugh, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-management of a disease is defined as "having or being able to obtain, the skills and resources necessary to best accommodate to the chronic disease and its consequences" (Holman & Lorig, 1992, p. 309). Self-management has been used in the management of several chronic conditions and this model may be useful in the management of weight loss.…

  5. Insulin algorithms in the self-management of insulin-dependent diabetes: the interactive 'Apple Juice' program.

    PubMed

    Williams, A G

    1996-01-01

    The 'Apple Juice' program is an interactive diabetes self-management program which runs on a lap-top Macintosh Powerbook 100 computer. The dose-by-dose insulin advisory program was initially designed for children with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus. It utilizes several different insulin algorithms, measurement formulae, and compensation factors for meals, activity, medication and the dawn phenomenon. It was developed to assist the individual with diabetes and/or care providers, in determining specific insulin dosage recommendations throughout a 24 h period. Information technology functions include, but are not limited to automated record keeping, data recall, event reminders, data trend/pattern analyses and education. This paper highlights issues, observations and recommendations surrounding the use of the current version of the software, along with a detailed description of the insulin algorithms and measurement formulae applied successfully with the author's daughter over a six year period.

  6. Self-management of type 2 diabetes: perspectives of Vietnamese Americans.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anna Thao

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore diabetes self-management strategies and underpinnings of behaviors among Vietnamese with type 2 diabetes. Using Leventhal's illness representation model, semistructured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 23 participants, 14 women and 9 men. NVivo 8 software was used for content analysis. Data revealed that participants constructed implicit theories of the identity, causes, consequences, timeline, and controllability of diabetes, which were inconsistent with the biomedical literature. Participants labeled diabetes by their symptoms of hypo-/hyperglycemia, and they focused on the relief of these symptoms. However, the participants' focus on symptomatology undermined their use of blood glucose monitoring to manage diabetes as a majority of the participants had diabetes-related complications. Participants integrated the continuum of Eastern and Western treatment belief systems to achieve a balance to create harmony between the two systems.

  7. 77 FR 11130 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued Recognition as a National Accreditation Organization for Accrediting Entities To Furnish Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training AGENCY: Centers for... the receipt of an application from the American Association of Diabetes Educators for...

  8. Implementation of a Self-Management System for Students with Disabilities in General Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that self-management procedures have a robust literature base attesting to their efficacy with students with disabilities, the use of these strategies in general education settings remains limited. This mixed methods study examined the implementation of self-management procedures using both quantitative and qualitative methods.…

  9. Randomised controlled trial of an automated, interactive telephone intervention to improve type 2 diabetes self-management (Telephone-Linked Care Diabetes Project): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An estimated 285 million people worldwide have diabetes and its prevalence is predicted to increase to 439 million by 2030. For the year 2010, it is estimated that 3.96 million excess deaths in the age group 20-79 years are attributable to diabetes around the world. Self-management is recognised as an integral part of diabetes care. This paper describes the protocol of a randomised controlled trial of an automated interactive telephone system aiming to improve the uptake and maintenance of essential diabetes self-management behaviours. Methods/Design A total of 340 individuals with type 2 diabetes will be randomised, either to the routine care arm, or to the intervention arm in which participants receive the Telephone-Linked Care (TLC) Diabetes program in addition to their routine care. The intervention requires the participants to telephone the TLC Diabetes phone system weekly for 6 months. They receive the study handbook and a glucose meter linked to a data uploading device. The TLC system consists of a computer with software designed to provide monitoring, tailored feedback and education on key aspects of diabetes self-management, based on answers voiced or entered during the current or previous conversations. Data collection is conducted at baseline (Time 1), 6-month follow-up (Time 2), and 12-month follow-up (Time 3). The primary outcomes are glycaemic control (HbA1c) and quality of life (Short Form-36 Health Survey version 2). Secondary outcomes include anthropometric measures, blood pressure, blood lipid profile, psychosocial measures as well as measures of diet, physical activity, blood glucose monitoring, foot care and medication taking. Information on utilisation of healthcare services including hospital admissions, medication use and costs is collected. An economic evaluation is also planned. Discussion Outcomes will provide evidence concerning the efficacy of a telephone-linked care intervention for self-management of diabetes. Furthermore

  10. Twelve-Month Outcomes of an Internet-Based Diabetes Self-Management Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Russell E.; Kurz, Deanna; King, Diane; Dickman, Jennifer M.; Faber, Andrew J.; Halterman, Eve; Woolley, Tim; Toobert, Deborah J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Osuna, Diego; Ritzwoller, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Objective Internet-based programs offer potential for practical, cost-effective chronic illness self-management programs. Methods We report 12-month results of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, with and without additional support, compared to enhanced usual care in a 3-arm practical randomized trial. Patients (n= 463) were randomized: 77.3% completed 12-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were changes in health behaviors of healthy eating, physical activity, and medication taking. Secondary outcomes were hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, lipids, blood pressure, and psychosocial factors. Results Internet conditions improved health behaviors significantly vs. usual care over the 12-month period (d for effect size = .09 – .16). All conditions improved moderately on biological and psychosocial outcomes. Latinos, lower literacy, and higher cardiovascular disease risk patients improved as much as other participants. Conclusions The Internet intervention meets the reach and feasibility criteria for a potentially broad public health impact. However, 12-month magnitude of effects was small, suggesting that different or more intensive approaches are necessary to support long-term outcomes. Research is needed to understand the linkages between intervention and maintenance processes and downstream outcomes. Practice Implications Automated self-management interventions should be tailored and integrated into primary care; maintenance of patient self-management can be enhanced through links to community resources. PMID:21924576

  11. A patient-centric, provider-assisted diabetes telehealth self-management intervention for urban minorities.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ernest L; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Callender, Clive

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of an online diabetes self-management intervention for a sample of inner-city African Americans with diabetes. Study participants were randomly assigned to the treatment (26) and control (21) conditions. The results indicate that treatment group participants were more likely to achieve positive outcomes in terms of lowered hemoglobin A1c and body mass index measurements than were control group members. These findings support the development of telehealth interventions to promote effective chronic disease management in medically underserved communities.

  12. Food insecurity is associated with hypoglycemia and poor diabetes self-management in a low-income sample with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Hilary K; Davis, Terry C; Schillinger, Dean; Wolf, Michael S

    2010-11-01

    More than 14% of the American population is food insecure, or at risk of going hungry because of an inability to afford food. Food-insecure (FI) adults often reduce food intake or substitute inexpensive, energy-dense carbohydrates for healthier foods. We hypothesized these behaviors would predispose FI adults with diabetes to hypoglycemia and impaired diabetes self-management. We therefore assessed whether food insecurity was associated with multiple indicators of diabetes self-management (self-efficacy, medication- and glucose-monitoring adherence, hypoglycemia, or glycemic control) among 40 low-income adults with diabetes. Mean self-efficacy score was lower among FI than food-secure (FS) participants (34.4 vs. 41.2, p=.02). Food-insecure participants reported poorer adherence to blood glucose monitoring (RR=3.5, p=.008) and more hypoglycemia-related emergency department visits (RR=2.2, p=.007). Mean hemoglobin A1c was 9.2% among FI and 7.7% among FS participants (p=.08). Food insecurity is a barrier to diabetes self-management and a risk factor for clinically significant hypoglycemia.

  13. Self-Management Training With Families of Insulin-Dependent Diabetic Children: A Controlled Long-Term Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Alan M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic children and their parents were trained in behavioral self management and conducted behavior change projects designed to enhance compliance with the medical regimen and reduce diabetes-related conflicts. Participating families experienced fewer arguments concerning diabetes, and the children displayed an increase in…

  14. A pilot test of the Self-Management and Research Technology project: A text message-based diabetes self-management program for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Collier, Suzanne; Stern, Alexa; Monaghan, Maureen; Streisand, Randi

    2015-09-22

    The aims of this study are to: (1) examine the preliminary utility of the Self-Management and Research Technology (SMART) pilot project, (2) identify which adolescents were most likely to benefit from participation, and (3) examine interview feedback to inform future program iterations. Twenty-three adolescents (M age = 15.13 years) were enrolled in the six-week text message pilot program consisting of daily interactive blood glucose (BG) prompts and type 1 diabetes-related educational text messages. Medical charts were reviewed for hemoglobin A1c and to corroborate medical record and demographic data. Glucometer data were downloaded to calculate an average monthly BG level and daily BG monitoring frequency. No statistically significant improvements were observed pre-intervention to post-intervention in glycemic outcomes. Participants with a high text message response rate were more likely to demonstrate improvement in average monthly BG levels and daily BG monitoring frequency than those with a low text message response rate. Participants reported satisfaction with the text message program. The text message-based SMART pilot project demonstrated preliminary efficacy for a targeted subset of adolescents who were engaged with the program. Continued research with a larger sample and longer trial duration is warranted to evaluate the potential utility of text message-based interventions.

  15. Improving Diabetes Self-Management through Acceptance, Mindfulness, and Values: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Jennifer A.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Hayes, Steven C.; Glenn-Lawson, June L.

    2007-01-01

    Patients in a low-income community health center with Type 2 diabetes (N = 81) taking a one-day education workshop as part of their diabetes medical management were randomly assigned either to education alone or to a combination of education and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT). Both groups were taught how to manage their diabetes, but…

  16. Integrating diabetes self-management interventions for mexican-americans into the catholic church setting.

    PubMed

    Baig, Arshiya A; Locklin, Cara A; Wilkes, Abigail E; Oborski, Donna Dempsey; Acevedo, John C; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Quinn, Michael T; Burnet, Deborah L; Chin, Marshall H

    2014-02-01

    Churches provide an innovative and underutilized setting for diabetes self-management programs for Latinos. This study sought to formulate a conceptual framework for designing church-based programs that are tailored to the needs of the Latino community and that utilize church strengths and resources. To inform this model, we conducted six focus groups with mostly Mexican-American Catholic adults with diabetes and their family members (N = 37) and found that participants were interested in church-based diabetes programs that emphasized information sharing, skills building, and social networking. Our model demonstrates that many of these requested components can be integrated into the current structure and function of the church. However, additional mechanisms to facilitate access to medical care may be necessary to support community members' diabetes care.

  17. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking.

  18. Mobile Phone and Smartphone Technologies for Diabetes Care and Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Laura F; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Wharam, J Frank

    2015-12-01

    Mobile and smartphone (mHealth) technologies have the potential to improve diabetes care and self-management, but little is known about their effectiveness and how patients, providers, and payers currently interact with them. We conducted a systematic review and found only 20 peer-reviewed articles, published since 2010, with robust evidence about the effectiveness of mHealth interventions for diabetes. The majority of these interventions showed improvement on primary endpoints, such as HbA1c; mHealth technologies that interacted with both patients and providers were more likely to be effective. There was little evidence about persistent use by patients, use by a patient's health care provider, or long-term effectiveness. None of the studies discussed regulatory oversight of mHealth technologies or payer reimbursement for them. No robust studies evaluated the more than 1100 publicly available smartphone apps for diabetes. More research with valid study designs and longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the impact of mHealth technologies for diabetes care and self-management.

  19. Moving the journey towards independence: Adolescents transitioning to successful diabetes self-management

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, C. June

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To gain a greater understanding of adolescent’s experiences living with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and create a theoretical paradigm. Methods Grounded theory as described by Glaser was used. Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted with adolescent’s ages 11 to 15 with T1DM. Symbolic interactionism is the theoretical framework for grounded theory. Data were collected; transcribed, coded, and analyzed simultaneously using constant comparative analysis and findings were grounded in the words of participants. Results A theoretical model was created with the concept of “normalizing”. Normalizing was defined as the ability to integrate diabetes into one’s daily life to make diabetes ‘part of me’. Phase four of the model, and the focus of this manuscript was “Moving the Journey towards Independence” and included: 1) taking over care, 2) experiencing conflict with parents, and 3) realizing diabetes is hard. The major task for adolescents in this phase was separating from parents to independently manage diabetes. The normalizing task for this phase was: “taking on the burden of care”. Adolescents described challenges with independent care and increased parental conflict including: fearing needles, forgetting insulin, feeling embarrassed and believing that diabetes was a burden in their life. Additionally, juggling the multiple responsibilities of home, school and work along with managing a chronic illness during adolescence is challenging. Conclusions Transitioning to diabetes self-management is a challenge for adolescents. This model advances understanding of the moving processes in adolescents transitioning; additionally, hypotheses are presented that may be used for developing interventions to promote success in self-management. PMID:26190456

  20. Parent and Teacher Perceptions of the Impact of School Nurse Interventions on Children's Self-Management of Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Annette I.; Engelke, Martha Keehner; Swanson, Melvin S.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is a common chronic illness among school-age children. The school nurse collaborates with the student, parents, and teachers to help the child manage their diabetes effectively. Very little is known about the relationship between school nurse interventions and parent/teacher perceptions of the child's self-management. We examined this…

  1. Using Patient-Generated Health Data From Mobile Technologies for Diabetes Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Nundy, Shantanu; Lu, Chen-Yuan E.; Hogan, Patrick; Mishra, Anjuli

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mobile health and patient-generated health data are promising health IT tools for delivering self-management support in diabetes, but little is known about provider perspectives on how best to integrate these programs into routine care. We explored provider perceptions of a patient-generated health data report from a text-message-based diabetes self-management program. The report was designed to relay clinically relevant data obtained from participants’ responses to self-assessment questions delivered over text message. Methods: Likert-type scale response surveys and in-depth interviews were conducted with primary care physicians and endocrinologists who pilot tested the patient-generated health data report in an actual clinical encounter. Interview guides were designed to assess providers’ perceptions of the feasibility and utility of patient-generated health data in routine clinical practice. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Results: Twelve providers successfully piloted the summary report in clinic. Although only a minority of providers felt the report changed the care they provided (3 of 12 or 25%), most were willing to use the summary report in a future clinical encounter (9 of 12 or 75%). Perceived benefits of patient-generated health data included agenda setting, assessment of self-care, and identification of patient barriers. Major themes discussed included patient selection, reliability of patient-generated health information, and integration into clinical workflow. Conclusion: Providers perceived multiple benefits of patient-generated health data in overcoming common barriers to self-management support in clinical practice and found the summary report feasible and usable in a clinical context. PMID:24876541

  2. The business case for a diabetes self-management intervention in a community general hospital.

    PubMed

    Micklethwaite, Ashley; Brownson, Carol A; O'Toole, Mary L; Kilpatrick, Kerry E

    2012-08-01

    There is a growing and increasingly compelling body of evidence that self-management interventions for persons with type 2 diabetes can be both effective and cost-effective from a societal perspective. Yet, the evidence is elusive that these interventions can produce a positive business case for a sponsoring provider organization in the short term. The lack of a business case limits the enthusiasm for provider organizations to implement these proven quality-enhancing interventions more widely. This article provides a case example of a self-management intervention in a community general hospital targeting an underserved population who have significant barriers to receiving regular health care. The 3-component program sought to improve meaningful access to care, increase health literacy related to type 2 diabetes, and partner with the enrollees to make long-term lifestyle changes. The intervention not only resulted in significant improvements in HbA1c levels (-0.77%) but saved the hospital an average of $551 per active patient per year, primarily by reducing hospital visits. With only 255 actively enrolled patients, the hospital can recover fully its total direct annual personnel and operating costs for the program. Because the program serves patients who would have been seen at other hospitals, it also enhanced care quality and reduced costs for the broader community in which the program is embedded.

  3. Testing a self-determination theory process model for promoting glycemic control through diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey C; McGregor, Holly A; Zeldman, Allan; Freedman, Zachary R; Deci, Edward L

    2004-01-01

    A longitudinal study tested the self-determination theory (SDT) process model of health behavior change for glycemic control within a randomized trial of patient activation versus passive education. Glycosylated hemoglobin for patients with Type 2 diabetes (n=159) was assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Autonomous motivation and perceived competence were assessed at baseline and 6 months, and the autonomy supportiveness of clinical practitioners was assessed at 3 months. Perceptions of autonomy and competence were promoted by perceived autonomy support, and changes in perceptions of autonomy and competence, in turn, predicted change in glycemic control. Self-management behaviors mediated the relation between change in perceived competence and change in glycemic control. The self-determination process model fit the data well.

  4. [Diabetes education in adult diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Clodi, Martin; Cvach, Sarah; Grafinger, Peter; Lechleitner, Monika; Howorka, Kinga; Ludvik, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes education and self management has gained a critical role in diabetes care. Patient empowerment aims to actively influence the course of the disease by self-monitoring and treatment modification, as well as integration of diabetes in patients' daily life to achieve changes in lifestyle accordingly.Diabetes education has to be made accessible for all patients with the disease. To be able to provide a structured and validated education program adequate personal as well as space, organizational and financial background are required. Besides an increase in knowledge about the disease it has been shown that structured diabetes education is able to improve diabetes outcome measured by parameters like blood glucose, HbA1c, blood pressure and body weight in follow-up evaluations. Modern education programs emphasize the ability of patients to integrate diabetes in everyday life and stress physical activity besides healthy eating as a main component of lifestyle therapy and use interactive methods in order to increase the acceptance of personal responsibility.

  5. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monninkhof, E; van der Valk, P; van der Palen, J; van Herwaarden, C; Partridge, M; Zielhuis, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the value of self-management education is not clear. This review was undertaken to clarify the effectiveness of self-management programmes in COPD. Methods: A search was made of the Cochrane Airways Group trial registers, Medline, reference lists, and abstracts of medical conferences for controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD. Two reviewers independently assessed each paper for methodological quality and extracted the data. Results: The reviewers included 12 articles describing eight randomised controlled trials and one controlled clinical trial in which self-management education was compared with usual care. The studies assessed a broad spectrum of outcome measures with different follow up times so meta-analysis could not be undertaken. Self-management education had no effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits, days lost from work, and lung function. Inconclusive results were observed on health related quality of life, COPD symptoms, and use of healthcare facilities such as doctor and nurse visits. Self-management education reduced the need for rescue medication and led to increased use of courses of oral steroids and antibiotics for respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Insufficient data were obtained to make recommendations because of the wide variation in outcome measures used and other limitations to generalisations in the current published literature. Further research in this area is needed. PMID:12728158

  6. Assessment of problem-solving: a key to successful diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Russell E; Toobert, Deborah J; Barrera, Manuel; Strycker, Lisa A

    2004-10-01

    Problem-solving skill is important for chronic illness self-management. This project prospectively evaluated a measure of diabetes problem-solving skill for its reliability, convergent validity, sensitivity to intervention, and relationship to change in behavior. Postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes (N = 279) participated in a RCT to evaluate a lifestyle modification program. The 9-item Diabetes Problem-Solving Inventory (DPSI) was used to assess how patients cope with challenges to diabetes self-care. The DPSI was found to have good inter-rater reliability and internal consistency for a brief scale, be moderately stable over time, and relate significantly to hypothesized variables. DPSI scores improved significantly more in the lifestyle change condition than in controls and were related to improved outcomes. Mediation analyses indicated that the increase in problem-solving was a partial mediator of outcomes. Results support the reliability, predictive ability, and sensitivity to change of the DPSI. Directions for future research on problem-solving and chronic illness are discussed.

  7. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn from a population-based sample aged 65 years or older with diabetes. The sample was stratified by sex and ethnic group (African American, American Indian, and White) from the low (A1C <6%) and high (A1C >8%) extremes of the glycemic control distribution. Case-based text analysis was guided by a model, including six self-management domains and four resource types (self-care, informal support, formal services, and medical care). Results: A “structured” approach to self-management differentiated respondents in good glycemic control from those in poor glycemic control. Those in good glycemic control were more likely to practice specific food behaviors to limit food consumption and practice regular blood glucose monitoring with specific target values. This approach was facilitated by a greater use of home aides to assist with diabetes care. Respondents in poor glycemic control demonstrated less structure, naming general food categories and checking blood glucose in reaction to symptoms. Implications: Results provide evidence that degree of structure differentiates self-management approaches of persons with good and poor glycemic control. Findings should provide a foundation for further research to develop effective self-management programs for older adults with diabetes. PMID:20110333

  8. Improvement of Rural Children's Asthma Self-Management by Lay Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Sharon D.; Fouladi, Rachel T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present analysis is to examine changes in rural children's asthma self-management after they received lay health educator (LHE)-delivered classes. Methods: Elementary schools were randomly assigned to the treatment or attention-control condition and their participating students received either asthma education or…

  9. Four Types of School Environment: Multilevel Self-Management and Educational Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Yin Cheong; Cheung, Wing Ming

    2004-01-01

    How school-based management in the form of multilevel self-management is related to educational quality is a crucial issue in current educational reforms. An empirical study was conducted to explore this issue in a sample of 68 primary schools in Hong Kong. It was found that the school environment of sampled schools could be classified into 4…

  10. A Comparison of an Individually Tailored and a Standardized Asthma Self-Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Judy; Bachman, Jean H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States and can be life-threatening. There are a rising number of adults with asthma that cannot be prevented or cured but may be controlled. Self-management education is essential for long-term asthma control; however, the most effective type of education is unknown.…

  11. Self-management education programs for people living with HIV/AIDS: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Millard, Tanya; Elliott, Julian; Girdler, Sonya

    2013-02-01

    The effectiveness of self-management programs to improve physical, psychosocial, health knowledge, and behavioral outcomes for adults living with HIV has not been well established. This article reviews the effectiveness of self-management education programs to improve physical, psychosocial, health knowledge, and behavior outcomes for adults living with HIV/AIDS. A systematic review of English articles using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsycINFO were used to identify and retrieve relevant studies. Each database was searched from its earliest record to October 2010. Search terms included HIV/AIDS, self-management, self-care, patient education, and education programs. Only studies that (1) reported on a HIV-specific intervention that aimed to increase participants HIV-related knowledge through a self-management component, (2) included a control group, (3) provided skills training or targeted behavior change, and (4) reported clinical outcomes were included. Independent data extraction by one author using the methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews. A second reviewer checked the data extraction. Six protocols were reported in eight publications (n=1178), all contained elements of self-management interventions. Effect size calculations were not conducted due to limitations in the available data. The review found randomized controlled trials (RCT) evidence sufficient to infer that self-management programs for people living with HIV/AIDS result in short-term improvements in physical, psychosocial, and health knowledge and behavioral outcomes. Statistically significant improvements were reported for intervention participants compared to control participants across most outcomes. There is insufficient evidence to provide conclusions regarding the long-term outcomes of HIV-specific self-management interventions.

  12. Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review.

    PubMed

    Park, Chorong; Nam, Soohyun; Whittemore, Robin

    2016-04-01

    It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)' unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs' perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs' perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and traditional health beliefs while struggling with multi-contextual barriers due to immigration. The evaluation of EAI diabetes self-management interventions revealed that there was a lack of consensus on cultural strategies for EAIs' across the interventions. Addressing language barriers was the only factor consistently integrated in the cultural components of intervention by employing bilingual interventionists. EAIs' perspectives and experiences need to be incorporated in the future diabetes self-management interventions to better provide culturally-competent care.

  13. Social organization of self-management support of persons with diabetes: A health systems comparison

    PubMed Central

    Schiøtz, Michaela; Frølich, Anne; Krasnik, Allan; Taylor, Warren; Hsu, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective Identify important organizational elements for providing self-management support (SMS). Design Semi-structured qualitative interviews conducted in two healthcare systems. Setting Kaiser Permanente Northern California and the Danish Health Care System. Subjects 36 managers and healthcare professionals in the two healthcare systems. Main outcome measures Elements important to providing self-management support to persons with diabetes. Results Healthcare professionals’ provision of SMS was influenced by healthcare system organization and their perceptions of SMS, the capability and responsibility of healthcare systems, and their roles in the healthcare organization. Enabling factors for providing SMS included: strong leadership; aligned incentives; use of an integrated health information technology (HIT) system; multidisciplinary healthcare provider teams; ongoing training for healthcare professionals; outreach; and quality goals. Barriers to providing SMS included lack of collaboration between providers and skeptical attitudes towards prevention and outreach. Conclusions and implications Implementation of SMS can be improved by an understanding of the elements that enhance its provision: (1) initiatives seeking to improve collaboration and integration between providers; (2) implementation of an integrated HIT system; and (3) ongoing training of healthcare professionals. PMID:22839353

  14. A Survey of Self-Management and Intrusiveness of Illness in Native Americans with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Chou, Ann F; Page, Evaren E; Norris, Ann I; Kim, Sue E; Thompson, David M; Roswell, Robert H

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has emerged as an important focus of national public health efforts because of the rapid increase in the burden of this disease. In particular, DM disproportionately affects Native Americans. Adequate management of DM requires that patients participate as active partners in their own care and much of patient activation and empowerment can be attributed to their experience with DM and self-care. That is, the degree to which the patient feels the disease intrudes on his or her daily life would impact the motivation for self-care. We conducted a study in collaboration with 2 tribal nations in Oklahoma, collecting data on survey questions regarding intrusiveness of illness and self-management behaviors from a sample of 159 members of the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations. Previously validated variables measuring intrusiveness of illness and self-care were included in the survey. Descriptive statistics and bivariate analyses illustrated the distribution of these variables and identified possible tribal and gender differences. Our findings showed that our sample adjusted well to DM and in general exhibited high compliance to self-care. However, our findings also revealed striking gender differences where female respondents were better adjusted to their disease, whereas male respondents reported higher adherence to self-management. Findings from our study, particularly those that describe tribal differences and gender disparities, can inform strategies for case management and patient interactions with providers and the health care system.

  15. Comorbidity "depression" in heart failure - Potential target of patient education and self-management.

    PubMed

    De Vecchis, Renato; Manginas, Athanassios; Noutsias, Ewa; Tschöpe, Carsten; Noutsias, Michel

    2017-02-15

    The progress of the pharmacological and device treatment of heart failure (HF) has led to a substantial improvement of mortality and rehospitalization. Further potential for improvement may be heralded in the post-discharge management of HF patients, including patient education for self-management of HF. The study by Musekamp et al. is among the first publications providing evidence that improvements in self-management skills may improve outcomes of HF patients. It is concluded that multimodal approaches addressing comorbidities in HF patients with novel concepts, and by optimal and specific HF management, including patient education, may ultimately contribute to substantial improvement of HF prognosis.

  16. Self-management practices among type 2 diabetes patients attending primary health-care centres in Medina, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al Johani, K A; Kendall, G E; Snider, P D

    2015-10-02

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of self-management activities among people who have type 2 diabetes in Saudi Arabia. The Arabic version of the Summary of Diabetes Self-care Activities questionnaire was used to identify self-management practices among 210 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Only 15% of participants had a blood glucose level indicative of good glycaemic control (glycosylated haemoglobin ≤ 7 mmol/L). Most reported that they took their medication as prescribed, but many demonstrated low levels of compliance with other self-management practices (overall mean 3.7 days per week). Males and those with lower incomes were less likely to practise self-care activities. Most were given basic advice to undertake self-care activities, but only some were given more detailed information. There are opportunities to improve type 2 diabetes mellitus self-management practices in Saudi Arabia and increase the proportion of patients who achieve good glycaemic control.

  17. Using Self-Management Interventions to Address General Education Behavioral Needs: Assessment of Effectiveness and Feasibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briesch, Amy M.; Daniels, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive self-management intervention was utilized to increase the on-task behavior of three African American students within an urban middle-school setting. The intervention was designed to necessitate minimal management on the part of the general education classroom teacher by utilizing an electronic prompting device, as well as a…

  18. Patient education. Timeless principles of learning: a solid foundation for enhancing chronic disease self-management.

    PubMed

    Suter, Paula M; Suter, W Newton

    2008-02-01

    The use of evidence-based principles of learning can contribute to the empowerment of patients as they adopt self-management skills aligned with healthy behaviors. This article, jointly written by a nurse and an educator, describes these timeless principles and how home care clinicians and patients benefit from their use.

  19. Self-Management Skills: An Important Link to Successful Special Education Postsecondary Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Sharon D.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated the process of teaching the self-management strategies, self-determination, and self-monitoring to chronically misbehaved students from the perspective of a secondary special education teacher. The investigation used a purposeful sample to select an urban high school setting and a tenured special education…

  20. Self-Managed Learning Groups in Higher Education: Students' Perceptions of Process and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizzio, Alf; Wilson, Keithia

    2005-01-01

    Background: Self-managed learning groups are increasingly used in higher education. There is a need for more systematic investigation of university students' perceptions of the processes and outcomes of this learning method. Aims: This study aimed to identify the domains of process issues that students perceive as relevant to their participation…

  1. An empowering approach to promote the quality of life and self-management among type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tol, Azar; Alhani, Fatemeh; Shojaeazadeh, Davoud; Sharifirad, Gholamreza; Moazam, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the most serious health concerns and policy agendas around the world. Epidemiological evidence suggests that it will likely continue to increase globally. Diabetes is strongly associated with the patients’ unhealthy lifestyle and behavioral patterns and socio-economic changes. New model of thinking is required to recognize whether the patients are in control of and responsible for the daily self-management of diabetes. Such a new approach should be based on ‘empowerment and involvement’ to be more applicable to daily activities in diabetic patients. Rapid changes toward patient empowerment and increasing involvement of patients in their care plan indicate more emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion and education than on mere disease and its treatment. Such changes make a step toward pervasive sense of responsibility among patients about their illness for their daily activities. Using the empowerment approach, healthcare professionals would help patients make informed decisions in accordance with their particular circumstances. Patient empowerment implies a patient-centered, collaborative approach that helps patients determine and develop the inherent capacity to be responsible for their own life. Empowerment is something more than certain health behaviors. Empowerment is more than an intervention, technique or strategy. It is rather a vision that helps people change their behavior and make decisions about their health care. It has the potential to improve the overall health and well-being of individuals and communities, and to change the socio-environmental factors that cause poor health conditions. The main concept of this change is the tendency to change. PMID:25861658

  2. Evaluating the Effect of Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice on Self-Management in Type 2 Diabetic Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ghannadi, Shima; Amouzegar, Atieh; Amiri, Parisa; Karbalaeifar, Ronak; Tahmasebinejad, Zhale

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type 2 diabetes is an increasingly common condition with several preventable microvascular complications such as kidney damage. Nephropathy is expensive to manage, especially as hospital dialysis treatment. Improving patients' knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) toward their condition can achieve better control, delay complications, and improve their quality of life. This study evaluated the KAP and self-care behaviors of diabetic patients on dialysis and variables that affect it. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti academic hospitals of Tehran, Iran. Face-to-face interviews were held to fill five validated questionnaires: three evaluating KAP, one evaluating self-management, and one evaluating quality of life. Result. 117 diabetic patients on hemodialysis (42 females) with mean (SD) age of 68.70 ± 9.26 years were enrolled in the survey. The scores for patient's KAP, self-care, and quality of life were 59.90 ± 11.23, 44.27 ± 8.35, 45.06 ± 12.87, 46.21 ± 10.23, and 26.85 ± 13.23, respectively. There was significant negative correlation between patients' knowledge and attitude with their glycosylated hemoglobin level and their fasting blood sugar. There was significant correlation between patients' knowledge and practice with their self-care activities. Conclusion. The present study suggests that patients' KAP scores have a practical effect upon self-care behavior. This highlights the needs for effective diabetes education programs in developing countries like Iran. PMID:27478845

  3. Enterprising Career Education: The Power of Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bengtsson, Anki

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an account of how people's career management is given prominence in contemporary European policy documents pertaining to career education for entrepreneurship in higher education and in vocational education and training. This study concerns the ways in which policy discourses of career management and governmental practices…

  4. Mobile Phone-Based Self-Management Tools for Type 2 Diabetes: The Few Touch Application

    PubMed Central

    Årsand, Eirik; Tatara, Naoe; Østengen, Geir; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background Mobile phones and other mobile information and communication technology applications and technologies hold great potential as a basis for powerful patient-operated self-management tools within diabetes. The work presented shows how such tools can be designed for supporting lifestyle changes among people with type 2 diabetes and how these were perceived by a group of 12 patients during a 6-month period. Method The study used focus groups, interviews, feasibility testing, questionnaires, paper prototyping, and prototyping of both software and hardware components. The design process was iterative, addressing the various elements several times at an increasing level of detail. The final test of the application was done qualitatively in everyday settings in a cohort of 12 people with type 2 diabetes, aged 44–70 (four men and eight women). Results A mobile phone-based system called the Few Touch application was developed. The system includes an off-the-shelf blood glucose (BG) meter, a tailor-made step counter, and software for recording food habits and providing feedback on how users perform in relation to their own personal goals. User feedback from the 6-month user intervention demonstrated good usability of the tested system, and several of the participants adjusted their medication, food habits, and/or physical activity. Of the five different functionalities, the cohort considered the BG sensor system the best. Conclusions It was shown that it is possible and feasible to design an application where several sensors and feedback applications are integrated in an overall system. The presented Few Touch application challenges people with type 2 diabetes to think about how they can improve their health, providing them with a way to capture and analyze relevant personal information about their disease. The half-year user intervention demonstrated that the system had a motivational effect on the users. PMID:20307393

  5. Addressing the needs of Latinos with type 2 diabetes through online patient education.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Sharon A; Gutierrez Ocampo, Alejandro; Blanco, Kenia Yazmin Reyna; Lewis, Virginia; Cupertino, A Paula; Ellerbeck, Edward F

    2014-09-01

    Patients with Type 2 diabetes are increasingly turning to the Web for information about diabetes and self-management. These sites, however, fail to address the cultural and linguistic needs of the growing community of Latinos with diabetes. The Juntos Controlamos la Diabetes Web site was designed as a low-cost patient education tool to be used by patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers to provide ongoing information about diabetes self-management tailored to the needs of the regional Latino community.

  6. Willingness of patients with diabetes to use an ICT-based self-management tool: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Waki, Kayo; Tomizawa, Nobuko; Igarashi, Ayumi; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Satoko; Fujita, Hideo; Kimura, Shigeko; Fujiu, Katsuhito; Waki, Hironori; Izumida, Yoshihiko; Sasako, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Ryo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence of the willingness of patients with diabetes to use a self-management tool based on information and communication technology (ICT) such as personal computers, smartphones, and mobile phones; and to examine the patient characteristics associated with that willingness. Research design and methods We conducted a cross-sectional interview survey of 312 adults with diabetes at a university hospital in an urban area in Japan. Participants were classified into 2 groups: those who were willing to use an ICT-based self-management tool and those who were unwilling. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with the willingness, including clinical and social factors, current use of ICT, self-management practices, self-efficacy, and diabetes-related emotional distress. Results The mean age of the 312 participants was 66.3 years (SD=11.5) and 198 (63%) were male. Most of the participants (93%) had type 2 diabetes. Although only 51 (16%) currently used ICT-based self-management tools, a total of 157 (50%) expressed the willingness to use such a tool. Factors associated with the willingness included: not having nephropathy (OR=2.02, 95% CI 1.14 to 3.58); outpatient visits once a month or more (vs less than once a month, OR=2.13, 95% CI 1.13 to 3.99); current use of personal computers and/or smartphones (OR=4.91, 95% CI 2.69 to 8.98); and having greater diabetes-related emotional distress (OR=1.10, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.20). Conclusions Approximately half of the patients showed interest in using an ICT-based self-management tool. Willing patients may expect ICT-based self-management tools to complement outpatient visits and to make self-management easier. Starting with patients who display the willingness factors might optimize programs based on such tools. PMID:28243450

  7. Self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: can they successfully prevent and treat diabetes?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Neal D; Woodley, Paula D Patnoe

    2011-05-01

    Patients with diabetes need a complex set of services and supports. The challenge of integrating these services into the diabetes regimen can be successfully overcome through self-management support interventions that are clinically linked and technology enabled: self-management support because patients need help mastering the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and behaviors so necessary for good outcomes; interventions because comprehensive theory-based, evidence-proven, long-term, longitudinal interventions work better than direct-to-consumer or nonplanned health promotion approaches; clinically linked because patients are more likely to adopt new behaviors when the approach is in the context of a trusted therapeutic relationship and within an effective medical care system; and technology enabled because capitalizing on the amazing power of information technology leads to the delivery of cost-effective, scalable, engaging solutions that prevent and manage diabetes.

  8. An evaluation framework and a pilot study of a mobile platform for diabetes self-management: insights from pediatric users.

    PubMed

    Padman, Rema; Jaladi, Sravani; Kim, Sean; Kumar, Saumitra; Orbeta, Philip; Rudolph, Kate; Tran, Tony

    2013-01-01

    According to WHO, pediatric diabetes is a rising global public health problem, with increasing impact on developing nations. This study summarizes a multidimensional, scalable pilot evaluation of a diabetes self-management platform combining mobile technology with social networking to capture four key metrics of Type 1 diabetes self-management, associated social interactions, and gaming features providing targeted feedback to 8 pediatric users. Based on their 2-month interaction with the application, we analyze click-stream data from social interactions, key health metrics, text comments, and usability and satisfaction surveys to evaluate engagement with the platform and effectiveness in controlling blood glucose using a product-process-program framework. Our preliminary results indicate that this framework was successful in demonstrating the potential of the mobile health platform to effectively leverage the growing use of mobile applications and social media to present a unique benefit that engaged pediatric users and provided useful insights for self-health management.

  9. Web-based self-management with and without coaching for type 2 diabetes patients in primary care: design of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Self-management is recognized as the cornerstone of overall diabetes management. Web-based self-management programs have the potential of supporting type 2 diabetes patients with managing their diabetes and reducing the workload for the care provider, where the addition of online coaching could improve patient motivation and reduce program attrition. This study aims to test the hypothesis that a web-based self-management program with coaching will prove more effective on improving patient self-management behavior and clinical outcome measures than a web-based self-management program without coaching. Methods The effects of a web-based self-management program with and without coaching will be tested with a nested randomized controlled trial within a healthcare group in the Netherlands. In one year 220 type 2 diabetes patients will be randomized into an intervention group (n = 110) or a control group (n = 110). The control group will receive only the online self-management program. The intervention group will receive the online self-management program and additional online coaching. Participants will be followed for one year, with follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Discussion The intervention being tested is set to support type 2 diabetes patients with their diabetes self-management and is expected to have beneficial effects on self-care activities, well being and clinical outcomes. When proven effective this self-management support program could be offered to other health care groups and their type 2 diabetes patients in the Netherlands. Trial registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR4064 PMID:24238104

  10. Association between knowledge, locus of control and health belief with self-management, Hb A1c level and number of attendances in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Mansour-Ghanaei, Roya; Joukar, Farahnaz; Soati, Fatemeh; Khanegha, Atefeh Ghanbari

    2013-01-01

    This survey was designed to determine the association between knowledge, locus of control and health belief with self-management, Hb A1c level and Number of attendances in type 1 diabetic patients in Rasht, Guilan Province - North of Iran. Data was derived from chart reviews of 92 patients. Patients’ glycosylated hemoglobin level and their number of health care attendances during the last 6 months were recorded. The four part questionnaires covered patients’ demographic data, knowledge, perceived control and health belief of diabetes. A blood sample was taken from each patient. There was no significant relationship between demographic data such as gender, age, marital status, education, occupation, duration of the disease, place of living and family history with knowledge, health belief and locus of control (P > 0.05). Also the results didn’t show any significant association between the complicated group and their knowledge and health belief (P > 0.05) while it was significantly related to their locus of control (P < 0.004). The majority of the samples had poor knowledge (59.8%), health belief (71.7%) and locus of control (62%). There was no significant relationship between patients’ knowledge, health belief and locus of control with their glycosylated hemoglobin level, number of referrals and self-management. It is suggested by the present survey that locus of control, health belief and knowledge of patients are not found to have no practical effect upon diabetic self-management behavior or outcomes, according to the variables used and care for the diabetic patients must be tailored to individual requirements. PMID:23844271

  11. Impact of a social network-based intervention promoting diabetes self-management in socioeconomically deprived patients: a qualitative evaluation of the intervention strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vissenberg, C; Stronks, K; Nijpels, G; Uitewaal, P J M; Middelkoop, B J C; Kohinor, M J E; Hartman, M A; Nierkens, V

    2016-01-01

    Objective There is a need for effective interventions that improve diabetes self-management (DSM) among socioeconomically deprived patients with type 2 diabetes. The group-based intervention Powerful Together with Diabetes (PTWD) aimed to increase social support for DSM and decrease social influences hindering DSM (eg, peer pressure, social norms) in patients living in deprived neighbourhoods. Through a qualitative process evaluation, this paper aims to study whether this intervention changed social support and social influences, and which elements of the intervention contributed to this. Methods The intervention group (IG) was compared with a standard group-based educational intervention (control group, CG). 27 qualitative in-depth interviews with participants (multiethnic sample) and 24 interviews with group leaders were conducted. Interviews were coded and analysed using MAXQDA according to framework analysis. Results Patients in the IG experienced more emotional support from group members and more instrumental and appraisal support from relatives than those in the CG. Also, they were better able to recognise and cope with influences that hinder their DSM, exhibited more positive norms towards DSM and increased their priority regarding DSM and their adherence. Finally, the engagement in DSM by relatives of participants increased. Creating trust between group members, skills training, practising together and actively involving relatives through action plans contributed to these changes. Conclusions A group-based intervention aimed at creating trust, practising together and involving relatives has the potential to increase social support and diminish social influences hindering DSM in socioeconomically deprived patients with diabetes. Promising elements of the intervention were skills training and providing feedback using role-playing exercises in group sessions with patients, as well as the involvement of patients' significant others in self-management tasks, and

  12. A cultural lens to understanding daily experiences with type 2 diabetes self-management among clinic patients in M'bour, Senegal.

    PubMed

    BeLue, Rhonda; Diaw, Mor; Ndao, Fatou; Okoror, Titilayo; Degboe, Arnold; Abiero, Beatrice

    Diabetes is a steadily increasing threat in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Factors such as urbanization, obesity, physical inactivity, and inadequate access to healthcare are believed to contribute to the increasing burden of diabetes. Interventions that optimize diabetes self-management are critically important since obtaining diabetes medications is challenging due to cost constraints and availability. Culture is a significant factor in shaping health behaviors such as diabetes self-management, where individual health behaviors operate in confluence with family, community, and social structures. This study examined experiences with diabetes self-management among clinic patients residing in M'bour, Senegal, using the PEN3 model as a cultural framework. Results indicate that financial challenges related to accessing medical care and adhering to the prescribed diabetic diet were the main barriers to diabetes management. Family dynamics serve as both supportive and inhibiting forces that influence the aforementioned barriers.

