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Sample records for diabetic neurogenic bladder

  1. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  2. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause skin to break down and lead to pressure sores Kidney damage if the bladder becomes too full, ... dysfunction; NBSD Patient Instructions Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Images Voiding cystourethrogram References Chapple CR, Osman NI. ...

  3. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  4. [Disorders of bladder compliance and neurogenic bladder].

    PubMed

    Chartier-Kastler, E; Comperat, E; Ruffion, A

    2007-05-01

    Bladder compliance is defined as the relationship between change in bladder volume and change in detrusor pressure (DV/DP). The pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance is still poorly understood. Experimental reduction of blood flow in the bladder wall, bilateral hypogastric nerve section in rats, the study of spinalized rat bladders, and reduction of oestrogen impregnation show that these conditions induce loss of the viscoelastic properties of the bladder. With the arrival of new treatments active on afferent and/or efferent pathways or on the central nervous system, it is very important to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance. The reversibility of these disorders constitutes a major therapeutic challenge and their functional consequences constitute a crucial prognostic element of neurogenic bladder. Disorders of bladder compliance can be assessed clinically from two points of view: 1) The natural history of onset of these disorders in neurogenic bladder. Clinical experience demonstrates certain risk factors for the development of these disorders, such as the voiding mode (intermittent self-catheterization or by a carer versus indwelling catheter), the level of the spinal cord lesion (suprasacral versus sacral, incomplete versus complete, and cauda equina lesions), and the presence of myelomeningocele. 2) Data derived from conservative management of these disorders in patients with neurogenic bladder: urethral dilatation, various types of sphincterotomy, vesical denervation, alpha-blockers, sympatholytics, vanilloids (resiniferatoxin and capsaicin), intra-detrusor botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen have been shown to improve disorders of compliance of neurogenic bladder.

  5. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  6. Bulbocavernosus Reflex Test for Diagnosis of Pudendal Nerve Injury in Female Patients with Diabetic Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoting; Wang, Xun; Huang, Huanjie; Ni, Peiqi; Lin, Yuanshao; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the clinical application and significance of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) test for diagnosing diabetic neurogenic bladder (DNB) in female subjects. In this study, 68 female patients with DNB and 40 female normal controls were subjected to a nerve conduction study (NCS) of all four limbs and the BCR test. The data were analyzed and compared, and the corresponding diagnostic sensitivities were discussed. Mean BCR latency for female DNB patients was significantly prolonged, compared to that of the control group, suggesting pudendal nerve injuries in female DNB patients. Moreover, DNB patients were categorized according to the diabetes course. Compared to that of Group A (diabetes course < 5 y), the mean BCR latency was significantly prolonged in Group B (diabetes course between 5 and 10 y) and then further prolonged in Group C (diabetes course > 10 y), which were all longer than the control group. Furthermore, compared with that of the controls, the mean BCR latency was prolonged in DNB patients with or without NCS abnormalities in limbs. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in BCR latency between DNB patients with and without NCS abnormalities. Significantly increasing trends were also observed in the NCS and BCR abnormality rates along with increased diabetes course. Most importantly, compared with the NCS of limbs, the BCR test was more sensitive in diagnosing DNB in the female subjects. Overall, our findings suggest that the BCR test would help to assess the pudendal nerve injury in female DNB patients, which might be a potential diagnostic tool in the clinic. PMID:28053822

  7. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  8. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin.

  9. Patient reported outcome measures in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Roderick

    2016-01-01

    Many interventions for neurogenic bladder patients are directed towards improving quality of life (QOL). Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are the primary method of evaluating QOL, and they provide an important quantification of symptoms which can’t be measured objectively. Our goal was to review general measurement principles, and identify and discuss PROMs relevant to neurogenic bladder patients. We identify two recent reviews of the state of the literature and updated the results with an additional Medline search up to September 1, 2015. Using the previous identified reviews, and our updated literature review, we identified 16 PROMs which are used for the assessment of QOL and symptoms in neurogenic bladder patients. Several are specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients, such as the Qualiveen (for neurogenic bladder related QOL), and the Neurogenic Bladder Symptom Score (NBSS) (for neurogenic bladder symptoms). We also highlight general QOL measures for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury (SCI) which include questions about bladder symptoms, and incontinence PROMs which are commonly used, but not specifically designed for neurogenic bladder patients. It is essential for clinicians and researchers with an interest in neurogenic bladder to be aware of the current PROMs, and to have a basic understanding of the principals of measurement in order to select the most appropriate one for their purpose. PMID:26904409

  10. The neurogenic bladder: medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Buyse, Gunnar M.

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder sphincter dysfunction (NBSD) can cause severe and irreversible renal damage and bladder-wall destruction years before incontinence becomes an issue. Therefore, the first step in adequate management is to recognize early the bladder at risk for upper- and lower-tract deterioration and to start adequate medical treatment proactively. Clean intermittent catheterization combined with anticholinergics (oral or intravesical) is the standard therapy for NBSD. Early institution of such treatment can prevent both renal damage and secondary bladder-wall changes, thereby potentially improving long-term outcomes. In children with severe side effects or with insufficient suppression of detrusor overactivity despite maximal dosage of oral oxybutynin, intravesical instillation is an effective alternative. Intravesical instillation eliminates systemic side effects by reducing the first-pass metabolism and, compared with oral oxybutynin, intravesical oxybutynin is a more potent and long-acting detrusor suppressor. There is growing evidence that with early adequate treatment, kidneys are saved and normal bladder growth can be achieved in children so they will no longer need surgical bladder augmentation to achieve safe urinary continence in adolescence and adulthood. PMID:18095004

  11. Neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2001-11-01

    Children with a neurological defect have a clear cause for their bladder dysfunction; however, in neurologically normal children the cause of their incontinence is usually unclear. When no anatomical abnormalities seem to be present a functional problem is generally the cause. This type of incontinence is referred to as 'functional incontinence'. The different forms of bladder and sphincter dysfunction will be discussed and treatment modalities described. As the treatment modalities in children with neuropathic bladders focus on medical and especially surgical options, special attention is paid to new developments in surgical treatment. For those with functional incontinence treatment options are more variable and the new developments are described.

  12. Multiple sclerosis and the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Rashid, T M; Hollander, J B

    1998-08-01

    Most patients with progressive MS will develop voiding dysfunction. In order to properly manage these patients, it is imperative to have a basic understanding of normal and abnormal bladder function. Based on history, physical examination, urinalysis, and renal function, diagnostic evaluation can be tailored to the individual. Empiric therapy without urologic consultation may be appropriate in some patients. In others, referral for full urodynamic evaluation will be necessary to best manage neurogenic voiding dysfunctions. Although there are many treatment options for patients with neurogenic bladders, it is imperative that therapy remain conservative and initially reversible because symptoms from MS tend to wax and wane over time. Long-term follow-up for patients with MS and neurogenic bladders is required to preserve renal function and avoid infections. A urologic program should be designed to promote continent, low-pressure bladder storage and controlled emptying while minimizing symptoms in a manner that promotes improved quality of life and self-esteem.

  13. Retrograde pyelonephritis and lumbar spondylitis as a result of Salmonella typhi in a type 2 diabetes patient with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuya; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Nishitani, Rie; Murakami, Masanori; Takeuchi, Takato; Akihisa, Momoko; Fujita, Masamichi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old diabetic woman with acute pyelonephritis and spondylitis caused by Salmonella typhi. She was admitted to Tokyo Medical Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, because of unconsciousness and was diagnosed with sepsis by retrograde pyelonephritis as a result of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotics treatment was immediately started; however, she subsequently developed lumbar spondylitis, and long-term conservative treatment with antibiotics and a fixing device were required. This is the first report of a diabetic patient who developed retrograde urinary tract infection with Salmonella typhi, followed by sepsis and spondylitis. The infection could be a result of diabetic neuropathy, presenting neurogenic bladder and hydronephrosis. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics and became asymptomatic with normal inflammatory marker levels, and no clinical sign of recurrence was observed in the kidney and spine at 4 months.

  14. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  15. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Neurogenic bladder: pathophysiology of the disorder of compliance].

    PubMed

    Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Ayoub, Nadim; Even-Schneider, Alexia; Richard, François; Soler, Jean-Marc; Denys, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    Bladder compliance is defined by the ratio of the increase of intravesical pressures to the increase of volume (_V/_P). The pathophysiology of disorders of compliance in neurogenic bladder is still poorly elucidated. It can be evaluated in terms of three elements: 1) The natural history of the appearance of these disorders in neurogenic bladders. Clinical experience shows the existence of prognostic factors that determine the development of these disorders, such as the voiding mode adopted (self-catheterization/hetero-catheterization versus indwelling catheter), the level of the spinal cord lesion (suprasacral versus sacral, incomplete versus complete, and cauda equina lesions), and the presence of meningomyelocele. 2). Data derived from conservative management of these disorders in neurogenic bladders: urethral dilatation, various sphincterotomies, bladder disafferentation, alpha-blockers, vanilloids (resiniferatoxin and capsaicin), intra-detrusor botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen, have demonstrated a marked improvement of disorders of compliance associated with neurogenic bladder 3). Data derived from experimentations. Morphometric studies on animal or human bladder strips have demonstrated an increased expression of proteolytic enzymes and endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (MMP-1) and type III collagen mRNA in hypocompliant neurogenic bladders. Reduction of bladder wall blood flow, bilateral section of hypogastric nerves in rats, study of the bladders of spinalized rats, and reduction of oestrogenic hormone impregnation, show that these conditions induce loss of the viscoelastic properties of the bladder With the arrival of new treatments, active on afferent and/or efferent pathways or even on the central nervous system, it is very important to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders of compliance in neurogenic bladders. Reversibility of these disorders constitutes a major therapeutic challenge and its functional

  17. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  18. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  19. Efficacy and Tolerability of Propiverine Hydrochloride in Patients With Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-09

    Neurogenic Urinary Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic; Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Urinary Bladder Disorder, Neurogenic; Neurogenic Bladder Disorder; Urinary Bladder Neurogenic Dysfunction; Urologic Diseases; Overactive Detrusor Function; Urinary Incontinence

  20. Effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on the bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li-Ping; Fan, Fan; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a common complication of spinal cord injury and results in urinary bladder dysfunction through lost control of micturition, or urination. Although several treatment options exist, the efficacies of many of these treatments are unknown. In particular, electroacupuncture and bladder training have had some success as individual treatments. The aim of this study was to explore effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury (SCI) above the sacral segment. Forty-two patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI were evenly divided into two groups (n=21) and given only bladder function training (control group) or electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training (treatment group). Urodynamic changes, IPSS score, and therapeutic efficacy were compared between groups pre- and post-treatment. After either treatment, patients had higher bladder volume and bladder compliance, but lower residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure, compared to pre-treatment (P<0.05). Compared to controls, treatment group patients had significantly increased bladder volume and bladder compliance, but significantly decreased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure (P<0.05). Treatment group patients had lower IPSS scores post-treatment (P<0.05) and better therapeutic efficacy (P<0.05) than control group patients. Altogether, our results suggest that electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training can clinically improve bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI above the sacral segment. PMID:24995093

  1. Not all neurogenic bladders are the same: a proposal for a new neurogenic bladder classification system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NGB) has long been defined as a clinical entity that describes a heterogeneous collection of syndromes. The common theme is a bladder disorder concomitant with a neurologic disorder. This definition does not give the clinician much information about the bladder disorder, nor how to treat it, or even what the natural history of the disorder is likely to be. It may be time for a new classification scheme to better define the bladder defect and prognosis, as well as inform treatment. We propose a classification system based on seven categories, each having a neurologic defect in a distinct anatomic location. This is termed SALE (Stratify by Anatomic Location and Etiology). In addition, the presence or absence of bowel dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia will be reported. In the future, as more definite prognostic information can be gleaned from biomarkers, we anticipate adding urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to the definition. We expect the SALE system to efficiently describe a patient suffering from NGB and simultaneously inform the most appropriate treatment, follow-up regimen, and long-term prognosis. PMID:26904408

  2. Investigation into neurogenic bladder in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Arantes de Araújo, Liubiana; Ferraz de Arruda Musegante, André; de Oliveira Damasceno, Edjane; Barroso, Ubirajara; Badaro, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    During the follow-up of children who had been diagnosed with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), it was noted that some were experiencing dysfunctional voiding. Further investigation into these cases led to a diagnosis of neurogenic bladder. Few studies have investigated the relationship between AMC and neurogenic bladder, this being the first to describe the clinical characteristics of neurogenic bladder among these patients. A series of 26 cases were obtained from the electronic medical records of patients with AMC who were admitted to Hospital Sarah in Salvador between 1994 and 2007. The patients had all been diagnosed with neurogenic bladder through clinical symptoms, lower urinary tract exams, and urodynamic findings. There was urinary incontinence in 21 patients (81%), and 50% had a history of urinary tract infections. Renal function was altered in 4 patients (15%) and normal in 22 (85%). In the urodynamic study, 14 patients (64%) had detrusor overactivity and 6 (27%) had underactivity. Patients with AMC may show changes in the urinary tract, including neurogenic bladder. It is mandatory to study these symptomatic children with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Total agenesis of the sacrum and neurogenic bladder dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Capitanucci, M L; Silveri, M; Nappo, S; Mosiello, G; Capozza, N; De Gennaro, M

    1997-01-01

    Total Sacral Agenesis (TSA) is a rare congenital anomaly of the lower vertebral column, frequently associated with bladder dysfunction. The diagnosis is often delayed until the evidence of neurological disorders addresses at neuro-radiological examination. In the last 9 years we observed 7 children, 3 males and 4 females, with TSA. The average age at diagnosis was 8 years (range: 1-15 years). Maternal diabetes was present only in one case. In 5 patients, urological ones have been the symptoms of presentation. In one case, TSA has been discovered because of the presence of a sacral mass (lipoma) and the subsequent development of club-foot. The neurological screening, performed in all patients with anorectal anomalies, led to the diagnosis of total sacral agenesis in a child with anteriorized anus. All patients have been evaluated by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, renal ultrasound, voiding cystography, renal nuclear scan and urodynamics. The functional evaluation of the lower urinary tract has shown a pattern of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in all children, while bilateral vesico-ureteral reflux has been detected in 2 cases. Intermittent clean catheterization (ICC) has been instituted at the diagnosis in all children. Surgery for continence and protection of upper urinary tract (bladder augmentation and bilateral ureteral reimplantation) has been performed in one patient. At a medium follow-up of 3 years (range: 1-5 years) 2 patients have been lost, normal renal function and urinary continence have been achieved in 4 and one child is continent but has renal failure. An early diagnosis and a correct neuro-urological evaluation and treatment are necessary to prevent urinary tract damage and achieve urinary continence in these patients. Symptoms, clinical findings and relationship with maternal diabetes are discussed. The diagnosis can be enough early if physicians pay attention to maternal diabetes, subtle neurological symptoms (voiding disturbance

  4. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  5. Treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie

    2011-12-01

    Central or neurogenic diabetes insipidus results from a deficiency in antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or arginine-vasopressin (AVP). Treatment is based on replacement therapy with the hormone analog desmopressin (d-DAVP). d-DAVP can be administered subcutaneously to infants or patients with postoperative or posttraumatic brain injury being monitored for transient diabetes insipidus. Intranasal and oral forms are also available. The recently introduced lyophilisate, which melts under the tongue, has replaced the tablet form (recently withdrawn from the market in France) and provides better bioavailability. Irrespective of the mode of administration, it is usually the patient who finds the effective minimal dose necessary for a normal life, i.e. without excessive polyuria, particularly at night. Patient education is necessary to avoid the risk of water intoxication and hyponatremia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  7. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  8. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

    PubMed

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  9. A case of idiopathic diabetes insipidus presented with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and neurogenic bladder: A pediatric case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Kivrak, Mithat; Sahin, Aytac; Akan, Serkan; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition with heterogeneous clinical symptoms characterized by polyuria (urine output >4 mL/kg/hr) and polydipsia (water intake >2 L/m (2)/d). In children, acquired nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than central DI (CDI). Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. A water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI from CDI and diagnose their incomplete forms. Neonates and young infants are better managed with hydration therapy alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, dDAVP). Its oral form is safe, highly effective and has dosing flexibility. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with CDI with severe bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis and megaureter. Dramatic clinical and radiological responses to dDAVP treatment were achieved and therapy reduced urine volume and led to marked radiological improvement in hydronephrosis.

  10. A case of idiopathic diabetes insipidus presented with bilateral hydroureteronephrosis and neurogenic bladder: A pediatric case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Ozgur Haki; Kivrak, Mithat; Sahin, Aytac; Akan, Serkan; Urkmez, Ahmet; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition with heterogeneous clinical symptoms characterized by polyuria (urine output >4 mL/kg/hr) and polydipsia (water intake >2 L/m 2/d). In children, acquired nephrogenic DI (NDI) is more common than central DI (CDI). Diagnosis is based on the presence of high plasma osmolality and low urinary osmolality with significant water diuresis. A water deprivation test with vasopressin challenge, though has limitations, is done to differentiate NDI from CDI and diagnose their incomplete forms. Neonates and young infants are better managed with hydration therapy alone. Older children with CDI are treated with desmopressin (1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin, dDAVP). Its oral form is safe, highly effective and has dosing flexibility. We report a case of an 8-year-old male patient with CDI with severe bilateral non-obstructive hydronephrosis and megaureter. Dramatic clinical and radiological responses to dDAVP treatment were achieved and therapy reduced urine volume and led to marked radiological improvement in hydronephrosis. PMID:26600892

  11. Urofacial syndrome: a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Tyritzis, S; Karakos, C; Skolarikos, A

    2011-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome (Ochoa syndrome) is considered to represent a subgroup of the non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction, characterized by non-neuropathic bladder-sphincter dysfunction, along with a characteristic inversion of the facial expression with laughing. Recent research suggests that it is probably a genetic inherited disease transmitted in an autosomal recessive fashion and might represent a distinct entity. We report a case of this syndrome in a 14-year-old boy who presented with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis, and bladder dilation.

  12. Pharmacotherapy in Pediatric Neurogenic Bladder Intravesical Botulinum Toxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Cristian; Burek, Carol; Durán, Victor; Corbetta, Juan Pablo; Weller, Santiago; Juan, Bortagaray; López, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    When the neurogenic bladder is refractory to anticholinergics, botulinum toxin type A is used as an alternative. The neurotoxin type A reduces bladder pressure and increases its capacity and wall compliance. Additionally, it contributes to improving urinary continence and quality of life. This novel therapy is ambulatory with a low incidence of adverse effects. Due to its transitory effect, it is necessary to repeat the injections in order to sustain its therapeutic effect. In these review article we talk about Mechanism of Action, Indications, effects, administration and presentations of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in pediatric patients. Also, we make references to controversial issues surrounding its use. A bibliographic search was done selecting articles and revisions from Pubmed. The key words used were botulinum toxin A, neurogenic bladder, and children. The search was limited to patients younger than 18 years of age and reports written in English in the past ten years. PMID:22720170

  13. [Electrostimulation of nerve roots in neurogenic bladder].

    PubMed

    Colombel, P; Egon, G; Isambert, J L; Ritz, M

    1994-05-15

    Thirty per cent of the patients with spinal injuries present chronical urinary problems. For these, G.S. Brindley's technique represents an important progress. It includes a section of posterior roots to control detrusor hyperexcitability and a stimulation of anterior roots to empty the bladder. The equipment is now perfectly reliable and the technique has been defined. Indications are essentially unstable bladders with incontinence and certain hypoactive bladders. The following results were obtained: continence is obtained in 90% of patients; complete bladder emptying in the majority of cases with very marked reduction of urinary infections; improvement of erection and regularization of intestinal transit. The complications of the surgery are uncommon but serious (CSF leaks, postoperative denervations, sepsis and material failure).

  14. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  15. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K N; Karakos, C D

    2010-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  16. Bladder augmentation and urinary diversion for neurogenic LUTS: current indications.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Goldman, Howard B

    2012-10-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty and urinary diversion are no longer commonplace in the management of patients with neurogenic bladder, but remain an important surgical treatment for those with refractory LUTS who have failed neuromodulation and onabotulinum toxin treatment or who are not candidates for those treatments. Augmentation is an option in patients who can perform intermittent catheterization and is usually performed with ileum or large intestine. Some patients benefit from continent cutaneous catherizable channels. Supravesical urinary diversion may be necessary in more severe cases. Ileovesicostomies are being supplanted by indwelling suprapubic catheters, and when catheters fail conduits may be a better option. When feasible, the diverted bladder should be excised to avoid pyocystis.

  17. Evaluation of 3 Methods of Bladder Irrigation to Treat Bacteriuria in Persons With Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Waites, Ken B; Canupp, Kay C; Roper, James F; Camp, Susan M; Chen, Yuying

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: We conducted a randomized, double-blind comparison of twice daily bladder irrigation using 1 of 3 different solutions in community-residing persons with neurogenic bladder who used indwelling catheters to evaluate efficacy in treatment of bacteriuria. Methods: Eighty-nine persons with bacteriuria were randomized to irrigate their bladders twice daily for 8 weeks with 30 mL of (a) sterile saline, (b) acetic acid, or (c) neomycin-polymyxin solution. Urinalysis, cultures, and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed at baseline and weeks 2, 4, and 8 to determine the extent to which each of the solutions affected numbers and types of bacteria, urinary pH, urinary leukocytes, and generation of antimicrobial-resistant organisms. Results: Bladder irrigation was well tolerated with the exception of 3 participants who had bladder spasms. None of the 3 irrigants had a detectable effect on the degree of bacteriuria or pyuria in 52 persons who completed the study protocol. A significant increase in urinary pH occurred in all 3 groups. No significant development of resistance to oral antimicrobials beyond what was observed at baseline was detected. Conclusions: Bladder irrigation was generally well tolerated for 8 weeks. No advantages were detected for neomycin-polymyxin or acetic acid over saline in terms of reducing the urinary bacterial load and inflammation. We cannot recommend bladder irrigation as a means of treatment for bacteriuria in persons with neurogenic bladder. PMID:16859225

  18. [PROSPECTS FOR THE TREATMENT OF IDIOPATHIC AND NEUROGENIC OVERACTIVE BLADDER].

    PubMed

    Kamalov, A A; Korshunova, E S; Popov, G R; Khodyreva, L A; Dudareva, A A; Nizov, A N

    2015-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common problem in modern population. The main line of medical treatment of this condition is the use of M-cholinoblockers. Solifenacin has shown high selectivity for the bladder in preclinical studies. Data on the efficacy and safety of high-dose (10 mg/day) of solifenacin are insufficient. The study was aimed to the comparative evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of solifenacin at a dose of 5 and 10 mg/day. The study included 28 patients (17 women and 11 men), mean age was 41.3±6.7 years. All patients were divided into two groups. In Group 1 included 12 patients with idiopathic overactive bladder, the Group 2 (n=16) - with neurogenic overactive bladder. Depending on the effect obtained, in some patients the dose was increased to 10 mg/day 1 month after starting treatment. The duration of treatment was 12 weeks. Application of solifenacin at a dose of 5 mg in patients with overactive bladder significantly reduces the severity of symptoms. Increasing the dose was required in 3 (25%) patients with idiopathic OAB and in 10 (62.5%) - with neurogenic OAB. Patients unsatisfied by therapy with solifenacin 5 mg/ day initially had more severe symptoms of the disease - significantly more urgency frequency, incontinence episodes, and nocturia. The use of high doses of solifenacin increased the effectiveness of treatment. Statistical significance was achieved for all parameters evaluated. Against the background of increasing doses, the number ofadverse effects may increase, but within a month of therapy in most cases they are reduced.

  19. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Olandoski, Karen Previdi; Koch, Vera; Trigo‐Rocha, Flavio Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA scintigraphy, weight, height, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis. Statistical analysis was performed, adopting the 5% significance level. RESULTS: The mean age at presentation was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Myelomeningocele was the most frequent etiology (71.4%). Recurrent urinary tract infection was the reason for referral in 82.8% of the patients. Recurrent urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 84.5% of the patients initially; 83.7% of those patients experienced improvement during follow‐up. The initial mean glomerular filtration rate was 146.7 ± 70.1 mL/1.73 m2/min, and the final mean was 193.6 ± 93.6 mL/1.73 m2/min, p  =  0.0004. Microalbuminuria was diagnosed in 54.1% of the patients initially and in 69% in the final evaluation. Metabolic acidosis was present in 19% of the patients initially and in 32.8% in the final assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Patient referral to a pediatric nephrologist was late. A reduction in the number of urinary tract infections was observed with adequate treatment, but microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis occurred frequently despite adequate management. PMID:21484032

  20. Survey of spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies using the Web of Science.

    PubMed

    Zou, Benjing; Zhang, Yongli; Li, Yucheng; Wang, Zantao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiyin; Wang, Bingdong; Long, Zhixin; Wang, Feng; Song, Guo; Wang, Yan

    2012-08-15

    To identify global trends in research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder, through a bibliometric analysis using the Web of Science. We performed a bibliometric analysis of studies on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder using the Web of Science. Data retrieval was performed using key words "spinal cord injury", "spinal injury", "neurogenic bladder", "neuropathic bladder", "neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction", "neurogenic voiding dysfunction", "neurogenic urination disorder" and "neurogenic vesicourethral dysfunction". (a) published peer-reviewed articles on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: no limitation. (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers and book chapters. (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to journals; (3) distribution according to subject areas; (4) distribution according to country; (5) distribution according to institution; and (6) top cited publications. There were 646 research articles addressing spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the Web of Science. Research on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder was found in the Science Citation Index-Expanded as of 1946. The United States, Ireland and Switzerland were the three major countries contributing to studies in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder in the 1970s. However, in the 1990s, the United States, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany and Japan published more papers on spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder than Switzerland, and Ireland fell off the top ten countries list. In this century, the United States ranks first in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic bladder studies, followed by France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Switzerland and Japan. Subject categories including urology, nephrology and clinical neurology, as well as

  1. Diuresis and urinary saturation in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Burr, R G; Nuseibeh, I

    1981-03-01

    The effects of variation in fluid intake, of hard or softened drinking water, and of dietary calcium restriction on urinary relative saturation with calcium phosphates and magnesium ammonium phosphate were studied in 36 patients with neruogenic bladder. The relationship between urine volume and brushite saturation was statistically significant in 25 patients. For 8, an output of at least 4 liters per day should provide effective antistone therapy. For 17, an impossibly large volume (up to 11 liters daily) would be required. In two patients brushite saturation was significantly reduced in response to substitution of softened water for hard drinking, and in another two soft water combined with dietary calcium restriction had a similar effect. Unless urinary pH can be controlled, limitation of calcium intake is of no value in the majority of patients with neurogenic bladder and calculous disease.

  2. [Urodynamic changes after bladder augmentation surgery in paediatric patients with myelomeningocele due to neurogenic bladder].

    PubMed

    Zaragoza Torres, Raúl Ignacio; Galarza-Flores, Mario Eduardo; Gómez-Castellanos, Julio Cesar; Barrera-de León, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Augmentation cystoplasty is a successful surgical procedure for the management of neurogenic bladder in children in order to improve urodynamic parameters. The aim of this article is to describe urodynamic changes after augmentation cystoplasty in children with myelomeningocele. A descriptive cross-sectional study including children aged 8-16 years with a myelomeningocele operated on for augmentation cystoplasty surgery with sigmoid colon segments due to a neurogenic bladder from the years 2003-2013. A urodynamic study was conducted before and after the surgical procedure. Non-probabilistic sample of consecutive cases. Descriptive statistics with frequencies and percentages, medians, and ranges. Inferential intra-group comparison with the Wilcoxon test and inter-group with Mann-Whitney U. SPSS 20.0 statistical package. The study included 50 patients, of whom 25 were male and 25 were female, with a median age of 12 years (range, 6-15 years). Bladder capacity improved from 52.8% to 95.9% (p<0.001), uninhibited contractions 1.4-1.8, contraction intensity 47-8.5 (p<0.001), mean pre-surgical and post-surgical filling pressure 40.8cm H2O and 11.0cm H2O, respectively (p<0.001), mean emptying pressure 48.5 vs. 3.6cm H2O (p<0.001), and bladder accommodation 4.6 vs. 41.3cm H2O (p<0.001). Augmentation cystoplasty with sigmoid colon significantly improved urodynamic parameters, such as bladder accommodation and filling pressure in children with myelomeningocele-associated neurogenic bladder. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying and classifying quality of life tools for neurogenic bladder function after spinal cord injury: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Best, Krista L; Ethans, Karen; Craven, B Catharine; Noreau, Luc; Hitzig, Sander L

    2017-09-01

    To identify and classify quality of life (QoL) tools for assessing the influence of neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury/disease (SCI). Systematic Review Methods: Medline/Pubmed, CINAHL, and PsycInfo were searched using terms related to SCI, neurogenic bladder and QoL. Studies that assessed the influence neurogenic bladder on QoL (or related construct) in samples consisting of ≥50% individuals with SCI were included. Two independent reviewers screened titles and abstracts of 368 identified references; 118 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, and 42 studies were included. Two reviewers independently classified outcomes as objective (societal viewpoint) or subjective (patient perspective) using a QoL framework. Ten objective QoL measures were identified, with the Medical Outcomes Short Form (SF-36/SF-12) used most frequently. Fourteen subjective QoL measures were identified; 8 were specific to neurogenic bladder. Psychometric evidence for SCI-specific neurogenic bladder QoL tools was reported for the Quality of Life Index (QLI), Qualiveen, Bladder Complications Scale, Spinal Cord Injury-Quality of Life (SCI-QOL) Bladder Management Difficulties, and the SCI-QOL Bladder Management Difficulties-Short Form. The QLI and Qualiveen showed sensitivity to neurogenic bladder in experimental designs. Several objective and subjective tools exist to assess the influence of neurogenic bladder on QoL in SCI. The QLI and Qualiveen, both subjective tools, were the only validated SCI-specific tools that showed sensitivity to neurogenic bladder. Further validation of existing subjective SCI-specific outcomes is needed. Research to validate objective measures of QoL would be useful for informing practice and policy related to resource allocation for bladder care post-SCI.

  4. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults.

    PubMed

    Allio, Bryce Andrew; Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-02-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson's, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  5. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson’s, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:26904410

  6. Acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Liu, Huilin; Liu, Zhishun; Wang, Linpeng

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Neurogenic bladder is one of the most common complications following spinal cord injury (SCI). In China, acupuncture therapy is a common treatment for neurogenic bladder due to SCI, but its effects and safety remain uncertain. A protocol is described for a systematic review to investigate the beneficial effects and safety of acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to SCI. Methods and analysis Eight databases will be searched from their inception: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, Embase, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), the VIP database, the Wanfang database, the China Doctoral Dissertations Full-text Database (CDFD) and the China Master's Theses Full-text Database (CMFD). Any clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the first period of randomised cross-over studies related to acupuncture for neurogenic bladder due to SCI will be included. Outcomes will include change in urinary symptoms, urodynamic tests, clinical assessment and quality of life (QoL). The incidence of adverse events will be assessed as the safety outcome. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment will be performed independently by two reviewers. Assessment of risk of bias, data synthesis and subgroup analysis will be carried out using Review Manager software. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval is not required as this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this systematic review will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number PROSPERO (CRD42014010448). PMID:25208851

  7. [Endoscopic augmentation of neurogenic bladder with botulinum-A toxin in children].

    PubMed

    Kroll, Paweł; Jankowski, Andrzej; Zachwieja, Jacek; Zaniew, Marcin; Mańkowski, Przemysław; Harasymczuk, Jerzy; Antczak, Andrzej; Murias, Marek

    2008-01-01

    To present our experience with endoscopic intradetrusor injections of botulinum-A toxin. Endoscopic treatment was proposed for children in which no improvement or side effects were observed. Botulinum-A toxin was injected in 25 children 3 to 7 years old. All children were evaluated with voiding-charts, in all of them urodynamic investigations were also performed in the pre and post-procedure period. Increased bladder volume was found in 18 patients, in 5 children bladder volume decreased. No major side effects were noted post BTX injections. Botulinum-A toxin in useful in children with neurogenic bladder overactivity.

  8. Complications of untreated and ineffectively treated neurogenic bladder dysfunctions in children: our own practical classification.

    PubMed

    Kroll, P; Zachwieja, J

    2016-04-01

    The neurogenic dysfunctions of the detrusor and the sphincter are caused by either a known congenital defect of the nervous system or by acquired damage to the nervous system. In patients with idiopathic bladder dysfunctions neurological examinations fail to reveal any pathology in the nervous system. The treatment strategy for the patient with detrusor-sphincter dysfunction should be based on a comprehensive functional and morphological evaluation. Clean Intermittent Catheterization is mandatory if voiding is ineffective. Reduced bladder capacity related to detrusor overactivity and decreased bladder walls compliance is successfully managed conservatively with oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment prevents complications in the majority of patients. However, despite proper conservative treatment, some patients still develop complications. We propose our own practical classification of complications characteristic for the bladder and sphincter dysfunctions: 1. Urinary tract infections; 2. Urolithiasis; 3. Anatomic changes in the lower urinary tract; 4. Anatomic changes in the upper urinary tract; 5. Functional disturbances of kidneys parenchyma; 6. Urinary incontinence. Proposed practical classification of complications of bladder and sphincter dysfunctions is clear and simple. This classification can be used both in children with neurogenic and non-neurogenic dysfunctions. It is helpful in planning follow-up procedures and evaluation of treatment results.

  9. Nerve growth factor combined with vascular endothelial growth factor enhances regeneration of bladder acellular matrix graft in spinal cord injury-induced neurogenic rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Kikuno, Nobuyuki; Kawamoto, Ken; Hirata, Hiroshi; Vejdani, Kaveh; Kawakami, Kazumori; Fandel, Thomas; Nunes, Lora; Urakami, Shinji; Shiina, Hiroaki; Igawa, Mikio; Tanagho, Emil; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-05-01

    To determine the combined effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on regeneration of the bladder acellular matrix graft (BAMG) in spinal cord injury (SCI)-mediated neurogenic bladder in rats. In all, 40 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used. At 8 weeks after spinalization surgery (neurogenic bladder), they were divided into five groups consisting of untreated controls and those whose bladders were injected with either no growth factor, NGF (2 microg/rat), VEGF (2 microg/rat) or both at partial BAMG replacement surgery. After 8 weeks, bladder function was assessed by urodynamic studies and the bladders were harvested for histological examination. Smooth muscle induction, collagen and nerve fibre regeneration were assessed immunohistochemically using antibodies to smooth muscle actin (alpha-actin), Masson's trichrome and protein gene product 9.5, respectively. Bladder capacity and compliance were significantly increased in all BAMG groups 8 weeks after surgery compared with that before bladder replacement surgery. Bladder capacity and compliance were much higher in the VEGF and NGF combined group than in the control, or NGF and VEGF alone groups. There was no significant difference in the residual volume ratio among all groups. This is the first report showing that NGF has a significant synergistic effect on the development, differentiation and functional restoration of the BAMG when administered with VEGF in neurogenic bladder. Our results indicate that NGF may be a useful cytokine for enhancing the regeneration of a functional bladder following acellular matrix grafting in a neurogenic rat model.

  10. Effect of onabotulinumtoxinA treatment on symptoms and urodynamic findings in pediatric neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Kask, M; Rintala, R; Taskinen, S

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate clinical and urodynamic efficiency of onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) treatment in pediatric patients with urinary incontinence due to neurogenic overactive bladder. Seventeen patients aged from 6 to 17 years (median 11 years) were treated with Botox injections. Clinical response to incontinence, duration of the response, and urodynamic results before and 1-3 months after treatment were evaluated. Mean incontinence frequency decreased significantly (p = 0.036); six of 17 patients had >90% reduction, and a further three patients had a 50-90% reduction in incontinence episodes. Median duration of the response was 15 months (range 3-42 months). Mean bladder volume changed from 380 ± 148 ml to 453 ± 147 (p = 0.078), maximal detrusor pressure decreased from 45 ± 31 cmH2O to 32 ± 21 cmH2O (p = 0.030), and the number of patients with detrusor contractions during filling decreased from 12 to three (p = 0.005) after the treatment. The patients with poor bladder compliance had either no response or a short duration of response. At follow-up eight patients had undergone bladder augmentation because of persistent incontinence. About one third of pediatric patients with neurogenic bladder had a good response to Botox treatment. In many patients, the clinical response was longer than expected. The patients who initially had poor bladder compliance had a poor response to the treatment. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Women's experiences of living with neurogenic bladder and bowel after spinal cord injury: life controlled by bladder and bowel.

    PubMed

    Nevedal, Andrea; Kratz, Anna L; Tate, Denise G

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder and bowel (NBB) is a chronic condition hindering the functioning and quality of life (QOL) of people with spinal cord injury (SCI). NBB research has focused on men with SCI leaving unanswered questions about women's experiences of living with NBB. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe women's experiences of living with SCI and NBB. Secondary analysis of semi-structured interviews from a larger qualitative study of women with SCI (N = 50) was carried out. Transcripts were coded for bowel and bladder content. Pile-sorting techniques were used to identify emergent themes related to NBB. Meta-themes were categorized under the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Bladder and bowel topics were spontaneously discussed by 46 out of 50 study participants suggesting the salience of this issue for women with SCI. We identified 6 meta-themes: life controlled by bladder and bowel, bladder and bowel accidents, women's specific challenges, life course disruption, bladder and bowel medical management, and finding independence. Findings describe concerns, strategies, and the detrimental impact of NBB in the lives of women with SCI. Findings inform policy makers, health care and rehabilitation professionals to improve accessibility and quality of life for women with NBB. Women with spinal cord injury (SCI) reported gender specific challenges to living with neurogenic bladder and bowel (NBB). Interventions designed for women with SCI can address these problems and provide recommendations for prevention and treatment. Women described the detrimental impact of NBB on life course expectations, emotional, social, physical health, and quality of life domains. Psychosocial and educational programs can be developed to address these challenges and improve overall quality of life. Recommendations for special treatment and policy considerations are needed to maximize women's independence and health while living with NBB

  12. Congenital causes of neurogenic bladder and the transition to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The population of patients with congenital genitourinary disorders has unique healthcare demands that require an additional interpersonal and medical skillset. Adults with congenital neurogenic bladder may have complex urinary anatomy, abnormal bladder function and atypical voiding mechanisms. While initial surgery and care of these patients is typically managed by a pediatric urologist, growth and development into adulthood necessitates transition of care to an adult care team. Failure of transition to adult care has been demonstrated to result in lower quality healthcare and increased risk of developing preventable complications. PMID:26904411

  13. Acute abdomen caused by bladder rupture attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous bladder rupture is a rare and serious event with high mortality. It is not often considered in the patient presenting with peritonitis. This often leads to delays in diagnosis. There are very few case reports of true spontaneous rupture in the literature. This is the first such reported case in which bladder rupture was attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old Caucasian man who presented with lower abdominal pain and a peritonitic abdomen. He had a long-term urethral catheter because of urinary retention following a previous stroke. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics before a surgical opinion was sought. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture. After repair of the defect, he eventually made a full recovery. Conclusion In this unusual case report, we describe an example of a serious event in which delays in diagnosis may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To date, no unifying theory explaining why rupture occurs has been postulated. We conducted a thorough literature search to examine the etiological factors in other published cases. These etiological factors either increase intra-vesical pressure or decrease the strength of the bladder wall. We hope that by increasing awareness of these etiological factors, spontaneous bladder rupture may be diagnosed earlier and appropriate therapy started. PMID:21714888

  14. A systematic review and comparison of questionnaires in the management of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Tsang, B; Stothers, L; Macnab, A; Lazare, D; Nigro, M

    2016-03-01

    Validated questionnaires are increasingly the preferred method used to obtain historical information. Specialized questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic disease including neurogenic bladder. Those currently available are systematically reviewed and their potential for clinical and research use are described. A systematic search via Medline and PubMed using the key terms questionnaire(s) crossed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) for the years 1946 to January 22, 2014 inclusive. Additional articles were selected from review of references in the publications identified. Only peer reviewed articles published in English were included. 18 questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic bladder; 14 related to MS, 3 for SCI, and 1 for neurogenic bladder in general; with 4 cross-validated in both MS and SCI. All 18 are validated for both male and female patients; 59% are available only in English. The domains of psychological impact and physical function are represented in 71% and 76% of questionnaires, respectively. None for the female population included elements to measure symptoms of prolapse. The last decade has seen an expansion of validated questionnaires to document bladder symptoms in neurogenic disease. Disease specific instruments are available for incorporation into the clinical setting for MS and SCI patients with neurogenic bladder. The availability of caregiver and interview options enhances suitability in clinical practice as they can be adapted to various extents of disability. Future developments should include expanded language validation to the top 10 global languages reported by the World Health Organization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Positional changes in voiding dynamics of children with non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Uluocak, Nihat; Oktar, Tayfun; Acar, Omer; Incesu, Olga; Ziylan, Orhan; Erkorkmaz, Unal

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the effect of certain positions on voiding dynamics in children with non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction. A total of 29 patients (10 male, 19 female) with non-neurogenic overactive bladder were enrolled. None of the patients had voiding phase dysfunction. Male patients were told to urinate in three positions (sitting, squatting, standing). Female patients did not void while standing. During voiding, maximum urinary flow rate (Qmax), detrusor pressure at maximal flow (Pdet-Qmax), and intra-abdominal pressure at maximal flow (Pabd-Qmax) were recorded. After voiding in one position, the bladder was re-distended. The same procedures were repeated for the three different positions. Then patients were told to perform three drinking-voiding cycles without the catheter in place. After recording Qmax, residual urine was measured with ultrasonography. The differences between these parameters were analyzed. The mean (+/- standard deviation) patient age was 11.10 +/- 2.94 years (range, 6-16 years). In girls, the mean Pdet-Qmax value in the sitting and squatting positions was 43.11 +/- 16.74 cm H(2)O and 35.21 +/- 10.67 cm H(2)O, respectively (P = .028). Girls voided with a significantly higher Qmax in sitting and squatting positions than boys, regardless of the presence of a catheter. The mean Pdet-Qmax value in the squatting position was 59.20 +/- 20.45 cm H(2)O in boys and 35.21 +/- 10.67 cm H(2)O in girls. The presence of a catheter significantly lowered mean maximal urinary flow rates in sitting and squatting positions. This is the first study to demonstrate the effect of voiding positions on pressure flow study results in children. Our results show that voiding dynamics are influenced by different voiding positions in children with non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and effects of intravesical oxybutynin on the paediatric neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Amark, P; Eksborg, S; Juneskans, O; Bussman, G; Palm, C

    1998-12-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of both oxybutynin and its active metabolite, N-desethyl oxybutynin (NDO), when the drug is instilled directly into the bladder in children with myelodysplasia and neurogenic bladder disturbance, in whom it may improve continence and decrease the risk of upper urinary tract deterioration. The study comprised 13 children (five girls and eight boys, mean age 9.3 years, range 1-15) with neurogenic bladders who were treated using clean intermittent catheterization and intravesical instillation of a sterile, pharmacy-produced solution of oxybutynin. Steady-state minimum plasma levels of oxybutynin and NDO, together with their effect on urodynamic variables and incontinence, were evaluated. The dose (0.04-0.17 mg/kg, mean 0.1 mg/kg) was instilled twice daily. The effects of the drug on incontinence and urodynamic variables were pronounced, improving both in most cases. Minimum plasma levels were < 0.3-7.2 ng/mL for oxybutynin and 0.8-14 ng/mL for NDO. The ratio of oxybutynin to NDO was 0.29-0.83 (mean 0.47). There was no clear relationship between minimum plasma levels of the drug or NDO and their clinical effects; however, the combination of oxybutynin and NDO seemed to be more strongly correlated with the clinical effects.

  17. Repeated injections of intradetrusor onabotulinumtoxinA as adjunctive treatment of children with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Sager, Cristian; Burek, Carol; Bortagaray, Juan; Corbetta, Juan Pablo; Weller, Santiago; Durán, Victor; Lopez, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of repeated injections of onabotulinumtoxinA in children with neurogenic bladders refractory to conventional treatment. A total of 26 children with neurogenic bladder were prospectively studied. Some patients received up to four repeat injections. Patients were reinjected if they showed improvement in voiding diary, score of urinary incontinence and/or urodynamic studies; otherwise, augmentation cystoplasty was indicated. Of the 26 patients, 12 were reinjected a second time, 6 patients were reinjected a third time and 2 patients received a repeat injection for the fourth time. Six months after the first, second and third injection, the urinary incontinence score 0 (dry) was 50, 77 and 75 %, respectively. After each injection, the mean bladder capacity in voiding diary and the mean maximum cystometric capacity increased. The mean detrusor pressure at the end of filling decreased. Only compliance after the first injection improved significantly. Detrusor overactivity (n: 4), improved during 3 months and reappeared in three children after the first injection, but at greater cystometric volumes. In the fourth case, it reappeared 11 months after the third injection. Five patients underwent cystoplasty. After treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA, urinary continence achieved was 50-77 %. There were favorable changes in urodynamic variables, but they were insufficient. Detrusor overactivity was attenuated, but did not disappear completely.

  18. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  19. Factors implicated in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections in neurogenic bladders: some revered, few forgotten, others ignored.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Pawan; Madersbacher, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    To comprehensively review factors implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, and to stimulate research, especially in the somewhat ignored and forgotten areas of this important clinical subject. In addition to reviewing relevant articles on pubmed, some important articles from previous times which were not available online were also procured and reviewed. Intrinsic defence mechanisms including protective flora, anti-adherence mechanisms, urothelial, and immunological responses to bacterial binding and the blood supply to the urinary bladder may be impaired in patients with neurogenic bladders. Further, bacterial washout mechanisms may be compromised as a result of inefficient voiding, reflux, and altered hydrokinetics. Finally, catheterization itself contributes to urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders. In order to address the issue of urinary tract infection in patients with neurogenic bladders, multiple factors need to be looked into and corrected. Further research is required, especially in the area of compromised host defence mechanisms. An individualized approach, which attempts to optimize each factor is recommended. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Quan, Chang-Yi; Li, Gang; Cai, Qi-Liang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jiu-Wei; Niu, Yuan-Jie

    2013-02-01

    To study the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of a case of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum and reviewed the relevant literature. The patient was a 37-year-old man, with urinary incontinence for 22 years and intermittent dysuria with frequent micturition for 9 years, aggravated in the past 3 months. He had received surgery for spina bifida and giant vesico-prostatic calculus. The results of preoperative routine urinary examination were as follows: WBC 17 -20/HPF, RBC 12 - 15/HPF. KUB, IVU and pelvic CT revealed spina bifida occulta, neurogenic bladder and giant prostatic calculus. The patient underwent TURP and transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. The prostatic calculus was carbonate apatite in composition. Urinary dynamic images at 2 weeks after surgery exhibited significant improvement in the highest urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Seventeen months of postoperative follow-up showed dramatically improved urinary incontinence and thicker urine stream. Prostate diverticulum with prostatic giant calculus is very rare, and neurogenic bladder may play a role in its etiology. Cystoscopy is an accurate screening method for its diagnosis. For the young patients and those who wish to retain sexual function, TURP combined with holmium laser lithotripsy can be employed, and intraoperative rectal examination should be taken to ensure complete removal of calculi.

  1. Health promotion in motion: improving quality of life for persons with neurogenic bladder and bowel using assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Kachourbos, M J; Creasey, G H

    2000-01-01

    The neurogenic bladder and bowel lead to many complications in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Management of these neurological complications is a multidimensional challenge for persons with SCI and their caregivers, and can affect the person medically, economically, socially, and personally. This may result in social isolation, poor self-image, and overall decreased quality of life (QOL). When facing this challenge, nurses working with persons with SCI must expand their practice to include more than traditional preventive care. A newly available technique for promoting health with a neurogenic bladder and bowel is the VOCARE Bladder and Bowel Control System. Sixteen persons with SCI who received this system were interviewed by telephone and asked for their recollections of health and QOL pre-operatively in relation to bladder and bowel care and to rate changes in their QOL post-implant. Post-operatively, the recipients reported improved health, a decrease in costs of management of their neurogenic bladder and bowel, increased independence leading to less social isolation, increased sense of control, increased feelings of self-worth, and overall improvement in QOL. These outcomes illustrate the global impact that can be made on the lives of persons with SCI by health services that go beyond prevention of complications and into the realm of health promotion.

  2. Onabotulinumtoxin A for Treating Overactive/Poor Compliant Bladders in Children and Adolescents with Neurogenic Bladder Secondary to Myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Marte, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This retrospective study was performed to verify the efficacy and safety of Onabotulinumtoxin A (BTX-A) in treating children with neurogenic bladder (NB) secondary to myelomeningocele (MMC) with detrusor overactivity/low compliance. From January 2002 to June 2011, 47 patients out of 68 with neuropathic bladder were selected (22 females, 25 males, age range 5–17 years; mean age 10.7 years at first injection). They presented overactive/poor compliant neurogenic bladders on clean intermittent catheterization, and were resistant or non compliant to pharmacological therapy. Ten patients presented second to fourth grade concomitant monolateral/bilateral vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). All patients were incontinent despite catheterization. In the majority of patients Botulinum-A toxin was administered under general/local anesthesia by the injection of 200 IU of toxin, without exceeding the dosage of 12IU/kg body weight, diluted in 20 cc of saline solution in 20 sites, except in the periureteral areas. Follow-up included clinical and ultrasound examination, urodynamics performed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks, and annually thereafter. Seven patients remained stable, 21 patients required a second injection after 6–9 months and 19 a third injection. VUR was corrected, when necessary, in the same session after the BT-A injection, by 1–3 cc of subureteral Deflux®. Urodynamic parameters considered were leak point pressure (LPP), leak point volume (LPV) and specific volume at 20 cm H2O pressure. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. All patients experienced a significant 66.45% average increase of LPV (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 7169 × 10 −10) and a significant 118.57% average increase of SC 20 (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 2.466 × 10 −12). The difference between preoperative and postoperative LPP resulted not significant (Wilcoxon paired rank test = 0.8858) No patient presented severe systemic complications; 38/47 patients presented slight hematuria for 2–3 days

  3. Button Cystostomy: Is it Really a Safe and Effective Therapeutic Option in Pediatric Patients With Neurogenic Bladder?