  13. Health capabilities and diabetes self-management: the impact of economic, social, and cultural resources.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Robert R; Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh; Goodman, William M

    2014-02-01

    disease self-management, and health.

  14. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  15. The Systematic Design of a Behavioural Mobile Health Application for the Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shivani; Morita, Plinio; Lewis, Gary F; Yu, Catherine; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-02-01

    Patients with diabetes often face serious complications due to limited self-management skills, the inability to adhere to care regimens, and psychosocial factors. Although regular self-monitoring of blood glucose is known to benefit patients receiving insulin therapy, its role in patients not treated with insulin has been unclear. However, recent studies have demonstrated that structured self-monitoring of blood glucose can significantly benefit patients who are not taking insulin, facilitating improved self-awareness and clinical decision making. We hypothesize that effective self-management by patients with type 2 diabetes who do not need insulin requires a behavioural intervention that enables the association between lifestyle behaviours, such as dietary intake and physical activity, and overall glycemic control. Mobile health applications (apps), coupled with wireless medical peripheral devices, can facilitate self-monitoring; deliver tailored, actionable knowledge; elicit positive behaviour changes and promote effective self-management of diabetes. Although existing apps incorporate tracking and feedback from healthcare providers, few attempt to elicit positive behaviour changes for the purposes of developing patients' self-care skills. The purpose of this article is to present a systematic approach to the design and development a diabetes self-management mobile app, which included 1) a scoping review of literature; 2) the development of an overarching theoretical approach and 3) validation of the app features through user-centred design methods. The resulting app, bant II, facilitates 1) self-monitoring of blood glucose, physical activity, diet and weight; 2) identification of glycemic patterns in relation to lifestyle; 3) remedial decision making and 4) positive behaviour change through incentives.

  16. Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hood, Korey K; Laffel, Lori; Kumah-Crystal, Yaa A; Lybarger, Cindy K

    2015-01-01

    Background For individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), following a complicated daily medical regimen is critical to maintaining optimal health. Adolescents in particular struggle with regimen adherence. Commonly available technologies (eg, diabetes websites, apps) can provide diabetes-related support, yet little is known about how many adolescents with T1D use them, why they are used, or relationships between use and self-management. Objective This study examined adolescent and parent use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes, including proportions who use each technology, frequency of use, and number of different technologies used for diabetes. Analyses also investigated the reasons adolescents reported for using or not using technologies for diabetes, and factors correlated with adolescents’ technology use. Finally, this study examined relationships between the type and number of technologies adolescents use for diabetes and their self-management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents (12-17 years) and their parents (N=174 pairs), recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic (n=134) and the Children with Diabetes community website (n=40), participated in this Web-based survey study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) values were obtained from medical records for pediatric clinic patients. Adolescents reported their use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes (ie, social networking, diabetes websites, mobile diabetes apps, text messaging, and glucometer/insulin pump software), reasons for use, and self-management behavior (Self-Care Inventory-Revised, SCI-R). Results Most adolescents and parents used at least one of the 5 technologies for diabetes. Among adolescents, the most commonly used technology for diabetes was text messaging (53%), and the least commonly used was diabetes websites (25%). Most adolescents who used diabetes apps, text messaging, or pump/glucometer software did so more frequently (≥2 times per week), compared to social

  17. Sociodemographic Factors and Self-Management Practices Related to Type 2 Diabetes among Hispanics and Non-Hispanic Whites in a Rural Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coronado, Gloria D.; Thompson, Beti; Tejeda, Silvia; Godina, Ruby; Chen, Lu

    2007-01-01

    Context: Hispanics in the United States have a higher prevalence of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 2 diabetes) and experience more complications for the disease than non-Hispanic whites. Differences in medical management or self-management practices may, in part, explain the relative high risk for diabetes complications among…

  18. Structured scaffolding for reflection and problem solving in diabetes self-management: qualitative study of mobile diabetes detective

    PubMed Central

    Heitkemper, Elizabeth M; Smaldone, Arlene M; Kukafka, Rita; Cole-Lewis, Heather; Davidson, Patricia G; Mynatt, Elizabeth D; Tobin, Jonathan N; Cassells, Andrea; Goodman, Carrie; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate subjective experiences and patterns of engagement with a novel electronic tool for facilitating reflection and problem solving for individuals with type 2 diabetes, Mobile Diabetes Detective (MoDD). Methods In this qualitative study, researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with individuals from economically disadvantaged communities and ethnic minorities who are participating in a randomized controlled trial of MoDD. The transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis; usage logs were analyzed to determine how actively the study participants used MoDD. Results Fifteen participants in the MoDD randomized controlled trial were recruited for the qualitative interviews. Usage log analysis showed that, on average, during the 4 weeks of the study, the study participants logged into MoDD twice per week, reported 120 blood glucose readings, and set two behavioral goals. The qualitative interviews suggested that individuals used MoDD to follow the steps of the problem-solving process, from identifying problematic blood glucose patterns, to exploring behavioral triggers contributing to these patterns, to selecting alternative behaviors, to implementing these behaviors while monitoring for improvements in glycemic control. Discussion This qualitative study suggested that informatics interventions for reflection and problem solving can provide structured scaffolding for facilitating these processes by guiding users through the different steps of the problem-solving process and by providing them with context-sensitive evidence and practice-based knowledge related to diabetes self-management on each of those steps. Conclusion This qualitative study suggested that MoDD was perceived as a useful tool in engaging individuals in self-monitoring, reflection, and problem solving. PMID:26769910

  19. Glycaemic Control and Associated Self-Management Behaviours in Diabetic Outpatients: A Hospital Based Observation Study in Lusaka, Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Michelo, Charles; Mudenda, Boyd; Manankov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Background. The control of diabetes mellitus depends on several factors that also include individual lifestyles. We assessed glycaemic control status and self-management behaviours that may influence glycaemic control among diabetic outpatients. Methods. This cross-sectional study among 198 consenting randomly selected patients was conducted at the University Teaching Hospital diabetic clinic between September and December 2013 in Lusaka, Zambia. A structured interview schedule was used to collect data on demographic characteristics, self-management behaviours, and laboratory measurements. Binary logistic regression analysis using IBM SPSS for Windows version 20.0 was carried out to predict behaviours that were associated with glycaemic control status. Results. The proportion of patients that had good glycaemic control status (HbA1c≤ 48 mmol/mol) was 38.7% compared to 61.3% that had poor glycaemic control status (HbA1c≥ 49 mmol/mol). Adherence to antidiabetic treatment and fasting plasma glucose predicted glycaemic control status of the patients. However, self-blood glucose monitoring, self-blood glucose monitoring means and exercise did not predict glycaemic control status of the patients.  Conclusion. We find evidence of poor glycaemic control status among most diabetic patients suggesting that health promotion messages need to take into account both individual and community factors to promote behaviours likely to reduce nonadherence. PMID:26798654

  20. Interdisciplinary Diabetes Care: A New Model for Inpatient Diabetes Education.

    PubMed

    Hardee, Sandra G; Osborne, Kim Crickmore; Njuguna, Njeri; Allis, Dustin; Brewington, Daphne; Patil, Shivajirao P; Hofler, Linda; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    A patient-centered interdisciplinary diabetes care model was implemented at Vidant Medical Center in Greenville, N.C., a 909-bed tertiary care teaching hospital, for the purpose of providing all patients with diabetes clear and concise instructions on diabetes survival skills. Survival skills education during hospitalization is needed for safe transition to community resources for continued and expanded diabetes self-management education. This article describes the process used to develop, implement, and evaluate the model. This initiative achieved substantial cost savings, with no significant changes in length of stay (LOS) or diabetes readmission rates. This patient-centered model demonstrates how a team of interdisciplinary health care professionals can integrate services in providing care for a large population of patients with chronic disease.

  1. Development of patient-centric linguistically tailored psychoeducational messages to support nutrition and medication self-management in type 2 diabetes: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Rebecca J Bartlett; Connor, Ulla; Marshall, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the feasibility of developing linguistically tailored educational messages designed to match the linguistic styles of patients segmented into types with the Descriptor™, and to determine patient preferences for tailored or standard messages based on their segments. Patients and methods Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) were recruited from a diabetes health clinic. Participants were segmented using the Descriptor™, a language-based questionnaire, to identify patient types based on their control orientation (internal/external), agency (high/low), and affect (positive/negative), which are well studied constructs related to T2DM self-management. Two of the seven self-care behaviors described by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (healthy eating and taking medication) were used to develop standard messages and then linguistically tailored using features of the six different construct segment types of the Descriptor™. A subset of seven participants each provided feedback on their preference for standard or linguistically tailored messages; 12 comparisons between standard and tailored messages were made. Results Overall, the tailored messages were preferred to the standard messages. When the messages were matched to specific construct segment types, the tailored messages were preferred over the standard messages, although this was not statistically significant. Conclusion Linguistically tailoring messages based on construct segments is feasible. Furthermore, tailored messages were more often preferred over standard messages. This study provides some preliminary evidence for tailoring messages based on the linguistic features of control orientation, agency, and affect. The messages developed in this study should be tested in a larger more representative sample. The present study did not explore whether tailored messages were better understood. This research will serve as preliminary evidence to develop future studies

  2. An educational intervention to promote self-management and professional socialization in graduate nurse anesthesia students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Debra A.

    Traditionally, nurse anesthesia educators have utilized prior academic achievement to predict student success. However, research has indicated that prior academic achievement offers an inadequate assessment of student success in graduate healthcare programs with extensive clinical residencies. The educational literature has identified many non-cognitive factors, such as self-efficacy and locus of control, that may provide a more holistic prediction model of student success. An experimental study with pretest-posttest design and stratified random assignment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to promote self-management, professional socialization, and academic achievement among first semester graduate nurse anesthesia students. Participants (N = 66) were demographically similar to the national graduate nurse anesthesia student body, though Hispanics and younger students were a little over-represented in the sample (56% female, 75.8% White, 15.2% Hispanic, 6% Other, 59% ≤ 30-years-old, 67% ≤ 3 years of ICU). The results showed that most graduate anesthesia students had strong self-management and professional socialization characteristics on admission. The results did not support the effectiveness of this educational intervention. Thus, ceiling effect may have accounted in part for statistically non-significant results regarding self-efficacy (p = .190, o2 = .03), locus of control (p = .137, o2 = .04), professional socialization (p = .819, o2 = .001), and academic achievement (p = .689, o2 = .003). Future researchers may need to expand the scope of the intervention, use a more powerful and sensitive instrument, and utilize a larger sample.

  3. Outcomes of Minimal and Moderate Support Versions of an Internet-Based Diabetes Self-Management Support Program

    PubMed Central

    Kurz, Deanna; King, Diane; Dickman, Jennifer M.; Faber, Andrew J.; Halterman, Eve; Wooley, Tim; Toobert, Deborah J.; Strycker, Lisa A.; Estabrooks, Paul A.; Osuna, Diego; Ritzwoller, Debra

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Internet and other interactive technology-based programs offer great potential for practical, effective, and cost-efficient diabetes self-management (DSM) programs capable of reaching large numbers of patients. This study evaluated minimal and moderate support versions of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, compared to an enhanced usual care condition. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A three-arm practical randomized trial was conducted to evaluate minimal contact and moderate contact versions of an Internet-based diabetes self-management program, offered in English and Spanish, compared to enhanced usual care. A heterogeneous sample of 463 type 2 patients was randomized and 82.5% completed a 4-month follow-up. Primary outcomes were behavior changes in healthy eating, physical activity, and medication taking. Secondary outcomes included hemoglobin A1c, body mass index, lipids, and blood pressure. RESULTS The Internet-based intervention produced significantly greater improvements than the enhanced usual care condition on three of four behavioral outcomes (effect sizes [d] for healthy eating = 0.32; fat intake = 0.28; physical activity= 0.19) in both intent-to-treat and complete-cases analyses. These changes did not translate into differential improvements in biological outcomes during the 4-month study period. Added contact did not further enhance outcomes beyond the minimal contact intervention. CONCLUSIONS The Internet intervention meets several of the RE-AIM criteria for potential public health impact, including reaching a large number of persons, and being practical, feasible, and engaging for participants, but with mixed effectiveness in improving outcomes, and consistent results across different subgroups. Additional research is needed to evaluate longer-term outcomes, enhance effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and understand the linkages between intervention processes and outcomes. Electronic supplementary material The online version

  4. 77 FR 44255 - Medicare Program; Application by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) for Continued Recognition as a National Accreditation Organization for Accrediting Entities To Furnish Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training AGENCY: Centers for... approval of an application from the American Association of Diabetes Educators for continued recognition...

  5. Factors Predictive of Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors among Male Military Veterans with Diabetes Residing in a Homeless Shelter for People Recovering from Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rojas-Guyler, Liliana; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah M.; Lee, Rebecca; Bernard, Amy; King, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes disproportionately affects individuals with lower income in the U.S. (CDC, 2012). Specifically the control of diabetes through self-management has been found to be sub-par and an important contributor to complications (Seligman, Davis, Schillinger, & Wolf, 2010). People experiencing homelessness also experience barriers. One such…

  6. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  7. Improvements in Care and Reduced Self-Management Barriers Among Rural Patients With Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dettori, Nancy; Flook, Benjamin N.; Pessl, Erich; Quesenberry, Kim; Loh, Johnson; Harris, Colleen; McDowall, Janet M.; Butcher, Marcene K.; Helgerson, Steven D.; Gohdes, Dorothy; Harwell, Todd S.

    2005-01-01

    Improved preventive care and clinical outcomes among patients with diabetes can reduce complications and costs; however, diabetes care continues to be suboptimal. Few studies have described effective strategies for improving care among rural populations with diabetes. In 2000, the Park County Diabetes Project and the Montana Diabetes Control…

  8. A randomized clinical trial of diabetes self-management for Mexican Americans: Are there serendipitous health benefits for supporters of study participants?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sharon A; García, Alexandra A; Orlander, Philip R; Hanis, Craig L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Studies of social support in diabetes have focused on the effects of support on the person with type 2 diabetes. We explored diabetes prevention effects of a culturally tailored diabetes self-management intervention in individuals without diabetes who were supporters of intervention participants. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of data from a randomized clinical trial that involved 256 Mexican Americans with diabetes. Each study participant designated a supporter—spouse, relative, friend—who attended intervention sessions and assisted participants in attaining effective diabetes self-management. Supporter’s glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) data were tracked for 1 year to determine diabetes conversion rates in supporters without diabetes at baseline. Results: Fewer individuals in the intervention group (n = 9) converted to an A1C above the 7% threshold, compared to the 1-year wait-listed control group (n = 16). We found a statistically significant difference (p = .021) at 12 months in the number of individuals whose A1C was ⩽8%, with fewer supporters above threshold in the intervention group (reduction of 48%). Supporters in the intervention group with prediabetes, based on baseline A1C, experienced a slight reduction in A1C, while control group supporters with prediabetes experienced an increase. Discussion: The results suggest that there are potential benefits for family members and other supporters of persons with diabetes who participated in diabetes self-management programs. PMID:28228947

  9. The OnTrack Diabetes Web-Based Program for Type 2 Diabetes and Dysphoria Self-Management: A Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Anthony Carl; Scuffham, Paul A; Parham, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising with the majority of patients practicing inadequate disease self-management. Depression, anxiety, and diabetes-specific distress present motivational challenges to adequate self-care. Health systems globally struggle to deliver routine services that are accessible to the entire population, in particular in rural areas. Web-based diabetes self-management interventions can provide frequent, accessible support regardless of time and location Objective This paper describes the protocol of an Australian national randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the OnTrack Diabetes program, an automated, interactive, self-guided Web program aimed to improve glycemic control, diabetes self-care, and dysphoria symptoms in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A small pilot trial is conducted that primarily tests program functionality, efficacy, and user acceptability and satisfaction. This is followed by the main RCT, which compares 3 treatments: (1) delayed program access: usual diabetes care for 3 months postbaseline followed by access to the full OnTrack Diabetes program; (2) immediate program: full access to the self-guided program from baseline onward; and (3) immediate program plus therapist support via Functional Imagery Training (FIT). Measures are administered at baseline and at 3, 6, and 12 months postbaseline. Primary outcomes are diabetes self-care behaviors (physical activity participation, diet, medication adherence, and blood glucose monitoring), glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, and diabetes-specific distress. Secondary outcomes are depression, anxiety, self-efficacy and adherence, and quality of life. Exposure data in terms of program uptake, use, time on each page, and program completion, as well as implementation feasibility will be conducted. Results This trial is currently underway with funding support from the Wesley Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia. Conclusions This is the first known trial of an

  10. Effects of Diabetic Case Management on Knowledge, Self-Management Abilities, Health Behaviors, and Health Service Utilization for Diabetes in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Soon Ae; Lee, Kunsei; Lin, Vivian; Liu, George; Shin, Eunyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a case management program for diabetics, using a pre-post comparison design. Materials and Methods The study population comprised 6007 diabetics who received case management intervention in 2006 and were sampled nationwide in Korea. Before and after the intervention, the study population answered questions regarding their knowledge of diabetes, self-management ability, and health behaviors. Body mass index (BMI) was also calculated. Healthcare service utilization for diabetes was extracted from health insurance claim data from 2005 to 2007. Results The case management program significantly improved the study population's knowledge of diabetes and ability to self-manage nutrition, blood glucose monitoring, foot and oral care, and medications. This program also significantly changed the study population's health behaviors regarding smoking, alcohol drinking, and exercise, and BMI was positively affected. In the over-serviced subgroup, there was a significant decrease in the number of consultations (mean=7.0; SD=19.5) after intervention. Conversely, in the under-serviced subgroup, there was a significant increase in the number of consultations (mean=3.2; SD=7.9) and the days of prescribed medication (mean=66.4; SD=120.3) after intervention. Conclusion This study showed that the case management program led the study population to improve their knowledge, self-management ability, health behaviors, and utilization of health care. It is necessary in future studies to evaluate the appropriateness of healthcare usage and clinical outcome by using a control group to determine the direct effectiveness of this case management program. PMID:25510771

  11. Integrating visual dietary documentation in mobile-phone-based self-management application for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Årsand, Eirik

    2015-05-01

    The goal of modern diabetes treatment is to a large extent focused on self-management to achieve and maintain a healthy, low HbA1c. Despite all new technical diabetes tools and support, including advanced blood glucose meters and insulin delivery systems, diabetes patients still struggle to achieve international treatment goals, that is, HbA1c < 7.5 in children and adolescents. In this study we developed and tested a mobile-phone-based tool to capture and visualize adolescents' food intake. Our aim was to affect understanding of carbohydrate counting and also to facilitate doctor-adolescent communication with regard to daily treatment. Furthermore, we wanted to evaluate the effect of the designed tool with regard to empowerment, self-efficacy, and self-treatment. The study concludes that implementing a visualization tool is an important contribution for young people to understand the basics of diabetes and to empower young people to define their treatment challenges. By capturing a picture of their own food, the person's own feeling of being in charge can be affected and better self-treatment achieved.

  12. Engaging faith-based resources to initiate and support diabetes self-management among African Americans: a collaboration of informal and formal systems of care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Patria; Thorman Hartig, Margaret; Frazier, Renee; Clayton, Mae; Oliver, Georgia; Nelson, Belinda W; Williams-Cleaves, Beverly J

    2014-11-01

    Diabetes for Life (DFL), a project of Memphis Healthy Churches (MHC) and Common Table Health Alliance (CTHA; formerly Healthy Memphis Common Table [HMCT]), is a self-management program aimed at reducing health disparities among African Americans with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Memphis and Shelby County, Tennessee. This program is one of five national projects that constitute The Alliance to Reduce Disparities in Diabetes, a 5-year grant-funded initiative of The Merck Foundation. Our purpose is to describe the faith-based strategies supporting DFL made possible by linking with an established informal health system, MHC, created by Baptist Memorial Health Care. The MHC network engaged volunteer Church Health Representatives as educators and recruiters for DFL. The components of the DFL project and the effect on chronic disease management for the participants will be described. The stages of DFL recruitment and implementation from an open-access to a closed model involving six primary care practices created a formal health system. The involvement of CTHA, a regional health collaborative, created the opportunity for DFL to expand the pool of health care providers and then recognize the core of providers most engaged with DFL patients. This collaboration between MHC and HMCT led to the organization of the formal health network.

  13. Understanding diabetes self-management behaviors among Hispanics in New York City.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith; Campos-Dominguez, Giselle; Jaramillo, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a public health concern disproportionately affecting Hispanics. Because Hispanics are greatly affected by a high prevalence of diabetes, a qualitative study was conducted, which explored how Hispanics understand, perceive, and experience behavioral change and how they maintain such change while managing their diabetes. Twenty Caribbean (Dominican and Puerto Rican) Hispanic adults with diabetes, who were either English- or Spanish-speaking, participated in the study. Twenty individual interviews were conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed and translated. Structured questions were used in the interviews which covered the meaning of certain terms (e.g., healthy eating, exercise), motivators and barriers to changing behaviors related to diabetes management, and a question to explore ways nurses can assist them in changing behaviors. Content analysis was used to analyze the text of the interviews. Three themes (diabetes management, behavior change, and nurse's role) emerged from the data, including apparent gaps in the participants' perception of adapting their cultural foods into healthier dietary habits.

  14. User-centered design of a web-based self-management site for individuals with type 2 diabetes – providing a sense of control and community

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To design and test a web-based self-management tool for patients with type 2 diabetes for its usability and feasibility. Methods An evidence-based, theory-driven website was created for patients with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-three patients with type 2 diabetes aged ≥ 25 years were recruited from 2 diabetes care centers in Toronto, Canada. We employed focus group methodology to assess acceptability, sustainability, strengths and weaknesses of the self-management website. Based on these results, revisions were made to the website. Three cycles of individual usability testing sessions using cognitive task analysis were conducted with patients with type 2 diabetes. Revisions to the website were made based on results from this testing. Results We identified five themes concerning participants’ experiences of health care and related unmet needs: 1) Desire for information and for greater access to timely and personalized care to gain a sense of control of their disease; 2) Desire for community (sharing experiences with others) to fulfill practical and emotional needs; 3) Potential roles of an online self-management website in self-empowerment, behavior change, self-management and health care delivery; 4) Importance of a patient-centered perspective in presenting content (e.g. common assumptions, medical nomenclature, language, messaging, sociocultural context); 5) Barriers and facilitators to use of a self-management website (including perceived relevance of content, incorporation into usual routine, availability for goal-directed use, usability issues). Conclusions Participants outlined a series of unmet health care needs, and stated that they wanted timely access to tailored knowledge about their condition, mechanisms to control and track their disease, and opportunities to share experiences with other patients. These findings have implications for patients with type 2 diabetes of diverse ages, socioeconomic backgrounds, and disease severity, as well

  15. Field of Dreams Program Evaluation: Empowering the Latino Population in Type2 Diabetes Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urteaga, Edie

    2011-01-01

    Adult onset, type2 diabetes affects Latino families at a higher rate than other ethnicities and negatively impacting their quality of life, ability to financially succeed, and ultimately impacting our overall economy. Multiple resources are available in the country to help people learn how to prevent, control, and manage diabetes. However, the…

  16. Patients' self-efficacy within online health communities: facilitating chronic disease self-management behaviors through peer education.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin

    2016-01-01

    In order to combat the growing burden of chronic disease, evidence-based self-management programs have been designed to teach patients about the disease and its affect on their lives. Self-efficacy is a key component in chronic disease self-management. This research used online ethnography and discourse analysis (N = 8,231) to examine self-efficacy within the computer-mediated communication (CMC) of four online health communities used by people with arthritis. Specifically, online opinion leaders were identified for examination. Across the four communities, there was a cyclical process that involved "disease veterans" sharing their experiences and gaining credibility within the community, new(er) members suffering from disease symptoms and sharing their experiences online, and finally, asking others for help with arthritis self-management behaviors. Three themes follow: (1) sharing disease experience, (2) suffering from disease symptoms, and (3) asking for help. Practical implications for health promotion and education are discussed.

  17. Different models to mobilize peer support to improve diabetes self-management and clinical outcomes: evidence, logistics, evaluation considerations and needs for future research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Much of diabetes care needs to be carried out by patients between office visits with their health care providers. Yet, many patients face difficulties carrying out these tasks. In addition, many adults with diabetes cannot count on effective support from their families and friends to help them with their self-management. Peer support programmes are a promising approach to enhance social and emotional support, assist patients in daily management and living with diabetes and promote linkages to clinical care. This background paper provides a brief overview of different approaches to mobilize peer support for diabetes self-management support, discusses evidence to date on the effectiveness of each of these models, highlights logistical and evaluation issues for each model and concludes with a discussion of directions for future research in this area. PMID:19293400

  18. Assessing psychosocial variables: a tool for diabetes educators.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kelly L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to share an educational strategy or tool that is relevant for use in patient and professional diabetes education. The tool offers an opportunity for diabetes educators to screen for psychosocial variables such as depression or emotional distress. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify psychological variables that have an impact on individuals living with diabetes and their ability to self-manage their disease. The literature revealed that both depression and emotional distress related to diabetes was experienced by individuals with diabetes along with those individuals who were unable to self-management their disease. The Accu-Check Interview is a computer software program that may assist diabetes educators to provide diabetes education. Use of the Accu-Check Interview software program has been implemented at various sites including the Joslin Clinic (Boston, Mass), Baystate Medical Center (Springfield, Mass), and Emerson Hospital (Concord, Mass). The Diabetes Self Care Profile is a Web-based version of the Accu-Check Interview and can be accessed as a demonstration in English and Spanish. These tools allow diabetes educators to screen for psychosocial variables and address issues with individuals while using a motivational interviewing approach.

  19. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O.; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. Methods The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. Conclusions The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a “superior” score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. PMID:26647414

  20. Connectivity, contest and the ties of self-management support for type 2 diabetes: a meta-synthesis of qualitative literature.

    PubMed

    Foss, Christina; Knutsen, Ingrid; Kennedy, Anne; Todorova, Elka; Wensing, Michel; Lionis, Christos; Portillo, Mari Carmen; Serrano-Gil, Manuel; Koetsenruijter, Jan; Mujika, Agurtzane; Rogers, Anne

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a meta-synthesis of the literature on community-based self-management to support experiences of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The aim was to synthesise findings on both formal and informal self-management support with particular reference to the relevance and influence of the social context operating at different levels. The review forms part of EU-WISE, a project financed through EU's 7th Framework Programme. The review was performed by systematically searching MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science for English language publications between 2005 and 2014 presenting research conducted in Europe on the experiences and perspectives of self-management concerns of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The search yielded 587 abstracts, which were reduced through search strategy refinement and eligibility and quality criteria to 29 papers that were included in the review. This review highlights the relevance of contextual factors operating at micro- and macro-levels. The synthesis yielded six second-order thematic constructs relating to self-management: sense of agency and identity, the significance and meaning of social networks, minimal disruption of everyday life, economic hardship, the problem of assigning patients' responsibility and structural influences of primary care. Using a line of argument synthesis, these themes were revisited, and a third-order construct, connectivity emerged which refers to how links in daily life are interwoven with peoples' social networks, local communities, economic and ideological conditions in society in a way which support self-management activities. This meta-synthesis indicates a need to heed the notion of connectivity as a means of mobilising and supporting the self-management strategies of people with type 2 diabetes in everyday life.

  1. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support.

    PubMed

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-02-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients' self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists' toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation.

  2. A Modified User-Oriented Heuristic Evaluation of a Mobile Health System for Diabetes Self-management Support

    PubMed Central

    Georgsson, Mattias; Staggers, Nancy; Weir, Charlene

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health platforms offer significant opportunities for improving diabetic self-care, but only if adequate usability exists. Expert evaluations such as heuristic evaluation can provide distinct usability information about systems. The purpose of this study was to complete a usability evaluation of a mobile health system for diabetes patients using a modified heuristic evaluation technique of (1) dual-domain experts (healthcare professionals, usability experts), (2) validated scenarios and user tasks related to patients’ self-care, and (3) in-depth severity factor ratings. Experts identified 129 usability problems with 274 heuristic violations for the system. The categories Consistency and Standards dominated at 24.1% (n = 66), followed by Match Between System and Real World at 22.3% (n = 61). Average severity ratings across system views were 2.8 (of 4), with 9.3% (n = 12) rated as catastrophic and 53.5% (n = 69) as major. The large volume of violations with severe ratings indicated clear priorities for redesign. The modified heuristic approach allowed evaluators to identify unique and important issues, including ones related to self-management and patient safety. This article provides a template for one type of expert evaluation adding to the informaticists’ toolbox when needing to conduct a fast, resource-efficient and user-oriented heuristic evaluation. PMID:26657618

  3. Expanded health belief model predicts diabetes self-management in college students.

    PubMed

    Wdowik, M J; Kendall, P A; Harris, M A; Auld, G

    2001-01-01

    An instrument was designed to determine relationships between constructs of the Expanded Health Belief Model and to identify characteristics of college students who successfully manage their diabetes. The Diabetes College Scale was developed to measure attitudes and behaviors pertinent to diabetes management and college life. It was tested for content validity, test-retest reliability, and internal consistency. Data were collected from college students using a cross-sectional design. Campus health care providers were invited via electronic mail to administer the survey to students with Type I diabetes. Ninety-eight questionnaires were mailed to interested providers, of which 86 (88%) were returned. Mean scores for attitude constructs, seven behaviors, and two outcomes were measured. Twenty-six experts established content validity. Instrument reliability was evaluated using paired t-tests, Cronbach's alpha, and correlation coefficients. Correlation coefficients and stepwise multiple regression analysis evaluated relationships among variables measured. Intention and emotional response were strong predictors of exercise, whereas health importance and intention were predictive of testing blood sugar. Situational factors and emotional response were substantial barriers to optimal diabetes self-care. College health care providers should address these areas in providing services to this population. Additional testing of the instrument is also recommended.

  4. Evaluation of a Worksite Diabetes Education Program at a Large Urban Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Renda, Susan; Baernholdt, Marianne; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes education can be delivered at the worksite to better support employees' diabetes self-management and improve productivity and health care costs. This study was conducted to address the feasibility of a diabetes worksite education program for employees at a large urban academic health care institution. The diabetes education program was delivered in the diabetes center at the institution, a resource that was previously underutilized by employees. Through collaboration with groups in the institution, 20 employees of diverse ethnicity participated in the worksite diabetes education program with positive outcomes: improved glycemic control measured (HbA1c), attainment of self-management goals, and satisfaction with the program. Work absences trended downward, but numbers of hospitalizations and emergency department visits were unchanged in the 3 months following education. Recommendations include replication of the study with more employee participation and program evaluation over a longer period of time to continue assessment of employees' educational needs.

  5. Arthritis Self-Management: A Study of the Effectiveness of Patient Education for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of an Arthritis Self Management course for people aged 55-95 (N=200). Results indicated significant gains in knowledge and pain reduction. Trends toward less disability were observed for participants under age 74. (JAC)

  6. Economic Evidence for US Asthma Self-Management Education and Home-Based Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Joy; Wilhelm, Natalie; Lewis, Lillianne; Herman, Elizabeth

    The health and economic burden of asthma in the United States is substantial. Asthma self-management education (AS-ME) and home-based interventions for asthma can improve asthma control and prevent asthma exacerbations, and interest in health care-public health collaboration regarding asthma is increasing. However, outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs are not widely available; economic sustainability is a common concern. Thus, we conducted a narrative review of existing literature regarding economic outcomes of outpatient AS-ME and home-based intervention programs for asthma in the United States. We identified 9 outpatient AS-ME programs and 17 home-based intervention programs with return on investment (ROI) data. Most programs were associated with a positive ROI; a few programs observed positive ROIs only among selected populations (eg, higher health care utilization). Interpretation of existing data is limited by heterogeneous ROI calculations. Nevertheless, the literature suggests promise for sustainable opportunities to expand access to outpatient AS-ME and home-based asthma intervention programs in the United States. More definitive knowledge about how to maximize program benefit and sustainability could be gained through more controlled studies of specific populations and increased uniformity in economic assessments.

  7. Hidden decay of impact after education for self-management of chronic illnesses: hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Park, M J; Green, Joseph; Ishikawa, Hirono; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2013-03-01

    People with chronic illnesses can benefit from self-management education. However, those benefits are said to decay over time (there is some evidence that this 'decay of impact' does occur), and the reinforcements used to prevent that decay appear to be ineffective. We hypothesize that the reinforcements appear to be ineffective because decay of impact occurs only in a subgroup of these programs' participants, so any benefits of reinforcements in that subgroup are concealed by whole-group summary statistics. We also hypothesize that reinforcements can benefit those who need them - those who would otherwise have decay. One approach to testing these hypotheses requires analysis of individual-level data, which is uncommon in this field. Some useful data could come from studies that have already been completed, but the strongest evidence will require prospectively designed tests in future trials. If the hypotheses are false, then time and resources spent on reinforcements can be saved or redirected. If the hypotheses are true, then reinforcements can be implemented with less waste and they can be made more effective. These programs can also be improved to better fit their users' needs, and there can be a new basis for evaluating the programs' effectiveness.

  8. Listening to patients' voices: linguistic indicators related to diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ulla; Anton, Marta; Goering, Elizabeth; Lauten, Kathryn; Hayat, Amir; Roach, Paris; Balunda, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    A great deal of research in health care has examined a wide range of variables to better understand the degree to which patients follow the advice of medical professionals in managing their health, known as adherence. This paper explains the development of the linguistic systems to describe and evaluate two psychosocial constructs (i.e. control orientation and agency) that have been found to be related to adherence in previous research for subjects with diabetes (Trento et al. 2007; Wangberg 2007; O'Hea et al. 2009). The present data came from 43 semi-structured in-depth interviews of subjects with Type 2 diabetes. One-on-one interviews with open-ended questions elicited subjects' 'stories' about living with diabetes, and the transcribed interviews were analyzed to develop the linguistic systems of control orientation and agency. The resultant systems were applied to the 43 interviews by raters with high inter-rater reliability. The results showed demarcations of clearly identified codings of patient types. The paper presents the linguistic coding systems developed in the study, the results of their application to the patient interview data, and recommendations for improved communication with patients.

  9. Focus group study assessing self-management skills of Chinese Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Chuang, Les; Bateman, William B

    2012-10-01

    Despite a rapid growth of Type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese Americans, the management of diabetes in this population is yet understudied. This pilot study attempts a first step in seeking solutions to decrease demand for health services in this population by improving patients' self-care. Focus groups were conducted in well-controlled (HbA1c < 7) and poorly-controlled (HbA1c > 8) Chinese Americans with Type 2 DM who were asked about their knowledge and self-care skills of diabetes as well as experience of living with the disease. Well-controlled had more insights in their illness and were more inquisitive, while poorly-controlled were more fixated on symptoms and side effects of treatments. Common themes for both groups included interest in diet and Traditional Chinese Medicine. The findings provide valuable information to design a survey instrument to more definitively assess self-care skills differentiating levels of control, suggest that changing attitudes and behaviors need to be a stronger focus in care and identify needs to provide more culturally appropriate materials to care for this population.

  10. Designing and evaluating a web-based self-management site for patients with type 2 diabetes - systematic website development and study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Given that patients provide the majority of their own diabetes care, patient self-management training has increasingly become recognized as an important strategy with which to improve quality of care. However, participation in self management programs is low. In addition, the efficacy of current behavioural interventions wanes over time, reducing the impact of self-management interventions on patient health. Web-based interventions have the potential to bridge the gaps in diabetes care and self-management. Methods Our objective is to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, self-care, blood pressure, cholesterol and glycemic control and promote exercise in people with type 2 diabetes through the rigorous development and use of a web-based patient self-management intervention. This study consists of five phases: (1) intervention development; (2) feasibility testing; (3) usability testing; (4) intervention refinement; and (5) intervention evaluation using mixed methods. We will employ evidence-based strategies and tools, using a theoretical framework of self-efficacy, then elicit user feedback through focus groups and individual user testing sessions. Using iterative redesign the intervention will be refined. Once finalized, the impact of the website on patient self-efficacy, quality of life, self-care, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, blood pressure and weight will be assessed through a non-randomized observational cohort study using repeated measures modeling and individual interviews. Discussion Increasing use of the World Wide Web by consumers for health information and ongoing revolutions in social media are strong indicators that users are primed to welcome a new era of technology in health care. However, their full potential is hindered by limited knowledge regarding their effectiveness, poor usability, and high attrition rates. Our development and research agenda aims to address these limitations by improving usability, identifying characteristics associated

  11. Beyond Good Intentions: the development and evaluation of a proactive self-management course for patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Bart; de Ridder, Denise; Bensing, Jozien; Gorter, Kees; Rutten, Guy

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the development and first results of a brief self-management course for patients recently diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The intervention incorporates elements from proactive coping and self-regulation theory in a five-step plan to help newly diagnosed patients formulate and carry out intentions with regard to their self-management. The theoretical framework and course program are described, patient evaluations are summarized and proximal outcomes of the course will be analyzed, investigating whether the course is able to increase patients' proactive skills, goal attainment and confidence in dealing with self-management issues. Participants included 180 patients, diagnosed 3-33 months previously during a population screening. Participants were randomized into an intervention (n = 78) or control group (n = 102). Course evaluations were very positive, regardless of patients' demographic or medical background and participants were particularly positive about the five-step plan and potential for peer interaction. Compared with the control group, course participants improved significantly in terms of proactive coping, goal achievement and self-efficacy. An intervention based on proactive coping appears to meet the needs of patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, teaching them new proactive skills, improving their goal achievement and increasing their self-efficacy in dealing with their self-management tasks.

  12. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, M.; de Wit, M.; Sieverink, F.; Roelofsen, Y.; Hendriks, S. H.; Bilo, H. J. G.; Snoek, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals. PMID:26955640

  13. Uptake and Effects of the e-Vita Personal Health Record with Self-Management Support and Coaching, for Type 2 Diabetes Patients Treated in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, M; de Wit, M; Sieverink, F; Roelofsen, Y; Hendriks, S H; Bilo, H J G; Snoek, F J

    2016-01-01

    We studied the use, uptake, and effects of e-Vita, a personal health record, with self-management support and personalized asynchronized coaching, for type 2 diabetes patients treated in primary care. Patients were invited by their practice nurse to join the study aimed at testing use and effects of a personal health record. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Uptake and usage were monitored using log data. Outcomes were self-reported diabetes self-care, diabetes-related distress, and emotional wellbeing. Patients' health status was collected from their medical chart. 132 patients agreed to participate in the study of which less than half (46.1%) did not return to the personal health record after 1st login. Only 5 patients used the self-management support program within the personal health record, 3 of whom asked a coach for feedback. Low use of the personal health record was registered. No statistical significant differences on any of the outcome measures were found between baseline and 6 month follow-up. This study showed minimal impact of implementing a personal health record including self-management support in primary diabetes care. Successful adoption of web-based platforms, as ongoing patient centered care, is hard to achieve without additional strategies aimed at enhancing patient motivation and engaging professionals.

  14. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program in the Basque Country

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa de Retana Garcia, Lourdes; Sánchez Perez, Álvaro; Martinez Carazo, Catalina; Arbonies Ortiz, Juan Carlos; Rua Portu, Maria Angeles; Piñera Elorriaga, Koldo; Zenarutzabeitia Pikatza, Amaya; Urquiza Bengoa, Miren Nekane; Méndez Sanpedro, Tomás; Oses Portu, Ana; Gorostidi Fano, Lourdes; Aguirre Sorondo, Miren Bakarne; Vrotsou, Kalliopi; Rotaeche Del Campo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of the Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program (SDSMP) in the primary care setting of the Basque Health Service and offer initial estimations of the randomized controlled trial (RCT) effects. Methods. Ten health centers (HCs) participated in a single-arm pilot study with a 6-month follow-up period between February 2011 and June 2012. Recruitment was performed via invitation letters, health professionals, and the local media. Each intervention group consisted of 8–15 people. The ability of each HC in forming up to 2 groups, participants' compliance with the course, and coordination and data collection issues were evaluated. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was the main outcome variable. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular risk factors, drugs consumption, medical visits, quality of life, self-efficacy, physical exercise, and diet. Results. Two HCs did not organize a course. A total of 173 patients initiated the program, 2 dropped out without baseline data, and 90% completed it. No pre-post HbA1c differences existed. Certain improvements were observed in blood pressure control, self-efficacy, physical activity, and some dietary habits. Conclusion. The SDSMP is feasible in our setting. Our experience can be of interest when planning and conducting this program in similar health settings. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01642394. PMID:28119932

  15. Implementing asthma self-management education in medical care settings--issues and strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullen, P D; Mullen, L R

    1983-11-01

    Asthma self-management education has the potential to improve the health and quality of life for children and to reduce use of acute care services. The preparation of parents and children to prevent asthma attacks and to ameliorate acute episodes when they do occur can best be accomplished with the support of medical care providers. This analysis addresses policy issues relevant to that acceptance: the degree of integration into medical practice that is desirable; the most hospitable clinical settings; and the incentives for providers, consumers, and payers that would result in appropriate supply and use of ASME:. The analysis commences with a discussion of the costs and benefits of making ASME a part of medical care. It then turns to a description of the trends that led to the current array of institutions, services, and incentives within the health care sector. Future changes in family context, financing, and other determinants of the use of medical services by children and youth are forecast. The framework for the analysis of incentives is diffusion of innovation. ASME is analyzed according to the attributes that generally facilitate the acceptance of a new procedure. In its current form and with current incentives, ASME is fairly complex and difficult to communicate, has little relative advantage, and is not necessarily compatible with the usual provider goals. The motivating factors for three interrelated groups-providers, consumers, and third-party payers-and leverage points for the application of incentives are identified. The latter include reimbursement, standards of practice, information generation and flow, insurance regulation, institutional development, and research funding. Important information to potential adopters includes the definition of the service, its optimal intensity and mix of providers, and its effects on net costs and quality of life.

  16. The reach of chronic-disease self-management education programs to rural populations.

    PubMed

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ahn, SangNam; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the sociodemographic characteristics of rural residents who participated in chronic-disease self-management education (CDSME) program workshops and the extent to which CDSME programs were utilized by those with limited access to health care services. We analyzed data from the first 100,000 adults who attended CDSME program workshops during a national dissemination spanning 45 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. Approximately 24% of participants lived in rural areas. Overall, 42% of all participants were minorities; urban areas reached more minority participants (48%) than rural areas (25%). The average age of participants was high in rural (age, μ = 66.1) and urban (age, μ = 67.3) areas. In addition, the average number of chronic conditions was higher (p < 0.01) in rural (μ = 2.6 conditions) versus urban (μ = 2.4 conditions) areas. Successful completion of CDSME programs (i.e., attending four or more of the six workshop sessions) was higher (p < 0.01) in rural versus urban areas (78% versus 77%). Factors associated with higher likelihood of successful completion of CDSME programs included being Black (OR = 1.25) versus White and living in rural (versus urban) areas (OR = 1.09). Factors associated with lower likelihood of successful completion included being male (OR = 0.92) and residing in a primary care Health Professional Shortage Area or HPSA (versus a non-HPSA) (OR = 0.93). Findings highlight the capability of CDSME programs to reach rural residents, yet dissemination efforts can be further enhanced to ensure minorities and individuals in a HPSA utilize this program. Tailored strategies are needed to increase participant recruitment and retention in rural areas to overcome traditional barriers to health service access.

  17. A Mobile Health Intervention for Self-Management and Lifestyle Change for Persons With Type 2 Diabetes, Part 2: One-Year Results From the Norwegian Randomized Controlled Trial RENEWING HEALTH

    PubMed Central

    Torbjørnsen, Astrid; Wahl, Astrid Klopstad; Jenum, Anne Karen; Småstuen, Milada Cvancarova; Årsand, Eirik; Ribu, Lis

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-management is crucial in the daily management of type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that mHealth may be an important method for enhancing self-management when delivered in combination with health counseling. Objective The objective of this study was to test whether the use of a mobile phone–based self-management system used for 1 year, with or without telephone health counseling by a diabetes specialist nurse for the first 4 months, could improve glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, self-management, and health-related quality of life compared with usual care. Methods We conducted a 3-arm prospective randomized controlled trial involving 2 intervention groups and 1 control group. Eligible participants were persons with type 2 diabetes with an HbA1c level ≥7.1% (≥54.1 mmol/mol) and aged ≥18 years. Both intervention groups received the mobile phone–based self-management system Few Touch Application (FTA). The FTA consisted of a blood glucose–measuring system with automatic wireless data transfer, diet manual, physical activity registration, and management of personal goals, all recorded and operated using a diabetes diary app on the mobile phone. In addition, one intervention group received health counseling based on behavior change theory and delivered by a diabetes specialist nurse for the first 4 months after randomization. All groups received usual care by their general practitioner. The primary outcome was HbA1c level. Secondary outcomes were self-management (heiQ), health-related quality of life (SF-36), depressive symptoms (CES-D), and lifestyle changes (dietary habits and physical activity). Data were analyzed using univariate methods (t test, ANOVA) and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Results A total of 151 participants were randomized: 51 to the FTA group, 50 to the FTA-health counseling (FTA-HC) group, and 50 to the control group. Follow-up data after 1 year were available for 120 participants (79%). HbA1c

  18. Keys to Successful Diabetes Self-Management for Uninsured Patients: Social Support, Observational Learning, and Turning Points A Safety Net Providers’ Strategic Alliance Study

    PubMed Central

    Hanahan, Melissa A.; Werner, James J.; Tomsik, Phillip; Weirich, Stephen A.; Reichsman, Ann; Navracruz, Lisa; Clemons-Clark, Terri; Cella, Peggi; Terchek, Joshua; Munson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine how medically uninsured patients with limited material resources successfully manage diabetes. Methods Clinicians at 5 safety net practices enrolled uninsured adult patients (N=26) with prior diagnosis of diabetes for 6 months or longer. Patients were interviewed about enabling factors, motivations, resources, and barriers. Chart reviews and clinician surveys supplemented interview data. Interview, survey, and chart review data were analyzed and findings were summarized. Results Two distinct groups of patients were investigated: 1) “successful,” defined as those with an HbA1c of ≤7% or a recent improvement of at least 2% (n=17); and 2) “unsuccessful,” defined as patients with HbA1c of ≥9% (n=9) without recent improvement. In comparison to unsuccessful patients, successful patients more often reported having friends or family with diabetes, sought information about the disease, used evidence-based self-management strategies, held an accurate perception of their own disease control, and experienced “turning point” events that motivated increased efforts in disease management. Conclusions Uninsured safety net patients who successfully managed diabetes learned from friends and family with diabetes and leveraged disease-related events into motivational turning points. It may be beneficial for clinicians to incorporate social learning and motivational enhancement into diabetes interventions to increase patients’ motivation for improved levels of self-management. PMID:21671529

  19. Everyday Expertise in Self-Management of Diabetes in the Dominican Republic: Implications for Learning and Performance Support Systems Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes Paulino, Lisette G.

    2012-01-01

    An epidemic such as diabetes is an extremely complex public health, economic and social problem that is difficult to solve through medical expertise alone. Evidence-based models for improving healthcare delivery systems advocate educating patients to become more active participants in their own care. This shift demands preparing chronically ill…

  20. Recruitment of black women with type 2 diabetes into a self-management intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Newlin, Kelley; Melkus, Gail D'Eramo; Jefferson, Vanessa; Langerman, Susan; Womack, Julie; Chyun, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of recruitment methods to enrollment status in Black women with type 2 diabetes screened for entry into a randomized clinical trial (RCT). Using a cross-sectional study design with convenience sampling procedures, data were collected on recruitment methods to which the women responded (N=236). Results demonstrated that the RCT had a moderate overall recruitment rate of 46% and achieved only 84% of its projected accrual goal (N=109). Chi-square analysis demonstrated that enrollment outcomes varied significantly according to recruitment methods (P=.05). Recruitment methods such as community health fairs (77.8%), private practice referrals (75.0%), participant referrals (61.5%), community clinic referrals (44.6%), community advertising and marketing (40.9%), and chart review (40.4%) demonstrated variable enrollment yields. Results confirm previous findings that indicate that Black Americans may be successfully recruited into research studies at moderate rates when traditional recruitment methods are enhanced and integrated with more culturally sensitive methods. Lessons learned are considered.

  1. [Analysis of health self-management for diabetes self-efficacy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yalan; Ding, Xianbin; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Chunhua; Mao, Deqiang; Shen, Zhuozhi; Qi, Li; Lü, Xiaoyan; Lu, Junjia; Wang, Tingting

    2015-08-01

    目的:评价健康自我管理对糖尿病患者自我效能的影响效果。方法:对符合条件、自愿参与健康自我管理的184例糖尿病患者进行连续 6 周的知识和技能指导。干预前后用糖尿病患者自我效能量表(diabetes self-efficacy scale,DSES)进行问卷调查,并采用两配对样本McNemar检验比较患者在干预前后自我效能的改变。结果:干预后,患者总饮食控制、药物治疗、血糖监测、足部护理和并发症应对效能得分均较干预前明显提高(均P<0.05)。结论:健康自我管理可有效提高糖尿病患者的自我效能,改善生存质量。.

  2. Recruiting Rural Participants for a Telehealth Intervention on Diabetes Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Sheridan; Henderson, Stuart; Young, Heather M.; Ward, Deborah; Santillan, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Recruiting rural and underserved participants in behavioral health interventions is challenging. Community-based recruitment approaches are effective, but they are not always feasible in multisite, diverse community interventions. This study evaluates the feasibility of a rapid, multisite approach that uses rural clinic site coordinators to recruit study participants. The approach allows for rural recruitment in areas where researchers may not have developed long-term collaborative relationships. Methods Adults with diabetes were recruited from rural Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) clinics. Recruitment feasibility was assessed by analyzing field notes by the project manager and health coaches, and 8 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with clinic site coordinators and champions, followed by thematic analysis of field notes and interviews. Findings Forty-seven rural sites were contacted to obtain the 6 sites that participated in the study. On average, sites took 14 days to commit to study participation. One hundred and twenty-one participants were acquired from letters mailed to eligible participants and, in some sites, by follow-up phone calls from site coordinators. Facilitators and deterrents affecting study recruitment fell into 4 broad categories—study design, site, site coordinator, and participant factors. Conclusion The rapid multi-site approach led to quick and efficient recruitment of clinic sites and participants. Recruitment success was achieved in some, but not all, rural sites. The study highlights the opportunities and challenges of recruiting rural clinics and rural, underserved participants in multisite research. Suggestions are provided for improving recruitment for future interventions. PMID:23289657

  3. Development of a Health Education Program to Promote the Self-Management of Cystic Fibrosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Social learning theory formed the basis of a program to develop self-management skills in cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies for practical learning activities for patients and their families included goal setting, reinforcement, modeling, skill training, and self-monitoring. (SK)

  4. Implementing Blended Self-Managed Action Learning for Digital Entrepreneurs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shurville, Simon; Rospigliosi, Asher

    2009-01-01

    We report upon implementing blended self-managed action learning (SMAL) within graduate and postgraduate courses in digital entrepreneurship. In four out of five cases, we found that SMAL was highly motivating to our learners and integrated well with a blended and flexible approach to learning. We report a case where a SMAL set broke down due to…

  5. Patient access to healthcare services and optimisation of self-management for ethnic minority populations living with diabetes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Charlotte; Alam, Rahul; Latif, Saima; Knighting, Katherine; Williamson, Susan; Beaver, Kinta

    2012-01-01

    A higher risk of diabetes mellitus in South Asian and Black African populations combined with lower reported access and self-management-related health outcomes informed the aims of this study. Our aims were to synthesise and evaluate evidence relating to patient self-management and access to healthcare services for ethnic minority groups living with diabetes. A comprehensive search strategy was developed capturing a full range of study types from 1995-2010, including relevant hand-searched literature pre-dating 1995. Systematic database searches of MEDLINE, Cochrane, DARE, HTA and NHSEED, the British Nursing Index, CAB abstracts, EMBASE, Global Health, Health Management Information Consortium and PsychInfo were conducted, yielding 21,288 abstracts. Following search strategy refinement and the application of review eligibility criteria; 11 randomised controlled trials (RCTs), 18 qualitative studies and 18 quantitative studies were evaluated and principal results extracted. Results suggest that self-management practices are in need of targeted intervention in terms of patients' knowledge and understanding of their illness, inadequacy of information and language and communication difficulties arising from cultural differences. Access to health-care is similarly hindered by a lack of cultural sensitivity in service provision and under use of clinic-based interpreters and community-based services. Recommendations for practice and subsequent intervention primarily rest at the service level but key barriers at patient and provider levels are also identified.

  6. Holistic self-management education and support: a proposed public health model for improving women's health in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Kanchense, Jane Handina Murigwa

    2006-08-01

    The primary health care model of public health has been implemented in many countries around the globe since the Declaration of Alma Ata in 1978, without pilot testing the primary health care model. Therefore, many public health researchers have sought methods of improving primary health care by creating evidence-based models. Many of these researchers recognize the role of behavioral models in public health. These offshoots of primary health care include the ecological, care, central human capabilities, and the SPECIES models. Holistic self-management education and support is a capacity-building philosophy that ensures active involvement of consumers of health care in the planning and implementation and evaluation of health care services. It helps consumers of health care to achieve the desired improved quality of health and life in managing and sustaining their health at the grassroots level. The care model addresses disease management ideals of the in the original primary health care model. The SPECIES model addresses those aspects of the primary health care model that include the cultural and social factors, as well as individual health education and support in the original primary health care model. The ecological model offers an improvement of the socioeconomic ideal in the original primary health care model. Improving the health of individuals will prevent illness, thereby reducing health care costs and lessening the current strain on an overburdened health care system in Zimbabwe. Holistic self-management education and support links health care delivery systems with social processes. It is a best practices model that could better serve Zimbabwean girls and women by contributing positively to the national challenges in health care, thereby meeting the Zimbabwean primary health care and safe motherhood goals. It is here recommended that holistic self-management education and support must be pilot tested before being adopted as the most appropriate model for

  7. Self-Management in Daily Life with Psoriasis: An Integrative Review of Patient Needs for Structured Education

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this integrative review is to identify and discuss patient needs for education to support self-management in daily life with psoriasis. As psoriasis increasingly gains recognition as a serious chronic autoimmune skin disease with long-term impairment on the life course, and not mainly a cosmetic problem, nurses are highly challenged to develop efficient education to support patient self-management. The paper includes five stages: (1) problem identification, (2) literature search, (3) data evaluation, (4) data analysis and synthesis, and (5) presentation, based on theoretic scaffolding around the concept “need.” Nineteen of 164 original papers within nursing, medicine and psychology, and reflecting patient perspective were included. To capture the patients' cultural understanding of the implications of the disease and care, we developed an interlevel model indicating that self-experienced burden of disease and its visibility, personal conditions such as illness perception, and the patient's age at onset time are high-impact factors that should be addressed in future structured patient education programmes. The research on patient needs has hitherto focused on adults, but the problems and vulnerability associated with having a chronic and visible disease during adolescence must be acknowledged, and patient education initiatives designed for this young group are recommended. PMID:23304484

  8. Quality of life and type 1 diabetes: a study assessing patients’ perceptions and self-management needs

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Martel, Dácil; Velasco, Rebeca; Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Carrillo, Armando; Nóvoa, Francisco Javier; Wägner, Ana María

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The main objective of this study was to assess quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and explore their needs regarding and their perception of QoL living with diabetes. Materials and methods Patients with type 1 diabetes attending the outpatient endocrinology clinics of a reference hospital were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Clinical and sociodemographic data were obtained (interview and clinical records), and diabetes-related QoL was assessed using a standardized questionnaire. In 67 participants, satisfaction with treatment was also assessed, and an open interview was performed, assessing the impact of diabetes, long-term worries, flexibility, restrictions, and self-perception of QoL. Descriptive statistical analysis, bivariate analysis, and multivariate analysis were performed in order to find factors associated with QoL. Interviews were analyzed and summarized questionwise. Results Mean patient age was 31.4±11.6 years, diabetes duration 14.2±9.3 years, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) 8.5%±1.9% (69±20.8 mmol/mol International Federation of Clinical Chemistry [IFCC]). The questionnaires showed good average QoL scores (94.6+22.9) and treatment satisfaction scores (25.7±6.7). QoL worsened with increasing HbA1c, female sex, severity of complications, and lower education (r2=0.283, P<0.005). In the open interview, 68.5% of the patients reported that diabetes had changed their lives, 83.5% identified complications as their most important long-term concern, and 59.7% said that they needed more training to manage the disease. Conclusion Poor glycemic control, lower education, complications, and female sex are associated with worse QoL. Semi-structured interviews identified aspects not included in the standardized questionnaires. PMID:26396503

  9. Employee perceptions of diabetes education needs: a focus group study.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia; Jacobson, Sharol

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this descriptive non-experimental research was to assess employee perceptions of desired diabetes education through focus groups. Thirteen employees of a southern university in three focus groups identified many standard and some emerging educational topics of interest including healthier food choices when eating out, increasing activity, deciding whether highly advertised "special" products for diabetes were necessary, and recognizing the importance of obesity among children. The employees were willing to attend group meetings related to diabetes, but not to pay for them. The information will be used to plan an intervention to promote diabetes prevention and self-management in a worksite environment where diabetes costs are rising rapidly, and to support the need for a university wellness program. Occupational health nurses can address both employees' needs and employers' costs through such a program.

  10. Self-management of type 2 diabetes among African Americans in the Arkansas Delta: a strengths perspective in social-cultural context.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Gauri

    2012-02-01

    This qualitative study explored underlying factors influencing the promotion of type 2 diabetes (T2D) self-management among adult African Americans diagnosed with T2D in the Arkansas Delta. Our narrative approach gathered insights in the participants' own voices and placed their T2D self-management experiences in social-cultural-historical contexts. Using purposive sampling, 31 participants (16 women and 15 men) were selected and interviewed. The participants showed low awareness of T2D's chronic nature because of its asymptomatic or nonspecific symptoms. They interpreted medically prescribed dietary and physical exercise guidelines as impractical and culturally irrelevant for them. Medication non-adherence was due to inadequate knowledge and awareness of T2D as a chronic disease, and suspicion and mistrust of the formal medical system. To develop culturally-targeted interventions to advance self-management outcomes, we must understand from and with African Americans the strengths of social-cultural contexts in which they live and make their health behavior choices. Engaging African Americans diagnosed with T2D in community-based programs may be a promising approach.

  11. The Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ): development and evaluation of an instrument to assess diabetes self-care activities associated with glycaemic control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Though several questionnaires on self-care and regimen adherence have been introduced, the evaluations do not always report consistent and substantial correlations with measures of glycaemic control. Small ability to explain variance in HbA1c constitutes a significant limitation of an instrument’s use for scientific purposes as well as clinical practice. In order to assess self-care activities which can predict glycaemic control, the Diabetes Self-Management Questionnaire (DSMQ) was designed. Methods A 16 item questionnaire to assess self-care activities associated with glycaemic control was developed, based on theoretical considerations and a process of empirical improvements. Four subscales, ‘Glucose Management’ (GM), ‘Dietary Control’ (DC), ‘Physical Activity’ (PA), and ‘Health-Care Use’ (HU), as well as a ‘Sum Scale’ (SS) as a global measure of self-care were derived. To evaluate its psychometric quality, 261 patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes were assessed with the DSMQ and an established analogous scale, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure (SDSCA). The DSMQ’s item and scale characteristics as well as factorial and convergent validity were analysed, and its convergence with HbA1c was compared to the SDSCA. Results The items showed appropriate characteristics (mean item-total-correlation: 0.46 ± 0.12; mean correlation with HbA1c: -0.23 ± 0.09). Overall internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha) was good (0.84), consistencies of the subscales were acceptable (GM: 0.77; DC: 0.77; PA: 0.76; HU: 0.60). Principal component analysis indicated a four factor structure and confirmed the designed scale structure. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated appropriate fit of the four factor model. The DSMQ scales showed significant convergent correlations with their parallel SDSCA scales (GM: 0.57; DC: 0.52; PA: 0.58; HU: n/a; SS: 0.57) and HbA1c (GM: -0.39; DC: -0.30; PA: -0.15; HU: -0.22; SS: -0.40). All correlations with

  12. The Impact of an Internet-Based Self-Management Intervention (HeLP-Diabetes) on the Psychological Well-Being of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Mixed-Method Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Megan; Dack, Charlotte; Barker, Chris; Murray, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This mixed-method study assessed the impact of an internet-based, self-management intervention (“HeLP-Diabetes”) on the psychological well-being of adults with type 2 diabetes. Nineteen participants were recruited from 3 general practices. Data were collected at baseline and at 6 weeks follow-up. Access to HeLP-Diabetes was associated with a significant decrease in participants' diabetes-related distress (Z = 2.04, p = 0.04, and d = 0.28). No significant differences were found in emotional distress or self-efficacy. The qualitative data found that participants reported improvements including increased self-efficacy and support, better management of low mood, greater diabetes awareness, and taking the condition more seriously. Participants also reported making improvements to their eating habits, exercise routine, and medical management. Some negative experiences associated with using the intervention were mentioned including feelings of guilt for not using the intervention as suggested or not making any behavioral changes, as well as technical and navigational frustrations with the intervention. Internet-based self-management interventions may have the potential to decrease diabetes-related distress in people with type 2 diabetes. The qualitative data also suggests internet interventions can positively impact both psychological and behavioural outcomes of adults with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26682226

  13. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Community Health Worker Self-Management Support Intervention Among Low-Income Adults With Diabetes, Seattle, Washington, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Leslie; Silverman, Julie; Kiefer, Meghan; Hebert, Paul; Lessler, Dan; Krieger, James

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Community health workers (CHWs) can improve diabetes outcomes; however, questions remain about translating research findings into practical low-intensity models for safety-net providers. We tested the effectiveness of a home-based low-intensity CHW intervention for improving health outcomes among low-income adults with diabetes. Methods Low-income patients with glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 8.0% or higher in the 12 months before enrollment from 3 safety-net providers were randomized to a 12-month CHW-delivered diabetes self-management intervention or usual care. CHWs were based at a local health department. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline enrollment to 12 months; secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipid levels, quality of life, and health care use. Results The change in HbA1c in the intervention group (n = 145) (unadjusted mean of 9.09% to 8.58%, change of −0.51) compared with the control group (n = 142) (9.04% to 8.71%, change of −0.33) was not significant (P = .54). In an analysis of participants with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >10%), the intervention group had a 1.23-point greater decrease in HbA1c compared with controls (P = .046). For the entire study population, we found a decrease in reported physician visits (P < .001) and no improvement in health-related quality of life (P = .07) in the intervention group compared with the control group. Conclusion A low-intensity CHW-delivered intervention to support diabetes self-management did not significantly improve HbA1c relative to usual care. Among the subgroup of participants with poor glycemic control (HbA1c >10% at baseline), the intervention was effective. PMID:28182863

  14. Lessons from a community-based mHealth diabetes self-management program: "it's not just about the cell phone".

    PubMed

    Katz, Richard; Mesfin, Tsega; Barr, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Cell phone-assisted self-management of diabetes offers a new approach to improving chronic care; however, introducing this new technology presents many challenges to a health care team. The George Washington University-District of Columbia Cell Phone Diabetes Project enrolled 32 patients with Type 2 diabetes from a community clinic using patients' cell phones connected to the Well Doc Diabetes Manager System with monitoring by case managers and monthly reports to primary care providers. Despite monetary incentives (cell phone rebates), dropout rate was high (50%), because of lack of use or inability to afford low-cost cell phone service. Active patients had sustained system use with improved diabetes standard-of-care goals and reduced hospitalizations and emergency department visits. On the basis of this pilot program, the authors assessed the multiple links in the chain (patients, case managers, primary care providers, support staff, medical record systems, disease management software, cell phones) that affect the success of a mHealth chronic care strategy.

  15. Psychometric properties of Osteoporosis Knowledge Tool and self-management behaviours among Malaysian type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Abdulameer, Shaymaa Abdalwahed; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Subramaniam, Karuppiah; Sahib, Mohanad Naji

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is a major growing public health problem and it is clear that much needs to be done to bridge the gap between patients and practitioners. However, the educator must have a valid and reliable tool to evaluate the effectiveness of the teaching and learning that are done. Osteoporosis Knowledge Tool (OKT) provides an important strategy for healthcare professionals to start early intervention for patients who are at risk of osteoporosis. The aims of this study were to translate and examine the psychometric properties of the Malaysian version of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Tool (OKT-M) among 250 type 2 diabetes patients and to assess factors that affect diabetic patients' osteoporosis knowledge. The OKT English version was translated and validated using the internationally accepted and recommended methodology. The sensitivity and specificity of OKT-M was calculated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The face and content validity showed acceptable results. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, mean difficulty factor and discriminatory power values were 0.72, 0.83, 0.47 ± 0.16 and 0.96, respectively. The cut-off point of the OKT-M to predict osteoporosis/osteopenia was 14 with optimal sensitivity (84.1%) and specificity (85.5%). Regression analysis revealed that health belief, self-efficacy and some demographic data had an impact on the OKT-M. The findings of this validation study indicate that the OKT-M is a reliable and valid tool with good psychometric properties in the Malaysian setting. The OKT-M is an appropriate tool for application in clinical setting to identify patients need for a bone health-promoting intervention regarding lifestyle behaviour changes.

  16. 3D Simulation as a Learning Environment for Acquiring the Skill of Self-Management: An Experience Involving Spanish University Students of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cela-Ranilla, Jose María; Esteve-Gonzalez, Vanessa; Esteve-Mon, Francesc; Gisbert-Cervera, Merce

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyze how 57 Spanish university students of Education developed a learning process in a virtual world by conducting activities that involved the skill of self-management. The learning experience comprised a serious game designed in a 3D simulation environment. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used in the…

  17. Even the Best Laid Plans Sometimes Go Askew: Career Self-Management Processes, Career Shocks, and the Decision to Pursue Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibert, Scott E.; Kraimer, Maria L.; Holtom, Brooks C.; Pierotti, Abigail J.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on career self-management frameworks as well as image theory and the unfolding model of turnover, we developed a model predicting early career employees' decisions to pursue graduate education. Using a sample of 337 alumni from 2 universities, we found that early career individuals with intrinsic career goals, who engaged in career…

  18. Reconceptualizing the Self-Managing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Contrary to the claims of its critics, the introduction of self-managing schools under the ERA and its counterpart in other countries did not lead to the privatization of public education. Self-managing schools have been one manifestation of a general trend to decentralization in public education in many countries since the late 1960s. The…

  19. Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helgeson, Lars; Francis, Carolee Dodge

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes is a prevalent disease in the United States. The emergence of Type 2 diabetes among children and adolescents within the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities brings increased public health and quality of life concerns. In this article, the authors describe an initiative titled "Diabetes Education in Tribal Schools K-12…

  20. Impact of Demographic, Socioeconomic, and Psychological Factors on Glycemic Self-Management in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A.; Mavarez-Martinez, Ana; Arias-Morales, Carlos E.; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Rogers, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is reported as one of the most complex chronic diseases worldwide. In the United States, Type 2 DM (T2DM) is the seventh leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Individuals with diabetes require lifelong personal care to reduce the possibility of developing long-term complications. A good knowledge of diabetes risk factors, including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, family history of DM, and sedentary lifestyle, play an essential role in prevention and treatment. Also, sociodemographic, economic, psychological, and environmental factors are directly and indirectly associated with diabetes control and health outcomes. Our review intends to analyze the interaction between demographics, knowledge, environment, and other diabetes-related factors based on an extended literature search, and to provide insight for improving glycemic control and reducing the incidence of chronic complications. PMID:27672634

  1. Impact of Demographic, Socioeconomic, and Psychological Factors on Glycemic Self-Management in Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zacarias, Alicia A; Mavarez-Martinez, Ana; Arias-Morales, Carlos E; Stoicea, Nicoleta; Rogers, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is reported as one of the most complex chronic diseases worldwide. In the United States, Type 2 DM (T2DM) is the seventh leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Individuals with diabetes require lifelong personal care to reduce the possibility of developing long-term complications. A good knowledge of diabetes risk factors, including obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, family history of DM, and sedentary lifestyle, play an essential role in prevention and treatment. Also, sociodemographic, economic, psychological, and environmental factors are directly and indirectly associated with diabetes control and health outcomes. Our review intends to analyze the interaction between demographics, knowledge, environment, and other diabetes-related factors based on an extended literature search, and to provide insight for improving glycemic control and reducing the incidence of chronic complications.

  2. Mobile App-Based Interventions to Support Diabetes Self-Management: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials to Identify Functions Associated with Glycemic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Yao, Xun; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Nicolucci, Antonio; Dong, Yajie; Kwong, Joey; Li, Ling; Sun, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobile health apps for diabetes self-management have different functions. However, the efficacy and safety of each function are not well studied, and no classification is available for these functions. Objective The aims of this study were to (1) develop and validate a taxonomy of apps for diabetes self-management, (2) investigate the glycemic efficacy of mobile app-based interventions among adults with diabetes in a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and (3) explore the contribution of different function to the effectiveness of entire app-based interventions using the taxonomy. Methods We developed a 3-axis taxonomy with columns of clinical modules, rows of functional modules and cells of functions with risk assessments. This taxonomy was validated by reviewing and classifying commercially available diabetes apps. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov from January 2007 to May 2016. We included RCTs of adult outpatients with diabetes that compared using mobile app-based interventions with usual care alone. The mean differences (MDs) in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and risk ratios of adverse events were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. After taxonomic classification, we performed exploratory subgroup analyses of the presence or absence of each module across the included app-based interventions. Results Across 12 included trials involving 974 participants, using app-based interventions was associated with a clinically significant reduction of HbA1c (MD 0.48%, 95% CI 0.19%-0.77%) without excess adverse events. Larger HbA1c reductions were noted among patients with type 2 diabetes than those with type 1 diabetes (MD 0.67%, 95% CI 0.30%-1.03% vs MD 0.36%, 95% CI 0.08%-0.81%). Having a complication prevention module in app-based interventions was associated with a greater HbA1c reduction (with complication

  3. A mobile diabetes management and educational system for type-2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia (SAED)

    PubMed Central

    Istepanian, Robert; Philip, Nada

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a chronic disease, with high prevalence across many nations, which is characterized by elevated level of blood glucose and risk of acute and chronic complication. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) has one of the highest levels of diabetes prevalence globally. It is well-known that the treatment of diabetes is complex process and requires both lifestyle change and clear pharmacologic treatment plan. To avoid the complication from diabetes, the effective behavioural change and extensive education and self-management is one of the key approaches to alleviate such complications. However, this process is lengthy and expensive. The recent studies on the user of smart phone technologies for diabetes self-management have proven to be an effective tool in controlling hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels especially in type-2 diabetic (T2D) patients. However, to date no reported study addressed the effectiveness of this approach in the in Saudi patients. This study investigates the impact of using mobile health technologies for the self-management of diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Methods In this study, an intelligent mobile diabetes management system (SAED), tailored for T2D patients in KSA was developed. A pilot study of the SAED system was conducted in Saudi Arabia with 20 diabetic patients for 6 months duration. The patients were randomly categorized into a control group who did not use the SAED system and an intervention group whom used the SAED system for their diabetes management during this period. At the end of the follow-up period, the HbA1c levels in the patients in both groups were measure together with a diabetes knowledge test was also conducted to test the diabetes awareness of the patients. Results The results of SAED pilot study showed that the patients in the intervention group were able to significantly decrease their HbA1c levels compared to the control group. The SAED system also enhanced the diabetes awareness amongst the patients in the

  4. Diabetes Education. Program Evaluation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IOX Assessment Associates, Culver City, CA.

    Intended as a resource for individuals wishing to evaluate diabetes education programs, this handbook, one of a series of seven, provides a collection of measuring devices that can improve the quality of such evaluations. Chapter 1 introduces the handbook's contents and outlines evaluation related issues specific to diabetes education programs.…

  5. "Governare il diabete" ("to steer diabetes"): a new proposal for diabetic camps.

    PubMed

    Salvatoni, Alessandro; Pompili, Valeria; Biasoli, Roberta; Cardani, Roberta; Arioli, Gianluigi; Nespoli, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    "Governare il diabete" (the Italian translation of "to steer diabetes") is a project which gives young diabetics the opportunity of sailing with non-diabetic companions in a protected and educational environment. The education technique, based on the parallelism between sailing and diabetes, encourage correct self-management of both diabetes related and unrelated problems. The impact of the experience on self-esteem, quality of life and metabolic control is currently under investigation.

  6. Evaluation of a Behavioral Mobile Phone App Intervention for the Self-Management of Type 2 Diabetes: Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gary; Yu, Catherine; Rotondi, Michael; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) struggle with the management of their condition due to difficulty relating lifestyle behaviors with glycemic control. While self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) has proven to be effective for those treated with insulin, it has been shown to be less beneficial for those only treated with oral medications or lifestyle modification. We hypothesized that the effective self-management of non-insulin treated T2DM requires a behavioral intervention that empowers patients with the ability to self-monitor, understand the impact of lifestyle behaviors on glycemic control, and adjust their self-care based on contextualized SMBG data. Objective The primary objective of this randomized controlled trial (RCT) is to determine the impact of bant2, an evidence-based, patient-centered, behavioral mobile app intervention, on the self-management of T2DM. Our second postulation is that automated feedback delivered through the mobile app will be as effective, less resource intensive, and more scalable than interventions involving additional health care provider feedback. Methods This study is a 12-month, prospective, multicenter RCT in which 150 participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: the control group will receive current standard of care, and the intervention group will receive the mobile phone app system in addition to standard of care. The primary outcome measure is change in glycated hemoglobin A1c from baseline to 12 months. Results The first patient was enrolled on July 28, 2015, and we anticipate completing this study by September, 2018. Conclusions This RCT is one of the first to evaluate an evidence-based mobile app that focuses on facilitating lifestyle behavior change driven by contextualized and structured SMBG. The results of this trial will provide insights regarding the usage of mobile tools and consumer-grade devices for diabetes self-care, the economic model of using incentives to motivate

  7. Educational Needs for Improving Self-care in Heart Failure Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Eun Seok; Clark, Patricia C.; Reilly, Carolyn Miller; Higgins, Melinda; Lobb, Maureen; Smith, Andrew L.; Dunbar, Sandra B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the need for self-monitoring and self-care education in heart failure patients with diabetes (HF-DM patients) by describing cognitive and affective factors to provide guidance in developing effective self- management education. Method A cross-sectional correlation design was employed using baseline patient data from a study testing a 12 week patient and family dyad intervention to improve dietary and medication-taking self-management behaviors in HF patients. Data from 116 participants recruited from metropolitan Atlanta area were used. Demographic and co-morbidities, physical function, psychological distress, relationship with health care provider, self-efficacy (medication taking and low sodium diet), and behavioral outcomes (medications, dietary habits) were assessed. Descriptive statistics and a series of chi-square tests, t-tests or Mann Whitney tests were performed to compare HF patients with and without DM. Results HF-DM patients were older, heavier, had more co- morbidities, and took more daily medications than HF patients. High self-efficacy on medication and low sodium diet was reported in both groups with no significant difference. Although HF-DM patients took more daily medications than HF, both groups exhibited high HF medication taking behaviors. The HF-DM patients consumed significantly lower total sugar than HF patients, but clinically higher levels of sodium. Conclusions Diabetes educators need to be aware of potential conflicts of treatment regimens to manage two chronic diseases. Special and integrated diabetes self-management education programs which incorporate principles of HF self-management should be developed to improve self-management behavior in HF-DM patients. PMID:22722611

  8. The challenge of integrating self-management support into clinical settings.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Best practice diabetes mellitus clinical treatment and education takes place in the medical clinic, however, patient outcomes are largely mediated through their own behaviour and lifestyle that occurs after they leave the clinical setting. Once they return home, people usually continue to engage in the social, cultural and lifestyle behaviours that had contributed to having diabetes in the first place. Although a host of factors (e.g. economic, health care team and system, condition and client-related) can impact a client's capacity to self-manage, there are client, organizational and community level strategies that may partially mitigate these difficulties. To address client behaviour, clinicians are increasingly becoming skilled to incorporate self-management support including behavioural counselling interventions into routine practice. At the organizational level, the operation and structure of the clinical setting may create difficulty for staff to provide self-management support. Sustaining benefits on a day-to-day basis presents an additional challenge. This article will review several common implementation barriers to self-management support and describe strategies and techniques used elsewhere to successfully integrate self-management support as a core care component for persons with diabetes.

  9. Lay Health Trainers Supporting Self-Management amongst Those with Low Heath Literacy and Diabetes: Lessons from a Mixed Methods Pilot, Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Bartlam, Bernadette; Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian; Protheroe, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a mixed methods process evaluation of a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing a Lay Health Trainer (LHT) intervention and usual care for those with poorly controlled Type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM). Set in a deprived area in the UK, this research explores patient and health care practitioner (HCP) views on whether a structured interview between a patient and a Lay Health Trainer (LHT), for the purpose of developing a tailored self-management plan for patients, is acceptable and likely to change health behaviours. In doing so, it considers the implications for a future, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were patients, LHTs delivering the intervention, service managers, and practice nurses recruiting patients to the study. Patients were purposively sampled on their responses to a baseline survey, and semistructured interviews were conducted within an exploratory thematic analysis framework. Findings indicate that the intervention is acceptable to patients and HCPs. However, LHTs found it challenging to work with older patients with long-term and/or complex conditions. In order to address this, given an ageing population and concomitant increases in those with such health needs, LHT training should develop skills working with these populations. The design of any future RCT intervention should take account of this.

  10. Lay Health Trainers Supporting Self-Management amongst Those with Low Heath Literacy and Diabetes: Lessons from a Mixed Methods Pilot, Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    This article reports a mixed methods process evaluation of a pilot feasibility randomised controlled trial comparing a Lay Health Trainer (LHT) intervention and usual care for those with poorly controlled Type 2 Diabetes Melitus (T2DM). Set in a deprived area in the UK, this research explores patient and health care practitioner (HCP) views on whether a structured interview between a patient and a Lay Health Trainer (LHT), for the purpose of developing a tailored self-management plan for patients, is acceptable and likely to change health behaviours. In doing so, it considers the implications for a future, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Participants were patients, LHTs delivering the intervention, service managers, and practice nurses recruiting patients to the study. Patients were purposively sampled on their responses to a baseline survey, and semistructured interviews were conducted within an exploratory thematic analysis framework. Findings indicate that the intervention is acceptable to patients and HCPs. However, LHTs found it challenging to work with older patients with long-term and/or complex conditions. In order to address this, given an ageing population and concomitant increases in those with such health needs, LHT training should develop skills working with these populations. The design of any future RCT intervention should take account of this. PMID:27840834

  11. Diabetes Case Management in Primary Care: The New Brunswick Experience and Expanding the Practice of the Certified Diabetes Educator Nurse into Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Jones, Shelley L

    2015-08-01

    The role of the outreach diabetes case manager in New Brunswick, Canada, was first developed in the Moncton Area of Horizon Health Network in response to a physician-identified gap between patients' diagnoses of diabetes and their attendance at the local diabetes education centre. This model of collaborative interprofessional practice increases support for primary care providers and people living with diabetes in that they are being provided the services of certified diabetes educators who can address knowledge gaps with respect to evidence-based guidelines and best practice, promote advancement of diabetes and chronic-disease management therapies and support adherence to treatment plans and self-management practices. This report chronicles a review of the implementation, expansion and evaluation of the outreach diabetes case manager model in the province of New Brunswick, Canada, along with the rationale for development of the role for registered nurses in other jurisdictions.

  12. Barriers and facilitating factors for disease self-management: a qualitative analysis of perceptions of patients receiving care for type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension in San José, Costa Rica and Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The burden of cardiovascular disease is growing in the Mesoamerican region. Patients’ disease self-management is an important contributor to control of cardiovascular disease. Few studies have explored factors that facilitate and inhibit disease self-management in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in urban settings in the region. This article presents patients’ perceptions of barriers and facilitating factors to disease self-management, and offers considerations for health care professionals in how to support them. Methods In 2011, 12 focus groups were conducted with a total of 70 adults with type 2 diabetes and/or hypertension who attended urban public health centers in San José, Costa Rica and Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas, Mexico. Focus group discussions were transcribed and coded using a content analysis approach to identify themes. Themes were organized using the trans-theoretical model, and other themes that transcend the individual level were also considered. Results Patients were at different stages in their readiness-to-change, and barriers and facilitating factors are presented for each stage. Barriers to disease self-management included: not accepting the disease, lack of information about symptoms, vertical communication between providers and patients, difficulty negotiating work and health care commitments, perception of healthy food as expensive or not filling, difficulty adhering to treatment and weight loss plans, additional health complications, and health care becoming monotonous. Factors facilitating disease self-management included: a family member’s positive experience, sense of urgency, accessible health care services and guidance from providers, inclusive communication, and family and community support. Financial difficulty, gender roles, differences by disease type, faith, and implications for families and their support were identified as cross-cutting themes that may add an additional layer of complexity to

  13. Factors Associated with Participation in Diabetes Education: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Min; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background A recent study revealed that the participation rate in diabetes education among diabetic patients was only about 50% in Korea. We investigated the factors associated with participation in diabetes education. Methods The study included 1,255 patients (≥19 years old) diagnosed with diabetes drawn from the total Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007 to 2009 population comprising 30,705 individuals. We compared age, sex, and age- and sex-adjusted clinical characteristics in patients who had received diabetes education versus those who had not. Results Of the 1,255 patients, 19.8% (n=248) had received diabetes education. Patients in the group who received diabetes education were younger, diagnosed at an earlier age, had a longer diabetes duration and were more likely to be using insulin therapy compared with the group who did not receive diabetes education (P<0.001). The group who received diabetes education included fewer manual workers (P<0.001) but more college graduates (P=0.004) compared with the group who did not receive diabetes education. Logistic regression analysis revealed that longer diabetes duration increased the likelihood of receiving diabetes education (odds ratio [OR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.06; P=0.004). Junior high school (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.91; P=0.026) and elementary school education levels (OR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.65; P=0.001) versus college graduation were inversely correlated with participation in diabetes self-management education. Non-insulin therapy reduced the likelihood of receiving diabetes education (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.21 to 0.64; P<0.001). Conclusion Longer diabetes duration, insulin therapy, and higher education level were positively associated with the completion of diabetes education. PMID:27766791

  14. Social media for diabetes health education - inclusive or exclusive?

    PubMed

    Pal, B Rani

    2014-01-01

    Technological innovations are rising rapidly and are inevitably becoming part of the health care environment. Patients frequently access Social media as a forum for discussion of personal health issues; and healthcare providers are now considering ways of harnessing social media as a source of learning and teaching. This review highlights some of the complex issues of using social media as an opportunity for interaction between public- patient-healthcare staff; considers the impact of self- education and self-management for patients with diabetes, and explores some recent advances in delivering education for staff. When using any information technology, the emphasis should rely on being assessed rigorously to show it promotes health education safely, can be recognized as delivering up-to- date health information effectively, and should ensure there is no bias in selective communication, or disadvantage to isolated patient groups.

  15. Using an electronic self-management tool to support patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a CKD clinic self-care model.

    PubMed

    Ong, Stephanie W; Jassal, Sarbjit V; Porter, Eveline; Logan, Alexander G; Miller, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    New healthcare delivery models are needed to enhance the patient experience and improve quality of care for individuals with chronic conditions such as kidney disease. One potential avenue is to implement self-management strategies. There is growing evidence that self-management interventions help optimize various aspects of chronic disease management. With the increasing use of information technology (IT) in health care, chronic disease management programs are incorporating IT solutions to support patient self-management practices. IT solutions have the ability to promote key principles of self-management, namely education, empowerment, and collaboration. Positive clinical outcomes have been demonstrated for a number of chronic conditions when IT solutions were incorporated into self-management programs. There is a paucity of evidence for self-management in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Furthermore, IT strategies have not been tested in this patient population to the same extent as other chronic conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension). Therefore, it is currently unknown if IT strategies will promote self-management behaviors and lead to improvements in overall patient care. We designed and developed an IT solution called My KidneyCare Centre to support self-management strategies for patients with CKD. In this review, we discuss the rationale and vision of incorporating an electronic self-management tool to support the care of patients with CKD.

  16. A gender-centered ecological framework targeting Black men living with diabetes: integrating a "masculinity" perspective in diabetes management and education research.