    PubMed

    Mosiello, Giovanni; Lopes Mendes, Ana Ludy; Capitanucci, Maria Luisa; Zaccara, Antonio Maria; De Gennaro, Mario

    2017-03-01

    To define safety and effectiveness of cystostomy button in the management of bladder drainage in pediatric patients with neurogenic bladder, and report our personalized surgical technique. This study is a retrospective analysis of patients undergoing cystostomy button placement for bladder drainage from October 2009 to December 2015. Endoscopic and open surgical techniques and medium-term complication were analyzed and indications were recorded. Thirty-five patients, 16 (45.7%) females and 19 (54.3%) males, underwent cystostomy button placement for bladder drainage with a mean age of 8.6 ± 4.8 years (standard deviation) and a mean follow-up time of 37 months. There were 91.4% of patients who had a neurogenic bladder; a nonobstructive urinary retention was diagnosed in the remainder of cases. A medium-term complication was mostly represented by urinary tract infection observed in 10 of 35 patients that was the most representative cause of button removal (4 of 35). Other observed complications were button leakage (n = 2), decubitus (n = 1), and bladder stone (n = 1). No postoperative complication was observed and no differences were found in terms of complications in the two surgical approaches performed. Cystostomy button is a safe and effective treatment for bladder drainage in neurogenic pediatric patients and it is also well accepted by patients and caregivers. Cystostomy button, which may avoid mechanical concerns and most of the social discomfort, should be considered an alternative method to other bladder drainage modalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of educational content of YouTube videos relating to neurogenic bladder and intermittent catheterization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Matthew; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Tsang, Brian; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Many patients conduct internet searches to manage their own health problems, to decide if they need professional help, and to corroborate information given in a clinical encounter. Good information can improve patients' understanding of their condition and their self-efficacy. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) featuring neurogenic bladder (NB) require knowledge and skills related to their condition and need for intermittent catheterization (IC). Information quality was evaluated in videos accessed via YouTube relating to NB and IC using search terms "neurogenic bladder intermittent catheter" and "spinal cord injury intermittent catheter." Video content was independently rated by 3 investigators using criteria based on European Urological Association (EAU) guidelines and established clinical practice. In total, 71 videos met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 (17%) addressed IC and 50 (70%) contained information on NB. The remaining videos met inclusion criteria, but did not contain information relevant to either IC or NB. Analysis indicated poor overall quality of information, with some videos with information contradictory to EAU guidelines for IC. High-quality videos were randomly distributed by YouTube. IC videos featuring a healthcare narrator scored significantly higher than patient-narrated videos, but not higher than videos with a merchant narrator. About half of the videos contained commercial content. Some good-quality educational videos about NB and IC are available on YouTube, but most are poor. The videos deemed good quality were not prominently ranked by the YouTube search algorithm, consequently user access is less likely. Study limitations include the limit of 50 videos per category and the use of a de novo rating tool. Information quality in videos with healthcare narrators was not higher than in those featuring merchant narrators. Better material is required to improve patients' understanding of their condition.

  5. Evaluation of educational content of YouTube videos relating to neurogenic bladder and intermittent catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Tsang, Brian; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients conduct internet searches to manage their own health problems, to decide if they need professional help, and to corroborate information given in a clinical encounter. Good information can improve patients’ understanding of their condition and their self-efficacy. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) featuring neurogenic bladder (NB) require knowledge and skills related to their condition and need for intermittent catheterization (IC). Methods: Information quality was evaluated in videos accessed via YouTube relating to NB and IC using search terms “neurogenic bladder intermittent catheter” and “spinal cord injury intermittent catheter.” Video content was independently rated by 3 investigators using criteria based on European Urological Association (EAU) guidelines and established clinical practice. Results: In total, 71 videos met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 (17%) addressed IC and 50 (70%) contained information on NB. The remaining videos met inclusion criteria, but did not contain information relevant to either IC or NB. Analysis indicated poor overall quality of information, with some videos with information contradictory to EAU guidelines for IC. High-quality videos were randomly distributed by YouTube. IC videos featuring a healthcare narrator scored significantly higher than patient-narrated videos, but not higher than videos with a merchant narrator. About half of the videos contained commercial content. Conclusions: Some good-quality educational videos about NB and IC are available on YouTube, but most are poor. The videos deemed good quality were not prominently ranked by the YouTube search algorithm, consequently user access is less likely. Study limitations include the limit of 50 videos per category and the use of a de novo rating tool. Information quality in videos with healthcare narrators was not higher than in those featuring merchant narrators. Better material is required to improve patients

  6. A framework for transitioning patients from pediatric to adult health settings for patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer; Frimberger, Dominic; Haddad, Emily; Slobodov, Gennady

    2017-04-01

    Adolescents with neurogenic bladder are a vulnerable population that severely lacks consistent transitional care from pediatric to adult urology settings. Our practice determined that 100 patients with spina bifida and other neurogenic bladder conditions were not appropriately transferred to the adult setting once reaching adulthood. We initiated a transitional program to establish a dedicated and formal process for adolescent patients to transition to adult urology. The REACH clinic implements a formalized staging framework to facilitate migration of adolescents and young adults to the adult health setting. A social worker was incorporated to act as a patient advocate, behavioral health consultant, and resource specialist. To date 45 patients have been enrolled in the transition program. We have identified and categorized according to the appropriate stage. The REACH clinic has appropriately outlined the goals and mission of the program and resources utilized are financially practical and feasible by conducting a monthly combined clinic. The program has been instrumental in improving tracking and monitoring of these patients through their transition period. Through the efforts of the pediatric and adult urology teams, the REACH program is a dedicated framework that provides structure for transition of the adolescent patient. The addition of a social worker has resulted in enriched rapport and will likely result in improved compliance. This program allows for surveillance and evaluation of patient outcome indicators in this patient population. We believe that early introduction and frequent encounters with the adult urologic team is crucial to successful transitions. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:973-978, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neurogenic factors in the impaired healing of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Galkowska, Hanna; Olszewski, Waldemar L; Wojewodzka, Urszula; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2006-08-01

    We hypothesize that the reduced innervation of skin can be observed both in clinically neuropathic and non-neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers and can contribute to low inflammatory cell infiltration. Twenty patients with type 2 diabetes and active foot ulcers, without clinical evidence of peripheral sensory neuropathy (n = 12) and with sensory neuropathy (n = 8) were involved in this study. Biopsies from ulcer margin were examined immunohistochemically. Studies revealed presence of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)+ nerve endings only in reticular dermis in 3 of 12 non-neuropathic subjects, however, regenerating GAP-43+ endings were seen in dermis of almost all specimens. Lack of substance P+ nerve endings was characteristic for both groups. The reduced distribution of calcitonin gene-related peptide+ nerves in epidermis and dermis was seen mainly in neuropathic group. In neo-epidermis lack of nerve growth factor expression was observed in both groups, whereas neurotrophin 3 immunostaining was characteristic for neuropathic specimens (P < 0.03). Expression of trkA and trkC receptors did not differ significantly between groups. Low inflammatory cell infiltration and moderate presence of fibroblasts was characteristic for all studied specimens. The observed reduction of foot skin innervation and neurogenic factors expression can be correlated with low inflammatory cell accumulation and subsequently leads to the observed chronicity of diabetic foot ulcer healing process in both neuropathic and non-neuropathic patients.

  8. Drug development for pediatric neurogenic bladder dysfunction: dosing, endpoints, and study design.

    PubMed

    Momper, Jeremiah D; Karesh, Alyson; Green, Dionna J; Hirsch, Mark; Khurana, Mona; Lee, Jinoo; Kim, Myong-Jin; Mulugeta, Yeruk; Sachs, Hari C; Yao, Lynne; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric drug development is challenging when a product is studied for a pediatric disease that has a different underlying etiology and pathophysiology compared to the adult disease. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction (NBD) is such a therapeutic area with multiple unsuccessful development programs. The objective of this study was to critically evaluate clinical trial design elements that may have contributed to unsuccessful drug development programs for pediatric NBD. Trial design elements of drugs tested for pediatric NBD were identified from trials submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Data were extracted from publically available FDA reviews and labeling and included trial design, primary endpoints, enrollment eligibilities, and pharmacokinetic data. A total of four products were identified. Although all four programs potentially provided clinically useful information, only one drug (oxybutynin) demonstrated efficacy in children with NBD. The lack of demonstrable efficacy for the remainder of the products illustrates that future trials should give careful attention to testing a range of doses, using objectively measured, clinically meaningful endpoints, and selecting clinical trial designs that are both interpretable and feasible. Compiling the drug development experience with pediatric NBD will facilitate an improved approach for future drug development for this, and perhaps other, therapeutic areas. © 2014, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  9. Inosine attenuates spontaneous activity in the rat neurogenic bladder through an A2B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Claire; Cristofaro, Vivian; Sack, Bryan S.; Lukianov, Stefan N.; Schäfer, Mattias; Chung, Yeun Goo; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). A recent report by us demonstrated an improvement in NDO in SCI rats following chronic systemic treatment with the purine nucleoside inosine. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of inosine underlying improvement of NDO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection at T8. Inosine (1 mM) delivered intravesically to SCI rats during conscious cystometry significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions. In isolated tissue assays, inosine (1 mM) significantly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous activity (SA) in SCI bladder muscle strips. This effect was prevented by a pan-adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943, but not by A1 or A3 receptor antagonists. The A2A antagonist ZM241385 and A2B antagonist PSB603 prevented the effect of inosine. The effect of inosine was mimicked by the adenosine receptor agonist NECA and the A2B receptor agonist BAY60-6583. The inhibition of SA by inosine was not observed in the presence of the BK antagonist, iberiotoxin, but persisted in the presence of KATP and SK antagonists. These findings demonstrate that inosine acts via an A2B receptor-mediated pathway that impinges on specific potassium channel effectors. PMID:28294142

  10. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity.

  11. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0–10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. Results: The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18–56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1–2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8

  12. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA.

    PubMed

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0-10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18-56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1-2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8 (2.5-21) months. Intradetrusor

  13. Long-term anodal block stimulation at sacral anterior roots promoted recovery of neurogenic bladder function in a rabbit model of complete spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoran; Gao, Qi; Yang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Weihua; Gu, Xinquan; Liu, Guifeng; Yan, Peng; Gao, Ge; Yu, Xin; Wang, Yongjie; Lian, Jihu; Shi, Chaoling; Wang, Yao; Fan, Li

    2012-01-01

    A complete spinal cord injury model was established in experimental rabbits using the spinal cord clip compression method. Urodynamic examination was performed 2 weeks later to determine neurogenic bladder status. The rabbits were treated with anodal block stimulation at sacral anterior roots for 4 weeks. Electrical stimulation of sacral anterior roots improved urodynamic parameters of neurogenic bladder in rabbit models of complete spinal cord injury, effectively promoted urinary function, and relieved urinary retention. Immunohistochemistry results showed that a balance was achieved among expression of muscarinic receptor subunits M2, M3, ATP-gated ion channel P2X3 receptors, and β2-adrenergic receptor, and nerve growth factor expression decreased. These results suggested that long-term sacral anterior root stimulation of anodal block could be used to treat neurogenic bladder in a rabbit model of complete spinal cord injury. PMID:25774174

  14. Diabetic Neuropathy and Axon Reflex-Mediated Neurogenic Vasodilatation in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Vera; Orszag, Andrej; Ng, Eduardo; Nwe, Patti; Perkins, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Axon reflex-mediated neurogenic vasodilatation in response to cutaneous heating may reflect early, pre-clinical small fibre dysfunction. We aimed to evaluate the distribution of the vascular flare area measured by laser doppler imaging (“LDIFLARE area”) in type 1 diabetes and in healthy volunteers. Research and Methods Concurrent with clinical and electrophysiological examination to classify diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP), LDIFLARE area (cm2) was determined in 89 type 1 diabetes subjects matched to 64 healthy volunteers. We examined the association and diagnostic performance of LDI with clinical and subclinical measures of DSP and its severity. Results Compared to the 64 healthy volunteers, the 56 diabetes controls without DSP had significantly lower LDIFLARE area (p = 0.006). The 33 diabetes cases with DSP had substantially lower LDIFLARE area as compared to controls without DSP (p = 0.002). There was considerable overlap in LDIFLARE area between all groups such that the ROC curve had an AUC of 0.72 and optimal sensitivity of 70% for the detection of clinical DSP. Use of a subclinical definition for DSP, according to subclinical sural nerve impairment, was associated with improved AUC of 0.75 and sensitivity of 79%. In multivariate analysis higher HbA1c and body mass index had independent associations with smaller LDIFLARE area. Conclusions Axon reflex-mediated neurogenic vasodilatation in response to cutaneous heating is a biomarker of early nerve dysfunction in DSP. Its independent association with glycemic exposure in diabetes subjects and both glycemic exposure and BMI in healthy volunteers highlights the existence of small-fibre dysfunction in the natural history of DSP. PMID:22529938

  15. The Factors That Affect Improvement of Neurogenic Bladder by Severe Lumbar Disc Herniation in Operation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Joon Bok; Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Ji-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study analyzed retrospectively the bladder function of patients after early surgery for cauda equina syndrome (CES) performed within 24 or 48 hours, or after 48 hours of the onset of autonomic symptoms. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 31 patients after decompression surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) who had been diagnosed with CES between January 2001 and December 2014 at Inha University Hospital. The following factors were assessed to evaluate the influence of time to surgery: bladder function, rectal incontinence, sexual dysfunction, LDH level, and degree of spinal canal compression. Results After decompression, the outcome group was categorized into normal bladder function and abnormal bladder function. The patients operated on within 48 hours showed an improved postoperative outcome. Among 16 patients operated on within 48 hours, 13 (81%) recovered normal bladder function. In contrast, among 15 patients with decompression after 48 hours, 6 (40%) recovered normal bladder function. Among 21 patients with mild bladder dysfunction at admission, 16 (76%) recovered normal bladder function after decompression. Conclusion Our study suggests that patients who have decompression surgery within 48 hours of the onset of bladder dysfunction, improve their chances of recovering bladder function than those who have a late operation (>48 hours). Also, patients with mild bladder dysfunction are more likely to recover bladder function after decompression, than patients with severe bladder dysfunction. PMID:27799991

  16. The passive and active contractile properties of the neurogenic, underactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Young, John S; Johnston, Louise; Soubrane, Camille; McCloskey, Karen D; McMurray, Gordon; Eccles, Rachel; Fry, Christopher H

    2013-02-01

    To characterize passive and active changes in detrusor activity in a highly compliant bladder. Bladders from adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were used 5 weeks after lower thoracic (T8) spinal cord transection or a sham-operation. Passive wall properties were assessed by pressure-volume relationships from whole bladders and the tensile response of bladder strips after a rapid (<0.5 s) stretch. Active properties were assessed from the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous contractions of bladder strips, and their response to the inotropic TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A. Passive bladder wall stiffness of SCT bladders was significantly reduced compared to that of the sham-operated control group (N = 6 and 8, respectively) and SCT bladder strips relaxed more quickly than those from sham-operated rats. The frequency of spontaneous contractions was reduced in SCT rats, and their amplitude, expressed as a ratio of bladder wall stiffness, was greater than in sham-operated rats. GSK1016790A (0.1 μM) significantly increased amplitude in strips from both sham-operated and SCT groups. There is no evidence of contractile failure in a highly-compliant bladder. The observations of reduced passive bladder wall stiffness and an enhanced rate of stress relaxation lead to the conclusion that increased compliance is marked by altered matrix properties that dissipate muscle force, thereby generating low pressures. Contractile agonists may be effective for improving bladder function in detrusor underactivity. © 2012 BJU International.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a Paenalcaligenes hominis Strain Isolated from a Paraplegic Patient with Neurogenic Bladder Using Single-Molecule Real-Time Sequencing Technology.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Rituparna; Joaquin, Joselita; Hogue, Robin; Kilaru, Austin; Jospin, Guillaume; Mars, Kristin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2017-04-27

    The genome of Paenalcaligenes hominis, isolated from a paraplegic patient with neurogenic bladder, was sequenced with the Pacific Biosciences RSII platform. The genome size is 2.68 Mb and includes 3,096 annotated coding sequences, including genes associated with quinone cofactors, which play crucial roles in the virulence of Gram-negative bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Mukhopadhyay et al.

  18. Quick note on tissue engineering-based surgical measures to treat patients with neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Contardo

    2015-01-01

    To treat the neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/urethral rhabdosphincter dyssynergia, early combined clean intermittent catheterization/ pharmacotherapy (anticholinergic-, β3-adrenoceptor agonist drugs) management may be at times crowned with success of preserving an adequate bladder compliance and renal safe conditions.The persistence, instead, of elevated bladder filling pressure levels with high voiding pressure/uroflow values, together with aberrant urethral rhabdosphincter electromyographic findings, make necessary the resort to surgery strategies, among which - a part from rhabdosphincterotomy or alternatively intrasphincteric botulinum A toxin injection or urethral stent insertion - the bladder augmentation cystoplasty, with either reconfigurated bowel- or gastric segment, is today the most efficacious surgical measure to increase the bladder urinary storage meanwhile lowering bladder filling pressure. Given the enterocistoplasty-dependent both potential systemic metabolic imbalances - such as hyperchloremic acidosis/hypokaliemia, hyperoxaluria, bone demineralization, chologenic diarrhoea/steatorrhoea, vit B12 deficiency - together with bowel prosthetic mucus overproduction-due recurrent stone formation, and, sometimes, malignant complications particularly at the intestinal-urinary tract suture line, tissue engineering techniques have been taken into consideration, more than twenty years ago, as alternative measure for bladder augmentation cystoplasty, until to reach successful clinical validation just in patients suffering from either congenital dysraphism- or acquired spinal cord injury-dependent neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, also the tissue engineering-made augmentation cistoplasty, as well as that bowel-based one, unfortunately remains influenced by spinal cord neuropathydue dysfunctional effects, hence the tissue engineering research could be today directed to suitably overcome such disadvantageous conditions.

  19. [Bacterial ecology and resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic overactive bladder treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections].

    PubMed

    Levy, J; Le Breton, F; Jousse, M; Haddad, R; Verollet, D; Guinet-Lacoste, A; Amarenco, G

    2014-10-01

    For the last ten years, botulinum neurotoxin type A has become the gold standard for the treatment of neurogenic overactive detrusor. Bacterial colonization is common for these patients using clean intermittent self-catheterization, and toxin injections are at risk of urinary tract infections. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of different germs and their resistance to antibiotics in patients with neurogenic bladder, treated with intravesical botulinum toxin injections. This epidemiologic study took place from September to October 2012 in a urodynamic and neurourology unit in a teaching hospital in Paris, France. Eighty patients with a valid urine culture according to our protocol, were included. Fourty-four culture were positive with 45 bacteria. We found an Escherichia coli in 42.5%, a Klebsiella pneumoniae in 7.5%, a Citrobacter freundii and an enterococcus in 2.5%, and a Staphylococcus aureus in 1.25%. Penicillin resistance were found in 51.11%, 3rd generation cephalosporins in 8.89%, quinolones in 28.89% and sulfamids in 24.44%. None were resistant to fosfomycin. E. coli was the most frequent bacterium. No resistance to fosfomycin was found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction--Preliminary Findings.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-03-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H₂O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6-8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of "urinary dryness" and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6-8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder.

  1. An Evaluation of the Efficacy of Selective Alpha-Blockers in the Treatment of Children with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Paweł; Gajewska, Ewa; Zachwieja, Jacek; Sobieska, Magdalena; Mańkowski, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of selective α1-blockers in children with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions and increased leak point pressure (LPP). 14 children from age 6 to 16 years with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunctions (neurogenic bladder) and LPP > 40 cm H2O were enrolled in the study. All patients received a selective α1-blocker (doxazosin) for 6–8 weeks with an initial dosage of 0.03 mg/kg. During the observation period the continuation of oral anticholinergics, Clean Intermittent Catheterization (CIC), observation of “urinary dryness” and urinary incontinence periods were recommended. Patients were scheduled for a follow-up visit and urodynamic investigation after 6–8 weeks after the doxazosin therapy was started. In 4 patients, urine leakage occurred at lower pressures; in 9 patients, no significant changes in urine leak point pressures were detected; in 3 patients, there was a significant increase in the bladder capacity; in one patient, deterioration in continence was noted. The differences both in LPP and LPV before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. Our observations are consistent with the conclusions from other studies and showed no evident efficacy of doxazosin in children with neurogenic bladder. PMID:26999168

  2. Anticholinergic drugs versus non-drug active therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults.

    PubMed

    Rai, Bhavan Prasad; Cody, June D; Alhasso, Ammar; Stewart, Laurence

    2012-12-12

    Overactive bladder syndrome is defined as urgency with or without urgency incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. Pharmacotherapy with anticholinergic drugs is often the first line medical therapy, either alone or as an adjunct to various non-pharmacological therapies after conservative options such as reducing intake of caffeine drinks have been tried. Non-pharmacologic therapies consist of bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback, behavioural modification, electrical stimulation and surgical interventions. To compare the effects of anticholinergic drugs with various non-pharmacologic therapies for non-neurogenic overactive bladder syndrome in adults. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 4 September 2012), which includes searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised or quasi-randomised, controlled trials of treatment with anticholinergic drugs for overactive bladder syndrome or urgency urinary incontinence in adults in which at least one management arm involved a non-drug therapy. Trials amongst patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction were excluded. Two authors evaluated the trials for appropriateness for inclusion and risk of bias. Two authors were involved in the data extraction. Data extraction was based on predetermined criteria. Data analysis was based on standard statistical approaches used in Cochrane reviews. Twenty three trials were included with a total of 3685 participants, one was a cross-over trial and the other 22 were parallel group trials. The duration of follow up varied from two to 52 weeks. The trials were generally small and of poor methodological quality. During treatment, symptomatic improvement was more common amongst those participants on anticholinergic drugs compared with bladder training in seven small trials (73/174, 42% versus 98/172, 57% not

  3. What do we know about neurogenic bladder prevalence and management in developing countries and emerging regions of the world?

    PubMed

    Przydacz, Mikolaj; Denys, Pierre; Corcos, Jacques

    2017-09-01

    To summarize information on Neurogenic Bladder (NB) epidemiology, management and access to patient treatment in developing countries and emerging regions of the world in order to propose future interventions and help governmental as well as non-governmental organizations design their action plans. Different search methods were used to gather the maximum available data. They included strategic searches; reference checks; grey literature searches (reports, working papers, government documents, civil society information); contacting professional societies, registries, and authors; requesting unpublished data from organizations; and browsing related websites and journals. The incidence and prevalence rates of NB in developing countries are difficult to establish because epidemiological reports are few and far between. The frequency of bladder dysfunction in neurologically impaired populations can be approximately estimated in some of these countries. Similar information paucity affects diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to NB patients living in less-developed regions of the world. The assessment and management of NB seems to vary markedly between countries, and care of patients from emerging regions of the world is often inadequate. Strong concerted efforts are needed on the part of international scientific societies, non-governmental organizations and local governments to work together to change the prognosis for these patients and to improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Predictive Factors for Intermittent Self-catheterization in German and Brazilian Individuals With Spina Bifida and Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Faleiros, Fabiana; Käppler, Christoph; Costa, Juliana Neves; Favoretto, Naira; Pontes, Fernando

    Our study aimed to identify predictive factors for the use of intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) in persons with spina bifida (SB) and neurogenic bladder. Cultural effects were evaluated by comparing ISC use in individuals from 2 countries, Germany and Brazil. Cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study included 71 Brazilian and 77 German individuals with SB (108 females and 92 males), aged between 6 and 55 years, who have used ISC for bladder management. Data were collected using printed (Brazil) and online (Germany) questionnaires, with 53 questions related to intermittent catheterization (IC) technique, the materials used in IC, difficulties with IC, and sociodemographic and health variables. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and multivariate logistical regression. Self-catheterization and assisted catheterization were used for 92 and 56 patients, respectively. Intermittent self-catheterization was more common in German participants (79.2%), while most Brazilian participants used assisted catheterization (56.3%). The following variables influenced the choice of catheterization method, according to logistic regression: age, education level, presence of hydrocephalus, severity of SB, and nationality. The variables unrelated to ISC use included gender, difficulty obtaining ISC equipment or learning to perform ISC, and wheelchair dependency. The identification of predictive factors for ISC improved our understanding of ISC in SB patients and should aid in the development of more effective strategies to increase ISC use.

  5. Comparison of different antibiotic protocols for asymptomatic bacteriuria in patients with neurogenic bladder treated with botulinum toxin A.

    PubMed

    Paradella, Ana Claudia; Musegante, André Ferraz de Arruda; Brites, Carlos

    Intravesical botulinum toxin A (BoNTA) injection has been widely used for the treatment of detrusor overactivity in patients with neurogenic bladder due to spinal cord injury who do not respond to conventional treatment. There is no consensus about antibiotic prophylaxis for this procedure. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records of adult patients with spinal cord injury who underwent detrusor BoNTA injection between January of 2007 and December of 2013 in a rehabilitation hospital. Occurrence of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) was assessed in 3 groups in accordance with their use of antibiotics (prophylactic dosage, 3 days, more than 3 days) for the treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria. All patients were performing self or assisted clean intermittent bladder catheterization and underwent a rigid cystoscopy, under general or regional anesthesia with sedation, and the drug used was Botox(®). A total of 616 procedures were performed during the study period. There were 11 identified cases of UTI (1.8%) with a trend to a higher rate in the group that used antibiotics for longer time. This report shows that a single dose of antibiotics before the detrusor BoNTA injection is enough to prevent UTI. Randomized clinical trial should be conducted for definitive conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Voltage-gated K+ channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 regulate myogenic and neurogenic contractions of rat urinary bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Muyan; Kellett, Whitney F.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the voltage-gated K+ (KV) channel family are suggested to control the resting membrane potential and the repolarization phase of the action potential in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Recent studies report that stromatoxin-1, a peptide isolated from tarantulas, selectively inhibits KV2.1, KV2.2, KV4.2, and KV2.1/9.3 channels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether KV channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 participate in the regulation of rat UBSM contractility and to identify their molecular fingerprints. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone in isolated UBSM strips. However, stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) had no effect on the UBSM contractions induced by depolarizing agents such as KCl (20 mM) or carbachol (1 μM). This indicates that, under conditions of sustained membrane depolarization, the KV channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 have no further contribution to the membrane excitability and contractility. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, suggesting also a role for these channels in neurogenic contractions. RT-PCR experiments on freshly isolated UBSM cells showed mRNA expression of KV2.1, KV2.2, and KV9.3, but not KV4.2 channel subunits. Protein expression of KV2.1 and KV2.2 channels was detected using Western blot and was further confirmed by immunocytochemical detection in freshly isolated UBSM cells. These novel findings indicate that KV2.1 and KV2.2, but not KV4.2, channel subunits are expressed in rat UBSM and play a key role in opposing both myogenic and neurogenic UBSM contractions. PMID:20393158

  7. New grading system for upper urinary tract dilation using magnetic resonance urography in patients with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Liao, Limin; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Guoqing

    2014-05-22

    In patients with neurogenic bladder (NB), elevated intravesical pressures can be transmitted to the upper urinary tract, causing hydronephrosis (HN) and ureteral dilation (UD), which are referred to as upper urinary tract dilation (UUTD). Ureteral obstruction at the bladder wall is another cause for UUTD, but is less of a concern. UUTD can lead to chronic renal failure. Therefore, evaluation and protection of UUT function is extremely important in the management for NB. Currently, the most common method by which to detect HN and UD is ultrasonography (US). The Society for Fetal Urology (SFU) established an US HN grading system in 1993, but this system was found to have some defects. The purpose of this study is to describe a new grading system for UUTD, including both HN and UD, based on magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and to correlate the new grading system with the SFU grading system for HN. A retrospective review of 70 patients with unilateral or bilateral UUTD was completed. Ninety-five sides in patients with UUTD were graded by the MRU-UUTD and SFU-HN grading systems. The results from the two grading systems were compared for each UUTD. The MRU-UUTD grading system revealed the following percentages for each grade: grade 0, 0; 1, 10.5%; 2, 19%; 3, 42.1%; and 4, 28.4%. The SFU-HN grading system revealed the following percentages for each grade: 0, 0; 1, 10.5%; 2, 19%; 3, 36.8%; and 4, 33.7%. There was no significant systematic difference between the two grading systems (p > 0.05), but a significant difference between grades 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). The MRU-UUTD grading system correlates well with SFU-HN grade, provides an objective and comprehensive evaluation for UUTD, and can be used for longitudinal monitoring of UUTD. This new grading system allows for better informed clinical decision-making, identifying changes in UUTD.

  8. Patient reported outcomes measures in neurogenic bladder and bowel: A systematic review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshan P; Elliott, Sean P; Stoffel, John T; Brant, William O; Hotaling, James M; Myers, Jeremy B

    2016-01-01

    To describe existing bladder and bowel specific quality of life (QoL) measurement tools, QoL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), spinal cord injury (SCI), Parkinson's Disease (PD), stroke, or spina bifida (SB) affected by bladder or bowel dysfunction, and the impact of specific bladder and bowel management on QoL. We performed a systematic review in PubMed/Medline databases in accordance with the PRISMA statement for English publications between January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2014. Articles were first screened based on their abstract and select full-text articles were then reviewed for eligibility. Articles with no QoL or PROM assessing urinary or bowel dysfunction were excluded. Risk of bias assessment included randomization, incomplete outcomes data, selective outcomes reporting, and other biases. All articles were graded using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system as per the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. The most common QoL measurement tool for urinary and bowel dysfunction was the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36. Twelve (24%) studies used only non-validated QoL questionnaires. Only three urinary or bowel specific QoL measures were found: the Qualiveen questionnaire, the FICQoL, and the QoL-BM. Several studies identified instances were clinical and patient-reported outcomes were inconsistent particularly with indwelling urinary catheter usage and reconstructive surgery. Additionally, certain clinical outcomes surrogates commonly used as primary outcomes measures may not correlate with the patient reported outcomes (PRO). Current PRO measures (PROM) and QoL assessments are heterogeneous and several inconsistencies in clinical and PRO for various management options exist. Standardized PROM will help identify optimal bladder and bowel management for patients with neurologic conditions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Medical quality standards for selected urological aids and devices : Consensus for patients with neurogenic urinary bladder dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Bremer, J; Domurath, B; Böthig, R; Kaufmann, A; Geng, V

    2017-07-13

    Using the CE mark of therapeutic appliances is, on its own, not sufficient enough for their appropriate and effective application. In order to treat the patient successfully, not jeopardizing the success of the treatment, medical quality criteria for therapeutic appliances care are necessary to acceptably compensate for a patient's disabilities. Medical quality criteria are formulated for the most frequently used urological aids and devices, considering hygienic requirements, international literature and the practical experience of physicians and nurses with regard to the care of patients with neurogenic urinary bladder dysfunction. An expert group of urologists, surgeons, rehabilitation physicians and nurses has developed medical quality criteria via a structured consensus procedure. Developing these criteria, the group has taken into account current jurisprudence, the current resource directory of neurourological relevant aids, data from international literature and hygiene requirements. Medical quality requirements are discussed and defined for selected groups of urological devices (single use catheters, indwelling catheters, external catheters, urine bags, templates and diapers as well as devices for the electrostimulation of nerves). The presented quality requirements offer the possibility to stabilize quality of care with neurourological relevant therapeutic appliances. The catalogue of therapeutic appliances must be urgently updated. Urinal catheters for single use must be classified as an individual product group. Devices for anterior root stimulation and neuromodulation must be included in the resource directory. The incontinence severity classification needs to be reviewed.

  10. Late onset of familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Cizmarova, M; Nagyova, G; Janko, V; Pribilincova, Z; Virgova, D; Ilencikova, D; Kovacs, L

    2013-10-01

    Autosomal dominant familial diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is a rare disease characterized by polydipsia and polyuria due to deficiency of the antidiuretic hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP). We report the first Slovak family with the disease. Noteworthy is the concordantly belated debut of the disease symptoms in two monozygotic twin proband girls in the age of 17 years. Because of inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus (DI), missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Molecular genetic testing of the AVP gene was proceeded, because of the inconclusive results of water deprivation test consistent with partial diabetes insipidus, missing "bright spot" of posterior pituitary gland in T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and family occurrence of polyuria and polydipsia on anamnestic evaluation. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous g.279G>A substitution that predicts a p.Ala19Thr substitution in the signal peptide of the AVP prohormone. The wide intrafamiliar variations (3 to 17 years) in disease onset together with the concordantly delayed debut of polyuria in two monozygotic twin girls suggest that individual differences in genetic influences family environmental factors may modify the penetrance of the mutation of the AVP gene. The present paper supports the notion that molecular genetic evaluation should be performed in all patients with familial occurrence of DI regardless of the clinical results.

  11. Risk of Bladder Cancer Among Diabetic Patients Treated With Pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James D.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Peng, Tiffany; Hedderson, Monique; Bilker, Warren B.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Vaughn, David J.; Nessel, Lisa; Selby, Joseph; Strom, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Some preclinical in vivo studies and limited human data suggest a possible increased risk of bladder cancer with pioglitazone therapy. This is an interim report of an ongoing cohort study examining the association between pioglitazone therapy and the risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This study includes 193,099 patients in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California diabetes registry who were ≥40 years of age between 1997 and 2002. Those with prior bladder cancer were excluded. Ever use of each diabetes medication (defined as two or more prescriptions within 6 months) was treated as a time-dependent variable. Cox regression–generated hazard ratios (HRs) compared pioglitazone use with nonpioglitazone use adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, diabetes medications, A1C, heart failure, household income, renal function, other bladder conditions, and smoking. RESULTS The group treated with pioglitazone comprised 30,173 patients. There were 90 cases of bladder cancer among pioglitazone users and 791 cases of bladder cancer among nonpioglitazone users. Overall, ever use of pioglitazone was not associated with risk of bladder cancer (HR 1.2 [95% CI 0.9–1.5]), with similar results in men and women (test for interaction P = 0.8). However, in the a priori category of >24 months of therapy, there was an increased risk (1.4 [1.03–2.0]). Ninety-five percent of cancers diagnosed among pioglitazone users were detected at early stage. CONCLUSIONS In this cohort of patients with diabetes, short-term use of pioglitazone was not associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer, but use for more than 2 years was weakly associated with increased risk. PMID:21447663

  12. Management of urinary tract infection with intravesical amikacin may increase the risk of bladder oxidative stress in children with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, Akin Soner; Yilmaz, Dilek; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kucukdurmaz, Faruk; Sonmez, Ferah; Erol, Haluk

    2017-09-27

    We evaluated the bladder oxidative stress in neurogenic bladder children treated with intravesical amikacin for recurrent UTI and whether urinary isoprostane f2 alpha (F2-IsoP) is a good biomarker in this particular condition. This prospectively designed controlled study was approved by the Adnan Menderes University institutional ethics committee (Adnan Menderes University, 2015/649). Between January 2016 and January 2017, twenty-six children with meningomyelocele who had been doing CIC were recruited. Serum and urine samples were collected during urinary tract infection (UTI) (group 1) and after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin (group 2) besides standard oral antibiotic treatment. While oxidative stress parameters SOD, GSH, GPX, MDA, F2-IsoP and NO were analyzed in the serum samples, only F2-IsoP was analyzed in the urine. All data were compared with 23 normal healthy control children (group 3). Median age, CIC duration and number of CIC per day of patients' group were 84 (60-147) months, 60 (30-90) months and 4 (4-6), respectively. Male-to-female ratio was 1:16. There was no statistical difference between groups in terms of serum oxidative stress parameters (p > 0.05). However, statistically significant urine F2-IsoP changes exist between groups (p = 0.011) (Fig. 1). But there were no correlations between urine F2-IsoP and disease clinical data such as CIC duration or number of CIC per day. Serum glutathione levels in group 2 were higher than group 1 and 3, as well (p = 0.023, Kruskal-Wallis test). Fig. 1 Comparison of median urinary isoprostane f2 alpha levels CONCLUSION: Higher urine F2-IsoP levels after management of UTI with intravesical amikacin may reflect increased lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress in children with NB. This detrimental effect on bladder should be considered in the long-term treatment period.

  13. Initial urological evaluation and management of children with neurogenic bladder due to myelomeningocele.

    PubMed

    Sager, Cristian; Burek, Carol; Corbetta, Juan Pablo; Weller, Santiago; Ruiz, Javier; Perea, Ramiro; Lago, Enrique; Gomez, Yesica; Durán, Victor; López, Juan Carlos

    2017-06-01

    The proactive management of children with myelomeningocele (MMC) has contributed to decreasing their progression to end-stage renal disease, thanks to early urological evaluation and timing implementation of treatments. To demonstrate that early urological evaluation of the urinary tract in MMC shows functional alterations in most cases, and that it requires medical intervention, even when in some cases the complementary imaging studies do not show any abnormalities. A retrospective study including 60 patients aged <1 year with MMC who were followed by a multidisciplinary team. All of them underwent renal/bladder ultrasound, videourodynamic studies, renal scintigraphy/dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and laboratory tests for kidney function. The studied variables were: bladder capacity and pressure, presence of overactivity, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary dilations and abnormalities on renal scintigraphy/DMSA. All the patients received clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). See Summary Table all the patients showed alterations in at least some of the assessed urodynamic variables: reduced cystometric capacity, 21.6%; detrusor overactivity, 55%; end filling detrusor pressure >20 cm H2O, 43.3%; inefficient bladder voiding, 98.3%; indirect dyssynergic patterns, 28.8%. The high-risk videourodynamic findings were observed in 28 cases (46.6%). DMSA was abnormal in 30%. Renal impairment was detected in 6.6% of cases. A total of 66% of cases received oxybutynin. Almost all the children in this sample population showed urinary dysfunction, and approximately half of them had high-risk videourodynamic findings. Although many cases showed reflex urinary contractions, almost the entire sample had inefficient bladder voiding. An important limitation of this work was the lack of simultaneity in obtaining each of the requested studies. In the initial urological evaluation of patients with myelomeningocele, almost all the urodynamic studies showed abnormalities and one

  14. Buccally Administered Intranasal Desmopressin Acetate for the Treatment of Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Smego, Allison R; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-05-01

    The treatment of neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) in infancy is challenging and complicated by fluid overload and dehydration. Therapy with subcutaneous (SC), intranasal (IN), or oral tablet desmopressin acetate (1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin [DDAVP]) remains difficult to titrate in infants. Assess the efficacy and safety of buccally administered IN DDAVP for the management of infants with neurogenic DI. Retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data of 15 infants (mean age, 4.5 mo) with neurogenic DI treated at a tertiary care center. Treatment was with diluted IN DDAVP formulation (10 mcg/mL) administered buccally via a tuberculin syringe to the buccal mucosa. After initial DDAVP titration of 2-3 days, IN DDAVP doses ranged from 1 to 5 mcg twice daily given buccally. Mean serum sodium concentration at DI diagnosis was 159 ± 6.6 mmol/L (range, 151-178) and improved to 142 ± 3.5 mmol/L (range, 137-147) with the buccally administered IN DDAVP. Normal sodium concentrations were established without major fluctuations. Serum sodium was then maintained in the outpatient setting at a mean of 145.7 ± 4.8 mmol/L (mean duration of follow-up, 11 mo). Buccally administered IN formulation of DDAVP provides a practical and safe treatment alternative for neurogenic DI in infancy. Our approach avoided severe hypo- and hypernatremia during DDAVP titration and ongoing outpatient management of DI. The possibility for smaller dosage increments and ease of administration make IN DDAVP administered buccally preferable over other DDAVP treatment options in infants.

  15. Combinational effects of muscarinic receptor inhibition and β3-adrenoceptor stimulation on neurogenic bladder dysfunction in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wada, Naoki; Shimizu, Takahiro; Takai, Shun; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Tyagi, Pradeep; Kakizaki, Hidehiro; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effects of combined therapy with an anticholinergic agent and a β3-adrenoceptor agonist on bladder dysfunction and proliferation-related molecule expression in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). The spinal cord was transected at the level of T8-9 in female Sprague-Dawley rats, which were divided into four groups; A: Vehicle, B: 10 mg/kg/day of oxybutynin, C: 10 mg/kg/day of mirabegron, and D: combined administration of oxybutynin and mirabegron. Drugs were administered by oral gavage from 2 to 4 weeks after spinal cord transection. We evaluated urodynamic parameters and bladder tissue remodeling factors. Non-voiding contractions (NVCs) during the storage phase of cystometrograms tended to be decreased in all three treated groups with a significant reduction in group D versus A. Bladder compliance was improved, and intercontraction intervals, voided volume and bladder capacity were increased in group D. In all three treated groups (B-D), the expression of HIF1-α and TGF-β1 was decreased compared to group A. The expression of collagen-III and bFGF was decreased in groups B and D. The total bladder elastin level was increased in group D. The combination therapy of an anticholinergic agent and a β3-adrenoceptor agonist elevated the bladder elastin level, reduced NVCs, and increased bladder compliance more effectively than the monotherapy in SCI rats. Thus, the combination therapy could be effective for the treatment of neurogenic bladder dysfunction including bladder remodeling. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1039-1045, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Roles of Polyuria and Hyperglycemia on Bladder Dysfunction in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhiping; Huang, Yexiang; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) causes diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD). We aimed to identify the pathogenic roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia on DBD in rats. Materials and Methods Seventy-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided: age-matched controls (control), sham urinary diversion (sham), urinary diversion (UD), streptozotocin-induced diabetes after sham UD (DM), streptozotocin-induced diabetes after UD (UD+DM), and 5% sucrose-induced diuresis after sham UD (DIU). UD was performed by ureterovaginostomy 10d before DM induction. Animals were evaluated 20 wks after DM or diuresis induction. We measured 24-hr drinking and voiding volumes and cystometry (CMG). Bladders were harvested for quantification of smooth muscle, urothelium, and collagen. We measured nitrotyrosine and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in bladder. Results Diabetes and diuresis caused increases in drinking volume, voiding volume and bladder weight. Bladder weights decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. Intercontractile intervals, voided volume, and compliance increased in the DIU and DM groups, decreased in the UD, and further decreased in the UD+DM group. The total cross-sectional tissue, smooth muscle and urothelium areas increased in the DIU and DM groups, and decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. As percentages of total tissue area, collagen decreased in the DIU and DM groups, and increased in the UD and UD+DM groups, and smooth muscle and urothelium decreased in the UD and UD+DM groups. Nitrotyrosine and MnSOD increased in DM and UD+DM rats. Conclusions Polyuria induced bladder hypertrophy, while hyperglycemia induced substantial oxidative stress in the bladder, which may play a pathogenic role in late stage DBD. PMID:22999997

  17. Ovalbumin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the bladder of sensitized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Giuliani, Sandro; Scotland, Ramona; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    1998-01-01

    We have developed and characterized a model of immediate hypersensitivity/inflammation of the urinary bladder in vivo induced by local application of ovalbumin (OA) in OA- sensitive female rats. Two parameters of the inflammatory response were assessed following OA challenge: plasma protein extravasation (PPE) and changes in smooth muscle reactivity. The former was estimated by measurement of Evans blue extravasation at 0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h time point following in vivo challenge. Changes in reactivity were determined by measurement of isotonic tension responses of urinary bladder strips following OA challenge in vitro.Acute in vivo intravesical OA challenge (10 mg in 0.3 ml saline) in actively sensitized female Wistar rats caused a time-dependent PPE in the urinary bladder which was biphasic with peak responses at 2–4 and 24 h.The PPE response to acute OA challenge, above base-line, at 2 h was abolished by systemic capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg kg−1, s.c., 4 days before use) (P<0.05) whilst the response at 24 h was unaffected. The 2 h time point was then used for further studies.Degranulation of mast cells, achieved by pretreatment with compound 48/80 (5 mg kg−1, s.c. for 3 consecutive days), completely abolished the PPE response to OA challenge at the 2 h time point.The tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140333 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.), abolished the 2 h PPE response whilst the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist MEN 11420 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.) appeared to reduce the response by approximately 50% but this did not reach significance. The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.), similarly to SR 140333, blocked the 2 h PPE response to OA, whereas the selective B1 receptor antagonist B 9858 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.) had no significant effect. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) achieved by pretreatment with the COX inhibitor dexketoprofen (5.3 μmol kg−1, i.v.) also blocked the

  18. New grading system for upper urinary tract dilation using magnetic resonance urography in patients with Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients with neurogenic bladder (NB), elevated intravesical pressures can be transmitted to the upper urinary tract, causing hydronephrosis (HN) and ureteral dilation (UD), which are referred to as upper urinary tract dilation (UUTD). Ureteral obstruction at the bladder wall is another cause for UUTD, but is less of a concern. UUTD can lead to chronic renal failure. Therefore, evaluation and protection of UUT function is extremely important in the management for NB. Currently, the most common method by which to detect HN and UD is ultrasonography (US). The Society for Fetal Urology (SFU) established an US HN grading system in 1993, but this system was found to have some defects. The purpose of this study is to describe a new grading system for UUTD, including both HN and UD, based on magnetic resonance urography (MRU) and to correlate the new grading system with the SFU grading system for HN. Methods A retrospective review of 70 patients with unilateral or bilateral UUTD was completed. Ninety-five sides in patients with UUTD were graded by the MRU-UUTD and SFU-HN grading systems. The results from the two grading systems were compared for each UUTD. Results The MRU-UUTD grading system revealed the following percentages for each grade: grade 0, 0; 1, 10.5%; 2, 19%; 3, 42.1%; and 4, 28.4%. The SFU-HN grading system revealed the following percentages for each grade: 0, 0; 1, 10.5%; 2, 19%; 3, 36.8%; and 4, 33.7%. There was no significant systematic difference between the two grading systems (p > 0.05), but a significant difference between grades 3 and 4 (p < 0.05). Conclusions The MRU-UUTD grading system correlates well with SFU-HN grade, provides an objective and comprehensive evaluation for UUTD, and can be used for longitudinal monitoring of UUTD. This new grading system allows for better informed clinical decision-making, identifying changes in UUTD. PMID:24885460

  19. Clinical indications for augmentation in children with neurogenic urinary incontinence following bladder outlet procedures: Results of a 14-year observational study.

    PubMed

    Snodgrass, Warren; Granberg, Candace

    2016-02-01

    We report continence, upper tract changes, and augmentation indications and rates in consecutive patients undergoing bladder outlet surgery without augmentation for neurogenic urinary incontinence. From 2000 to 2007, 37 patients underwent bladder neck sling (BNS), and from 2007 to 2013, 45 patients had Leadbetter/Mitchell bladder neck revision plus sling (LMS), all without augmentation. Mitrofanoff channels were created in all cases. Twenty children with persistent outlet insufficiency underwent bladder neck closure (BNC). All patients had pre- and postoperative urodynamic testing (UD). Mean follow-up was 60 months after BNS, 38 months after LMS, and 29 months after BNC. Continence (dry, no pads) was achieved significantly more often with LMS versus BNS (66% vs. 37%). There were no significant differences between these patients in preoperative UD % capacity, end filling pressure (EFP), or compliance. Those that became dry had a greater % capacity on postoperative UD, but postoperative EFP was similar between dry and wet LMS and BNS patients. BNC resulted in dryness in 65% of patients, with most incontinence occurring from the Mitrofanoff stoma associated with filling pressures > 40 cm. A total of 10 (12%) children had augmentation, seven after BNC. Clinical indications were end filling pressures > 40 cm plus hydronephrosis ≥ grade 3, and/or persistent incontinence. Need for augmentation was not predicted by preoperative urodynamic parameters. Postoperative UD in those who were augmented showed significantly less % capacity and compliance, and significantly greater EFP, than those not augmented. Dryness was achieved in only 33% of BNS versus 66% of LMS and BNC patients. Twelve percent of consecutive children undergoing bladder outlet surgery for neurogenic incontinence developed clinical parameters leading to augmentation. These occurred most often after BNC. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Association Between Overactive Bladder and Polyneuropathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder that often leads to complications. We aimed to correlate two complications of DM, polyneuropathy and hyperactive bladder syndrome, using noninvasive measures, such as screening tests. Methods We included 80 female and 40 male type 2 diabetic patients in this prospective study. Diabetic polyneuropathy evaluations were conducted using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4), and overactive bladder (OAB) evaluations were performed using the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-V8). The patients were also evaluated for retinopathy and nephropathy. The diabetic male and female patients with or without OAB were chosen and compared for microvascular complications (polyneuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy). Results There were no significant correlations between OAB and retinopathy as well as between OAB and nephropathy among diabetic patients (female patients, P>0.05; male patients, P>0.05). However, the patients with OAB were significantly more likely to develop polyneuropathy (female patients, P<0.05; male patients, P<0.05). Conclusions In diabetic patients, OAB and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are significantly correlated. These correlations were demonstrated using short, understandable, valid, and reliable disease-specific tests without invasive measures. Using these screening tests, both neurologists and urologists can easily diagnose these complications. PMID:27706007

  1. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Seema; Sharma, Vipin; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-06-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis.

  2. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Seema; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-01-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis. PMID:26266174

  3. Emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in catheter-associated urinary tract infection in neurogenic bladder patients.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Kei; Shigemura, Katsumi; Osawa, Kayo; Nomi, Masashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-03-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is a common clinic problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate recent trends in CAUTI in neurogenic bladder patients focusing on extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Isolates from the urine of neurogenic bladder patients with UTI were investigated. Nine strains of ESBL-producing E coli were assayed by molecular strain typing using the Diversilab system for repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR). E coli accounted for most of the bacteria (74.1% to 81.0%) that produced ESBLs. Rep-PCR data showed that 7 out of 9 ESBL-producing E coli belonged to the same typing group with high similarity (more than 97% similarity) and that this distribution corresponded with antibiotic resistance patterns. ESBL producing E coli strains isolated from CAUTI patients could be discriminated by rep-PCR typing using the Diversilab system in consistent with antibiotic resistance patterns. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of diabetes mellitus on bladder uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T; Ruiz, Giovanni W; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming; Apodaca, Gerard; Birder, Lori A

    2013-01-15

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a prevalent complication of diabetes mellitus (DM), is characterized by a broad spectrum of symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency, and incontinence. As DBD is commonly diagnosed late, it is important to understand the chronic impact of DM on bladder tissues. While changes in bladder smooth muscle and innervation have been reported in diabetic patients, the impact of DM on the specialized epithelial lining of the urinary bladder, the urothelium (UT), is largely unknown. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and electron microscopy were used to evaluate UT gene expression and cell morphology 3, 9, and 20 wk following streptozotocin (STZ) induction of DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats compared with age-matched control tissue. Desquamation of superficial (umbrella) cells was noted at 9 wk DM, indicating a possible breach in barrier function. One causative factor may be metabolic burden due to chronic hyperglycemia, suggested by upregulation of the polyol pathway and glucose transport genes in DM UT. While superficial UT repopulation occurred by 20 wk DM, the phenotype was different, with significant upregulation of receptors associated with UT mechanosensation (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1; TRPV1) and UT autocrine/paracrine signaling (acetylcholine receptors AChR-M2 and -M3, purinergic receptors P2X(2) and P2X(3)). Compromised barrier function and alterations in UT mechanosensitivity and cell signaling could contribute to bladder instability, hyperactivity, and altered bladder sensation by modulating activity of afferent nerve endings, which appose the urothelium. Our results show that DM impacts urothelial homeostasis and may contribute to the underlying mechanisms of DBD.