    PubMed

    Jack, Leonard; Toston, Tyra; Jack, Nkenge H; Sims, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Blacks have traditionally experienced a disproportionate burden of diabetes in the United States. Research published from 1980 to 2008 revealed a paucity of diabetes education and management research targeting Black men. There is a paucity of published research that takes into consideration attributes of "being male," such as masculinity, and how its attributes influence diabetes self-management behaviors. This article discusses three important factors that may help explain diabetes-related disparities among Black men.These factors include absence of consistent sources of health care, lack of health insurance, and the absence of a masculinity perspective in diabetes education and management research. This article offers a gender-centered ecological framework that examines pathways between demographic factors, family functioning, knowledge and psychological health, biological health, behavioral health and medical compliance, masculinity, and diabetes-related outcomes. Recommendations for future research that consider how aspects of masculinity might lead to the identification of gender-based risk factors are presented.

  17. Mediators and Moderators of Improvements in Medication Adherence: Secondary Analysis of a Community Health Worker-Led Diabetes Medication Self-Management Support Program.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Rebecca; Choi, Hwajung; Mase, Rebecca; Fagerlin, Angela; Spencer, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2016-07-14

    Objective In a randomized controlled trial we compared two models of community health worker-led diabetes medication decision support for low-income Latino and African American adults with diabetes. Most outcomes were improved when community health workers used either an interactive e-Health tool or print materials. This article investigates mediators and moderators of improved medication adherence in these two models. Method Because both programs significantly improved satisfaction with medication information, medication knowledge, and decisional conflict, we examined whether improvements in each of these outcomes in turn were associated with improvements in self-reported medication adherence, and if so, whether these improvements were mediated by improvements in diabetes self-efficacy or diabetes distress. Potential moderators of improvement included gender, race/ethnicity, age, education, insulin use, health literacy, and baseline self-efficacy, diabetes distress, and A1c. Results A total of 176 participants (94%) completed all assessments. After adjusting for potential confounders, only increased satisfaction with medication information was correlated with improved medication adherence (p = .024). Improved self-efficacy, but not diabetes distress, was associated with improvements in both satisfaction with medication information and medication adherence. However, the Sobel-Goodman Mediation test did not support improvements in self-efficacy as a mechanism by which improved satisfaction led to better adherence. None of the examined variables achieved statistical significance as moderators. Conclusions Improvements in satisfaction with medication information but not in medication knowledge or decision conflict were associated with improvements in medication adherence. Interventions that target low-income ethnic and racial minorities may need to focus on increasing participants' satisfaction with information provided on diabetes medications and not just improving

  18. Even the best laid plans sometimes go askew: career self-management processes, career shocks, and the decision to pursue graduate education.

    PubMed

    Seibert, Scott E; Kraimer, Maria L; Holtom, Brooks C; Pierotti, Abigail J

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on career self-management frameworks as well as image theory and the unfolding model of turnover, we developed a model predicting early career employees' decisions to pursue graduate education. Using a sample of 337 alumni from 2 universities, we found that early career individuals with intrinsic career goals, who engaged in career planning, who were less satisfied with their career, or who experienced impactful positive career shocks were more likely to intend to go to graduate school. In contrast, individuals with extrinsic career goals who were highly satisfied with their careers were less likely to intend to go to graduate school. Graduate education intentions, career planning, and the impact of having one's mentor leave the organization positively related to actual applications to graduate school. However, having extrinsic career goals, an impactful sooner than expected raise or promotion (a positive career shock), and a negative organizational change (a negative career shock) negatively related to the likelihood of applying. The career shocks' direct relationship to applications to graduate school, regardless of one's intentions, suggests that "the best laid plans" can sometimes be altered by unplanned events. This study contributes to the literatures on career self-management and graduate education and extends the application of the shock construct from the unfolding model of turnover to other career-related decisions.

  19. Find a Diabetes Educator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Corporate Opportunities Annual Meeting Mailing Lists Favorably Reviewed Advertising DiMedex Media Resources Quote an Expert About Diabetes ... Media Policy | Contact AADE | Sitemap Copyright 2016 AADE FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn Pinterest Google Plus Instagram

  20. 75 FR 47458 - TRICARE; Diabetic Education

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 199 RIN 0720-AB32 TRICARE; Diabetic Education AGENCY: Office of the... final rule to clarify TRICARE coverage for diabetic education. This rule introduces new definitions and... changes pertaining to diabetic education. DATES: Effective Date: This final rule is effective September...

  1. Family Model of Diabetes Education with a Pacific Islander Community

    PubMed Central

    McElfish, Pearl Anna; Bridges, Melissa D.; Hudson, Jonell S.; Purvis, Rachel S.; Bursac, Zoran; Kohler, Peter O.; Goulden, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Structured Abstract Purpose The purpose of this study is to use a community-based participatory approach to pilot test a family model of diabetes education conducted in participants’ homes with extended family members. Approximately 50% of Marshallese adults have type 2 diabetes, and prior attempts at diabetes education have not been shown effective due in large part to very high attrition. Research Design and Methods The pilot test included six families (27 participants) who took part in a family model of diabetes self-management education (DSME) using an intervention driven pre-test/post-test design with the aim of improving glycemic control as measured by A1C. Questionnaires and additional biometric data were also collected. Researchers systematically documented elements of feasibility using participant observations and research field reports. Results Over three-fourths (78%) of participants were retained in the study. Post-test results indicated a 5% reduction in A1C across all participants and a 7% reduction among those with type 2 diabetes. Feasibility of an in-home model with extended family members was documented, along with observations and recommendation for further DSME adaptations related to blood glucose monitoring, physical activity, nutrition, and medication adherence. Conclusions The information gained from this pilot helps bridge the gap between knowledge of an evidence-based intervention and the actual implementation of the intervention within a unique minority population with especially high rates of type 2 diabetes and significant health disparities. Building on the emerging literature of family models of DSME, this study shows that the family model delivered in the home had high acceptance and that the intervention was more accessible for this hard-to-reach population. PMID:26363041

  2. Gender Differences in Diabetes Self-Management: A Mixed-Methods Analysis of a Mobile Health Intervention for Inner-City Latino Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burner, Elizabeth; Menchine, Michael; Taylor, Elena; Arora, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Background The benefit of mobile health (mHealth) on diabetes management among low-income, inner-city patients is largely unknown, particularly for Latino patients. TExT-MED (Trial to Examine Text Message for Emergency Department Patients with Diabetes) is a text message-based program designed to improve disease knowledge, self-efficacy, and glycemic control among low-income, inner-city Latinos. In phase I, 23 patients participated in an acceptability and feasibility study. Contrary to our model, there was no increase in knowledge despite increases in self-efficacy and healthy behaviors. In phase II, we performed a mixed-methods analysis to understand how TExT-MED achieved these seemingly contradictory findings. Methods We performed a qualitative analysis of focus groups with patients from phase I. We explored patients’ receipt of health information from TExT-MED and other information sources. We used these qualitative findings to perform a mixed-methods analysis of the outcomes from phase I, reanalyzing the quantitative measures of self-efficacy, diabetes knowledge, and healthy behaviors. Results We conducted two focus groups, one in English and one in Spanish. Through qualitative analysis, we found gender differences in information sources, dietary self-efficacy, and desired educational content. Applying this knowledge, we re-stratified phase I outcomes by gender and found differential changes in diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, and behaviors. Men had increased self-efficacy while women showed increased knowledge. Conclusions The efficacy of mHealth on diabetes management was affected by gender. Specifically, men and women differ in their dietary self-efficacy, information sources, and desired topics in future mHealth interventions. To achieve maximal impact, future mHealth interventions should be mindful of this gender difference. PMID:23439166

  3. Examining the efficacy of DVD technology compared to print-based material in COPD self-management education of rural patients.

    PubMed

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth H; Chaney, J Don

    2009-12-01

    A pilot study (n = 41) was conducted to test the effects of three educational treatments (DVD vs. Pamphlet vs. DVD + Pamphlet) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), COPD information needs and self-efficacy among a referred sample of Certified Federal Rural Health Clinic patients (mean age = 61.51 years ± 6.29 years; ~61% female) suffering from COPD using a randomly-assigned, multiple-group pretest-posttest design with a control group. A MANCOVA testing planned multivariate contrasts determined patients receiving a DVD reported statistically significant higher levels of lung-specific physical functioning as compared to patients receiving a Pamphlet. Additionally, DVD patients reported clinically significant improvements on two dimensions of lung-specific HRQoL. No such improvements occurred within the Pamphlet and Control groups. The provision of self-management education as compared to usual care, however, did not improve the outcome variables examined.

  4. Self-managing versus self-management: reinvigorating the socio-political dimensions of self-management.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Elizabeth; Ehrlich, Carolyn; Sunderland, Naomi; Muenchberger, Heidi; Rushton, Carole

    2011-03-01

    In Australia, self-management predominantly refers to education programmes that, theoretically, equip people with chronic disease with the necessary information and skills to manage their own healthcare, maintain optimal health, and minimize the consequences of their condition. These programmes are designed, and often delivered, by practitioners. Our research has demonstrated that for consumers, self-management involves navigating and responding to a myriad of information sources and experiences, many of which originate in their own lived bodily experiences and personal knowledge. In contrast to this organic and dynamic version of self-managing that is naturally practised by consumers, common practitioner and policy representations of self-management tend to discount consumer agency and overlook the daily ways in which people manage their own body, experiences and health choices. We argue that if the self-management movement is to tackle health inequalities (rather than creating new ones), health professionals and policy-makers must examine the potentially damaging assumptions that are inherent in contemporary self-management discourse.

  5. Assessing the effect of culturally specific audiovisual educational interventions on attaining self-management skills for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Poureslami, Iraj; Kwan, Susan; Lam, Stephen; Khan, Nadia A; FitzGerald, John Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient education is a key component in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Delivering effective education to ethnic groups with COPD is a challenge. The objective of this study was to develop and assess the effectiveness of culturally and linguistically specific audiovisual educational materials in supporting self-management practices in Mandarin- and Cantonese-speaking patients. Methods Educational materials were developed using participatory approach (patients involved in the development and pilot test of educational materials), followed by a randomized controlled trial that assigned 91 patients to three intervention groups with audiovisual educational interventions and one control group (pamphlet). The patients were recruited from outpatient clinics. The primary outcomes were improved inhaler technique and perceived self-efficacy to manage COPD. The secondary outcome was improved patient understanding of pulmonary rehabilitation procedures. Results Subjects in all three intervention groups, compared with control subjects, demonstrated postintervention improvements in inhaler technique (P<0.001), preparedness to manage a COPD exacerbation (P<0.01), ability to achieve goals in managing COPD (P<0.01), and understanding pulmonary rehabilitation procedures (P<0.05). Conclusion Culturally appropriate educational interventions designed specifically to meet the needs of Mandarin and Cantonese COPD patients are associated with significantly better understanding of self-management practices. Self-management education led to improved proper use of medications, ability to manage COPD exacerbations, and ability to achieve goals in managing COPD. Clinical implication A relatively simple culturally appropriate disease management education intervention improved inhaler techniques and self-management practices. Further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of self-management education on behavioral change and patient empowerment

  6. Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Dawish, Mohamed A.; Zamzami, Marwan M.; Sam, Asirvatham E.; Alzaid, Aus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) requires continuous medical care, patients’ self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ≥ 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 ± 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3%) and 33 (31.7%) were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients’ dietary plan (P = 0.0001), physical exercise (P = 0.0001), self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.0001), HbA1c (P = 0.04), adherence to medication (P = 0.007), and depression (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression. PMID:23983558

  7. Improvement in medication adherence and self-management of diabetes with a clinical pharmacy program: a randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cani, Catarina Gomes; da Silva Girão Lopes, Laura; Queiroz, Márcia; Nery, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a clinical pharmacy program on health outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital in Brazil. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was performed in 70 adults, aged 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin and who had an HbA1c level ≥8%. Patients in the control group (CG) (n = 36) received standard care, patients in the intervention group (IG) (n = 34) received an individualized pharmacotherapeutic care plan and diabetes education. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included diabetes and medication knowledge, adherence to medication, insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques and diabetes-related quality of life. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using questionnaires. RESULTS: Diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, adherence to medication and correct insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques significantly improved in the intervention group but remained unchanged in the control group. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c values in the control group remained unchanged but were significantly reduced in the intervention group. Diabetes-related quality of life significantly improved in the intervention group but worsened significantly in the control group. CONCLUSION: The program improved health outcomes and resulted in better glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy. PMID:25789518

  8. Effectiveness of Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan: preliminary report of a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yukawa, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yoshihiko; Yonekura, Yuki; Togari, Taisuke; Abbott, Fusae K; Homma, Mieko; Park, Minjeong; Kagawa, Yumi

    2010-12-01

    This is the preliminary report of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-management Program in Japan by comparing changes in health outcomes at the baseline and 3-month and 6-month follow-ups. The program is a patient-centered educational program for the self-management of chronic conditions. The study's participants were recruited from among the attendees of the program workshops. During the study period (August 2006 to May 2007), 18 workshops were held and 128 attendees agreed to participate in the study. The health outcomes that were measured included health status, self-management behaviors, utilization of health services, self-efficacy, satisfaction with daily living, and clinical indicators. These indicators were further analyzed by disease type: diabetes, rheumatic disease, and cardiovascular disease/dyslipidemia. The findings indicated statistically significant positive changes in health distress, coping with symptoms, stretching exercises, communication with the physician, and satisfaction with daily living. The positive changes were especially remarkable among the groups with diabetes and rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that the Chronic Disease Self-management Program can be effective for Japanese people with chronic conditions.

  9. Chronic disease self-management support: the way forward for Australia.

    PubMed

    Glasgow, Nicholas J; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Kraus, Stefan G; Pearce-Brown, Carmen L

    2008-11-17

    We examined research and implementation activities presented at the Centre for Rheumatic Diseases 2007 Conference and other selected literature to identify common themes and posit some "next steps" required to develop self-management programs in the Australian context. Self-management and self-management support are key aspects of optimal chronic disease care, and are effective if implemented appropriately. Health literacy is the foundation for self-management programs and should be fostered within the whole population. We should invest in research and evaluation of self-management because the evidence base is under-developed and inherently difficult to expand. Because patient, carer, clinician and organisational engagement with self-management and self-management support programs are uneven, we need to prioritise activities designed to engage known hard-to-reach groups. We should strive to improve integration of self-management into clinical, educational and workplace contexts. Education and psychological theories can help guide self-management support.

  10. Community Readiness for Self-Managed School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2007-01-01

    The concept of Self-managing schools involving local community members, teachers and parents with the formation of School Management Committee is gaining ground in Nepal after the world conference on education for all (WCEFA) held in Jomtien, Thailand in the year 1990. Transferring the management of public schools in the hand of willing community…

  11. The Mexican-American Trial of Community Health workers (MATCH): Design and baseline characteristics of a randomized controlled trial testing a culturally tailored community diabetes self-management intervention

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Steven K.; Martin, Molly A.; Swider, Susan M.; Lynas, Carmen T.; Avery, Elizabeth F.; Janssen, Imke; Powell, Lynda H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Community Health Workers (CHWs) have been recommended to reduce diabetes disparities, but few robust trials of this approach have been conducted. Limitations of prior studies include: unspecified a priori outcomes; lack of blinded outcome assessments; high participant attrition rates; and lack of attention to intervention fidelity. These limitations reflect challenges in balancing methodologic rigor with the needs of vulnerable populations. The Mexican-American Trial of Community Health workers (MATCH) was a blinded randomized controlled trial testing CHW efficacy in improving physiologic outcomes and self-management behaviors among Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes. This paper describes methods used to overcome limitations of prior studies. Research Design and Methods The primary aim was to determine if a CHW intervention would result in significant reductions in Hemoglobin A1c and rates of uncontrolled blood pressure. 144 Mexican-Americans with diabetes were randomized. The intervention consisted of self-management training delivered by CHWs over a 24-month period; the comparison population received identical information via bilingual newsletter. Blinded research assistants completed assessments at baseline, 12 months, and 24 months post-randomization. Results The MATCH cohort was characterized by low acculturation and socioeconomic status. Study participants had low rates of medication adherence and glucose monitoring. 70% had poor glycemic control with A1c levels over 7.0, and 57.3% had blood pressures worse than ADA target levels (<130/80). Conclusions MATCH preserved community sensitivity and methodologic rigor. The study’s attention to intervention fidelity, behavioral attention control, blinded outcomes assessment, and strategies to enhance participant retention can be replicated by researchers testing culturally-tailored CHW interventions. PMID:22115970

  12. Wellness and illness self-management skills in community corrections.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patricia J; Ramaswamy, Megha; Chen, Hsiang-Feng; Denny, Donald

    2015-02-01

    Community corrections provide a readjustment venue for re-entry between incarceration and home for inmates in the US corrections system. Our goal was to determine how self-management skills, an important predictor of re-entry success, varied by demographic and risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, we analyzed responses of 675 clients from 57 community corrections programs run by the regional division of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. A self-administered survey collected data on self-management skills, demographics, and risk factors; significant associations were applied in four regression models: the overall self-management score and three self-management subscales: coping skills, goals, and drug use. Over one-quarter (27.2%/146) of participants had a mental health history. White race, no mental health history and high school education were associated with better overall self-management scores; mental health history and drug use in the past year were associated with lower coping scores; female gender and high school education were associated with better self-management goals; female gender was associated with better self-management drug use scores. Self-management programs may need to be individualized for different groups of clients. Lower scores for those with less education suggest an area for targeted, nurse-led interventions.

  13. Self-Management and Self-Management Support Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Mixed Research Synthesis of Stakeholder Views

    PubMed Central

    Boger, Emma; Ellis, Jaimie; Latter, Sue; Foster, Claire; Kennedy, Anne; Jones, Fiona; Fenerty, Vicky; Kellar, Ian; Demain, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Self-management has received growing attention as an effective approach for long-term condition management. Little is known about which outcomes of supported self-management are valued by patients, their families, health professionals and those who commission self-management services. This study systematically reviewed published empirical evidence in accordance with PRISMA guidelines to determine the outcomes of self-management valued by these key stakeholder groups, using three prominent exemplar conditions: colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke. Aim To systematically review the literature to identify which generic outcomes of self-management have been targeted and are considered important using three exemplar conditions (colorectal cancer, diabetes and stroke), which collectively have a range of features that are likely to be representative of generic self-management issues. Methods Systematic searching of nine electronic databases was conducted in addition to hand searches of review articles. Abstracts were identified against inclusion criteria and appraised independently by two reviewers, using a critical appraisal tool. Synthesis of findings was conducted using mixed research synthesis. Results Over 20,536 abstracts were screened. 41 studies which met the review criteria were fully retrieved and appraised. The majority of evidence related to diabetes. Few studies directly focussed on stakeholders’ views concerning desired self-management outcomes; the majority of evidence was derived from studies focusing upon the experience of self-management. The views of health care commissioners were absent from the literature. We identified that self-management outcomes embrace a range of indicators, from knowledge, skills, and bio-psychosocial markers of health through to positive social networks. Conclusions Patients’, families’, health professionals’ and commissioners’ views regarding which outcomes of self-management are important have not been

  14. [Effectiveness of education in diabetes care management - instructions for educators].

    PubMed

    Jirkovská, Jarmila

    2017-01-01

    Continuous process of diabetic patient´s education is essential. Educator´s task is to select situationally and individually appropriate form of education and educational tools. Than he becomes capable to motivate patients to participate actively and cooperate. Use of practical and visual educational tools increases the memorability. Studies have shown positive effect on improvement of glycemic control for both individual and group education. When properly educated diabetic patient is able to make independent decisions and manage the disease. Achieving good long-term glycemic control with reduced risk of chronic complications in compliant diabetic patient is the expected target of treatment. Thus the medical care becomes cost-effective.Key words: conversation map tools - diabetes mellitus - educator - group education - individual education.

  15. Patient Education Self-Management During Surgical Recovery: Combining Mobile (iPad) and a Content Management System

    PubMed Central

    Moradkhani, Anilga; Douglas, Kristin S. Vickers; Prinsen, Sharon K.; Fischer, Erin N.; Schroeder, Darrell R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The objective of this investigation was to assess whether a new electronic health (e-health) platform, combining mobile computing and a content management system, could effectively deliver modular and “just-in-time” education to older patients following cardiac surgery. Subjects and Methods: Patients were provided with iPad® (Apple®, Cupertino, CA) tablets that delivered educational modules as part of a daily “to do” list in a plan of care. The tablet communicated wirelessly to a dashboard where data were aggregated and displayed for providers. Results: A surgical population of 149 patients with a mean age of 68 years utilized 5,267 of 6,295 (84%) of education modules delivered over a 5.3-day hospitalization. Increased age was not associated with decreased use. Conclusions: We demonstrate that age, hospitalization, and major surgery are not significant barriers to effective patient education if content is highly consumable and relevant to patients' daily care experience. We also show that mobile technology, even if unfamiliar to many older patients, makes this possible. The combination of mobile computing with a content management system allows for dynamic, modular, personalized, and “just-in-time” education in a highly consumable format. This approach presents a means by which patients may become informed participants in new healthcare models. PMID:24443928

  16. Living with sugar: influence of cultural beliefs on type 2 diabetes self-management of English-speaking Afro-Caribbean women.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chrystal A S

    2012-08-01

    Studies show that cultural beliefs influence disease conceptualization, adaption, and coping strategies of chronic diseases. This study investigated the type 2 diabetes cultural belief model of English-speaking Afro-Caribbean women in southwest Florida. A 53 item cultural consensus beliefs questionnaire was designed and administered to 30 Afro-Caribbean women diabetics. Cultural consensus analysis found that these women shared a single cultural belief model about type 2 diabetes, .72 ± .081 SD. Women with higher cultural knowledge scores (r(s) = -.41730, P = .0218) were significantly younger at type 2 diabetes diagnosis than women with lower scores. In qualitative interviews, women described ongoing struggles to modify their traditional Caribbean diet and believed in the efficaciousness of traditional Caribbean medicine and prayer to treat type 2 diabetes. These findings suggest that health practitioners treating English-speaking Afro-Caribbean diabetics should offer culturally appropriate nutritional guidance and inquire about their use of traditional Caribbean medicines.

  17. Patient Education: Identifying Risks and Self-Management Approaches for Adherence and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Buchhalter, Jeffrey

    2016-05-01

    Patient education in epilepsy is one part of quality epilepsy care and is an evolving and growing field. Health outcomes, patient satisfaction, safety, patient/provider communication, and quality of life may all be affected by what people are taught (or not taught), what they understand, and how they use this information to make decisions and manage their health. Data regarding learning needs and interventions to address medication adherence and sudden unexpected death in epilepsy education can be used to guide clinicians in health care or community settings.

  18. Anger Self-Management in Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury: Protocol for a Psycho-educational Treatment With a Structurally Equivalent Control and an Evaluation of Treatment Enactment

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Tessa; Brockway, Jo Ann; Fann, Jesse R.; Maiuro, Roland D.; Vaccaro, Monica J.

    2014-01-01

    Anger and irritability are important and persistent clinical problems following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Treatment options include medications, behavioral modification, and psychotherapies, but some are impractical and none have proven efficacy with this population. We describe a randomized multi-center clinical trial testing a novel, one-on-one, 8-session psychoeducational treatment program, Anger Self-Management Training (ASMT), designed specifically for people with TBI who have significant cognitive impairment. The trial is notable for its use of a structurally equivalent comparison treatment, called Personal Readjustment and Education (PRE), which was created for the study and is intended to maximize equipoise for both participants and treaters. Fidelity assessment is conducted in real time and used in therapist supervision sessions. The primary outcome is change in self-reported anger on validated measures from pre-treatment to 1 week after the final session. Secondary outcomes include participant anger as reported by a significant other; emotional distress in domains other than anger/ irritability; behavioral functioning; and quality of life. An interim assessment after the 4th session will allow examination of the trajectory of any observed treatment effects, and a follow-up assessment 2 months after the end of intervention will allow examination of persistence of effects. A treatment enactment phase, in which participants are interviewed several months after the last therapy session, is designed to provide qualitative data on whether and to what extent the principles and techniques learned in treatment are still carried out in daily life. PMID:25530306

  19. Persuasive Reminders for Health Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Katie; Liu, Leslie; McClure, Jennifer B.; Ralston, James; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Health reminders are integral to self-managing chronic illness. However, to act on these health reminders, patients face many challenges, such as lack of motivation and ability to perform health tasks. As a result, patients experience negative consequences for their health. To investigate the design of health reminders that persuade patients to take action, we conducted six participatory design sessions with two cohorts: mothers of children with asthma, and older adults with type 2 diabetes. Participants used collages, storyboards, and photos to express design ideas for future health reminder systems. From their design artifacts, we identified four types of persuasive reminders for health self-management: introspective, socially supportive, adaptive, and symbolic. We contribute insights into desired features for persuasive reminder systems from the perspectives of patients and informal caregivers, including features that support users to understand why and how to complete health tasks ahead of time, and affordances for intra-familial and patient-provider collaboration. PMID:28269896

  20. Development of a diabetes education program based on modified AADE diabetes education curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yue-Ping; Wu, Liao-Fang; Su, Zhen-Fang; Zhou, Qiu-Hong

    2014-01-01

    To assess the feasibility and acceptability of a diabetes education program tailored to patients with type 2 diabetes in communities and the preliminary outcomes of the intervention. Methods: Two-phase, one group, mixed-method study design was used. Modified American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) diabetes education curriculum was used as the framework for the program. Patients with diabetes participated in classes and diabetes conversation map discussion. Feasibility and acceptability of the program were evaluated by the ability to recruit and retain participants and their satisfaction with the program. Diabetes knowledge test and the summary of diabetes self-care activities (SDSCA) were used to evaluate the knowledge and behavior changes of the patients. Results: 40 patients completed the program and the attrition rate was 11.1%. All participants were “very satisfied” with the program. Significant improvement in diabetes knowledge and blood glucose monitoring and foot care were reported. Conclusion: The diabetes education program based on modified AADE diabetes education curriculum combined with diabetes conversation map may be effective in patients with type 2 diabetes. Practice Implications: Flexible time schedule and a control group should be designed in the future study. PMID:24753774

  1. Educating supervisors of employees with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Jacobson, Sharol

    2008-06-01

    The worksite presents special challenges not only for employees with diabetes, but also for their supervisors. Supervisors wonder whether certain behaviors are willful misconduct or indicative of health problems, as well as if and how to accommodate employees with diabetes to meet the needs of the employees and the company, within the law. The purpose of this research was to pilot test an innovative educational program for supervisors of employees with diabetes to benefit employees' health and diabetes control while meeting the legal requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Nine supervisors completed a 6-hour program that included innovative teaching strategies--"living the life" of a person with diabetes for 2 days and case studies to practice decision making according to the ADA. The program increased supervisors' reported self-efficacy for supervising employees with diabetes and should improve work life for employees with diabetes, ultimately decreasing employers' health care costs.

  2. Exploring educational needs and design aspects of internet-enabled patient education for persons with diabetes: a qualitative interview study

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Javad; Karimi Moonaghi, Hosein; Zary, Nabil; Masiello, Italo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this article is to explore the educational needs and design aspects of personalised internet-enabled education for patients with diabetes in Iran. Design Data were collected using semistructured interviews and then qualitatively analysed using inductive content analysis. Participants 9 patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Inclusion criteria were access to and knowledge on how to use the internet. The selection ensured representation based on gender, age, occupation and educational background. Setting The sample population was patients with diabetes who were admitted to an outpatient diabetes clinic in Mashhad, a large city of Iran with about 3 million inhabitants. Results 4 core categories emerged from the data: (1) seeking knowledge about diabetes, including specific knowledge acquisition, patient's interactions and learning requirements; (2) teaching and learning, including using different teaching methods and different ways to learn about the disease; (3) facilitators, including internet and mobile phone use to learn about the disease; and (4) barriers, including lack of internet access, uncertainty of access to the internet and lack of website in the local language and also perceived cultural barriers, such as patients' fears of the internet, lack of time and awareness. Conclusions This study provides a better understanding of the patient's educational expectations and technical needs in relation to internet-enabled education. This knowledge will inform the development of functional mock-ups in the next research phase using a design-based research approach in order to design internet-enabled patient education for self-management of diabetes. PMID:27799245

  3. American Association of Diabetes Educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Glucose Monitoring Resources Medication Adherence Resources Insulin Infusion Set Resources Diabetes and CVD Resources AADE in ... Blood Glucose Monitoring Resources Medication Adherence Resources Insulin Infusion Set Resources Diabetes and CVD Resources AADE in ...

  4. Peer-based behavioural strategies to improve chronic disease self-management and clinical outcomes: evidence, logistics, evaluation considerations and needs for future research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of a chronic disease such as diabetes generally evokes strong emotions and often brings with it the need to make changes in lifestyle behaviours, such as diet, exercise, medication management and monitoring clinical and metabolic parameters. The diagnosis thus affects not only the person diagnosed but also the family members. Chronic illnesses are largely self-managed with ∼99% of the care becoming the responsibility of patients and their families or others involved in the daily management of their illnesses. While the responsibility for outcomes, such as metabolic control and chronic complications, are shared with the health care team, the daily decisions and behaviours adopted by patients clearly have a strong influence on their future health and well-being. While diabetes self-management education is essential, it is generally not sufficient for patients to sustain behaviours and cope with a lifetime of diabetes. Peers have been proposed as one method for assisting patients to deal with the behavioural and affective components of diabetes and to provide ongoing self-management support. This paper first describes effective behavioural strategies in diabetes, based on multiple studies and/or meta-analyses, and then provides examples of their use by peers or in peer-based programmes in diabetes. A comprehensive search using the MEDLINE® and Cinahl databases was conducted. Key search terms included peer mentors, peer leaders, peer educators, lay health workers and community health workers. Studies that clearly identified behavioural strategies used by peers were included. PMID:19509083

  5. Perceptions of Successful Cues to Action and Opportunities to Augment Behavioral Triggers in Diabetes Self-Management: Qualitative Analysis of a Mobile Intervention for Low-Income Latinos With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Menchine, Michael D; Kubicek, Katrina; Robles, Marisela; Arora, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing prevalence of diabetes and the associated cost of managing this complicated disease have a significant impact on public health outcomes and health expenditures, especially among resource-poor Latino patients. Mobile health (mHealth) may be the solution to reaching this group and improving their health. Objective In this qualitative study, we examined nuances of motivation, intention, and triggers to action effected by TExT-MED (Trial to Examine Text Messaging for Emergency Department patient with Diabetes), an mHealth intervention tailored to low-income, urban Latinos with diabetes. TExT-MED is a fully-automated, text message-based program designed to increase knowledge, self-efficacy, and subsequent disease management and glycemic control. Methods We conducted 5 focus group interviews with 24 people who participated in TExT-MED. We employed a modified grounded theory analytic approach—an iterative process of coding and immersion in the data used to recognize the patterns and links between concepts voiced by the participants. We coded data to identify themes of participant experiences, motivations, and responses to the program. We organized themes into a theory of TExT-MED’s action. Results Participants enjoyed their experience with TExT-MED and believed it improved their diabetes management. Through analysis of the transcripts, we identified that the strengths of the program were messages that cued specific behaviors such as medication reminders and challenge messages. Our analysis also revealed that increasing personalization of message delivery and content could augment these cues. Conclusions This in-depth qualitative analysis of TExT-MED shows that low-income Latino patients will accept text messages as a behavioral intervention. This mHealth intervention acts as a behavioral trigger rather than an education platform. Personalization is an opportunity to enhance these cues to action and further research should be conducted on the

  6. The Feasibility of Health Trainer Improved Patient Self-Management in Patients with Low Health Literacy and Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Trishna; Rowlands, Gillian; Richardson, Gerry; Reeves, David

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is most prevalent in deprived communities and patients with low health literacy have worse glycaemic control and higher rates of diabetic complications. However, recruitment from this patient population into intervention trials is highly challenging. We conducted a study to explore the feasibility of recruitment and to assess the effect of a lay health trainer intervention, in patients with low health literacy and poorly controlled diabetes from a socioeconomically disadvantaged population, compared with usual care. Methods. A pilot RCT comparing the LHT intervention with usual care. Patients with HbA1c > 7.5 (58 mmol/mol) were recruited. Baseline and 7-month outcome data were entered directly onto a laptop to reduce patient burden. Results. 76 patients were recruited; 60.5% had low health literacy and 75% were from the most deprived areas of England. Participants in the LHT arm had significantly improved mental health (p = 0.049) and illness perception (p = 0.040). The intervention was associated with lower resource use, better patient self-care management, and better QALY profile at 7-month follow-up. Conclusion. This study describes successful recruitment strategies for hard-to-reach populations. Further research is warranted for this cost-effective, relatively low-cost intervention for a population currently suffering a disproportionate burden of diabetes, to demonstrate its sustained impact on treatment effects, health, and health inequalities. PMID:27833922

  7. Validation of Malaysian Versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE) and 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) Using Partial Credit Rasch Model

    PubMed Central

    Al Abboud, Safaa Ahmed; Ahmad, Sohail; Bidin, Mohamed Badrulnizam Long

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a common silent epidemic disease with frequent morbidity and mortality. The psychological and psychosocial health factors are negatively influencing the glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Therefore, various questionnaires were developed to address the psychological and psychosocial well-being of the diabetic patients. Most of these questionnaires were first developed in English and then translated into different languages to make them useful for the local communities. Aim The main aim of this study was to translate and validate the Malaysian versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE), and to revalidate 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) by Partial Credit Rasch Model (Modern Test Theory). Materials and Methods Permission was obtained from respective authors to translate the English versions of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 into Malay language according to established standard international translation guidelines. In this cross-sectional study, 62 adult DM patients were recruited from Hospital Kuala Lumpur by purposive sampling method. The data were extracted from the self-administered questionnaires and entered manually in the Ministeps (Winsteps) software for Partial Credit Rasch Model. The item and person reliability, infit/outfit Z-Standard (ZSTD), infit/outfit Mean Square (MNSQ) and point measure correlation (PTMEA Corr) values were analysed for the reliability analyses and construct validation. Results The Malay version of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 found to be valid and reliable instrument for the Malaysian diabetic adults. The instrument showed good overall reliability value of 0.76 and 0.93 for item and person reliability, respectively. The values of infit/outfit ZSTD, infit/outfit MNSQ, and PTMEA Corr were also within the stipulated range of the Rasch Model proving the valid item constructs of the questionnaire. Conclusion The

  8. Diabetic Mario: Designing and Evaluating Mobile Games for Diabetes Education.

    PubMed

    Baghaei, Nilufar; Nandigam, David; Casey, John; Direito, Artur; Maddison, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Traditionally, diabetes education has relied on written materials, with limited resources available for children with diabetes. Mobile games can be effective and motivating tools for the promotion of children's health. In our earlier work, we proposed a novel approach for designing computer games aimed at educating children with diabetes. In this article, we apply our game design to a mobile Android game (Mario Brothers). We also introduce four heuristics that are specifically designed for evaluating the mobile game, by adapting traditional usability heuristics. Results of a pilot study (n = 12) to evaluate gameplay over 1-week showed that the children found the game engaging and improved their knowledge of healthy diet and lifestyle.

  9. Online Health Communities and Chronic Disease Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Willis, Erin; Royne, Marla B

    2017-03-01

    This research uses content analysis (N = 1,960) to examine the computer-mediated communication within online health communities for evidence of chronic disease self-management behaviors, including the perceived benefits and perceived barriers to participating in such behaviors. Online health communities act as informal self-management programs led by peers with the same chronic disease through the exchange of health information. Online health communities provide opportunities for health behavior change messages to educate and persuade regarding chronic disease self-management behaviors.

  10. Recommendations for age-appropriate education of children and adolescents with diabetes and their parents in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Martin, Delphine; Lange, Karin; Sima, Alexandra; Kownatka, Dagmar; Skovlund, Søren; Danne, Thomas; Robert, Jean-Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Education is the keystone of diabetes care, and structured self-management education is the key to a successful outcome. Existing guidelines provide comprehensive guidance on the various aspects of education and offer general and organizational principles of education, detailed curricula at different ages and stages of diabetes, and recommendations on models, methods, and tools to attain educative objectives. The International Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes guidelines give the most elaborate and detailed descriptions and recommendations on the practice of education, which other national guidelines address on specific aspects of education and care. The aim of the work package on education developed by Better Control in Paediatric and Adolescent Diabetes in the European Union: Working to Create Centers of Reference (SWEET) project was not to generate new guidelines but to evaluate how the existing guidelines were implemented in some pediatric diabetes reference centers. The SWEET members have completed a questionnaire that elaborates on the many aspects of delivery of education. This survey highlights a profound diversity of practices across centers in Europe, in terms of organization as well as the practices and the content of initial and continuing education. A toolbox is being developed within SWEET to facilitate exchanges on all aspects of education and to establish a process of validation of materials, tools, written structured age-adjusted programs, and evaluation procedures for the education of children and adolescents with diabetes.

  11. Diabetes Island: Preliminary Impact of a Virtual World Self-Care Educational Intervention for African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moadsiri, Ada; Quinn, Lauretta T; Riley, Barth B; Danielson, Kirstie K; Monahan, Colleen; Bangs, Valerie A; Gerber, Ben S

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a serious worldwide public health challenge. The burden of diabetes, including prevalence and risk of complications, is greater for minorities, particularly African Americans. Internet-based immersive virtual worlds offer a unique opportunity to reach large and diverse populations with diabetes for self-management education and support. Objective The objective of the study was to examine the acceptability, usage, and preliminary outcome of a virtual world intervention, Diabetes Island, in low-income African Americans with type 2 diabetes. The main hypotheses were that the intervention would: (1) be perceived as acceptable and useful; and (2) improve diabetes self-care (eg, behaviors and barriers) and self-care related outcomes, including glycemic control (A1C), body mass index (BMI), and psychosocial factors (ie, empowerment and distress) over six months. Methods The evaluation of the intervention impact used a single-group repeated measures design, including three assessment time points: (1) baseline, (2) 3 month (mid intervention), and (3) 6 month (immediate post intervention). Participants were recruited from a university primary care clinic. A total of 41 participants enrolled in the 6 month intervention study. The intervention components included: (1) a study website for communication, feedback, and tracking; and (2) access to an immersive virtual world (Diabetes Island) through Second Life, where a variety of diabetes self-care education activities and resources were available. Outcome measures included A1C, BMI, self-care behaviors, barriers to adherence, eating habits, empowerment, and distress. In addition, acceptability and usage were examined. A series of mixed-effects analyses, with time as a single repeated measures factor, were performed to examine preliminary outcomes. Results The intervention study sample (N=41) characteristics were: (1) mean age of 55 years, (2) 71% (29/41) female, (3) 100% (41/41) African American, and (4

  12. PKU Self-Management Timeline

    MedlinePlus

    ... difference between your child ‘having’ a specific self-management skill and ‘performing the skill independently’ at all times. It is important that parents Age of Child Tasks for Children ...

  13. [A diabetes care team--role of diabetes specialists and certified diabetes educator].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K

    2001-12-01

    In recent decades, diabetes care has undergone fundamental changes that have influenced the manner in which any type of diabetic patients are managed: (i) acceptance of tight metabolic control; (ii) recognition of primary care management; (iii) focus on quality improvement: and (iv) emphasis on cost containment. Then, the role of a diabetes care team has been recognized and acted upon to a far greater extent than before. Treatment of diabetes consists of two principal components: metabolic control and intervention to prevent complications. The former is a part of the primary health care scheme in which the indication for education, as well as care and treatment, frequently depend of the data produced by patients; the latter pertaining to hospital-based care. In 2001 in Japan, the number of the diabetes specialists is about 2500, and the certified diabetes educators certified are about 4300. However, the accessibility of the patients to the specialists still remains poor. Nurses, dietitians, medical technologists, pharmacists and physical therapists are eligible to take the examination of certified diabetes educator. They must be skilled at identifying the background of patients to improve care and health through life-style modification. Education for care and treatment consists of medical and educational models. In both of these, here are specific processes of diagnosis and therapy: along with medical diagnosis and treatment, through physical and laboratory examinations, assessment of the patient for indication of a curriculum by test of knowledge, skill and attitude for adequate educational therapy is necessary.

  14. Community Health: FCS Extension Educators Deliver Diabetes Education in PA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    For decades, family and consumer sciences (FCS) Extension educators have provided health related education to consumers through Cooperative Extension programming at land grant universities. However, offering diabetes education can be extra challenging due to the complicated nature of the disease and the multi-faceted treatment required. Faced with…

  15. Recent Trends in Diabetes Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors: Implications for National Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piccinino, Linda; Griffey, Susan; Gallivan, Joanne; Lotenberg, Lynne Doner; Tuncer, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Examine trends in diabetes-related knowledge, perceptions, and behavior among U.S. adults with and without a diagnosis of diabetes and among subpopulations at risk. Discuss implications for national diabetes education and for the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) in particular. Methods: Three population-based NDEP National…

  16. The evaluating self-management and educational support in severely obese patients awaiting multidisciplinary bariatric care (EVOLUTION) trial: rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, demand for multidisciplinary bariatric (obesity) care far outstrips capacity. Consequently, prolonged wait times exist and contribute to substantial health impairments. A supportive, educational intervention (with in-person and web-based versions) designed to enhance the self-management skills of patients wait-listed for multidisciplinary bariatric medical and surgical care has been variably implemented across Alberta, Canada. However, its effectiveness has not been evaluated. Our objectives were: 1. To determine if this program improves clinical and humanistic outcomes and is cost-effective compared to a control intervention; and 2. To compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of in-person group-based versus web-based care. We hypothesize that both the web-based and in-person programs will reduce body weight and improve outcomes compared to the control group. Furthermore, we hypothesize that the in-person version will be more effective but more costly than the web-based version. Methods/Design This pragmatic, prospective controlled trial will enrol 660 wait-listed subjects (220 per study arm) from regional bariatric programs in Alberta and randomly assign them to: 1. an in-person, group-based intervention (9 modules delivered over 10 sessions); 2. a web-based intervention (13 modules); and 3. controls who will receive mailed literature. Subjects will have three months to review the content assigned to them (the intervention period) after which they will immediately enter the weight management clinic. Data will be collected at baseline and every 3 months for 9 months (study end), including: 1. Clinical [5% weight loss responders (primary outcome), absolute and % weight losses, changes in obesity-related comorbidities]; 2. Humanistic (health related quality of life, patient satisfaction, depression, and self-efficacy); and 3. Economic (incremental costs and utilities and cost per change in BMI assessed from the third party health care

  17. Effectiveness of diabetes education and awareness of diabetes mellitus in combating diabetes in the United Kigdom; a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Nazar, Chaudhary Muhammad Junaid; Bojerenu, Micheal Mauton; Safdar, Muhammad; Marwat, Jibran

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood glucose level, and body cannot produce enough insulin, or does not respond to the produced insulin. In spite of the diabetes education campaigns and programmes, a large number of people in the United Kingdom are living with diabetes. The main objective of the study is to evaluate the role of knowledge and awareness of diabetes in fighting against diabetes and to interpret to which extent is diabetes education successful. The systematic review to be carried out will include literature from 2001 to 2011 in the United Kingdom regarding awareness of diabetes among UK population and effectiveness of diabetes education. Literature will be accessed using search database, British medical journals, and library. Good quality papers will be used for the systematic review. Previous studies about diabetes education will consulted and assessed. This study is going to summarize the efficacy of diabetes education campaigns and programmes which are promising to enhance the awareness The outcome of the review will be the guideline for the government, education centres, researchers, and campaigns to implement more diabetic education programmes and easily accessible diabetes services and education interventions to increase the awareness of risk factors and complications of diabetes to overcome the increasing epidemic of diabetes in the United Kingdom. PMID:28197516

  18. Culture brokerage strategies in diabetes education.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gina K; Uz, Sharon W; Hinton, Ivora; Williams, Ishan; Jones, Randy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the elements of culture brokerage as applied in a recent educational pilot study among rural African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Culture Brokerage is a nursing intervention consisting of mediation between the traditional health beliefs and practices of a patient's culture and the health care system. The intervention of Culture Brokerage holds particular relevance for clinicians who work with chronically ill patients, including those with diabetes. Diabetes prevalence rates continue to rise with alarming swiftness, affecting people of all age groups and ethnicities. The burden of disease, however, disproportionately falls on ethnic minority groups, including African Americans. Notable health disparities in the prevalence and long-term complications of diabetes warrant the attention of health care professionals. One way in which public health nurses can address these disparities is to apply strategies of culture brokerage.

  19. Health and diabetes self-efficacy: a study of diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Christensen, Nancy; Myers, Kyl; Nourian, Maziar M; Ashby, Jeanie; Greenwood, Jessica L J; Reel, Justine J

    2014-08-01

    Free clinics across the country provide free or reduced fee healthcare to individuals who lack access to primary care and are socio-economically disadvantaged. This study examined perceived health status among diabetic and non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members of the patients. Diabetes self-efficacy among diabetic free clinic patients was also investigated with the goal of developing appropriate diabetes health education programs to promote diabetes self-management. English or Spanish speaking patients and family members (N = 365) aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey. Physical and mental health and diabetes self-efficacy were measured using standardized instruments. Diabetic free clinic patients reported poorer physical and mental health and higher levels of dysfunction compared to non-diabetic free clinic patients and family members. Having a family history of diabetes and using emergency room or urgent care services were significant factors that affected health and dysfunction among diabetic and non-diabetes free clinic patients and family members. Diabetic free clinic patients need to receive services not only for diabetes, but also for overall health and dysfunction issues. Diabetes educational programs for free clinic patients should include a component to increase diabetes empowerment as well as the knowledge of treatment and management of diabetes. Non-diabetic patients and family members who have a family history of diabetes should also participate in diabetes education. Family members of free clinic patients need help to support a diabetic family member or with diabetes prevention.

  20. Nurses' knowledge of heart failure self-management.

    PubMed

    Willette, Elizabeth W; Surrells, Danielle; Davis, Leslie L; Bush, Charles T

    2007-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is increasing in prevalence. Patient education is essential and is included in both ambulatory and hospital performance measures used to ensure quality care. Nurses are often the primary providers of education to patients with HF. This study assessed nurses' knowledge of basic principles of HF self-management. The study surveyed 49 nurses who regularly provided care to patients with HF at a hospital in the southeastern United States. A 20-item, true/false survey was administered to participants. Mean HF self-management knowledge score was 15.97 (79.85% correct). Consistent with previous studies, nurses scored lowest on knowledge related to transient dizziness (16.3% answered correctly), daily weight monitoring (36.2% answered correctly), and asymptomatic hypotension (58.3% answered correctly). Findings confirm previous work suggesting that nurses may not be adequately prepared to educate patients with HF about self-management.

  1. Health literacy in health systems: perspectives on patient self-management in Israel.

    PubMed

    Levin-Zamir, D; Peterburg, Y

    2001-03-01

    Health systems will face new challenges in this millennium. Striking the balance between the best quality of care and optimal use of dwindling resources will challenge health policy makers, managers and practitioners. Increasingly, improvements in the outcomes of interventions for both acute and chronic patients will depend on partnerships between health service providers, the individual and their family. Patient education that incorporates self-management and empowerment has proven to be cost-effective. It is essential that health care providers promote informed decision making, and facilitate actions designed to improve personal capacity to exert control over factors that determine health and improve health outcomes. It is for these reasons that promoting health literacy is a central strategy for improving self-management in health. The different types of health literacy--functional, interactive and critical health literacy--are considered. The potential to improve health literacy at each of these levels has been demonstrated in practice among diabetics and other chronic disease patients in Clalit Health Services (CHS) in Israel is used as an example to demonstrate possibilities. The application of all three types of health literacy is expressed in: (i) developing appropriate health information tools for the public to be applied in primary, secondary and tertiary care settings, and in online and media information accessibility and appropriateness using culturally relevant participatory methods; (ii) training of health professionals at all levels, including undergraduate and in-service training; and (iii) developing and applying appropriate assessment and monitoring tools which include public/patient participatory methods. Health care providers need to consider where their patients are getting information on disease and self-management, whether or not that information is reliable, and inform their patients of the best sources of information and its use. The

  2. The Adult Diabetic Patient: An Education Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    finding that he/she, too, must care for sicker patients. To better prepare these patients for life after discharge, patient education must be initiated as...admitted, patient education often begins at the physicians’ office. This paper explores diabetes mellitus in relation to concepts of self-care and adult...betting foj.L eduuation and iio.w, wore ofteni, patient education and follow-up sercvices- a:leL beiny p~rovided on ani outpatient bcdtsis" (p. 36) . Thet

  3. Education's Role in Explaining Diabetic Heath Investment Differentials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    1998-01-01

    Studies the relationship between education and certain diabetic health investment proxies, such as smoking propensities, blood sugar control, and diet. Increased education positively affects diabetic health investment even after controlling for IQ and available information. However, diabetics' health investments are less responsive to education…

  4. Multimedia technology for diabetes education of school nurses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require school nurses (SN) with specific diabetes training. Multimedia learning can facilitate cost-effective, convenient education of SN by diabetes educators (DE). We conducted formative research to gather qualitative and quantitative data to inform the interven...

  5. Diabetes Training for Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Aponte, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Background A 2.5-month diabetes education training for community health workers (CHWs) was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Methods Training methods used included case studies, role-playing, and lectures. Exams were used throughout the training for its evaluation. Teaching was delivered by different ways: a one day American Diabetes Association (ADA) course; a five day Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP); Conversation Maps; and a series of seven National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) diabetes education booklets. Results Qualitative and quantitative evaluative methods were used during and after the training. The CHWs’ diabetes knowledge was evaluated by a pre- and post-test Diabetes Knowledge Questionnaire (DKQ). The post-test was conducted one week after completing the training. The findings showed that the diabetes knowledge of the CHWs increased. Conclusions Diabetes competencies and evaluative tools need to be developed specific for CHWs as a way to standardize all CHW diabetes trainings. PMID:27110434

  6. Self-management and creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, B. A.; Skaptsov, A. A.; Polikarpov, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    How to improve physicist's creativity? How one can make himself an instrument for creativity? What is the role of the humanities in initiation of intuitive moments in thinking? The problems are discussed in terms of such modern conception as Self-management, in context of the dialogue between nature and human being by Prigogine, "Farther reaches of human nature" by Maslow, and mathematical approach for modeling of mental structure elements.

  7. Teleconferenced Educational Detailing: Diabetes Education for Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stewart B.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Van, Daphne M.; O'Neill, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Formal didactic continuing medical education (CME) is relatively ineffective for changing physician behavior. Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent disease, and interventions to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are needed. Methods: A stratified, cluster-randomized, controlled trial design was used to…

  8. Health Education Video Games for Children and Adolescents: Theory, Design, and Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Debra A.

    This study examined whether video games could be effective health education and therapeutic interventions for children and adolescents with diabetes. KIDZ Health Software developed a game about diabetes self-management, and tested its effectiveness for children with diabetes. The Packy and Marlon Super Nintendo video game promotes fun,…

  9. Metabolic control and educational status in children with type 1 diabetes: effects of a summer camp and intensive insulin treatment.

    PubMed

    Karagüzel, G; Bircan, I; Erişir, S; Bundak, R

    2005-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate prospectively, in our diabetic patients, the impacts of a summer camp and intensive insulin treatment (IIT) on both metabolic control and disease-related educational level. Twenty-five patients participated in a 7-day-long summer camp. Before the camp, all patients were on therapy with short-acting human insulin (SAI) and intermediate-acting insulin (IAI) twice daily. On arrival, their insulin therapy regimen was changed by IIT including either SAI or rapid-acting insulin analogue (RAI) three times before meals supplemented by IAI at bedtime. Following the camp, all participants were given IIT with RAI plus IAI. Frequency of hypoglycaemia, insulin dose, body mass index (BMI) and glycohaemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were assessed at pre-camp and post-camp controls. To evaluate the effectiveness of camp-assisted education, all participants were regularly tested. We observed significant elevations in total daily dose of insulin and BMI at months 3 and 6 when compared with the pre-camp values but, by month 12, they were not significantly different from precamp values. The mean HbA(1c) level decreased significantly at months 6 and 12. Severe hypoglycaemic episodes and ketoacidosis were not detected during the camp and the following year. Significant improvements in knowledge about diabetes and self-management were determined at the end of the camp, after 6 and 12 months. Camp-assisted IIT with RAI improved metabolic control of diabetic children. Additionally, camp-assisted education has a positive effect on disease-related educational level and self-management.

  10. Conceptualisation of the 'good' self-manager: A qualitative investigation of stakeholder views on the self-management of long-term health conditions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J; Boger, E; Latter, S; Kennedy, A; Jones, F; Foster, C; Demain, S

    2017-03-01

    Healthcare policy in developed countries has, in recent years, promoted self-management among people with long-term conditions. Such policies are underpinned by neoliberal philosophy, as seen in the promotion of greater individual responsibility for health through increased support for self-management. Yet still little is known about how self-management is understood by commissioners of healthcare services, healthcare professionals, people with long-term conditions and family care-givers. The evidence presented here is drawn from a two-year study, which investigated how self-management is conceptualised by these stakeholder groups. Conducted in the UK between 2013 and 2015, this study focused on three exemplar long-term conditions, stroke, diabetes and colorectal cancer, to explore the issue. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were carried out with 174 participants (97 patients, 35 family care-givers, 20 healthcare professionals and 22 commissioners). The data is used to demonstrate how self-management is framed in terms of what it means to be a 'good' self-manager. The 'good' self-manager is an individual who is remoralised; thus taking responsibility for their health; is knowledgeable and uses this to manage risks; and, is 'active' in using information to make informed decisions regarding health and social wellbeing. This paper examines the conceptualisation of the 'good' self-manager. It demonstrates how the remoralised, knowledgeable and active elements are inextricably linked, that is, how action is knowledge applied and how morality underlies all action of the 'good' self-manager. Through unpicking the 'good' self-manager the problems of neoliberalism are also revealed and addressed here.

  11. Creativity and diabetes education: Essentiality, impact and way forward.

    PubMed

    Sarda, Archana

    2015-04-01

    The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) program is a unique program aimed at children suffering from type 1 diabetes. The whole focus of CDiC is to provide comprehensive care including diabetes education. Various innovative and creative diabetes educational materials have been developed, which makes learning fun. Lot of diabetes camps are held at CDiC, focusing on diabetes education, experience sharing and fun activities. CDiC faces many challenges in an effort to cater to the needs of most deserving children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) throughout the country, to provide comprehensive care including self-sufficiency, to serve children for as long as possible and to ultimately have better outcomes for all children with T1DM. The CDiC program aims to make the child more positive, secure and hopeful and initiate and strive for comprehensive diabetes care for the economically underprivileged children with T1DM.

  12. Gamifying Self-Management of Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Gary; Ranchhod, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management of chronic illnesses is an ongoing issue in health care research. Gamification is a concept that arose in the field of computer science and has been borrowed by many other disciplines. It is perceived by many that gamification can improve the self-management experience of people with chronic illnesses. This paper discusses the validation of a framework (called The Wheel of Sukr) that was introduced to achieve this goal. Objective This research aims to (1) discuss a gamification framework targeting the self-management of chronic illnesses and (2) validate the framework by diabetic patients, medical professionals, and game experts. Methods A mixed-method approach was used to validate the framework. Expert interviews (N=8) were conducted in order to validate the themes of the framework. Additionally, diabetic participants completed a questionnaire (N=42) in order to measure their attitudes toward the themes of the framework. Results The results provide a validation of the framework. This indicates that gamification might improve the self-management of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. Namely, the eight themes in the Wheel of Sukr (fun, esteem, socializing, self-management, self-representation, motivation, growth, sustainability) were perceived positively by 71% (30/42) of the participants with P value <.001. Conclusions In this research, both the interviews and the questionnaire yielded positive results that validate the framework (The Wheel of Sukr). Generally, this study indicates an overall acceptance of the notion of gamification in the self-management of diabetes. PMID:27612632

  13. Effects of a Tier 3 Self-Management Intervention Implemented with and without Treatment Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Ashley; Young, K. Richard; Christensen, Lynnette; Caldarella, Paul; Williams, Leslie; Wills, Howard

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of a Tier 3 peer-matching self-management intervention on two elementary school students who had previously been less responsive to Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions. The Tier 3 self-management intervention, which was implemented in the general education classrooms, included daily electronic communication between…

  14. Integrating Self-Management and Exercise for People Living with Arthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, A. D.; McCullough, C.; Chan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Program for Arthritis Control through Education and Exercise, PACE-Ex[TM}, is an arthritis self-management program incorporating principles and practice of self-management, goal setting and warm water exercise. The purpose of this program review is to examine the impact of PACE-Ex on participants' self-efficacy for condition management,…

  15. Evaluation of WebEase: An Epilepsy Self-Management Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen; Escoffery, Cam; McCarty, Frances; Yeager, Katherine A.; Henry, Thomas R.; Koganti, Archana; Reisinger, Elizabeth L.; Wexler, Bethany

    2009-01-01

    People with epilepsy have various education needs and must adopt many self-management behaviors in order to control their condition. This study evaluates WebEase, an Internet-based, theory-driven, self-management program for adults with epilepsy. Thirty-five participants took part in a 6-week pilot implementation of WebEase. The main components of…

  16. Effective School Self-Management--What's Ahead? Conference Proceedings (October 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Bev, Comp.

    This proceedings of an international conference examines the nature of school self-management around the world. The volume opens with the keynote address by, Tony Townsend, which provides an overview of school self-management, effective education, and the school-effectiveness movement. Some of the topics addressed include student achievement, the…

  17. Partnering With Community-Dwelling Individuals With Diabetes for Health Behavior Change Using Action Plans: An Innovation in Health Professionals Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Barry Hultquist, Teresa; Brown, Sara Goomis; Geske, Jenenne; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Waibel-Rycek, Denise

    2015-11-01

    Health care practitioners support or hinder an individual's attempts to self-manage health behavior. Practitioners must understand an individual's health needs and goals to effectively partner for behavior change. Self-management support (SMS) promote efforts toward positive health behavior change. Practitioners need training to provide effective SMS, beginning with their formal education. The purpose of this educational practice project was to integrate an evidence-based intervention (SMS using action plans) into a nursing curriculum. Three sequential steps included (1) providing foundational SMS education, (2) SMS application with students' personal action plans, and (3) implementing SMS with community-dwelling individuals with diabetes. Students (n = 130) partnered with participants (n = 85), developing short- (n = 240) and long-term (n = 99) action plans during home visits. The average baseline Diabetes Empowerment Scale score measuring participant's perceived psychosocial diabetes management self-efficacy was 4.3 (1-5 scale, SD = 0.51, n = 83). Most common short-term actions related to physical activity (n = 100, 42%) and healthy eating (n = 61, 25%). Average participant confidence level was 7.7 (SD = 1.9, 0-10 scale). Short-term goal evaluation (n = 209) revealed 66% (n = 137) were met more than 50% of the time. Both participants (99%) and students (99%) expressed satisfaction with home visit and action plan experiences. This teaching-learning experience is replicable and applicable to any professional health care student.

  18. 77 FR 3783 - Collection; Comment Request: Revision of the National Diabetes Education Program Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... Diabetes Education Program Comprehensive Evaluation Plan SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) Comprehensive Evaluation Plan. Type of Information Collection...: The National Diabetes Education Program is a partnership of the National Institutes of Health...

  19. Improving Diabetes Care in the Latino Population: The Emory Latino Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Britt; Greene, Rachel; Ferez-Pinzon, Anyul M.; Mejia, Robert; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence of diabetes in Latinos is 12.8% compared to 9.3% of the general population. Latinos suffer from a higher prevalence of diabetic complications and mortality than whites yet receive less monitoring tests and education. Purpose: (1) Identify changes in clinical indicators among subjects with type 2 diabetes participating in…

  20. The Effectiveness of a Peer Coaching Education on Control and Management of Type 2 Diabetes in Women: A Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aalaa, Maryam; Sanjari, Mahnaz; Aghaei Meybodi, Hamid Reza; Amini, Mohammad Reza; Qorbani, Mostafa; Adibi, Hossien; Mehrdad, Neda

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Diabetes Education by Peer Coaching is a strategy which helps the patients with diabetes in the field of behavioral and emotional problems. However, the results of studies in this field in other countries could not be generalized in our context. So, the current study aimed to examine the effectiveness of Diabetes Education by Peer Coaching on Diabetes Management. Methods: Outcome variables for patients and peer coaches are measured at baseline and in3,6 and 12 months. The primary outcome consisted of Fasting Blood Sugar (FBS) and HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included Blood Pressure (BP), Body Mass Index (BMI,) Waist-Hip Ratio (WHR), Lipid Profile, diabetes self-care activities, diabetes-related quality of life, depression, and Social Capital levels.Initial analyses compared the frequency of baseline levels of outcome and other variables using a simple Chi-square test, t-test and the Mann-Whitney- U test. Sequential measurements in each group were evaluated by two-way analysis of variance. If significant differences in baseline characteristics were found, analyses were repeated adjusting for these differences using ANOVA and logistic regression for multivariate analyses. Additional analyses were conducted to look for the evidence of effect modification by pre-specified subgroups. Conclusion: The fact is that self-control and self-efficacy in diabetes management and treatment of diabetes could be important components. It seems that this research in this special setting with cultural differences would provide more evidence about peer-coaching model. It seems that if the peer-coaching model improves learning situations between patients with diabetes by offering one-on-one Diabetes Self Management Education, it could be an interactive approach to diabetic education. Trial Registration Number: IRCT201501128175N3

  1. Activating patients with chronic disease for self-management: comparison of self-managing patients with those managing by frequent readmissions to hospital.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Sue E; Dennis, Sarah M; Bazeley, Pat; Harris, Mark F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors that activate people to self-manage chronic disease is important in improving uptake levels. If the many frequent hospital users who present with acute exacerbations of chronic disease were to self-manage at home, some hospital admissions would be avoided. Patient interview and demographic, psychological, clinical and service utilisation data were compared for two groups of patients with chronic disease: those attending self-management services and those who managed by using hospital services. Data were analysed to see whether there were differences that might explain the two different approaches to managing their conditions. The two groups were similar in terms of comorbidity, age, sex, home services, home support and educational level. Self-managing patients were activated by their clinician, accepted their disease, changed their identity, confronted emotions and learnt the skills to self-manage and avoid hospital. Patients who frequently used hospital services to manage their chronic disease were often in denial about their chronic disease, hung on to their identity and expressed little emotional response. However, they reported a stronger sense of coherence and rated their health more highly than self-managing patients. This study shed light on the process of patient activation for self-management. A better understanding of the process of patient activation would encourage clinicians who come into contact with frequently readmitted chronic disease patients to be more proactive in supporting self-management.

  2. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory.

  3. Making Diabetes Education Accessible For People With Visual Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ann S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify changes needed to make the diabetes education materials and programs of the Diabetes Association of Greater Cleveland (DAGC) accessible for people who have visual impairment and diabetes (PVID). Methods Using the principles and techniques of participatory action research (PAR), five PVID and four staff members of a local diabetes association met once a month for a year to plan, implement, and evaluate progress towards full accessibility of all diabetes education materials and programs. The researcher served as facilitator. Results Four “transformational moments” are presented through which the PAR process enabled PVID and diabetes professionals to learn to understand and trust each other. Changes made to increase accessibility included: production of two recordings for providing access to print information about diabetes; planning public education program publicity and locations for access; development of guidelines to help speakers make their diabetes education presentations accessible for people who cannot see slides and gestures. and presentation of an inservice for the entire staff of the diabetes association, including information about how they live with visual impairment, and common courtesies that make communication with PVID more effective Implications Diabetes education programs should include planning for full accessibility for PVID. Diabetes organizations should publish teaching materials in accessible format. PMID:19417119

  4. Self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hanzhang; Luo, Jianfeng; Wu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    Background To compare self–reported diabetes education among Chinese middle–aged and older adults with diabetes in three population groups: urban residents, migrants in urban settings, and rural residents. Methods We used data from the 2011 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study. The sample included 993 participants age 45 and older who reported having diabetes diagnosed from a health professional. We performed multilevel regressions performed to examine the associations between characteristics and different aspects of diabetes education received. Findings Our study shows that 20.24% of the participants received no diabetes education at all. Among those who received information, 46.82% of respondents with diabetes received weight control advice from a health care provider, 90.97% received advice on exercise, 60.37% received diet advice, 35.12% were spoken to smoking control, and only 17.89% of persons were informed of foot care. After controlling socioeconomic factors, life style, number of comorbidities and community factors, we found that compared with migrant population and rural residents, urban residents were more likely to receive diabetes education on diet. Urban residents were also more likely to obtain diabetes education and more aspects of diabetes education comparison with migrants and rural residents. Conclusions Our study suggests diabetes education is a serious concern in China, and a significant proportion of the participants did not receive advice on smoking control and foot care. Rural residents and migrants from rural areas received much less diabetes education compared with urban residents. Efforts to improve diabetes educations are urgently needed in China. PMID:27698998

  5. Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit - REACT. Study protocol of a randomised controlled trial to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a supported self management package for relatives of people with recent onset psychosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mental health problems commonly begin in adolescence when the majority of people are living with family. This can be a frightening time for relatives who often have little knowledge of what is happening or how to manage it. The UK National Health Service has a commitment to support relatives in order to reduce their distress, but research studies have shown that this can lead to a better outcome for service users as well. Unfortunately, many relatives do not get the kind of support they need. We aim to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of providing and supporting a Relatives' Education and Coping Toolkit (REACT) for relatives of people with recent onset psychosis. Methods The study is a randomised control trial. Trial Registration for Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69299093. Relatives of people receiving treatment from the Early Intervention Service for psychosis are randomly allocated to receive either Treatment As Usual (TAU) or TAU plus the REACT intervention. The main aims of the study are to: (i) determine the acceptability of a supported self-management intervention; (ii) determine preference for type of support; (iii) assess the feasibility of the design; (iv) identify the barriers and solutions to offering support for self-management approaches within the NHS; (v) estimate the likely effect size of the impact of the intervention on outcome for relatives; (vi) gain detailed feedback about the barriers and solutions to using a self-management approach; (vii) describe the way in which the intervention is used. Outcomes will be assessed from baseline and at 6 month follow-up. Discussion The intervention is compared to current treatment in a sample of participants highly representative of relatives in routine early intervention services across the UK. The intervention is protocolised, offered within routine practice by existing staff and extensive process data is being collected. Randomisation is independent; all assessments

  6. A patient as a self-manager of their personal data on health and disease with new technology--challenges for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Hopia, Hanna; Punna, Mari; Laitinen, Teemu; Latvala, Eila

    2015-12-01

    Background: Digital technologies have transformed nearly every aspect of our lives. However, for many of us, they have not yet improved the way we receive or participate in our health services and disease care. Hostetter et al. (2014) explore in a new multimedia essay the changes occurring with the arrival of new digital tools, from mobile apps and data-driven software solutions to wearable sensors that transmit information to a patient's team of health care providers. Digitisation will revolutionise health technology to a new extent, as the self-measurement, cloud services, teleconsultation and robotics technologies are being used to get health expenditure under control. In the future, robots will dispense drugs, and treatment routines will utilise cloud services (Biesdorf and Niedermann, 2014; Grain and Sharper, 2013). According to the rationale of the Horizon 2020 (European Commission, 2013b) work programme, personalising health and care has been stated to empower citizens and patients to manage their own health and disease, which can result in more cost-effective healthcare systems by enabling the management of chronic diseases outside institutions, improving health outcomes, and by encouraging healthy citizens to remain so. Solutions should be developed and tested with the use of open innovation platforms, such as large-scale demonstrators for health and service innovation. It is a fact that ICT/new health technology and personal health applications are transforming patients' self-management in many ways. A huge amount of personal health application solutions are being offered in the marketplace, which engage in activities that promote health, monitoring the symptoms and signs of illness, and managing the impact of illness (European Commission eHealth Action Plan 2012-2020, 2012). The WHO (2011) has conducted a comprehensive study and published a report on Member States' use of mHealth (mobile Health) as well as the readiness and barriers to its use. The

  7. Delivery of self training and education for stressful situations (DESTRESS-PC): a randomized trial of nurse assisted online self-management for PTSD in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Charles C.; Litz, Brett; Magruder, Kathryn M.; Harper, Elizabeth; Gore, Kristie; Stein, Nathan; Yeager, Derik; Liu, Xian; Coe, T. Ray

    2016-01-01

    Objective This randomized controlled trial examined the effectiveness of a nurse assisted online cognitive-behavioral self-management intervention for war-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to optimized usual primary care PTSD Treatment (OUC) to reduce PTSD symptoms. Method Participants were 80 veterans of recent military conflicts with PTSD as assessed by the PTSD Checklist (PCL) seeking primary care treatment at one of three Veterans Affairs (VA) and four Army clinics. DESTRESS-PC consisted of logins to a secure website three times per week for 6 weeks with monitoring by a study nurse. All participants received nurse care management in the form of phone check-ins every two weeks and feedback to their primary care providers. Blinded raters assessed outcomes 6, 12, and 18 weeks post-randomization. Results DESTRESS-PC was associated with a significantly greater decrease in PTSD symptoms compared to OUC (F(3, 186)=3.72, p=.012). The effect was largest at the 12-week assessment (ΔPCL=12.6±16.6 versus 5.7±12.5, p<0.05) with the treatment effect disappearing by the 18-week follow-up. Notably, there was a dose effect; number of logins correlated significantly with PTSD outcomes, with more logins associated with greater PTSD symptom improvement. None of the secondary outcomes (depression, anxiety, somatic symptoms, and functional status) showed statistically significant improvement; however, the treatment effect on depression approached significance (F(3, 186)=2.17, p=.093). Conclusions DESTRESS-PC shows promise as a means of delivering effective, early PTSD treatment in primary care. Larger trials are needed. PMID:25929985

  8. Teaching Self-Management: The Design and Implementation of Self-Management Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhardt, Megan

    2007-01-01

    Learning the skills of self-management is an essential task for students in the 21st century. A total of 223 undergraduate students participated in 4 self-management tutorials that presented the components of understanding and mastering self-management skills including (a) self-assessment, (b) goal setting, (c) time management, and (d)…

  9. Evaluation of a Standardized Patient Education Program for Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation: Impact on Illness Knowledge and Self-Management Behaviors up to 1 Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Karin; Seekatz, Bettina; Haug, Günter; Mosler, Gabriele; Schwaab, Bernhard; Worringen, Ulrike; Faller, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Patient education is an essential part of the treatment of coronary heart disease in cardiac rehabilitation. In Germany, no standardized and evaluated patient education programs for coronary heart disease have been available so far. In this article, we report the evaluation of a patient-oriented program. A multicenter quasi-experimental,…

  10. Effects of a Classroom-Based Asthma Education Curriculum on Asthma Knowledge, Attitudes, Self-Efficacy, Quality of Life, and Self-Management Behaviors among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Sally Fontamillas; Marshak, Helen Hopp; Dyjack, David T.; Neish, Christine M.

    2005-01-01

    Asthma education interventions primarily target young children and adults, and a few target adolescents. Several constructs of the social cognitive theory were used to design a classroom-based high school asthma education curriculum and to determine if the curriculum would improve asthma knowledge and attitudes among 10th grade students, as well…

  11. Improving self-management for patients with long-term conditions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicola J

    An increasing number of people are living with long-term conditions. These conditions cannot be cured, but can be managed through education, health promotion, medication, therapy and self-management. Self-management involves people taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing, as well as learning to manage any long-term illnesses. Nurses play a pivotal role in providing advice, guidance, education and support to people living with long-term conditions. Self-management is important as it not only benefits the patient, but also provides wider opportunities for community and specialist nurses to use and develop their clinical and interpersonal skills.

  12. "With diabetes, it's always a continuous education and a continuous struggle."

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Diabetes Stories "With diabetes, it's always a continuous education and a continuous struggle." ... understand, and they support me, too. With diabetes, it's always a continuous education and a continuous struggle. ...

  13. Teaching Self-Management Strategies to Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, K. Richard; And Others

    This book presents a behavioral program to teach adolescents basic self-management skills; two chapters provide the theoretical basis for the program and four chapters supply sample lesson plans. The first chapter is an introduction to behavioral self-management. It proposes a behavior change model with four major components: assessment,…

  14. Self-Managed Studying in College Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, K. Anthony

    In an introductory psychology course, students were taught some principles of "adjustment" using self-management techniques and were required to conduct a self-management project. The four student projects reported herein were specifically designed to improve study skills through use of Premack's principle and stimulus control. Course…

  15. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  16. Adoption of Self-management Interventions for Prevention and Care

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Ingram, Barbara L.; Swendeman, Dallas; Lee, Adabel

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of spiraling healthcare costs can be attributed to chronic diseases, making prevention and management of chronic conditions one of our highest healthcare priorities, especially as we organize for patient-centered medical homes. Collaborative patient self-management in primary care has been repeatedly demonstrated to be efficacious in reducing both symptoms and increasing quality of life, yet there is no consensus on what, how, when, and by whom self-management programs are best implemented. In this article, we argue that self-management interventions effectively span the continuum of prevention and disease management. Self-management interventions rest on a foundation of five core actions: 1) activate motivation to change; 2) apply domain-specific information from education and self-monitoring; 3) develop skills; 4) acquire environmental resources; and 5) build social support. A range of delivery vehicles, including group interventions, primary care providers, and advanced wireless technology, are described and evaluated in terms of diffusion and cost-containment goals. PMID:23148958

  17. Career Self-Management and Career Capital of Mid-Level Administrators in Higher Education Who Previously Served as Professional Academic Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elecia Cole

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the prerequisites for career advancement helps to keep employees motivated and engaged. However, in the higher education (H.E.) workplace, where formalized career ladders are sparse and ambiguous for staff personnel--especially those in professional academic advising--employees who are interested in career advancement into mid-level…

  18. The over time development of chronic illness self-management patterns: a longitudinal qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There currently exists a vast amount of literature concerning chronic illness self-management, however the developmental patterns and sustainability of self-management over time remain largely unknown. This paper aims to describe the patterns by which different chronic illness self-management behaviors develop and are maintained over time. Method Twenty-one individuals newly diagnosed with chronic illnesses (e.g., diabetes, rheumatism, ischemic heart disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic renal disease, inflammatory bowel disease) were repeatedly interviewed over two-and-a-half years. The interviews were conducted in Sweden from 2006 to 2008. A total of 81 narrative interviews were analyzed with an interpretive description approach. Results The participants’ self-management behaviors could be described in four different developmental patterns: consistent, episodic, on demand, and transitional. The developmental patterns were related to specific self-management behaviors. Most participants took long-term medications in a consistent pattern, whereas exercise was often performed according to an episodic pattern. Participants managed health crises (e.g., angina, pain episodes) according to an on demand pattern and everyday changes due to illness (e.g., adaptation of work and household activities) according to a transitional pattern. All of the participants used more than one self-management pattern. Conclusion The findings show that self-management does not develop as one uniform pattern. Instead different self-management behaviors are enacted in different patterns. Therefore, it is likely that self-management activities require support strategies tailored to each behavior’s developmental pattern. PMID:23647658

  19. Learning Difficulties of Diabetic Patients: A Survey of Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Caroline; Gagnayre, Remi; d'Ivernois, Jean-Francois

    1998-01-01

    Surveys 85 health care professionals on the learning difficulties of diabetic patients. Results show that educators find it easy to teach techniques: patients master procedures well and make few mistakes. In contrast, diabetic patients seem to have problems learning skills, such as insulin dose adjustment, that require complex problem-solving.…

  20. General literacy and health literacy in Dominicans with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Dominicans are one of the fastest growing Hispanic subgroups in the United States, and they are greatly affected by type 2 diabetes. Health literacy and general literacy are critical components in diabetes self-management given that type 2 diabetes is a disease that relies heavily on a person having the skills needed to actively participate in their diabetes care. Three PubMed searches were conducted using search words Dominicans, Hispanics, diabetes, type 2 diabetes, diabetes education, health literacy, and literacy. These searches were based on published articles completed from January 2000 to May 2012. There were 14 articles reviewed. Eight articles were eliminated from the 3 literature searches. These findings show a lack of data and research on Dominicans with diabetes and on health literacy and general literacy among this Hispanic subgroup. Qualitative and quantitative studies are urgently needed to examine diabetes in Dominicans and the impact health literacy and general literacy have on diabetes health outcomes in this Hispanic subgroup.

  1. Educational attainment moderates the associations of diabetes education with health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes education is a critical element of care for people with diabetes. However, the associations between diabetes education and self-care or health outcomes have not been clearly demonstrated at a national level. The aims of this study were to examine the associations of attendance of diabetes education classes with health behaviours and glycaemic control, and to understand whether these associations were moderated by level of educational attainment. Data were analysed for 456 adults from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V, collected from January 2010 to December 2012. No significant differences were observed between patients who had attended diabetes education classes and those who had never attended for factors such as smoking, drinking, exercise, nutrition therapy or glycaemic control. There was a significant interaction effect between receiving diabetes education and level of educational attainment on obtaining optimal glycaemic control. Attending diabetes education was positively associated with optimal glycaemic control among patients with more than a high school education but was negatively associated with it among those with less than middle school education. Diabetes education programmes need to be tailored to the needs and cognitive capacities of the target population.

  2. Association between education and quality of diabetes care in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Flatz, Aline; Casillas, Alejandra; Stringhini, Silvia; Zuercher, Emilie; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Low socioeconomic status is associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, worse outcomes, and worse quality of care. We explored the relationship between education, as a measure of socioeconomic status, and quality of care in the Swiss context. Patients and methods Data were drawn from a population-based survey of 519 adults with diabetes during fall 2011 and summer 2012 in a canton of Switzerland. We assessed patients and diabetes characteristics. Eleven indicators of quality of care were considered (six of process and five of outcomes of care). After bivariate analyses, regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and diabetic complications were performed to assess the relationship between education and quality of care. Results Of 11 quality-of-care indicators, three were significantly associated with education: funduscopy (patients with tertiary versus primary education were more likely to get the exam: odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.004–3.3) and two indicators of health-related quality of life (patients with tertiary versus primary education reported better health-related quality of life: Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life: β=0.6 [95% CI, 0.2–0.97]; SF-12 mean physical component summary score: β=3.6 [95% CI, 0.9–6.4]). Conclusion Our results suggest the presence of educational inequalities in quality of diabetes care. These findings may help health professionals focus on individuals with increased needs to decrease health inequalities. PMID:25759596

  3. Understanding patients' health and technology attitudes for tailoring self-management interventions.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Katie; Vizer, Lisa; Eschler, Jordan; Ralston, James; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare providers are moving towards tailoring self-management interventions to include the communication technologies patients use in daily life. Accurate understanding of patients' attitudes towards both technology and involvement in managing chronic conditions will be critical for informing effective self-management strategies. The tailoring of these interventions, however, could be undermined by providers' implicit biases based on patient age, race, and education level that have been shown to negatively affect care. To inform the design and tailoring of self-management interventions, we elicited attitudes toward technology use and participation in care of 40 participants in a maximum variation sample. The analysis revealed three participant clusters-"Proactive Techies," "Indie Self-Managers," and "Remind Me! Non-Techies"-that represent varying attitudes toward health behaviors and technologies that were independent of race, education level, and age. Our approach provides insight into how people prioritize important values related to health participation and technology.

  4. Modelling effective diagnosis of risk complications in gestational diabetes mellitus: an e-diabetic expert system for pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreedevi, E.; Vijaya Lakshmi, K.; Chaitanya Krishna, E.; Padmavathamma, M.

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic illness that requires continuous medical care and patient self-management education to prevent acute complications and to reduce the risk of long-term complications. This paper deals with study and development of algorithm to develop an initial stage expert system to provide diagnosis to the pregnant women who are suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) by means of Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

  5. Are podcasts effective at educating African American men about diabetes?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jarrett; Ross, Levi; Iwanenko, Walter; Schiffert, Judith; Sen, Arup

    2012-09-01

    Education is a critical component of the National Blueprint to eliminate racial disparities in diabetes. Research indicates that traditional methods of diabetes education has had limited effectiveness with minority populations and suggests that different educational approaches be explored. The purpose of the research was to explore the effectiveness of an emergent technology (podcast) for use in educating inner-city, African American men about diabetes prevention. Thirty African American men participated in self-administered, pretest-posttest surveys in August 2009. Surveys collected information on demographic characteristics, perceptions of diabetes, and diabetes knowledge. Paired samples t test was computed to evaluate pretest-posttest changes in overall knowledge. McNemar or binomial tests were computed to evaluate pretest-posttest knowledge changes on each of the 15 individual knowledge items. Diabetes knowledge scores for the sample increased from 8.27 at pretest to 10.47 at posttest (p = .001). Posttest knowledge scores increased for 77% of men, stayed the same for 13%, and decreased for 10%. Men who listened to the podcast correctly answered 40% more knowledge questions on their posttest assessments. Results from this exploratory study suggest that podcasts are useful for helping inner-city, African American men recall diabetes prevention information. Additional research is recommended with larger randomly selected samples using more rigorous research designs.

  6. PREP-T1 (Preteen Re-Education With Parents-Type 1 Diabetes) Feasibility Intervention Results.

    PubMed

    Sullivan-Bolyai, Susan; Crawford, Sybil; Johnson, Kim; Ramchandani, Neesha; Quinn, Diane; D'Alesandro, Bianca; Stern, Kailyn; Lipman, Terry; Melkus, Gail; Streisand, Randi

    2016-11-01

    There has been a 2% to 3% increase in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children below 11 years old. Preteens (9-12 years old) with T1D are often overlooked regarding future diabetes self-management (DSM) expectations because parents are still in the "driver's seat." The study purpose was to explore feasibility/ability to recruit and conduct a two-arm trial on reeducation, collaboration, and social support. One component of DSM was reviewed (hypoglycemia) with preteens (n = 22) and parents (n = 22). The experimental preteens discussed hypoglycemia management with a teen mentor and nurse educator using a human patient simulator for practice, and working collaboratively with parents. Concurrently, mothers met with a parent mentor and psychologist to discuss growth and development, and collaborative shared management. Comparison dyads discussed hypoglycemia management with a nurse. Preteens slightly improved in diabetes knowledge; the experimental arm had higher problem-solving scores. Parents in the experimental arm had higher self-efficacy scores. Findings will inform future research.

  7. Pilot Program to Improve Self-Management of Patients with Heart Failure by Redesigning Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Jessica D.; O'Neal, Daniel J.; Siddharthan, Kris; Neugaard, Britta I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF). Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support) to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care. PMID:24864206

  8. Social Media in Diabetes Education: A Viable Option?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Julie; Cox, Jill N.; Corbin, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    As Extension educators are encouraged to implement more cost-effective and efficient means of programming, the use of Web-based social media has become a popular option. Penn State Extension implemented a social media awareness survey among participants in its community-based diabetes education program to determine familiarity with this medium,…

  9. Self management of oral anticoagulation: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Murray, E T; McCahon, D; Holder, R; Raftery, J P; Hussain, S; Sandhar, H; Hobbs, F D R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of self management compared with routine care in patients on long term oral anticoagulants. Design Multicentre open randomised controlled trial. Setting Midlands region of the UK. Participants 617 patients aged over 18 and receiving warfarin randomised to intervention (n = 337) and routine care (n = from 2470 invited; 193/337 (57%) completed the 12 month intervention. Intervention Intervention patients used a point of care device to measure international normalised ratio twice a week and a simple dosing chart to interpret their dose of warfarin. Main outcome measure Percentage of time spent within the therapeutic range of international normalised ratio. Results No significant differences were found in percentage of time in the therapeutic range between self managment and routine care (70% v 68%). Self managed patients with poor control before the study showed an improvement in control that was not seen in the routine care group. Nine patients (2.8/100 patient years) had serious adverse events in the self managed group, compared with seven (2.7/100 patient years) in the routine care arm (χ2(df = 1) = 0.02, P = 0.89). Conclusion With appropriate training, self management is safe and reliable for a sizeable proportion of patients receiving oral anticoagulation treatment. It may improve the time spent the therapeutic range for patients with initially poor control. Trial registration ISRCTN 19313375. PMID:16216821

  10. [Integrative treatment of instable diabetes mellitus: education or psychotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Leweke, Frank; Kurth, Regina; Milch, Wolfgang; Brosig, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    The term "brittle diabetes" describes a subtype of instable type-I diabetes, characterized by high variations of blood sugar without any evident cause and despite careful clinical management. Clear guidelines for a precise definition of the condition are still lacking; this fosters insecurities concerning diagnosis and therapy of the disease. Psychosocial influences, triggering these conditions, were discussed. The patient-doctor-relationship appears to be tensed due to an often missing compliance. Using a paradigmatic case study as background, the specific diagnostic and therapeutic problems in brittle diabetes were presented. Brittle diabetes advocates a close cooperation between internal and psychosomatic medicine units and a combination of patient education and psychotherapy. Seen under a psychosomatic paradigm, brittle diabetes can be detected early and effective treatment may avoid further complications in these young patients.