  5. Lack of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel modulates the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction induced by cross-sensitization in afferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder pain of unknown etiology has been associated with co-morbid conditions and functional abnormalities in neighboring pelvic organs. Mechanisms underlying pain co-morbidities include cross-sensitization, which occurs predominantly via convergent neural pathways connecting distinct pelvic organs. Our previous results showed that colonic inflammation caused detrusor instability via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) signaling pathways, therefore, we aimed to determine whether neurogenic bladder dysfunction can develop in the absence of TRPV1 receptors. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and TRPV1−/− (knockout) mice were used in this study. Colonic inflammation was induced by intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The effects of transient colitis on abdominal sensitivity and function of the urinary bladder were evaluated by cystometry, contractility and relaxation of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) in vitro to various stimuli, gene and protein expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and pelvic responses to mechanical stimulation. Results Knockout of TRPV1 gene did not eliminate the development of cross-sensitization between the colon and urinary bladder. However, TRPV1−/− mice had prolonged intermicturition interval and increased number of non-voiding contractions at baseline followed by reduced urodynamic responses during active colitis. Contractility of DSM was up-regulated in response to KCl in TRPV1−/− mice with inflamed colon. Application of Rho-kinase inhibitor caused relaxation of DSM in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice during colonic inflammation. TRPV1−/− mice demonstrated blunted effects of TNBS-induced colitis on expression and function of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and delayed development of abdominal hypersensitivity upon colon-bladder cross-talk in genetically modified animals. Conclusions The lack of TRPV1 receptors

  6. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  7. [Efficacy of Botulinum-A toxin injection into bladder to treat neurogenic incontinence in patients with spinal cord injury: comparison of two doses].

    PubMed

    Fu, Guang; Wu, Juan; Cong, Huiling; Zha, Lihua; Li, Dong; Ju, Yanhe; Chen, Guoqing; Xiong, Zhongsheng; Liao, Limin

    2015-12-19

    To evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum-A toxin injection into bladder to treat neurogenic incontinence in patients with spinal cord injury and compare effectiveness of two different doses (200 U and 300 U). Between January 2009 and October 2014, A total of 60 adult patients with spinal cord injury above the sacral (mean age, 32 years; male 56, female 4) were selected in Beijing Bo'ai Hospital of China Rehabilitation Research Center. All the patients kept voiding diary and underwent urodynamic examination before operation. All the patients were allocated with a random number table into 200 U Botulinum-A toxin injection group or 300 U group (both n=30). In the 200 U group, 200 U of Botulinum-A toxin were dissolved in 10 ml of normal saline, which was injected into 20 different sites (0.5 ml for each site) of bladder wall, including 10 outside the bladder trigone and the remaining 10 inside trigone. In the 300 U group, 300 U of Botulinum-A toxin were dissolved in 15 ml of normal saline, which was injected into 30 different sites (0.5 ml for each site) in bladder outside of the bladder trigone using a flexible cystoscopic needle. The evaluation of the effects and follow-up included voiding diary, urodynamic testing and observation of adverse and toxic effects. At baseline, mean urinary incontinence frequencies were (15.2±3.2) episodes/day and (16.2±2.9) episodes/day in 200 U and 300 U group, which reduced to (2.9±1.2) episodes/day and (2.5±1.4) episodes/day, respectively in week 4 (P<0.05). However, continence rate was not significantly different between the two dose groups [63% (19/30) vs 70% (21/30), P>0.05]. The effect of botulinum-A toxin started to be observed from the 1(st) posttreatment week on average. Obvious improvements in maximum cystometric capacity, end-filling maximum detrusor pressure, and bladder compliance were observed at week 4 as shown by urodynamics (all P<0.05), but with no significant difference between the 200 U and 300 U groups. In the

  8. Effects of Physiotherapy in the Treatment of Neurogenic Bladder in Patients Infected with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosana C.P.; Neto, José A.; Andrade, Luciana; Oliveira, Tatiane S. S.; Santos, Dislene N.; Oliveira, Cassius J.V.; Prado, Márcio J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy for urinary manifestations in patients with HTLV-1-associated lower urinary tract dysfunction. Methods Open clinical trial with 21 patients attending the physiotherapy clinic of the Hospital Universitário, Bahia, Brazil. Combinations of behavioral therapy, perineal exercises and intravaginal/intra-anal electrical stimulation were used. Results The mean age was 54±12 years and 67% were female. After treatment, there was an improvement in symptoms of urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence, nocturia and in the sensation of incomplete emptying (p<0.001). There was also a reduction in the overactive bladder symptom score from 10±4 to 6±3 (p<0.001) and an increasing in the perineal muscle strength (p<0.001). The urodynamic parameters improved, with reduction in the frequency of patients with detrusor hyperactivity from 57.9% to 42.1%; detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) from 31.6% to 5.3%; detrusor hypocontractility from 15.8% to 0% and detrusor areflexia from 10.5% to 0%, with positive repercussions in the quality of life in all patients. Conclusion Physiotherapy was effective in cases of HTLV-1-associated neurogenic bladder, reducing symptoms, increasing perineal muscle strength, improving urodynamic parameters and quality of life. PMID:26724409

  9. Effects of coffee and caffeine on bladder dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chao-Ran; Wei, Zhong-Qing; Deng, Xiang-Lei; Sun, Ze-Yu; Li, Xing-Rong; Tian, Cheng-Gong

    2006-08-01

    To explore the effects and mechanisms of caffeine and coffee on bladder dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided randomly into 4 groups: control, diabetes mellitus (DM), DM with coffee treatment, and DM with caffeine treatment. The diabetic rat was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 7 weeks of treatment with coffee and caffeine, cystometrogram, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration of the bladder body and base were measured. The bladder weight, volume threshold for micturition and post-void residual volume (PVR) in the diabetic rats were significantly higher compared to those in the control animals. Coffee or caffeine treatment significantly reduced the bladder weight, bladder capacity and PVR in the diabetic rats. DM caused significant decreases in cAMP concentration of the bladder and coffee and caffeine caused upregulation of cAMP content in the diabetic bladder. In addition, coffee and caffeine tended to normalize the altered detrusor contractile responses to EFS and ACh in the diabetic rats. These results indicate that caffeine and coffee may have beneficial effects on bladder dysfunction in the early stage of diabetes by increasing cAMP content in the lower urinary tract, recovering the micturition reflex and improving the detrusor contractility.

  10. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  11. Alpha1A-adrenoceptor antagonist improves underactive bladder associated with diabetic cystopathy via bladder blood flow in rats.

    PubMed

    Yonekubo, Saori; Tatemichi, Satoshi; Maruyama, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Mamoru

    2017-08-23

    Patients with diabetes experience lower urinary tract symptoms. Cystopathy may evolve into underactive bladder (UAB), depending on the degree and duration of the symptoms. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of silodosin, an alpha1A-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonist, on UAB in a rat model of diabetes mellitus (DM). Female Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks old) were administered streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg, i.v.) to establish a DM model. One week after STZ administration, vehicle or silodosin (0.3 or 1 mg/kg/day) was delivered subcutaneously through an osmotic pump. Nine weeks after STZ administration (8 weeks after drug treatment), a catheter was implanted into the bladder under urethane anesthesia. After the measurement of emptied bladder blood flow (BBF), saline was continuously infused into the bladder and intravesical pressure and micturition volume were measured. In another experiment, the bladder was isolated and nerve markers were quantified. A cystometrogram showed that bladder capacity (BC), residual volume (RV), and bladder extension (BC/bladder weight) increased by 7.43, 10.47, and 3.59 times, respectively, in vehicle rats in comparison with normal rats. These findings suggested the occurrence of UAB-like symptoms in this model. Silodosin (1 mg/kg/day) inhibited the increase in BC and RV by 49.0% and 46.8%, respectively, and caused a decrease in BBF of approximately 25.5% (when the difference between normal and vehicle was set as 100%) in STZ rats. The nerve marker expression levels tended to be decreased in the bladders of STZ rats and these effects were ameliorated by silodosin. The STZ rats showed increased bladder extension and RV, symptoms that were suggestive of UAB, and these symptoms were ameliorated by silodosin. These results suggested that the alpha1A-AR antagonist would be useful for the prevention or treatment of UAB.

  12. Microscopic investigations in a diabetic rat urinary bladder infected with Trichosomoides crassicauda.

    PubMed

    Ozkorkmaz, Ebru Gokalp

    2011-01-01

    Rats are widely used laboratory animals and have several parasites. One of these are helminths, known not only to cause serious effects on the experimental results in healthy subjects, but also in subjects with heavy infections. One of the relatively pathologic helminth is Trichosomoides crassicauda, which lives in the nodules of the urinary bladder. It is known that diabetics are more prone to infections with several microorganisms. Observations in a diabetic rat bladder showed T. crassicauda eggs inside the transitional epithelium, and structural changes in the bladder epithelium were evident. Urinary-bladder tissues taken from streptozotocin-injected diabetic subjects and citrate buffer-injected control subjects were fixed, embedded in araldite and investigated under a light microscope. Distinct changes in the histological structure of a diabetic urinary bladder transitional epithelium were observed after T. crassicauda infection. Many papillomas were formed and the epithelial tissues were completely degenerated. In addition, electron microscopic examinations also revealed degeneration of the subepithelial tissues.

  13. An unresolved relationship: the relationship between lesion severity and neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarifakioglu, Banu; Yalbuzdağ, Şeniz Akcay; Saraçgil Coşar, Sacide Nur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of the spinal lesion and urodynamic findings, bladder drainage method at discharge, and incidence of renal calculi in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Studydesign Retrospective. Setting In-patient rehabilitation unit of a tertiary research hospital. Methods A total of 131 patients who were admitted to our clinic with a diagnosis of SCI and placed into a rehabilitation program were included in the study. The severity of the lesion was determined according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). We evaluated the relationship between the severity of the lesion and the detrusor hyperactivity and compliance as determined by urodynamic investigation, the bladder drainage method used at discharge, and the renal calculi rate as determined by ultrasonography. Results While no difference was found between the patients with complete and incomplete injuries in terms of age, sex, disease duration, detrusor hyperactivity and compliance, the bladder drainage method was found to show a significant change according to the severity of the lesion. None of the patients were found to have hydronephrosis and the rate of renal calculi showed no statistically significant difference according to the severity of the lesion. Conclusions We concluded that urodynamic examination is required in each patient with SCI as the severity of the lesion is not sufficient to determine the bladder type, and patients with complete and incomplete injuries should be monitored with the same sensitivity in terms of complications. PMID:26322550

  14. A cost-utility analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) compared with medical treatment in patients with complete spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Morlière, Camille; Verpillot, Elise; Donon, Laurence; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bénard, Antoine

    2015-12-01

    Sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) and posterior sacral rhizotomy restores the ability to urinate on demand with low residual volumes, which is a key for preventing urinary complications that account for 10% of the causes of death in patients with spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, comparative cost-effectiveness results on a long time horizon are lacking to adequately inform decisions of reimbursement. This study aimed to estimate the long-term cost-utility of SARS using the Finetech-Brindley device compared with medical treatment (anticholinergics+catheterization). The following study design is used for the paper: Markov model elaborated with a 10-year time horizon; with four irreversible states: (1) initial treatment, (2) year 1 of surgery for urinary complication, (3) year >1 of surgery for urinary complication, and (4) death; and reversible states: urinary calculi; Finetech-Brindley device failures. The sample consisted of theoretical cohorts of patients with a complete spinal cord lesion since ≥1 year, and a neurogenic bladder. Effectiveness was expressed as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Costs were valued in EUR 2013 in the perspective of the French health system. A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to estimate transition probabilities and QALYs. Costs were estimated from the literature, and through simulations using the 2013 French prospective payment system classification. Probabilistic analyses were conducted to handle parameter uncertainty. In the base case analysis (2.5% discount rate), the cost-utility ratio was 12,710 EUR per QALY gained. At a threshold of 30,000 EUR per QALY the probability of SARS being cost-effective compared with medical treatment was 60%. If the French Healthcare System reimbursed SARS for 80 patients per year during 10 years (anticipated target population), the expected incremental net health benefit would be 174 QALYs, and the expected value of perfect information (EVPI

  15. Inflammatory response to Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder of the spinal cord injured host.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Ortiz, Tara K; Balsara, Zarine; Tang, Yuping; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-05-01

    Urinary tract infections cause significant morbidity in patients with spinal cord injury. An in vivo spinal cord injured rat model of experimental Escherichia coli urinary tract infection mimics human disease with enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection compared to controls. We hypothesized that a dysregulated inflammatory response contributes to enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection. Spinal cord injured and sham injured rats were inoculated transurethrally with E. coli. Transcript levels of 84 inflammatory pathway genes were measured in bladder tissue of each group before infection, 24 hours after infection and after 5 days of antibiotic therapy. Before infection quantitative polymerase chain reaction array revealed greater than twofold up-regulation in the proinflammatory factor transcripts slc11a1, ccl4 and il1β, and down-regulation of the antimicrobial peptides lcn2 and mpo in spinal cord injured vs control bladders. At 24 hours after infection spinal cord injured bladders showed an attenuated innate immune response with decreased expression of il6, slc11a1, il1β and lcn2, and decreased il10 and slpi expression compared to controls. Despite clearance of bacteriuria with antibiotics spinal cord injured rats had delayed induction of il6 transcription and a delayed anti-inflammatory response with decreased il10 and slpi transcript levels relative to controls. Spinal cord injured bladders fail to mount a characteristic inflammatory response to E. coli infection and cannot suppress inflammation after infection is eliminated. This may lead to increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection and persistent chronic inflammation through neural mediated pathways, which to our knowledge remain to be defined. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of TNF-α Improves the Bladder Dysfunction That Is Associated With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongwei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Cristofaro, Vivian; Li, Jijun; Xiao, Xingyuan; Gomez, Pablo; Ge, Rongbin; Gong, Edward; Strle, Klemen; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; White, Morris F.; Olumi, Aria F.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) is common and affects 80% of diabetic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying DBD remain elusive because of a lack of appropriate animal models. We demonstrate DBD in a mouse model that harbors hepatic-specific insulin receptor substrate 1 and 2 deletions (double knockout [DKO]), which develops type 2 diabetes. Bladders of DKO animals exhibited detrusor overactivity at an early stage: increased frequency of nonvoiding contractions during bladder filling, decreased voided volume, and dispersed urine spot patterns. In contrast, older animals with diabetes exhibited detrusor hypoactivity, findings consistent with clinical features of diabetes in humans. The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily genes were upregulated in DKO bladders. In particular, TNF-α was upregulated in serum and in bladder smooth muscle tissue. TNF-α augmented the contraction of primary cultured bladder smooth muscle cells through upregulating Rho kinase activity and phosphorylating myosin light chain. Systemic treatment of DKO animals with soluble TNF receptor 1 (TNFRI) prevented upregulation of Rho A signaling and reversed the bladder dysfunction, without affecting hyperglycemia. TNFRI combined with the antidiabetic agent, metformin, improved DBD beyond that achieved with metformin alone, suggesting that therapies targeting TNF-α may have utility in reversing the secondary urologic complications of type 2 diabetes. PMID:22688336

  17. Controversies Related to Diabetes and Risk of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spradling, Kyle; Youssef, Ramy F

    2016-03-15

    In recent years, a growing number of case-control and cohort studies have suggested that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer (BC). However, the body of evidence linking DM and BC is controversial and largely composed of observational studies with significant heterogeneity in study design. In this review, we outline the current body of evidence associating DM with BC. We also highlight the evidence surrounding the relationship between BC and two antidiabetic medications, metformin and pioglitazone. Currently, not enough evidence is available to decisively conclude that DM is associated with an increased risk for development of BC. Similarly, the current body of evidence is inadequate to establish a causal relationship between pioglitazone and BC nor a protective relationship between metformin and BC.

  18. A pilot prospective study to evaluate whether the bladder morphology in cystography and/or urodynamic may help predict the response to botulinum toxin a injection in neurogenic bladder refractory to anticholinergics.

    PubMed

    Álvares, Ronaldo Alvarenga; Araújo, Ivana Duval; Sanches, Marcelo Dias

    2014-08-14

    We have observed different clinical responses to botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) in patients who had similar urodynamic parameters before the procedure. Furthermore, some bladders evaluated by cystography and cystoscopy during the procedure had different characteristics that could influence the outcome of the treatment. The aim of this study was to assess whether cystography and urodynamic parameters could help predict which patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to anticholinergics respond better to treatment with injection of BTX-A. In total, 34 patients with spinal cord injury were prospectively evaluated. All patients emptied their bladder by clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and had incontinence and NDO, despite using 40 mg or more of intravesical oxybutynin and undergoing detrusor injection of BTX-A (300 IU). Pretreatment evaluation included urodynamic, and cystography. Follow-up consisted of urodynamic and ambulatory visits four months after treatment. The cystography parameters used were bladder shape, capacity and presence of diverticula. Urodynamic parameters used for assessment were maximum cystometric capacity (MCC), maximum detrusor pressure (MDP), compliance and reflex volume (RV). After injection of BTX-A, 70% of the patients had success, with 4 months or more of continence. Before the treatment, there were significant differences in most urodynamic parameters between those who responded successfully compared to those who did not. Patients who responded successfully had greater MCC (p = 0.019), higher RV (p = 0.041), and greater compliance (p = 0.043). There was no significant difference in the MDP (0.691). The cystography parameters were not significantly different between these groups bladder shape (p = 0.271), capacity (p > 0.720) and presence of diverticula (p > 0.999). Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS (version 20.0) and included Student's t-test for two paired samples and Fisher's exact test, with a

  19. Possible link of pioglitazone with bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kanta; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Honjo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Yukiko; Mori, Kanako; Tatsuoka, Hisato; Matsuoka, Atsuko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Hiroki; Fujikawa, Jun; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    We retrospectively examined the frequency of bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes in relation to use of pioglitazone. Among a total of 663 patients identified to be taking pioglitazone, 9 had bladder cancer (1.36%). Overall the hazard ratio of 1.75 [95% CI: 0.89-3.45] for pioglitazone for bladder cancer was not significant. However the prevalence of bladder cancer was 2.10% in patients taking pioglitazone for less than 24 months which was significant increased (HR 2.73 [95% CI: 1.11-6.72]).

  20. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-Ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-02-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code.More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48-6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02-10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51-13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46-56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51-13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer.Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure.

  1. Functional and Morphological Alterations of the Urinary Bladder in Type 2 Diabetic FVBdb/db Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liyang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xiao, Nan; Huang, Yexiang; Kavran, Michael; Elrashidy, Rania A.; Wang, Mingshuai; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming

    2016-01-01

    Aims Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) has been extensively studied in animal models of type 1 diabetes. We aimed to examine the functional and morphological alterations of the urinary bladder in a type 2 diabetes model, FVBdb/db mice. Methods FVBdb/db mice and age-matched FVB/NJ control mice were tested at either 12, 24 or 52 weeks of age. Body weight, blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels were measured. Bladder function was assessed by measurement of 24-hour urination behavior and conscious cystometry. Bladder was harvested for Masson's Trichrome staining and morphometric analysis. Results The body weights of FVBdb/db mice were twice as those of FVB/NJ control mice. The blood glucose and HbA1c levels were higher in FVBdb/db mice at 12 and 24 weeks, but not at 52 weeks. A significant increase in the mean volume per void, but decrease in the voiding frequency, in FVBdb/db mice was observed. Cystometry evaluation showed increased bladder capacity, voided volume, and peak micturition pressure in FVBdb/db mice compared with FVB/NJ mice. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increase in the areas of detrusor muscle and urothelium in FVBdb/db mice. In addition, some FVBdb/db mice, especially males at 12 and 24 weeks, showed small-volume voiding during 24-hour urination behavior measurement, and detrusor overactivity in the cystometry measurement. Conclusions The FVBdb/db mouse, displaying DBD characterized by not only increased bladder capacity, void volume, and micturition pressure, but also bladder overactivity, is a useful model to further investigate the mechanisms of type 2 diabetes-related bladder dysfunction. PMID:27037041

  2. Validation of a Dutch version of the Actionable 8-item screening questionnaire for neurogenic bladder overactivity in multiple sclerosis: an observational web-based study.

    PubMed

    Jongen, Peter Joseph; Blok, Bertil F M; Heesakkers, John P; Heerings, Marco; Lemmens, Wim A; Donders, Rogier

    2015-10-30

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) the impact of urological symptoms on quality of life and daily activities is considerable. Yet, a substantial percentage of patients may not be urologically evaluated and thus fail to be treated concordantly. The 8-item Actionable questionnaire is a validated English screening tool for the detection of neurogenic bladder overactivity in MS. To enable the use of the 8-item Actionable in The Netherlands and Belgium we translated the questionnaire into the Dutch language and investigated the test-retest reliability and the concurrent validity of the Dutch version. The process of translating the English Actionable questionnaire into the Dutch language included forward translations and back-translations. Then, in an online observational study, MS patients completed the Dutch Actionable at Days 1 and 8, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life 54-Items (MSQoL-54) and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Profile (MSIP) questionnaires at Day 1; the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was assessed by phone at Day 1. For assessment of the test-retest reliability Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) between the Day 1 and Day 8 Actionable scores was calculated. For assessment of the concurrent validity r values were calculated between the Day 1 Actionable score and the EDSS score, the Physical and Mental MSQoL-54 composites, and the MSIP domain and symptom disability scores. N = 141 (106 female, 35 male) (80 relapsing remitting, 48 progressive, 13 unknown), mean age 47.8 (standard deviation [SD] 10.4) years, mean EDSS score 4.7 (SD 1.8); 137 patients completed the Day 8 assessment. Pearson's r between Actionable scores Day 1 and Day 8: 0.85 (P < .0001). Pearson's r between Actionable score Day 1 and scores for EDSS 0.41 (P < 0.0001), MSQoL-54 Physical -0.31 (P = 0.0002), MSQoL-54 Mental -0.29 (P = 0.0005), MSIP Excretion and Reproductive Functions 0.44 (P < 0.0001), Muscle and Movement Functions 0.39 (P

  3. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    voiding contractions (NVC) during normal bladder filling. These NVC are responsible for incontinence episodes, bladder and bladder neck damage, as...eliminated, however, voiding occurred by a combination of augmented overflow incontinence (NVC-driven and a vesicosomatic reflex of the hindquarters...spinal micturition reflex, but rather an augmented overflow incontinence with a locomotor component (High amplitude pressure swings in bottom trace

  4. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  5. [Neurogenic senile vertebral spondylopathy].

    PubMed

    Meneghello, A

    1993-01-01

    Neurogenic spinal arthropathy is quite frequent a finding in elderly patients. Peripheral neuropathy underlies this complication. As a matter of fact, impaired proprioception and sensitivity, which are often associated with lesions of the motor nerves, prevent the joint or bone segment submitted to repeated traumas from perceiving alarm sensations, especially pain. Thus, bone lesions follow, which present as bone erosions, fractures, and even more severe bone destruction. At first, tabetic neuropathy was held responsible for this condition. Then, neurogenic arthropathy was observed in diabetes, syringomyelia, and sometimes trauma. However, in the elderly patient, other conditions can cause peripheral neuropathy, which accounts for the high incidence of this disorder. The radiologic findings of the lumbar spine of 23 of 4,922 patients examined in our department 1989 to 1991 were suggestive of neurogenic spinal arthropathy. Clinical, laboratory and electromyographic findings confirmed the presence of neuropathy. Besides the neurogenic lesions described in 7 diabetic patients, these lesions are reported for the first time in 4 cases of multiple myeloma, in a case of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, in 2 cases of vincristine-treated lymphoma, and finally in an alcohol abuser. Analgesic abuse was observed in 2 patients. In the extant cases, the pathogenesis of neuropathy remained unknown, even though "elderly neuropathy" is known to exist and to be underlain by vascular or degenerative conditions.

  6. Oxidative stress status accompanying diabetic bladder cystopathy results in the activation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kanika, Nirmala; Chang, Jinsook; Tong, Yuehong; Tiplitsky, Scott; Lin, Juan; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Tar, Moses; Chance, Mark; Christ, George J.; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role that oxidative stress plays in the development of diabetic cystopathy. Materials and methods Comparative gene expression in the bladder of non-diabetic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced 2-month-old diabetic rats was carried out using microarray analysis. Evidence of oxidative stress was investigated in the bladder by analyzing glutathione S-transferase activity, lipid peroxidation, and carbonylation and nitrosylation of proteins. The activity of protein degradation pathways was assessed using western blot analysis. Results Analysis of global gene expression showed that detrusor smooth muscle tissue of STZ-induced diabetes undergoes significant enrichment in targets involved in the production or regulation of reactive oxygen species (P = 1.27 × 10−10). The microarray analysis was confirmed by showing that markers of oxidative stress were all significantly increased in the diabetic bladder. It was hypothesized that the sequelae to oxidative stress would be increased protein damage and apoptosis. This was confirmed by showing that two key proteins involved in protein degradation (Nedd4 and LC3B) were greatly up-regulated in diabetic bladders compared to controls by 12.2 ± 0.76 and 4.4 ± 1.0-fold, respectively, and the apoptosis inducing protein, BAX, was up-regulated by 6.76 ± 0.76-fold. Conclusions Overall, the findings obtained in the present study add to the growing body of evidence showing that diabetic cystopathy is associated with oxidative damage of smooth muscle cells, and results in protein damage and activation of apoptotic pathways that may contribute to a deterioration in bladder function. PMID:21518418

  7. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhoujun; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Xianjin; Lu, Yingli; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we evaluated the relation between DM and incidence and mortality of bladder cancer in an updated meta-analysis of cohort studies. Methods We identified cohort studies by searching the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, through 31 March 2012. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with random-effects models. Results A total of 29 cohort studies (27 articles) were included in this meta-analysis. DM was associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer (RR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.08–1.54), with significant evidence of heterogeneity among these studies (p<0.001, I2 = 94.9%). In stratified analysis, the RRs of bladder cancer were 1.36 (1.05–1.77) for diabetic men and 1.28 (0.75–2.19) for diabetic women, respectively. DM was also positively associated with bladder cancer mortality (RR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14–1.55), with evident heterogeneity between studies (p = 0.002, I2 = 63.3%). The positive association was observed for both men (RR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.30–1.82) and women (RR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.05–2.14). Conclusion These findings suggest that compared to non-diabetic individuals, diabetic individuals have an increased incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. PMID:23437204

  8. Neurogenic bladder: etiology and assessment

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A review of the various causes of neurologic impairment to the lower urinary tract in children was the aim of this presentation. The emphasis was on diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment that strive to maintain as normal a function as possible in order to achieve eventual urinary continence and health of the upper urinary tract. The latest principles based on the most up to date evidence are promulgated but with an eye towards historical prospective. The reader should gain an adequate understanding of various disorders that comprise this condition and feel comfortable with proposing options for management when faced with the responsibility of caring for an affected child. PMID:18270749

  9. Does radio frequency radiation induce micronuclei frequency in exfoliated bladder cells of diabetic rats?

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, N; Sirav, B; Kuzay, D; Ozer, C; Seyhan, N

    2015-07-01

    For many years there has been a discussion among both experts and the general public regarding the effects of radio frequency (RF) radiation on the human organism. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the relationship of micronucleui (MN) frequency and RF radiation in exfoliated bladder cells of non-diabetic and diabetic rats. Three groups were used in the experiment: Group I (n=6): diabetic group without RF exposure; Group II (n=6): diabetic group exposed 2100 MHz RF radiation and Group III (n=6): control animals (non-diabetic group, no RF exposure). RF exposure in the experiment resulted in a whole body average SAR of 0.24 W/kg with an ERMS field of 17.5 V/m in non-thermal levels. Results showed that there was no statistically important differences between non-RF exposed diabetes group and control group; Group I and Group III (p>0.05). There was no statistically important differences between diabetes group and diabetes+RF exposed group (Group I and Group II) (p>0.05). RF exposure did not result in increased MN frequencies in exfoliated bladder cells of diabetic rats with respect to control animals (Group II and Group III), either and this result found no statistically important (p>0.05). This study suggested no possible genotoxic effects of RF radiation among human beings especially with chronic disorders, such as diabetes.

  10. L-carnitine treatment partially restores urinary bladder function of streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Irat, Ali Murat

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with urinary bladder dysfunction. This study determined whether or not detrusor responses were altered and reversed by L-carnitine treatment in the urinary bladders of diabetic rats. Three groups of animals were used: streptozotocin-treated (45 mg x kg(-1) i.p., 8 weeks), parallel L-carnitine-treated (0.6 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) i.p.), and control rats. Contractile and relaxant responses were measured using isolated bath techniques. Serum glucose levels in diabetic rats were partially reversed after L-carnitine treatment. Detrusor strips from diabetic rats exhibited an increase in response to electrical field stimulation (EFS; 0.5-32 Hz). Treatment with L-carnitine restored the hyperreactivity to EFS-induced contractility. The response to direct activation of the smooth muscle with carbachol and KCl remained unaltered. In relaxation studies, the urinary bladders of diabetic rats displayed a diminished response to isoprenaline, an unchanged response to ATP, and an increased response to adenosine of the ATP metabolite. L-carnitine treatment restored the hyporesponsiveness of isoprenaline and the hyperresponsiveness of adenosine-elicited relaxation. These findings show that carnitine can be implicated in the contractile response of noradrenergic noncholinergic nerve stimulation and the relaxation response of isoprenaline and adenosine. Hence, L-carnitine deficiency can contribute to voiding deficiency in diabetic patients. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Chronic treatment with taurine ameliorates diabetes-induced dysfunction of nitric oxide-mediated neurogenic and endothelium-dependent corpus cavernosum relaxation in rats.

    PubMed

    Dalaklioglu, Selvinaz; Kuscu, Nilay; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi Satilmis

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effect of chronic taurine treatment on corpus cavernosum dysfunction in diabetic rats and to investigate possible underlying mechanisms. Thirty male rats were randomized to three groups of 10 each, including control, diabetic, and taurine-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ, single intraperitoneal dose of 50 mg/kg body weight). Taurine was administered orally for 12 weeks (1% w/v in drinking water) from the day on which STZ was injected. At the end of the 12th week, strips of corpus cavernosum were suspended in an organ bath system for functional studies. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation were evaluated by acetylcholine (ACh, 0.1-100 μm) and electrical field stimulation (EFS, 30 V, 5 ms, 2-32 Hz), respectively. The expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser-1177), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) , Rho A, and Rho kinase in corpus cavernosum were semi-quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry. Induction of diabetes resulted in significant inhibition of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation. Furthermore, eNOS, p-eNOS, and nNOS expressions decreased significantly in diabetic rats compared to controls, while gp91(phox) , RhoA and Rho kinase expressions increased significantly. The diminished relaxation response to ACh and EFS as well as diabetes-related changes in expressions of these proteins in corpus cavernosum of diabetic rats was significantly improved by taurine. Taurine treatment improves NO-mediated relaxations of corpus cavernosum in diabetic rats probably by inhibiting NADPH oxidase/Rho kinase pathways.

  12. Spontaneous Urinary Bladder Perforation: An Unusual Presentation of Diabetes Mellitus☆

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Abdo E.; Ramchandani, Parvati; Guzzo, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare event, which requires immediate medical attention due to its extremely high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with acute-onset abdominal pain without any inciting events. His glucose level at the time of presentation was 1107 mg/dL. On initial abdominal imaging, it was believed that he had a large pelvic mass likely originating from the bladder. On further workup at our hospital, it was discovered that he had an intraperitoneal perforation after which he underwent an exploratory laparotomy and a cystorrhaphy. PMID:26955559

  13. Neurogenic cough.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Noordzij, J Pieter; Rosen, Clark A; Cohen, Seth; Sulica, Lucian

    2015-07-01

    We review contemporary concepts of the pathophysiology of neurogenic cough, and its evaluation and treatment based on scientific publications addressing neurogenic cough. Neurogenic cough is thought to be the result of sensory neuropathy, most commonly idiopathic. Because it is principally a sensory phenomenon, clinical evaluation is challenging, the diagnosis most often being made by exclusion. Identification of motor paresis, either by laryngoscopy or laryngeal electromyography, may suggest the presence of sensory neuropathy. The utility of amitriptyline and gabapentin has been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials, and retrospective series and case reports have suggested efficacy of pregabalin, baclofen, and botulinum toxin. Sensory neuropathy appears to be an important cause of chronic refractory cough, and appears amenable to treatment with a variety of pharmacologic agents.

  14. Association between metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Capogrosso, Paolo; Damiano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several metabolic abnormalities, its prevalence is increasing worldwide. To summarize the most recent evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome, its components and the oncological outcomes in bladder cancer patients, a National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search for relevant articles either published or e-published up to March 2014 was carried out by combining the following Patient population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome terms: metabolic syndrome, obesity, body mass index, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, bladder cancer, risk, mortality, cancer specific survival, disease recurrence and progression. Metabolic syndrome is a complex, highly prevalent disorder, and central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension are its main components. Published findings would suggest that metabolic syndrome per se might be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in male patients, but it did not seem to confer a risk of worse prognosis. Considering the primary components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia), available data are uncertain, and it is no possible to reach a conclusion yet on either a direct or an indirect association with bladder cancer risk and prognosis. Only with regard to type 2 diabetes mellitus, available data would suggest a potential negative correlation. However, as the evaluation of bladder cancer risk and prognosis in patients with metabolic disorders is certainly complex, further studies are urgently required to better assess the actual role of these metabolic disorders.

  15. Botulinum toxin type A for the treatment of non-neurogenic overactive bladder: does using onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ) or abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ) make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Pravisha; Jackson, Benjamin L; Parkinson, Richard J

    2013-07-01

    To compare the clinical effects of two different commercially available botulinum toxin type A products, onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox(®) ; Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) and abobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport(®) ; Ipsen Ltd, Slough, UK), on non-neurogenic overactive bladder (OAB). We included 207 patients, who underwent treatment with botulinum toxin type A for non-neurogenic OAB from January 2009 to June 2012 at our institution, in a prospective database that recorded details of their presentation, treatment and outcomes. In December 2009, our institution switched from using onabotulinumtoxinA to using abobotulinumtoxinA. Results from the onabotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 101) and the abobotulinumtoxinA cohort (n = 106) were compared. Similar reductions in daytime frequency, nocturia and incontinence episodes were observed after treatment, with no difference in duration of effect. The abobotulinumtoxinA cohort had almost twice the rate of symptomatic urinary retention (23 vs 42%) requiring intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC). AbobotulinumtoxinA use was complicated by a significantly higher risk of requiring ISC. The study suggests that these two toxins are not interchangeable at the doses used. © 2013 BJU International.

  16. [Neurogenic Dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Prosiegel, M

    2007-10-01

    Neurogenic dysphagia occurs in many diseases, the most frequent cause being stroke. Diagnostic approaches include neurologic examination and fiberoptic and videofluoroscopic evaluations of swallowing, which are complementary. The pivotal aim of therapeutic interventions is the prevention of aspiration and aspiration pneumonia. Proof of the effectivity of some restitutional, compensatory, and adaptive methods is given.

  17. Prevalence of Gall Bladder Stones among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi Libya: A Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elmehdawi, RR; Elmajberi, SJ; Behieh, A; Elramli, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and gall bladder stones are both common and costly diseases. Increasing age, female gender, overweight, familial history of the disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus is all associated with an increased risk of gallstones. Several studies from around the world reported an increased prevalence of gall bladder stones in patients with diabetes mellitus. Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to define the frequency of gall bladder stones among Libyan diabetics and to evaluate the possible associated risk factors in these patients. Patients and methods: A case-control study was performed during 2007 at Benghazi Diabetes and endocrinology Center. The study involved 161 randomly selected type-2 diabetic patients under regular follow up at the center, and 166 age and sex matched non-diabetic outpatients at the 7th of October teaching hospital. Real-time abdominal ultrasound was performed by two radiologists to examine the abdomen after an overnight fast. Results: About 40% of the diabetic cohort had gall bladder stones as compared to 17.5% of non-diabetic patients. Females were significantly more affected than males. Patients with gall bladder stones were significantly older and had a significantly higher body mass index than those without stones. Conclusion: The prevalence of gallstones in Libyan diabetic patients is higher than the rates reported in other parts of the world. Libyan diabetic patients with gallstones tend to be older and more obese than those without gallstones. Duration of diabetes mellitus and type of treatment does not seem to influence the frequency of gall bladder stones among Libyan diabetics. PMID:21483499

  18. Pioglitazone and bladder cancer in human studies: is it diabetes itself, diabetes drugs, flawed analyses or different ethnicities?

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews human observations on pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk. The PROspective pioglitAzone Clinical Trial In macroVascular Events trial showed an imbalance in bladder cancer between users of pioglitazone and placebo (14 versus six cases, p = 0.069). However, after excluding bladder cancer probably ascribed to other etiology, a blind assessment concluded that the imbalance might not be related to pioglitazone. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the United States and France using insurance databases independently suggested that pioglitazone use for >2 years might confer a 20%-40% higher risk. Another study evaluating bladder cancer risk in diabetic patients using the National Health Insurance in Taiwan did not find any incident bladder cancer case among 422 pioglitazone users for a follow-up of up to 3 years. Because observational studies may suffer from selection and information bias, and inadequate adjustment for confounders may inflate the estimated risk, causal inference from these studies should be interpreted with caution. While investigating cancer risk associated with a medication, indication bias should also be attended, especially when the medication is used at a late stage of the disease. Because pioglitazone is usually a second or third line antidiabetic agent, the users are always characterized by older age, longer diabetes duration, poorer glycemic control, and higher rates of complications and comorbidities. Biased estimates will also result if these differences are not appropriately addressed in the analyses. Current evidence neither concludes nor excludes a causal role of pioglitazone on bladder cancer. Clinical trials aiming at evaluating the risk of cancer associated with a medication is not ethical and may not be expected to provide an answer on the issue of pioglitazone-related bladder cancer. However, a meta-analysis using all available clinical trials to compare the bladder cancer risk between pioglitazone and comparators

  19. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in the progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Rahmani, Arshad H; Khan, Amjad A; Aly, Salah Mesalhy

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy is a major public health and economical burden worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the molecular mechanisms that induce or develop bladder carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy progression are poorly understood but it might be due to the disturbance in balance between angiogenic factors such as VEGF and antiangiogenic factors such as pigment epithelium derived growth factor. VEGF is one of the important survival factors for endothelial cells in the process of normal physiological and abnormal angiogenesis and induce the expression of antiapoptotic proteins in the endothelial cells. It is also the major initiator of angiogenesis in cancer and diabetic retinopathy, where it is up-regulated by oncogenic expression and different type of growth factors. The alteration in VEGF and VEGF receptors gene and overexpression, determines a diseases phenotype and ultimately the patient’s clinical outcome. However, expressional and molecular studies were made on VEGF to understand the exact mechanism of action in the genesis and progression of bladder carcinoma and diabetic retinopathy , but still how VEGF mechanism involve in such type of disease progression are not well defined. Some other factors also play a significant role in the process of activation of VEGF pathways. Therefore, further detailed analysis via molecular and therapeutic is needed to know the exact mechanisms of VEGF in the angiogenesis pathway. The detection of these types of diseases at an early stage, predict how it will behave and act in response to treatment through regulation of VEGF pathways. The present review aimed to summarize the mechanism of alteration of VEGF gene pathways, which play a vital role in the development and progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23641300

  20. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Wu, Jian; Mao, Yeqing; Zhu, Yi; Hu, Zhenghui; Xu, Xianglai; Lin, Yiwei; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiangyi; Qin, Jie; Xie, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is associated with increased risk of cancer at several sites, but its association with risk of bladder cancer is still controversial. We examined this association by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Methods Studies were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Cochrane register, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases through April 29, 2012. Summary relative risks (SRRs) with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Results A total of fifteen cohort studies were included in this meta-analysis. Analysis of all studies showed that diabetes was associated with a borderline statistically significant increased risk of bladder cancer (RR 1.11, 95% CI 1.00–1.23; p<0.001 for heterogeneity; I2 = 84%). When restricting the analysis to studies that had adjusted for cigarette smoking (n = 6) or more than three confounders (n = 7), the RRs were 1.32 (95% CI 1.18–1.49) and 1.20 (95% CI 1.02–1.42), respectively. There was no significant publication bias (p = 0.62 for Egger’s regression asymmetry test). Conclusions Our findings support that diabetes was associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. More future studies are warranted to get a better understanding of the association and to provide convincing evidence for clinical practice in bladder cancer prevention. PMID:23472134

  1. [Treatment of non-neurogenic masculine urinary incontinence due to overactive bladder: a review by the LUTS committee of the French Urological Association].

    PubMed

    Lebdai, S; Haillot, O; Azzouzi, A R; Benchikh, A; Campeggi, A; Cornu, J-N; Delongchamps, N B; Dumonceau, O; Faix, A; Fourmarier, M; Lukacs, B; Mathieu, R; Misrai, V; Robert, G; de La Taille, A; Descazeaud, A

    2014-07-01

    To perform an update on the treatment of masculine urinary incontinence due to idiopathic overactive bladder. A systematic review was conducted using PubMed/MEDLINE with the following keywords: "overactive bladder", "male urinary incontinence", "urgency", "antimuscarinic", "onabotulinumtoxinA", "neurostimulation", "cystoplasty". Antimuscarinic treatments were the first line option for overactive bladder incontinence (decreased incontinence under tolterodine versus placebo respectively -71% vs. -40%, P < 0.05). Their main side effects were dry mouth (16-29.6%) and constipation (4%), which might decrease the observance. In case of failure, neuromostimulation could be prosed with a 67% efficacy rate. Intra-detrusorian injections of onabotulinumtoxinA were an option, however there were still not validated for this indication and their efficacy decreases with time and after repeated injections. The ultimate option in case of refractory major over-activity was cystoplasty, which involves major morbidity for inconstant efficacy. The same treatments are available for non-neurologic urinary incontinence by bladder over-activity for men and women: antimuscarinic drugs, neurostimulation, onabotulinumtoxinA. However, only few data is available for masculine population exclusively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Pioglitazone prescription increases risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Shiyao; Tang, Yu-hong; Zhao, Guobin; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Dehou; Zhang, Ye

    2014-03-01

    Pioglitazone is widely used for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but evidence regarding the association between pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk is confusing. A systematic search of databases was carried out, and other relevant papers were also identified. Then, the analyses were conducted according to the PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. After quality assessment, nine datasets from 10 available studies were included on the basis of inclusion criteria. The incidence of bladder cancer among pioglitazone ever users and never users, pooled from four cohort and one randomized studies, were 84.51 and 66.68 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Nine studies representing 2,596,856 diabetic patients were recognized as eligible for overall study; the result suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients exposed to pioglitazone. A persistent significance was detected after being adjusted by age, gender, and use of other diabetes medications. Subgroup analyses indicated that the significantly increased incidence of bladder cancer was found in men, but not in women. Additionally, the analyses addressing increasing exposure to pioglitazone observed a dose-response relation between exclusive ever use of pioglitazone and bladder cancer in terms of cumulative duration of use and cumulative dosage. With some limitations, our results suggest an increased risk of bladder cancer in diabetic patients using pioglitazone, especially for men with long-term and high-dose exposure. Additional studies are needed to provide more precise evidences to support our results.

  3. Diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness: A case of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Nasrollah; Bashardoust, Bahman; Zakeri, Anahita; Salehifar, Azita; Tavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, progressive optic atrophy, and deafness. A 19-year-old female patient, a known case of diabetes mellitus type I from six years before, presented with progressive vision loss since four years earlier. On fundoscopic examination, she had bilateral optic atrophy without diabetic retinopathy. The patient also had diabetes insipidus, neurosensory deafness, and neurogenic bladder. WS should be considered a differential diagnosis in patients with diabetes mellitus who present with optic atrophy, and it is necessary to perform a hearing test as well as collecting 24-h urine output.

  4. Pioglitazone does not increase the risk of type II diabetes in patients with bladder cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youhong; Wang, Anping

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to analyze the effect of pioglitazone on the expression of tumor tissue inflammation factor interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of type II diabetes in bladder cancer patients. In addition, whether there was a correlation between pioglitazone and the occurrence of male bladder cancer was also investigated. In total, 42 male cases diagnosed with type II diabetes secondary to bladder cancer were selected. Forty male cases, with simplex type II diabetes but not with bladder cancer, served as the control. Tumor biopsy specimens were collected to detect the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF. The results showed that the expression of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF of the simplex diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the secondary to tumor group (P<0.05). The comparison of the two groups in terms of daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone, duration of diabetes, average fasting blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin levels, was not statistically significant. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF were independent risk factors for the occurrence of bladder cancer (P<0.05), but were not associated with daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone (P>0.05). In conclusion, oral pioglitazone may not increase the risk of type II diabetes patients with bladder cancer. However, the occurrence of bladder cancer be associated with the increasing expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF.

  5. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    findings over the course of the past year have been that NVC in chronic SCI are accompanied by intra-abdominal pressure increases resulting from...and intrinsic myogenic activity on the generation of high pressure NVC in chronic SCI rats with detrusor hyperreflexia and detrusor-sphincter...sphincter dyssynergia in humans with suprasacral spinal cord injury. Our overarching hypothesis is that NVCs in chronic SCI may be augmented by bladder

  6. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction in a Type II Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Qiu, Xuefeng; Shindel, Alan W.; Ning, Hongxiu; Ferretti, Ludovic; Jin, Xunbo; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a broad constellation of voiding complaints that are often multifactorial and resistant to currently available therapies. The leading causes of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) include alterations in the bladder smooth muscle, neuronal degeneration, and urothelial dysfunction. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a type of mesenchymal stromal cells, have shown promise as a novel tissue regenerative technique that may have utility in DBD. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and mechanism by which ADSCs may ameliorate DBD in rats fed a high-fat diet and treated with low-dose streptozotocin to induce type II diabetes. Improved voiding function was noted in ADSCs-treated rats as compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated rats. Though some ADSCs differentiated into smooth muscle cells, paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, thus resulting in reduction of apoptosis and preservation of “suburothelial capillaries network.” PMID:22008016

  7. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin-use and risk of bladder cancer in a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Newton, Christina C; Gapstur, Susan M; Campbell, Peter T; Jacobs, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased bladder cancer incidence in some, but not all, studies. Many studies had limited statistical power and few examined risk by insulin-use, duration of diabetes or cancer stage. We examined the association between T2DM and bladder cancer incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a large prospective study with information on insulin-use and duration of diabetes. Diabetes and insulin-use were ascertained from a questionnaire at study enrollment in 1992 or 1993 and updated in 1997 and every 2 years thereafter. During follow-up through 2007, 1,852 cases of incident bladder cancer were identified among 172,791 participants. Multivariable adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using extended Cox regression modeling. There were no associations of T2DM with the risk of bladder cancer overall (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.87-1.17), noninvasive disease (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.76-1.14) or invasive disease (RR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.91-1.40). Compared to participants without T2DM, risk of invasive bladder cancer was higher among participants who had had T2DM for >15 years (RR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.09-2.43) and among those using insulin (RR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.18-2.27). These results do not support an association of T2DM with overall bladder cancer incidence, but do suggest positive associations of long-term T2DM and insulin-use or other factors correlated with severe diabetes, with invasive bladder cancer incidence.

  8. Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control increases bladder cancer recurrence risk in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chung-Hsin; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Tai, Huai-Chin; Wang, Sho-Mon; Pu, Yeong-Shiau

    2015-03-01

    The association of diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer recurrence following radical nephroureterectomies (RNUs) in patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC) was investigated. Between January 1996 and March 2009, 538 patients with UTUC who received RNU and had no previous bladder cancer histories were enrolled. The clinicopathological characteristics were obtained and used for the analysis of metachronous bladder recurrence by using Cox proportional hazard model. The diabetic patients (N = 104, 19.3%) were elderly (72 vs 67 years, p < 0.001) and had more hypertension (56.7 vs 34.5%, p < 0.001) as compared with non-diabetic patients. There was no significant difference in the rest of clinicopathological characteristics between patient groups. During the median follow-up duration of 51 months, bladder recurrences were discovered in 47.1 and 33.1% of diabetic and non-diabetic patients with UTUC, respectively. Poorly controlled diabetic patients (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) exhibited a shorter duration of bladder cancer recurrence-free survival as compared with those with good glycemic controlled diabetes mellitus and without diabetes mellitus (log-rank test, p < 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). In the multivariate analysis, male gender [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.67, p = 0.017], ureteral tumour (HR = 1.61, p = 0.020), end-stage renal disease (HR = 2.09, p = 0.030) and diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HR = 2.10, p < 0.018) independently predicted bladder recurrence after RNU. Diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control (HbA1c  ≥ 7.0%) increases the risk of subsequent bladder cancer recurrence. These results underscore the need for intensive glycemic control and close follow-up for diabetic patients. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Philyppov, Igor B.; Paduraru, Oksana N.; Gulak, Kseniya L.; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (˂17 °C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors – tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation. PMID:26935999

  10. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Philyppov, Igor B; Paduraru, Oksana N; Gulak, Kseniya L; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (<17°C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors - tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation.

  11. AB86. The roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia in bladder dysfunction in long-term diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Aims of study Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a collective description of clinical symptoms including decreased sensation, increased capacity, poor emptying, and also detrusor overactivity, is among the most common and costly complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is estimated that DBD occurs in approximately 87% of individuals diagnosed with DM, and substantially affects quality of life. Yet, little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of DBD. Unlike other organs, the bladder experiences not only hyperglycemia, but also an increased volume of urine in DM. To aid in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of DBD and to aid development of specific treatments, identification of individual contributions of polyuria and hyperglycemia in the DBD is essential. Materials and methods Seventy two female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups: age-matched controls (control), sham urinary diversion (sham), urinary diversion (UD), streptozotocin-induced diabetics after sham urinary diversion (DM), streptozotocin-induced diabetics after urinary diversion (UD+DM), and 5% sucrose-induced diuretics after sham urinary diversion (DIU). UD was performed 10 days before diabetes induction by surgical disconnection of the ureters from the bladder and implantation to uterine cervix. Each group was subsequently evaluated 20 weeks after diabetes or diuresis induction. Twenty-four hour drinking and voided volumes were measured. Conscious cystometry (CMG) was examined. The bladders were harvested for histological examination and quantification of smooth muscle, urothelium, and collagen. The expressions of oxidative stress-related proteins, nitrotyrosine and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), in bladder were examined. Results Diabetes and diuresis caused increases in drinking volume, voided volume and bladder weight. The bladder weight decreased in the UD and UD+DM group. CMG showed increased intercontractile intervals, voided volume and compliance in DIU and DM group

  12. AB191. The roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia in bladder dysfunction in long-term diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhiping; Wang, Jiaji; Mi, Jun; Liu, Guiming

    2014-01-01

    Aims of study Diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD), a collective description of clinical symptoms including decreased sensation, increased capacity, poor emptying, and also detrusor overactivity, is among the most common and costly complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). It is estimated that DBD occurs in approximately 87% of individuals diagnosed with DM, and substantially affects quality of life. Yet, little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of DBD. Unlike other organs, the bladder experiences not only hyperglycemia, but also an increased volume of urine in DM. To aid in our knowledge of the pathophysiology of DBD and to aid development of specific treatments, identification of individual contributions of polyuria and hyperglycemia in the DBD is essential. Materials and methods Seventy two female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups: age-matched controls (control), sham urinary diversion (sham), urinary diversion (UD), streptozotocin-induced diabetics after sham urinary DM, streptozotocin-induced diabetics after urinary diversion (UD + DM), and 5% sucrose-induced diuretics after sham urinary diversion (DIU). UD was performed 10 days before diabetes induction by surgical disconnection of the ureters from the bladder and implantation to uterine cervix. Each group was subsequently evaluated 20 weeks after diabetes or diuresis induction. Twenty-four hour drinking and voided volumes were measured. Conscious cystometry (CMG) was examined. The bladders were harvested for histological examination and quantification of smooth muscle, urothelium, and collagen. The expressions of oxidative stress-related proteins, nitrotyrosine and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), in bladder were examined. Results Diabetes and diuresis caused increases in drinking volume, voided volume and bladder weight. The bladder weight decreased in the UD and UD + DM group. CMG showed increased inter-contractile intervals, voided volume and compliance in DIU and DM group

  13. [Electrostimulation of anterior sacral nerve roots in the treatment of central neurogenic bladders. G.S. Brindley's technique. Results of the 40 first French cases].

    PubMed

    Barat, M; Egon, G; Daverat, P; Colombel, P; Guerin, J; Ritz, M; Marit, E; Herlant, M

    1993-01-01

    The results of the first 40 cases who underwent implantation of a sacral anterior root stimulator (G.S. Brindley) in France are reported. One patient die two years after implantation from an unrelated cause. 39 patients are using electrostimulation with a 6 month to 8 year follow-up. 90% have a satisfactory continence and no longer require an incontinence appliance. 82% of the patients have a post-void residue of 0 to 50 cc. Urinary infection rate has dramatically decreased. Bladder capacity and compliance have increased, and urethral closure pressure has decreased according to posterior rhizotomy. Possible side effect of total posterior rhizotomy from S2 to S4 could be stress incontinence.

  14. Risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zeegers, Maurice P; Bazelier, Marloes T; De Bruin, Marie L; Buntinx, Frank; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the association between diabetes, and both urinary bladder cancer (UBC) risk and mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked to the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2, or using antidiabetic drugs (ADDs), were compared to matched non-diabetic controls. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk and mortality of UBC. We adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and body mass index. Results The cohort included 329 168 patients using ADD, and 307 315 controls with 1295 and 1071 patients, respectively, diagnosed as having UBC during follow-up. The adjusted HRs of UBC were 0.77 (95% CI 0.57 to 1.05) and 1.04 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for type 1 and 2 diabetes, respectively. These results were similar if we restricted our analysis to an inception cohort. We noticed a small increased risk during the first year after diagnosis (HR=1.26 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.52)), which could be explained by detection bias. There was no influence of the severity of diabetes as measured by the glycated haemoglobin. Mortality of UBC was not increased for patients with either type 1 (HR=0.95 (95% CI 0.39 to 2.34)) or type 2 diabetes (HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.46)). Conclusions Neither the risk of UBC nor the mortality from UBC was increased in patients with type 1 and patients with type 2 diabetes in the CPRD data. PMID:26033947

  15. Propiverine: a review of its use in the treatment of adults and children with overactive bladder associated with idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity, and in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Propiverine is a well established antimuscarinic agent with a mixed mode of action in the treatment of symptoms associated with overactive bladder (OAB). As well as blocking muscarinic receptors in the detrusor muscle, the drug also inhibits cellular calcium influx, thereby diminishing muscle spasm. In patients with symptoms of OAB resulting from idiopathic detrusor overactivity (IDO) or neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), propiverine demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy and tolerability, with adverse events consistent with those associated with all antimuscarinic agents. In adults with IDO, propiverine demonstrated similar efficacy to that of other antimuscarinic agents (including solifenacin, tolterodine, oxybutynin and imidafenacin) and, in adults with NDO, propiverine and oxybutynin demonstrated similar efficacy. Propiverine was generally well tolerated in these patient populations, with a lower incidence of dry mouth than that associated with oxybutynin. In men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and in whom the presence of benign prostatic enlargement (BPE) was implicated, propiverine administered as add-on therapy to an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist demonstrated similar or superior efficacy to that achieved with an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist alone, and combination therapy was particularly effective in patients with urinary storage symptoms. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated, but was associated with a higher incidence of adverse events than an α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist alone. In children and adolescents with IDO/OAB or NDO, propiverine was generally more effective and better tolerated than oxybutynin. In conclusion, propiverine provides a valuable option for the treatment of adults and children with OAB associated with IDO or NDO, and in men with storage LUTS.

  16. Alterations in urinary bladder M2-muscarinic receptor protein and mRNA in 2-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y C; Chin, W T; Cheng, J T

    1999-12-31

    The M2 receptor (M2-mAChR) is quantitatively the dominant muscarinic subtype in animal bladders. The alterations in its protein quantity and biosynthesis during diabetic cystopathy were investigated. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (1) 2-week-old diabetics; and (2) normoglycemic control rats. Diabetes was induced by single intravenous injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. The amount of M2 receptor protein in the rat bladder body tissue was measured by Western immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies. For determination of M2 muscarinic receptor mRNA in the bladder tissue, the method of Northern blotting was employed. The results of the Western immunoblotting showed that the amount of M2-mAChR protein in the diabetic bladder was significantly increased by 40.0 +/- 6.2% when compared with the control bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The Northern blotting demonstrated a 69.3 +/- 8.5% increase of the M2-mAChR mRNA in the diabetic bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The findings of the present study demonstrated an up-regulation of M2-mAChR biosynthesis in the diabetic urinary bladder. This phenomenon could lead to increased reactivity to acetylcholine and thus results in detrusor instability.

  17. Biomatrices for bladder reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Madihally, Sundar V; Palmer, Blake; Frimberger, Dominic; Fung, Kar-Ming; Kropp, Bradley P

    2015-03-01

    There is a demand for tissue engineering of the bladder needed by patients who experience a neurogenic bladder or idiopathic detrusor overactivity. To avoid complications from augmentation cystoplasty, the field of tissue engineering seeks optimal scaffolds for bladder reconstruction. Naturally derived biomaterials as well as synthetic and natural polymers have been explored as bladder substitutes. To improve regenerative properties, these biomaterials have been conjugated with functional molecules, combined with nanotechology, or seeded with exogenous cells. Although most studies reported complete and functional bladder regeneration in small-animal models, results from large-animal models and human clinical trials varied. For functional bladder regeneration, procedures for biomaterial fabrication, incorporation of biologically active agents, introduction of nanotechnology, and application of stem-cell technology need to be standardized. Advanced molecular and medical technologies such as next generation sequencing and magnetic resonance imaging can be introduced for mechanistic understanding and non-invasive monitoring of regeneration processes, respectively.

  18. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes.

  19. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  20. [Holoprosencephaly with neurogenic hypernatremia].

    PubMed

    Cuisset, J M; Cuvellier, J C; Vallée, L; Ryckewäert, P; Soto-Ares, G; Nuyts, J P

    1999-01-01

    Semi-lobar holoprosencephalies can be seldom complicated by neurogenic hypernatremia, which must be distinguished from other causes of hypernatremia. In two admitted children with semi-lobar holoprosencephaly, 7 months and 4 years old, biological data revealed chronic hypernatremia and hyperosmolarity without clinical signs of dehydration, which were finally attributed to a neurogenic hypernatremia. Neurogenic hypernatremia must be clearly differentiated from other causes of hypernatremia since it never causes specific complications.

  1. Early treatment improves urodynamic prognosis in neurogenic voiding dysfunction: 20 years of experience.

    PubMed

    Costa Monteiro, Lucia M; Cruz, Glaura O; Fontes, Juliana M; Vieira, Eliane T R C; Santos, Eloá N; Araújo, Grace F; Ramos, Eloane G

    To evaluate the association between early treatment and urodynamic improvement in pediatric and adolescent patients with neurogenic bladder. Retrospective longitudinal and observational study (between 1990 and 2013) including patients with neurogenic bladder and myelomeningocele treated based on urodynamic results. The authors evaluated the urodynamic follow-up (bladder compliance and maximum bladder capacity and pressure) considering the first urodynamic improvement in two years as the outcome variable and early referral as the exposure variable, using a descriptive and multivariate analysis with logistic regression model. Among 230 patients included, 52% had an early referral. The majority were diagnosed as overactive bladder with high bladder pressure (≥40cm H2O) and low bladder compliance (3mL/cmH2O) and were treated with oxybutynin and intermittent catheterization. Urodynamic follow-up results showed 68% of improvement at the second urodynamic examination decreasing bladder pressure and increasing bladder capacity and compliance. The percentage of incontinence and urinary tract infections decreased over treatment. Early referral (one-year old or less) increased by 3.5 the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years (95% CI: 1.81-6.77). Treatment onset within the first year of life improves urodynamic prognosis in patients with neurogenic bladder and triplicates the probability of urodynamic improvement in two years. The role of neonatologists and pediatricians in early referral is extremely important. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. An unusual cause of bilateral massive peripheral edema in a young male with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gać, Paweł; Stoinska, Anna; Balawejder, Kamila; Jaźwiec, Przemysław; Miszalski-Jamka, Tomasz; Szuba, Andrzej

    2014-10-01

    The present article demonstrates an unusual case of bilateral massive peripheral edema caused by neurogenic areflexic bladder in diabetes mellitus type 1. A 28-year-old patient with diabetes type 1 treated for a number of years was referred to the department of internal medicine because of massive edema of his lower limbs. Blood samples revealed increased concentrations of glucose (21.2 mmol/L) and glycated hemoglobin (8.5%). The computed tomography examination of abdomen and pelvis confirmed enlargement of the bladder, with smooth external contour and normal wall thickness. In addition, computed tomography demonstrated bilateral compression of the iliac veins caused by the enlarged bladder. This case highlights the importance of keeping a broad differential diagnosis in mind for patients with diabetes and massive peripheral edema. Neurogenic bladder should be considered in the differential diagnosis, especially for patients with poor glycemia control and long-standing diabetes complicated by diabetic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Endogenous Stem Cells Were Recruited by Defocused Low-Energy Shock Wave in Treating Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Muwen; Jin, Xunbo; Zhang, Haiyang

    2017-04-01

    Defocused low-energy shock wave (DLSW) has been shown effects on activating mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vitro. In this study, recruitment of endogenous stem cells was firstly examined as an important pathway during the healing process of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) treated by DLSW in vivo. Neonatal rats received intraperitoneal injection of 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) and then DBD rat model was created by injecting streptozotocin. Four weeks later, DLSW treatment was performed. Afterward, their tissues were examined by histology. Meanwhile, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were treated by DLSW in vitro. Results showed DLSW ameliorated voiding function of diabetic rats by recruiting EdU(+)Stro-1(+)CD34(-) endogenous stem cells to release abundant nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some EdU(+) cells overlapped with staining of smooth muscle actin. After DLSW treatment, ADSCs showed higher migration ability, higher expression level of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and secreted more NGF and VEGF. In conclusion, DLSW could ameliorate DBD by recruiting endogenous stem cells. Beneficial effects were mediated by secreting NGF and VEGF, resulting into improved innervation and vascularization in bladder.

  4. [Alterations in blood circulation of vesicourethral segment in men with neurogenic and non-neurogenic lower urinary tract symptoms].

    PubMed

    Alayev, Yu G; Esilevskiy, Yu M; Shmidt, T E; Demidko, Yu L; Fiev, D N; Kazantsev, K Yu

    2016-12-01

    To specify the pathogenetic link between blood supply of the bladder neck and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The study involved 78 men aged 26 to 50 years, including 19 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and LUTS, 29 patients with chronic prostatitis category IIIB with LUTS and 30 patients with chronic prostatitis category IIIB without LUTS (control group). All the patients underwent Doppler ultrasonography of prostatic arteries and selective study of blood flow in the neck of the bladder. Pharmacological test using combinations of 1-blockers (1-AB) with m-anticholinergics (m-CB) and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDEI-5). The changes in the blood circulation of VUS were found to correlate with LUTS. The response of blood flow depended not only on the type of pharmacological agents, but also on the degree of vascular changes and neurological deficit in VUS. The findings of VUS vascular pharmacological tests with PDEI-5 and 1-AB + m-CB were comparable in chronic prostatitis with non-neurogenic LUTS and in MS with neurogenic LUTS. Vascular reaction in VUS depends on the presence of neurological deficit. The combination of (1-AB+ m-CB) increases the blood circulation of the bladder neck and prostate and reduces the LUTS. PDEI-5 reduces LUTS due to the positive effect on the blood circulation of the prostate and VUS. Circulatory abnormalities (=hypoxia) in VUS is an important pathogenetic mechanism of neurogenic and non-neurogenic LUTS and the way to compensate them using a combination of (1-AB+ m-CB) or PDEI-5. Therefore, one of the mechanisms of LUTS is associated with impaired blood flow in the bladder neck and VUS.

  5. Neurogenic neuroprotection: clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Mauricio; Fonoff, Erich Talamoni; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Chadi, Gerson

    2012-01-01

    Summary Neurogenic neuroprotection is a promising approach for treating patients with ischemic brain lesions. In rats, stimulation of the deep brain nuclei has been shown to reduce the volume of focal infarction. In this context, protection of neural tissue can be a rapid intervention that has a relatively long-lasting effect, making fastigial nucleus stimulation (FNS) a potentially valuable method for clinical application. Although the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by FNS remain partially unclear, important data have been presented in the last two decades. A 1-h electrical FNS reduced, by 59%, infarctions triggered by permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in Fisher rats. The acute effect of electrical FNS is likely mediated by a prolonged opening of potassium channels, and the sustained effect appears to be linked to inhibition of the apoptotic cascade. A better understanding of the neuronal circuitry underlying neurogenic neuroprotection may contribute to improving neurological outcomes in ischemic brain insults. PMID:23597434

  6. Neurogenic voiding dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Petros; Apostolidis, Apostolos

    2017-05-01

    This review aims to analyze and discuss all recently published articles associated with neurogenic voiding discussion providing readers with the most updated knowledge and trigger for further research. They include the proposal of a novel classification system for the pathophysiology of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) which combines neurological defect in a distinct anatomic location, and data on bowel dysfunction, autonomic dysreflexia and urine biomarkers; review of patient-reported outcome measures in NLUTD; review of the criteria for the diagnosis of clinically significant urinary infections; novel research findings on the pathophysiology of NLUTD; and review of data on minimally and more invasive treatments. Despite the extended evidence base on NLUTD, there is a paucity of high-quality new research concerning voiding dysfunction as opposed to storage problems. The update aims to inform clinicians about new developments in clinical practice, as well as ignite discussion for further clinical and basic research in the aforementioned areas of NLUTD.

  7. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  8. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Charlot-Lambrecht, Isabelle; Brochot, Pascal; Noblet, Hervé; Varoquier, Coralie; Eschard, Jean-Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report the case of a 48-year-old man who presented with left calf hypertrophy 6 years after an episode of left S1 sciatica related to a herniated disk. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed muscle hypertrophy. Electromyography showed left S1 radiculopathy with abnormal spontaneous muscle activity. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy is a rare phenomenon that is chiefly seen when denervation occurs slowly and gradually. The typical patient is a middle-aged man who has a history of S1 radiculopathy. The soleus muscle is the main site of involvement. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve type I fiber hypertrophy in response to the complex repetitive discharges recorded by electromyography. The natural history of neurogenic muscle hypertrophy is incompletely understood.

  9. Risk of bladder cancer among patients with diabetes treated with a 15 mg pioglitazone dose in Korea: a multi-center retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Song, Sun Ok; Jung, Chang Hee; Chang, Jin-Sun; Suh, Sunghwan; Kang, Seung Min; Jung, Inkyung; Park, Cheol-Young; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2014-02-01

    It has not yet been determined whether chronic exposure to relatively low doses of pioglitazone increases risk of bladder cancer. We aimed to assess the risk of bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone in Korean patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of diabetic patients who had ≥ 2 clinic visits between November 2005 and June 2011 at one of four tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort was conducted to further adjust confounders. A total of 101,953 control patients and 11,240 pioglitazone-treated patients were included, in which there were 237 and 30 cases of incidental bladder cancer (64.9 and 54.9 per 100,000 person-years; age, sex-adjusted HR 1.135, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.769-1.677), respectively. In the prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort, use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months, but not ever use of pioglitazone, was associated with an increased rate of bladder cancer as compared to never use of pioglitazone. In conclusion, we failed to exclude the possible association between use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months and bladder cancer.

  10. Neurogenic plasma leakage in mouse airways

    PubMed Central

    Baluk, Peter; Thurston, Gavin; Murphy, Thomas J; Bunnett, Nigel W; McDonald, Donald M

    1999-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether neurogenic inflammation occurs in the airways by examining the effects of capsaicin or substance P on microvascular plasma leakage in the trachea and lungs of male pathogen-free C57BL/6 mice. Single bolus intravenous injections of capsaicin (0.5 and 1 μmol kg−1, i.v.) or substance P (1, 10 and 37 nmol kg−1, i.v.) failed to induce significant leakage in the trachea, assessed as extravasation of Evans blue dye, but did induce leakage in the urinary bladder and skin. Pretreatment with captopril (2.5 mg kg−1, i.v.), a selective inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), either alone or in combination with phosphoramidon (2.5 mg kg−1, i.v.), a selective inhibitor of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), increased baseline leakage of Evans blue in the absence of any exogenous inflammatory mediator. The increase was reversed by the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist Hoe 140 (0.1 mg kg−1, i.v.). After pretreatment with phosphoramidon and captopril, capsaicin increased the Evans blue leakage above the baseline in the trachea, but not in the lung. This increase was reversed by the tachykinin (NK1) receptor antagonist SR 140333 (0.7 mg kg−1, i.v.), but not by the NK2 receptor antagonist SR 48968 (1 mg kg−1, i.v.). Experiments using Monastral blue pigment as a tracer localized the leakage to postcapillary venules in the trachea and intrapulmonary bronchi, although the labelled vessels were less numerous in mice than in comparably treated rats. Blood vessels of the pulmonary circulation were not labelled. We conclude that neurogenic inflammation can occur in airways of pathogen-free mice, but only after the inhibition of enzymes that normally degrade inflammatory peptides. Neurogenic inflammation does not involve the pulmonary microvasculature. PMID:10077247

  11. A comprehensive review of urologic complications in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arrellano-Valdez, Fernando; Urrutia-Osorio, Marta; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, as a result of abnormal insulin production, insulin function, or both. DM is associated with systemic complications, such as infections, neuropathy and angiopathy, which involve the genitourinary tract. The three most significant urologic complications include: bladder cystopathy, sexual dysfunction and urinary tract infections. Almost half of the patients with DM have bladder dysfunction or cystopathy, which can be manifested in women as hypersensitivity (in 39-61% of the diabetic women) or neurogenic bladder. In males it can be experienced as lower urinary tract symptoms (in 25% of diabetic males with a nearly twofold increased risk when seen by age groups). Additionally, an increased prostate volume affects their micturition as well as their urinary tract. Involving sexual dysfunction in women, it includes reduced libido, decreased arousal, clitoral erectile dysfunction and painful or non-sensitive intercourse; and in diabetic males it varies from low libido, ejaculatory abnormalities and erectile dysfunction. Globally, sexual disorders have a prevalence of 18-42%. Erectile dysfunction is ranked as the third most important complication of DM. Urinary tract infections are observed frequently in diabetic patients, and vary from emphysematous infections, Fournier gangrene, staghorn infected lithiasis to repetitive bacterial cystitis. The most frequent finding in diabetic women has been lower urinary tract infections. Because of the high incidence of obesity worldwide and its association with diabetes, it is very important to keep in mind the urologic complication associated with DM in patients, in order to better diagnose and treat this population.

  12. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study using datasets from four European countries

    PubMed Central

    Heintjes, Edith M; Williams, Rachael; Hoti, Fabian; Christopher, Solomon; Majak, Maila; Kool-Houweling, Leanne; Strongman, Helen; Linder, Marie; Dolin, Paul; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between pioglitazone use and bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Retrospective cohort study using propensity score matched cohorts. Settings Healthcare databases from Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Data comprised country specific datasets of linked records on prescriptions, hospitals, general practitioners, cancer, and deaths. Participants Patients with type 2 diabetes who initiated pioglitazone (n=56 337) matched with patients with type 2 diabetes in the same country exposed to diabetes drug treatments other than pioglitazone (n=317 109). Two matched cohorts were created, using a 1:1 fixed ratio (nearest match cohort) and a 1:10 variable ratio (multiple match cohort). Patients were matched on treatment history and propensity scores accounting for several variables associated with pioglitazone initiation. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox’s proportional hazards model with adjustments for relevant confounders. To assess the robustness of the findings, several sensitivity and stratified analyses were performed. Results In the cohort exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 130 bladder cancers occurred over a mean follow-up time of 2.9 years. In the nearest match and multiple match cohorts not exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 153 and 970 bladder cancers were recorded, with a mean follow‑up time of 2.8 and 2.9 years, respectively. With regards to bladder cancer risk, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients ever exposed versus never exposed to pioglitazone was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.30) and 1.00 (0.83 to 1.21) in the nearest and multiple match cohorts, respectively. Increasing duration of pioglitazone use and increasing cumulative dose were not associated with risk of bladder cancer (>48 months of pioglitazone use, adjusted hazard ratio 0.86 (0.44 to 1.66); >40 000 mg cumulative dose, 0.65 (0.33 to 1

  13. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study using datasets from four European countries.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, Pasi; Heintjes, Edith M; Williams, Rachael; Hoti, Fabian; Christopher, Solomon; Majak, Maila; Kool-Houweling, Leanne; Strongman, Helen; Linder, Marie; Dolin, Paul; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-08-16

     To evaluate the association between pioglitazone use and bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes.  Retrospective cohort study using propensity score matched cohorts.  Healthcare databases from Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Data comprised country specific datasets of linked records on prescriptions, hospitals, general practitioners, cancer, and deaths.  Patients with type 2 diabetes who initiated pioglitazone (n=56 337) matched with patients with type 2 diabetes in the same country exposed to diabetes drug treatments other than pioglitazone (n=317 109). Two matched cohorts were created, using a 1:1 fixed ratio (nearest match cohort) and a 1:10 variable ratio (multiple match cohort). Patients were matched on treatment history and propensity scores accounting for several variables associated with pioglitazone initiation.  Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox's proportional hazards model with adjustments for relevant confounders. To assess the robustness of the findings, several sensitivity and stratified analyses were performed.  In the cohort exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 130 bladder cancers occurred over a mean follow-up time of 2.9 years. In the nearest match and multiple match cohorts not exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 153 and 970 bladder cancers were recorded, with a mean follow‑up time of 2.8 and 2.9 years, respectively. With regards to bladder cancer risk, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients ever exposed versus never exposed to pioglitazone was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.30) and 1.00 (0.83 to 1.21) in the nearest and multiple match cohorts, respectively. Increasing duration of pioglitazone use and increasing cumulative dose were not associated with risk of bladder cancer (>48 months of pioglitazone use, adjusted hazard ratio 0.86 (0.44 to 1.66); >40 000 mg cumulative dose, 0.65 (0.33 to 1.26) in the nearest match cohort).  This study shows no evidence

  14. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  15. Primary neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R. C.; Cartlidge, N. E. F.; Millac, P.

    1970-01-01

    Eight further cases of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension are described together with a necropsy study on one case. Three cases showed evidence of autonomic dysfunction in isolation, while in five cases this was accompanied by evidence of more diffuse central nervous system degeneration. (Parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dementia, pyramidal signs, bulbar weakness, and muscular wasting were all seen in varying proportions.) The various clinical presentations, investigations, pathology, treatment, and prognosis are discussed. In the experience of the authors, when assessed, an abnormal Valsalva response is invariable, confirming the breakdown of the circulatory reflex. A normal vasopressor response is likewise invariable, eliminating an abnormality of blood vessels themselves, and confirming the lesion as neurogenic. The demonstration of loss of sweating to indirect body heating, which also is usual suggests that the defect is central or on the efferent side of the reflex and a normal pilo-erector response to acetylcholine confirms this as preganglionic. Emphasis is laid on the non-specificity of many accepted physiological tests in this disorder and on the delay in diagnosis consequent upon the variable presentation. PMID:5431725

  16. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ, much like a balloon, that stores urine. Pelvic floor muscles help hold urine in the bladder. The ... the bathroom more often. The bladder wall and pelvic floor muscles may weaken. Weak bladder wall muscles may ...

  17. Bladder Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... Catheterization • Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Bladder Management [ Download this pamphlet: "Bladder Management" - (PDF, 499KB) ] The ... and medication or surgery may be helpful. Bladder Management Foley or Suprapubic Catheter A tube is inserted ...

  18. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial cancer ... In the United States, bladder cancer often starts from the cells lining the bladder. These cells are called transitional cells. These tumors are classified by the way ...

  19. Bladder Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... schistosomiasis) is a common cause of bladder infections. Adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma begins in cells that make up mucus-secreting glands in the bladder. Adenocarcinoma of the bladder is rare in the United ...

  20. Bladder biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Biopsy - bladder ... A bladder biopsy can be done as part of a cystoscopy . Cystoscopy is a telescopic examination of the inside of the ... informed consent form before you have a bladder biopsy. In most cases, you are asked to urinate ...

  1. Semiconditional electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents stimulation to manage neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete injury and incomplete injury groups by ASIA classification and subdivided into tetraplegia and paraplegia groups by neurologic level of injury. Bladder function, such as bladder volumes infused to the bladder until the first occurrence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (V(ini)) and the last contraction suppressed by electrical stimulation (V(max)) was measured by water cystometry (CMG) and compared with the results of each subgroup. Among the 40 subjects, 35 patients showed neurogenic detrusor overactivity in the CMG study. Among these 35 patients, detrusor overactivity was suppressed effectively by pudendal nerve afferent electrical stimulation in 32 patients. The infusion volume until the occurrence of the first reflex contraction (V(ini)) was 99.4±80.3 ml. The volume of saline infused to the bladder until the last contraction suppressed by semiconditional pudendal nerve stimulation (V(max)) was 274.3±93.2 ml, which was significantly greater than V(ini). In patients with good response to the pudendal nerve afferent stimulation, the bladder volume significantly increased by stimulation in all the patients. In this study, semiconditional electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile afferent nerve could effectively inhibit neurogenic detrusor overactivity and increase bladder volume in patients with spinal cord injury.

  2. Impaired M3 and enhanced M2 muscarinic receptor contractile function in a streptozotocin model of mouse diabetic urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pak, K. J.; Ostrom, R. S.; Matsui, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the contractile roles of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors in urinary bladder from streptozotocin-treated mice. Wild-type and M2 muscarinic receptor knockout (M2 KO) mice were given a single injection of vehicle or streptozotocin (125 mg kg−1) 2–24 weeks prior to bladder assays. The effect of forskolin on contractions elicited to the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine-M, was measured in isolated urinary bladder (intact or denuded of urothelium). Denuded urinary bladder from vehicle-treated wild-type and M2 KO mice exhibited similar contractile responses to oxotremorine-M, when contraction was normalized relative to that elicited by KCl (50 mM). Eight to 9 weeks after streptozotocin treatment, the EC50 value of oxotremorine-M increased 3.1-fold in urinary bladder from the M2 KO mouse (N = 5) compared to wild type (N = 6; P < 0.001). Analogous changes were observed in intact bladder. In denuded urinary bladder from vehicle-treated mice, forskolin (5 µM) caused a much greater inhibition of contraction in M2 KO bladder compared to wild type. Following streptozotocin treatment, this forskolin effect increased 1.6-fold (P = 0.032). At the 20- to 24-week time point, the forskolin effect increased 1.7-fold for denuded as well as intact bladders (P = 0.036, 0.01, respectively). Although streptozotocin treatment inhibits M3 receptor-mediated contraction in denuded urinary bladder, muscarinic contractile function is maintained in wild-type bladder by enhanced M2 contractile function. M2 receptor activation opposes forskolin-induced relaxation of the urinary bladder, and this M2 function is enhanced following streptozotocin treatment. PMID:20349044

  3. Protective effect of cyanidin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside fraction from mulberry fruit pigment against oxidative damage in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Ha, U-Syn; Bae, Woong-Jin; Kim, Su-Jin; Yoon, Byung-Il; Jang, Hoon; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Lee, Ji-Yeoul; Hwang, Seung-Yeon; Kim, Sae-Woong

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether cyanidin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (C3G) fraction from mulberry fruit pigment has protective effects against bladder dysfunction on streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n = 12 in each): normal, diabetes (DM), and DM treated with C3G fraction (DM + C3G). The DM and DM + C3G groups received a single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Four weeks after the induction of diabetes, the DM + C3G group was treated with daily oral C3G (10 mg/kg) dissolved in water, for 8 weeks. After 12 weeks of streptozotocin injections, rats in each group underwent cystometrography and bladders were used for evaluation of apoptosis and oxidative stress. The DM group showed a markedly lower maximal intravesical pressure than that observed in the control group, whereas rats in the DM + C3G group showed improved maximum intravesical pressure associated with minimization of apoptosis, and increased levels of Akt and Bad phosphorylation, implying inhibition of pro-apoptotic stimuli. The level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative stress, was significantly greater in the DM group compared to the control group and it was significantly reduced in the C3G treated group. Immunoblotting revealed a significant decrease in the levels of the superoxide dismutase protein and nerve growth factor in the DM group compared with the control group; however, these proteins were upregulated in the DM + C3G group compared with the DM group. The study is the first to suggest that C3G fraction have a potency to protect the bladder under conditions of diabetes-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Autoantibodies to calcium channels in type 1 diabetes mediate autonomic dysfunction by different mechanisms in colon and bladder and are neutralized by antiidiotypic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wan, En-Chi; Gordon, Tom P; Jackson, Michael W

    2008-08-01

    Autoantibodies (Abs) directed against L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been shown to contribute to autonomic dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract and bladder in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We used a passive transfer model to determine whether the functional activity of the Ab requires crosslinking of channels in colon and bladder and can be neutralized by intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). Mice were injected with mono- and divalent F(ab) fragments of patient IgG with anti-VGCC activity and tested for gut and bladder function using a colonic migrating motor complex (MMC) assay and bladder-filling cystometry. The ability of IVIg to neutralize anti-VGCC IgG-mediated autonomic dysfunction was investigated by injection of mice with an equimolar concentration of IVIg prior to T1D IgG injection, or by injection with T1D IgG passed over a sepharose 4B column coupled with F(ab')(2) from IVIg. Passive transfer of T1D IgG and its F(ab')(2) or F(ab) fragments reduced the amplitude of spontaneous colonic motility. In contrast, intact IgG and F(ab')(2,) but not F(ab), produced the urodynamics features of an overactive bladder. T1D IgG-mediated colonic and bladder dysfunction was neutralized in vivo by prior injection of animals with equimolar IVIg. Moreover, anti-VGCC activity was depleted by preabsorption of patient IgG on a IVIg F(ab')(2) column. The activity of anti-VGCC IgG is mediated by the antigen-binding site consistent with a true functional Ab. The pathogenic effect on the bladder requires crosslinking of the channel, whereas monovalent binding of Ab is sufficient for disruption of colon motility. The anti-VGCC Abs are neutralized by antiidiotypic antibodies present in IVIg that may prevent the emergence of these Abs in healthy individuals.

  5. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bailén, M; Rucabado Aguilar, L; López Martínez, A

    2006-01-01

    The existence of stunned myocardium and reversible myocardial dysfunction is widely described and accepted in patients suffering ischemic heart disease. However, it cannot be exclusive to coronary disease. Classically, the appearance of electrocardiographic changes in the critical neurological disease has been described. However, at present, it seems to be observed that some of these patients with critical neurological disease could have variable grades of myocardial dysfunction, which is generally reversible in the surviving patients. This myocardial dysfunction, which could affect critically ill neurological patients, has traits similar to stunned myocardium generated in coronary patients since: a) it is generally associated to electrocardiographic changes, b) it can be accompanied by segmental contractility disorders and even c) it may be accompanied by a certain increase of cardiac biomarkers. Although its etiopathogeny is unknown, it could be related with the severity of the primary neurological disease. Its prophylaxis and prognosis are also unknown. It could be related with neurogenic edema, with hemodynamic instability, and could also play a very important role in brain death and in organ donation.

  6. [Neurogenic foot deformities].

    PubMed

    Senst, S

    2010-01-01

    There is a multitude of neurological diseases which may lead to neuro-orthopaedic problems and subsequently to neurogenic foot deformities. For this reason the diagnostician will be consistently surprised that there is a great multitude of different foot abnormalities and that not only the typical spastic talipes equines dominates. Of particular significance here is that these deformities almost always develop progressively, whereas most diseases persist per se, cerebral palsy being a typical case in point. However, in MMC (myelomeningocele) patients, there is also the danger of a worsening of the basic problem in the case of tethered cord syndrome. Unlike congenital talipes equinovarus, neuro-orthopaedic talipes equinovarus often shows over- or undercorrection postoperatively due to a shift in muscle imbalance. It is important, therefore, that the basis of conservative therapy include regular physiotherapy and orthoses during the day and, if necessary, at night. Botulinum toxin has been established as an additional measure for spasticity; however, this cannot always prevent surgical intervention, but is able to delay this to a better point in the development of the child/patient. The present article describes the diversity of neurological deformities and presents conservative as well as surgical therapeutic approaches.

  7. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Tudor, Katarina Ivana; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-12-01

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) in health is regulated by coordinated multi-level neurological inputs which require an intact central and peripheral nervous system. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is, therefore, a common sequelae of neurological disease and the patterns of bladder storage and voiding dysfunction depend upon the level of neurological lesion. Evaluation includes history taking, bladder diary, urological examination when relevant, ultrasonography and urodynamic testing when indicated. Antimuscarinic agents are the first line treatment for patients with storage dysfunction. Alternative treatments include intradetrusor injection of onabotulinumtoxinA, which has been shown to be of benefit in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), and neuromodulation. Intermittent catheterization remains the option of choice in patients with significant voiding dysfunction resulting in high post-void residual volumes.

  8. A portable device for experimental treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    PubMed

    Fjorback, M V; Hansen, J; Dalmose, A L; Rijkhoff, N J M; Sinkjaer, T

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of automatic event-driven electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve for management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in spinal cord injured subjects. In order to reach the objectives it was necessary to design and realize a portable device for ambulatory urodynamic studies which was able to activate an electrical stimulator when the detrusor pressure exceeded a certain threshold. The developed device was repeatedly tested in a healthy subject and subsequently tested in a spinal cord injured subject. In testing the automatic event-driven system in the spinal cord injured subject, detrusor contractions were successfully inhibited until a certain bladder volume was reached and no incontinence episodes were observed prior to disabling the system. The preliminary results indicate that automatic event-driven electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile/clitoral nerve can inhibit involuntary detrusor contractions in spinal cord injured subjects and hereby restore continence and increase bladder capacity.

  9. Neurogenic arthropathy. Differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Arlecchini, S; Busanelli, L; Masetti, C

    1992-01-01

    Neurological affections responsible for secondary arthropathic pathology are: tabes, syringomyelia, diabetes mellitus, congenital insensitivity to pain syndrome, alcoholism, leprosy. Each of the affections shows predilection for specific joints: syringomyelia the shoulder, tabes the hip and knee, diabetes mellitus the foot, congenital insensitivity to pain the lower limb, alcoholism the shoulder and knee. The authors discuss two cases of hip arthropathy in previous dorsal myelic fractures.

  10. Bladder Stones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. The elements in urine can form crystals. These harden to create bladder stones. Bladder stones ... away from diets high in fat, salt, and sugar.Avoid smoking and illegal drugs. Your kidneys can ...

  11. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  12. Diabetic neuropathies: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Deli, Gabriella; Bosnyak, Edit; Pusch, Gabriella; Komoly, Samuel; Feher, Gergely

    2013-01-01

    Changes in human behaviour and lifestyle over the last century have resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes worldwide. Neuropathy is a common and costly complication of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The prevalence of neuropathy is estimated to be about 8% in newly diagnosed patients and greater than 50% in patients with long-standing disease. There are two main types of diabetic neuropathies, named as sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathies. Sensorimotor neuropathy is marked by pain, paraesthesia and sensory loss, and autonomic neuropathy may contribute to myocardial infarction, malignant arrhythmia and sudden death. In this article we reviewed the pathogenesis, clinical manifestations diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathies. Sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathies (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and genitourinary autonomic neuropathies) are common in diabetic patients. Apart from strict glycaemic control, no further therapeutic approach exists in the prevention of this phenomenon. Intensive diabetes therapy, intensive multifactorial cardiovascular risk reduction and lifestyle intervention are recommended in patients with cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy. Gastroparesis is the most debilitating complication of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy and genitourinary autonomic neuropathy can cause sexual dysfunction and neurogenic bladder; these conditions are hard to manage. The symptomatic treatment of sensory symptoms includes tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, gabapentin, pregabalin and opioids. Other treatment strategies are not so effective. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Juvenile diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, hearing loss, diabetes insipidus, atonia of the urinary tract and bladder, and other abnormalities (Wolfram syndrome). A review of 88 cases from the literature with personal observations on 3 new patients.

    PubMed

    Cremers, C W; Wijdeveld, P G; Pinckers, A J

    1977-01-01

    A review of 88 cases from the literature with personal observations on 3 new patients is given of the syndrome featured by juvenile diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, hearing loss, diabetes insipidus, atonia of the urinary tract and bladder and other abnormalities. The postmortem in one of our cases is mentioned. The pattern of inheritance is autosomal recessive. The interpretation of the data on diabetes insipidus from the literature and in our three patients is also discussed. It can only be stated that neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus can be a component of the syndrome and that in many cases--particularly in the presence of lesions of the efferent urinary tract--the possibility of nephrogenous diabetes insipidus can not be excluded with certainty. It seems probable that the same mechanism can be held responsible for the lesions of the olfactory, optic, vestibular and cochlear nerves, the hypophyseal form of diabetes insipidus, retarded sexual maturation, abnormal pupillary reaction, myelopathy and the electro-encephalographic, electroneurological and electromyographic changes in the Wolfram syndrome. The process underlying this affection of neural structures remains obscure.

  14. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  15. [Oral anticholinergics in overactive bladder].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    2006-07-01

    Behavioural therapy and anticholinergics are the mainstays in the treatment of symptoms of overactive bladder in patients with idiopathic and neurogenic detrusor overactivity; they are the first-line treatment. Oxybutynin, propiverine, tolterodine and trospium chloride as well as the "newcomers" solifenacin and darifenacin are comparable in regards to their efficacy. However, based on different pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with different resorption velocity, different metabolisation and different CNS penetration, the profile of adverse events is different, qualitatively and quantitatively. Substances that are resorbed slowly or available as slow-release formulations are tolerated better. Lipophilic anticholinergics which pass the blood-brain barrier may compromise cognitive functions, especially in geriatric patients, who are already on cholinesterase inhibitors due to memory disorders. The following article gives an overview of the anticholinergics currently prescribed in patients with symptoms of overactive bladder with special attention to the influence of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics on the adverse events profile including possible CNS side effects.

  16. Neonatal Bladder Inflammation Produces Functional Changes and Alters Neuropeptide Content in Bladders of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    DeBerry, Jennifer; Randich, Alan; Shaffer, Amber D.; Robbins, Meredith T.; Ness, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal bladder inflammation has been demonstrated to produce hypersensitivity to bladder re-inflammation as an adult. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of neonatal urinary bladder inflammation on adult bladder function and structure. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated on postnatal days 14-16 with intravesical zymosan or anesthesia alone. At 12-16 weeks of age, micturition frequency and cystometrograms were measured. Similarly treated rats had their bladders removed for measurement of plasma extravasation following intravesical mustard oil, for neuropeptide analysis (CGRP or SubP), or for detailed histological examination. Rats treated with zymosan as neonates exhibited increased micturition frequency, reduced micturition volume thresholds, greater extravasation of Evan's Blue following intravesical mustard oil administration, and greater total bladder content of CGRP and SubP. In contrast, there were no quantitative histological changes in the thickness, fibrosis or mast cells of bladder tissue due to neonatal zymosan treatments. Functional changes in urologic systems observed in adulthood, coupled with the increased neuropeptide content and neurogenic plasma extravasation in adult bladders, suggest that the neonatal bladder inflammation treatment enhanced the number, function and/or neurochemical content of primary afferent neurons. These data support the hypothesis that insults to the urologic system in infancy may contribute to the development of adult bladder hypersensitivity. Perspective Inflammation of the bladder early in life in the rat has multiple sequelae including laboratory measures that suggest an alteration of the neurophysiological substrates related to the bladder. Some painful bladder syndromes in humans have similar characteristics and so may be due to similar mechanisms. PMID:19945355

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety of tolterodine in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod P; Borgstein, Niels G; Nijman, Rien J M; Ellsworth, Pamela I

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated long-term (> or =12 months) efficacy and safety of tolterodine in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Subjects successfully completed one of three 12-week, open-label studies and had stable neurologic disease and urodynamic evidence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity requiring intermittent catheterization. Drug formulation and dosing were based on age (4 months-4 years, tolterodine oral solution 0.2-2mg twice daily; 5-10 years, tolterodine oral solution 0.5-4 mg twice daily; 11-16 years, tolterodine extended-release capsules 2, 4, or 6 mg once daily). Daily doses were individualized for each subject. Efficacy was evaluated urodynamically and using parent-completed 3-day bladder diaries. Thirty subjects were enrolled. Functional bladder capacity (volume at first leakage, first sensation of bladder fullness or 40 cm H(2)O pressure) increased by month 12 in the younger age groups but not in the oldest subjects. Volume to first detrusor contraction >10 cm H(2)O pressure and detrusor leak point pressure did not change in any age group. The number of incontinence episodes per 24h decreased in all subjects, as did the number of catheterizations per 24h. Mean volume per catheterization increased in all subjects. Seven treatment-related adverse events were reported. Both tolterodine formulations were effective and well tolerated in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

  18. Best practice in the assessment of bladder function in infants

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael; Castagnetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review normal developmental bladder physiology in infants and bladder dysfunction in conditions such as neurogenic bladder, posterior urethral valves and high grade vesicoureteric reflux. We contrast the classical concept that bladder function in nontoilet-trained children is thought to be ‘reflexive’ or ‘uninhibited’, with the results of more recent research showing that infants most commonly have a stable detrusor. The infant bladder is physiologically distinct from the state seen in older children or adults. The voiding pattern of the infant is characterized by an interrupted voiding stream due to lack of proper urinary sphincter relaxation during voiding. This is called physiologic detrusor sphincter dyscoordination and is different from the pathologic ‘detrusor sphincter dyssynergy’ seen in patients with neurogenic bladder. Urodynamic abnormalities in neonates born with spina bifida are common and depend on the level and severity of the spinal cord malformation. Upper neuron lesions most commonly lead to an overactive bladder with or without detrusor sphincter dyssynergy while a lower neuron lesion is associated with an acontractile detrusor with possible denervation of the external urinary sphincter. In infants with neurogenic bladder, the role of ‘early prophylactic treatment (clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics)’ versus initial ‘watchful waiting and treatment as needed’ is still controversial and needs more research. Many urodynamic-based interventions have been suggested in patients with posterior urethral valves and are currently under scrutiny, but their impact on the long-term outcome of the upper and lower urinary tract is still unknown. Cumulative data suggest that there is no benefit to early intervention regarding bladder function in infants with high-grade vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:25083164

  19. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  20. Cough responsiveness in neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Smith, P E; Wiles, C M

    1998-03-01

    In neurogenic dysphagia a good cough is important for airway protection. If triggering of cough, or its effectiveness, is impaired this might result in an increased aspiration risk. Capsaicin, an agent which induces cough through sensory nerve stimulation, was used to test cough sensitivity in groups of patients with and without neurogenic dysphagia. On the basis of swallowing speed (ml/s) in a validated water test 28 alert neurological inpatients (16 women, aged 22-71 years) were classified into 13 with abnormal and 15 with normal swallowing (median swallowing speed 23% and 99%, median volume/swallow 43% and 106% of that predicted for age and sex respectively: p<0.001). Capsaicin nebulised on air in saline was inhaled via a low resistance valve using a mouthpiece and noseclip. Up to seven incremental concentrations of capsaicin ranging from 0.07-20.0 x 10(-4) mol/l were each inhaled for up to a minute. A pneumotachograph connected to the expiratory limb gave a paper recording of expiratory air flow. Coughs were recorded as high flow expirations of short duration. Capsaicin concentrations at first cough (threshold) were recorded; concentrations at frequencies of 10 and 20 coughs/minute were interpolated from the dose-response curve. Cough threshold tended to be lower in those with abnormal swallowing (non-significant): the (log) concentration of capsaicin producing 10 or 20 coughs/ minute also tended to be lower (p=0.12 and 0.07 respectively) in those with abnormal swallowing. Contrary to expectation, these results suggest that cough responsiveness is enhanced in alert patients with neurogenic dysphagia even after allowing for diagnostic category, the possible presence of a bulbar upper motor neuron lesion, or voluntary respiratory capacity. It is concluded that these patients with neurogenic dysphagia do not have a reduced sensitivity of cough triggering.

  1. Electrodiagnostic methods for neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, C; Aydogdu, I; Yüceyar, N; Tarlaci, S; Kiylioglu, N; Pehlivan, M; Celebi, G

    1998-08-01

    Swallowing mechanisms and neurogenic dysphagia have not been systematically studied by the EMG technique. It is desirable to evaluate neurogenic dysphagia for diagnostic and possibly for therapeutic purposes using electrophysiological methods. The following methods were described: mechanical upward/downward movements of the larynx were detected using a piezoelectric sensor, while submental integrated EMG activity was recorded during dry and wet swallowing. The EMG activity of cricopharyngeal muscle of the upper oesophageal sphincter was also recorded in some normal subjects and patients. Piecemeal deglutition and the dysphagia limit were determined in all patients to detect dysphagia objectively. In this study 75 normal subjects and 177 neurological patients with various degrees of dysphagia were investigated. Voluntarily triggered oropharyngeal swallowing was commonly pathological in the majority of patients, with or without overt dysphagia. The dysphagia limit appeared to be an objective measure of the degree of dysphagia in more than 90% of patients. Pathophysiological mechanisms were different in at least three groups of patients with neurogenic dysphagia. In the group of patients with muscular disorders, laryngeal elevators were involved while the CP-sphincter was intact. The second group included patients with the clinical signs of corticobulbar fibre involvement such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and pseudobulbar palsy. In these patients, there was incoordination between paretic laryngeal elevators and hyperreflexic CP-sphincter. In the third group (patients with Parkinson's disease), the swallowing reflex was delayed and prolonged. EMG methods described in the present study are very useful for the diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia, objectively and quickly. They are important to understand the physiological mechanisms for deglutition and its disorders.

  2. Botulinum toxin injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Ömer; Sadioğlu, Erkan; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a disorder that can cause high intravesical pressure, decreased capacity, decreased bladder compliance, and upper urinary system damage. The current treatment options for NDO are established on the basis of agents that block parasympathetic innervation of the detrusor and inhibit involuntary bladder contractions. Several side effects, such as dryness of mouth, constipation, dyspepsia, changes in visual accommodation, somnolence, and being unable to obtain consistently favorable results, caused by anticholinergic agents, which are frequently used for this purpose, decrease the patient’s compliance to treatment. Procedures such as neuromodulation, auto-augmentation, and enterocystoplasty are surgical options, and they could be used as the last alternative. Thus, botulinum toxin (BTX) injections to the detrusor have been commonly performed in recent years and lead to satisfactory results. The mechanism of action of BTX in NDO is based on the principal of smooth muscle relaxation in the bladder by the transient inhibition of neuromuscular nerve signals. The aim is to decrease acetylcholine secretion by blocking presynaptic vesicles in the neuromuscular junction. When studies were evaluated, it was observed that BTX injections to the detrusor muscle are a necessary and effective option in patients with incontinence caused by NDO. This treatment option could be indicated in situations where anticholinergic agents are not effective or could not be tolerated, and it could be a valuable alternative to major surgical treatments. In this review, we evaluated the effectiveness and reliability of BTX in patients with NDO. PMID:26623152

  3. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor.

  4. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  5. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Oner; Dobruch, Jakub; Knowles, Margaret A; Burger, Maximilian; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Nielsen, Matthew E; Lotan, Yair

    2017-04-13

    Bladder cancer is a highly prevalent disease and is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and cost. Environmental or occupational exposures to carcinogens, especially tobacco, are the main risk factors for bladder cancer. Most bladder cancers are diagnosed after patients present with macroscopic haematuria, and cases are confirmed after transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT), which also serves as the first stage of treatment. Bladder cancer develops via two distinct pathways, giving rise to non-muscle-invasive papillary tumours and non-papillary (solid) muscle-invasive tumours. The two subtypes have unique pathological features and different molecular characteristics. Indeed, The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified genetic drivers of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) as well as subtypes of MIBC with distinct characteristics and therapeutic responses. For non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), intravesical therapies (primarily Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)) with maintenance are the main treatments to prevent recurrence and progression after initial TURBT; additional therapies are needed for those who do not respond to BCG. For localized MIBC, optimizing care and reducing morbidity following cystectomy are important goals. In metastatic disease, advances in our genetic understanding of bladder cancer and in immunotherapy are being translated into new therapies.

  6. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  7. The utility of stem cells in pediatric urinary bladder regeneration.

    PubMed

    Iannaccone, Philip M; Galat, Vasil; Bury, Matthew I; Ma, Yongchao C; Sharma, Arun K

    2017-09-15

    Pediatric patients with a neurogenic urinary bladder caused by developmental abnormalities including spina bifida exhibit chronic urological problems. Surgical management in the form of enterocystoplasty is used to enlarge the bladder but is associated with significant clinical complications. Thus, alternative methods to enterocystoplasty have been explored through the incorporation of stem cells with tissue engineering strategies. Within the context of this review, we will examine the use of bone marrow stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) as they relate to bladder regeneration at the anatomic and molecular levels. The use of bone marrow stem cells has demonstrated significant advances in bladder tissue regeneration as multiple aspects of bladder tissue have been recapitulated including urothelium, bladder smooth muscle, vasculature and peripheral nerves. iPSCs, on the other hand, have been well characterized and used in multiple tissue regenerative settings, yet iPSC research is still in its infancy with regards to bladder tissue regeneration with recent studies describing the differentiation of iPSCs to bladder urothelium. Finally, we examine the role of the Sonic Hedgehog signaling cascade that mediate the proliferative response during regeneration between bladder smooth muscle and urothelium. Taken together, this review provides a current, comprehensive perspective on bladder regeneration.Pediatric Research accepted article preview online, 15 September 2017. doi:10.1038/pr.2017.229.

  8. The Other Bladder Syndrome: Underactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Miyazato, Minoru; Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Detrusor underactivity, or underactive bladder (UAB), is defined as a contraction of reduced strength and/or duration resulting in prolonged bladder emptying and/or a failure to achieve complete bladder emptying within a normal time span. UAB can be observed in many neurologic conditions and myogenic failure. Diabetic cystopathy is the most important and inevitable disease developing from UAB, and can occur silently and early in the disease course. Careful neurologic and urodynamic examinations are necessary for the diagnosis of UAB. Proper management is focused on prevention of upper tract damage, avoidance of overdistension, and reduction of residual urine. Scheduled voiding, double voiding, al-blockers, and intermittent self-catheterization are the typical conservative treatment options. Sacral nerve stimulation may be an effective treatment option for UAB. New concepts such as stem cell therapy and neurotrophic gene therapy are being explored. Other new agents for UAB that act on prostaglandin E2 and EP2 receptors are currently under development. The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries that have a pipeline in urology and women’s health may want to consider UAB as a potential target condition. Scientific counsel and review of the current pharmaceutical portfolio may uncover agents, including those in other therapeutic fields, that may benefit the management of UAB. PMID:23671401

  9. Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation.