  11. Supporting Self-management of Asthma Care.

    PubMed

    Keep, Suzanne M; Reiffer, Alice; Bahl, Thomas E

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a major public health concern, with an estimated 18.8 million adults in the United States having the disease. Asthma can be controlled with a variety of effective treatment options; however, only half the people with asthma report their asthma is well controlled. Uncontrolled asthma leads to high direct and indirect costs as well as decreased quality of life. The pathophysiology of asthma, current asthma practice guidelines, and common barriers to self-management will be discussed. Through use of motivational interviewing techniques and knowledge of available self-management tools, the home care clinician is poised to help increase self-management of asthma, decrease hospitalizations, and improve quality of life.

  12. Closing the Gap: Eliminating Health Care Disparities among Latinos with Diabetes Using Health Information Technology Tools and Patient Navigators

    PubMed Central

    López, Lenny; Grant, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    Latinos have higher rates of diabetes and diabetes-related complications compared to non-Latinos. Clinical diabetes self-management tools that rely on innovative health information technology (HIT) may not be widely used by Latinos, particularly those that have low literacy or numeracy, low income, and/or limited English proficiency. Prior work has shown that tailored diabetes self-management educational interventions are feasible and effective in improving diabetes knowledge and physiological measures among Latinos, especially those interventions that utilize tailored coaching and navigator programs. In this article, we discuss the role of HIT for diabetes management in Latinos and describe a novel “eNavigator” role that we are developing to increase HIT adoption and thereby reduce health care disparities. PMID:22401336

  13. Web 2.0 Chronic Disease Self-Management for Older Adults: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P.S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Background Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. Objective To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Results Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically

  14. Patients with Complex Chronic Diseases: Perspectives on Supporting Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Trauth, Jeanette M.; Ling, Bruce S.; Anderson, Roger T.; Piatt, Gretchen A.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    A Complex Chronic Disease (CCD) is a condition involving multiple morbidities that requires the attention of multiple health care providers or facilities and possibly community (home)-based care. A patient with CCD presents to the health care system with unique needs, disabilities, or functional limitations. The literature on how to best support self-management efforts in those with CCD is lacking. With this paper, the authors present the case of an individual with diabetes and end-stage renal disease who is having difficulty with self-management. The case is discussed in terms of intervention effectiveness in the areas of prevention, addiction, and self-management of single diseases. Implications for research are discussed. PMID:18026814

  15. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person's ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient's current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient's skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level.

  16. Chronic disease self-management support for persons with dementia, in a clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Anderson, Laura J; MacPhail, Aleece; Lovell, Janaka Jonathan; Davis, Marie-Claire; Winbolt, Margaret

    2017-01-01

    The burden of chronic disease is greater in individuals with dementia, a patient group that is growing as the population is aging. The cornerstone of optimal management of chronic disease requires effective patient self-management. However, this is particularly challenging in older persons with a comorbid diagnosis of dementia. The impact of dementia on a person’s ability to self-manage his/her chronic disease (eg, diabetes mellitus or heart failure) varies according to the cognitive domain(s) affected, severity of impairment and complexity of self-care tasks. A framework is presented that describes how impairment in cognitive domains (attention and information processing, language, visuospatial ability and praxis, learning and memory and executive function) impacts on the five key processes of chronic disease self-management. Recognizing the presence of dementia in a patient with chronic disease may lead to better outcomes. Patients with dementia require individually tailored strategies that accommodate and adjust to the individual and the cognitive domains that are impaired, to optimize their capacity for self-management. Management strategies for clinicians to counter poor self-management due to differentially impaired cognitive domains are also detailed in the presented framework. Clinicians should work in collaboration with patients and care givers to assess a patient’s current capabilities, identify potential barriers to successful self-management and make efforts to adjust the provision of information according to the patient’s skill set. The increasing prevalence of age-related chronic illness along with a decline in the availability of informal caregivers calls for innovative programs to support self-management at a primary care level. PMID:28182172

  17. Tailoring of self-management interventions in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Jonkman, Nini; Westland, Heleen; Schuurmans, Marieke; Rutten, Frans; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of heart failure (HF) self-management interventions varies within patients suggesting that one size does not fit all. It is expected that effectiveness can be optimized when interventions are tailored to individual patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the literature on current use of tailoring in self-management interventions and patient characteristics associated with self-management capacity and success of interventions, as building blocks for tailoring. Within available trials, the degree to which interventions are explicitly tailored is marginal and often limited to content. We found that certain patient characteristics that are associated with poor self-management capacity do not influence effectiveness of a given intervention (i.e., age, gender, ethnicity, disease severity, number of comorbidities) and that other characteristics (low: income, literacy, education, baseline self-management capacity) in fact are indicators of patients with a high likelihood for success. Increased scientific efforts are needed to continue unraveling success of self-management interventions and to validate the modifying impact of currently known patient characteristics.

  18. A Self-Managed Reading Improvement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, George

    In an investigation of the effectiveness of self-managed reading improvement programs, a program incorporating self-monitoring (observing and recording relevant activity), self-reinforcement (increasing the probability of some target behavior by the self-presentation of positive consequences or the removal of negative consequences), and shaping…

  19. Beyond quality circles: self-managing teams.

    PubMed

    Sims, H P; Dean, J W

    1985-01-01

    A more extreme form of change than QCs, self-managing teams are informally estimated to have evolved in more than 200 U.S. plants. Indications are, however, that this is but the beginning--despite middle managers' fears that such teams will erode their power.

  20. Self Directed Learning and Self Management. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on self-directed learning and self-management. "Validating a More-Dimensional Conception of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerald A. Straka, Cornelia Schaefer) discusses the development and validation of a conception of self-directed learning as a dynamic interplay between behavior,…

  1. Self-Management and Reading Rate Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, George

    1979-01-01

    Principles of self-management were incorporated into a reading improvement program administered to study skills students. Results indicated that the performance-contingent strategy facilitated improvement. Results indicate that persistent practice is a salient factor in reading improvement. The importance of the self-reinforcement strategy used in…

  2. Impact of intensive nutritional education with carbohydrate counting on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Zipp, Christopher; Roehr, Jessica Terrone; Weiss, Lucia Beck; Filipetto, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study assessed the impact of an intensive carbohydrate counting educational intervention on diabetes control in type 2 diabetic patients. An experimental, prospective study design was used to assess the effect of nutritional education on diabetes control. The impact and efficacy of the education were measured over a 1-year period through changes in diabetes clinical markers, including hemoglobin A1c, lipid profiles, glucose levels, patients’ energy levels, and sense of well-being. Six patients were initially enrolled in the pilot study, with only three patients completing the intervention phase and the 3-month follow-up. Two patients were followed-up at the 1-year mark for their diabetes, although neither continued participation in the study beyond the 3-month mark. Marginal improvements in clinical markers at 3 months were found. However, due to the small sample size, changes in the clinical profiles may have occurred because of variables unrelated to the nutritional intervention. Further research is indicated for the control of these variables. PMID:21311697

  3. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need? This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as ``design features`` for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  4. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as design features'' for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  5. Patient factors that influence clinicians’ decision making in self-management support: A clinical vignette study

    PubMed Central

    Bos-Touwen, Irene D.; Trappenburg, Jaap C. A.; van der Wulp, Ineke; Schuurmans, Marieke J.; de Wit, Niek J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim Self-management support is an integral part of current chronic care guidelines. The success of self-management interventions varies between individual patients, suggesting a need for tailored self-management support. Understanding the role of patient factors in the current decision making of health professionals can support future tailoring of self-management interventions. The aim of this study is to identify the relative importance of patient factors in health professionals’ decision making regarding self-management support. Method A factorial survey was presented to primary care physicians and nurses. The survey consisted of clinical vignettes (case descriptions), in which 11 patient factors were systematically varied. Each care provider received a set of 12 vignettes. For each vignette, they decided whether they would give this patient self-management support and whether they expected this support to be successful. The associations between respondent decisions and patient factors were explored using ordered logit regression. Results The survey was completed by 60 general practitioners and 80 nurses. Self-management support was unlikely to be provided in a third of the vignettes. The most important patient factor in the decision to provide self-management support as well as in the expectation that self-management support would be successful was motivation, followed by patient-provider relationship and illness perception. Other factors, such as depression or anxiety, education level, self-efficacy and social support, had a small impact on decisions. Disease, disease severity, knowledge of disease, and age were relatively unimportant factors. Conclusion This is the first study to explore the relative importance of patient factors in decision making and the expectations regarding the provision of self-management support to chronic disease patients. By far, the most important factor considered was patient’s motivation; unmotivated patients

  6. Treating skin disease: self-management behaviors of Latino farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Arcury, Thomas A; Vallejos, Quirina M; Feldman, Steven R; Quandt, Sara A

    2006-01-01

    Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers experience high rates of skin disease that result from their working and living conditions. Knowledge of the ways farmworkers treat skin disease symptoms will provide a foundation for developing culturally appropriate health education, improving the delivery of health services, and improving occupational health policy for agricultural workers. The purpose of this paper is to describe skin disease self-management practices among Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers in North Carolina. This analysis uses a qualitative design based on in-depth interviews with 30 Latino farmworkers (six females, 24 males). Computer assisted, systematic procedures are used to analyze the verbatim transcripts of these interviews. Participants shared a consistent set of health self-management actions in treating skin disease. These actions were within the domains of self-care and medical care. A model of skin disease self-management among Latino farmworkers includes the self-care actions of hygiene, use of home remedies and use of over-the-counter remedies, with farmworkers often combining different domains of self-care. While farmworkers acknowledge the benefits of medical care, they are also mindful of barriers to its use, including cost, transportation and language. The large percentage of farmworkers who experience skin problems indicates that health outreach workers who serve this population need to provide education on preventing and treating skin problems, and they need to recommend to farmworkers appropriate over-the-counter medicines for the treatment of these skin problems. Appropriate medical care for treating skin problems that are dangerous and reduce farmworkers' quality-of-life needs to be made available to this population.

  7. The diabetes education team in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Holvey, S M

    1987-02-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is a complex disease that lasts a lifetime. It can be controlled but not cured. Treatment involves extensive changes in the patient's lifestyle, particularly in the areas of diet and exercise, which can often result in noncompliance with treatment regimens. Efforts to bring about these lifestyle changes usually require an enormous amount of time and attention on the part of the physician, and thus, are best carried out with the help of a diabetes education team. An ideal team would consist not only of the physician, patient, and family, but also a diabetes educator, a nutritionist or dietitian, an exercise therapist, a psychologist or social worker, a podiatrist, and an ophthalmologist or retinologist. A smaller number of team participants can offer a viable alternative by doubling up discipline areas, and by using interested members of the community as a referral source.

  8. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    PubMed Central

    Hempler, Nana Folmann; Ewers, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use. PMID:25593850

  9. Improving quality of care using a diabetes registry and disease management services in an integrated delivery network.

    PubMed

    Campion, Francis X; Tully, George L; Barrett, Jo-Ann; Andre, Paulo; Sweeney, Ann

    2005-08-01

    Disease management for chronic conditions is a call for collaboration among all parties of the health care system. The Caritas Christi Health Care System established a unified American Diabetes Association (ADA) recognized outpatient diabetes self-management education program (DSME) in each of its six hospital communities and has established an Internet data portal with managed care organizations to improve preventive care for thousands of patients with diabetes. This article describes the stepwise process of building the successful Caritas Diabetes Care Program and the central role of the Caritas Diabetes Registry over a 5-year period.

  10. Factors Influencing Latino Participation in Community-Based Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.; Noterman, Amber; Litchfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An Extension diabetes program (DP) was revised for Latinos; however, participation was limited. Factors influencing low participation rates were examined. Five Latinos interested in the DP participated in a focus group discussion. Transcripts were analyzed for themes. Preferred education programs were multi-session, local, group classes led by an…

  11. Diabetes Education Needs of Chinese Australians: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Tammie S. T.; Walker, Karen Z.; Ralston, Robin A.; Palermo, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate a type 2 diabetes education programme for Chinese Australians, based on the experience of participants and by exploring the unique needs of Chinese patients, their health beliefs and their cultural behaviours. Design and setting: A qualitative ethnographic study was undertaken in a community health…

  12. Implementation of a Chronic Illness Model for Diabetes Care in a Family Medicine Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Robin

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION While the Chronic Care Model (CCM) has been shown to improve the care of patients with chronic illnesses, primary care physicians have been unprepared in its use, and residencies have encountered challenges in introducing it into the academic environment. AIM Our residency program has implemented a diabetes management program modeled on the CCM to evaluate its impact on health outcomes of diabetic patients and educational outcomes of residents. SETTING University-affiliated, community-based family medicine residency program. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Six residents, two faculty clinicians, and clinic staff formed a diabetes management team. We redesigned the outpatient experience for diabetic patients by incorporating elements of the CCM: multidisciplinary team care through planned and group visits; creation of a diabetes registry; use of guidelines-based flow sheets; and incorporation of self-management goal-setting. Residents received extensive instruction in diabetes management, quality improvement, and patient self-management. PROGRAM EVALUATION We achieved overall improvement in all metabolic and process measures for patients, with the percentage achieving HbA1c, LDL, and BP goals simultaneously increasing from 5.7% to 17.1%. Educational outcomes for residents, as measured by compliance with review of provider performance reports and self-management goal-setting with patients, also significantly improved. DISCUSSION Through a learning collaborative experience, residency programs can successfully incorporate chronic care training for residents while addressing gaps in care for patients with diabetes. PMID:20737237

  13. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  14. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community.

  15. Impact of a self-care education programme on patients with type 2 diabetes in primary care in the Basque Country

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) is a disease with high prevalence and significant impact in terms of mortality and morbidity. The increased prevalence of the disease requires the implementation of new strategies to promote patient self-management. The Spanish Diabetes Self-Management Program (SDSMP) has proven to be effective in other settings. The objective of this study is to assess its effectiveness in terms of care for DM2 patients in primary care settings within the Basque Health Service – Osakidetza (Spain). Method/Design This is a randomised clinical trial in which patients diagnosed with DM2, 18–79 years of age, from four health regions within the Basque Health Service will be randomised into two groups: an intervention group, who will follow the SDSMP, and a control group, who will receive usual care in accordance with the clinical guidelines for DM2 and existing regulations in our region. The intervention consists of 2,5 hour-group sessions once a week for six weeks. The sessions cover target setting and problem solving techniques, promotion of physical exercise, basic knowledge of nutrition, proper use of medication, effective communication with relatives and health professionals, and basic knowledge about DM2 and its complications. This content is complemented by educational material: books, leaflets and CDs. The primary outcome measure will be the change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and secondary outcome measures will include changes in levels of physical activity and intake of fruit and vegetables, cardiovascular risk, quality of life, self-efficacy, number of consultations and drug prescriptions. The results will be analysed 6, 12 and 24 months after the intervention. Discussion If the intervention were to be effective, the programme should be spread to the entire diabetic population in the Basque Country and it could also be applied for other diseases. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01642394 PMID:23718222

  16. Integrating community health workers into a patient-centered medical home to support disease self-management among Vietnamese Americans: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Bui, Tap; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Price-Haywood, Eboni G

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) and community health workers (CHWs) improve chronic disease management. There are few models for integrating CHWs into PCMHs in order to enhance disease self-management support among diverse populations. In this article, we describe how a community-based nonprofit agency, a PCMH, and academic partners collaborated to develop and implement the Patient Resource and Education Program (PREP). We employed CHWs as PCMH care team members to provide health education and support to Vietnamese American patients with uncontrolled diabetes and/or hypertension. We began by conducting focus groups to assess patient knowledge, desire for support, and availability of community resources. Based on findings, we developed PREP with CHW guidance on cultural tailoring of educational materials and methods. CHWs received training in core competencies related to self-management support principles and conducted the 4-month intervention for PCMH patients. Throughout the program, we conducted process evaluation through structured team meetings and patient satisfaction surveys. We describe successes and challenges associated with PREP delivery including patient recruitment, structuring/documenting visits, and establishing effective care team integration, work flow, and communication. Strategies for mitigating these issues are presented, and we make recommendations for other PCMHs seeking to integrate CHWs into care teams.

  17. Patient-Centered Community Diabetes Education Program Improves Glycemic Control in African-American Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: Importance of Point of Care Metabolic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Trudy; Amponsah, Grace; Osei, Kwame

    2015-07-01

    African-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have higher morbidity and mortality partly attributed to poor glucose control and lack of formal diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) programs compared to Whites. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the clinical and metabolic parameters during DSMES vs. standard care in African-Americans with T2DM attending primary care inner city clinics. We recruited 124 African-American patients with T2DM, randomized into Group 1-DSMES (n = 58) and Group 2-standard care group (n = 38) for 6 months. Body weight, blood pressure, random blood sugars and point-of-care (POC) hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and lipids/lipoproteins were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months. At 6 months, Group 1 had significant reduction in A1C (8.2 ± 1.4% vs. 7.5 ± 1.5%, p = 0.02) and random glucose (190.4 ± 77.6 vs. 160.6 ± 59.8 mg/dl, p = 0.03). However, there were no changes in body weight, blood pressure, or lipids/lipoprotein levels. We found no significant changes in the clinical/metabolic parameters in Group 2. We concluded that DSMES, supplemented with POC testing, was associated with significant improvements in glycemic control without changes in body weight, blood pressure, or lipids/lipoproteins. We recommend the inclusion of DSMES with POC testing in managing African-American patients with T2DM attending inner city primary care clinics.

  18. [Educational practices for diabetes mellitus: integrative literature review].

    PubMed

    Borba, Anna Karla de Oliveira Tito; Marques, Ana Paula de Oliveira; Leal, Márcia Carréra Campos; Ramos, Roberta Souza Pereira da Silva

    2012-03-01

    This is an integrative literature review which aims to identify the multi-professional scientific production on educational practices for individuals with diabetes available in the databases: Latin American Literature in Health Sciences (Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde-LILACS), Medical Literature and Retrieval System online (Medline), Spanish Bibliographical Index in Health Sciences (Indice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud-Ibecs) and the Database on Nursing (Base de Dados em Enfermagem-BDENF), from 1999 to 2009. Results show that educational practices are developed mainly for adults and seniors up to 80 years of age, and involve themes that reflect the daily ife of living with diabetes. These practices are spread mainly through groups, bringing benefits not only for the individual with diabetes but also for the healthcare professional. Thus, we can see the process of changing the traditional education paradigm to a problem-based dialogical education, with a view for promoting health.

  19. Intensive Patient Education Improves Glycaemic Control in Diabetes Compared to Conventional Education: A Randomised Controlled Trial in a Nigerian Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Essien, Okon; Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Enang, Ofem; Hicks, Joseph Paul; Walley, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes is now a global epidemic, but most cases are now in low- and middle-income countries. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is key to enabling patients to manage their chronic condition and can reduce the occurrence of costly and devastating complications. However, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of different DSME programmes in resource limited settings. Methods We conducted an unblinded, parallel-group, individually-randomised controlled trial at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (Nigeria) to evaluate whether an intensive and systematic DSME programme, using structured guidelines, improved glycaemic control compared to the existing ad hoc patient education (clinical practice was unchanged). Eligible patients (≥18 years, HbA1c > 8.5% and physically able to participate) were randomly allocated by permuted block randomisation to participate for six months in either an intensive or conventional education group. The primary outcome was HbA1c (%) at six-months. Results We randomised 59 participants to each group and obtained six-month HbA1c outcomes from 53 and 51 participants in the intensive and conventional education groups, respectively. Intensive group participants had a mean six-month HbA1c (%) of 8.4 (95% CI: 8 to 8.9), while participants in the conventional education group had a mean six-month HbA1c (%) of 10.2 (95% CI: 9.8 to 10.7). The difference was statistically (P < 0.0001) and clinically significant, with intensive group participants having HbA1c outcomes on average -1.8 (95% CI: -2.4 to -1.2) percentage points lower than conventional group participants. Results were robust to adjustment for a range of covariates and multiple imputation of missing outcome data. Conclusions This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a structured, guideline-based DSME intervention in a LMIC setting versus a pragmatic comparator. The intervention is potentially replicable at other levels of the Nigerian healthcare system

  20. Comprehensive evidence-based program teaching self-management of auditory hallucinations on inpatient psychiatric units.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Robin Kay; Trygstad, Louise Nigh; Buffum, Martha D; Lyttle, Kathleen; Dowling, Glenna

    2010-03-01

    Patients hearing command hallucinations to harm whose only self-management strategies are to obey these commands, can represent serious safety concerns on inpatient psychiatric units. A comprehensive evidence-based program teaching self-management of auditory hallucinations on inpatient psychiatric units is described that includes five components: suggestions for staff education; patient self-assessment tools; an interview guide and safety protocol; a course to teach strategies for managing distressing voices and commands to harm; suggestions to improve staff communication; and a plan to extend the program from inpatient care settings into the community by sharing materials with community case managers and caregivers when patients are discharged.

  1. Differences in Osteoarthritis Self-Management Support Intervention Outcomes According to Race and Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperber, Nina R.; Bosworth, Hayden B.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Lindquist, Jennifer H.; Oddone, Eugene Z.; Weinberger, Morris; Allen, Kelli D.

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether the effects of a telephone-based osteoarthritis (OA) self-management support intervention differed by race and health literacy. Participants included 515 veterans with hip and/or knee OA. Linear mixed models assessed differential effects of the intervention compared with health education (HE) and usual care (UC) on pain…

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of the Hepatitis C Self-Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groessl, Erik J.; Sklar, Marisa; Laurent, Diana D.; Lorig, Kate; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Ho, Samuel B.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Despite the emergence of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) antiviral medications, many people with chronic HCV know little about their disease, are at risk for transmitting HCV to others, and/or are not considered good treatment candidates. Self-management interventions can educate HCV-infected persons, improve their quality of life, and…

  3. On the Horizon. Biofeedback and Self-Management of Stress in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Edward W.; Walton, Wilbur T.

    1979-01-01

    The use of biofeedback in the self management of stress in school children is discussed. Educational research on biofeedback suggests that biofeedback training can help children to learn relaxation skills, reduce school-related anxiety, and gain a measure of self-discipline and confidence. (PHR)

  4. Ethnic and Sex Differences in Ownership of Preventive Health Equipment among Rural Older Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ronny A.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Golden, Shannon L.; Snively, Beverly M.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Diabetes self-management is important for achieving successful health outcomes. Different levels of self-management have been reported among various populations, though little is known about ownership of equipment that can enhance accomplishment of these tasks. Purpose: This study examined diabetes self-management equipment ownership…

  5. Results of a community translation of the "Women Take PRIDE" heart disease self-management program.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Mary P; Pettinger, Tianna M; Coyle, Cassandra L; Spokane, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    This article reports the results of a community demonstration of an evidence-based heart disease self-management program for older women. Women Take PRIDE (WTP) is a group-based education and behavior modification program, based on social cognitive theory, designed to enhance heart disease self-management among older women. We implemented the program in community settings with 129 participants. Evaluation data was collected at baseline and at 4- and 12-month follow-ups. Outcomes included general health status, functional health status, and knowledge. Results showed significant improvements in self-rated health, energy, social functioning, knowledge of community resources, and number, frequency, and bother of cardiac symptoms. These results demonstrate that an evidence-based heart disease self-management program can be effective at improving health and quality of life among older women with heart disease when implemented in community settings.

  6. Increasing On-Task Behavior in Students in a Regular Classroom: Effectiveness of a Self-Management Procedure Using a Tactile Prompt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dennis W.; Anderson, Angelika; Glassenbury, Michele; Lang, Russell; Didden, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Self-management strategies have been shown to be widely effective. However, limited classroom-based research exists involving low performing but developmentally normal high school-aged participants. This study examined the effectiveness of a self-management strategy aimed at increasing on-task behavior in general education classrooms with students…

  7. Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People with Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support.

    PubMed

    Goeman, Dianne; Conway, Sue; Norman, Ralph; Morley, Jo; Weerasuriya, Rona; Osborne, Richard H; Beauchamp, Alison

    Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS). Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management.

  8. Optimising Health Literacy and Access of Service Provision to Community Dwelling Older People with Diabetes Receiving Home Nursing Support

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Sue; Norman, Ralph; Morley, Jo; Weerasuriya, Rona; Osborne, Richard H.; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Background. Health literacy is the ability to access, understand, and use information and services for good health. Among people with chronic conditions, health literacy requirements for effective self-management are high. The Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) study engaged diverse organisations in the codesign of interventions involving the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) needs assessment, followed by development and evaluation of interventions addressing identified needs. This study reports the process and outcomes of one of the nine organisations, the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS). Methods. Participants were home nursing clients with diabetes. The intervention included tailored diabetes self-management education according to preferred learning style, a standardised diabetes education tool, resources, and teach-back method. Results. Needs analysis of 113 quota-sampled clients showed difficulties managing health and finding and appraising health information. The service-wide diabetes education intervention was applied to 24 clients. The intervention was well received by clients and nurses. Positive impacts on clients' diabetes knowledge and behaviour were seen and nurses reported clear benefits to their practice. Conclusion. A structured method that supports healthcare services to codesign interventions that respond to the health literacy needs of their clients can lead to evidence-informed, sustainable practice changes that support clients to better understand effective diabetes self-management. PMID:27668261

  9. Self-management programmes in temporomandibular disorders: results from an international Delphi process.

    PubMed

    Durham, J; Al-Baghdadi, M; Baad-Hansen, L; Breckons, M; Goulet, J P; Lobbezoo, F; List, T; Michelotti, A; Nixdorf, D R; Peck, C C; Raphael, K; Schiffman, E; Steele, J G; Story, W; Ohrbach, R

    2016-12-01

    Self-management (SM) programmes are commonly used for initial treatment of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The programmes described in the literature, however, vary widely with no consistency in terminology used, components of care or their definitions. The aims of this study were therefore to construct an operationalised definition of self-management appropriate for the treatment of patients with TMD, identify the components of that self-management currently being used and create sufficiently clear and non-overlapping standardised definitions for each of those components. A four-round Delphi process with eleven international experts in the field of TMD was conducted to achieve these aims. In the first round, the participants agreed upon six principal concepts of self-management. In the remaining three rounds, consensus was achieved upon the definition and the six components of self-management. The main components identified and agreed upon by the participants to constitute the core of a SM programme for TMD were as follows: education; jaw exercises; massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. This Delphi process has established the principal concepts of self-management, and a standardised definition has been agreed with the following components for use in clinical practice: education; self-exercise; self-massage; thermal therapy; dietary advice and nutrition; and parafunctional behaviour identification, monitoring and avoidance. The consensus-derived concepts, definitions and components of SM offer a starting point for further research to advance the evidence base for, and clinical utility of, TMD SM.

  10. Translating an Evidence-Based Diabetes Education Approach Into Rural African-American Communities: The “Wisdom, Power, Control” Program

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Ory, Marcia G.; Hollingsworth, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this exploratory study was to assess the efficacy of the “Wisdom, Power, Control” diabetes self-management education (DSME) program with regard to diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy, self-care, distress level, and A1C in an African-American population. Methods. A prospective, quasi-experimental, repeated-measure design was employed to measure these outcomes. Study participants were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks post-intervention, and at a 3-month A1C follow-up. Results. A total of 103 participants were recruited from the intervention counties, and 14 were identified from the control counties. At the post-test, participants in the intervention group reported a significantly higher level of diabetes knowledge (Δ = 9.2%, P <0.0001), higher self-efficacy (Δ = 0.60, P <0.0001), more self-care behaviors (Δ = 0.48, P <0.0001), lower distress level (Δ = –0.15, P = 0.05), and higher health status (Δ = 0.49, P = <0.0001). About 56% of the intervention group completed all six classes, and 25% attended five classes. Conclusions. Findings from this study demonstrate the initial success of translating a culturally adapted DSME program into rural African-American communities. The study highlights important lessons learned in the process of implementing this type of program in a real-world setting with a minority population. PMID:25987809

  11. An integrative review of the benefits of self-management interventions for adults with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Edward, Karen-leigh; Cook, Mark; Giandinoto, Jo-Ann

    2015-04-01

    The life-limiting effects of epilepsy are well documented in the literature, where the management of epilepsy and seizure control relies heavily on the self-management abilities of the individual. The psychosocial impact of epilepsy on the person and their family is profound and has been studied extensively. Interventions such as educational programs and lifestyle management education to improve self-mastery and quality of life in people with epilepsy are not necessarily integrated in standard care practices. The aim of this integrative review was to systematically identify and appraise research that reported findings related to self-management interventions for adults with epilepsy. A search of bibliographic databases was conducted, and a total of n=14 articles were included in this review. The main finding was that self-management education for adults with epilepsy shows promise to improving knowledge and self-confidence in managing one's own condition including the management of the psychosocial stressors, improvement in seizure control, and enhancement of quality of life. Self-management interventions were delivered in diverse formats, and the inclusion of this type of intervention should be part of the comprehensive care for people living with epilepsy.

  12. The Impact of Health Education Intervention for Prevention and Early Detection of Type 2 Diabetes in Women with Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Mirella Youssef

    2016-10-14

    This study aims to investigate the impact of a health belief model (HBM)-based educational intervention on knowledge, beliefs, self-reported practices, gestational and postpartum weight in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

  13. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  14. Potentials of Web 2.0 for Diabetes Education of Adolescent Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    Diabetes is a very common chronic disease which produces compli-cations in almost all body organs and consumes a huge amount of the health budget. Although education has proved to be useful in diabetes management, there is a great need to improve the availability of these courses for the increasing number of diabetic patients. E-learning can facilitate this service, but the current education system should be tailored towards e-learning standards. Amongst diabetic patients, adolescents as computer natives are suggested as the best target to e-learning diabetes education. With regards to its features, Web 2.0 can be a very good technology to build a framework for diabetes education and consequent evaluation of this education.

  15. Individualized diabetes nutrition education improves compliance with diet prescription.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hae-Mi; Park, Ji-Eun; Choi, Young-Ju; Huh, Kap-Bum; Kim, Wha-Young

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of individualized diabetes nutrition education. The nutrition education program was open to all type 2 diabetes patients visiting the clinic center and finally 67 patients agreed to join the program. To compare with 67 education group subjects, 34 subjects were selected by medical record review. The education program consisted of one class session for 1-2 hours long in a small group of 4~5 patients. A meal planning using the food exchange system was provided according to the diet prescription and food habits of each subject. Measurements of clinical outcomes and dietary intakes were performed at baseline and 3 months after the education session. After 3 months, subjects in education group showed improvement in dietary behavior and food exchange knowledge. In education group, intakes of protein, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin B(2), and folate per 1,000 kcal/day were significantly increased and cholesterol intake was significantly decreased. They also showed significant reductions in body weight, body mass index (BMI), and fasting blood concentrations of glucose (FBS), HbA1c, total cholesterol, and triglyceride. However, no such improvements were observed in control group. To evaluate telephone consultation effect, after the nutrition education session, 34 subjects of the 67 education group received telephone follow-up consultation once a month for 3 months. The others (33 subjects) had no further contact after the nutrition education session. Subjects in the telephone follow-up group showed a decrease in BMI, FBS, and HbA1c. Moreover, the subjects who did not receive telephone follow-up also showed significant decreases in BMI and FBS. These results indicated that our individually planned education program for one session was effective in rectifying dietary behavior problems and improving food exchange knowledge, and quality of diet, leading to an improvement in the clinical outcomes. In conclusion, our individualized

  16. Diabetes Care as an Active Learning Model of Postgraduate Education and Training for Pharmaceutical Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koda-Kimble, Mary Anne; Batz, Forrest R.

    1994-01-01

    In a University of California continuing pharmacy education course in diabetes care, practicing pharmacists lived as patients with diabetes for two days and role-played in small groups. One year later, participants reported making changes in their diabetes care-related practice, suggesting its effectiveness in improving practitioners' skill…

  17. Views and Preferences of Low-Literate Hispanics regarding Diabetes Education: Results of Formative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosal, Milagros C.; Goins, Karin Valentine; Carbone, Elena T.; Cortes, Dharma E.

    2004-01-01

    Hispanics are twice as likely as non-Hispanic Whites to have diabetes and are also at higher risk for diabetes-related complications and poorer outcomes. The prevalence of diabetes is inversely related to educational status. Low literacy is common, especially among older Hispanics. Little literature exists on formative research to create diabetes…

  18. The art and science of diabetes education: a culture out of balance.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert M; Funnell, Martha M

    2008-01-01

    In the past 20 years, behavioral science has helped create a growing body of theoretically derived, evidenced-based approaches to diabetes patient education. Health care professionals in all disciplines are being required to demonstrate that their practice is evidence based. For diabetes educators, behavioral science is the source of much of that evidence. However, effective diabetes education involves a combination of art and science. Establishing a therapeutic alliance with patients is an art. Diabetes educators must have the interpersonal skills, values, and personal traits needed to cultivate relationships with patients that are characterized by trust, respect, and acceptance. They must feel and be able to express compassion, empathy, and warmth. However, if someone outside the field were reviewing diabetes education evaluation research, they would probably conclude that diabetes educators are interchangeable cogs in a wheel. The positive impact of the therapeutic alliance is well documented in the counseling, psychotherapy, education, and nursing literature. However, evidence to support the important role of the diabetes educator's values, interpersonal skills, and ability to establish a therapeutic alliance with patients is absent from that literature. Valid and reliable measures used to document the impact of interpersonal skills counselors and teachers could be used in diabetes education with little or no adaptation. The evidence and tools exist; we now need to determine if the will exists.

  19. Spanish-speaking patients' engagement in interactive voice response (IVR) support calls for chronic disease self-management: data from three countries.

    PubMed

    Piette, John D; Marinec, Nicolle; Gallegos-Cabriales, Esther C; Gutierrez-Valverde, Juana Mercedes; Rodriguez-Saldaña, Joel; Mendoz-Alevares, Milton; Silveira, Maria J

    2013-02-01

    We measured Spanish-speaking patients' engagement in Interactive Voice Response (IVR) calls using data from self-management support studies in Honduras, Mexico and the US. A total of 268 patients with diabetes or hypertension participated in 6-12 weeks of weekly IVR follow-up. Participants had an average of 6.1 years of education, and 73% of them were women. After 2443 person-weeks of follow-up, patients had completed 1494 IVR assessments. The call completion rates were higher in the US (75%) than in Honduras (59%) or Mexico (61%; P < 0.001). Patients participating with an informal caregiver were more likely to complete calls (adjusted odds ratio 1.5; P = 0.03) while patients reporting fair or poor health at enrolment were less likely (adjusted odds ratio 0.59; P = 0.02). Satisfaction rates were high, with 98% of patients reporting that the system was easy to use, and 86% reporting that the calls helped them a great deal in managing their health problems. IVR self-management support is feasible among Spanish-speaking patients with chronic disease, including those living in less-developed countries. Involving informal caregivers may increase patient engagement.

  20. Feasibility of the SMART Project: A Text Message Program for Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Mehta, Priya; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated response rates to the Self-Management and Research Technology Project, a 6-week text message program for adolescents with type 1 diabetes designed to provide diabetes self-management reminders and education. The rate of response to texts was high, with 78% of texts responded to during the 6-week period. Girls and participants who self-reported sending a large number of personal daily texts had higher response rates; other demographic and medical variables were unrelated to text response rates. Inclusion of mobile health technologies such as text messages in clinical care may be a unique, relevant method of intervention for youths with type 1 diabetes, regardless of age, socioeconomic status, or glycemic control.

  1. Adult Diabetic Patients’ Self-Care Levels, Attitudes, and Perceptions Following an Education Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    hospital. Diabetes care, 1981, 4,. 487-489. Graber, A. L., Christman, B. G., Alogna, M, T., & Davidson, J. K. Evaluation of diabetes patient - education programs...L. Why patient education ? An elookate thow doatientwt diabeter elts c:j~inlHat Nurs ngOulo, 1979, 27, 71-75 7-11. Leie .(E..Idviulzn.hea.• atrt-ne...Salzer, J. E. Classes to improve diabetic self-care. American Journal of Nursing, 1975, 75, 1324-1326. Svtall, D. A patient education program. American

  2. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  3. Evaluation of Online Education about Diabetes Management in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Jean A.; Hsueh, Kuei-Hsiang

    2008-01-01

    There are a variety of initiatives to provide education to improve the quality of care for children with diabetes in the school setting. This study piloted and evaluated an online continuing education program for school nurses about diabetes management for children in schools using current practice principles. The evaluation determined if…

  4. Two for one: A self-management plan coupled with a prescription sheet for children with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Francine M; Noya, Francisco; McGillivray, David; Resendes, Sandy; Ducharme-Bénard, Stéphanie; Zemek, Roger; Bhogal, Sanjit Kaur; Rouleau, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite strong recommendations in the asthma guidelines, the use of written self-management plans remains low among asthmatic patients. OBJECTIVES: To develop a written self-management plan, based on scientific evidence and expert opinions, in a format intended to facilitate its dispensing by health care professionals, and to test the perception of its relevance and clarity by asthmatic children, adolescents and adults. METHODS: Inspired by previously tested self-management plans, surveys of asthma educators, expert opinions and the 2004 Canadian Asthma Guidelines, the authors simultaneously developed French and English versions of a written self-management plan that coupled with a prescription. The self-management plan was tested in parents and their asthmatic children (aged one to 17 years), and it was revised until 85% clarity and perceived relevance was achieved. RESULTS: Ninety-seven children and their parents were interviewed. Twenty per cent had a self-management plan. On the final revision, nearly all items were clear and perceived relevant by 85% or more of the interviewees. Two self-management plans were designed for clinics and acute care settings, respectively. The plans are divided into three control zones identified by symptoms with optional peak flow values and symbolized by traffic light colours. They are designed in triplicate format with a prescription slip, a medical chart copy and a patient copy. CONCLUSION: The written self-management plans, based on available scientific evidence and expert opinions, are clear and perceived to be relevant by children, adolescents and their parents. By incorporating the prescription and chart copies, they were designed to facilitate dispensing by physicians in both clinics and acute care settings. PMID:18949103

  5. Self-Managed Career Services: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonnamaker, John; Hagenbaugh, Stacie; Grote, Ann DiMeola; Denon, Gregory; Jessup, Kara

    2001-01-01

    Taking a lead from corporate culture, many colleges and universities are experimenting with the self-managed team model, an alternative to traditional hierarchical structures. This article discusses Boston's Emerson College career services staff's experience with becoming a self-managed team. They were able to improve service delivery, reduce…

  6. Self-Management Strategies to Support Students with ASD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is a set of procedures that students can be taught to apply to their own behaviors to change them. In self-management, students are taught to observe, assess, and modify their own behavior. These procedures include such things as self-identifying and observing a target behavior and setting a goal to change it. Self-management…

  7. The Development of a Naturalistic Self-Management Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Sandra P.; And Others

    The most common approach to self-management research has been to apply it to a specific target behavior, without attending to the generalizability of changes to other facets of one's life. A procedure for measuring self-management effectiveness under real world conditions was developed which emphasized the successful application of self-change…

  8. Moving from Token Economies to Teaching Self-Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terance M.

    1998-01-01

    Shows how moving away from the token economy and contingency-contracting concepts of behavior management in the classroom is an effective way to teach self management skills to students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Supplies detailed instructions for implementing a successful self-management program. (MKA)

  9. Relationship of self-management to personality types and indices.

    PubMed

    Williams, R L; Verble, J S; Price, D E; Layne, B H

    1995-06-01

    This study addressed the relationship between self-management (as measured by the Lifestyle Approaches Inventory, Williams, Moore, Pettibone, & Thomas, 1992) and personality types and indexes (as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, Myers & McCaulley, 1985) in a sample of 347 university students. Correlational analyses indicated that the self-management factor most consistently linked to the Myers-Briggs indices was Organization of Physical Space. The Myers-Briggs index most consistently correlated with the self-management factors was Judgment-Perception. Overall, male and female subjects showed similar patterns of relationships between the self-management and personality indices. When the self-management scores were compared for the various Myers-Briggs types, the analysis indicated that types having a J (planful and organized) or S (precise and practical) in the typology tended to score higher than those having a P (spontaneous and flexible) or N (imaginative and insightful).

  10. A self-management programme for COPD: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katy E; Johnson-Warrington, Vicki; Apps, Lindsay D; Bankart, John; Sewell, Louise; Williams, Johanna E; Rees, Karen; Jolly, Kate; Steiner, Michael; Morgan, Mike; Singh, Sally J

    2014-12-01

    Studies of programmes of self-management support for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been inconclusive. The Self-Management Programme of Activity, Coping and Education (SPACE) FOR COPD is a 6-week self-management intervention for COPD, and this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention in primary care. A single-blind randomised controlled trial recruited people with COPD from primary care and randomised participants to receive usual care or SPACE FOR COPD. Outcome measures were performed at baseline, 6 weeks and 6 months. The primary outcome was symptom burden, measured by the self-reported Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ-SR) dyspnoea domain. Secondary outcomes included other domains of the CRQ-SR, shuttle walking tests, disease knowledge, anxiety, depression, self-efficacy, smoking status and healthcare utilisation. 184 people with COPD were recruited and randomised. At 6 weeks, there were significant differences between groups in CRQ-SR dyspnoea, fatigue and emotion scores, exercise performance, anxiety, and disease knowledge. At 6 months, there was no between-group difference in change in CRQ-SR dyspnoea. Exercise performance, anxiety and smoking status were significantly different between groups at 6 months, in favour of the intervention. This brief self-management intervention did not improve dyspnoea over and above usual care at 6 months; however, there were gains in anxiety, exercise performance, and disease knowledge.

  11. Effectiveness of Teach-Back Self-Management Training Program on Happiness of Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed

    Ahmadidarrehsima, Sudabeh; Rahnama, Mozhgan; Afshari, Mahdi; Asadi Bidmeshki, Elahe

    2016-10-01

    Self-management training is one of the ways to empower patients to cope with disease. The aim of this before-and-after quasi-experimental study was to determine effects of a teach-back self-management training method on breast cancer patient happiness. Fifty breast cancer patients who visited the Park-e Neshat Limited Surgery Clinic in Kerman, Iran were randomly divided into intervention and control groups after convenience sampling and checking for inclusion eligibility. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Oxford Happiness Inventory before and after teach-back training and analyzed using SPSS 23. Findings showed no significant difference between mean happiness scores in the two groups before the intervention. However, after the intervention, the mean happiness score in the intervention group increased from 37.2 to 62.9, while it decreased from 41.4 to 29.8 in the control group. These changes were statistically significant (p<0.001). Even after controlling for the effect of confounding factors such as residence location and history of cancer education, the observed differences between the groups were statistically significant (p<0.001). A teach-back self-management training program can increase happiness levels in breast cancer patients. Therefore, the use of this method is recommended to improve self-management and increase happiness.

  12. 77 FR 38072 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The National Diabetes Education Program Survey of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Diabetes Education Program Survey of the Public SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of... Collection: Title: The National Diabetes Education Program Survey of the Public. Type of Information... and Use of Information Collection: The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is a partnership...

  13. Removing barriers to promote more positive thinking for people with diabetes: implications for social work.

    PubMed

    Wardian, Jana; Sun, Fei

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand changes in thinking in patients with diabetes and factors related to the health care providers and significant others that would mediate changes in thinking. Cross-sectional data were collected from three sites. Adults age 21 and older with type 2 diabetes were asked about their thinking regarding diabetes at diagnosis and the present time. In addition, respondents were asked questions about their perceptions of health care providers (that is, physicians, nurses, diabetes educators), significant others, and manage- ment of diabetes. Significant other blame and self-efficacy were found to be partial mediators in thinking about diabetes; the model explained 29 percent of the variance. Social workers are uniquely trained in the person-in-environment framework, which allows flexibility in creating interventions to provide patients with diabetes the support necessary to have a more positive orientation toward diabetes self-management, increase self-efficacy, and reduce feelings of blame from significant others. Improving the support of significant others and the patients' level of self-efficacy can provide mediation of negative thinking, which may result in an environment that supports improved diabetes self-management behaviors.

  14. Tailoring a diabetes nursing elective course to millennial students.

    PubMed

    Strang, Sharon Lee; Bagnardi, Margaret; Williams Utz, Sharon

    2010-12-01

    Tailoring classroom teaching to millennial college students who have grown up as active learners is challenging. Interactive, collaborative teaching methods may be effective with such learners. An innovative class using Diabetes Conversation Maps, a patient self-management tool, was taught as an elective course. Students were assigned the role of a person who received a diagnosis of diabetes; the role included the person's specific age, gender, ethnicity, medication regimen, and predominant emotion. Students were expected to complete the assigned readings to enable them to role-play during five Conversation Map sessions. An updated, modified version of the Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center's Brief Diabetes Knowledge Test was used to evaluate knowledge in a pretest-posttest format. The new teaching method resulted in an increased knowledge of diabetes and patient education techniques, as well as high student satisfaction.

  15. Optimising the person-centred management of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne

    Type 2 diabetes is increasing in prevalence at a worrying rate and has been exacerbated by the worldwide obesity epidemic. The number of people in the UK diagnosed with type 2 diabetes has soared by 60% in the past 10 years. Type 2 diabetes is a very serious condition, with significant associated risks, and is the leading cause of avoidable macro- and microvascular complications. Health professionals have a key role in enabling and optimising person-centred approaches, educating and augmenting the essential skills every person, whatever his or her individual circumstances, requires for the successful self-management of this lifelong condition. This article reviews approaches to care for the management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, which includes optimising person-centred targets, promoting individualised care, minimising the risk of complications and promoting education from diagnosis onwards.

  16. Self-management programs based on the social cognitive theory for Koreans with chronic disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yeonsoo; Yoo, Hyera

    2012-02-01

    Self-management programs based on social cognitive theory are useful to improve health care outcomes for patients with chronic diseases in Western culture. The purpose of this review is to identify and synthesize published research on the theory to enhance self-efficacy in disease management and examine its applicability to Korean culture regarding the learning strategies used. Ultimately, it was to identify the optimal use of these learning strategies to improve the self-efficacy of Korean patients in self-management of their hypertension and diabetic mellitus. The authors searched the Korean and international research databases from January 2000 to September 2009. Twenty studies were selected and reviewed. The most frequently used learning strategies of social cognitive theory was skill mastery by practice and feedback (N = 13), followed by social or verbal persuasion by group members (N = 7) and, however, observation learning and reinterpretation of symptoms by debriefing or discussion were not used any of the studies. Eight studies used only one strategy to enhance self-efficacy and six used two. A lack of consistency regarding the content and clinical efficacy of the self-efficacy theory-based self-management programs is found among the reviewed studies on enhancing self-efficacy in Koreans with hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Further research on the effectiveness of these theory-based self-management programs for patients with chronic diseases in Korea and other countries is recommended.

  17. Low educational status is a risk factor for mortality among diabetic people.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, P M; Johansson, S E; Sundquist, J

    1998-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus and its complications are an important cause of mortality in Western populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between self-reported diabetes mellitus, gender, attained level of education, and socio-economic resources to all-cause mortality risk in a simple random sample of 39055 subjects, aged 25 to 74 years. Follow-up data were obtained for a maximum of 16 years, from baseline (1979-1985) to 31 December 1995. Diabetic males (2.2% of the male study group) had a relative risk (RR) for total mortality of 2.24 (CI = 1.96-2.57), adjusted for age, education, marital status, housing tenure, and car ownership, compared with non-diabetic males. The corresponding figure for females with diabetes (1.9%) was RR = 3.67 (CI = 3.16-4.27). Diabetic women had the highest age-adjusted mortality risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) of 8 compared with non-diabetic women. The corresponding RR for men was just below 3 (p<0.0001). Males and females (with and without diabetes) of low attained educational level had a RR = 1.26 (CI = 1.15-1.39) and RR = 1.54 (CI = 1.31-1.81), respectively. When analysing all people with diabetes separately, adjusting for sex and age, low-educated subjects had a 40% excess all-cause mortality compared with high-educated subjects. We conclude that diabetic women have a very high relative risk for CHD mortality compared to non-diabetic women. Furthermore, diabetic people with a low attained level of education, have an increased vulnerability to, and a higher total mortality.

  18. Evaluation of a school-based diabetes education intervention, an extension of Program ENERGY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conner, Matthew David

    . The second questionnaire, adapted from a survey developed for the Starr County Diabetes Education Study (Garcia et al, 2001), measured general diabetes and diabetes management knowledge. A comparison group, a total of 19 students, also completed both surveys during the study period. Results: Significant increases (p<0.05) were seen in the post-intervention study group in general diabetes knowledge, diabetes management knowledge, and awareness of diabetes prevention strategies, when compared to the baseline study group and comparison group.

  19. The role of collaborative self-management in pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, Jean

    2009-12-01

    Self-management's key feature is to increase patients' involvement and control in their disease and improve their well-being. Self-management is not intended to replace components of patient health care such as medication and pulmonary rehabilitation. We may be enthusiastic about recent results of self-management programs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients showing a reduction in hospital admissions. However, being interested only in patients' hospital admissions is overly narrow. The pivotal objective of self-management programs is to change patients' behavior. The success should correspond to the goals of self-management (e.g., acquiring key self-management skills such as problem solving, decision making, early symptom recognition, and taking action) and self-health behaviors (maintaining comfortable breathing, implementing an action plan in the event of an exacerbation, and facilitating exercise maintenance). Pulmonary rehabilitation is increasingly becoming a realistic component of COPD patient management, but it should not stand as an isolated intervention. Pulmonary rehabilitation should be part of an integrated care process and include self-management support (i.e., aiming to achieve a shift from management by the health care provider to management by the patients themselves, which implies structural behavior change). Changing patient behavior and ensuring maintenance are complex processes and require time.

  20. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. A Fact Sheet from the National Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes in U.S. children and adolescents may be increasing and many more new cases of type 2 diabetes are being reported in young people. Standards of care for managing children with diabetes issued by the American Diabetes Association in January 2005 provide more guidance than previously given. To update primary care providers and their…

  1. Enhancing patient engagement in chronic disease self-management support initiatives in Australia: the need for an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Joanne E; Briggs, Andrew M; Brand, Caroline A; Osborne, Richard H

    2008-11-17

    Although emphasis on the prevention of chronic disease is important, governments in Australia need to balance this with continued assistance to the 77% of Australians reported to have at least one long-term medical condition. Self-management support is provided by health care and community services to enhance patients' ability to care for their chronic conditions in a cooperative framework. In Australia, there is a range of self-management support initiatives that have targeted patients (most notably, chronic disease self-management education programs) and health professionals (financial incentives, education and training). To date, there has been little coordination or integration of these self-management initiatives to enhance the patient-health professional clinical encounter. If self-management support is to work, there is a need to better understand the infrastructure, systems and training that are required to engage the key stakeholders - patients, carers, health professionals, and health care organisations. A coordinated approach is required in implementing these elements within existing and new health service models to enhance uptake and sustainability.

  2. Self-management and representation of reality in photo stories.

    PubMed

    Sitvast, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of study was to investigate whether the process of making photo stories in health care (the photo instrument) matches with requirements of self-motivation in self-management programs. Although training and advice in self-management were absent, the photo instrument shared important elements with self-management: the call upon responsibility, the focus on concrete (visual) details of the life world, and the sharpened awareness of choices to make. Expressing one's views, prolonged reflection, a dialogue, and sharing of the photo stories are components that can be considered building stones for commitment to self-representation of an illness story and a life beyond illness.

  3. A review of advances in collaborative pharmacy practice to improve adherence to standards of care in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Conley, Michael P; Chim, Christine; Magee, Chelsea E; Sullivan, Daniel J

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of diabetes in the United States is increasing and so is the need to provide diabetes care. Given the time commitment and complexity of diabetes management, an interdisciplinary approach is recommended. Pharmacists are integral members of the diabetes care team because of their accessibility and expertise in medication management. Pharmacists are receiving specialized training and becoming more involved in direct patient care through collaborative practice opportunities such as medication therapy management and collaborative drug therapy management. These collaborative practice models increase patient access to care and allow pharmacists to optimize drug therapy and provide important education to promote diabetes self-management. Studies show pharmacists practicing in a variety of outpatient environments can reduce HbA1c, LDL and BP as well as improve adherence to recommended American Diabetes Association guidelines (yearly monofilament exams, dilated eye exams, microalbumin screening, etc). Pharmacists working as part of the health care team can ensure optimal diabetes management.

  4. Patients' health education and diabetes control in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Ezenwaka, C E; Offiah, N V

    2003-12-01

    We previously reported poor metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients attending 2 primary care clinics in Trinidad. In an attempt to explain the poor metabolic control, we assessed primary care patients' theoretical knowledge of diabetes control and risk factors. Two hundred fifty-four diabetic out-patients recruited consecutively were asked by questionnaire: (i) if they were aware that family history of diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity and cigarette smoking were diabetes risk factors; (ii) if they knew the benefits of weight loss, exercise and healthy diet in diabetes management, and (iii) what where their common sources of diabetes health information. Although the majority of the patients (81.1%) were unaware that cigarette smoking is a diabetes risk factor, a majority were aware that obesity (66.3%), physical inactivity (73.5%) and being a relative of a diabetic patient (78.7%) constitute diabetes risk factors. Again, the majority of the patients were aware that healthy diet (94.9%), exercise (94.5%) and weight loss (87.4%) are beneficial in diabetes control. While media (48.6%) was the commonest source of diabetes information, doctors and nurses were consulted by 39.9% and 11.0% of patients, respectively. Type 2 diabetic patients in these clinics were well informed about diabetes risk factors and benefits of healthy lifestyle. Given our recent reports on poor metabolic control, application of this theoretical knowledge in controlling their diabetes remains doubtful.

  5. A comprehensive e-education engine for a virtual diabetes centre.

    PubMed

    Thomson, George A; Fernando, Devaka J S; Bushby, Phyllis; Meredith, Suzanne; Thomson, Anna K

    2006-01-01

    It seems likely that the development of effective diabetes education for patients, carers and staff would prove highly cost-effective. Diabetes-e is an electronic diabetes encyclopaedia designed to provide comprehensive education to patients, carers (e.g. family, schools, care homes) and health professionals (specialist and non-specialist). In addition, educational media such as information leaflets (that can be printed during a consultation), streaming educational video and slide resource packs are available. Self-assessment questionnaires with feedback guide further education and facilitate targeted continuing professional development (CPD) for health professionals. The prototype has been developed with a particular emphasis on patient input. It is anticipated that Diabetes-e will be implemented across Central Nottinghamshire, including training of key personnel, by the end of 2005. The project has already gone live for insulin commencement.

  6. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Diabetic Patients - A Cross Sectional Study in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mysore.

    PubMed

    Babu, M Suresh; Gowdappa, H Basavana; Kalpana, T; Vidyalaxmi, K; Nikhil, B; Chakravarthy, T

    2015-08-01

    major reason for diabetic patients to have poor awareness of different aspects of diabetes. The low awareness in diabetes patients are noted in different studies done in different parts of India. Education is not just a part of diabetes treatment. It is the treatment. According to WHO, education is the cornerstone of diabetes care. For a physician, diabetes is one of the many diseases calling for his attention in his practice. The time constraints prohibit physicians from delivering optimal diabetes care to their patients which include performing all the necessary tests, educating their patients about the disease, its complications and management. Diabetes educator who can be a nurse, a dietician, a social worker or in a more sophisticated centre a qualified diabetes educator can fill up this important void and play a major role in optimal diabetes care. The key aims of diabetes education are to change behavior of people and promote self management. Self management implies that the person with diabetes will understand the importance of factors like food intake, exercise and medications on blood glucose. PACE project study has concluded that through direct public education and mass media campaigns, awareness about diabetes and its complications can be improved.3 To conclude, education has the biggest role to play in containing diabetes epidemic in India. Responsibility should be at every level from individual doctors to organizations to governments. Effective utilization of the limited available resources is critical for a country like India. We in India are blessed with a large youth population and we should not turn this blessing of a vibrant young nation to a curse of an unhealthy young nation.

  7. Toward consensus on self-management support: the international chronic condition self-management support framework.

    PubMed

    Mills, Susan L; Brady, Teresa J; Jayanthan, Janaki; Ziabakhsh, Shabnam; Sargious, Peter M

    2016-05-30

    Self-management support (SMS) initiatives have been hampered by insufficient attention to underserved and disadvantaged populations, a lack of integration between health, personal and social domains, over emphasis on individual responsibility and insufficient attention to ethical issues. This paper describes a SMS framework that provides guidance in developing comprehensive and coordinated approaches to SMS that may address these gaps and provides direction for decision makers in developing and implementing SMS initiatives in key areas at local levels. The framework was developed by researchers, policy-makers, practitioners and consumers from 5 English-speaking countries and reviewed by 203 individuals in 16 countries using an e-survey process. While developments in SMS will inevitably reflect local and regional contexts and needs, the strategic framework provides an emerging consensus on how we need to move SMS conceptualization, planning and development forward. The framework provides definitions of self-management (SM) and SMS, a collective vision, eight guiding principles and seven strategic directions. The framework combines important and relevant SM issues into a strategic document that provides potential value to the SMS field by helping decision-makers plan SMS initiatives that reflect local and regional needs and by catalyzing and expanding our thinking about the SMS field in relation to system thinking; shared responsibility; health equity and ethical issues. The framework was developed with the understanding that our knowledge and experience of SMS is continually evolving and that it should be modified and adapted as more evidence is available, and approaches in SMS advance.

  8. Current status of managing diabetes mellitus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an increasing global health problem. Guidelines for diabetic care recommend management of lifestyle and risk factors (glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol), as well as regular screening for complications associated with treatment of the conditions related to diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes increased from 8.6% to 11.0% from 2001 to 2013. According to the diabetes fact sheet 2015, the proportion of patients with diabetes treated with antihypertensive medications increased from 56.0% to 62.5% from 2006 to 2013, and 49.5% of those with diabetes were being treated with lipid-lowering medications in 2013, a 1.8-fold increase since 2006. According to the 2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data, 45.6% of patients with diabetes achieved a hemoglobin A1c level of < 7.0%, 72.8% achieved a blood pressure of < 140/85 mmHg, and 58.0% achieved a low density lipoprotein cholesterol level of < 100 mg/dL. Only 19.7% of patients with diabetes had good control of all three of these parameters. Despite improvements in health promotion efforts, the rates of adherence to medication and risk-factor control are low. Therefore, a systematic approach to managing diabetes, including self-management education, is needed to prevent or delay complications. The government needs to establish a long-term policy to address the growing burden of diabetes. PMID:27604796

  9. Factors increasing physical activity levels in diabetes mellitus: a survey of patients after an inpatient diabetes education program.

    PubMed

    Murano, Isamu; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Mizukami, Masafumi; Takihara, Jun; Shimizu, Kaoru; Imai, Taihei

    2014-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to understand the factors involved in increasing physical activity levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients for improved glycemic control. [Subjects] The subjects were 101 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who had completed an inpatient diabetes education program. [Methods] The survey evaluated physical activity levels on the basis of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and a questionnaire listing physical and psychosocial factors. [Results] Four variables-participation or non-participation in farm work, presence or absence of a job, stage of change in attitude toward exercise behavior, and social support-accounted for 34% of physical activity levels in these diabetes mellitus patients. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between physical activity level and HbA1c was -0.31. [Conclusion] Intervention in terms of practical use of living environments, promotion of exercise behavior, and social support may be effective in helping to improve glycemic control.

  10. Glucosim: A Simulator for Education on the Dynamics of Diabetes Mellitus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    GLUCOSIM: A SIMULATOR FOR EDUCATION ON THE DYNAMICS OF DIABETES MELLITUS Fetanet Ceylan Erzen, Gülnur Birol, and Ali Çinar Department of Chemical...increasing at a rate of about 6% a year [3]. There are two main types of diabetes mellitus : insulin-dependent (IDDM) and noninsulin-dependent (NIDDM). In...glucose-insulin interaction in human body. Mathematical models of insulin-dependent (type-I) diabetes mellitus have been reported in the literature [4] [5

  11. Enabling self-management: selecting patients for home dialysis?

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Alastair J; Courthold, Jonathan J

    2011-12-01

    Pre-emptive living donor transplantation should always be promoted as the first-line treatment for kidney failure. Where that is not possible, patients must receive timely information and advice regarding all dialysis options available, including home-based peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis. Where a dialysis unit enables and actively encourages self-management, patients will tend to select themselves, and if well motivated may overcome significant difficulties to exceed the expectations or predictions of dialysis staff. Patients then become advocates themselves and can provide other patients with the necessary motivation to consider a home treatment, such that they approach staff, rather than vice versa. For staff to be able to talk to patients with confidence requires direct experience of home dialysis, but in units which do not have a full range of home therapies, this may initially be difficult. Visiting patients in their home environment is an essential part of training for both medical and nursing staff. Before a patient is able to begin to engage in discussion about any dialysis therapy, they must have reached a point of acceptance that dialysis is necessary. If they are not at this point, then any attempt at 'education' will be largely futile. Once a patient has arrived at the point of choosing a home therapy, the pathway to their first dialysis at home must be as smooth and problem-free as possible.

  12. Living with lipoedema: reviewing different self-management techniques.

    PubMed

    Fetzer, Amy; Wise, Christine

    2015-10-01

    At present, there is no proven cure for lipoedema. Nevertheless, much can be done to help improve symptoms and prevent progression. Many of these improvements can be achieved by patients using self-management techniques. This article describes the range of self-management techniques that community nurses can discuss with patients, including healthy eating, low-impact exercise, compression garments, self-lymphatic drainage, and counselling.

  13. Applying Medical Anthropology: Developing Diabetes Education and Prevention Programs in American Indian Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Brooke

    1999-01-01

    Medical anthropology provides a broader contextual framework for understanding complex causal factors associated with diabetes among American Indians and how to minimize these factors in education/treatment programs. Discusses historical, epidemiological, and genetic considerations in American Indian diabetes; cultural factors related to foods,…

  14. An Education-Support-Group Program for Visually Impaired People with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caditz, J.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the Diabetes Education/Support Group Program for people with diabetes and visual impairment. It analyzes some of the common problems that participants have reported (such as fear of insulin reactions and of long-term complications) and discusses methods of reducing anxiety and depression related to the two conditions.…

  15. An Analysis, Using Concept Mapping, of Diabetic Patients' Knowledge, before and after Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchand, C.; d'Ivernois, J. F.; Assal, J. P.; Slama, G.; Hivon, R.

    2002-01-01

    Assesses whether concept maps used with diabetic patients could describe their cognitive structure, before and after having followed an educational program. Involves 10 diabetic patients and shows that concept maps can be a suitable technique to explore the type and organization of the patients' prior knowledge and to visualize what they have…

  16. Role of Health Educators in Assisting Youth and Adolescents with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiegel, Gail A.; Evert, Alison; Shea, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Management of diabetes in children requires balancing nutrition, physical activity and medication on a daily basis in order to achieve blood glucose targets. The health educator can assist children and their families in meeting their diabetes management goals by better understanding the current recommendations and tasks involved to achieve them.…

  17. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  18. Teaching secondary students with learning disabilities to self-manage classroom survival skills.

    PubMed

    Snyder, M C; Bambara, L M

    1997-01-01

    This multiple baseline study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral self-management training package on the consistent use of specific classroom survival skills. Participants were three adolescent males with learning disabilities in Grades 7 and 8. The training package involved a multicomponent strategy focused on the improvement, maintenance, and cross-classroom generalization of targeted classroom preparedness skills. Following intervention, the training procedures were systematically faded. Results demonstrated more consistent use of targeted classroom survival skills by all three students in both learning support and mainstream generalization settings. Long-term maintenance of the intervention effects was observed for two students in both settings. Three social validity measures revealed positive results. Implications for self-management in secondary education settings are discussed.

  19. The Diabetic in Physical Education, Recreation, and Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engerbretson, David

    1977-01-01

    Regular vigorous physical exercise is probably as important as diet and insulin in the control of diabetes; the controlled diabetic should be encouraged to participate fully in almost any activity in which he or she is interested. (JD)

  20. Parent Health Literacy and Communication With Diabetes Educators in a Pediatric Diabetes Clinic: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Howe, Carol J; Cipher, Daisha J; LeFlore, Judy; Lipman, Terri H

    2015-01-01

    Low health literacy is associated with poor communication between adults and providers, but little is known about how parents' health literacy influences communication in pediatric encounters. We examined how parent health literacy affected communication between parents and diabetes educators in a pediatric diabetes clinic. A mixed methods study was conducted including a cross-sectional survey of 162 parents and semi-structured interviews with a subsample of 24 parents of a child with Type 1 diabetes. Parent and child characteristics, parents' report of quality of communication, and parent health literacy were assessed. Logistic regression was performed to determine associations between health literacy and 4 subscales of the Interpersonal Processes of Care (IPC) survey; directed content analyses of interview data were completed. Although health literacy was not significantly associated with the IPC subscales, results from directed content analyses revealed different communication experiences for parents by health literacy classification. Low health literate parents were confused by diabetes jargon, preferred hands-on teaching, and wished for information to be communicated in simple language, broken down into key points, and repeated. Parents with adequate health literacy wanted comprehensive information communicated through ongoing dialogue. Findings indicate that learner-driven curricula may be most appropriate for diabetes education.

  1. Primary care practitioner and patient understanding of the concepts of multimorbidity and self-management: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kenning, Cassandra; Fisher, Louise; Bee, Penny; Bower, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this article is to offer insight into how professionals and patients understand and experience multimorbidity and how these accounts differ, and how they affect attitudes and engagement with self-management. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 20 primary healthcare practitioners and 20 patients with at least 2 long-term conditions (including coronary heart disease, diabetes, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and depression). Thematic analysis was used, and themes were identified using an open-coding method. Results: Practitioners associated multimorbidity with complexity and uncertainty in the clinic, leading to emotional strain and ‘heart sink’. Patient accounts differed. Some described multimorbidity as problematic when it exacerbated their symptoms and caused emotional and psychological strain. Others did not perceive multimorbidity as problematic. Self-management was seen by practitioners and patients to be a key element of managing multiple conditions, but drivers for prompting and engaging in self-management differed between patients and practitioners. Conclusion: This study suggests that recommendations for clinical practice for multimorbid patients should take into account the gap in perceptions between practitioner and patients about experiences of multimorbidity. Not least, practice would need to reflect the tension between practitioners’ and patients’ accounts about the role and benefits of self-management in the presence of multimorbidity. PMID:26770690

  2. Multimodal Self-Management for Children: An Holistic Program for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Edward J.

    This paper describes an innovative program for teaching self-management to children in elementary and secondary schools. The background of techniques for teaching self-management is briefly reviewed, the application of self-management techniques is noted, deficits in self-management programs are considered, and Lazarus's multimodal model of…

  3. Theory and practical applications of a wellness perspective in diabetes education.

    PubMed

    Klepac, M J

    1996-01-01

    From a wellness perspective, health is viewed in a broad sense that encompasses interrelationships among physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual components. This approach to health is particularly applicable in diabetes management because diabetes affects all areas of a person's life--work, family, social, and recreational. The boundaries of diabetes education need to be expanded to address this holistic view of health. The integration of a wellness approach in an adult-centered diabetes education program is described to offer a new perspective in diabetes management and education. This outpatient, hospital-based program is provided at regular intervals for small groups of 6 to 12 participants, most of whom have type II diabetes. Support for this wellness direction in diabetes education is discussed in relation to theoretical principles of the wellness model, including similarities and differences with other concepts such as empowerment and self-efficacy. Practical applications of the wellness perspective are clarified using this specific outpatient program as a case example.

  4. Are Podcasts Effective at Educating African-American Men about Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Levi; Iwanenko, Walter; Schiffert, Judith; Sen, Arup

    2013-01-01

    Education is a critical component of the National Blueprint to eliminate racial disparities in diabetes. Research indicates that traditional methods of diabetes education has had limited effectiveness with minority populations and suggest that different educational approaches be explored. The purpose of the research was to explore the effectiveness of an emergent technology (podcast) for use in educating inner-city, African-American men about diabetes prevention. Thirty African-American men participated in self-administered, pretest-posttest surveys in August 2009. Surveys collected information on demographic characteristics, perceptions of diabetes and diabetes knowledge. Paired samples t-test was computed to evaluate pretest-posttest changes in overall knowledge. McNemar or binomial tests were computed to evaluate pretest-posttest knowledge changes on each of the 15 individual knowledge items. Diabetes knowledge scores for the sample increased from 8.27 at pretest to 10.47 at posttest (p = .001). Posttest knowledge scores increased for 77% of men, stayed the same for 13%, and decreased for 10%. Men who listened to the podcast correctly answered 40% more knowledge questions on their posttest assessments. Results from this exploratory study suggest that podcasts are useful for helping inner-city, African-American men recall diabetes prevention information. Additional research is recommended with larger randomly selected samples using more rigorous research designs. PMID:22516566

  5. Self-management interventions in stages 1 to 4 chronic kidney disease: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Welch, Janet L; Johnson, Michelle; Zimmerman, Lani; Russell, Cynthia L; Perkins, Susan M; Decker, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence, effect on health outcomes, and economic impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have created interest in self-management interventions to help slow disease progression to kidney failure. Seven studies were reviewed to identify knowledge gaps and future directions for research. All studies were published between 2010 and 2013; no investigations were conducted in the United States. Knowledge gaps included the focus on medical self-management tasks with no attention to role or emotional tasks, lack of family involvement during intervention delivery, and an inability to form conclusions about the efficacy of interventions because methodological rigor was insufficient. Educational content varied across studies. Strategies to improve self-management skills and enhance self-efficacy varied and were limited in scope. Further development and testing of theory-based interventions are warranted. There is a critical need for future research using well-designed trials with appropriately powered sample sizes, well-tested instruments, and clear and consistent reporting of results.

  6. Chronic disease self-management and health literacy in four ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Susan J; Armin, Julie; Torres, Cristina Huebner; Orzech, Kathryn M; Vivian, James

    2012-01-01

    Research from several fields has explored health literacy as a multidimensional construct. The authors' multimethod study, "The Impact of Cultural Differences on Health Literacy and Chronic Disease Outcomes," assessed health literacy and chronic disease self-management among 296 patients from four ethnic groups (Vietnamese, African American, White, Latino) at a Massachusetts community health center between 2006 and 2010. Health literacy was assessed using the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA), the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM), and the Short Assessment of Health Literacy for Spanish-speaking Adults (SAHLSA) measures. Qualitative research methods, including in-depth interviews (n = 34), home visits (n = 12), chronic disease diaries (n = 15), and focus groups (n = 47), were completed with a subset of participants. Qualitative interviews indicated a wide range of interpretations of S-TOFHLA questions in which participants substituted their own illness or health care experiences for the abstract examples offered in the instrument, at times leading to incorrect responses. Situating these responses in a broader social and cultural context, this article describes examples of the wide range of chronic disease self-management abilities among participants with limited education and/or low health literacy. It also discusses the culturally variable health beliefs identified among participants interviewed that may play important roles in their chronic disease self-management practices.

  7. Results of a research study evaluating WebEase, an online epilepsy self-management program.

    PubMed

    DiIorio, Colleen; Bamps, Yvan; Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Escoffery, Cam

    2011-11-01

    WebEase (Epilepsy Awareness, Support, and Education) is an online epilepsy self-management program to assist people with taking medication, managing stress, and improving sleep quality. The primary study aims were to determine if those who participated in WebEase demonstrated improvements in medication adherence, perceived stress, and sleep quality. Participants were randomized to a treatment (T) or waitlist control (WCL) group (n=148). At follow-up, participants in the T group reported higher levels of medication adherence than those in the WLC group. Analyses were also conducted comparing those who had completed WebEase modules with those who had not. Those who had completed at least some modules within the WebEase program reported higher levels of self-efficacy and a trend toward significance was observed for the group×time interactions for medication adherence, perceived stress, self-management, and knowledge. The results highlight the usefulness of online tools to support self-management among people with epilepsy.

  8. T2DM Self-Management via Smartphone Applications: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mingxuan; Wu, Xueyan; Mao, Jiangfeng; Wang, Xi; Nie, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile health interventions (mHealth) based on smartphone applications (apps) are promising tools to help improve diabetes care and self-management; however, more evidence on the efficacy of mHealth in diabetes care is needed. The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of mHealth apps on changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood glucose, blood pressure, serum lipids, and body weight in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Methods Two independent reviewers searched three online databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and EMBASE) to identify relevant studies published between January 2005 and June 2016. Of the 2,596 articles retrieved, 13 RCTs were included. We used random effects model to estimate the pooled results. Results Thirteen studies were selected for the systematic review, six of which with data available containing 1,022 patients were included for the meta-analysis. There was a moderate effect on glycemic control after the mHealth app-based interventions. The overall effect on HbA1c shown as mean difference (MD) was -0.40% (-4.37 mmol/mol) (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.69 to -0.11% [-7.54 to -1.20 mmol/mol]; p = 0.007) and standardized mean differences (SMD) was -0.40% (-4.37 mmol/mol) (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.69 to -0.10% [-7.54 to -1.09 mmol/mol]; p = 0.008). A subgroup analysis showed a similar effect with -0.33% (-3.61 mmol/mol) (95% CI -0.59 to -0.06% [-6.45 to -0.66 mmol/mol]; p = 0.02) in MD and -0.38% (-4.15 mmol/mol) (95% CI -0.71 to -0.05% [-7.76 to -0.55 mmol/mol]; p = 0.02) in SMD in studies where patients’ baseline HbA1c levels were less than 8.0%. No effects of mHealth app interventions were found on blood pressure, serum lipids, or weight. Assessment of overall study quality and publication bias demonstrated a low risk of bias among the six studies. Conclusions Smartphone apps offered moderate benefits for T2DM self-management

  9. Solving the barriers to diabetes education through the use of multimedia.

    PubMed

    Isarankura-Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Dansethakul, Prabhop; Saetum, Pradermchai; Laosrivijit, Sirikul; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that affects > 180 million people worldwide. It is persistent in Thai communities in spite of much effort in prevention and control. This study examined the knowledge capacity of villagers in the Klongmai community of Nakhon Pathom, Thailand, regarding diabetes by way of action research. A health status assessment and a survey of the community were carried out and used as the basis for designing an educational video on diabetes that is accessible regardless of age and educational background. Evaluations of the pre- and poststudy questionnaires were carried out using statistical analysis. The results indicated that the devised educational materials were effective in encouraging the community's self-awareness and perception of diabetes at the significance level of 0.05. Most importantly, the participants demonstrated proficiency in adapting the knowledge gained from the workshop to their own lifestyle.

  10. Potential Return on Investment (RoI) on web-based diabetes education in UK.

    PubMed

    Shabestari, Omid; Roudsari, Abdul

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is growing in the UK. As most diabetes care is performed by the patients themselves, structured education is one way to encourage their responsible participation in delivering effective care. Continuous e-learning by Internet has proven to be a useful method of diabetes education. "Return on Investment" (RoI) can be used as an indicator of the cost-benefit of web-based education. RoI is the ratio of money gained or lost on an investment relative to the amount of money invested. This report uses system dynamics modeling to predict the flow of patients in the educational system and the cost of their care. The analysis compared traditional and web-based education. Separate models were developed for each educational method and simulated until 2020 in one year intervals. The population of diabetic patients was adjusted at each cycle according to anticipated incidence and mortality rates. The population of educated diabetic patients was based on the educational capacity and literacy limits of each method. A report by the National Health Service (NHS) was used to calculate the cost of care by considering the cost difference between uneducated and educated patients. By 2020 with an annual rate of inflation of 3%, the annual cost of care is projected to increase to pound 3.67 billion for the traditional model as compared to pound 3.39 billion for the web-based model. RoI is estimated to be a ratio of 32.33. Investment in web-based diabetes education is not only a health benefit but also a reduction in care cost.

  11. The effectiveness of self-management support interventions for men with long-term conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Galdas, Paul; Fell, Jennifer; Bower, Peter; Kidd, Lisa; Blickem, Christian; McPherson, Kerri; Hunt, Kate; Gilbody, Simon; Richardson, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the effectiveness of self-management support interventions in men with long-term conditions. Methods A quantitative systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews was searched to identify published reviews of self-management support interventions. Relevant reviews were screened to identify randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of self-management support interventions conducted in men alone, or which analysed the effects of interventions by sex. Review methods Data on relevant outcomes, patient populations, intervention type and study quality were extracted. Quality appraisal was conducted using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. Meta-analysis was conducted to compare the effects of interventions in men, women, and mixed-sex sub-groups. Results 40 RCTs of self-management support interventions in men, and 20 eligible RCTs where an analysis by sex was reported, were included in the review. Meta-analysis suggested that physical activity, education, and peer support-based interventions have a positive impact on quality of life in men. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to make strong statements about whether self-management support interventions show larger, similar or smaller effects in men compared with women and mixed-sex groups. Conclusions Clinicians may wish to consider whether certain types of self-management support (eg, physical activity, education, peer support) are particularly effective in men, although more research is needed to fully determine and explore this. PMID:25795688

  12. Acceptability of a team-based mobile health (mHealth) application for lifestyle self-management in individuals with chronic illnesses.

    PubMed

    Hartzler, Andrea L; Venkatakrishnan, Anusha; Mohan, Shiwali; Silva, Michael; Lozano, Paula; Ralston, James D; Ludman, Evette; Rosenberg, Dori; Newton, Katherine M; Nelson, Lester; Pirolli, Peter

    2016-08-01

    With increased incidence of chronic illnesses arising due to unhealthy lifestyle habits, it is increasingly important to leverage technology applications to promote and sustain health behavior change. We developed a smartphone-based application, NutriWalking (NW), which recommends personalized daily exercise goals and promotes healthy nutritional habits in small peer teams. Here, we demonstrate an early study of usability and acceptability of this app in patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Depression. Our goal was to evaluate the potential of NW as a self-management support tool. Findings point to design considerations for team-based self-management tools delivered via mHealth platforms.

  13. Diabetes in Thailand: Status and Policy.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn

    2016-03-01

    Like other countries in the Western Pacific region, Thailand is facing increasing numbers of patients with diabetes due to unhealthy diets, high obesity rates, and an aging society. Diabetes is a considerable burden for developing countries as it reduces quality of life, increases mortality, and drives up healthcare costs. The disease detection rate in Thailand has improved in recent years, but glycemic control remains suboptimal and significant numbers of patients suffer from complications. Universal healthcare coverage has increased access to care, but inequality exists between different health plans and non-medication diabetes supplies are not yet widely covered. Diabetes self-management education has not yet been standardized and a multidisciplinary team approach is not widely utilized. The Thai government recognizes the burden of diabetes and has launched nationwide programs of health promotion and disease prevention. In addition, local initiatives have targeted reductions in specific complications, including retinopathy and diabetic foot problems, which has resulted in better disease prevention and treatment. Along with strategic public health planning, increased collaboration between private and public sectors, enhanced professional training, increased use of technology and data management, and equitable distribution of care are all needed to improve outcomes of patients with diabetes in Thailand.

  14. Effects of cancer comorbidity on disease management: making the case for diabetes education (a report from the SOAR program).

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Lauren; Li, Qijuan E; Duncan, Ian; Thurston, Andrew L; Fitzner, Karen A; Edwards, Beatrice J; McKoy-Bent, Judith M; Tulas, Katrina M; McKoy, June M

    2013-02-01

    Individuals with type II diabetes have an increased risk of cancer diagnosis (relative risk [RR]=1.12-2.50) and mortality (RR=1.4) compared to normoglycemic individuals. Biologic mechanisms, including mitogenic effects of insulin, hyperglycemia, and increased oxidative stress, as well as behavioral factors (eg, difficulty managing the comorbidity) may explain the elevated risk. To investigate the effects of the comorbidity on disease management, the authors compared diabetes education utilization in individuals with diabetes-cancer co-morbidity to utilization by individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer. The effect of diabetes education on outcomes was further assessed in the subset of individuals with diabetes-cancer comorbidity. Administrative claims data were used for this analysis. The study population included individuals >60 years of age and members of both commercial and Medicare Advantage health plans from a private national database of payer data, but excluded Medicare fee for service and Medicaid patients. Most of these individuals were eligible to receive reimbursement for diabetes education. Diabetes education utilization was identified using procedure codes. Outcomes were assessed for a 3-year time period. There was little difference in diabetes education utilization between individuals with diabetes in the absence of cancer (3.8% utilization) and those with diabetes-cancer comorbidity (3.5% utilization). Individuals who receive diabetes education are more likely to have multiple HbA1c tests per year, fewer emergency department visits, fewer hospital admissions, and lower care-associated costs (except for outpatient and pharmacy averages). When diabetes coexists with cancer, management of diabetes often lags, making diabetes education an imperative.

  15. SELF-MANAGEMENT COUNSELING IN PATIENTS WITH HEART FAILURE: PRIMARY RESULTS FROM THE HEART FAILURE ADHERENCE AND RETENTION TRIAL (HART)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Lynda H.; Calvin, James E.; Richardson, Dejuran; Janssen, Imke; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Flynn, Kristin J.; Grady, Kathleen L.; Rucker-Whitaker, Cheryl S.; Eaton, Claudia; Avery, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Context Activating patients with heart failure (HF) to adhere to physician advice has not translated into clinical benefit, but past trials have had methodologic limitations. Objective To determine the value of self-management counseling plus HF education, over HF education alone, on the primary endpoint of death or HF hospitalization. Design, Setting, and Patients A single center behavioral efficacy trial in 902 patients with mild to moderate systolic or diastolic dysfunction, randomized between 2001–2004. Interventions All patients were offered 18 contacts and 18 HF educational tip sheets over the course of 1 year. Patients randomized to education received tip sheets in the mail and phone calls to check comprehension. Patients randomized to self-management received tip sheets in groups and were taught self-management skills to implement the advice. Main Outcome Measure Death or HF hospitalization, blindly adjudicated by cardiologists. Intent-to-treat results were analyzed as time-to-event and accelerated failure time models were used for non-proportional hazards. Results Patients were an average of 63.6 years, 47% female, 40% minority, 52% with family income <$30,000/year, and 23% with diastolic dysfunction. The self-management arm was no different from the education arm on the primary endpoint (Wilcoxon p=0.58). Post-hoc analyses on pre-specified subgroups revealed a significant income x treatment interaction (log-logistic estimate=0.64, p=0.02). Patients with income <$30,000 in self-management had a slower time to event than those in education (p=0.05) and were no different than higher income patients in either treatment arm. Conclusions The addition of self-management counseling to HF education does not reduce death or HF hospitalizations in patients with mild to moderate HF. Future trials should evaluate tailored outpatient HF management featuring ongoing education and comprehension checks for all, augmented by group-based skill development for those more

  16. Implementation and quantitative evaluation of chronic disease self-management programme in Shanghai, China: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Dongbo; Fu, Hua; McGowan, Patrick; Shen, Yi-e; Zhu, Lizhen; Yang, Huiqin; Mao, Jianguo; Zhu, Shitai; Ding, Yongming; Wei, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Shanghai Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP). METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with six-month follow-up compared patients who received treatment with those who did not receive treatment (waiting-list controls) in five urban communities in Shanghai, China. Participants in the treatment group received education from a lay-led CDSMP course and one copy of a help book immediately; those in the control group received the same education and book six months later. FINDINGS: In total, 954 volunteer patients with a medical record that confirmed a diagnosis of hypertension, heart disease, chronic lung disease, arthritis, stroke, or diabetes who lived in communities were assigned randomly to treatment (n = 526) and control (n = 428) groups. Overall, 430 (81.7%) and 349 (81.5%) patients in the treatment and control groups completed the six-month study. Patients who received treatment had significant improvements in weekly minutes of aerobic exercise, practice of cognitive symptom management, self-efficacy to manage own symptoms, and self-efficacy to manage own disease in general compared with controls. They also had significant improvements in eight indices of health status and, on average, fewer hospitalizations. CONCLUSION: When implemented in Shanghai, the CDSMP was acceptable culturally to Chinese patients. The programme improved participants' health behaviour, self-efficacy, and health status and reduced the number of hospitalizations six months after the course. The locally based delivery model was integrated into the routine of community government organizations and community health services. Chinese lay leaders taught the CDSMP courses as successfully as professionals. PMID:12764513

  17. Ocular Disease, Knowledge, and Technology Applications in Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Threatt, Jennifer; Williamson, Jennifer Faye; Huynh, Kyle; Davis, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    An estimated 25.8 million children and adults in the United States, approximately 8.3% of the population, have diabetes. Diabetes prevalence varies by race and ethnicity. African Americans have the highest prevalence (12.6%), followed closely by Hispanics (11.8%), Asian Americans (8.4%), and Whites (7.1%). The purpose of this article is to discuss the ocular complications of diabetes, the cultural and racial differences in diabetes knowledge, and the role of telemedicine as a means to reach the undeserved who are at risk of complications. Information on the pathophysiology of ocular disease in patients with diabetes and the role of telemedicine in diabetes care was derived from a literature review. National Institutes of Health (NIH) on-line resources were queried to present data on the racial and cultural understandings of diabetes and diabetes-related complications. The microvascular ocular complications of diabetes are discussed for retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma and ocular surface disease. Racial and cultural differences in knowledge of recommended self-care practices are presented. These differences in part, may explain health disparities and the increased risk of diabetes and its complications in rural minority communities. Finally, advances in telemedicine technology are discussed that show improvements in metabolic control and cardiovascular risk in adults with type 2 diabetes. Improving provider and patient understanding of diabetes complications may improve management and self care practices that are important for diabetes control. Telemedicine may improve access to diabetes specialists and may improve self-management education and diabetes control particularly in rural and underserved communities. PMID:23531956

  18. Biologically-Inspired Concepts for Self-Management of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, G.

    2006-01-01

    Inherent complexity in large-scale applications may be impossible to eliminate or even ameliorate despite a number of promising advances. In such cases, the complexity must be tolerated and managed. Such management may be beyond the abilities of humans, or require such overhead as to make management by humans unrealistic. A number of initiatives inspired by concepts in biology have arisen for self-management of complex systems. We present some ideas and techniques we have been experimenting with, inspired by lesser-known concepts in biology that show promise in protecting complex systems and represent a step towards self-management of complexity.