    PubMed

    Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugiyama, Megumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation is not well known. Hence, we systematically investigated the frequency of reduced or increased bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. We analyzed 911 patients who were referred from within our hospital. Data registries included a diagnosis, a lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, a urodynamic study, and neurological examinations. Reduced bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation >300 ml. Increased bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation <100 ml. These patients were stratified into those with and without DO. Neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation (33.3-43.8% in diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Myelopathies are the second most common cause (17.4-25.0% in multiple sclerosis, etc.). Less common is brain diseases (9.6% in multiple system atrophy, etc.). In contrast, myelopathies are the most common cause of increased bladder sensation without DO (25.0-40.0% in spinal forms of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, etc.). Neuropathies are the second most common (17.3-22.2% in post-pelvic organ surgery, diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Less common is brain/mental diseases (20.0% in psychogenic bladder dysfunction, 8.1% in Parkinson's disease, etc.). The present study revealed that neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. Increased bladder sensation without DO occurs mainly in peripheral and central sensory pathway lesions, as well as in basal ganglia lesions and psychogenic bladder dysfunction. Reduced and increased bladder sensation should be a major treatment target for maximizing patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Development of hydronephrosis secondary to poorly managed neurogenic bowel requiring surgical disimpaction in a patient with spinal cord injury: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Jairon; Wolfe, Tracy; Walker, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Context Case of an adult patient with paraplegia managing neurogenic bladder with intermittent catheterization who was not performing a standard bowel program for management of neurogenic bowel. Findings Patient presented with increasing spasticity, fecal incontinence, and abdominal pain and ultimately was hospitalized for management. Imaging revealed massive fecal impaction, resulting in ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis. Despite repeated aggressive bowel regimens, serial abdominal X-rays showed continued large stool burden. Ultimately surgical intervention was required to evacuate the colon and subsequently the hydronephrosis resolved. Conclusion/Clinical relevance This case illustrates the importance of proper management of neurogenic bowel, as significant medical complications, such as hydronephrosis can occur with poorly managed neurogenic bowel. PMID:24617444

  11. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Bladder Cancer Research Network Bladder Cancer Genomics Consortium Get Involved Ways to ... RESEARCHERS Research Grants Bladder Cancer Think Tank Research Network Explore all research programs View all stories NEWSLETTER ...

  12. Diabetic neuropathy: an intensive review.

    PubMed

    Duby, Jeremiah John; Campbell, R Keith; Setter, Stephen M; White, John Raymond; Rasmussen, Kristin A

    2004-01-15

    The epidemiology, classification, pathology, and treatment of diabetic neuropathy are reviewed. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes that can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Some 30% of hospitalized and 20% of community-dwelling diabetes patients have peripheral neuropathy; the annual incidence rate is approximately 2%. The primary risk factor is hyperglycemia. Sensorimotor neuropathy is marked by pain, paresthesia, and sensory loss. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) may contribute to myocardial infarction, malignant arrhythmia, and sudden death. Gastroparesis is the most debilitating complication of gastrointestinal autonomic neuropathy. Genitourinary autonomic neuropathy can cause sexual dysfunction and neurogenic bladder. The pathology of diabetic neuropathy involves oxidative stress, advanced glycation end products, polyol pathway flux, and protein kinase C activation; all contribute to microvascular disease and nerve dysfunction. For symptom management current evidence from clinical trials supports the use of desipramine, amitriptyline, capsaicin, tramadol, gabapentin, bupropion, and venlafaxine as preferred medications. Citalopram, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and opioid analgesics may be used as adjuvant agents. Lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, paroxetine, levodopa, and alpha-lipoic acid are alternative considerations. Evidence supporting the use of zonisamide, fluoxetine, mexiletine, dextromethorphan, and phenytoin is considered equivocal. Complementary therapies have also shown efficacy. The symptoms of CAN may be ameliorated with fludrocortisone, clonidine, midodrine, dihydroergotamine or caffeine, octreotide, and beta-blockers. Gastroparesis may be treated with metoclopramide or erythromycin. The most promising disease-modifying therapy is ruboxistaurin, which is in Phase III trials. Glycemic control remains the foundation of prevention and the prerequisite of adequate treatment. Diabetic neuropathy is a many

  13. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  14. [Videofluoroscopy study of swallowing in neurogenic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Avdiunina, I A; Popova, L M; Dokuchaeva, N V; Bragina, L K; Dokuchaeva, N F

    2000-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy (VFS) was for the first time used for examining swallowing in 49 patients with nervous diseases. Disturbances in each phase of swallowing act are analyzed with evaluation of the time parameters and defects, causes of aspiration in neurogenic dysphagia are discussed, and cricopharyngeal insufficiency is described. Neurogenic dysphagia is characterized by a combination of disorders which determine the degree of dysphagia. The most severe swallowing disorders were observed in patients with multiple foci in the brain stem and in diphtheritic polyneuropathies. The authors conclude that VFS is the optimal method for the diagnosis of neurogenic dysphagia.

  15. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise blood pressure by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This review summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  17. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  18. Prenatal myelomeningocele repair: Do bladders better?

    PubMed

    Horst, Maya; Mazzone, Luca; Schraner, Thomas; Bodmer, Christine; Möhrlen, Ueli; Meuli, Martin; Gobet, Rita

    2017-08-01

    Prenatal myelomeningocele (MMC) repair has been proven to significantly reduce the need for hydrocephalus shunting and improve lower-extremity motor outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of prenatal MMC repair on the urological outcome. All patients who underwent fetal MMC repair at our institution are followed prospectively. Assessments include medical history, renal and bladder ultrasound, voiding cystourethrogram and urodynamic study, need for clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) and anticholinergics, and the occurrence of urinary tract infections (UTI). Of the 30 patients who underwent prenatal MMC closure from December 2010 to December 2015, eight patients with a postnatal follow-up of at least 2 years were included in this study and compared with eight patients after postnatal MMC repair. The level of the bony spinal defect was similar in both groups. Urological evaluation at 2 years revealed normal bladder function in 50% after prenatal repair. Neurogenic bladder dysfunction requiring CIC and anticholinergic therapy was seen in 50% in the prenatal and in 100% in the postnatal group. Significant bladder wall thickening was found in 37.5% and 87.5%, respectively. Febrile UTIs occurred in 37.5% in the prenatal and 62.5% in the postnatal group during the observation period. Our data suggest a positive effect of prenatal MMC closure on lower urinary tract function. The long-term significance of these results remains unclear. Therefore, continued close monitoring of renal and bladder function are mandatory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pathophysiology and animal modeling of underactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Smith, Phillip P.; Kuchel, George A.; de Groat, William C.; Birder, Lori A.; Chermansky, Christopher J.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Tse, Vincent; Chancellor, Michael B.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    While the symptomology of underactive bladder (UAB) may imply a primary dysfunction of the detrusor muscle, insights into pathophysiology indicate that both myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms need to be considered. Due to lack of proper animal models, the current understanding of the UAB pathophysiology is limited, and much of what is known about the clinical etiology of the condition has been derived from epidemiological data. We hereby review current state of the art in the understanding of the pathophysiology of and animal models used to study the UAB. PMID:25238890

  20. Pathophysiology and animal modeling of underactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Smith, Phillip P; Kuchel, George A; de Groat, William C; Birder, Lori A; Chermansky, Christopher J; Adam, Rosalyn M; Tse, Vincent; Chancellor, Michael B; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    While the symptomology of underactive bladder (UAB) may imply a primary dysfunction of the detrusor muscle, insights into pathophysiology indicate that both myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms need to be considered. Due to lack of proper animal models, the current understanding of the UAB pathophysiology is limited, and much of what is known about the clinical etiology of the condition has been derived from epidemiological data. We hereby review current state of the art in the understanding of the pathophysiology of and animal models used to study the UAB.

  1. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Refinement in the Management of the Denervated Canine Urinary Bladder Using an Abdominal Vesicostomy

    PubMed Central

    Agelan, Alexis; Braverman, Alan S.; Dean, Gregory E.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the neurogenic bladder in canine models of spinal cord injury presents challenges in ensuring bladder drainage. While vesicostomy is routine for humans, the procedure is not common in canines. Our study of bladder reinnervation involved transection of the nerve roots that mediate bladder contraction in 34 canines. An abdominal vesicostomy was created by fixing the everted mucosa to the skin incision. After euthanasia, we assessed the contractility of in vitro bladder muscle strips in response to muscarinic receptor stimulation. There were a total of 11 complications in 9 of the 34 animals. In two animals, the vesicostomy narrowed such that it could not be catheterized and in two other animals the vesicostomy closed to between 5 and 10 mm diameter. Another animal removed the stitches prior to complete healing, requiring further surgical procedures. In five animals, partial prolapse of the bladder through the vesicostomy required surgical repair, and in one animal the bladder became infected and required antibiotic treatment. In the few animals in which irritation resulted from the constant contact of urine with the skin, daily topical application of petrolatum ointment alleviated this symptom. Gross inspection of the bladder at euthanasia and in vitro contractility of bladder muscle strips from these animals revealed no evidence of changes associated with bladder hypertrophy. This study demonstrated that permanent cutaneous vesicostomy is an optimal refinement method for management of the neurogenic bladder in canines. The procedure avoids the distress as well as potential bladder hypertrophy induced by multiple daily interventions to empty the bladder by either catheterization or manual compression. PMID:18506057

  3. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-04

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients.

  4. An integrative review of standardized clinical evaluation tool utilization in anticholinergic drug trials for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stothers, L; Tsang, B; Nigro, M; Lazare, D; Macnab, A

    2016-01-01

    Study design: To review prospective and randomized trials studying anticholinergic therapy for neurogenic bladder in SCI to identify whether trials included standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures now recognized to enhance clinical trial data. Methods: A systematic search via EMBASE, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), HTA (Health Technology Assessment), CMR (Comprehensive Microbial Resource), HAPI (Health and Psychosocial Instruments) and PsycINFO using the key term spinal cord injury crossed with oxybutynin, tolterodine, darifenacin, solifenacin, fesoterodine, trospium chloride, propiverine, propantheline and anticholinergic(s) for 1946–2015 inclusive. We then collated whether standardized clinical tools, measures and descriptors were used within each study identified: American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale; symptom scores validated in SCI; technical methodology for urodynamics/video urodynamics; urinary diaries; and standardized urologic terminology. Results: A total of 1225 entries with 610 unique articles were identified, 14 randomized and 16 prospective studies. In 6/30 the population comprised SCI patients with neurogenic bladder alone; the remainder included mixed neurogenic etiologies. Classification using the ASIA impairment scale was used in <10% of studies; none used symptom scores validated in SCI; <50% reported urodynamic test methodology fully, incorporated urinary diaries or used International Continence Society Standardization Subcommittee urinary tract terminology. Conclusion: Integrative review of trials from 1946 to 2015 identified infrequent use of standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures. Data from future trials evaluating therapies for neurogenic bladder would likely be more applicable to specific SCI patients if current standardized classification and descriptors now available were used consistently: for example, the ASIA scale

  5. Use of botulinum toxin in individuals with neurogenic detrusor overactivity: State of the art review

    PubMed Central

    Linsenmeyer, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) injection into the bladder wall has been shown to be an effective alternative to anticholinergic (antimuscarinic) medications and more invasive surgery in those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and urinary incontinence who are not tolerating anticholinergic medications. In August 2011, Botox® (onabotulinumtoxinA) received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for this use. Clinically, intradetrusor injection of BoNT has been found to decrease urinary incontinence and improve quality of life. Its impact on urodynamic parameters is an increase in the maximum cystometric (bladder) capacity and decrease in the maximum detrusor pressures. The most common side effects are urinary tract infections and urinary retention. There have been rare reports and a black box warning of distant spread of BoNT. BoNT has gained popularity because of its effectiveness and long duration of action, relative ease of administration, easy learning curve, reproducibility of results on repeated administration, and low incidence of complications. Objective To discuss the structure and function, mechanisms of action, clinical and urodynamic studies, injection technique, potential beneficial and adverse effects, and potential areas of research of BoNT. Methods Literature search focused on botulinum toxin in MEDLINE/PubMed. Search terms included botulinum toxin, neurogenic bladder, NDO, botox bladder, botox spinal cord injury, botox, FDA, botox side effects. All papers identified were English language, full-text papers. In addition, English abstracts of non-English papers were noted. The reference list of identified articles was also searched for further papers. Conclusion Botulinum toxin is an alternative treatment for individuals with NDO who fail to tolerate anticholinergic medications. Its popularity has increased because of the literature, which has supported its effectiveness, safety, easy

  6. Cervicobrachial pain - How Often is it Neurogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, N. Sreekumaran; Bhat, Anil K; Solomon, John M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9% (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1% (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful. PMID:27134988

  7. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia: neurogenic etiology and manifestation.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Swapna; Nair, Prem G; Thomas, Philip; Tyagi, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    To determine the type, severity and manifestation of dysphagia in patients with neurogenic etiology. Clinical documentation was done on the different etiologies, its manifestation, assessment findings and management strategies taken for patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia who were referred for assessment and management of dysphagia over a period of three months in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Flexible endoscopic examination was done in all the patients. The severity of dysphagia in these patients were graded based on Gugging Swallowing Screen (GUSS). A total of 53 patients with neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia were evaluated by an otolaryngologist and a speech language pathologist over a period of three months. The grading of severity based on GUSS for these patients were done. There were 30 patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury due to various etiologies, one patient with Neurofibroma-vestibular schwanoma who underwent surgical excision, 16 patients with stroke, two patients with traumatic brain injury, two patients with Parkinsonism and two patients with myasthenia gravis. The manifestation of dysphagia was mainly in the form of prolonged masticatory time, oral transit time, and increased number of swallows required for each bolus, cricopharyngeal spasms and aspiration. Among the dysphagia patients with neurogenic etiology, dysphagia is manifested with a gradual onset and is found to have a progressive course in degenerative disorders. Morbidity and mortality may be reduced with early identification and management of neurogenic dysphagia.

  8. Overactive bladder in cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a new disease concept defined by the International Continence Society in 2002. There have been no reports of OAB among patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy assessed on the basis of symptom questionnaires. One-hundred-and-six patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and treated by use of laminoplasty were examined. The patients were classified into two groups, those identified as having OAB (OAB group) and those identified as not having OAB (non-OAB group), by use of the Overactive Bladder Symptom Score collected before and 1 year after surgery. The clinical results for the two groups were assessed. OAB symptom prevalence and post-operative symptom improvement were investigated 1 year postoperatively. Of the 106 patients, 50 were identified as having OAB (symptom prevalence 47.2%). Of these 50 patients, symptom improvement was observed for only 14 (28%) 1 year after surgery. For both groups good improvement on the basis of the Japanese Orthopedic Association score was observed 1 year postoperatively, but there were no significant differences between them. Post-operative improvement of OAB symptoms in cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients was low, which indicated that OAB was most frequently attributable to non-neurogenic and idiopathic, but not neurogenic, causes. It is considered necessary to tell patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy that the possibility of post-operative OAB symptom improvement is not high when the explanation for informed consent is given before the operation.

  9. The M2-Muscarinic Receptor Inhibits the Development of Streptozotocin-Induced Neuropathy in Mouse Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Pak, K. J.; Ostrom, R. S.; Matsui, M.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the role of M2-muscarinic receptors in maintaining neurogenic bladder contraction during hyperglycemia. Mice were injected with a single dose of streptozotocin (125 mg/kg), and neurogenic contraction of urinary bladder from wild type and M2-muscarinic receptor knockout (M2 KO) mice was measured at 8 to 24 weeks after treatment. In wild-type bladder lacking urothelium, the summation of the cholinergic (64%) and purinergic (56%) components of the electrical-field-stimulated response exceeded 100%, indicating a reserve capacity. Although the cholinergic component was slightly less in the M2 KO mouse, the total electrical-field-stimulated contraction was the same as wild type. The cholinergic and purinergic components of contraction in wild-type bladder were minimally affected by streptozotocin treatment. In M2 KO bladder, streptozotocin treatment reduced both the cholinergic (after 8–9 and 20–24 weeks) and purinergic (after 20–24 weeks only) components. The loss of function was approximately 50 to 70%. Similar results were observed in bladder with intact urothelium. M2 KO bladder was more sensitive to the relaxant effect of isoproterenol compared with wild type, and this difference significantly increased at the early and late time points after streptozotocin treatment. In the presence of urothelium, however, this difference in isoproterenol sensitivity was smaller with streptozotocin treatment, but this trend reversed over time. Our results show that M2 receptors oppose urinary bladder distension in wild-type bladder and inhibit streptozotocin-induced neuropathy. PMID:20624991

  10. Evaluation of anti-diabetic effect and gall bladder function with 2-thio-5-thiomethyl substituted imidazoles as TGR5 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuqing; Sui, Zhihua; Kauffman, Jack; Hou, Cuifen; Chen, Cailin; Du, Fuyong; Kirchner, Thomas; Liang, Yin; Johnson, Dana; Murray, William V; Demarest, Keith

    2017-04-15

    A novel series of 2-thio-5-thiomethyl substituted imidazoles was discovered to be potent TGR5 agonists that possessed glucose-lowering effects while inhibiting gall bladder emptying in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanisms involved in new therapies for overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Francisco

    2004-03-01

    During the last few years, vanilloid substances and botulinum-A toxin were extensively investigated as new therapies for overactive bladder. Intravesical administration of capsaicin or resiniferatoxin--2 members of the vanilloid family--has been shown to increase bladder capacity and decrease urge incontinence in patients with neurogenic, as well as nonneurogenic, forms of detrusor overactivity. In addition, vanilloids have been shown also to reduce bladder pain in patients with hypersensitive disorders. Vanilloids are exogenous ligands of vanilloid receptor type 1 (VR1), an ion channel present in the membrane of type C primary afferent nerve fibers. This receptor, which plays a key role in pain perception and control of the micturition reflex, may be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophic molecule detected in high concentrations in overactive detrusor tissue. Vanilloids, by reducing uptake of NGF through sensory neurons, may counteract VR1 upregulation. Intravesical injections of botulinum-A toxin, a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum, were shown to increase bladder capacity and to decrease urge incontinence episodes in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Botulinum-A toxin impedes the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve endings at the neuromuscular junction, leading to paralysis of the detrusor smooth muscle.

  12. Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Outcomes following a Conservative Management Approach.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Robert A; Pisansky, Andrew; Fleck, Joseph; Hoversten, Patrick; Cotter, Katherine J; Katorski, Jenna; Liberman, Daniel; Elliott, Sean P

    2016-04-01

    Cerebral palsy is characterized by motor impairment following injury to the developing brain. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction is estimated to affect at least a third of children with cerebral palsy. However there are limited data as patients transition to adulthood. We sought to describe the symptoms, sequelae and management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults with cerebral palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of adult patients with cerebral palsy between 2011 and 2014. Patients with prior bladder reconstruction or catheterization based bladder drainage were excluded from study. Cerebral palsy severity was determined using GMFCS (Gross Motor Function Classification System). A conservative evaluation and treatment paradigm was used. Noninvasive treatments were encouraged. Specifically clean intermittent catheterization, which is often not feasible, is avoided unless urinary retention, hydronephrosis or refractory lower urinary tract symptoms develop. There were 121 patients included in final analysis. Median age was 25 and 61 patients (50%) had GMFCS level V. Noninvasive management failed in 28 of 121 patients (23%) as defined by hydronephrosis in 9, persistent urinary retention in 10 and refractory lower urinary tract symptoms/incontinence in 9. Urethral clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated. Of all patients 25% showed evidence of urolithiasis during the study period. Surgical intervention was rare and associated with significant morbidity. Adults with cerebral palsy may present with variable signs and symptoms of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. Conservative treatment was successful in more than 75% of patients. Clean intermittent catheterization was poorly tolerated in patients in whom conservative treatment failed. Surgical intervention was rarely indicated and it should be reserved for select individuals. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  13. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach for posterior bladder neck dissection and placement of pediatric bladder neck sling: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Storm, Douglas W; Fulmer, Brant R; Sumfest, Joel M

    2008-11-01

    Bladder neck sling cystourethropexy is a common procedure used to correct intrinsic sphincter deficiency in children with spinal dyspharism. Various modifications of the procedure have been made but all involve circumferential dissection of the bladder neck and proximal urethra. The posterior dissection can be challenging and can result in injury to the rectum, urethra, or vagina. The posterior approach to the bladder neck as reported by Lottmann and later by de Badiola addresses these potential complications. Using these principles of the posterior approach, we performed a robotic-assisted laparoscopic placement of an acellular human dermal allograft bladder neck sling in 2 patients. We present our initial experience regarding this surgical technique. The diagnosis of intrinsic sphincter deficiency was established in 2 female patients, aged 9 and 10 years. Both patients had a neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida. Video urodynamics confirmed adequate bladder compliance and intrinsic sphincter deficiency. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic placement of a bladder neck sling was performed in both patients. Both procedures were completed intracorporeally. The mean blood loss was 20 mL. The mean operative time was 189 minutes. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. The mean hospital stay was 3 days (range 2-4). The follow-up ranged from 13 to 22 months. Postoperative studies revealed continued low-pressure, compliant bladders and stable upper tracts. At last follow-up, the 2 patients were using catheterization without difficulty and were continent. The robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach to performing bladder neck dissection and placement of a bladder neck sling in children is technically feasible.

  14. A role for transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 in tonicity-induced neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Vergnolle, N; Cenac, N; Altier, C; Cellars, L; Chapman, K; Zamponi, G W; Materazzi, S; Nassini, R; Liedtke, W; Cattaruzza, F; Grady, E F; Geppetti, P; Bunnett, N W

    2010-03-01

    Changes in extracellular fluid osmolarity, which occur after tissue damage and disease, cause inflammation and maintain chronic inflammatory states by unknown mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether the osmosensitive channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), mediates inflammation to hypotonic stimuli by a neurogenic mechanism. TRPV4 was localized in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by immunofluorescence. The effects of TRPV4 agonists on release of pro-inflammatory neuropeptides from peripheral tissues and on inflammation were examined. Immunoreactive TRPV4 was detected in DRG neurones innervating the mouse hindpaw, where it was co-expressed in some neurones with CGRP and substance P, mediators of neurogenic inflammation. Hypotonic solutions and 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, which activate TRPV4, stimulated neuropeptide release in urinary bladder and airways, sites of neurogenic inflammation. Intraplantar injection of hypotonic solutions and 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate caused oedema and granulocyte recruitment. These effects were inhibited by a desensitizing dose of the neurotoxin capsaicin, antagonists of CGRP and substance P receptors, and TRPV4 gene knockdown or deletion. In contrast, antagonism of neuropeptide receptors and disruption of TRPV4 did not prevent this oedema. TRPV4 gene knockdown or deletion also markedly reduced oedema and granulocyte infiltration induced by intraplantar injection of formalin. Activation of TRPV4 stimulates neuropeptide release from afferent nerves and induces neurogenic inflammation. This mechanism may mediate the generation and maintenance of inflammation after injury and during diseases, in which there are changes in extracellular osmolarity. Antagonism of TRPV4 may offer a therapeutic approach for inflammatory hyperalgesia and chronic inflammation.

  15. Distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali; Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Hakgüder, Gülce; Ateş, Oğuz; Özer, Erdener; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelomeningocele (MMC) is one of the most common reason of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children. Although neurogenic bladder dysfunction occurrence is related with bladder innervation, also there are some changes seen in the smooth muscle and neural cells of the bladder. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells found in organs with peristaltic activity. Although it has been shown that ICC are diminished in the rat urinary bladder with traumatic spinal cord injury, there is no data about ICC in fetal rat bladders with MMC. This study has been conducted to investigate the ICC in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced MMC. Materials and methods Time dated pregnant Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups. In MMC group, dams were fed with gavage solution containing 60 mg/kg all-trans retinoic acid dissolved in olive oil on 10. embryologic day. Sham group animals were fed only olive oil. Control group dams were fed with standard rat chow. Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section and harvested on 22. embryologic day. MMC was identified by observing MMC sacs at the back of the fetuses. Distribution of ICCs were evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Results ICCs were found in all groups, which have the same morphological features that had been described earlier in the gastrointestinal tract and the bladder. The density of the ICC in the MMC group was found to be significantly decreased when compared with the control and the sham groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The density of the ICC in the urinary bladder decreased in the neurogenic bladder developed in MMC. PMID:27909623

  16. [Bladder augmentation in children: experience with 15 cases].

    PubMed

    Nortes, L; Zambudio, G A

    1996-07-01

    From 1993 to 1995 bladder augmentation was performed in 11 female and 4 male patients from 1 to 13 years old (average age 6.7 years). Indications included neurogenic bladder, extrophy and epispadias with small bladder. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt had been performed in 6 patients for hydrocephalus. We used 22 segments since 5 patients had 2 segments. Segments included sigmoid in 12 cases, stomach in 5, small bowel in 1, cecum and appendix in 2. We have used the AMS-800 artificial urinary sphincter in 7 patients. Upper tracts and renal function have remained stable in these patients. Continence was achieved in 7 of 9 cases with augmentation, and in 6 of those patients with artificial urinary sphincter. The most common complication was leaks and the hematuria-dysuria syndrome when stomach was used.

  17. An unusual cause of death: spontaneous urinary bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Unluer, Erden Erol; Unay, Fulya Cakalagaoglu; Oyar, Orhan; Sener, Aslı

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare and life-threatening condition similar to traumatic and iatrogenic perforation. The connection with the underlying bladder damage due to previous radiotherapy, inflammation, malignancy, obstruction, or other causes can be found in almost all cases. The symptoms are often nonspecific, and misdiagnosis is common. Here, we present a case of spontaneous urinary bladder perforation due to bladder necrosis in a diabetic woman. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy was performed by surgeons and revealed necrosis of the anterior and lateral walls of the urinary bladder. Microscopic examination revealed necrotic changes throughout the bladder wall. Ghost-like cellular outlines were compatible with coagulative necrosis. Clusters of bacteria were also present in some necrobiotic tissues. Malignant cells were not present. It appears probable that the infection was due to local interference with the blood supply (arterial, capillary, or venous) combined with the systemic metabolic upset that led to the bladder condition. In our case, we observed partial necrosis of the bladder rather than distortion of the entire blood supply to the bladder as consequences of the microvascular effects of diabetes. Urinary bladder perforation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with free fluid in the abdomen/peritonitis, decreased urine output, and hematuria, and in whom increased levels of urea/creatinine are detected in serum and/ or peritoneal fluid aspirate.

  18. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  19. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  20. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... obese and are less physically active.What is pre-diabetes?Pre-diabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher ... that your doctor can say you have diabetes. Pre-diabetes is becoming more common in the United ...

  1. Portable bladder ultrasound: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the clinical utility of portable bladder ultrasound. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Data from the National Population Health Survey indicate prevalence rates of urinary incontinence are 2.5% in women and 1.4 % in men in the general population. Prevalence of urinary incontinence is higher in women than men and prevalence increases with age. Identified risk factors for urinary incontinence include female gender, increasing age, urinary tract infections (UTI), poor mobility, dementia, smoking, obesity, consuming alcohol and caffeine beverages, physical activity, pregnancy, childbirth, forceps and vacuum-assisted births, episiotomy, abdominal resection for colorectal cancer, and hormone replacement therapy. For the purposes of this review, incontinence populations will be stratified into the following; the elderly, urology patients, postoperative patients, rehabilitation settings, and neurogenic bladder populations. Urinary incontinence is defined as any involuntary leakage of urine. Incontinence can be classified into diagnostic clinical types that are useful in planning evaluation and treatment. The major types of incontinence are stress (physical exertion), urge (overactive bladder), mixed (combined urge and stress urinary incontinence), reflex (neurological impairment of the central nervous system), overflow (leakage due to full bladder), continuous (urinary tract abnormalities), congenital incontinence, and transient incontinence (temporary incontinence). Postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, which is the amount of urine in the bladder immediately after urination, represents an important component in continence assessment and bladder management to provide quantitative feedback to the patient and continence care team regarding the effectiveness of the voiding technique. Although there is no standardized definition of normal PVR urine volume, measurements greater than 100 mL to 150 mL are considered an indication for urinary

  2. Suburothelial Bladder Contraction Detection with Implanted Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Fletter, Paul C.; Ferry, Elizabeth K.; Zhu, Hui; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Damaser, Margot S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Managing bladder pressure in patients with neurogenic bladders is needed to improve rehabilitation options, avoid upper tract damage, incontinence, and their associated co-morbidities and mortality. Current methods of determining bladder contractions are not amenable to chronic or ambulatory settings. In this study we evaluated detection of bladder contractions using a novel piezoelectric catheter-free pressure sensor placed in a suburothelial bladder location in animals. Methods Wired prototypes of the pressure monitor were implanted into 2 nonsurvival (feline and canine) and one 13-day survival (canine) animal. Vesical pressures were obtained from the device in both suburothelial and intraluminal locations and simultaneously from a pressure sensing catheter in the bladder. Intravesical pressure was monitored in the survival animal over 10 days from the suburothelial location and necropsy was performed to assess migration and erosion. Results In the nonsurvival animals, the average correlation between device and reference catheter data was high during both electrically stimulated bladder contractions and manual compressions (r = 0.93±0.03, r = 0.89±0.03). Measured pressures correlated strongly (r = 0.98±0.02) when the device was placed in the bladder lumen. The survival animal initially recorded physiologic data, but later this deteriorated. However, endstage intraluminal device recordings correlated (r = 0.85±0.13) with the pressure catheter. Significant erosion of the implant through the detrusor was found. Conclusions This study confirms correlation between suburothelial pressure readings and intravesical bladder pressures. Due to device erosion during ambulatory studies, a wireless implant is recommended for clinical rehabilitation applications. PMID:28060842

  3. [Diabetic neuropathy. III: Autonomic neuropathy. Genito-urinary system].

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Bronzino, P; Persico, M; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Contaldi, P; Stroffolini, T

    1984-04-21

    When considering urogenital complaints occurring during diabetic autonomous neurotherapy , three clinical situations are important due to their frequency and the clinical situation, the considerable effect they have on quality of life. In addition they may also be responsible for severe complications as in the case of diabetic cystopathy . This syndrome is the cause of considerable subjective disturbances even though it may be diagnosed instrumentally in its early, completely asymptomatic stage. The complaint evolves inevitably towards bladder denervation, chronic urinary retention and more or less severe septic complications. Retrograde ejaculation may lead to the loss of procreative ability as in the case of neurogenic impotence in diabetics. These three autonomous neuropathic situations occur quite frequently, especially in older subjects who have suffered from diabetes for more than ten years. Often the three syndromes are interconnected or linked to autonomous or peripheric neuropathic complaints affecting other areas. The few therapeutic measures practised have not proved very conclusive. Only a diligent examination of signs and symptoms with the aim of early diagnosis and the maintenance of good glycometabolic balance are considered to be at all effective as preventive measures.

  4. [The ice water test and bladder cooling reflex. Physiology, pathophysiology and clinical importance].

    PubMed

    Hüsch, T; Neuerburg, T; Reitz, A; Haferkamp, A

    2016-04-01

    Urodynamic studies are utilised for identification and follow-up of functional disorders of the lower urinary tract. Provocation tests are used to determine disorders which could not be revealed in standard cystometry. The ice water test is a simple test to identify neurogenic bladder dysfunction and to screen the integrity of the upper motor neuron in neurogenic bladder dysfunction. Development and significance of the ice water test is presented in this review against the background of physiology and pathophysiology of the lower urinary tract. A systematic review of PubMed and ScienceDirect databases was performed in April 2015. No language or time limitation was applied. The following key words and Medical Subject Heading terms were used to identify relevant studies: "ice water test", "bladder cooling reflex", "micturition" and "neuronal control". Review articles and bibliographies of other relevant studies identified were hand searched to find additional studies. The ice water test is performed by rapid instillation of 4-8 °C cold fluid into the urinary bladder. Hereby, afferent C fibers are activated by cold receptors in the bladder leading to the bladder cooling reflex. It is a spinal reflex which causes an involuntarily contraction of the urinary bladder. The test is normally positive in young infants during the first 4 years of life and become negative with maturation of the central nervous system afterwards by inhibition of the reflex. The damage of the upper motor neuron causes the recurrence of the reflex in the adulthood and indicates spinal and cerebral lesions. The ice water test is utilised to identify lesions of the upper motor neuron. However, in the case of detrusor acontractility the test will always be negative and can not be utilized to distinguish between neurogenic or muscular causes. Furthermore, the test is also positive in a small percentage of cases of non-neurogenic diseases, e.g. in prostate-related bladder outlet obstruction or

  5. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes ... early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with ...

  6. Factors that influence the urodynamic results of botulinum toxin in the treatment of neurogenic hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Vírseda-Chamorro, M; Salinas Casado, J; Gómez-Rodríguez, A; Esteban-Fuertes, M

    2015-05-01

    To determine the urodynamic efficacy and factors that influence the urodynamic results of treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity with intradetrusor injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). A retrospective study was conducted with a cohort of 70 patients composed of 40 men and 30 women with stable SCI (mean age, 39 ± 13.3 years) who underwent an intradetrusor injection of 300 IUs of BTX-A. A urodynamic study was conducted prior to the injection and 6 ± 4.3 months after the treatment. New urodynamic studies were subsequently performed up to an interval of 16 ± 12.2 months. The BTX-A significantly increased (p < .05) the cystomanometric bladder capacity, the bladder volume of the first involuntary contraction of the detrusor and the postvoid residue. We observed a decrease that tended towards statistical significance (p < .1) of the maximum detrusor pressure and the maximum urine flow. Neither the bladder accommodation nor the urethral resistance index (bladder outlet obstruction index) varied significantly. The increase in vesical capacity was maintained in 50% of the sample for more than 32 months. Age, sex, anticholinergic treatment and lesion age showed no influence in terms of the increase in bladder capacity. The indwelling urinary catheter (IUC) was the only statistically significant negative factor. The urodynamic effect of BTX-A is maintained for a considerable time interval. The IUC negatively influences the result of the treatment. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of nerve-evoked contractions by β3-adrenoceptor agonism in human and rat isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Céline; Rekik, Moèz; Camparo, Philippe; Botto, Henry; Rischmann, Pascal; Lluel, Philippe; Palea, Stefano; Westfall, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of β3-adrenoceptors has been shown to have a direct relaxant effect on urinary bladder smooth muscle from both rats and humans, however there are very few studies investigating the effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonists on nerve-evoked bladder contractions. Therefore in the current study, the role of β3-adrenoceptors in modulating efferent neurotransmission was evaluated. The effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonism on neurogenic contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were compared with effects on contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (Ach) and αβ-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβ-meATP) in order to determine the site of action. Isoproterenol inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of human bladder (pD2=6.79; Emax=65%). The effect of isoproterenol was selectively inhibited by the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748,337 (pKB=7.34). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach (0.5-1μM) were inhibited 25% by isoproterenol (3μM) while contractions to 10Hz in the same strip were inhibited 67%. The selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316,243 inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of rat bladder (pD2=7.83; Emax=65%). The effects of CL-316,243 were inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by L-748,337 (pA2=6.42). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach and αβ-meATP were significantly inhibited by CL-316,243, 29% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the activation of β3-adrenoceptors inhibits neurogenic contractions of both rat and human urinary bladder. Contractions induced by exogenously applied parasympathetic neurotransmitters are also inhibited by β3-agonism however the effect is clearly less than on neurogenic contractions (particularly in human), suggesting that in addition to a direct effect on smooth muscle, activation of prejunctional β3-adrenoceptors may inhibit neurotransmitter release.

  8. Neurogenic sarcomas of the neck in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Martin, G; Kleinsasser, O

    1981-01-01

    Based on two observations and a review of the literature, the pathological and clinical findings in sarcomas of the neck in patients with neurofibromatosis are described. Histologically these neurogenic tumours show a manifold picture; in addition to spindle-cell sarcomas pleomorphic structures are to be found, which can be similar to rhabdomyo-, lipo-, chondro-, angio-, or osteogenic sarcomas so that a histological diagnosis of a neurogenic sarcoma cannot always be made without clinical details. Up to the present surgical treatment is preferred; the value of cytostatic therapy and irradiation is controversial. The results of treating these tumours are unsatisfactory. Of 29 cases reported in the literature, only two could be found in which the patient survived without a recurrence for more than five years.

  9. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  10. Bladder sensation measures and overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Rapp, David E; Neil, Nancy J; Govier, Fred E; Kobashi, Kathleen C

    2009-09-01

    We performed a prospective multicomponent study to determine whether subjective and objective bladder sensation instruments may provide data on sensory dysfunction in patients with overactive bladder. We evaluated 70 prospectively enrolled patients with urodynamics and questionnaires on validated urgency (Urgency Perception Score), general overactive bladder (Urogenital Distress Inventory) and quality of life (Incontinence Impact Questionnaire). We first sought a correlation between sensory specific (Urgency Perception Score) and quality of life questionnaire scores. We then assessed a correlation between sensory questionnaire scores and urodynamic variables, exploring the hypothesis that certain urodynamic parameters may be bladder sensation measures. We evaluated 2 urodynamic derivatives (first sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity) to increase sensory finding discrimination. We noted a moderate correlation between the Urgency Perception Score (0.56) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (0.74) vs the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (each p <0.01). A weak negative correlation was seen between Urgency Perception Score and bladder capacity (-0.25, p <0.05). No correlation was noted for the other urodynamics parameters. First sensation ratio and bladder urgency velocity statistically significantly correlated with the Urgency Perception Score despite the lesser or absent correlation associated with the individual components of these derivatives. Bladder sensation questionnaires may be valuable to identify patients with sensory dysfunction and provide additional data not obtained in generalized symptom questionnaires. Urodynamic variables correlated with bladder sensation questionnaire scores and may be an objective method to assess sensory dysfunction.

  11. Neurogenic stunned myocardium in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kerro, Ali; Woods, Timothy; Chang, Jason J

    2017-04-01

    "Stunned myocardium," characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, was first described via animal models using transient coronary artery occlusion. However, this phenomenon has also been noted with neurologic pathologies and collectively been labeled "neurogenic stunned myocardium" (NSM). Neurogenic stunned myocardium resulting from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a challenging pathology due to its diagnostic uncertainty. Traditional diagnostic criteria for NSM after SAH focus on electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities and troponemia. However, tremendous heterogeneity still exists. Traditional pathophysiological mechanisms for NSM encompassed hypothalamic and myocardial perivascular lesions. More recently, research on pathophysiology has centered on myocardial microvascular dysfunction and genetic polymorphisms. Catecholamine surging as a mechanism has also gained attention with particular focus placed on the role of adrenergic blockade in both the prehospital and acute settings. Management remains largely supportive with case reports acknowledging the utility of inotropes such as dobutamine and milrinone and intra-aortic balloon pump when NSM is accompanied by cardiogenic shock. Neurogenic stunned myocardium that follows SAH can result in many complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary edema, and prolonged intubation, which can negatively impact long-term recovery from SAH and increase morbidity and mortality. This necessitates the need to accurately diagnose and treat NSM.

  12. Defining Causes for Overactive Bladder Symptoms in Women.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yu-Hua; Lin, Alex T L; Chen, Kuang-Kuo

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the causes for overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms in women visiting a urological clinic. We prospectively recruited female patients with OAB symptoms between December 2008 and February 2010. All patients were interviewed for their detailed personal and medical history. All patients completed a 3-day frequency-volume chart. Symptom severity was evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Overactive Bladder Symptom Score (OABSS) questionnaires. All patients underwent either conventional pressure-flow urodynamic studies or video-urodynamic studies. On the basis of these evaluations, patients were assigned to one of the following categories: idiopathic OAB, stress urinary incontinence (SUI)-associated, neurogenic bladder, or bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). A total of 108 female patients were recruited into the study. The mean age of the patients was 63.75 ± 14.02 years (range: 23-89). Detrusor overactivity was demonstrated in 55 patients (51%). The differential diagnosis was idiopathic OAB in 51 women (47.2%), SUI-associated in 46 (42.6%), neurogenic bladder in 13 (12.0%) and BOO in 7 (6.5%). Our study suggests that the causes for OAB symptoms could be defined in half of the women visiting a urological clinic. Among them, SUI was the most common. Moreover, OAB symptoms in women might relate to BOO. Detailed history taking and sophisticated urodynamic studies are required for a substantial group of female patients with OAB symptoms to make the correct diagnosis and provide optimal therapy. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  14. Prolonged Cardiac Dysfunction After Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stunned Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Wilson, Thomas; Sharma, Deepak; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction occurring secondary to neurologic disease, termed neurogenic stunned myocardium, is an incompletely understood phenomenon that has been described after several distinct neurologic processes. We present a case of neurogenic stunned myocardium, discovered intraoperatively after anesthetic induction, in a patient who presented to our operating room with a recent intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We discuss the longitudinal cardiac functional course after neurogenic stunned myocardium. Lastly, we discuss the pathophysiology of neurogenic stunned myocardium, as well as its implications for anesthesiologists caring for neurosurgical patients. PMID:26462162

  15. Photodynamic therapy of the rabbit bowel and bladder after installation and injection of delta aminolevulinic acid (ALA): uptake of protoporphyrin IX and depth of necrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merguerian, Paul A.; Pugach, Jeff L.; Park, Jane; Sepers, Marja; Lilge, Lothar D.

    1999-06-01

    Management of neurogenic bladders with high pressures and poor compliance often requires surgical enlargement of the bladder utilizing small or large bowel or stomach. The bowel segments usually retain their absorptive and secretory properties causing several complications which include hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis for small and large bowel segments, hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis for stomach segments, increased risk of bacteriuria, stone formation, altered hepatic metabolism and altered drug metabolism. There is also the potential risk of developing cancer at the anastomotic site.

  16. A case-control study on the association between bladder cancer and prior bladder calculus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Ching-Chun; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-03-15

    Bladder calculus is associated with chronic irritation and inflammation. As there is substantial documentation that inflammation can play a direct role in carcinogenesis, to date the relationship between stone formation and bladder cancer (BC) remains unclear. This study aimed to examine the association between BC and prior bladder calculus using a population-based dataset. This case-control study included 2,086 cases who had received their first-time diagnosis of BC between 2001 and 2009 and 10,430 randomly selected controls without BC. Conditional logistic regressions were employed to explore the association between BC and having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus. Of the sampled subjects, bladder calculus was found in 71 (3.4%) cases and 105 (1.1%) controls. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio (OR) of having been diagnosed with bladder calculus before the index date for cases was 3.42 (95% CI = 2.48-4.72) when compared with controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, and renal disease, tobacco use disorder, obesity, alcohol abuse, and schistosomiasis, bladder outlet obstruction, and urinary tract infection. We further analyzed according to sex and found that among males, the OR of having been previously diagnosed with bladder calculus for cases was 3.45 (95% CI = 2.39-4.99) that of controls. Among females, the OR was 3.05 (95% CI = 1.53-6.08) that of controls. These results add to the evidence surrounding the conflicting reports regarding the association between BC and prior bladder calculus and highlight a potential target population for bladder cancer screening.

  17. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as “urinary bladder neck obstruction”, “urinary bladder, overactive”, and “urinary bladder, neurogenic”. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  18. The Role(s) of Cytokines/Chemokines in Urinary Bladder Inflammation and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder related and with at least one urinary symptom. It was recently concluded that 3.3–7.9 million women (>18 years old) in the United States exhibit BPS/IC symptoms. The impact of BPS/IC on quality of life is enormous and the economic burden is significant. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of BPS/IC are unknown, numerous theories including infection, inflammation, autoimmune disorder, toxic urinary agents, urothelial dysfunction, and neurogenic causes have been proposed. Altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder (i.e., pain at low or moderate bladder filling) that accompany BPS/IC may be mediated by many factors including changes in the properties of peripheral bladder afferent pathways such that bladder afferent neurons respond in an exaggerated manner to normally innocuous stimuli (allodynia). The goals for this review are to describe chemokine/receptor (CXCL12/CXCR4; CCL2/CCR2) signaling and cytokine/receptor (transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/TGF-β type 1 receptor) signaling that may be valuable LUT targets for pharmacologic therapy to improve urinary bladder function and reduce somatic sensitivity associated with urinary bladder inflammation. PMID:24738044

  19. Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a heterogeneous syndrome which is usually characterized by urinary frequency, nocturia, and bladder pain. Several pathomechanisms have been proposed, including uroepithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation, autoimmunity, and occult urinary tract infections. It is possible that an inflammatory process alters regulation of urothelial homeostasis and results in dysfunction of the bladder epithelium. Different phenotypes of IC/BPS have been explored including Hunner and non-Hunner type IC, hypersensitive bladder, and bladder pain both with and without functional somatic syndrome. Different gene expressions have also been found in different IC phenotypes. Abnormal expressions of uroplakin, chondroitin sulfate and adhesive protein E-cadherin, tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in IC/BPS bladder suggest abnormal epithelial differentiation in this bladder disease. Analysis of inflammatory proteins, or cytokines in the urine or serum provides another diagnostic foundation forIC/BPS subtypes. The involvement of IC/BPS in systemic functional somatic syndrome and other pelvic organ diseases might also subdivide subtypes of IC/BPS. Chronic inflammation, increased urothelial apoptosis, and abnormal urothelial function are closely associated in IC bladders. This article reviews recent research on the pathomechanisms of IC, which might help us in mapping the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27915472

  20. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E U; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-10-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  1. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  2. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  3. Dose-escalating study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of fesoterodine in children with overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Bimal; El-Tahtawy, Ahmed; Wang, Ellen Q; Darekar, Amanda; Cossons, Nandini; Crook, Tim J; Scholfield, David; Reddy, Pramod

    2012-08-01

    To determine the pharmacokinetics, safety and tolerability of fesoterodine, and assess the utility of 3-day bladder diaries (exploratory objective) in pediatric subjects with neurogenic detrusor overactivity or idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). In this 8-week open-label study, subjects (8-17 years, >25 kg) received fesoterodine 4 mg for 4 weeks, then 8 mg for 4 weeks. Blood samples were obtained at weeks 4 and 8. Of 21 subjects enrolled, 11 had neurogenic detrusor overactivity and 10 had idiopathic OAB; 1 discontinued (personal reasons). Mean age and weight were 13.2 years and 54.0 kg for boys (n = 12) and 13.1 years and 49.2 kg for girls (n = 9). 5-Hydroxy-methyltolterodine plasma concentrations did not differ by diagnosis and were consistent with predictions based on adult data. Treatment-related adverse events (all mild or moderate) included 1 event each of dry mouth, constipation, dry eyes and blurred vision, and 2 events each of nausea and increased post-void residual volume. Three-day bladder diaries proved feasible. Oral administration of fesoterodine in pediatric subjects (>25 kg) with idiopathic OAB or neurogenic detrusor overactivity produced steady-state plasma 5-hydroxy-methyltolterodine exposures similar to those in adults. The doses given were well tolerated. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A role for the Drosophila neurogenic genes in mesoderm differentiation.

    PubMed

    Corbin, V; Michelson, A M; Abmayr, S M; Neel, V; Alcamo, E; Maniatis, T; Young, M W

    1991-10-18

    The neurogenic genes of Drosophila have long been known to regulate cell fate decisions in the developing ectoderm. In this paper we show that these genes also control mesoderm development. Embryonic cells that express the muscle-specific gene nautilus are overproduced in each of seven neurogenic mutants (Notch, Delta, Enhancer of split, big brain, mastermind, neuralized, and almondex), at the apparent expense of neighboring, nonexpressing mesodermal cells. The mesodermal defect does not appear to be a simple consequence of associated neural hypertrophy, suggesting that the neurogenic genes may function similarly and independently in establishing cell fates in both ectoderm and mesoderm. Altered patterns of beta 3-tubulin and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the mutants indicate a role for the neurogenic genes in development of most visceral and somatic muscles. We propose that the signal produced by the neurogenic genes is a general one, effective in both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  5. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture.

  6. Myogenic bladder defects in mouse models of human oculodentodigital dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Shao, Qing; Barr, Kevin; Simek, Jamie; Fishman, Glenn I.; Laird, Dale W.

    2015-01-01

    To date, over 65 mutations in the gene encoding Cx43 (connexin43) have been linked to the autosomal-dominant disease ODDD (oculodentodigital dysplasia). A subset of these patients experience bladder incontinence which could be due to underlying neurogenic deterioration or aberrant myogenic regulation. BSMCs (bladder smooth muscle cells) from wild-type and two Cx43 mutant lines (Cx43G60S and Cx43I130T) that mimic ODDD exhibit a significant reduction in total Cx43. Dye transfer studies revealed that the G60S mutant was a potent dominant-negative inhibitor of co-expressed Cx43, a property not equally shared by the I130T mutant. BSMCs from both mutant mouse strains were defective in their ability to contract, which is indicative of phenotype changes due to harbouring the Cx43 mutants. Upon stretching, Cx43 levels were significantly elevated in controls and mutants containing BSMCs, but the non-muscle myosin heavy chain A levels were only reduced in cells from control mice. Although the Cx43G60S mutant mice showed no difference in voided urine volume or frequency, the Cx43I130T mice voided less frequently. Thus, similar to the diversity of morbidities seen in ODDD patients, genetically modified mice also display mutation-specific changes in bladder function. Furthermore, although mutant mice have compromised smooth muscle contraction and response to stretch, overriding bladder defects in Cx43I130T mice are likely to be complemented by neurogenic changes. PMID:24228978

  7. The use of cystometry in small rodents: a study of bladder chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Uvin, Pieter; Everaerts, Wouter; Pinto, Silvia; Alpízar, Yeranddy A; Boudes, Mathieu; Gevaert, Thomas; Voets, Thomas; Nilius, Bernd; Talavera, Karel; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-08-21

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) functions as a dynamic reservoir that is able to store urine and to efficiently expel it at a convenient time. While storing urine, however, the bladder is exposed for prolonged periods to waste products. By acting as a tight barrier, the epithelial lining of the LUT, the urothelium, avoids re-absorption of harmful substances. Moreover, noxious chemicals stimulate the bladder's nociceptive innervation and initiate voiding contractions that expel the bladder's contents. Interestingly, the bladder's sensitivity to noxious chemicals has been used successfully in clinical practice, by intravesically infusing the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin to treat neurogenic bladder overactivity. This underscores the advantage of viewing the bladder as a chemosensory organ and prompts for further clinical research. However, ethical issues severely limit the possibilities to perform, in human subjects, the invasive measurements that are necessary to unravel the molecular bases of LUT clinical pharmacology. A way to overcome this limitation is the use of several animal models. Here we describe the implementation of cystometry in mice and rats, a technique that allows measuring the intravesical pressure in conditions of controlled bladder perfusion. After laparotomy, a catheter is implanted in the bladder dome and tunneled subcutaneously to the interscapular region. Then the bladder can be filled at a controlled rate, while the urethra is left free for micturition. During the repetitive cycles of filling and voiding, intravesical pressure can be measured via the implanted catheter. As such, the pressure changes can be quantified and analyzed. Moreover, simultaneous measurement of the voided volume allows distinguishing voiding contractions from non-voiding contractions. Importantly, due to the differences in micturition control between rodents and humans, cystometric measurements in these animals have only limited translational value. Nevertheless, they are

  8. ["Pathophysiology and treatment of the overactive bladder"].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    The International Continence Society (ICS) recently derived a consensus symptomatic definition of overactive bladder (OAB) as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. These symptom combinations are suggestive of urodynamically demonstrable detrusor overactivity. The etiology of OAB falls into two broad categories: neurogenic and nonneurogenic. It is not easy to confirm the etiology of OAB in patients with bladder outlet obstruction and neurological disease. This debate has attempted to examine the pathophysiology of OAB and to determine the optimal treatment strategy in a patient with two diseases possibly causing OAB. A 75-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of OAB (urgency, nocturia, and urge incontinence) occurring after cerebrovascular accidents. Urge incontinence worsened concomitantly with the appearance of turbid urine. Urinary tract infection was accompanied by 84 ml of post-void residual. The prostate volume and PSA value were 28 ml and 1.2 ng/ml, respectively. The total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Quality of Life (QOL) Index were 23 and 5, respectively. IPSS for storage symptoms was higher than that for obstructive symptoms. The maximum flow rate, measured after treatment for UTI, was 9.4 ml/s. Two debaters discuss the treament modality, TURP, or pharmacotherapy.

  9. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Treating Neurogenic Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gross, Tobias; Schneider, Marc P; Bachmann, Lucas M; Blok, Bertil F M; Groen, Jan; Hoen, Lisette A 't; Castro-Diaz, David; Padilla Fernández, Bárbara; Del Popolo, Giulio; Musco, Stefania; Hamid, Rizwan; Ecclestone, Hazel; Karsenty, Gilles; Phé, Véronique; Pannek, Jürgen; Kessler, Thomas M

    2016-06-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a promising therapy for non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and might also be a valuable option in patients with an underlying neurological disorder. We systematically reviewed all available evidence on the efficacy and safety of TENS for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. After screening 1943 articles, 22 studies (two randomised controlled trials, 14 prospective cohort studies, five retrospective case series, and one case report) enrolling 450 patients were included. Eleven studies reported on acute TENS and 11 on chronic TENS. In acute TENS and chronic TENS, the mean increase of maximum cystometric capacity ranged from 69ml to 163ml and from 4ml to 156ml, the mean change of bladder volume at first detrusor overactivity from a decrease of 13ml to an increase of 175ml and from an increase of 10ml to 120ml, a mean decrease of maximum detrusor pressure at first detrusor overactivity from 18 cmH20 to 72 cmH20 and 8 cmH20, and a mean decrease of maximum storage detrusor pressure from 20 cmH20 to 58 cmH2O and from 3 cmH20 to 8 cmH2O, respectively. In chronic TENS, a mean decrease in the number of voids and leakages per 24h ranged from 1 to 3 and from 0 to 4, a mean increase of maximum flow rate from 2ml/s to 7ml/s, and a mean change of postvoid residual from an increase of 26ml to a decrease of 85ml. No TENS-related serious adverse events have been reported. Risk of bias and confounding was high in most studies. Although preliminary data suggest TENS might be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the evidence base is poor and more reliable data from well-designed randomised controlled trials are needed to make definitive conclusions. Early data suggest that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation might be effective and safe for

  10. Multiple Uric Acid Bladder Stones: Clinical Presentation and Endoscopic Management

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Shen, Shujane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bladder urinary calculi occur in 3%–8% of men with bladder outlet obstruction, and although most of them are composed of calcium, in a few cases uric acid bladder stones are diagnosed. Case Presentation: We present clinical images and therapeutic management of a 65-year-old diabetic man with significant prostate enlargement and >30 bladder stones, the largest being 17 mm. Despite the large stone burden, the patient was managed by cystolithotripsy. Remarkably, stone composition analysis revealed 100% uric acid stone. Intraoperative and postoperative course were uneventfully. Conclusion: Uric acid bladder stone pathogenesis seems to be multifactorial with local and systemic factors contributing in different manners and even large stone burdens may be cystoscopically managed. PMID:28265592

  11. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  12. Increased urothelial cell detection in the primary bladder smooth muscle cell cultures with dual MACS/qRT-PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Genheimer, Chistopher W; Guthrie, Kelly I; Shokes, Jacob E; Bruce, Andrew T; Quinlan, Sarah F; Sangha, Namrata; Ilagan, Roger M; Basu, Joydeep; Burnette, Teresa; Ludlow, John W

    2011-03-01

    Bladder tissue has been regenerated in humans with neurogenic bladder using an implant produced from autologous urothelial (UC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) expanded from bladder biopsies seeded onto a biodegradable synthetic scaffold. As the majority of bladder cancers are urothelial carcinomas (aka, transitional cell carcinoma), this 2-cell type autologous sourcing strategy presents significant challenges to product development. Entire bladders have been regenerated in cystectomized animals using a single-cell-type sourcing strategy: implants were seeded with bladder-derived SMC-only. Applying the bladder SMC-only sourcing strategy to produce clinical implants for bladder replacement or urinary diversion in bladder cancer patients requires methods for screening SMC cultures for the presence of potentially cancerous UC cells to provide evidence of SMC culture purity before seeding the scaffold. In this report, we show a 10-fold to 100-fold improvement in the sensitivity of qualitative and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)-based assays for detecting UC positive for Cytokeratin 5 (CK5) in mixed SMC/UC cultures when the cell population was first subjected to magnetic activated cell sorting to enrich for cells expressing the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (known as EPCAM or CD326), a marker known to be present in normal UC and upregulated in the cancerous UC.

  13. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  14. The effect of semiconditional dorsal penile nerve electrical stimulation on capacity and compliance of the bladder with deformity in spinal cord injury patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-H; Kim, S-H; Kim, J M; Im, H T; Choi, I S; Lee, K W

    2012-04-01

    Bladder capacity, bladder compliance, the volume of the first overactive contraction, maximal volume during cystometry (CMG) and the vesicoureteral reflux, bladder wall deformity before and after semiconditional stimulation on DPN. To evaluate the effect of the semiconditional electrical stimulation on dorsal penile nerve (DPN) to improve the complicated bladder function in male with spinal cord injury (SCI). Semiconditional stimulation system and urodynamic laboratory in a university hospital. Six men (age, 33-59 years) with SCI incurred from 38 to 156 months before this study. semiconditional stimulation parameters were set during CMG and semiconditional stimulation on DPN by surface electrodes via Empi Focus stimulator was applied from 14 to 28 days, at home. Parameters about bladder function were measured before and after stimulation applied. All parameters for bladder after semiconditional stimulation were increased. Also, the vesicoureteral reflux and bladder wall deformity was improved in five of six patients. Semiconditional electrical stimulation on DPN effectively suppresses neurogenic detrusor overactivity and distend the bladder physiologically in the SCI patient with a complicated bladder. The bladder capacity and compliance as well as the bladder wall deformity were improved as a result of this treatment.

  15. Bilateral Hydroureteronephrosis with a Hypertrophied, Trabeculated Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Showkathali; Raiz, Iqbal; Faiz, Iqbal

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral hydroureteronephrosis involves the dilatation of the renal pelvis, calyces and ureter; it develops secondary to urinary tract obstruction and leads to a build-up of back pressure in the urinary tract, and it may lead to impairment of renal function and ultimately culminate in renal failure. Although clinically silent in most cases, it can be diagnosed as an incidental finding during evaluation of an unrelated cause. In a minority of patients, it presents with signs and symptoms. Renal calculus is the most common cause, but there are multiple non-calculus aetiologies, and they depend on age and sex. Pelviureteric junction obstruction, benign prostatic hypertrophy, urethral stricture, neurogenic bladder, retroperitoneal mass and bladder outlet obstruction are some of the frequent causes of hydroureteronephrosis in adults. The incidence of non-calculus hydronephrosis is more common in males than in females. Ultrasonography is the most important baseline investigation in the evaluation of patients with hydronephrosis. Here, we report a rarely seen case of bilateral hydroureteronephrosis associated with a hypertrophied, trabeculated bladder in an adult male cadaver, suspected to be due to a primary bladder neck obstruction, and analyse its various other causes, clinical presentations and outcomes. PMID:28894411

  16. [Principles and indications of electrostimulation of the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Tanagho, E A

    1990-07-01

    Neurostimulation to restore the essential elements of lower urinary tract function is a very promising approach in the management of the neuropathic bladder. The goal of neurostimulation is to restore the three main functions of the lower urinary tract: the reservior capacity of the bladder, the sphincteric activity of the continence mechanism, and the ability of the bladder to evacuate completely. In extensive experimental studies conducted over the past 18 years, the physiological foundations of micturition and sphincteric control were investigated, which made the clinical application of neurostimulation in the management of the neurogenic bladder possible. In human studies, the essential experimental model of ventral root stimulation after dorsal rhizotomy and selective peripheral neurotomy proved to be the most successful. To date, over 220 patients have been treated, of whom 35 have spinal cord injury or severe neuropathy and received multiple sacral root implants. 25 of the 35 patients are evaluable, 15 (60%) of these achieved the three goals of the study: complete continence, restoration of reservoir function with adequate capacity, and voiding to neurostimulation with minimal residual urine or none. The remaining 185 patients with a variety of voiding dysfunctions classified under four main headings: 1) urge incontinence; 2) post-prostatectomy incontinence; 3) pelvic dysfunction syndrome in the male; 4) pelvic dysfunction syndrome in the female were treated by single electrode implantation in order to modulate spastic voiding dysfunction and pelvic floor activity. Success rates (improvement of 50% or more) were 72%, 38%, 46%, and 47% in the four groups, respectively.

  17. Cotransplantation with specific populations of spina bifida bone marrow stem/progenitor cells enhances urinary bladder regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun K; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Marks, Andrew J; Kollhoff, David M; Rao, Manoj V; Hota, Partha V; Matoka, Derek J; Edassery, Seby L; Thaker, Hatim; Sarwark, John F; Janicki, Joseph A; Ameer, Guillermo A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2013-03-05

    Spina bifida (SB) patients afflicted with myelomeningocele typically possess a neurogenic urinary bladder and exhibit varying degrees of bladder dysfunction. Although surgical intervention in the form of enterocystoplasty is the current standard of care in which to remedy the neurogenic bladder, it is still a stop-gap measure and is associated with many complications due to the use of bowel as a source of replacement tissue. Contemporary bladder tissue engineering strategies lack the ability to reform bladder smooth muscle, vasculature, and promote peripheral nerve tissue growth when using autologous populations of cells. Within the context of this study, we demonstrate the role of two specific populations of bone marrow (BM) stem/progenitor cells used in combination with a synthetic elastomeric scaffold that provides a unique and alternative means to current bladder regeneration approaches. In vitro differentiation, gene expression, and proliferation are similar among donor mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), whereas poly(1,8-octanediol-cocitrate) scaffolds seeded with SB BM MSCs perform analogously to control counterparts with regard to bladder smooth muscle wall formation in vivo. SB CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells cotransplanted with donor-matched MSCs cause a dramatic increase in tissue vascularization as well as an induction of peripheral nerve growth in grafted areas compared with samples not seeded with hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Finally, MSC/CD34(+) grafts provided the impetus for rapid urothelium regeneration. Data suggest that autologous BM stem/progenitor cells may be used as alternate, nonpathogenic cell sources for SB patient-specific bladder tissue regeneration in lieu of current enterocystoplasty procedures and have implications for other bladder regenerative therapies.

  18. Neurovascular aspects of skin neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Brain, Susan D

    2011-12-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is involved in skin inflammation. It is hypothesized that it is involved in the pathogenesis of the common chronic cutaneous vascular disorder rosacea, but the exact mechanism of action is currently unknown. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are widely expressed on primary sensory neuron endings and non-neuronal cells such as keratinocytes. Here we describe the potential for TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors to be involved in the pathophysiology of rosacea due to their polymodal activation, including cold and hot temperature, pungent products from vegetable and spices, reactive oxygen species, and mechanical stimuli. We discuss the role of both receptors and the sensory neuropeptides that they release in inflammation and pain sensation and evidence suggesting that both TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors may be promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of the inflammatory symptoms of rosacea.

  19. Management of oropharyngeal neurogenic dysphagia in adults.

    PubMed

    Miles, Anna; Allen, Jacqui E

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews recent literature in the management of neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) including assessment processes and treatments, with a specific focus on OPD as a result of stroke and Parkinson's disease. A large number of high-quality systematic reviews were published that provide an excellent summary of current evidence across assessment and treatment of swallowing disorders. There is building interest and knowledge in technology in both the understanding and treatment of OPD including functional MRI, manometry, and noninvasive brain stimulation. Neurologic disorders demonstrate a high prevalence of OPD resulting in significant decrement to health and healthcare costs. Novel technologies were reported in assessment and tracking of dysphagia as well as emerging innovative therapeutic options.

  20. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Saracen, A; Kotwica, Z; Woźniak-Kosek, A; Kasprzak, P

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is observed in cerebral injuries and has an impact on treatment results, being a predictor of fatal prognosis. In this study we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 250 consecutive patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for the frequency and treatment results of NPE. The following factors were taken under consideration: clinical status, aneurysm location, presence of NPE, intracranial pressure (ICP), and mortality. All patients had plain- and angio-computer tomography performed. NPE developed most frequently in case of the aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery. The patients with grades I-III of SAH, according to the World Federation of Neurosurgeons staging, were immediately operated on, while those with poor grades IV and V had only an ICP sensor's implantation procedure performed. A hundred and eighty five patients (74.4 %) were admitted with grades I to III and 32 patients (12.8 %) were with grade IV and V each. NPE was not observed in SAH patients with grade I to III, but it developed in nine patients with grade IV and 11 patients with grade V. Of the 20 patients with NPE, 19 died. Of the 44 poor grade patients (grades IV-V) without NPE, 20 died. All poor grade patients had elevated ICP in a range of 24-56 mmHg. The patients with NPE had a greater ICP than those without NPE. Gender and age had no influence on the occurrence of NPE. We conclude that the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in SAH patients with poor grades is a fatal prognostic as it about doubles the death rate to almost hundred percent.

  1. Pyridostigmine treatment trial in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolfgang; Sandroni, Paola; Opfer-Gehrking, Tonette L; Suarez, Guillermo A; Klein, Caroline M; Hines, Stacy; O'Brien, Peter C; Slezak, Jeffrey; Low, Phillip A

    2006-04-01

    Midodrine hydrochloride is the only drug demonstrated in a placebo-controlled treatment trial to improve orthostatic hypotension (OH) but it significantly worsens supine hypertension. By enhancing ganglionic transmission, pyridostigmine bromide can potentially ameliorate OH without worsening supine hypertension. To evaluate the efficacy of a single 60-mg dose of pyridostigmine bromide, alone or in combination with a subthreshold (2.5 mg) or suprathreshold (5 mg) dose of midodrine hydrochloride, compared with placebo. We report a double-blind, randomized, 4-way cross-over study of pyridostigmine in the treatment of neurogenic OH. A total of 58 patients with neurogenic OH were enrolled. After 1 day of baseline measurements, patients were given 4 treatments (3 active treatments [60 mg of pyridostigmine bromide; 60 mg of pyridostigmine bromide and 2.5 mg of midodrine hydrochloride; 60 mg of pyridostigmine bromide and 5 mg of midodrine hydrochloride] and a placebo) in random order on successive days. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate were measured, both supine and standing, immediately before treatment and hourly for 6 hours after the treatment was given. No significant differences were seen in the supine BP, either systolic (P = .36) or diastolic (P = .85). In contrast, the primary end point of the fall in standing diastolic BP was significantly reduced (P = .02) with treatment. Pairwise comparison showed significant reduction by pyridostigmine alone (BP fall of 27.6 mm Hg vs 34.0 mm Hg with placebo; P = .04) and pyridostigmine and 5 mg of midodrine hydrochloride (BP fall of 27.2 mm Hg vs 34.0 mm Hg with placebo; P = .002). Standing BP improvement significantly regressed with improvement in OH symptoms. Pyridostigmine significantly improves standing BP in patients with OH without worsening supine hypertension. The greatest effect is on diastolic BP, suggesting that the improvement is due to increased total peripheral resistance.

  2. Urosepsis complicated by a spontaneous bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-11-08

    The authors present a case of a 72-year-old diabetic male s/p pelvic irradiation for prostate carcinoma who arrived in the emergency department with complaints of shaking chills. After admission for urosepsis, he developed severe abdominal pain and examination revealed a diffusely tender abdomen. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous urinary bladder perforation and underwent surgery. After several weeks of intravenous antibiotics, he was discharged with multiple drains in place and bilateral nephrostomy tubes.

  3. Addressing ketamine bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    The rise in ketamine misuse means more health professionals will need to diagnose, refer and treat ketamine bladder syndrome. Prevention and raising awareness of the problem among multidisciplinary teams will help limit damage to the bladder as well as making treatment and management more effective.

  4. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Fougere, Renée J; Currie, Katharine D; Nigro, Mark K; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2016-09-15

    Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of life.

  5. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fougere, Renée J.; Currie, Katharine D.; Nigro, Mark K.; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of

  6. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Neurogenic Type with Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Rosenmann, A.; Arad, I.

    1974-01-01

    An infant affected by severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita leading to death in infancy due to neurogenic atrophy is described. Six other sibs were similarly affected. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance is suggested. Images PMID:4837288

  7. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications.

  8. Treatment of primary bladder neck obstruction in women with transurethral resection of the bladder neck.

    PubMed

    Blaivas, Jerry G; Flisser, Adam J; Tash, Jennifer A

    2004-03-01

    We describe the presentation, clinical characteristics, treatment and followup of a series of women with primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO). A patient data base was searched for women who underwent transurethral resection for bladder outlet obstruction diagnosed by videourodynamic study (VUDS) according to the Blaivas-Groutz nomogram for female bladder outlet obstruction between 1993 and 2002. A total of 37 women with obstruction were identified. Patients with neurogenic, traumatic, anatomical or iatrogenic causes of obstruction were excluded. Seven patients remained who had been diagnosed with PBNO, of whom all underwent transurethral bladder neck resection. Office records were reviewed for history, presentation, surgical treatment and clinical outcome. Seven patients were diagnosed with PBNO. Age was 39 to 81 years. Six of 7 patients presented with symptoms of obstruction, including a weak or intermittent stream and urinary hesitancy. These 6 patients had unremarkable physical examination findings with normal perianal sensation, anal sphincter tone and lower extremity reflexes. One patient presented with abdominal swelling, which on physical examination was found to be a markedly distended bladder containing more than 1000 cc urine. All patients had overt urethral obstruction on VUDS. In 6 of 7 patients obstruction was clearly at the vesical neck and in 1 the obstruction site was equivocal. Three patients were treated or had previously been treated pharmacologically with alpha-blockers. All patients were subsequently treated with intermittent self-catheterization. All patients then underwent transurethral bladder neck resection at the vesical neck and proximal urethra. Surgical specimens weighed 1 to 5 gm and showed urethral fragments or fibromuscular tissue without specific pathological findings. Followup was 1 to 10 years (median 3) and it included physical examination, uroflowmetry, post-void residual urine measurement and videourodynamic study. Six

  9. EAU Guidelines on the Assessment of Non-neurogenic Male Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms including Benign Prostatic Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gratzke, Christian; Bachmann, Alexander; Descazeaud, Aurelien; Drake, Marcus J; Madersbacher, Stephan; Mamoulakis, Charalampos; Oelke, Matthias; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Gravas, Stavros

    2015-06-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) represent one of the most common clinical complaints in adult men and have multifactorial aetiology. To develop European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on the assessment of men with non-neurogenic LUTS. A structured literature search on the assessment of non-neurogenic male LUTS was conducted. Articles with the highest available level of evidence were selected. The Delphi technique consensus approach was used to develop the recommendations. As a routine part of the initial assessment of male LUTS, a medical history must be taken, a validated symptom score questionnaire with quality-of-life question(s) should be completed, a physical examination including digital rectal examination should be performed, urinalysis must be ordered, post-void residual urine (PVR) should be measured, and uroflowmetry may be performed. Micturition frequency-volume charts or bladder diaries should be used to assess male LUTS with a prominent storage component or nocturia. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) should be measured only if a diagnosis of prostate cancer will change the management or if PSA can assist in decision-making for patients at risk of symptom progression and complications. Renal function must be assessed if renal impairment is suspected from the history and clinical examination, if the patient has hydronephrosis, or when considering surgical treatment for male LUTS. Uroflowmetry should be performed before any treatment. Imaging of the upper urinary tract in men with LUTS should be performed in patients with large PVR, haematuria, or a history of urolithiasis. Imaging of the prostate should be performed if this assists in choosing the appropriate drug and when considering surgical treatment. Urethrocystoscopy should only be performed in men with LUTS to exclude suspected bladder or urethral pathology and/or before minimally invasive/surgical therapies if the findings may change treatment. Pressure-flow studies should be performed

  10. Dual effect of GABA on the contractile activity of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Santicioli, P; Meli, A

    1985-06-01

    The effects of GABA and related substances were examined in isolated detrusor strips from the dome of the guinea-pig urinary bladder. GABA (0.01-1 mM) produced concentration-related phasic contractions of isolated strips from the guinea-pig urinary bladder dome. This effect of GABA was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol, selective GABAA receptor agonists but not by (+/-)-baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist. A specific cross desensitization was observed between GABA, homotaurine and muscimol but not between (+/-)-baclofen and GABA. GABA (1 mM)-induced contractions were antagonized by picrotoxin, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist. GABA-induced contractions were almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM, TTX) thus indicating their neurogenic origin. In addition GABA-induced contractions were partially antagonized by atropine (to about the same extent as those produced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), a ganglionic stimulant), but were unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM), phentolamine (0.2 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). In the presence of GABA the contractile effect of both DMPP (TTX-sensitive) and acetylcholine (ACh, TTX-insensitive) were significantly reduced. Similar findings were obtained with DMPP, i.e. in preparations exposed to this ganglionic stimulant both GABA- and ACh-induced contractions were depressed. Homotaurine but not (+/-)-baclofen mimicked the depressant effect of GABA on DMPP-induced contractions. The depressant effect of GABA on ACh-induced contractions of the guinea-pig urinary bladder was neurogenic in origin, i.e., was not observed in preparations exposed to TTX. These experiments indicate that GABA has a dual effect on the contractile behaviour of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder. Recently it has been proposed that endogenous GABA plays a neuromodulatory role in this organ. Our data suggest that in the early phase of neurogenic activation of detrusor muscle (micturition reflex) GABA might transiently

  11. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy.

  12. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  13. Factors influencing bladder management in male patients with spinal cord injury: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Engkasan, J P; Ng, C J; Low, W Y

    2014-02-01

    Qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews. The objective of this study was to explore the factors influencing the choice of bladder management for male patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Public hospitals in Malaysia. Semistructured (one-on-one) interviews of 17 patients with SCI; 7 were in-patients with a recent injury and 10 lived in the community. All had a neurogenic bladder and were on various methods of bladder drainage. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using thematic analyses. The choice of bladder management was influenced by treatment attributes, patients' physical and psychological attributes, health practitioners' influences and social attributes. Participants were more likely to choose a treatment option that was perceived to be convenient to execute and helped maintain continence. The influence of potential treatment complications on decision making was more variable. Health professionals' and peers' opinions on treatment options had a significant influence on participants' decision. In addition, patients' choices depended on their physical ability to carry out the task, the level of family support received and the anticipated level of social activities. Psychological factors such as embarrassment with using urine bags, confidence in self-catheterization and satisfaction with the current method also influenced the choice of bladder management method. The choice of bladder management in people with SCI is influenced by a variety of factors and must be individualized. Health professionals should consider these factors when supporting patients in making decisions about their treatment options.

  14. AAEM minimonograph #46: neurogenic muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, L

    1996-07-01

    Muscle hypertrophy occurs uncommonly in several neurogenic disorders including neuropathies, radiculopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, and post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis varies in different circumstances. In the presence of generalized myokymia and neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), symmetrical hypertrophy appears to be the result of continuous spontaneous electrical stimulation of myofibers and, in some cases, results in type 1 myofiber preponderance. Focal hypertrophy occurring with radiculopathies and mononeuropathies was associated with complex repetitive discharges (CRDs) in approximately half the cases. CRDs may play a role in the pathogenesis of myofiber hypertrophy by continuous myofiber stimulation, but in some cases, with and without CRDs, myofiber hypertrophy may be related to mechanical events. Muscle enlargement seen in old polio appears to involve a significant degree of pseudohypertrophy, although some myofiber hypertrophy occurs. The symmetrical occurrence of hypertrophy in genetically determined disorders, such as spinal muscular atrophy, and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy types 1 and 2 may have both a genetic and a mechanical basis in addition to pseudohypertrophy in some cases.

  15. Microglia participate in neurogenic regulation of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao Z; Li, You; Li, Liang; Shah, Kandarp H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Lyden, Patrick; Shi, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is associated with neuroinflammation and increased sympathetic tone. Interference with neuroinflammation by an anti-inflammatory reagent or overexpression of interleukin-10 in the brain was found to attenuate hypertension. However, the cellular mechanism of neuroinflammation, as well as its impact on neurogenic regulation of blood pressure, is unclear. Here, we found that hypertension, induced by either angiotensin II or l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, is accompanied by microglial activation as manifested by microgliosis and proinflammatory cytokine upregulation. Targeted depletion of microglia significantly attenuated neuroinflammation, glutamate receptor expression in the paraventricular nucleus, plasma vasopressin level, kidney norepinephrine concentration, and blood pressure. Furthermore, when microglia were preactivated and transferred into the brains of normotensive mice, there was a significantly prolonged pressor response to intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II, and inactivation of microglia eliminated these effects. These data demonstrate that microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, are the major cellular factors in mediating neuroinflammation and modulating neuronal excitation, which contributes to the elevated blood pressure.

  16. [Primary neurogenic and myogenic disorders of posture].

    PubMed

    Schranz, C; Meinck, H-M

    2004-05-01

    Disturbance of posture may occur in a variety of neurological disorders and occasionally is the presenting or even the only sign. In the majority of cases, the head or the trunk or both are bent forward (bent spine syndrome, dropped head syndrome). A feature of these primary neurogenic or myogenic postural disturbances that is in contrast to antalgic contraction or ankylosis is that they are not fixed, but the trunk or head are easily erected by the examiner and show a characteristic sagging. Neuromuscular disorders are a frequent cause. They may be confined to the paraspinal muscles. Axial computed tomography of the spine, electromyography of the involved muscles, and muscle biopsy help to make the diagnosis. However, also central movement disorders may lead to a sagging of the head or trunk or of both due to a lessened tone of the head and trunk extensors. This is frequently seen in the various parkinsonian syndromes which may, however, occur in association with a focal myopathy of the paraspinal muscles. Occasionally, sagging of the trunk is seen as a side effect of neuropharmacologic medication. Sagging of the trunk or head should be differentiated from a pathologically increased innervation of the ventral muscles in dystonic movement disorders such as antecollis or camptocormia. Pathologic reclination of the head or trunk or both is a rare disturbance of posture. It may occur in dystonia (retrocollis) or, occasionally, as a consequence of musculotendinous contractures secondary to certain neuromuscular disorders such as the rigid spine syndrome.

  17. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  18. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder, which is called the urothelium or transitional epithelium . As the cancer grows into or through the ... in the inner layer of cells (the transitional epithelium) but have not grown into the deeper layers. ...

  19. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  20. Bladder Diseases - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bladder Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bladderdiseases.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  1. An unusual case of non-disseminated bladder aspergillosis in a setting of transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Siddappa, S; Mythri, K M; Kowsalya, R; Shivalingaiah, M

    2012-01-01

    A bladder infection of Aspergillus with no evidence of dissemination is rare. We present a case of Aspergillus infection with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder without any evidence of systemic involvement. A 65-year-old male diabetic whose main complaints were intermittent painful haematuria and nocturia had undergone nephroureterectomy a year and a half back for transitional cell carcinoma of right renal pelvis. Cystoscopy revealed bladder mucosa having fixed broad tumour with encrustation and bleeding on touch at the right vesico-ureteric junction. The histopathologic diagnosis was a high-grade transitional carcinoma with Aspergillus infection. Fungal culture of urine obtained after bladder wash yielded Aspergillus fumigatus.

  2. Engineering functional bladder tissues.

    PubMed

    Horst, Maya; Madduri, Srinivas; Gobet, Rita; Sulser, Tullio; Milleret, Vinzent; Hall, Heike; Atala, Anthony; Eberli, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    End stage bladder disease can seriously affect patient quality of life and often requires surgical reconstruction with bowel tissue, which is associated with numerous complications. Bioengineering of functional bladder tissue using tissue-engineering techniques could provide new functional tissues for reconstruction. In this review, we discuss the current state of this field and address different approaches to enable physiologic voiding in engineered bladder tissues in the near future. In a collaborative effort, we gathered researchers from four institutions to discuss the current state of functional bladder engineering. A MEDLINE® and PubMed® search was conducted for articles related to tissue engineering of the bladder, with special focus on the cells and biomaterials employed as well as the microenvironment, vascularisation and innervation strategies used. Over the last decade, advances in tissue engineering technology have laid the groundwork for the development of a biological substitute for bladder tissue that can support storage of urine and restore physiologic voiding. Although many researchers have been able to demonstrate the formation of engineered tissue with a structure similar to that of native bladder tissue, restoration of physiologic voiding using these constructs has never been demonstrated. The main issues hindering the development of larger contractile tissues that allow physiologic voiding include the development of correct muscle alignment, proper innervation and vascularization. Tissue engineering of a construct that will support the contractile properties that allow physiologic voiding is a complex process. The combination of smart scaffolds with controlled topography, the ability to deliver multiple trophic factors and an optimal cell source will allow for the engineering of functional bladder tissues in the near future. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Teaching self-catheterization skills to children with neurogenic bladder complications.

    PubMed Central

    Neef, N A; Parrish, J M; Hannigan, K F; Page, T J; Iwata, B A

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effects of simulation training on the acquisition of self-catheterization skills in 2 female children with spina bifida. Based on a task analysis, the children were taught to perform on a doll each of the components of preparation, and, using a mirror to locate the urinary meatus, to insert and remove the catheter and to clean-up. Before, during, and after training, the children's performance of the skills on the doll and on themselves was assessed. Results of a multiple baseline design across subjects and skill components showed that doll training facilitated the children's acquisition of self-catheterization skills. PMID:2793631

  4. Intravesical therapy for overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Overactive bladder and urgency incontinence are common conditions generally treated with oral anticholinergic therapy. Despite the development of new antimuscarinic agents, many patients do not tolerate or fail to respond to oral therapy. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative method of managing bladder overactivity. Intravesical instillation of anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and atropine can achieve cholinergic blockade without producing systemic side effects. Botulinum A toxin injected directly into the detrusor has been shown in preliminary studies to increase bladder capacity and decrease uncontrolled bladder contractility for up to 6 months. Intravesical local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine block the conduction of unmyelinated C fibers and when administered into the bladder, lead to an increase in functional bladder capacity. Intravesical capsaicin and resiniferatoxin also affect afferent innervation by blocking C-fiber afferents, leading to decreased bladder contractility and increased bladder capacity. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative treatment for the management of overactive bladder.

  5. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    Injury - bladder and urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... Types of bladder injuries include: Blunt trauma (such as a blow to the body) Penetrating wounds (such as bullet or stab wounds) The ...

  6. Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy: defective neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Westerman, R A; Block, A; Nunn, A; Delaney, C A; Hahn, A; Dennett, X; Carr, R W

    1992-01-01

    Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy exhibits autosomal dominant inheritance with complete penetrance in males and incomplete penetrance in females. Newer tests of small sensory nerve function were used in screening 8 family members aged between 14 and 66 years. All exhibited some frequent features of the disorder with an onset in the 2nd or 3rd decade, foot ulceration, foot callus, loss of pin prick, thermal and light touch sensation, and some reduction in vibration acuity and proprioception in the lower limbs. The hands were involved in 3 of 8, muscle involvement was present in 5 of 8, but deafness was not detected by audiometry. Nerve conduction velocity, sensory action potentials, latency and amplitude, thermal acuity, vibration acuity and axon reflex flares were measured in all patients. One sural nerve biopsy confirmed the presence of peripheral fibre loss in this predominantly sensory neuropathy. Chemically evoked axon reflex tests were used to evaluate the extent of primary sensory nerve fibre involvement. All patients were tested using a Moor MBF 3-D dual channel laser Doppler velocimeter. Acetylcholine or phenylephrine iontophoretically applied as 16 mC doses evoked absent or tiny axon reflexes in areas of impaired pin prick sensation. By contrast, direct microvascular dilator responses to nitroprusside (smooth muscle dependent) and acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) were present but somewhat reduced in areas with defective neurogenic inflammation. These results differ significantly from the responses obtained in age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.05). Foot pressure analysis was performed for orthoses in 2 affected members with foot ulceration using the Musgrave Footprint system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Uncoupling neurogenic gene networks in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William A; Goyal, Yogesh; Yamaya, Kei; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y; Levine, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The EGF signaling pathway specifies neuronal identities in the Drosophila embryo by regulating developmental patterning genes such as intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind). EGFR is activated in the ventral midline and neurogenic ectoderm by the Spitz ligand, which is processed by the Rhomboid protease. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to delete defined rhomboid enhancers mediating expression at each site of Spitz processing. Surprisingly, the neurogenic ectoderm, not the ventral midline, was found to be the dominant source of EGF patterning activity. We suggest that Drosophila is undergoing an evolutionary transition in central nervous system (CNS)-organizing activity from the ventral midline to the neurogenic ectoderm. © 2017 Rogers et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  8. Treatment of Neurogenic Cough with Tramadol: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Dion, Gregory R; Teng, Stephanie E; Achlatis, Efstratios; Fang, Yixin; Amin, Milan R

    2017-07-01

    This study employs validated cough assessment tools to prospectively determine the impact of tramadol on cough severity and quality of life in subjects with neurogenic cough. The study was a prospective case series with planned data collection at a tertiary care academic medical center laryngology practice. Sixteen consecutive collected subjects with neurogenic cough prospectively completed pre- and posttreatment validated cough assessment tools, the cough severity index (CSI) and Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ). All subjects in the study reported at least some improvement in their cough symptoms. In a Wilcoxon signed rank test that compared paired results, CSI scores improved from 23 to 14 and LCQ scores improved from 74 to 103 ( P = .003 and P = .005, respectively). This small preliminary assessment suggests that tramadol warrants additional evaluation as a treatment for neurogenic cough.

  9. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    PubMed

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A practical guide to the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Berger, Michael J; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2014-03-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH) is a debilitating condition associated with many central and peripheral neurological disorders. It has a complex pathophysiology and variable clinical presentation, which makes diagnosis and treatment difficult. Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension is often confused with other disorders of orthostatic intolerance, hypovolemic states and systemic conditions. Diagnosis is usually made by an autonomic specialist following characteristic responses to head-up tilt. Symptom control can be achieved through a combination of patient education, nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy. The purpose of this review is to provide the clinician with a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of NOH.

  11. DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Loki

    2015-01-01

    A new study shows that statin therapy before diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is not associated with an increased risk of microvascular disease and might even be beneficial for retinopathy and neuropathy. These data suggest a potential protective effect of statins in specific complications, which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:25366041

  12. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sphincter muscles relax to allow urine to pass through the urethra as the bladder contracts to ... contract at the same time, so urine cannot pass easily. Drug therapy for an uncoordinated bladder and ...

  13. Options for independent bladder management in patients with spinal cord injury and hand function prohibiting intermittent catheterization.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Igor; De, Elise

    2015-02-01

    Choosing the appropriate bladder management strategy for the spinal cord injury patient with neurogenic bladder and hand function prohibitive of self catheterization (urethral or stomal) catheterization is complex and based on limited literature. We have catalogued the available data in this review. A literature review was conducted on external sphincterotomy, suprapubic tube, ileal conduit, and ileovesicostomy between 1994 and 2012. Articles on neurogenic bladder focused primarily on spinal cord injury were included. Important aspects of each technique, patient selection, urologic events, and quality of life are described. The available literature consists primarily of level 3 data. Patient reported outcomes were rarely measured. External sphincterotomy is a good option for males who are candidates for an external catheter and who wish to avoid a complicated reconstruction-most will need re-operations for failure. Suprapubic tube is an option in both genders. Complaints usually involve urine leakage and urinary tract infection, which typically resolve with conservative measures. There is some evidence to support patient satisfaction. Ileal conduit is an option for all patients with quadriplegia, offering continuous drainage and absence of foreign material. Many providers and patients will choose more conservative options first. The ileovesicostomy is best applied to small bladders with severe overactivity. The "reversibility" of this procedure makes it attractive to those not interested in an ileal conduit and who have had complications from prolonged suprapubic tube placement. The authors conclude with recommendations for future research, most importantly more standard reporting of objective data. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  15. [Standard pharmacological treatment and new therapies for overactive bladder].

    PubMed

    Del Popolo, Giulio; Mencarini, Marco; Li Marzi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) in adult males varies from 10.2% to 17.4%, and in females from 7.7 to 31.3. 16.5% of the adult population presents symptoms consistent with OAB; of these, 37.2% are actually affected. The OAB has a significant effect on the quality of life. Initial treatment includes behavioral therapy, physiotherapy and antimuscarinic drugs. In patients where behavioral modifications fail, treatment is associated with antimuscarinics. The antimuscarinic agents used to treat OAB showed some efficacy, but adverse events too, such as dry mouth, constipation, headache and blurred vision. In selected cases unresponsive to antimuscarinic therapy, it is possible to use second-line treatments represented by sacral neuromodulation and botulinum toxin type A both for idiopathic detrusor overactivity, where it is still an experimental treatment, and for neurogenic cases with 2011 FDA approval. Surgical options represent the last choice for selected cases.

  16. [Effects of octreotide on experimental orthostatic neurogenic hypotension].

    PubMed

    Verwaerde, P; Bordet, R; Portolan, G; Tran, M A; Marques, M A; Montastruc, J L; Sénard, J M

    1996-08-01

    The synthetic somatostatin analogue, octreotide, has recently been proposed for the treatment of both postprandial and orthostatic hypotension (OH) in humans with autonomic failure related to multiple system atrophy (MSA) or diabetes mellitus. However, pharmacodynamic data are not still available in experimental models of orthostatic hypotension. We investigated in a model of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, obtained by chronic sinoaortic denervation (SAD) in chloralose-anaesthetized dogs, the effects of octreotide (0.1 mg/kg, subcutaneous route) during a double-blind cross-over study vs placebo. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) average values, SBP and HR short-term variabilities (using fast Fourier transformation) in both low (LF: 50-150 mHz) and high frequency range (respiratory rate +/- 50 mHz) and plasma noradrenaline (NA) levels (HPLC) were measured in supine position and during head-up tilt test (HUT: 80 degrees, 10 min) before and 45 min after drug administration. In controls, as expected, head-up tilt test induced a significant increase in DBP (+14 +/- 8 mmHg), HR (+36 +/- 21 beat/min), NA (296 +/- 118 vs 141 +/- 63 pg/ml), SBP-LF (25 +/- 5 vs 14 +/- 3%) whereas HR-HF significantly decreased. The changes during head-up tilt test were not modified after placebo or octreotide administration. In SAD dogs, head-up tilt test elicited a dramatic fall in SBP (-74 +/- 39 mmHg), DBP (-20 +/- 15 mmHg) without any significant change in HR (-5 +/- 12 beat/min), NA (708 +/- 213 vs 606 +/- 331 pg/ml), SBP-LF (16 +/- 3 vs 16 +/- 3%), HR-HF (8 +/- 2 vs 7 +/- 1%). Octreotide or placebo failed to significantly modify any of the measured parameters during head-up tilt test performed 45 min after drug administration. At the dose used, octreotide elicited a 80% decrease in insulin plasma levels after 45 min in both normal and SAD dogs. These results suggest that 1) this experimental model of orthostatic hypotension in SAD dogs is reproductible and can be used to

  17. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  18. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  19. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies. PMID:28098199

  20. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies.

  1. Trospium chloride in the management of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Rovner, Eric S

    2004-01-01

    Trospium chloride is an orally active, quaternary ammonium compound with antimuscarinic activity. It binds specifically and with high affinity to muscarinic receptors M(1), M(2) and M(3), but not nicotinic, cholinergic receptors. It is hydrophilic and does not cross the normal blood-brain barrier in significant amounts and, therefore, has minimal central anticholinergic activity. Peak plasma trospium chloride concentrations are attained approximately 5-6 hours after oral administration, which should occur before meals as concurrent food ingestion significantly reduces trospium bioavailability. Trospium chloride undergoes negligible metabolism by the hepatic cytochrome P450 system; few metabolic drug interactions are known. While trospium chloride dosage adjustments based on age or sex appear unwarranted, such adjustments may be needed in patients with severe renal impairment. Direct comparative studies in patients with overactive bladder indicate that trospium chloride is at least as effective as oxybutynin and tolterodine. Placebo-controlled studies have also confirmed the efficacy of trospium chloride in terms of improved urodynamic parameters; small-scale, noncomparative studies have documented significant trospium chloride-induced improvements in patients with reflex neurogenic bladder, postoperative bladder irritation and radiation-induced cystitis; and observational studies including >10,000 patients have also revealed favourable findings for trospium chloride, including a marked decrease in incontinence episodes and substantial improvement in health-related quality of life. Trospium chloride is generally well tolerated, and significantly more so than immediate-release oxybutynin. The most frequent adverse events, occurring in >1% of trospium chloride-treated patients, are dry mouth, dyspepsia, constipation, abdominal pain and nausea. Available for many years in several countries outside North America, trospium chloride is likely to develop an important role

  2. Detrusor underactivity and the underactive bladder: Symptoms, function, cause-what do we mean? ICI-RS think tank 2014.

    PubMed

    Smith, Phillip P; Birder, Lori A; Abrams, Paul; Wein, Alan J; Chapple, Chris R

    2016-02-01

    Impaired bladder emptying is a well-recognized cause of lower urinary tract symptoms. However, the symptoms produced do not always relate to voiding, and may include frequency, urgency and incontinence. Conversely, the etiology of symptoms of disturbed voiding is not necessarily dependent upon objectively impaired voiding. Terms including underactive bladder, detrusor underactivity, and impaired contractility describe aspects of these problems, and have been used somewhat interchangeably. It is possible that the present lack of effective therapy in many cases relates to both etiologic and diagnostic uncertainty stemming from terminologic imprecision. Detrusor underactivity has a standardized definition, unlike underactive bladder and impaired contractility. The relationships of symptoms, function, and cause were the focus of a 2014 ICI-RS Think Tank entitled Does Detrusor Underactivity Exist, and if so it is neurogenic, myogenic, or both? This review presents a summary of the problem and the Think Tank conclusions. A terminologic hierarchy and specific research goals are presented.

  3. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  4. Neurogenic hypertension related to basilar impression. Case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, L D; Papadopoulos, S M; Hoff, J T

    1993-12-01

    The authors report the resolution of essential hypertension following transoral odontoidectomy and medullary decompression in a 39-year-old woman with basilar invagination. Current understanding of central regulation of the cardiovascular system is discussed and the pertinent neuroanatomy illustrated. Experimental and clinical evidence supporting the role of neurogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertension is reviewed.

  5. Neurogenic tumors of the duodenum in patients with neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, J.M.; Han, S.Y.; Colcher, H.; Halpern, N.B.

    1983-10-01

    Neurogenic tumors of the duodenum may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis. They may be solitary or multiple and are located distal to the duodenal bulb. The presenting complaints may be hematemesis, vomiting, or jaundice. The lesions are generally benign and have a low potential for malignant degenertion. Four cases are reported.

  6. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  7. Measurement of electrochemical conductance of penile skin using Sudoscan(®): A new tool to assess neurogenic impotence.

    PubMed

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the value of electrochemical skin conductance (ESC) measurement at penile level using Sudoscan(®) for the diagnosis of neurogenic impotence in diabetics. The following neurophysiological parameters were assessed in 25 male diabetics who complained of impotence and 25 age-matched normal male subjects without erectile dysfunction (age range: 29-70 years): ESC, sympathetic skin responses (SSR), warm detection thresholds (WDT), and cold detection thresholds (CDT) for the penis and the feet, vibration detection thresholds (VDT) for the penis, and sensory nerve conduction study of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) with sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) recording. Diabetic patients with impotence differed from controls with regard to most neurophysiological results at both penile and foot levels. Among penile innervation variables in the group of impotent diabetics, penile ESC was found to be the most frequently abnormal (80% of patients), followed by penile WDT, CDT, and DNP-SNAP amplitude (52% of patients), and then penile SSR amplitude and VDT (44% of patients). Various combinations of abnormalities were observed: penile ESC was the only abnormal test in 2 patients, while all tests were abnormal in 2 patients and remained normal in only one patient. Erectile dysfunction is common in diabetic men, but the diagnosis of a neurogenic origin is challenging. This study showed that ESC measurement using Sudoscan(®) is feasible and more sensitive than SSR recordings to show penile sympathetic innervation impairment. This new test should be further studied to better define its diagnostic accuracy and clinical correlates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Aerosol transfer of bladder urothelial and smooth muscle cells onto demucosalized colonic segments for bladder augmentation: in vivo, long term, and functional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hidas, Guy; Lee, Hak J.; Bahoric, Andrej; Kelly, Maryellen S.; Watts, Blake; Liu, Zhongbo; Saharti, Samah; Lusch, Achim; Alamsahebpour, Alireza; Kerbl, David; Truong, Hung; Zi, Xiaolin; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate permeability of the new urothelial lining to water. To determine if the aerosol transfer of bladder cells would have behaved differently in the neurogenic bladder population, this experiment should have been performed in animals with neuropathic bladders. Conclusion Aerosol spraying of single cell suspension of urothelial and muscular cells with fibrin glue resulted in coverage of the demucosalized intestinal segment with a uniform urothelial layer. This new lining segment was durable without regrowth of colonic mucosa after 6 months. The new reconstituted segment absorbs and secretes significantly less than control colocystoplasty. PMID:26022502

  9. Conantokin G-induced changes in the chemical coding of dorsal root ganglion neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bossowska, A; Majewski, M

    2012-01-01

    Conantokin G (CTG), isolated from the venom of the marine cone snail Conus geographus, is an antagonist of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), the activation of which, especially those located on the central afferent terminals and dorsal horn neurons, leads to hypersensitivity and pain. Thus, CTG blocking of NMDARs, has an antinociceptive effect, particularly in the case of neurogenic pain treatment. As many urinary bladder disorders are caused by hyperactivity of sensory bladder innervation, it seems useful to estimate the influence of CTG on the plasticity of sensory neurons supplying the organ. Retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the urinary bladder wall of six juvenile female pigs. Three weeks later, intramural bladder injections of CTG (120 microg per animal) were carried out in all animals. After a week, dorsal root ganglia of interest were harvested from all animals and neurochemical characterization of FB+ neurons was performed using a routine double-immunofluorescence labeling technique on 10-microm-thick cryostat sections. CTG injections led to a significant decrease in the number of FB+ neurons containing substance P (SP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), somatostatin (SOM), calbindin (CB) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) when compared with healthy animals (20% vs. 45%, 13% vs. 26%, 1.3% vs. 3%, 1.2 vs. 4% and 0.9% vs. 6% respectively) and to an increase in the number of cells immunolabelled for galanin (GAL, 39% vs. 6.5%). These data demonstrated that CTG changed the chemical coding of bladder sensory neurons, thus indicating that CTG could eventually be used in the therapy of selected neurogenic bladder illnesses.

  10. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  11. Urinary bladder xanthomatous cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shrenik J.; Ajitsaria, Vineet; Singh, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Xanthoma cystitis of urinary bladder is a rare entity and may present as an intravesical mass. A 38-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and imaging was done which was suggestive of a malignant mass with surrounding tissue infiltration. Partial cystectomy was performed, and histological examination of the mass showed xanthomatous cystitis. PMID:28197037

  12. Long-term follow-up after botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the detrusor for treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity in children

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Tanja; Koen, Mark; Berger, Christoph; Riccabona, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To prove the long-term efficacy of BTX-A injection in the management of children with neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity. Materials and methods 28 out of 145 children with neurogenic bladder (15 male and 13 female, mean age 10.7 years) who were treated between 2002 and 2010 and became non-responders to conservative treatment were included into the retrospective study. We injected 10-12 U/kg of BTX-A (Botox®) into the detrusor at 20-30 sites, sparing the trigone. The mean follow-up was 48 months (range 6-84 months). Results Group 1. 14 patients had a single injection of BTX-A. Five of them were successful. Mean bladder reflex volume increased (from 62.9 to 117.5 ml), maximum detrusor pressure decreased (from 59 to 37.5 cm H2O), detrusor compliance increased (from 4.8 to 9.5 ml/cm H2O), and leak-point-pressure decreased (from 46.5 to 24.2 cm H2O). Four patients did not respond and were treated by ileocystoplasty. Another five were lost to follow-up. Group 2. 14 patients had repeated (mean 2.5) injections of BTX-A with a mean interval of 13.7 months. In thirteen patients, urodynamic parameters of the first and last injection were similar to those obtained in Group 1, showing a good response. One patient received an ileocystoplasty. Conclusion BTX-A is a safe alternative in the treatment of detrusor hyperactivity in children with myelomeningocele (MMC). The efficacy lasted a mean of 12 months and urodynamic response was unchanged even after several injections. In our series, 21.7% of children with severe low-compliance bladders were non-responders. PMID:24578954

  13. Alterations in Nerve-Evoked Bladder Contractions in a Coronavirus-Induced Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Malykhina, Anna P.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s often present with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and retention) resulting from damage to the peripheral and central nervous systems. These studies were designed to examine the changes in the function of the bladder that may underlie neurogenic bladder dysfunction using a mouse model of demyelination in the CNS. Methods Bladders from 12 week old male C57BL/6J mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE, a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease model of human MS), and age-matched controls, were cut into 5–7 strips and suspended in physiological muscle baths for tension measurement in response to agonists and electric field stimulation (EFS). Experiments were performed on intact and denuded (with mucosa removed) bladder strips. Results The maximum effect of EFS was not significantly different between CIE and control bladders. Nerve-evoked EFS contractions (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) were blocked by a combination of atropine (cholinergic antagonist) and α,β-methylene ATP (an ATP analog that desensitizes purinergic receptors). In response to EFS, the α,β-methylene ATP-resistant (cholinergic) component of contraction was significantly reduced, while the atropine-resistant (purinergic) component was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Removal of the mucosa in CIE bladders restored the cholinergic component. Bethanechol (muscarinic receptor agonist) potency was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a deficit in the nerve-evoked cholinergic component of contraction that is not due to the ability of the smooth muscle to respond to acetylcholine. We conclude that neurodegenerative bladder dysfunction in this model of multiple sclerosis may be due, in part, to pathologic changes in the mucosa that causes suppression of muscarinic receptor-mediated contractile response

  14. Alterations in nerve-evoked bladder contractions in a coronavirus-induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lamarre, Neil S; Braverman, Alan S; Malykhina, Anna P; Barbe, Mary F; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Patients with neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's often present with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, urinary frequency, urgency, nocturia and retention) resulting from damage to the peripheral and central nervous systems. These studies were designed to examine the changes in the function of the bladder that may underlie neurogenic bladder dysfunction using a mouse model of demyelination in the CNS. Bladders from 12 week old male C57BL/6J mice with coronavirus-induced encephalomyelitis (CIE, a chronic, progressive demyelinating disease model of human MS), and age-matched controls, were cut into 5-7 strips and suspended in physiological muscle baths for tension measurement in response to agonists and electric field stimulation (EFS). Experiments were performed on intact and denuded (with mucosa removed) bladder strips. The maximum effect of EFS was not significantly different between CIE and control bladders. Nerve-evoked EFS contractions (tetrodotoxin-sensitive) were blocked by a combination of atropine (cholinergic antagonist) and α,β-methylene ATP (an ATP analog that desensitizes purinergic receptors). In response to EFS, the α,β-methylene ATP-resistant (cholinergic) component of contraction was significantly reduced, while the atropine-resistant (purinergic) component was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Removal of the mucosa in CIE bladders restored the cholinergic component. Bethanechol (muscarinic receptor agonist) potency was significantly increased in CIE bladders. Our data demonstrate a deficit in the nerve-evoked cholinergic component of contraction that is not due to the ability of the smooth muscle to respond to acetylcholine. We conclude that neurodegenerative bladder dysfunction in this model of multiple sclerosis may be due, in part, to pathologic changes in the mucosa that causes suppression of muscarinic receptor-mediated contractile response and augmentation of purinergic response of

  15. Clinical course of a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence symptoms followed at a tertiary center.