  19. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  20. Developing cartoons for long-term condition self-management information

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advocating the need to adopt more self-management policies has brought with it an increasing demand for information about living with and making decisions about long-term conditions, with a significant potential for using cartoons. However, the purposeful use of cartoons is notably absent in many areas of health care as is evidence of their acceptability to patients and lay others. This paper outlines the process used to develop and evaluate cartoons and their acceptability for a series of self-management guidebooks for people with inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods Principles for a process to develop information and cartoons were developed. Cartoon topics were created using qualitative research methods to obtain lay views and experiences. The CKD guidebook was used to provide a detailed exemplar of the process. Focus group and trial participants were recruited from primary care CKD registers. The book was part of a trial intervention; selected participants evaluated the cartoons during in-depth interviews which incorporated think-aloud methods. Results In general, the cartoons developed by this process depict patient experiences, common situations, daily management dilemmas, making decisions and choices and the uncertainties associated with conditions. CKD cartoons were developed following two focus groups around the themes of getting a diagnosis; understanding the problem; feeling that facts were being withheld; and setting priorities. Think-aloud interviews with 27 trial participants found the CKD cartoons invoked amusement, recognition and reflection but were sometimes difficult to interpret. Conclusion Humour is frequently utilised by people with long-term conditions to help adjustment and coping. Cartoons can help provide clarity and understanding and could address concerns related to health literacy. Using cartoons to engage and motivate

  1. Experimenting with styles of living: Bernard, Canguilhem and type 2 diabetes education.

    PubMed

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2013-09-01

    The paper links a debate in the history of medical science between statistics and the experimental method with contemporary diabetes educational practices. An empirical example of a tension between neglect and concern in diabetes self-regulation frames the subsequent theoretical discussion between first, Claude Bernard and statistics and afterwards, Georges Canguilhem as a correlative to Bernard. Through these philosophers of medical science a connection between the experimental method and education is demonstrated. Finally, a case description of an experimental approach to alcohol and experimentation frames and highlights the educational aspect of the methodological discussion.

  2. Sugar Free with Justin T.: Diabetes Education through Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Justin B.; Donaldson, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design, development, and delivery of an Extension community cable television program, "Sugar Free with Justin T.," in Roane County, Tennessee. The program targets diabetics, pre-diabetics, and those who care for them, with practical information and demonstrations to improve dietary quality. In addition to…

  3. The Effectiveness of Self-Management Mobile Phone and Tablet Apps in Long-term Condition Management: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term conditions and their concomitant management place considerable pressure on patients, communities, and health care systems worldwide. International clinical guidelines on the majority of long-term conditions recommend the inclusion of self-management programs in routine management. Self-management programs have been associated with improved health outcomes; however, the successful and sustainable transfer of research programs into clinical practice has been inconsistent. Recent developments in mobile technology, such as mobile phone and tablet computer apps, could help in developing a platform for the delivery of self-management interventions that are adaptable, of low cost, and easily accessible. Objective We conducted a systematic review to assess the effectiveness of mobile phone and tablet apps in self-management of key symptoms of long-term conditions. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, EBSCO databases, the Cochrane Library, and The Joanna Briggs Institute Library for randomized controlled trials that assessed the effectiveness of mobile phone and tablet apps in self-management of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and chronic lung diseases from 2005–2016. We searched registers of current and ongoing trials, as well as the gray literature. We then checked the reference lists of all primary studies and review papers for additional references. The last search was run in February 2016. Results Of the 9 papers we reviewed, 6 of the interventions demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the primary measure of clinical outcome. Where the intervention comprised an app only, 3 studies demonstrated a statistically significant improvement. Interventions to address diabetes mellitus (5/9) were the most common, followed by chronic lung disease (3/9) and cardiovascular disease (1/9). A total of 3 studies included multiple intervention groups using permutations of an intervention involving an app. The duration of the

  4. The scope of cell phones in diabetes management in developing country health care settings.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Vamadevan S; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

    2011-05-01

    Diabetes has emerged as a major public health concern in developing nations. Health systems in most developing countries are yet to integrate effective prevention and control programs for diabetes into routine health care services. Given the inadequate human resources and underfunctioning health systems, we need novel and innovative approaches to combat diabetes in developing-country settings. In this regard, the tremendous advances in telecommunication technology, particularly cell phones, can be harnessed to improve diabetes care. Cell phones could serve as a tool for collecting information on surveillance, service delivery, evidence-based care, management, and supply systems pertaining to diabetes from primary care settings in addition to providing health messages as part of diabetes education. As a screening/diagnostic tool for diabetes, cell phones can aid the health workers in undertaking screening and diagnostic and follow-up care for diabetes in the community. Cell phones are also capable of acting as a vehicle for continuing medical education; a decision support system for evidence-based management; and a tool for patient education, self-management, and compliance. However, for widespread use, we need robust evaluations of cell phone applications in existing practices and appropriate interventions in diabetes.

  5. Are community-based nurse-led self-management support interventions effective in chronic patients? Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Azzurra; De Vito, Corrado; Brufola, Ilaria; Corsaro, Alice; Marzuillo, Carolina; Migliara, Giuseppe; Rega, Maria Luisa; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo; Damiani, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of primary care and community-based service delivery systems is intended to meet emerging needs, reduce the costs of hospital-based ambulatory care and prevent avoidable hospital use by the provision of more appropriate care. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of self-management in the complex process of care of patient with long-term conditions. Several studies have determined that nurses, among the health professionals, are more recommended to promote health and deliver preventive programs within the primary care context. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy of the nurse-led self-management support versus usual care evaluating patient outcomes in chronic care community programs. Systematic review was carried out in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Science including RCTs of nurse-led self-management support interventions performed to improve observer reported outcomes (OROs) and patients reported outcomes (PROs), with any method of communication exchange or education in a community setting on patients >18 years of age with a diagnosis of chronic diseases or multi-morbidity. Of the 7,279 papers initially retrieved, 29 met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses on systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure reduction (10 studies-3,881 patients) and HbA1c reduction (7 studies-2,669 patients) were carried-out. The pooled MD were: SBP -3.04 (95% CI -5.01--1.06), DBP -1.42 (95% CI -1.42--0.49) and HbA1c -0.15 (95% CI -0.32-0.01) in favor of the experimental groups. Meta-analyses of subgroups showed, among others, a statistically significant effect if the interventions were delivered to patients with diabetes (SBP) or CVD (DBP), if the nurses were specifically trained, if the studies had a sample size higher than 200 patients and if the allocation concealment was not clearly defined. Effects on other OROs and PROs as well as quality of life remain inconclusive.

  6. Are community-based nurse-led self-management support interventions effective in chronic patients? Results of a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    De Vito, Corrado; Brufola, Ilaria; Corsaro, Alice; Marzuillo, Carolina; Migliara, Giuseppe; Rega, Maria Luisa; Ricciardi, Walter; Villari, Paolo; Damiani, Gianfranco

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of primary care and community-based service delivery systems is intended to meet emerging needs, reduce the costs of hospital-based ambulatory care and prevent avoidable hospital use by the provision of more appropriate care. Great emphasis has been placed on the role of self-management in the complex process of care of patient with long-term conditions. Several studies have determined that nurses, among the health professionals, are more recommended to promote health and deliver preventive programs within the primary care context. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the efficacy of the nurse-led self-management support versus usual care evaluating patient outcomes in chronic care community programs. Systematic review was carried out in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Scopus and Web of Science including RCTs of nurse-led self-management support interventions performed to improve observer reported outcomes (OROs) and patients reported outcomes (PROs), with any method of communication exchange or education in a community setting on patients >18 years of age with a diagnosis of chronic diseases or multi-morbidity. Of the 7,279 papers initially retrieved, 29 met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses on systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure reduction (10 studies—3,881 patients) and HbA1c reduction (7 studies—2,669 patients) were carried-out. The pooled MD were: SBP -3.04 (95% CI -5.01—-1.06), DBP -1.42 (95% CI -1.42—-0.49) and HbA1c -0.15 (95% CI -0.32–0.01) in favor of the experimental groups. Meta-analyses of subgroups showed, among others, a statistically significant effect if the interventions were delivered to patients with diabetes (SBP) or CVD (DBP), if the nurses were specifically trained, if the studies had a sample size higher than 200 patients and if the allocation concealment was not clearly defined. Effects on other OROs and PROs as well as quality of life remain inconclusive. PMID:28282465

  7. The global challenge of type 2 diabetes and the strategies for response in ethnic minority groups.

    PubMed

    Lirussi, Flavio

    2010-09-01

    Ethnic minorities living in high-income countries usually exhibit a greater risk of developing diabetes along with higher morbidity and mortality rates. We evaluated the effectiveness of interventions to improve glycaemic control in ethnic minority groups. Results of major controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included in the review. Only 1/47 studies addressing diet and exercise interventions reported details on the ethnicity of the studied population. Self-management education was successful if associated with increased self-efficacy; delivered over a longer period; of high intensity; culturally tailored; and when using community educators. Strategies adopted in community-gathering places, family-based, multifaceted, and those tackling the social context were likely to be more effective. A positive relationship was found between social support and self-management behaviour as well as quality of life, but there is little evidence about the impact of organizational changes within health-care services on diabetes control. More research is needed to strengthen the evidence on effective strategies for response to diabetes in ethnic minorities. Also, there is a need to take into account diabetes beliefs and communication difficulties, as well as potential protective factors. Globally, many health-care systems are inadequately equipped to improve diabetes prevention and disease outcomes in these communities.

  8. Evaluation of the Impact of a Diabetes Education Curriculum for School Personnel on Disease Knowledge and Confidence in Caring for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cory T.; Chen, Aleda M. H.; Plake, Kimberly S.; Nash, Christiane L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: School personnel may lack knowledge of diabetes and be unprepared to address the needs of students with type 1 diabetes. This project evaluated the effectiveness of a type 1 diabetes education program for school personnel on increasing knowledge of diabetes and confidence in caring for students with diabetes. Methods: Two types of…

  9. Academic Detailing in Diabetes: Using Outreach Education to Improve the Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Most diabetes care is provided in primary care settings, but typical primary care clinicians struggle to keep up with the latest evidence on diabetes screening, pharmacotherapy, and monitoring. Accordingly, many patients with diabetes are not receiving optimal guideline-based therapy. Relying on front-line clinicians on their own to assess the huge volume of new literature and incorporate it into their practice is unrealistic, and conventional continuing medical education has not proven adequate to address gaps in care. Academic detailing, direct educational outreach to clinicians that uses social marketing techniques to provide specific evidence-based recommendations, has been proven in clinical trials to improve the quality of care for a range of conditions. By directly engaging with clinicians to assess their needs, identify areas for change in practice, and provide them with specific tools to implement these changes, academic detailing can serve as a tool to improve care processes and outcomes for patients with diabetes.

  10. Self-management abilities and quality of life among frail community-dwelling individuals: the role of community nurses in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether community nurses in the Netherlands improve self-management abilities and quality of life of frail community-dwelling people. This longitudinal study was performed in the context of a larger evaluation study of the 'Zichtbare Schakels'(Visible Link) programme, conducted to determine the quality of care provided by community nurses to community-dwelling frail people in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. For the current study, clients seen by community workers in Rotterdam between July 2013 and November 2014 participated. Data were gathered via personal interviews by the community nurses as part of care delivery at the start (T0; n = 220) and end of care delivery (T1; n = 111 - the remaining 109 clients were still receiving care) to evaluate and improve quality of care. We measured client's quality of life (using the EQ5D), self-management abilities (using the Self-Management Ability Scale) and background characteristics. Results showed that clients seen by the community nurses especially experience problems when it comes to usual activities and pain/discomfort. Furthermore, quality of life was much worse among clients of the community nurses (0.51) than among frail older (aged ≥70 years) people in Rotterdam (0.61), Dutch patients with chronic illnesses [CVD (0.83), COPD (0.79) or diabetes (0.83)] and older (aged ≥65 years) people who had recently been hospitalised (0.80). Significant improvements were seen in client's self-management and quality of life over time. Self-management abilities at T0 and changes in self-management abilities (T1 - T0) clearly predicted quality of life at T1. Investing in community health nurses may be beneficial for the improvement of self-management abilities and quality of life among very frail people in the community.

  11. Self Management Techniques and Disclosure of Sero Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falaye, Ajibola; Afolayan, Joel Adeleke

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at using Self Management Technique (SMT) to promote self-disclosure of Sero status in Kwara State, Nigeria. A pre-test, post-test and control group quasi experimental design using a 2x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Sixty participants were sampled by balloting from two HIV/AIDS screening centres. Four instruments were used such…

  12. Self-Management Procedures: A Comparison across the Autism Spectrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southall, Candice M.; Gast, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have difficulty generalizing learned behavior to varied environments with independence. This review of 24 empirical studies compares self-management as a systematic procedure for modifying one's own behavior, to increase target behaviors in students with either autistic disorder (AD) or…

  13. String Quartets as Self-Managed Teams: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboa, Avi; Tal-Shmotkin, Malka

    2012-01-01

    This article examines empirically and systematically whether a string quartet (SQ) ensemble is perceived as a self-managed team (SMT). SMTs, which were initially employed in the industrial world, are groups of employees that have a total responsibility for a defined project. The hypothesis that the SQ would exhibit more typical SMT characteristics…

  14. Arthritis Self-Management Studies: A Twelve-Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; Holman, Halsted

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the Arthritis Self-Management Program conclude that (1) it improves patient behaviors and self-efficacy; (2) formal reinforcement does not improve long-term outcomes; (3) improvement gains have both clinical and cost-saving effects; and (4) changes in health status are more closely linked to self-efficacy than to behavior. (SK)

  15. Asthma Self-Management Model: Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivera, Carolina M. X.; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C.; de Menezes, Marcelo B.; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A.; Valdevite, Laura M.; Almeida, Gustavo A.; Araujo, Ana S.; Simoneti, Christian S.; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A.; Borges, Marcos C.; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by…

  16. Diabetes Awareness of Low-Income Middle School Students Participating in the Help a Friend, Help Yourself Youth Diabetes Awareness Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wroten, Kathryn; Reames, Elizabeth S.; Tuuri, Georgianna

    2012-01-01

    The study reported here investigated the effectiveness of the LSU AgCenter Help a Friend, Help Yourself youth diabetes education curriculum to increase knowledge and awareness of diabetes and its symptoms in low-income middle school students participating in the Boys and Girls Club after-school program. The curriculum includes four lessons with…

  17. Can Chronic Disease Management Programs for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Reduce Productivity-Related Indirect Costs of the Disease? Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolin, Jane N.; Ohsfeldt, Robert L.; Phillips, Charles D.; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G.; Forjuoh, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; P<0.001) and persons with greater than high school education were associated with additional productivity losses (+$758/year; P<0.001). Persons with more than 1 comorbid condition were marginally associated with lower productivity losses (-$326/year; P=0.055). No evidence was found that the chronic disease management programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses. (Population Health Management 2014;17:112–120) PMID:24152055

  18. Can chronic disease management programs for patients with type 2 diabetes reduce productivity-related indirect costs of the disease? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Adepoju, Omolola E; Bolin, Jane N; Ohsfeldt, Robert L; Phillips, Charles D; Zhao, Hongwei; Ory, Marcia G; Forjuoh, Samuel N

    2014-04-01

    The objective was to assess the impacts of diabetes self-management programs on productivity-related indirect costs of the disease. Using an employer's perspective, this study estimated the productivity losses associated with: (1) employee absence on the job, (2) diabetes-related disability, (3) employee presence on the job, and (4) early mortality. Data were obtained from electronic medical records and survey responses of 376 adults aged ≥18 years who were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of type 2 diabetes self-management programs. All study participants had uncontrolled diabetes and were randomized into one of 4 study arms: personal digital assistant (PDA), chronic disease self-management program (CDSMP), combined PDA and CDSMP, and usual care (UC). The human-capital approach was used to estimate lost productivity resulting from 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, which are summed to obtain total productivity loss. Using robust regression, total productivity loss was modeled as a function of the diabetes self-management programs and other identified demographic and clinical characteristics. Compared to subjects in the UC arm, there were no statistically significant differences in productivity losses among persons undergoing any of the 3 diabetes management interventions. Males were associated with higher productivity losses (+$708/year; P<0.001) and persons with greater than high school education were associated with additional productivity losses (+$758/year; P<0.001). Persons with more than 1 comorbid condition were marginally associated with lower productivity losses (-$326/year; P=0.055). No evidence was found that the chronic disease management programs examined in this trial affect indirect productivity losses.

  19. Diabetes Prevention and Management among Minority Ethnic Groups in Nicaragua: Findings from Phase 2 of a Community-Based Participatory Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Mitchell, Emma McKim; Mclean, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To (1) describe barriers to diabetes prevention and self-management, (2) explore how religious beliefs inform diabetes prevention and self-management and (3) describe community action strategies to address the problem of diabetes locally. Design: Qualitative, descriptive design. Setting: Three Moravian Churches located, respectively,…

  20. A qualitative evaluation of a comprehensive self-management programme for COPD patients: effectiveness from the patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Monninkhof, Evelyn; van der Aa, Maaike; van der Valk, Paul; van der Palen, Job; Zielhuis, Gerhard; Koning, Karen; Pieterse, Marcel

    2004-11-01

    The COPE self-management programme, including a self-management education course, self-treatment of exacerbations and a fitness programme, appeared to have no significant effect on health related quality of life (HRQoL) as measured by the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This is in contrast to our hypothesis and despite expressions of satisfaction of patients to healthcare workers. To understand this discrepancy, a qualitative study was performed. A purposive sample of 20 participants of the COPE self-management programme were interviewed at home using in-depth, semi-structured interviews. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed verbatim and analysed according grounded theory. The fitness programme was most positively evaluated by patients due to the perceived increase of exercise capacity and the social aspect of the group training. Major effects gained by the self-management education course reported by patients were the skills to evenly distribute their energy and to listen to their body signals. Most patients thought favourable about self-treatment of exacerbations. The possibility to start early, not having to call a doctor and autonomy were raised as important advantages. Furthermore, several patients reported increased self-confidence and coping behaviour as important effects of the COPE programme. Finally, many patients reported feeling safe due to the frequent follow-up visits and 24h access to the hospital, and this aspect elicited to be very important. In this study, the qualitative interviews suggest that the SGRQ and possibly other existing HRQoL instruments might fail to capture the full experience of patients in self-management studies. The need for more elaborate qualitative research on this subject is indicated.

  1. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, John N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient’s health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic. PMID:25657590

  2. Psychosocial interventions for the diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Harvey, John N

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes usually requires substantial life-long self-management by the patient. Psychological factors and the patient's health beliefs are important determinants of self-care behavior. Education has a modest influence on generating better self-care, but psychologically based interventions are clearly more effective. This review gives an overview of these interventions with some discussion of their basis in psychological theory. Some labels such as cognitive behavioral therapy and family therapy include a wide range of approaches. Randomized trials have generally produced improvement in measures of psychological well-being, but improved glycemic control has been more elusive. The influence on behavior can be very dependent on the individual therapist. Only a few trials have managed to sustain improvement in glycosylated hemoglobin beyond a year. Not all patients are prepared to engage and accept these forms of therapeutic intervention. We are still some way from moving psychological management from the trial situation into the diabetic clinic.

  3. Using Action Research and Peer Perspectives to Develop Technology That Facilitates Behavioral Change and Self-Management in COPD

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Catherine; Dinsmore, John; Brady, Anne Marie; Mckee, Gabrielle; O'Donnell, Sharon; Prendergast, David

    2014-01-01

    Background. Behavioural change and self-management in patients with chronic illness may help to control symptoms, avoid rehospitalization, enhance quality of life, and decrease mortality and morbidity. Objective. Guided by action research principles and using mixed methods, the aim of this project was to develop peer based educational, motivational, and health-promoting peer based videos, using behavioural change principles, to support self-management in patients with COPD. Methods. Individuals (n = 32) living with COPD at home and involved in two community based COPD support groups were invited to participate in this project. Focus group/individual interviews and a demographic questionnaire were used to collect data. Results. Analysis revealed 6 categories relevant to behavioural change which included self-management, support, symptoms, knowledge, rehabilitation, and technology. Participants commented that content needed to be specific, and videos needed to be shorter, to be tailored to severity of condition, to demonstrate “normal” activities, to be positive, and to ensure that content is culturally relevant. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that detailed analysis of patient perspectives and needs for self-management is essential and should underpin the development of any framework, materials, and technology. The action research design principles provided an effective framework for eliciting the data and applying it to technology and testing its relevance to the user. PMID:24959177

  4. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications.

  5. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  6. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  7. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  8. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  9. 42 CFR 410.146 - Diabetes outcome measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diabetes outcome measurements. 410.146 Section 410... MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.146 Diabetes outcome measurements. (a)...

  10. Barriers to diabetes management: patient and provider factors.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Chesla, Catherine; Stotts, Nancy A; Kroon, Lisa; Janson, Susan L

    2011-07-01

    Despite significant advances in diagnosis and treatment, the persistence of inadequate metabolic control continues. Poor glycemic control may be reflected by both the failure of diabetes self-management by patients as well as inadequate intervention strategies by clinicians. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize existing knowledge regarding various barriers of diabetes management from the perspectives of both patients and clinicians. A search of PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, and PsycINFO identified 1454 articles in English published between 1990 and 2009, addressing type 2 diabetes, patient's barriers, clinician's barriers, and self-management. Patients' adherence, attitude, beliefs, and knowledge about diabetes may affect diabetes self-management. Culture and language capabilities influence the patient's health beliefs, attitudes, health literacy, thereby affecting diabetes self-management. Other influential factors include the patient's financial resources, co-morbidities, and social support. Clinician's attitude, beliefs and knowledge about diabetes also influence diabetes management. Clinicians may further influence the patient's perception through effective communication skills and by having a well-integrated health care system. Identifying barriers to diabetes management is necessary to improve the quality of diabetes care, including the improvement of metabolic control, and diabetes self-management. Further research that considers these barriers is necessary for developing interventions for individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  12. Dietary education must fit into everyday life: a qualitative study of people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hempler, Nana F; Nicic, Sara; Ewers, Bettina; Willaing, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background The high prevalence of diabetes among South Asian populations in European countries partially derives from unhealthy changes in dietary patterns. Limited studies address perspectives of South Asian populations with respect to utility of diabetes education in everyday life. This study explores perspectives on dietary diabetes education and healthy food choices of people living in Denmark who have a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2012 and December 2013 with 12 participants with type 2 diabetes who had received dietary diabetes education. Data analysis was systematic and was based on grounded theory principles. Results Participants described the process of integrating and utilizing dietary education in everyday life as challenging. Perceived barriers of the integration and utilization included a lack of a connection between the content of the education and life conditions, a lack of support from their social networks for dietary change, difficulty integrating the education into everyday life, and failure to include the participants’ taste preferences in the educational setting. Conclusion Dietary education that is sensitive to the attitudes, wishes, and preferences of the participants and that aims at establishing a connection to the everyday life of the participants might facilitate successful changes in dietary practices among people with a Pakistani background and type 2 diabetes. The findings suggest that more focus should be placed on collaborative processes in the dietary educational setting in order to achieve appropriate education and to improve communication between this population and health care professionals. PMID:25750523

  13. School Empowerment through Self-Managing Teams: Leader Behavior in Developing Self-Managing Work Groups in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Paula M.

    In searching for avenues to create a collaborative school environment in which autonomous teachers impact the outcomes of schooling and students become independent learners, there is increasing interest in "self-managing work groups." This paper presents findings of a study that examined the role of the principal in the development of…

  14. Measuring HIV Self-Management in Women Living with HIV/AIDS: A Psychometric Evaluation Study of the HIV Self-Management Scale

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Asher, Alice; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G.; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Rose, Carol Dawson; Hanson, Jan E.; Salata, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the HIV Self-Management Scale for women, a new measure of HIV self-management, defined as the day-to-day decisions that individuals make to manage their illness. Methods The development and validation of the scale was undertaken in three phases: focus groups, expert review and psychometric evaluation. Focus groups identified items describing the process and context of self-management in women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA). Items were refined using expert review and were then administered to WLHA in two sites in the U.S. (n=260). Validity of the scale was assessed through factor analyses, model fit statistics, reliability testing, and convergent and discriminate validity. Results The final scale consists of 3-domains with 20 items describing the construct of HIV self-management. Daily self-management health practices, Social support and HIV self-management, and Chronicity of HIV self-management comprise the three domains. These domains explained 48.6% of the total variance in the scale. The item mean scores ranged from 1.7-2.77, and each domain demonstrated acceptable reliability (0.72-0.86) and stability (0.61-0.85). Conclusions Self-management is critical for WLHA, who constitute over 50% of PLWHA and have poorer health outcomes than their male counterparts. Methods to assess the self-management behavior of WLHA are needed to enhance their health and well-being. Presently no scales exist to measure HIV self-management. Our new 20-item HIV Self-Management Scale is a valid and reliable measure of HIV self-management in this population. Differences in aspects of self-management may be related to social roles and community resources and interventions targeting these factors may decrease morbidity in WLHA. PMID:22569267

  15. Providing Culturally Appropriate Education on Type 2 Diabetes to Rural American Indians: Emotions and Racial Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Struthers, Roxanne; Kaas, Merrie; Hill, Doris L; Hodge, Felicia; DeCora, Lorelei; Geishirt-Cantrell, Betty

    2003-01-01

    Healthy and balanced emotions are an important aspect of well-being. Today, diabetes has a high prevalence in American Indian communities. Four Talking Circle facilitators were interviewed in a phenomenological research study to describe their experience of facilitating Talking Circles during a diabetes research intervention, Diabetes Wellness: American Indian Talking Circles. The Diabetes Wellness study provided a twelve week educational curriculum in a Talking Circle format to target prevention and effective maintenance of symptoms of Type 2 diabetes among American Indians adults on two rural Northern Plains reservations. Seven essential themes emerged from the phenomenological study data. This report describes one theme: expression of the emotional aspect of diabetes and three sub-themes that depict American Indian culture: connectedness, collective living, and transformation. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that affects the emotional status of American Indians in rural communities. The notion of racial consciousness is discussed as a potential context from which Talking Circle facilitators can operate and Talking Circle participants respond. This viewpoint may be a useful cultural approach for lay personnel with an (emic) inside perspective like Talking Circle facilitators when working in areas like rural American Indian reservations.

  16. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  17. Building a novel inpatient diabetes management mentor program: a blueprint for success.

    PubMed

    Modic, Mary Beth; Sauvey, Rebecca; Canfield, Christina; Kukla, Aniko; Kaser, Nancy; Modic, Joselyn; Yager, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this project was to create a formalized educational program for bedside nurses responsible for inpatient diabetes management. Bedside nurses are recruited to serve as diabetes management mentors. The mentors receive advanced education concerning teaching and learning principles, the AADE7™ Self-Care Behaviors, and diabetes management strategies. They teach their peers, advocate for patients, and facilitate referrals for outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) programs. The focus of these ongoing educational activities is to foster the development of diabetes management mentors and to create teaching tools that mentors can use with peers to address practice gaps or skill deficiencies. The diabetes management mentor is integral in enhancing the care of patients with diabetes in the hospital. The empowerment of bedside nurses as mentors for their peers and their patients is an invaluable asset that helps nurses take ownership of their practice. This role could be applied to other complex disease entities, helping nurses to develop specific management skills to improve patient outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction.

  18. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  19. Extending Self-Management Strategies: The Use of a Classwide Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Kathryn E.; Ervin, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Notwithstanding the wealth of research that documents the effectiveness of self-management programs in the classroom, few investigations have explored classwide use of self-management procedures as a universal intervention. To extend existing research in this area, we examined the effectiveness of a classwide self-management intervention for…

  20. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  1. Middleware Architecture Evaluation for Dependable Self-managing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Babar, Muhammad A.; Gorton, Ian

    2008-10-10

    Middleware provides infrastructure support for creating dependable software systems. A specific middleware implementation plays a critical role in determining the quality attributes that satisfy a system’s dependability requirements. Evaluating a middleware architecture at an early development stage can help to pinpoint critical architectural challenges and optimize design decisions. In this paper, we present a method and its application to evaluate middleware architectures, driven by emerging architecture patterns for developing self-managing systems. Our approach focuses on two key attributes of dependability, reliability and maintainability by means of fault tolerance and fault prevention. We identify the architectural design patterns necessary to build an adaptive self-managing architecture that is capable of preventing or recovering from failures. These architectural patterns and their impacts on quality attributes create the context for middleware evaluation. Our approach is demonstrated by an example application -- failover control of a financial application on an enterprise service bus.

  2. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Diabetic Patients in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Fatma; El-Sadig, Mohamed; Al-Kaabi, Juma M.; Afandi, Bachar; Nagelkerke, Nicolas; Yeatts, Karin B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes self-management education is a cornerstone of diabetes care. However, many diabetics in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) lack sufficient knowledge about their disease due to illiteracy. Thus, before considering any possible intervention it was imperative to assess present knowledge, attitudes, and practices of patients towards the management of diabetes. Methods A random sample of 575 DM patients was selected from diabetes outpatient's clinics of Tawam and Al-Ain hospitals in Al-Ain city (UAE) during 2006–2007, and their knowledge attitude and practice assessed using a questionnaire modified from the Michigan Diabetes Research Training Center instrument. Results Thirty-one percent of patients had poor knowledge of diabetes. Seventy-two had negative attitudes towards having the disease and 57% had HbA1c levels reflecting poor glycemic control. Only seventeen percent reported having adequate blood sugar control, while 10% admitted non-compliance with their medications. Knowledge, practice and attitude scores were all statistically significantly positively, but rather weakly, associated, but none of these scores was significantly correlated with HbA1c. Conclusions The study showed low levels of diabetes awareness but positive attitudes towards the importance of DM care and satisfactory diabetes practices in the UAE. Programs to increase patients' awareness about DM are essential for all diabetics in the UAE in order to improve their understanding, compliance and management and, thereby, their ability to cope with the disease. PMID:23341913

  3. [Self-Management in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chou-Ping; Lu, Yung-Chuan; Hung, Shih-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients typically self-manage their disease-care program. Self-management requires the investment of considerable time and energy in health management and in following the multifaceted CKD treatment regimen. CKD, a progressive disease, is classified into five stages that correspond to the five stages of decline in kidney function, as measured using the glomerular filtration rate (GRF). Each of these stages requires that a patient modify his / her lifestyle and shoulder the responsibility for day-to-day health management tasks. Key to promoting self-management is the partnership and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients. Tasks in this partnership include patient assessment and communication, regimen adherence, emotional management, negotiation of care plans, and the enhancement of self-efficacy, with the aims of creating positive changes in behavior, promoting correct symptoms interpretation and reporting, and promoting the appropriate use of resources. Nurses may help patients maneuver this initially frightening and sometimes difficult terrain with strategies that are tailored to each CKD stage.

  4. [Is self-management practical in bronchial asthma?].

    PubMed

    Gonon, M; Solèr, M; Langewitz, W; Perruchoud, A P

    1999-04-03

    The threat and uncertainty involved in an asthma attack reduce the quality of life for the patient. Life quality can be improved if the patient learns self-management principles. This is easy to learn and involves a simple procedure requiring the patient to refer to written instructions in the event of an asthma exacerbation. As a basis for treatment the patient needs to measure maximum peak flow, which can be done with an easy-to-use peak flow meter. A value above 80% of the personal best indicates that the treatment has been successful. By means of printed instructions in credit card format, the appropriate treatment for particular peak flow values and/or symptoms can be looked up and administered. So far there have been no self-management studies providing a definite answer on what interventions are effective and cost-effective. One clear result is that inhaled steroid therapy must be initiated early. Learning self-management patently leads to improvement in the patient's life quality and safety. In the long run this concept appears to be cost-saving with regard to days lost through sickness and hospitalization.

  5. Product self-management: evolution in recycling and reuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Valerie M

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the potential to make product recycling and reuse easier by shifting responsibility for product management toward the product itself. Examples range from barcode-enabled Internet sales of used products to RFID-enabled garbage trucks that identify recyclable items and provide rebates. Initial steps toward product self-management have made opportunistic use of product bar codes and Internet markets. In the United States, Internet markets are driving increased reuse of products. In the European Union, recycling and waste management policy is driving the use of radio electronics in waste management. Prospects for product self-management are assessed from both a technological and an economic perspective. The technological analysis indicates that radio-frequency tags offer some advantages over bar codes, but their application to product self-management requires considerable investment in the waste management infrastructure. This suggests that early applications of advanced product tags are most suitable for Germany and other countries where the waste management industry has already integrated information technology into its operations. The economic analysis indicates that increased reuse of products can reduce consumption of new products and materials, although on a less than one-to-one basis, simultaneously reducing costs for consumers and deriving more value from existing products.

  6. Educational video game for juvenile diabetes: results of a controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, S J; Lieberman, D A; Germeny, B A; Fan, Y C; Wilson, D M; Pasta, D J

    1997-01-01

    Packy & Marlon, an interactive video game designed to improve self-care among children and adolescents with diabetes, was evaluated in a six-month randomized controlled trial. In the game, players take the role of animated characters who manage their diabetes by monitoring blood glucose, taking insulin injections, and choosing foods, while setting out to save a diabetes summer camp from marauding rats and mice who have stolen the diabetes supplies. Study participants were patients aged 8 to 16 from two separate diabetes clinics. Each participant received a Super Nintendo video game system at an initial clinic visit and was randomly assigned to receive either Packy & Marlon (treatment group, N = 31) or an entertainment video game containing no diabetes-related content (control group, N = 28). Participants were interviewed and a parent filled out a questionnaire at baseline, three months, and six months. The findings in this study indicate that well-designed, educational video games can be effective interventions. There was improvement in the treatment group relative to the control group in terms of diabetes-related self-efficacy (p = 0.07), communication with parents about diabetes (p = 0.025), and self-care behaviours (p = 0.003), and a decrease in unscheduled urgent doctor visits (p = 0.08). There were no significant differences between the groups in knowledge about diabetes or in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. Since participants in the study were in general well-controlled patients who were receiving excellent medical care, future research is contemplated involving youngsters who are not under good glycaemic control.

  7. Effective Nutrition Education for Aboriginal Australians: Lessons from a Diabetes Cooking Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Penelope A.; Davison, Joyce E.; Moore, Louise F.; Rubinstein, Raechelle

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the experiences of Aboriginal Australians with or at risk of diabetes who attended urban community cooking courses in 2002-2007; and to develop recommendations for increasing the uptake and effectiveness of nutrition education in Aboriginal communities. Methods: Descriptive qualitative approach using semistructured…

  8. Outcomes of a type 2 diabetes education program adapted to the cultural contexts of Saudi women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bannay, Hana R.; Jongbloed, Lyn E.; Jarus, Tal; Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Dean, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the outcomes of a pilot intervention of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) education program, based on international standards, and adapted to the cultural and religious contexts of Saudi women. Methods: This study is an experiment of a pilot intervention carried out between August 2011 and January 2012 at the primary health clinics in Dammam. Women at risk of or diagnosed with T2D (N=35 including dropouts) were assigned to one of 2 groups; an intervention group participated in a pilot intervention of T2D education program, based on international standards and tailored to their cultural and religious contexts; and a usual care group received the usual care for diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Outcomes included blood glucose, body composition, 6-minute walk distance, life satisfaction, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge. The intervention group participated in a focus group of their program experience. Data analysis was based on mixed methods. Results: Based on 95% confidence interval comparisons, improvements were noted in blood sugar, 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge in participants of the intervention group. They also reported improvements in lifestyle-related health behaviors after the education program. Conclusion: Saudi women may benefit from a T2D education program based on international standards and adapted to their cultural and religious contexts. PMID:26108595

  9. Psychological, Behavioral, and Educational Considerations for Children with Classified Disabilities and Diabetes within the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyckoff, Leah; Hanchon, Timothy; Gregg, S. Renee

    2015-01-01

    School nurses are answering a call to action to provide day-to-day care for an increasing number of students diagnosed with chronic illnesses. Diabetes mellitus is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions identified among school-age children and presents a host of complex challenges for the school nurse, educators, and other support…

  10. The Impacts of Type 1 Diabetes on the K-12 Educational Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKerns-O'Donnell, Monica A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to uncover the impacts that type 1 diabetes have on a child's or adolescent's school educational experience. The study used a phenomenological approach based upon the work of Moustakas (1994). Purposeful sampling was used to identify participants. The participant group was comprised of 10…

  11. Lay and health care professional understandings of self-management: A systematic review and narrative synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Charles DA; McKevitt, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Self-management is widely promoted but evidence of effectiveness is limited. Policy encourages health care professionals to support people with long-term conditions to learn self-management skills, yet little is known about the extent to which both parties share a common understanding of self-management. Thus, we compared health care professional and lay understandings of self-management of long-term conditions. Methods: Systematic review and narrative synthesis of qualitative studies identified from relevant electronic databases, hand-searching of references lists, citation tracking and recommendations by experts. Results: In total, 55 studies were included and quality was assessed using a brief quality assessment tool. Three conceptual themes, each with two subthemes were generated: traditional and shifting models of the professional–patient relationship (self-management as a tool to promote compliance; different expectations of responsibility); quality of relationship between health care professional and lay person (self-management as a collaborative partnership; self-management as tailored support) and putting self-management into everyday practice (the lived experience of self-management; self-management as a social practice). Conclusion: Self-management was conceptualised by health care professionals as incorporating both a biomedical model of compliance and individual responsibility. Lay people understood self-management in wider terms, reflecting biomedical, psychological and social domains and different expectations of responsibility. In different ways, both deviated from the dominant model of self-management underpinned by the concept of self-efficacy. Different understandings help to explain how self-management is practised and may help to account for limited evidence of effectiveness of self-management interventions. PMID:26770733

  12. Diabetes in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Hennis, Anselm; Fraser, Henry S

    2004-02-01

    Rates of diabetes mellitus in the English-speaking Caribbean have been rising in recent years, and they are projected to continue climbing in the new millennium. Prevalence rates across countries of the African diaspora mirror levels of Western acculturation, and available data emphasize the importance of obesity as a modifiable risk factor. The population-based Barbados Eye Studies have provided new information about the burden of ocular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and lens opacities. Diabetes was shown to increase the risk of lens opacities, and 14% of prevalent cataract was attributed to diabetes. Persons with type 1 diabetes were particularly at increased risk of retinopathy, as a result of longer durations of illness and poor glycemic control. Other Caribbean studies have suggested that glycemic control in patients evaluated in various clinical settings is suboptimal, which raises important concerns about quality of care. Diabetics are at increased risk of mortality compared with nondiabetics, and that mortality risk increases with higher baseline levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, even among nondiabetics. These data highlight the need for urgent attention to public health and clinical strategies to prevent diabetes in unaffected persons as well as to prevent or reduce the burden of complications among those who are affected. Among the measures that should be adopted to stem the flood of diabetes in the Caribbean region are lifestyle interventions to promote better nutrition and to increase exercise; patient education, particularly about the central role of diabetes self-management; and the multidisciplinary team approach in the provision of care.

  13. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes Management: The Moderating Role of Coping Styles

    PubMed Central

    Shayeghian, Zeinab; Hassanabadi, Hamidreza; Aguilar-Vafaie, Maria E.; Amiri, Parisa; Besharat, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Evidence of the efficacy of existing psychological interventions for self-management in diabetes is limited. The current study aimed at assessing the effects of group-based ACT on self-management of patients with T2DM, considering the moderating role of coping styles. Methods One hundred and six patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned either to the education alone (n = 53) or to a combination of education and group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (n = 53) over a period of 10 sessions. In each group, 50 participants completed a 3 month follow-up assessment. Results After 3 months, compared to patients who received education alone, those in the group-based acceptance and commitment therapy condition were more likely to use effective coping strategies, reported better diabetes self-care, and optimum glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels in the target range. Conclusions Consideration of the role of coping style for a more accurate evaluation of the effects of acceptance and commitment therapy may be a useful addition to services provided for patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:27907074