    PubMed

    Lebl, Adrienne; Fagundes, Simone Nascimento; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika

    2016-01-01

    To characterize a cohort of children with non-neurogenic daytime urinary incontinence followed-up in a tertiary center. Retrospective analysis of 50 medical records of children who had attained bladder control or minimum age of 5 years, using a structured protocol that included lower urinary tract dysfunction symptoms, comorbidities, associated manifestations, physical examination, voiding diary, complementary tests, therapeutic options, and clinical outcome, in accordance with the 2006 and 2014 International Children's Continence Society standardizations. Female patients represented 86.0% of this sample. Mean age was 7.9 years and mean follow-up was 4.7 years. Urgency (56.0%), urgency incontinence (56.0%), urinary retention (8.0%), nocturnal enuresis (70.0%), urinary tract infections (62.0%), constipation (62.0%), and fecal incontinence (16.0%) were the most prevalent symptoms and comorbidities. Ultrasound examinations showed alterations in 53.0% of the cases; the urodynamic study showed alterations in 94.7%. At the last follow-up, 32.0% of patients persisted with urinary incontinence. When assessing the diagnostic methods, 85% concordance was observed between the predictive diagnosis of overactive bladder attained through medical history plus non-invasive exams and the diagnosis of detrusor overactivity achieved through the invasive urodynamic study. This subgroup of patients with clinical characteristics of an overactive bladder, with no history of urinary tract infection, and normal urinary tract ultrasound and uroflowmetry, could start treatment without invasive studies even at a tertiary center. Approximately one-third of the patients treated at the tertiary level remained refractory to treatment. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  17. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder. PMID:26938559

  18. Murine bladder wall biomechanics following partial bladder obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph; Drzewiecki, Beth A; Merryman, W David; Pope, John C

    2013-10-18

    Evaluation of bladder wall mechanical behavior is important in understanding the functional changes that occur in response to pathologic processes such as partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO). In the murine model, the traditional approach of cystometry to describe bladder compliance can prove difficult secondary to small bladder capacity and surgical exposure of the bladder. Here, we explore an alternative technique to characterize murine mechanical properties by applying biaxial mechanical stretch to murine bladders that had undergone pBOO. 5-6 week old female C57/Bl6 mice were ovariectomized and subjected to pBOO via an open surgical urethral ligation and sacrificed after 4 weeks (n=12). Age matched controls (n=6) were also analyzed. Bladders were separated based on phenotype of fibrotic (n=6) or distended (n=6) at the time of harvest. Biaxial testing was performed in modified Kreb's solution at 37°C. Tissue was preconditioned to 10 cycles and mechanical response was evaluated by comparing axial strain at 50kPa. The normal murine bladders exhibited anisotropy and were stiffer in the longitudinal direction. All mice showed a loss of anisotropy after 4 weeks of pBOO. The two phenotypes observed after pBOO, fibrotic and distended, exhibited less and more extensibility, respectively. These proof-of-principle data demonstrate that pBOO creates quantifiable changes in the mechanics of the murine bladder that can be effectively quantified with biaxial testing.

  19. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  20. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  1. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium in Pediatrics. A case report].

    PubMed

    Alados Arboledas, F J; Millán-Miralles, L; Millán-Bueno, M P; Expósito-Montes, J F; Santiago-Gutierrez, C; Martínez Padilla, M C

    2015-10-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is an unusual clinical entity. It mimics an acute coronary syndrome with electrocardiographic abnormalities, cardiac dysfunction and elevated cardiac enzymes with absence of obstructive coronary disease. It may occur after a neurosurgical procedure. A case is presented of neurogenic stunned myocardium occurring in a child after removal of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma. The patient developed nodal tachycardia with hemodynamic impairment. The clinical course was satisfactory due to antiarrhythmic therapy, with biochemical, echocardiographic, and clinical improvement within a week. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO. PMID:28119846

  3. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  4. [Neurogenic communication disorders: how effective are relaxation therapy and acupuncture?].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M

    2008-12-01

    Not only neurologists but also ENT-physicians and phoniatricians have to prescribe speech and language therapy for patients with communication disorders. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has gained increasing popularity among patients. Many studies have investigated these procedures and positive effects on certain physical e. g., chronic pain and anxiety disorders could be validated. Unfortunately only few empirical investigations have targeted the use of CAM to treat neurogenic disorders of communication or cognition. In this review we provide an overview over general therapeutical principals of two widely used approaches, relaxation therapy and acupuncture. Then we survey the literature and summarize existent research literature regarding the effects of the treatment of neurogenic disorders including dementia.

  5. Neurogenic neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Although fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have distinct clinical phenotypes, they do share many other features. Pain, allodynia and dysaesthesia occur in each condition and seem to exist on a similar spectrum. Fibromyalgia and CRPS can both be triggered by specific traumatic events, although fibromyalgia is most commonly associated with psychological trauma and CRPS is most often associated with physical trauma, which is frequently deemed routine or minor by the patient. Fibromyalgia and CRPS also seem to share many pathophysiological mechanisms, among which the most important are those involving central effects. Nonetheless, peripheral effects, such as neurogenic neuroinflammation, are also important contributors to the clinical features of each of these disorders. This Review highlights the differing degrees to which neurogenic neuroinflammation might contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of both fibromyalgia and CRPS, and discusses the evidence suggesting that this mechanism is an important link between the two disorders, and could offer novel therapeutic targets.

  6. Contemporary Management of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David; Fradet, Yves

    1991-01-01

    Bladder cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in Western society, and its incidence appears to be increasing. Important advances have recently occurred in both diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to bladder neoplasms. Presentation is not unique, and physician awareness is important to identify patients who are at risk for bladder neoplasia and consequently require further investigation. A diagnostic approach and contemporary management are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 4 PMID:21229043

  7. Preemptive analgesia: the prevention of neurogenous orofacial pain.

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Chronic neurogenous pain is often an extremely difficult condition to manage. In the orofacial region, trauma from injury or dental procedures may lead to the development of severe neuralgic pains and major distress to the patient. Clinical and experimental evidence suggests that the use of adequate preemptive regional anesthesia, systemic analgesia, and the avoidance of repeated, painful stimuli may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:8934952

  8. Primary intrapulmonary neurogenic sarcoma with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and asbestosis

    PubMed Central

    Caves, P. K.; Jacques, J.

    1971-01-01

    A case of primary intrapulmonary neurogenic sarcoma with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and asbestosis is described. The essential histological features of this rare tumour are detailed, and the five authentic cases previously reported are reviewed. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy and its occurrence in this case are discussed. After surgical removal of the tumour recurrence appeared in the chest within six months. It responded poorly to radiotherapy, and death from metastases occurred 16 months after operation. Images PMID:5576539

  9. Using Mitrofanoff's principle and Monti's technique as a surgical option for bladder augmentation with a continent stoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Hydronephrosis, reflux and renal failure are serious complications that occur in patients with neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. When the bladder compliance is lost, it is imperative to carry out surgery aimed at reducing bladder storage pressure. An ileocystoplasty, and for patients not suitable for intermittent catheterization, using the Mitrofanoff principle to form a continent stoma and the subsequent closure of the bladder neck, can be used. We report here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, an association between two previously described techniques (the Mitrofanoff principle and the technique of Monti), that can solve the problem of a short appendix in obese patients. Case presentation A 33-year-old male Caucasian patient with myelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder developed low bladder compliance (4.0 mL/cm H2O) while still maintaining normal renal function. A bladder augmentation (ileocystoplasty) with continent derivation principle (Mitrofanoff) was performed. During surgery, we found that the patient's appendix was too short and was insufficient to reach the skin. We decided to make an association between the Mitrofanoff conduit and the ileal technique of Monti, through which we performed an anastomosis of the distal stump of the appendix to the bladder (with an antireflux valve). Later, the proximal stump of the appendix was anastomosed to an ileal segment of 2.0 cm that was open longitudinally and reconfigured transversally (Monti technique), modeled by a 12-Fr urethral catheter, and finally, the distal stump was sutured at the patient's navel. After the procedure, a suprapubic cystostomy (22 Fr) and a Foley catheter (10 Fr) through the continent conduit were left in place. The patient had recovered well and was discharged on the tenth day after surgery. He remained with the Foley catheter (through the conduit) for 21 days and cystostomy for 30 days. Six months after surgery he was continent with good

  10. Using Mitrofanoff's principle and Monti's technique as a surgical option for bladder augmentation with a continent stoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Marcelo F; Rodrigues, Antonio A; Tucci, Silvio; Cologna, Adauto J; Reis, Rodolfo B; Martins, Antonio Cp; Suaid, Haylton J

    2011-02-03

    Hydronephrosis, reflux and renal failure are serious complications that occur in patients with neurogenic bladder associated with myelomeningocele. When the bladder compliance is lost, it is imperative to carry out surgery aimed at reducing bladder storage pressure. An ileocystoplasty, and for patients not suitable for intermittent catheterization, using the Mitrofanoff principle to form a continent stoma and the subsequent closure of the bladder neck, can be used. We report here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, an association between two previously described techniques (the Mitrofanoff principle and the technique of Monti), that can solve the problem of a short appendix in obese patients. A 33-year-old male Caucasian patient with myelomeningocele and neurogenic bladder developed low bladder compliance (4.0 mL/cm H2O) while still maintaining normal renal function. A bladder augmentation (ileocystoplasty) with continent derivation principle (Mitrofanoff) was performed. During surgery, we found that the patient's appendix was too short and was insufficient to reach the skin. We decided to make an association between the Mitrofanoff conduit and the ileal technique of Monti, through which we performed an anastomosis of the distal stump of the appendix to the bladder (with an antireflux valve). Later, the proximal stump of the appendix was anastomosed to an ileal segment of 2.0 cm that was open longitudinally and reconfigured transversally (Monti technique), modeled by a 12-Fr urethral catheter, and finally, the distal stump was sutured at the patient's navel.After the procedure, a suprapubic cystostomy (22 Fr) and a Foley catheter (10 Fr) through the continent conduit were left in place. The patient had recovered well and was discharged on the tenth day after surgery. He remained with the Foley catheter (through the conduit) for 21 days and cystostomy for 30 days. Six months after surgery he was continent with good bladder compliance without reflux and

  11. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  12. Isolated bladder aspergillosis as the primary presentation of non-oliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Dikmen, Emre; Filinte, Deniz; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with acute obstructive non-oliguric renal failure. Abdominal CT revealed obstructive hydronephrosis and irregular thickening of the bladder wall. Upon cystoscopy, samples of tissue were taken and found to be positive for Aspergillus spp. on histology, indicating infection of the bladder wall. The patient was treated successfully by means of a percutaneous nephrostomy and a 30-day course of caspofungin.

  13. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure.

  14. Protocol for a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial investigating sacral neuromodulation for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sacral neuromodulation has become a well-established and widely accepted treatment for refractory non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but its value in patients with a neurological cause is unclear. Although there is evidence indicating that sacral neuromodulation may be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the number of investigated patients is low and there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Methods and design This study is a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicenter trial including 4 sacral neuromodulation referral centers in Switzerland. Patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction are enrolled. After minimally invasive bilateral tined lead placement into the sacral foramina S3 and/or S4, patients undergo prolonged sacral neuromodulation testing for 3–6 weeks. In case of successful (defined as improvement of at least 50% in key bladder diary variables (i.e. number of voids and/or number of leakages, post void residual) compared to baseline values) prolonged sacral neuromodulation testing, the neuromodulator is implanted in the upper buttock. After a 2 months post-implantation phase when the neuromodulator is turned ON to optimize the effectiveness of neuromodulation using sub-sensory threshold stimulation, the patients are randomized in a 1:1 allocation in sacral neuromodulation ON or OFF. At the end of the 2 months double-blind sacral neuromodulation phase, the patients have a neuro-urological re-evaluation, unblinding takes place, and the neuromodulator is turned ON in all patients. The primary outcome measure is success of sacral neuromodulation, secondary outcome measures are adverse events, urodynamic parameters, questionnaires, and costs of sacral neuromodulation. Discussion It is of utmost importance to know whether the minimally invasive and completely reversible sacral neuromodulation would be a valuable treatment option for

  15. The pre-vertebrate origins of neurogenic placodes.

    PubMed

    Abitua, Philip Barron; Gainous, T Blair; Kaczmarczyk, Angela N; Winchell, Christopher J; Hudson, Clare; Kamata, Kaori; Nakagawa, Masashi; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kusakabe, Takehiro G; Levine, Michael

    2015-08-27

    The sudden appearance of the neural crest and neurogenic placodes in early branching vertebrates has puzzled biologists for over a century. These embryonic tissues contribute to the development of the cranium and associated sensory organs, which were crucial for the evolution of the vertebrate "new head". A previous study suggests that rudimentary neural crest cells existed in ancestral chordates. However, the evolutionary origins of neurogenic placodes have remained obscure owing to a paucity of embryonic data from tunicates, the closest living relatives to those early vertebrates. Here we show that the tunicate Ciona intestinalis exhibits a proto-placodal ectoderm (PPE) that requires inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and expresses the key regulatory determinant Six1/2 and its co-factor Eya, a developmental process conserved across vertebrates. The Ciona PPE is shown to produce ciliated neurons that express genes for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a G-protein-coupled receptor for relaxin-3 (RXFP3) and a functional cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGA), which suggests dual chemosensory and neurosecretory activities. These observations provide evidence that Ciona has a neurogenic proto-placode, which forms neurons that appear to be related to those derived from the olfactory placode and hypothalamic neurons of vertebrates. We discuss the possibility that the PPE-derived GnRH neurons of Ciona resemble an ancestral cell type, a progenitor to the complex neuronal circuit that integrates sensory information and neuroendocrine functions in vertebrates.

  16. A dangerous Cushing response in a child: neurogenic heart damage.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Francesco; Calvi, Maria Rosa; Beretta, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Cushing response, which acts to preserve cerebral blood flow by inducing arterial hypertension, could induce neurogenic heart damage through hyperactivation of autonomic nervous system. Most of clinical reports describe neurogenic heart damage as a self-limiting condition clinically characterized by electrocardiographic abnormalities in the setting of an acute neurologic insult. Here we describe a case of life-threatening cardiac dysfunction immediately after a massive intracerebral hemorrhage in a healthy 7-year-old child. The low probability of ischemic heart disease, the poor increase of cardiac necrosis markers, the localization of regional wall motion abnormalities that are not typical for coronary artery disease, and reversibility after brain surgical decompression are consistent all with neurogenic heart damage. Acute decrease of brain oxygen delivery caused by cardiac dysfunction worsens secondary brain injury in the setting of an acute neurologic insult. Thus, Cushing response, which is a physiological mechanism of cerebral protection, could become a double-edged sword when massive sympathetic activation makes the myocardium stunned.

  17. Bladder and bowel dysfunction affect quality of life. A cross sectional study of 60 patients with aquaporin-4 antibody positive Neuromyelitis Optica spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mutch, Kerry; Zhao, Sizheng; Hamid, Shahd; Methley, Abigail; Elsone, Liene; Singh, Gurpreet; Young, Carolyn; Emmanuel, Anton; Panicker, Jalesh; Jacob, Anu

    2015-11-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) associated with Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) can be severe and is well known to reduce mobility early in the disease. However the burden of bladder and bowel dysfunction is unknown and overlooked. We studied the frequency of bladder and bowel dysfunction and their impact on quality of life. A cross-sectional study of 60 patients who had AQP4-IgG positive NMO associated TM was performed using the Bladder Control Scale, Lower Urinary Tract Quality of Life, Bowel Control Scale and Neurogenic Bowel Score, Short-Form-36 Health Survey and EDSS. The relationships between the variables were analysed with multiple linear regression. Fifty women and 10 men participated. 78% (47/60) patients reported bladder symptoms and a similar number reported bowel problems. 87% (52/60) patients reported either bladder or bowel dysfunction. 65% (39/60) developed residual symptoms after the first episode of myelitis and the remaining by the second episode. Both bladder and bowel dysfunction reduced quality of life and required modification of lifestyle in 83% (39/47) and 70% (33/47) respectively. Bladder and bowel dysfunction is very common in NMO associated myelitis developing early in the disease and significantly affects quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Deciphering the Roles of Thiazolidinediones and PPARγ in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Melody; McBeth, Lucien; Sindhwani, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    The use of thiazolidinedione (TZD) therapy in type II diabetic patients has proven useful in the lowering of blood glucose levels. However, recent investigations have shown that there may be potential health concerns associated, including the risk of developing bladder cancer as well as complications in the cardiovasculature. TZDs are ligands for the nuclear receptor PPARγ, and activation causes lipid uptake and insulin sensitization, both of which are critical processes for diabetic patients whose bodies are unable to utilize insulin effectively. Several studies have shown that PPARγ/TZDs decrease IGF-1 levels and, thus, reduce cancer growth in carcinomas such as the pancreas, colon, liver, and prostate. However, other studies have shed light on the potential of the receptor as a biomarker for uroepithelial carcinomas, particularly due to its stimulatory effect on migration of bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, PPARγ may provide the tumor-promoting microenvironment by de novo synthesis of nutrients that are needed for bladder cancer development. In this review, we closely examine the TZD class of drugs and their effects on PPARγ in patient studies along with additional molecular factors that are positive modulators, such as protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), which may have considerable implications for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:28348577

  19. Update on Management of Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Low, Phillip A.; Singer, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is common in the elderly and in disorders like diabetes and Parkinson's disease. It is important to grade its severity and its impact on the person's quality of life. It is also possible to quantitate the severity of OH. Symptoms of OH vary with orthostatic stress, and it is important to recognize subtle symptoms such as tiredness and cognitive impairment. Standard drug treatment is efficacious in improving OH and its symptoms but will worsen supine hypertension. Pyridostigmine will modestly but significantly improve OH without worsening supine hypertension. Since orthostatic stress varies from moment to moment and drug treatment is suboptimal, it is necessary to combine drug treatment of OH with non-pharmacological approaches, such as compression of venous capacitance bed, use of physical counter-maneuvers, and intermittent water bolus treatment. Search Strategy: The manuscript is based on a focused review. To achieve this, references for this review were identified by searches of PubMed between 1995 and January 2008 using the search term “orthostatic hypotension”. Articles were also identified through searches of the authors own files. Only papers published in English were selected. The final reference list was generated on the basis of originality and relevance to the topic covered in this review, with a particular focus on data supported by clinical trials. PMID:18420158

  20. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... at NIDDK Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  1. Urogynecological conditions associated with overactive bladder symptoms in women

    PubMed Central

    Forde, James C.; Davila, Jonathan L.; Marks, Brian K.; Epstein, Matthew; Tsui, Johnson F.; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Blaivas, Jerry G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder symptoms (OAB) affect 9–43% of women and are associated with underlying disorders, including pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The aim of this study is to identify urogynecological conditions associated with OAB symptoms. Methods This prospective, institutional review board-approved study included women referred to a tertiary centre with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). All women completed the self-administered OAB questionnaire (OABSS). Those with an OABSS ≥8, the cutoff, were considered to have OAB symptoms. Patients underwent a history and physical examination (including Baden-Walker prolapse grading and stress test), 24-hour voiding diary, pad test (for urinary incontinence), urinalysis, and uroflow with post-void residual volume. Patients were classified clinically into the following: idiopathic OAB, SUI, POP, bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) neurogenic bladder (NGB), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and miscellaneous. Results In total, 148 women met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 67 years. Only 27% had no comorbid conditions and were considered idiopathic OAB. Associated urogynecological conditions included SUI in 37%, POP in 26%, miscellaneous conditions in 18%, recurrent UTI in 11%, NGB in 9%, and BOO in 8%. Some patients met criteria for more than one category, thus the total is greater than 100%. Conclusions In a tertiary care setting, a significant proportion of women with OAB symptoms have underlying conditions that may cause or contribute to their symptoms. Appropriate evaluation is desirable to enhance our understanding of the relationship of these conditions to the diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and pathophysiology of OAB. PMID:28360952

  2. Evidence for bladder urothelial pathophysiology in functional bladder disorders.

    PubMed

    Keay, Susan K; Birder, Lori A; Chai, Toby C

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the role of urothelium in regulating bladder function is continuing to evolve. While the urothelium is thought to function primarily as a barrier for preventing injurious substances and microorganisms from gaining access to bladder stroma and upper urinary tract, studies indicate it may also function in cell signaling events relating to voiding function. This review highlights urothelial abnormalities in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), and nonneurogenic idiopathic overactive bladder (OAB). These bladder conditions are typified by lower urinary tract symptoms including urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, nocturia, and bladder discomfort or pain. Urothelial tissues and cells from affected clinical subjects and asymptomatic controls have been compared for expression of proteins and mRNA. Animal models have also been used to probe urothelial responses to injuries of the urothelium, urethra, or central nervous system, and transgenic techniques are being used to test specific urothelial abnormalities on bladder function. BPS/IC, FIC, and OAB appear to share some common pathophysiology including increased purinergic, TRPV1, and muscarinic signaling, increased urothelial permeability, and aberrant urothelial differentiation. One challenge is to determine which of several abnormally regulated signaling pathways is most important for mediating bladder dysfunction in these syndromes, with a goal of treating these conditions by targeting specific pathophysiology.

  3. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A; Burgos, Patricia V; Velásquez, Zahady D; Muñoz, Rosa I; Lafourcade, Carlos A; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as "neurogenic niche". Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles

  4. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  5. Our patients followed up with a diagnosis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Mehmet Yusuf; Yıldızdaş, Rıza Dinçer; Yükselmiş, Ufuk; Horoz, Özden Ögür

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical situation which developes as a result of central nervous system injury. It is rare in the childhood. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical diagnosis. Although the pathogenesis is not elucidated well, there is increase in pulmonary interstitial and alveolar fluid. The main principle in treatment of neurogenic pulmonary edema is supportive treatment and decreasing intracranial pressure as in acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this article, clinical properties of our two patients diagnosed with neurogenic pulmonary edema developed as a result of central nervous system injury are presented. PMID:26884694

  6. Anticholinergic drugs for adult neurogenic detrusor overactivity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Madhuvrata, Priya; Singh, Manju; Hasafa, Zaid; Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    There is a lack of evidence about the efficacy and safety of anticholinergic drugs and about the optimal anticholinergic drug, if any, for the treatment of adult neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Review the current evidence on the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of anticholinergic drugs in the treatment of adult NDO. A literature search was conducted from 1966 to May 2011. Meta-analysis of all published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing anticholinergic drugs with placebo and comparing different types, doses, and routes of administration of anticholinergic drugs, in adults with NDO, was performed in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis statement. The primary outcome was patient-reported cure/improvement of overactive bladder symptoms. Secondary outcomes were quality of life (QoL) changes, bladder diary events, urodynamic outcomes, adverse events, and costs to health services. A total of 960 patients from 16 RCTs with mean follow-up of 3.8 wk were included. Anticholinergic drugs were associated with statistically significantly better patient-reported cure/improvement (risk ratio: 2.80; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64 to 4.77), higher maximum cystometric capacity (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 49.49; 95% CI, 15.38 to 84.20), higher volume at first contraction (WMD: 49.92; 95% CI, 20.06 to 79.78), and lower maximum detrusor pressure (WMD: -38.30; 95% CI, -53.17 to -23.43) when compared with placebo. The dry-mouth rates were statistically significantly higher with anticholinergics, with no difference in withdrawals because of adverse events. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the outcomes between oxybutynin and other anticholinergics or among different doses and preparations of anticholinergic drugs. No study reported QoL changes or costs to health services. Compared with placebo, anticholinergic treatment in patients with NDO is associated with better patient

  7. Immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fuge, Oliver; Vasdev, Nikhil; Allchorne, Paula; Green, James SA

    2015-01-01

    It is nearly 40 years since Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) was first used as an immunotherapy to treat superficial bladder cancer. Despite its limitations, to date it has not been surpassed by any other treatment. As a better understanding of its mechanism of action and the clinical response to it have evolved, some of the questions around optimal dosing and treatment protocols have been answered. However, its potential for toxicity and failure to produce the desired clinical effect in a significant cohort of patients presents an ongoing challenge to clinicians and researchers alike. This review summarizes the evidence behind the established mechanism of action of BCG in bladder cancer, highlighting the extensive array of immune molecules that have been implicated in its action. The clinical aspects of BCG are discussed, including its role in reducing recurrence and progression, the optimal treatment regime, toxicity and, in light of new evidence, whether or not there is a superior BCG strain. The problems of toxicity and non-responders to BCG have led to development of new techniques aimed at addressing these pitfalls. The progress made in the laboratory has led to the identification of novel targets for the development of new immunotherapies. This includes the potential augmentation of BCG with various immune factors through to techniques avoiding the use of BCG altogether; for example, using interferon-activated mononuclear cells, BCG cell wall, or BCG cell wall skeleton. The potential role of gene, virus, or photodynamic therapy as an alternative to BCG is also reviewed. Recent interest in the immune check point system has led to the development of monoclonal antibodies against proteins involved in this pathway. Early findings suggest benefit in metastatic disease, although the role in superficial bladder cancer remains unclear. PMID:26000263

  8. Medical management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ubee, Sarvpreet S.; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB), as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat. PMID:20877608

  9. Simple cyst of urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bo, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Simple cysts are rare in the urinary bladder and can pose a diagnostic dilemma to both the urologist and the histopathologist. No case study was found in the database of Elsevier Science Direct, Spring-Link, or PubMed. We present two cases of subserous cyst in the bladder and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The cystic lesion at bladder dome was detected by radiologic examination and confirmed by cystoscopy. In case 1, transurethral resection was first performed which was followed by partial cystectomy; In case 2, the cyst was removed with the urachus using laparoscopic surgery. The patients recovered uneventfully and the histopathology showed cysts in subserous layer of urinary bladder. The bladder cyst should be distinguished from urachal tumor, and laparoscopic partial cystectomy is the preferred operative procedure.

  10. OnabotulinumtoxinA Urethral Sphincter Injection as Treatment for Non-neurogenic Voiding Dysfunction – A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction including dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity caused by a spastic or non-relaxing external urethral sphincter can theoretically be treated by injections of botulinum A toxin into the external urethral sphincter. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injections in patients with dysfunctional voiding or detrusor underactivity. Patients with medically refractory dysfunctional voiding (n = 31) or detrusor underactivity (n = 31) were randomly allocated in a 2:1 ratio to receive either onabotulinumtoxinA (100 U) (n = 38) or placebo (normal saline) (n = 24). There were no significant differences in subjective or objective parameters between patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA and those who received saline injection therapy, and the overall success rate was 43.5% (reduction in Patient perception of Bladder Condition by ≥2: onabotulinumtoxinA 36.8% vs placebo 54.2%, p = 0.114). The results were similar between the dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity subgroups; however, a significant reduction in detrusor voiding pressure was only observed in dysfunctional voiding patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA. Repeat urethral sphincter onabotulinumtoxinA injections offered greater therapeutic effects in both dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity patients. For patients with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, the success rate of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injection was not superior to placebo. PMID:27958325

  11. Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Bladder Cancer Cell Transitional; Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Urinary Bladder; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urinary Bladder Diseases; Urologic Diseases

  12. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  13. Efficacy and safety of oxybutynin transdermal system in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence: an open-label, dose-titration study.

    PubMed

    Kennelly, Michael J; Lemack, Gary E; Foote, Jenelle E; Trop, Cynthia S

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oxybutynin transdermal system (oxybutynin-TDS) in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity and incontinence despite use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC). This multicenter, open-label, dose-titration study included patients > or = 18 years old. During an 8-week dose-titration period, oxybutynin-TDS doses were adjusted every 2 weeks, depending on symptoms. The primary efficacy end point was a change in daily number of CIC periods without leakage, from baseline to 8 weeks or last observation. Outcome parameters included 3-day voiding diary, CIC volume, and urodynamic parameters. Changes from baseline were analyzed with paired t tests. Of 24 study participants (mean age, 41.9 years), 18 (75.0%) completed the study. Final oxybutynin-TDS doses were 7.8, 9.1, and 11.7 mg/d for 4, 9, and 11 patients, respectively. Daily number of CIC periods without leakage increased significantly (mean change, 1.5 + or - 2.2; P = .0036) from baseline (2.4 + or - 1.8) to 8 weeks (3.9 + or - 1.9). CIC volume (P = .0029), reflex volume (P = .0466), maximal cystometric bladder capacity (P = .0009), and residual urine volume (P = .0023) all increased significantly, whereas detrusor pressure at maximal bladder capacity decreased significantly (P = .0457). The most common adverse events were application site reaction (12.5% of patients), dry mouth (8.3%), and abnormal vision (8.3%). No patient discontinued treatment because of an adverse event. Oxybutynin-TDS was efficacious in spinal cord injury patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity and was well tolerated at up to 3 times the standard dose.

  14. A novel implantation technique for pudendal nerve stimulation for treatment of overactive bladder and urgency incontinence.

    PubMed

    Possover, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Herein is described laparoscopic implantation of a neuroprosthesis to the pudendal nerve for treatment of non-neurogenic bladder overactivity. This case series study was performed at a tertiary referral unit that specializes in advanced gynecologic surgery and neuropelveology. Fourteen consecutive male and female patients underwent laparoscopic implantation of an electrode to the endopelvic portion of the pudendal nerve for pudendal neuromodulation. All procedures were performed successfully via laparoscopy, without any complications. The mean operative time for the entire procedure was 18 minutes. After a successful test phase of external stimulation, 11 patients (78.57%) underwent implantation of a permanent generator. These patients demonstrated a mean (SD) decreased micturition frequency, from 25 (11.7; range, 13-50) per day on average to 10.18 (2.7; range, 7-15) at final evaluation (mean follow-up, 18 months; range 9-49 months). Nocturia decreased from 5.82 (4.2; range, 3-18) to 2.18 (1.08; range, 1-5) micturitions per night. Cystometric bladder capacities increased from 159 mL (53; range, 80-230 mL) to 312 mL (104.9;160-500 mL). Mean incontinence episodes at the initial evaluation, based on a 3-day voiding diary, were 8.1. At final evaluation, 6 patients were completely dry. Number of pads used per day decreased from 7.3 (4.2) to 1.6 (2.3). No lead dislocation or migration occurred. It was concluded that laparoscopic implantation of a neuroprosthesis to the pudendal nerve is an effective, safe, and reproducible day procedure for treatment of intractable non-neurogenic overactive bladder with urinary urgency incontinence. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurogenic mucosal bicarbonate secretion in guinea pig duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Fei, G; Fang, X; Wang, GD; Liu, S; Wang, XY; Xia, Y; Wood, JD

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose To test a hypothesis that: (i) duodenal pH and osmolarity are individually controlled at constant set points by negative feedback control centred in the enteric nervous system (ENS); (ii) the purinergic P2Y1 receptor subtype is expressed by non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which represent the final common excitatory pathway from the ENS to the bicarbonate secretory glands. Experimental Approach Ussing chamber and pH-stat methods investigated involvement of the P2Y1 receptor in neurogenic stimulation of mucosal bicarbonate (HCO3−) secretion in guinea pig duodenum. Key Results ATP increased HCO3− secretion with an EC50 of 160 nM. MRS2179, a selective P2Y1 purinergic receptor antagonist, suppressed ATP-evoked HCO3− secretion by 47% and Cl− secretion by 63%. Enteric neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin or exposure to a selective vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP, VPAC1) receptor antagonist suppressed ATP-evoked HCO3− secretion by 61 and 41%, respectively, and Cl- by 97 and 70% respectively. Pretreatment with the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine did not alter ATP-evoked HCO3− or Cl− secretion. Conclusion and Implications Whereas acid directly stimulates the mucosa to release ATP and stimulate HCO3− secretion in a cytoprotective manner, neurogenically evoked HCO3− secretion accounts for feedback control of optimal luminal pH for digestion. ATP stimulates duodenal HCO3− secretion through an excitatory action at purinergic P2Y1 receptors on neurons in the submucosal division of the ENS. Stimulation of the VIPergic non-cholinergic secretomotor/vasodilator neurons, which are one of three classes of secretomotor neurons, accounts for most, if not all, of the neurogenic secretory response evoked by ATP. PMID:22994306

  16. Curative effect assessment of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Zhao; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Fu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    AIM To observe the curative effect of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis. METHODS Twenty cases of neurogenic keratitis were studied at the Department of Ophthalmology, the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, between October 2012 and June 2013. These included 13 males and 7 females, aged from 35 to 88y. Patients were voluntarily divided into an experimental group (lens wearing group, n=10) and control group (drug therapy, n=10). In experimental group patients wore silicone hydrogel bandage soft contact lens. Both groups used the following eyedrops: 0.5% levofloxacin TID; 0.5% Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose QID; fibroblast growth factor BID; ganciclovir BID [cases complicated with herpes simplex virus (HSV)]; compound tropicamide BID (cases concurrent hypopyon). The healing time of corneal ulcer and complication rates were observed in the two groups. RESULTS The healing time of corneal ulcer in the experimental group was 10.80±4.44d versus 46.70±13.88d in the control group (P<0.05). No complications occurred in the experimental group, except for the lens falling off twice in one case, the patient recovered eight days after rewearing the lens. While in the control group, all cases vascularized, 2 cases were complicated with descemetocele that recovered with amniotic membrane transplantation and 1 case was complicated with corneal perforation that recovered by autologous conjunctival flap covering. CONCLUSION Bandage contact lens is a safe and effective method of treating neurogenic keratitis and significantly shortened the healing time of corneal ulcer. PMID:25540750

  17. Spontaneous perforation of acalculous gall bladder presenting as acute abdomen.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Usha; Majumder, Shounak; Banerjee, Pinaki; Kapoor, Nisha; Nandi, Subhabrata; Sethy, Pradeepta K; Goenka, Mahesh K

    2012-10-01

    Acute abdominal pain is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED), but a diagnosis of gall bladder perforation (GBP) is rarely considered in the absence of predisposing factors. This article will highlight the risk factors, diagnosis, and management of GBP, a rare but potentially life-threatening biliary pathology. A 73-year-old diabetic man presented to the ED with a 12-h history of severe upper abdominal pain. He was hemodynamically stable, but abdominal examination showed distention, guarding, and diffuse tenderness. Abdominal X-ray study showed mildly distended small bowel loops without any air-fluid levels. Abdominal sonography revealed mild ascites and pericholecystic fluid collection but no gall bladder calculi. Laboratory reports documented a white blood cell count of 13,700/mm(3) and elevated serum amylase of 484 IU/L. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen suggested discontinuity of the gall bladder wall along with fluid accumulation in the pericholecystic, perihepatic, right subphrenic, and right paracolic spaces. In view of the possibility of spontaneous GBP developing as a complication of acute acalculous cholecystitis, laparotomy was planned. At surgery, several liters of bile-stained peritoneal fluid were aspirated and inspection of the gall bladder revealed a perforation at the fundus. After cholecystectomy, the patient had an uneventful recovery. The diagnosis of spontaneous gall bladder perforation should be considered in elderly patients presenting to the ED with symptoms and signs of peritonitis even in the absence of pre-existing gall bladder disease. Abdominal CT scan is an invaluable tool for the diagnosis, and early surgical intervention is usually life-saving. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Botulinum toxin type A-induced changes in the chemical coding of dorsal root ganglion neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bossowska, A; Majewski, M

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin, which in recent years has been effectively applied in experimental treatments of many neurogenic disorders of the urinary bladder. BTX is a selective, presynaptically-acting blocking agent of acetylcholine release from nerve terminals what, in turn, leads to the cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. However, application of this toxin in urological practice is still in the developmental stages and the full mechanism of its action remain elusive. Thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder after BTX treatment. Retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the urinary bladder wall in six juvenile female pigs and three weeks later, intramural bladder injections of BTX (100 IU per animal) were carried out in all the animals. After a week, DRG from L1 to Cql were harvested from the pigs and neurochemical characterization of FB+ neurons was performed using double- labeling immunofluorescence technique on 10-microm-thick cryostat sections. BTX injections led to a significant decrease in the number of FB+ neurons containing substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), calbindin (CB), somatostatin (SOM) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) when compared with that found in the healthy animals (19% vs. 45%, 18% vs. 36%, 0.6% vs. 3%, 0.4 vs. 4% and 0.1% vs. 6%, respectively) These data demonstrated that BTX changed the chemical coding of bladder sensory neurons, and therefore this drug should be taken into consideration when it planning experimental therapy of selected neurogenic bladder disorders.

  19. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  20. Neurogenic pulmonary edema: successful treatment with IV phentolamine.

    PubMed

    Davison, Danielle L; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Selassie, Leelie; Tevar, Rahul; Junker, Christopher; Seneff, Michael G

    2012-03-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant CNS insult. The cause is believed to be a surge of catecholamines that results in cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Although there are myriad case reports describing CNS events that are associated with this syndrome, few studies have identified specific treatment modalities. We present a case of NPE caused by an intracranial hemorrhage from a ruptured arteriovenous malformation. We uniquely document a rise and fall of serum catecholamine levels correlating with disease activity and a dramatic clinical response to IV phentolamine.

  1. [Advance of neurogenic erectile dysfunction therapy by stem cells].

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Jian; Zhu, Guang-You

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction (NED) commonly results from erectile nerve damage. Recent researches have focused on the preclinical study of stem cell-based therapies targeted at repairing and protecting nervi erigentes. In this paper, researches of NESCs, MDSCs, ASCs and MSCs in NED are reviewed. Early studies have demonstrated that stem cells and gene modified stem cells were effective to the therapy of ED, even likely to cure ED. Stem cells are expected to be applied in the clinical therapy of NED. Stem cells as a new therapy technique will bring up a new challenge in forensic clinical medicine.

  2. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  3. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  4. [Drug therapy of bladder dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Caremel, R; Cornu, J-N; Kerdraon, J; Castel-Lacanal, E; Bastide, C; Bruyere, F; Guy, L; Karsenty, G

    2013-11-01

    To describe drugs targeting urinary bladder to treat bladder dysfunctions such as OAB, NDO and bladder pain syndrome. Pubmed search for efficacy, mode of action and side effects for each molecule. Additional data were searched from the French regulatory agencies web sites (HAS and ANSM). Anticholinergics antimuscarinics remain the first-line treatment option for both OAB and NDO. Beta-3 adrenergics emerges as a new therapeutic class for OAB. Post approval safety as well as association with other micturition cycle's drugs need to be evaluated. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are effective to treat BPH-related LUTS including storage symptoms. Botulinum toxin type A injections within the detrusor are effective and approved to treat NDO in MS and spinal cord injured patients voiding with clean intermittent catheterization. Evaluation of such approach to treat OAB is ongoing. Drug therapy for bladder pain syndrome has limited efficacy including pentosan polyphosphate despite it has a temporary autorisation. There is no drug treatment to restore or improve bladder contraction. Armamenterium to treat bladder dysfunction has recently increased. Three new therapeutic classes emerged. Careful post approval evaluation is mandatory and study of these drugs' combination is expected. Results should drive changes in bladder dysfunction treatment algorithms. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Teloscopy after bladder neck suspension.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, E S; Wilkinson, P D

    1998-08-01

    Teloscopy, a method of suprapubic cystoscopy, involves placing a telescope into the dome of a full bladder to examine the bladder interior. A 5-mm Dexide cannula was pierced through the dome of the bladder and a telescope was inserted through it. This specialized cannula sleeve maintained bladder distention and allowed an excellent wide-angle view of the interior of the bladder and ureteral orifices. In a retrospective analysis, 103 consecutive women with stress urinary incontinence who underwent retropubic urethropexy were placed into one of three categories: Burch laparotomy (13), Burch laparoscopy (44), or laparoscopy with mesh and staples (46). Teloscopy was performed and indigo carmine was given intravenously at the end of the procedure in 90 patients. Of these, seven (8%) were positive. In all seven a suture was seen through the bladder mucosa, and in five an additional obstructed ureter was observed. In all seven women the suture was removed and replaced, and all obstructed ureters were patent before the end of the procedure. Average time required was 4 minutes. No complications, short- or long-term, occurred in the 90 women. Our results support the view that cystoscopy should be performed at the end of bladder neck suspension.

  6. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  7. Intravesical electrostimulation versus sacral neuromodulation for incomplete spinal cord patients suffering from neurogenic non-obstructive urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, G; Musco, S; Celso, M; Ierardi, A; Nelli, F; Del Corso, F; Del Popolo, G

    2013-07-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravesical electrostimulation (IVES) versus sacral neuromodulation (SNM) in patients with incomplete spinal cord lesions (SCL) and neurogenic non-obstructive urinary retention (N-NOR). In this retrospective study, 77 N-NOR patients underwent IVES (minimum 28 sessions), then after returning to voiding baseline symptoms, percutaneous first stage of SNM (lasting for minimum 4 weeks). After the two neuromodulation treatments, responders were categorized as patients experiencing both a 50% reduction of volume per catheterization per ml and a 50% reduction in number of catheterizations per day when comparing the 7-day voiding diaries at the end of both procedures to baselines. New urodynamics were performed subsequently. Responders to first stage of SNM underwent permanent SNM. Forty-eight patients responded to neither of the treatments, whereas 29 responded to both IVES and first-stage SNM. No significant statistical differences (P>0.05) were detected in the voiding diaries. Following the two procedures, the first sensation of bladder filling was either maintained or recovered by all responders, whereas the same 11 patients reached a bladder contractility index of >100. The 29 IVES responders lost their clinical benefits in a mean follow-up of 9.6 months. Only 10 out of the 29 patients became nonresponsive to permanent SNM, in a mean follow-up of 54 months. A strict correlation in terms of clinical and urodynamic patterns was demonstrated in patients with incomplete SCL and N-NOR, following IVES and first stage of SNM. However, voiding improvement through IVES was short-term when compared with the effects of permanent SNM.

  8. A clinician survey of speech and non-speech characteristics of neurogenic stuttering.

    PubMed

    Theys, Catherine; van Wieringen, Astrid; De Nil, Luc F

    2008-03-01

    This study presents survey data on 58 Dutch-speaking patients with neurogenic stuttering following various neurological injuries. Stroke was the most prevalent cause of stuttering in our patients, followed by traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and other causes. Speech and non-speech characteristics were analyzed separately for these four etiology groups. Results suggested possible group differences, including site of lesion and influence of speech conditions on stuttering. Other characteristics, such as within-word localization of disfluencies and presence of secondary behaviors were comparable across the etiology groups. The implications of our results for the diagnosis of neurogenic stuttering will be discussed. After reading this article, the reader will be able to: (1) provide a concise overview of the main literature on neurogenic stuttering; (2) discuss the speech and non-speech characteristics of neurogenic stuttering; (3) provide an overview of current clinical practices for intervention with neurogenic stuttering patients and their perceived outcome.

  9. Stars from the darkest night: unlocking the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Jens P; Frisén, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    In a few regions of the adult brain, specialized astrocytes act as neural stem cells capable of sustaining life-long neurogenesis. In other, typically non-neurogenic regions, some astrocytes have an intrinsic capacity to produce neurons when provoked by particular conditions but do not use this ability to replace neurons completely after injury or disease. Why do astrocytes display regional differences and why do they not use their neurogenic capacity for brain repair to a greater extent? In this Review, we discuss the neurogenic potential of astrocytes in different brain regions and ask what stimulates this potential in some regions but not in others. We discuss the transcriptional networks and environmental cues that govern cell identity, and consider how the activation of neurogenic properties in astrocytes can be understood as the de-repression of a latent neurogenic transcriptional program. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension.

  11. Bladder Capacity is a Biomarker for a Bladder Centric versus Systemic Manifestation in Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walker, Stephen J; Zambon, João; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Langefeld, Carl D; Matthews, Catherine A; Badlani, Gopal; Bowman, Heather; Evans, Robert J

    2017-02-12

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome presents a significant clinical challenge due to symptom heterogeneity and the myriad associated comorbid medical conditions. We recently reported that diminished bladder capacity may represent a specific interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome subphenotype. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between anesthetic bladder capacity, and urological and nonurological clinical findings in a cohort of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had undergone therapeutic urinary bladder hydrodistention. This is a retrospective chart review of prospectively collected data on women diagnosed with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome between 2011 and 2015 who underwent bladder hydrodistention. Assessments in each patient included a detailed history and physical examination, ICPI (Interstitial Cystitis Problem Index), ICSI (Interstitial Cystitis Symptom Index) and PUF (Pelvic Pain and Urgency/Frequency Patient Symptom Scale). Bladder capacity was determined during bladder hydrodistention with the patient under general anesthesia. Mean age was 45.8 years and mean bladder capacity was 857 ml in the 110 enrolled patients. We found a significant inverse correlation between bladder capacity and scores on 3 gold standard interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome metrics, including ICPI (p = 0.0014), ICSI (p = 0.0022) and PUF (p = 0.0009) as well as urination frequency (p = 0.0025). Women with higher bladder capacity were significantly more likely to report depression (p = 0.0059) and irritable bowel syndrome (p = 0.022). Low bladder capacity while under anesthesia was significantly associated with high symptom scores on 3 validated interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome questionnaires as well as with urinary frequency. However, it was not associated with depression or other common systemic pain problems. These results suggest that low bladder capacity is a marker for a bladder

  12. Bladder Diverticulitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature. PMID:23326691

  13. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies.

  14. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  15. Increased bladder permeability in interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Wisniewski, Amy B.; VanGordon, Samuel; Lin, HsuehKung; Kropp, Bradley P.; Towner, Rheal A.

    2015-01-01

    The definition of interstitial cystitis (IC) has evolved over the years from being a well-defined entity characterized by diagnostic lesion (Hunner’s ulcer) in the urothelium to a clinical diagnosis by exclusion [painful bladder syndrome (PBS)]. Although the etiology is unknown, a central theme has been an association with increased permeability of the bladder. This article reviews the evidence for increased permeability being important to the symptoms of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) and in treating the disorder. Recent work showing cross-communication among visceral organs is also reviewed to provide a basis for understanding IC/PBS as a systemic disorder of a complex, interconnected system consisting of the bladder, bowel and other organs, nerves, cytokine-responding cells and the nervous system. PMID:26751576

  16. High-dose insulin therapy for neurogenic-stunned myocardium after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Justine; Peeters, André; Wittebole, Xavier; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of complicated type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a diagnosis of right-hemispheric ischaemic stroke. She developed acute respiratory distress with radiological evidence of pulmonary oedema. The ECG showed poorly significant ST-segment changes, with a minimal increase of cardiac biomarkers. Echocardiography showed a severely depressed left ventricular function, with also low values of cardiac output at invasive monitoring. The possibility of neurogenic-stunned myocardium was discussed and a metabolic resuscitation with high-dose insulin was proposed. An intravenous bolus of 80 units of insulin (0.72 IU/kg) was followed by a continuous infusion at the rate of 160 IU/h (1.45 IU/kg/h). The treatment led to a rapid and sustained improvement of the haemodynamic condition and was well tolerated. In comparison with dobutamine, insulin had significant inotropic effects without tachycardia. The patient unfortunately died on day 35, from respiratory complications after poor neurological recovery. PMID:23175002

  17. ECG abnormalities predict neurogenic pulmonary edema in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Lung; Huang, Chi-Hung; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Tai, Henry Chih-Hung; Chang, Su-Hen; Wang, Yung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to assess if electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities could predict the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) within 24 hours in cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We studied prospectively a cohort of 269 adult patients with nontraumatic SAH in an emergency department of a university-affiliated medical center. A 12-lead ECG was taken for these patients. The patients were stratified into NPE and non-NPE based on serially clinical and radiologic findings. The ECG abnormalities were compared between these 2 groups of patients. Compared with the non-NPE (n = 229), the NPE (n = 40) had significantly higher World Federation of Neurological Surgeons class (P < .001), higher Hunt-Hess scale (P < .001), and higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus (P = .033). In addition, the percentage of ECG morphological abnormality was significantly higher in NPE, in which nonspecific ST- or T-wave changes (NSSTTCs) are significantly higher. Multiple logistic regression model identified World Federation of Neurological Surgeons class (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6-13.3; P < .001), abnormal Q or QS wave (95% CI, 1.1-9.1; P = .038), and NSSTTCs (95% CI, 1.2-7.5; P = .016) as the significant variables associated with NPE. Electrocardiographic abnormalities, especially abnormal Q or QS wave and NSSTTCs, may predict the development of NPE within 24 hours in adult patients with spontaneous SAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  19. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  20. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Zutelija Fattorini, Matija; Gagro, Alenka; Dapic, Tomislav; Krakar, Goran; Marjanovic, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy secondary to denervation is very rare, but well-documented phenomena in adults. This is the first report of a child with neurogenic unilateral hypertrophy due to S1 radiculopathy. A 12-year-old girl presented with left calf hypertrophy and negative history of low back pain or trauma. The serum creatinine kinase level and inflammatory markers were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed muscle hypertrophy of the left gastrocnemius and revealed a protruded lumbar disc at the L5-S1 level. The protruded disc abuts the S1 root on the left side. Electromyography showed mild left S1 radiculopathy. Passive stretching and work load might clarify the origin of neurogenic hypertrophy but there is still a need for further evidence. Clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography findings showed that S1 radiculopathy could be a cause of unilateral calf swelling in youth even in the absence of a history of back or leg pain. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability. PMID:24364023

  2. Analysis of carbonated thin liquids in pediatric neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lundine, Jennifer P.; Bates, David G.; Yin, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of liquids is a serious complication of neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury or stroke. Carbonated liquids have been examined as a possible alternative to thickened liquids to help reduce aspiration in cases of dysphagia in adults, but no published literature to the best of our knowledge has evaluated this technique in children. If carbonated liquids result in safer swallowing in children, they could provide a preferred alternative to thickened liquids. Objective This pilot study examined whether carbonated thin liquids (CARB) improved swallowing compared to noncarbonated thin liquids (NOCARB) for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Materials and methods Twenty-four children admitted to a level I trauma center for acute neurological injury/disease were evaluated via videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Four descriptive outcome measures were contrasted. Results CARB significantly decreased pooling (P=0.0006), laryngeal penetration/aspiration (P=0.0044) and Penetration-Aspiration Scale scores (P=0.0127) when compared to NOCARB. On average, CARB improved scores on the Penetration-Aspiration Scale by 3.7 points for participants who aspirated NOCARB. There was no significant difference in pharyngeal residue noted between CARB and NOCARB (P=0.0625). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that carbonated thin liquids may provide an alternative to thickened liquids for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25758792

  3. Epigenetic regulation of stemness maintenance in the neurogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Loro, Raquel; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Bizy, Alexandra; Ferrón, Sacri R

    2015-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are two zones that contain neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity to give rise to neurons and glia during the entire life of the animal. Spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in the NSCs population is established and maintained by the coordinated interaction between transcription factors and epigenetic regulators which control stem cell fate. Epigenetic mechanisms are heritable alterations in genome function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence itself but that modulate gene expression, acting as mediators between the environment and the genome. At the molecular level, those epigenetic mechanisms comprise chemical modifications of DNA such as methylation, hydroxymethylation and histone modifications needed for the maintenance of NSC identity. Genomic imprinting is another normal epigenetic process leading to parental-specific expression of a gene, known to be implicated in the control of gene dosage in the neurogenic niches. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from NSCs by expression of defined transcription factors, provide key insights into fundamental principles of stem cell biology. Epigenetic modifications can also occur during reprogramming of NSCs to pluripotency and a better understanding of this process will help to elucidate the mechanisms required for stem cell maintenance. This review takes advantage of recent studies from the epigenetic field to report knowledge regarding the mechanisms of stemness maintenance of neural stem cells in the neurogenic niches. PMID:26029342

  4. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M.; Angerer, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:26657764

  5. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking.

  6. Analysis of carbonated thin liquids in pediatric neurogenic dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Lundine, Jennifer P; Bates, D Gregory; Bates, David G; Yin, Han

    2015-08-01

    Aspiration of liquids is a serious complication of neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury or stroke. Carbonated liquids have been examined as a possible alternative to thickened liquids to help reduce aspiration in cases of dysphagia in adults, but no published literature to the best of our knowledge has evaluated this technique in children. If carbonated liquids result in safer swallowing in children, they could provide a preferred alternative to thickened liquids. This pilot study examined whether carbonated thin liquids (CARB) improved swallowing compared to non-carbonated thin liquids (NOCARB) for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Twenty-four children admitted to a level I trauma center for acute neurological injury/disease were evaluated via videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Four descriptive outcome measures were contrasted. CARB significantly decreased pooling (P = 0.0006), laryngeal penetration/aspiration (P = 0.0044) and Penetration-Aspiration Scale scores (P = 0.0127) when compared to NOCARB. On average, CARB improved scores on the Penetration-Aspiration Scale by 3.7 points for participants who aspirated NOCARB. There was no significant difference in pharyngeal residue noted between CARB and NOCARB (P = 0.0625). These findings support the hypothesis that carbonated thin liquids may provide an alternative to thickened liquids for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed.

  7. Rehabilitation of neurogenic dysphagia with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy.

    PubMed

    Klor, B M; Milianti, F J

    1999-01-01

    Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia is common in nursing home populations, and the risk of aspiration is sufficient to indicate the need for percutaneous endoscopid gastrostomy (PEG) feedings. Although intake provided through the PEG may meet the nutritional and hydration requirements for this group of patients, the risk of complication, e.g., aspiration of reflux, skin breakdown at the site of insertion, potential for infection, digestive difficulties, higher risk of rehospitalization, pneumonia, prolonged nursing home stay, and greater morbidity than for those without PEG tubes, may compromise the gains accrued from the ease of feeding. In an attempt to reduce these complications and return individuals to per orum (PO) diets, a program was developed to treat the dysphagia. Sixteen male nursing home patients were enrolled in a treatment program based on videofluoroscopic examination. Interventions included combinations of dietary consistency modifications, compensatory techniques, and direct swallow retraining. Results indicated such an approach reintroduced successful oral feeding in all patients, improved dietary consistency, resulted in a mean weight gain of 5.1 pounds, yielded a mean albumin increase of 0.5 g/dl, and allowed PEG tubes to be removed in 10 of the 16 patients. As a result of intervention, these findings suggest significant benefits in both quality of life issues and health care savings for this neurogenically based population.

  8. Neurogenic ejaculatory disorders: focus on current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco S; Polimeni, Giovanni; Ciurleo, Rosella; Casella, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido

    2011-09-01

    Ejaculation is a complex and still poorly understood neurological mechanism, at both spinal and cerebral levels as it is closely associated with orgasm. Physiologically, ejaculation is defined as the expulsion of seminal fluid from the urethral meatus and consists of two phases, namely emission and expulsion. Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal control center, referred to as a spinal pattern generator that coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic and motor (somatic) outflows, integrating the latter with the inputs from the supraspinal sites in brainstem, hypothalamus and preoptic area. Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual dysfunction among young men, and it has been considered mostly psychogenic in origin, although it can be associated to diverse urological and neurological diseases. On the contrary, retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation are predominantly related to organic causes, particularly to neurogenic ones. Since ejaculation is mostly a spinal reflex, it is comprehensible that ejaculatory disorders are more frequent in spinal cord injury than in other neurological disorders. Over the past decades, research has focused on PE, and evidence from clinical studies showed a beneficial effect of antidepressants for the treatment of men with PE. Other ejaculatory disorders, especially painful ejaculation, have been less investigated and the proper therapy is still controversial. Aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive description of both currently available treatments and most promising future therapies, including assigned patents, for the neurogenic ejaculatory disorders.

  9. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication.

    PubMed

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-12-16

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability.

  10. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Gabapentin: a novel drug as add-on therapy in cases of refractory overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M S; Bharti, Aruna; Kumar, Raj; Ranjan, Priyadarshi; Srivastava, Aneesh; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2013-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of gabapentin as an add-on therapy in children presenting with overactive bladder (OAB) not responding to conventional anticholinergics. Children with refractory OAB were included prospectively from March 2009 to February 2010. The inclusion criterion was persistence of symptoms while on conventional anticholinergics for 6 months. Gabapentin was prescribed as an add-on therapy. The patients were followed 4 weekly with bladder diary and urodynamic study was repeated at 3 months. There were 31 children, 26 of neurogenic OAB and 5 of non-neurogenic origin. Mean ± SD age was 8.5 ± 5.3 years. Data were analyzed in 30 patients as treatment was terminated in 1 due to adverse effects. Continence improved in 16 (53.3%) patients. Voiding volume improved from 175 ± 90 to 320 ± 110 ml (p<0.03). Objective assessment of OAB symptom relief showed marked improvement (p<0.05). Mean maximum cystometric bladder capacity improved from 210 ± 94 to 360 ± 110 ml (p<0.02). The maximal detrusor contraction decreased from 75 ± 35 to 25 ± 15 cmH(2)O (p<0.02). Fourteen patients (46.7%) failed to respond to gabapentin therapy. These patients had baseline maximum cystometric bladder capacity <60% for age and maximum detrusor contractions >50 cm of water (p<0.03). Gabapentin gives moderate results in children with OAB refractory to conventional anticholinergics. In general, the drug is well tolerated with fewer adverse effects. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Prospective open label study of solifenacin for overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Stéphane; Moore, Katherine; Nadeau, Geneviève; Lebel, Sylvie; Lamontagne, Pascale; Hamel, Micheline

    2010-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of solifenacin for urinary incontinence in children with overactive/neurogenic bladder refractory to oxybutynin or tolterodine. Pediatric patients presenting with refractory overactive bladder with incontinence were offered the opportunity to enter a prospective, open label protocol using adjusted dose regimens of 1.25 to 10 mg solifenacin. Study inclusion criteria were absent correctable neurological anomalies on magnetic resonance imaging, failure of symptoms to improve on intensive behavioral and medical (oxybutynin or tolterodine) therapy, and/or significant side effects of those agents. Followup consisted of a voiding diary, post-void residual urine measurement, urine culture, ultrasound and urodynamics. Families were questioned about continence, side effects, compliance, behavior change and quality of life. The primary end point was efficacy for continence and secondary end points were tolerability and safety. Enrolled in the study were 42 girls and 30 boys. Of the patients 27 with neurogenic bladder, of whom 11 were on clean intermittent catheterization, and 45 with overactive bladder completed a minimum 3-month followup. Patients were on solifenacin a mean of 15.6 months. Mean age at study initiation was 9.0 years. Mean ± SD urodynamic capacity improved from 146 ± 64 to 311 ± 123 ml and uninhibited contractions decreased from 70 ± 29 to 20 ± 19 cm H(2)O (p <0.01). Continence improved in all patients, including 24 who were dry, and 42 and 6 who were significantly and moderately improved, respectively. Of the patients 50 reported no side effects while 15 had mild and 3 had moderate side effects. Four patients withdrew from the protocol due to intolerable side effects. Four patients had significant post-void residual urine (greater than 20 ml). In children with overactive bladder refractory to oxybutynin or tolterodine solifenacin is an effective alternative to improve symptoms. Tolerability was acceptable and the adjusted dose

  13. A systematic review of the diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor muscle.

    PubMed

    Borau, A; Adot, J M; Allué, M; Arlandis, S; Castro, D; Esteban, M; Salinas, J

    2017-04-13

    Neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity (NDH) is a urodynamic observation characterised by involuntary detrusor contractions during the filling phase that are caused by an underlying neurological disease. The common and severe complications that can result from NDH warrant the preparation of healthcare protocols for the proper management of patients with NDH. The aim of this study is to standardise the criteria for the decision-making process in the management of patients with diagnosed or suspected NDH, providing personalised medical care. We performed a systematic noncomprehensive literature review on the aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of NDH. Based on the review, recommendations were issued by nominal consensus of a group of urology specialists. In general, the diagnosis of NDH is arrived at by a proper review of the medical history, physical examination and voiding diary before performing any diagnostic study. The main treatment objectives are to protect the upper urinary tract, restore function of the lower tract and improve these patients' continence and quality of life. The treatment consists of several steps aimed at obtaining proper bladder storage that allows for sufficiently spaced voidings. The follow-up should be personalised based on each patient's needs. The identification and management of NDH is important for positively redirecting the function of the lower urinary tract, in terms of filling and voiding, thereby improving the patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. Treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Morales, A.

    1980-01-01

    Most patients with bladder cancer initially present with localized, potentially curable tumours. Endoscopic surgery offers the best opportunity to eliminate these early lesions, but the rate of tumour recurrence after adequate resection is high (around 70%). Conventional methods of treatment have a place in the management of early bladder neoplasms, but their success rate is still unsatisfactory and they frequently fail to decrease the risk of recurrence. New drugs and more effective forms of administration have enhanced the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Fundamentally different approaches, such as specific immunotherapy, the use of laser energy and photodynamic therapy, are emerging as valuable approaches in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer and the prevention of recurrence. Randomized trials to assess their value and a concerted multidisciplinary effort with combined treatment give hope for effective control of early bladder cancer. PMID:6770987

  16. Treatment of superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Morales, A

    1980-05-24

    Most patients with bladder cancer initially present with localized, potentially curable tumours. Endoscopic surgery offers the best opportunity to eliminate these early lesions, but the rate of tumour recurrence after adequate resection is high (around 70%). Conventional methods of treatment have a place in the management of early bladder neoplasms, but their success rate is still unsatisfactory and they frequently fail to decrease the risk of recurrence. New drugs and more effective forms of administration have enhanced the use of chemotherapeutic agents. Fundamentally different approaches, such as specific immunotherapy, the use of laser energy and photodynamic therapy, are emerging as valuable approaches in the treatment of superficial bladder cancer and the prevention of recurrence. Randomized trials to assess their value and a concerted multidisciplinary effort with combined treatment give hope for effective control of early bladder cancer.

  17. Radiation-induced bladder carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Uyama, T.; Nakamura, S.; Moriwaki, S.

    1981-01-01

    Two cases are presented of radiation-induced bladder carcinoma which followed prior irradiation for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. One was a sixty-eight-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma fourteen years after irradiation (total dose of 4,500 rad) for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. The other was a sixty-four-year-old woman with bladder carcinoma twenty-five years after irradiation with 150-K volt apparatus for cervical carcinoma of the uterus. From the late radiation change of the skin, it was estimated that the total dose of prior radiation might be 4,000 rad or more. Both had high-grade, high-stage transitional cell bladder carcinoma, and the former was with marked mucus-forming adenomatous metaplasia.

  18. Endemic bladder calculi in children.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Neveen A; Rizvi, S Adibul Hasan

    2016-11-15

    Urinary calculi are being recognized more frequently in children and the urinary bladder is the most common site for stone formation in the lower urinary tract. Bladder calculi are grouped into three basic categories: primary idiopathic/endemic, secondary, and migrant. The incidence of vesical calculi has declined significantly in the last 70 years in developed nations owing to improvements in nutrition and socioeconomic conditions, but it is still high in developing nations. Primary idiopathic/endemic bladder calculi typically occur in children, in the absence of urinary tract infection (UTI), urinary stasis, or foreign body, and diet lacking in animal proteins is the major contributor factor. Comprehensive preventive and treatment strategies are critical for improving the quality of life of diseased children, in addition to helping to eradicate, or at least decrease, the incidence of endemic bladder calculi in developing nations.

  19. Assessing continence with bladder ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Addison, Ray

    Ray Addison outlines the principal uses of portable bladder ultrasound and reminds readers of the importance of reviewing the results of this investigation with other clinical investigations and the patient's health status.

  20. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir.

  1. Bladder perforation by ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Marcelo Eller; de Sousa, Mariana Bueno; Tatsuo, Edson Samesima; Quites, Lucas Viana; Giannetti, Alexandre Varella

    2016-12-01

    Bladder perforation by ventriculoperitoneal shunt is a rare complication that has been describe in 19 cases in prior literature. This work describes the case of a 4-month-old baby who presented with extrusion of the distal catheter through the urethra. The patient underwent a laparotomy; the catheter was cut close to the bladder wall and repositioned into the peritoneal cavity. The bladder wall was sutured, and the remaining distal portion of the catheter was removed through the urethra. Based on this single experience and a literature review, the authors classified the clinical signs and symptoms of bladder perforation by the ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter. Finally, the authors propose a more conservative approach for this rare complication.

  2. Bladder and urethral repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... 100002.htm Bladder and urethral repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  3. The CNS and bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Holstege, Gert; Griffiths, Derek J.

    2012-01-01

    The brain's role in the development and maintenance of bladder control is critical, although its precise role in patient-reported complaints such as urgency and urine leakage is unknown. Functional brain imaging studies have advanced our knowledge of brain activity during the micturition cycle, showing multiple neuronal circuits involved as parts of a ‘brain-bladder control network.’ Yet, new advances need to be made in order to incorporate this knowledge into existing models of neuroanatomy and of clinical syndromes of bladder dysfunction and related clinical practice. This short article explains why and how brain imaging methods are poised to achieve that goal and decode the role of the brain in widely prevalent clinical conditions related to bladder dysfunction. PMID:23091564

  4. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kozlowski JM. The p53 tumor suppressor gene and nuclear protein: basic science review and relevance in the ... Zwarthoff EC, Radvanyi F. Novel fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations in bladder cancer previously identified ...

  5. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Adraktas, Dionesia; Caserta, Melanie; Tchelepi, Hisham

    2014-09-01

    Extra-adrenal paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Typically, patients present with symptoms related to catecholamine hypersecretion or mass effect, but these tumors can also be encountered incidentally on imaging studies obtained for a different purpose. It is important to recognize the key imaging features of this entity so that it may be suggested as a possible differential diagnosis in the setting of a newly identified bladder mass.

  6. Bladder cancer epidemiology and genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system. The incidence of bladder cancer of men is higher than that of women (approximately 4:1). Here, we summarize the bladder cancer-related risk factors, including environmental and genetic factors. In recent years, although the mortality rate induced by bladder cancer has been stable or decreased gradually, the public health effect may be pronounced. The well-established risk factors for bladder cancer are cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. Genetic factors also play important roles in the susceptibility to bladder cancer. A recent study demonstrated that hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. Since 2008, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to identify the susceptibility loci for bladder cancer. Further gene-gene or gene-environment interaction studies need to be conducted to provide more information for the etiology of bladder cancer. PMID:23720672

  7. What Are the Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of bladder cancer in the United States. Personal history of bladder or other urothelial cancer Urothelial carcinomas ... urinary infections and bladder cancer. Genetics and family history People who have family members with bladder cancer ...

  8. Neurogenic claudication secondary to degenerative spondylolisthesis: is fusion always necessary?

    PubMed

    Kitchen, W J; Mohamed, Mohamed; Bhojak, Manesh; Wilby, Martin

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the efficacy and long-term safety of a midline sparing decompression for patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). We specifically looked at the rate of re-operation with a lumbar fusion. Of the patients that did require a secondary fusion procedure, we examined retrospectively any risk factors (both clinical and radiological) that could have been identified pre-operatively to predict the necessity of a primary fusion procedure. Data was collected prospectively within a single surgeon practice at our institution. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication secondary to DS. Radiological and clinical risk factors that could have predicted the requirement of a fusion procedure were retrospectively analysed. This is a study of 70 patients (46F:24M). The median age at surgery was 68 years. All patients had a diagnosis of neurogenic claudication and were treated with a mid-line sparing decompression. Following the primary procedure, patients' VAS and ODI scores for both leg and back pain improved significantly both at short-term follow-up (mean seven months) and sustained at long-term follow-up (range 16-57 months, mean 33 months; p < 0.0001 Wilcoxon matched pair ranks). Eight (11%) patients had symptom progression and required a further fusion procedure. We found that if on the pre-operative MRI, the patient had a facet joint angle of greater than 60°, and a preserved disc height (greater than 7 mm) this would increase the likelihood of the requirement for fusion. Of the patients that required a secondary fusion procedure, 6/8 patients (75%) had sagittal facets, hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height pre-operatively. A primary decompression using a midline sparing osteotomy is an effective procedure for the treatment of neurogenic claudication caused by DS. The second message is that on inspection of the pre-operative imaging, sagittally placed facet joints, a hyperlordosis and a preserved disc height then a fusion

  9. Elective bladder-sparing treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Rico-López, J; Moreno, S; Fernández Parra, E; González-Almeida, C; Camacho Martínez, E

    2014-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We offer a bladder-sparing treatment with TURB +/- Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy to selected patients as an alternative. We analyze, retrospectively, 30 patients diagnosed with MIBC from March 1991 to October 2010. The mean age was 62.7 years (51-74). All patients were candidates for a curative treatment, and underwent strict selection criteria: T2 stage, primary tumor, solitary lesion smaller than 5cm with a macroscopic disease-free status after TURB, negative random biopsy without hydronephrosis. Staging CT evaluation was normal. Restaging TURB or tumor bed biopsy showed a disease-free status or microscopic muscle invasion. 14 patients underwent TURB alone, 13 TURB+Chemotherapy and 3 TURB+Chemotherapy+Radiotherapy. The mean follow up was 88.7 months (19-220). 14 patients remained disease free (46.6%), 10 had recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (33%). 81.3% complete clinical response. 71% bladder preserved at 5-years. Overall, 5-years survival rate was 79% and 85% cancer-specific survival rate. Although radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localised MIBC, in strictly selected cases, bladder-sparing treatment offers an alternative with good long term results. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis arising as a result of lumbar epidural varices.

    PubMed

    Dabasia, H; Rahim, N; Marshall, R

    2012-09-01

    Neurogenic claudication is most frequently observed in patients with degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis. We describe a patient with lumbar epidural varices secondary to obstruction of the inferior vena cava by pathological lymph nodes presenting with this syndrome. Following a diagnosis of follicular lymphoma, successful chemotherapy led to the resolution of the varices and the symptoms of neurogenic claudication. The lumbar epidural venous plexus may have an important role in the pathogenesis of spinal stenosis. Although rare, epidural venous engorgement can induce neurogenic claudication without spinal stenosis. Further investigations should be directed at identifying an underlying cause.

  11. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; Macdiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-10-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, 'healthy' bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  12. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Neurogenic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sann, H; Dux, M; Schemann, M; Jancsó, G

    1996-11-29

    In contrast to the skin and some visceral organs the capability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of evoking an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract is equivocal. We have therefore investigated the neurogenic plasma extravasation induced by local application of capsaicin to the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the rat. Permeable vessels were visualised histologically with the vascular labelling technique using colloidal silver. In the smooth muscle layer of the small intestine, capsaicin elicited a 3-fold increase in the density of labelled blood vessels (diameter, 7-35 microns). Significant capsaicin-evoked plasma extravasation was also observed in the submucosa of the jejunum and ileum, and in the basal layer of the jejunal mucosa. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was not noted in the stomach and the colon. The data suggest the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents in inflammatory processes in the rat small intestine.

  14. Unlocking the Neurogenic Potential of Mammalian Müller Glia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohuan; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the primary support cells in the vertebrate retina, regulating homeostasis in one of the most metabolically active tissues. In lower vertebrates such as fish, they respond to injury by proliferating and reprogramming to regenerate retinal neurons. In mammals, MG may also react to injury by proliferating, but they fail to initiate regeneration. The barriers to regeneration could be intrinsic to mammalian MG or the function of the niche that cannot support the MG reprogramming required for lineage conversion or both. Understanding these mechanisms in light of those being discovered in fish may lead to the formulation of strategies to unlock the neurogenic potential of MG and restore regeneration in the mammalian retina. PMID:27572710

  15. Overactive bladder in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Sophie; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This condition is especially troublesome for pediatric patients and their families when associated with incontinence, since it negatively affects self-esteem and impairs children’s development. From the patient’s perspective, urgency and urge incontinence can have a significant impact, negatively affecting their quality of life. For a therapy to have true benefit, changes must not only be statistically significant, but must also be perceived as meaningful by the patient. A stepwise approach is favoured to treat this pathology, starting with behavioural therapy, followed by medical management, and eventually more invasive procedures. Antimuscarinic agents are the mainstay of medical treatment for OAB. Oxybutynin is the most commonly used antimuscarinic in the pediatric population. However, some patients have a suboptimal response to antimuscarinics and many experience bothersome side effects, which have been documented with all antimuscarinics to a significantly higher degree than placebo. Although there have been reports about the use of tolterodine, fesoterodine, trospium, propiverine, and solifenacin in children, to date, only oxybutynin has been officially approved for pediatric use by medical authorities in North America. This review will address alternative treatment options for pediatric patients presenting with OAB, from conservative measures to more invasive therapies. PMID:28265325

  16. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes.

  17. [Validity of schintigraphy in the study of neurogenic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Galli, J; Valenza, V; D'Alatri, L; Gajate Samanes, A M; Reale, F; La Mura, F

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify the validity and potential application of oropharyngealesophageal scintigraphy in the analysis of neurogenic dysphagia. Scintigraphy was used on 36 patients divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (control) comprised 17 healthy volunteers; Group 2 included 19 patients suffering from various neurological and neuromuscular pathologies (myasthenia gravis, Parkinson's disease, polymyositis, stroke, paralysis of the last cranial nerves). In group 1 scintigraphy provided normal results both for mode of swallowing and transit, and for the values of the various parameters studied. On the other hand, scintigraphy showed that in group 2 all oral, pharyngeal and esophageal phases of swallowing were altered vs the controls with a statistically significant increase in the average values for the oral transit time (OTT) (1.45 sec., p = 0.0005), pharyngeal transit time (OTT) (3.23 sec., p = 0.044), esophageal transit time (ETT) e19.87 sec., p = 0.005) as well as in the corresponding bolus retention indexes ORU (12.95%, p = 0.0003), FIR (15.05%, p = 0.0003) and ERI (28.63%, p = 0.002). Moreover, the quality and means of swallowing also proved altered while tracheobronchial aspiration was only seen in 6 of the 19 patients (maximum value: 90%, average value; 7.66%) with a marked prevalence in the stroke subgroup (4/8). In light of these results and considering the low dose of radiation (0.00043 Gy), the lack of invasiveness and excellent tolerability, scintigraphy has confirmed its clinical validity in the functional, objective and quali-quantitative study of deglutition, even in patients suffering from neurogenic dysphagia.

  18. Bladder and bowel dysfunction in children: An update on the diagnosis and treatment of a common, but underdiagnosed pediatric problem

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana Dos; Lopes, Roberto I.; Koyle, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) describes a spectrum of lower urinary symptoms (LUTS) accompanied by fecal elimination issues that manifest primarily by constipation and/or encopresis. This increasingly common entity is a potential cause of significant physical and psychosocial burden for children and families. BBD is commonly associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), which at its extreme may lead to renal scarring and kidney failure. Additionally, BBD is frequently seen in children diagnosed with behavioural and neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Patients with concomitant BBD and neuropsychiatric disorders have less favourable treatment outcomes. Early diagnosis and treatment of BBD are critical to avoid secondary comorbidities that can adversely impact children’s kidney and bladder function, and psychosocial well-being. The majority of patients will improve with urotherapy, adequate fluid intake, and constipation treatment. Pharmacological treatment must only be considered if no improvement occurs after intensive adherence to at least six months of urotherapy ± biofeedback and constipation treatment. Anticholinergics remain the mainstay of medical treatment. Selective alpha-blockers appear to be effective for improving bladder emptying in children with non-neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO), incontinence, recurrent UTIs, and increased post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes. Alpha-1 blockers can also be used in combination with anticholinergics when overactive bladder (OAB) coexists with functional bladder outlet obstruction. Minimally invasive treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA bladder injections, and recently neurostimulation, are promising alternatives for the management of BBD refractory to behavioural and pharmacological treatment. In this review, we discuss clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and indications

  19. The influence of melatonin and agomelatine on urodynamic parameters in experimental overactive bladder model--preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Dobrek, Łukasz; Thor, Piotr J

    2011-11-23

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common disease entity with complex pathogenesis that involves neurogenic, myogenic and abnormal paracrine urothelial activity mechanisms. Our objective was to estimate bladder functioning in urodynamic studies in experimental, both acute (AOAB) and chronic (COAB) cyclophosphamide (CYP)-evoked OAB model in response to melatonin (MLT; antioxidant and MT receptor agonist) or agomelatine (AMT; MT receptor agonist and 5HT2C receptor antagonist). Seven groups were studied: 1--control, 2-4--MLT treated AOAB and COAB rats, 5-7--AMT treated AOAB and COAB rats. AOAB model was evoked by single CYP administration (IP 200 mg/kg body weight), while COAB one was induced by a four-time administration of CYP (IP 75 mg/kg body weight). Each group underwent urethane anesthesia to perform urodynamic recordings in resting conditions and after administration 50 (group 2 or 5), 75 (group 3 or 6) or 100 mg/kg (group 4 or 7) of melatonin (groups 2-4) or agomelatine (groups 5-7), followed by classical urodynamic parameters assessment. Neither melatonin nor agomelatine did not affect urodynamic parameters in the AOAB rats. In COAB model, after 75 and 100 mg/kg of MLT we revealed an improvement in urodynamic parameters. AMT (75 and 100 mg/kg) administration caused deterioration of urodynamic findings suggesting bladder overactivity exacerbation. DISSCUSSION: In summary, melatonin ameliorates bladder overactivity in cyclophosphamide-induced COAB. Agomelatine, contrary to melatonin, aggravates bladder dysfunction in this group. These findings suggest that the improvement in urodynamic parameters after melatonin administration may be due to its antioxidative profile and is not related to MT receptors activation. However, agomelatine's unfavorable action on the bladder, resulting in its overactivity in COAB group, may not only be the result of MT receptor activation without the concomitant antioxidative effects but may also occur secondarily to co-existing 5HT2C

  20. OnabotulinumtoxinA improves quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaishali; Leng, Wendy W.; Shenot, Patrick J.; Lam, Wayne; Globe, Denise R.; Loeb, Alex L.; Chapple, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life (HRQOL), treatment satisfaction, and treatment goal attainment in patients with urinary incontinence (UI) due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III, 52-week study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00311376), patients with UI due to NDO who were not adequately managed with anticholinergic therapy were treated with intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (200 or 300 U) or placebo (0.9% saline). HRQOL measures included the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL) Questionnaire total score, and the 3 domain scores (avoidance and limiting behavior, psychosocial, and social embarrassment), the modified Overactive Bladder Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Questionnaire (OAB-PSTQ), and Patient Global Assessment. Assessments were made at baseline, posttreatment week 6 (primary time point), week 12, and at 12-week intervals. Results: Patients (mean age of 46 years with 30.5 weekly UI episodes at baseline) were randomized to receive placebo (n = 149) or onabotulinumtoxinA (200 U [n = 135] or 300 U [n = 132]). At week 6, improvements from baseline in I-QOL Questionnaire total score were greater (p < 0.001) in both onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups vs placebo. Responses to the OAB-PSTQ also demonstrated greater mean improvements from baseline (p < 0.001) in both onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups vs placebo at week 6. Patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA also reported greater improvement in the Patient Global Assessment than those in the placebo group (p ≤ 0.001 vs placebo). Conclusions: Patients with UI due to NDO reported greater improvement in HRQOL and treatment satisfaction with onabotulinumtoxinA than with placebo consistently across several patient-reported outcome instruments. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that

  1. OnabotulinumtoxinA improves quality of life in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity.

    PubMed

    Chancellor, Michael B; Patel, Vaishali; Leng, Wendy W; Shenot, Patrick J; Lam, Wayne; Globe, Denise R; Loeb, Alex L; Chapple, Christopher R

    2013-08-27

    To evaluate the effects of onabotulinumtoxinA on patient-reported outcomes including health-related quality of life (HRQOL), treatment satisfaction, and treatment goal attainment in patients with urinary incontinence (UI) due to neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, phase III, 52-week study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00311376), patients with UI due to NDO who were not adequately managed with anticholinergic therapy were treated with intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA (200 or 300 U) or placebo (0.9% saline). HRQOL measures included the Incontinence Quality of Life (I-QOL) Questionnaire total score, and the 3 domain scores (avoidance and limiting behavior, psychosocial, and social embarrassment), the modified Overactive Bladder Patient Satisfaction with Treatment Questionnaire (OAB-PSTQ), and Patient Global Assessment. Assessments were made at baseline, posttreatment week 6 (primary time point), week 12, and at 12-week intervals. Patients (mean age of 46 years with 30.5 weekly UI episodes at baseline) were randomized to receive placebo (n = 149) or onabotulinumtoxinA (200 U [n = 135] or 300 U [n = 132]). At week 6, improvements from baseline in I-QOL Questionnaire total score were greater (p < 0.001) in both onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups vs placebo. Responses to the OAB-PSTQ also demonstrated greater mean improvements from baseline (p < 0.001) in both onabotulinumtoxinA-treated groups vs placebo at week 6. Patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA also reported greater improvement in the Patient Global Assessment than those in the placebo group (p ≤ 0.001 vs placebo). Patients with UI due to NDO reported greater improvement in HRQOL and treatment satisfaction with onabotulinumtoxinA than with placebo consistently across several patient-reported outcome instruments. This study provides Class I evidence that onabotulinumtoxinA intradetrusor injections (200 or 300 U) can improve quality of

  2. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a high rate of recurrence and poor outcomes as a result of relapse. Bladder cancer patients require lifelong invasive monitoring and treatment, making bladder cancer one of the most expensive malignancies. Lines of evidence increasingly point to distinct genetic and epigenetic alteration patterns in bladder cancer, even between the different stages and grades of disease. In addition, genetic and epigenetic alterations have been demonstrated to play important roles during bladder tumorigenesis. This review will focus on bladder cancer-associated genomic and epigenomic alterations, which are common in bladder cancer and provide potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27915480

  4. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  5. Trospium chloride for the treatment of overactive bladder with urge incontinence.

    PubMed

    Singh-Franco, Devada; Machado, Caridad; Tuteja, Sony; Zapantis, Antonia

    2005-05-01

    maximum cystometric capacity and bladder compliance, and in significantly reducing maximum detrusor pressure compared with baseline (all, P < 0.001); there were no significant differences between the 2 treatments at end point. In a third double-blind study comparing TCl and tolterodine with placebo, only TCl significantly reduced the frequency of micturitions/d (P = 0.01). Commonly reported adverse effects in patients receiving TCl included dry mouth, constipation, and headache. In the 7 studies reviewed, TCl was effective and well tolerated in patients with urge incontinence caused by idiopathic detrusor muscle overactivity or neurogenic detrusor overactivity resulting from spinal cord injury. However, this agent was associated with anticholinergic adverse effects similar to those of other anticholinergic agents; careful monitoring of tolerability is required.

  6. Significance of random bladder biopsies in superficial bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    May, F; Treiber, U; Hartung, R; Schwaibold, H

    2003-07-01

    We investigated to what extent biopsies of normal-appearing urothelium taken from patients with superficial bladder cancer (Ta, T1, Tis) showed malignant disease and whether those findings had impact on therapeutical decisions. 1033 consecutive patients presenting with Ta, T1 or Tis (carcinoma in situ) superficial bladder tumors at increased risk for recurrence underwent multiple random biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium during transurethral resection (TUR). Patients with small, primary, singular tumors (smaller or equal to 1cm) were excluded from random biopsies. No tumor was found in the random biopsies of 905 patients (87.6%). 128 patients (12.4%) showed urothelial bladder cancer in their random biopsies (Tis: 74, Ta: 41, T1: 12, T2: 1). In 14 patients, where transurethral resection of the primary tumor revealed no signs of malignancy, urothelial bladder cancer was detected in the random biopsy material: Ta 8 patients, Tis 5 patients and T1 one patient. 21 patients with Ta tumors and 29 patients with T1 disease showed concomitant Tis. Upstaging of the primary, resected tumor by histological examination of the random biopsy material occurred in 75 patients (7%). Altogether, due to the random biopsy results therapy was altered in 70 patients (6.8%) of our series: It changed intravesical chemotherapy to BCG in 45, provoked a second TUR in 48 and cystectomy in 15 patients. While the clinical significance of random biopsies is still controversial, random biopsy results had strong impact on therapeutical decisions in our series. Regarding random bladder biopsies a simple tool for the urologist to identify high risk groups of patients, we recommend them as part of the routine management of superficial bladder cancer.

  7. Restoration of Bladder and Bowel Function Using Electrical Stimulation and Block after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Organization and the Food and Drug Administration. The medical records of 779 patients with spinal cord injury have been examined to identify...management of the neurogenic bladder.  The approval by the  Food  and Drug Administration of Investigational Device Exemption for Phase I of this...the team and  provided them with information required for them to give Informed Consent. She also drafted the application to the  Food  and Drug

  8. Molecular pathology and biomarkers of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer originates in the epithelial lining of the bladder's mucosa and develops in association with several habitual, industrial, and environmental risk factors via papillary and non-papillary pathways. In this chapter we review novel concepts concerning the molecular mechanisms of early field change in bladder neoplasia stemming from whole-organ genomic mapping studies. These mechanisms are discussed in the context of molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer and in relation to treatment and biomarker-based detection strategies.

  9. Gall bladder malignancy: an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Appukutty, Sona J; Worthington, Tim; Bagwan, Izhar N

    2013-06-01

    Gall bladder malignancy predominantly comprises adenocarcinoma and is found mostly in a late stage whereas primary lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) within the gall bladder is exceedingly rare and has an incidental presentation. We report a case of well differentiated adenocarcinoma with MALT lymphoma of the gall bladder in an 83 year old woman. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a carcinoma and lymphoma occurring simultaneously in the gall bladder.

  10. [Use of oral anticholinergic therapy in children under 1 years of age with high risk bladder].

    PubMed

    Luque Mialdea, R; Martín-Crespo, R; Hernández, E; Sánchez, O; Cañizo, A; Fernández, A; Aparicio, C; Blanco, T; Cebrían, J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness and safety of the treatment with oral anticholinergic agents (Oxybutin clorure) in patients under 1 year old, and who aree carriers of high risk bladder secondary to neurological illness as well as no neurological one. Since 1989, we have indicated treatment with anticholinergic agents to 16 patients: 9 patients had neurogenic bladder secondary to: myelomeningocele (n=7) and sacrocoxigeal teratoma (n=2). Others 7 patients had non neurogenic bladder secondary to: posterior urethral valvulas (n=1), valvula-like syndrome (n=4), post-surgery of neonatal giant bladder diverticulum (n=1) and Prune-Belly syndrome (n=1). The urodinamic study was performed during the first six months of life, being "high risk bladder" defined according to the parameters of compliance vesical and pressure of leak at point (PER). Five of the patients showed neonatal cronic renal failure (CRF), who were treated by cutaneus temporary derivation. All patients at treatment with anticholinergic agents at a 0.2 mg/kg/day dose was established; other early adjunctive treatment prior to the closure of the urinary derivation in children with CRF(n=5); or as a part of the conservative treatment (n=3), alone or associate to intermittent bladder catheterization (IBC) (n=8). During the treatment with anticholinergic agents, the cardiac frequency was controlled by EKG registration in 6 patients, being the rest of the children clinicaly controled (skin colour, mouth dryness, cardiac frequency and intestinal function). In all the cases, the minimum duration of the treatment was one year, until the functional stabilization of the urinary tract. It is to underline the absence of secondary complications which would have caused the suspension or the reduction of the treatment at long term. Conventional studies of urologicals image and urodinamic studies, showed the stabilization of the urinary tract and also the preservation of kidney function and not only was demonstrated in those

  11. Pathophysiology of diabetic sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Morano, S

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with diabetes mellitus. Vascular, neurological and hormonal alterations are involved in this complication. Many studies showed altered endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxations in corpus cavernosum from diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). This finding has been associated with a lack of nitric oxyde (NO) production and a significant increase in NO synthase (NOS) binding sites in penile tissues, induced by diabetes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) concur to diabetic vascular complications by quenching NO activity and by increasing the expression of mediators of vascular damage such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), possessing permeabilizing and neoangiogenic effects, and endothelin-1 (ET-1), with vaso-constricting and mitogenic action. Moreover, the differential gene expression for various growth factors in penile tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of ED associated with diabetes. Neuropathy is also likely to be an important cause of diabetic ED: morphological alterations of autonomic nerve fibers in cavernosal tissue of patients with diabetic ED have been demonstrated. Finally, androgens enhance nNOS gene expression in the penile corpus cavernosum of rats, suggesting that they play a role in maintaining NOS activity. However, sexual dysfunctions in women with diabetes has received less attention in clinical research. Several studies suggest an increased prevalence of deficient vaginal lubrication, making sexual intercourse unpleasant. Sexual dysfunction is associated with lower overall quality of marital relation and more depressive symptoms in diabetic women.

  12. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in men Scarring of the urinary channel (urethra) or bladder neck, as a result of injury or surgery Use of certain medications, including antihistamines, decongestants ... of bladder outlet obstruction is important to prevent serious problems caused by ...

  13. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  14. Circulating Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Lakshminarayanan; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple unmet needs in the realm of diagnosis, clinical staging, monitoring and therapy. There is an urgent need to develop precision medicine for advanced urothelial carcinoma. Given the difficulty of serial analyses of metastatic tumor tissue to identify resistance and new therapeutic targets, development of non-invasive monitoring using circulating molecular biomarkers is critically important. Although the development of circulating biomarkers for the management of bladder cancer is in its infancy and may currently suffer from lower sensitivity of detection, they have inherent advantages owing to non-invasiveness. Additionally, circulating molecular alterations may capture tumor heterogeneity without the sampling bias of tissue biopsy. This review describes the accumulating data to support further development of circulating biomarkers including circulating tumor cells, cell-free circulating tumor (ct)-DNA, RNA, micro-RNA and proteomics to improve the management of bladder cancer. PMID:28035318

  15. [Occupational hazards and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nizamova, R S

    1991-01-01

    Occupational exposure to health hazards was studied in 258 industrial workers who had developed cancer of the bladder against 454 matched controls. All the test subjects and controls were residents of the Tambov Province centers of chemical industry. Statistical significance (relative risk-4.7) was established for exposure to aromatic amines. For those contacting with aniline dyes the relative risk (RR) made up 2.4. The risk to develop bladder cancer in powder shops (RR-3.2) was attributed to the hazards of dyes and diphenylamine. In leather-shoe and textile industry the exposure to dyes was not safe (RR-6.1), neither was it to chemicals, oil products, pesticides, overheating (RR-3.2, 1.6, 3.2 and 2.9, respectively). It is stated that in line with a significant risk to develop bladder cancer at exposure to aromatic amines there exist a number of occupational factors contributing to this risk.

  16. Bladder cavernous hemangioma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Collar, Tomás Lázaro; Casa de Valle Castro, Midalys; Báez Sarría, Felix; Trujillo Fernández, Reinerio

    2014-07-01

    To report a case of a bladder cavernous hemangioma, as well as the main features of its diagnosis and treatment. A 74 year old patient, regular smoker, presented with total macroscopic hematuria of moderate intensity with large rounded clots. On physical examination the patient's mucous membranes color was normal, and digital rectal examination showed a normal size prostate with fibroelastic consistency. An abdominal ultrasound was performed showing a slight bladder bottom thickening in addition to free clots and a homogeneous and normal prostate. Cystoscopy confirmed the presence of a sessile violet-colored rounded retrotrigonal tumor, 2 cm in diameter and 0.5 in height; it was immediately resected. The pathological study reported cavernous hemangioma. Patient's evolution has been satisfactory. Bladder cavernous hemangioma is a rare cause of hematuria, and transurethral resection of the small size lesions constitutes an effective option as a definitive surgical treatment.

  17. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function.

  18. Medial antebrachial cutaneous sensory studies in the evaluation of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M J; Macintosh, K; Heistand, M; Logigian, E L

    1998-05-01

    Over 3 years, we studied 8 patients with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and tested the medial antebrachial sensory response (MASR) to determine its diagnostic value. The MASR and ulnar sensory response (USR) were abnormal in all 8 patients. Seven had a low median motor response (MMR) with a low USR. In 1, the MASR and USR were abnormal but the MMR was normal. We conclude that the MASR is of diagnostic value in patients with neurogenic TOS.

  19. Clinical experience with the Swiss lithoclast master in treatment of bladder calculi.

    PubMed

    Kingo, Pernille S; Ryhammer, Allan M; Fuglsig, Sven

    2014-10-01

    Bladder calculi account for 5% of urinary tract calculi in the Western world, and many different treatment modalities have been presented throughout the decades. We report our clinical experience using the Swiss LithoClast® Master (SLM). The SLM is a rigid, hand-held endourologic probe including a pneumatic lithotriptor and an ultrasonic lithotriptor. Attached to the ultrasonic modality is a suction system. The two lithotriptor modalities are controlled by a footswitch and can be activated separately or simultaneously. The SLM is used via a rigid endoscope. Indications for treatment were medical complaints such as hematuria, lower urinary tract symptoms, pain, recurrent urinary tract infections, recurrent bursts of balloon in indwelling catheters, and difficulties performing clean intermittent self-catheterization. From August 1, 2009, to August 1, 2011, 27 patients were treated for bladder calculi (24 men). Five had a neurogenic voiding dysfunction, 3 had prostate cancer, and 19 had benign prostatic enlargement or detrusor muscle insufficiency. Median age was 74 years (range 45-86 years). Stone clearance was obtained in 26 (96%) patients. Stone burden was one or multiple bladder calculi. Median stone size of the largest stone in each patient was 20 (5-40) mm. Under the same anesthesia, two patients underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate because of a very large prostate. Median lithotripsy time was 60 (range 20-144) minutes. All patients were discharged within 24 hours. The method described is a safe and quick method for endoscopic lithotripsy of bladder calculi rendering the patients stone free in the vast majority of cases. The procedure can be performed as day-case surgery.

  20. Pioglitazone has a dubious bladder cancer risk but an undoubted cardiovascular benefit.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R E J

    2015-03-01

    On 8 April 2014, a US jury ordered Takeda and Eli Lilly to pay $9 bn in punitive damages after finding that they had concealed the cancer risks associated with pioglitazone. By contrast, on 28 August 2014, the long-awaited outcome of the 10-year Kaiser Permanente Northern California study was announced. That study was specifically designed to investigate whether patients exposed to pioglitazone were at an increased risk of bladder cancer and found no association; thus, at last, the controversial issue has been resolved. A review, in retrospect, of the story of the proposed link between pioglitazone and bladder cancer reveals flaws at every stage. In 2012, a BMJ editorial, in keeping with some other contemporary reports, stated 'it can confidently be assumed that pioglitazone increases the risk of bladder cancer'. Examination of the information which led to such a statement shows that: 1) the pre-clinical findings of bladder cancer in male rats is not indicative of human risk; 2) there is no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone in randomized controlled trials, once cases that could not plausibly be related to treatment are removed; and 3) the observational studies that have suggested a link have over-extrapolated from the data: pioglitazone-treated patients had more risk factors for bladder cancer than those not treated with pioglitazone. Meanwhile careful study of randomized controlled trials shows evidence of cardiovascular benefit from pioglitazone in Type 2 diabetes, a condition which results, more than anything, in premature cardiovascular death and morbidity.

  1. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  2. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  3. Immunobiology of human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Herr, H W

    1976-02-01

    The immune destruction of bladder cancer most likely results from an interaction of specific and non-specific cellular and humoral responses evoked by tumor-associated antigens. We are just beginning to comprehend the complex immune mechanisms operating to retard or facilitate tumor growth in patients with this disease. This understanding has led to renewed hope that the immune system may be manipulated for the benefit of the tumor-bearing patient. However, only a thorough understanding of the basic functions of the immune system in man will permit a rational approach to immunotherapy in patients with bladder cancer.

  4. Diabetic neuropathy, A review of clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, A M; Abraira, C

    1976-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy in some form or other afflicts a majority of patients with diabetes mellitus. Neuropathic disturbance of sensory, motor or autonomic nerves may occur singly or in combination. Cranial nerve and other mononeuropathies generally resolve spontaneously. Autonomic neuropathy which can result in orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis diabeticorum, nocturnal diarrhea, atonic bladder and impotence, although chronic, may wax and wane in clinical severity. Neuritis, disesthesias and painful sensory neuritis may resolve with good diabetic control; on occasion, diphenylhydantoin has been of therapeutic benefit.

  5. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function.

  6. Gall-bladder duplication - case report.

    PubMed

    Koszman, Bogusław

    2014-12-18

    Gall-bladder duplication is a rare anatomical variation, which can affect safe performance of cholecystectomy and be a cause of persistent symptoms and a need for reoperation in case of accessory gall-bladder omission. A case of successfully performed elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a patient with duplicated gall-bladder accidentally intraoperatively disclosed is presented. The identified anomaly was classified according to the Harlaftis Classification of Multiple Gall-bladders. Attention was drawn to the uneffectivenes of ultrasound scanning in multiple gall-bladders preoperative detecting, and presence of other non-biliary anatomical variation in the same individual as well.

  7. Obesity, Physical Activity and Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Jonathan L; Liss, Michael A; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2015-10-01

    While smoking and exposure to certain chemicals are well-defined risk factors for bladder cancer, there is no consensus as to the roles of modifiable lifestyle factors, notably physical activity, and obesity. We evaluated associations of obesity and physical activity with bladder cancer risk by performing a system-wide search of PubMed for cohort and case-control studies focused on obesity, exercise, and bladder cancer. A total of 31 studies were identified that evaluated the associations of obesity and physical activity with bladder cancer risk: 20 focused on obesity, eight on physical activity, and three on both. There was marked heterogeneity in population composition and outcomes assessment. Fifteen (65%) of the obesity studies used prevalence or incidence as the primary outcome and seven (30%) used bladder cancer mortality. Ten (44%) observed positive and 13 (56%) null associations of obesity with bladder cancer. Three (100%) of three studies also noted strong positive associations of obesity with bladder cancer progression or recurrence. Ten (91%) of the physical activity studies analyzed prevalence or incidence and one (9%) mortality. One (9%) study observed positive, seven (64%) null, and three (27%) negative associations of physical activity with bladder cancer. Study heterogeneity precluded quantitative assessment of outcomes. Obesity is potentially associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer, particularly for progression, recurrence, or death. Further studies of physical activity and bladder cancer are needed to validate these observations and elucidate the associations of exercise with bladder cancer progression and mortality.

  8. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  9. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal.

  10. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall. PMID:27781020

  11. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  12. Intravesical oxybutynin affects bladder permeability.

    PubMed

    Ersay, A; Demirtas, O C

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of intravesical application of oxybutynin chloride on bladder permeability we designed an animal model. Female Guinea pigs were given 3 different test solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 50% acetone and 1.27 x 10(-2) M oxybutynin chloride solution. Then 99mTc-DTPA 45 microCi in 2 ml normal saline was instilled into the bladder lumen in each animals and allowed to dwell for 30 minutes. At the end of exposure time, the net count data in each 1 ml serum sample were corrected for radioactive decay and converted to the total percentage of administered dose. 99mTc-DTPA absorption percentages of both acetone and oxybutynin groups were significantly higher than that of PBS group (mean 3.2 +/- 2.9% p < 0.001). Intravesical oxybutynin application increases bladder permeability 5 times compared with PBS administration. This observation can also explain how rapid absorption of oxybutynin through the bladder into the systemic circulation occurs.

  13. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. Ultrasonic lithotripsy of bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Cetin, S; Ozgür, S; Yazicioğlu, A; Unsal, K; Ilker, Y

    1988-01-01

    In the second half of 1985, 15 patients with 25 bladder stones were treated with Lutzeyer's Ultrasonic Lithotriptor. Of the patients 13 underwent additional operations, mostly transurethral resection of the prostate. The average duration of lithotripsy was 30.5 minutes. Some difficulties were experienced especially when drilling hard stones and as a complication late urethral bleeding occurred in one patient.

  15. Pioglitazone use and the risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Ho, Shu-Chen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to identify the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. A nested case-control study was performed using a representative database randomly sampled from National Health Insurance enrollees. The source cohort consisted of newly diagnosed diabetic patients from 1997 to 2009. Cases were identified as those with a diagnosis of bladder cancer from 2002 to 2009. For each case, four matched control individuals were randomly selected. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate the relative magnitude of risk in relation to the use of pioglitazone. In total, 259 cases and 1036 controls were identified. The prevalent use of pioglitazone is similar in cases and controls (adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-2.49). Compared to nonusers, these values were 1.08 (0.41-2.88) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use ≤ 8268 mg and 1.35 (0.48-3.79) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use > 8268 mg. This study does not provide support for the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. Further confirmation is needed due to the limitation of small case number with relatively shorter exposure duration and lower cumulative dose.

  16. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  17. Modulation of bladder afferent signals in normal and spinal cord-injured rats by purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Alvaro; Somogyi, George T.; Boone, Timothy B.; Ford, Anthony P.; Smith, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE • To evaluate the role of bladder sensory purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors on modulating the activity of lumbosacral neurones and urinary bladder contractions in vivo in normal or spinal cord-injured (SCI) rats with neurogenic bladder overactivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS • SCI was induced in female rats by complete transection at T8 – T9 and experiments were performed 4 weeks later, when bladder overactivity developed. Non-transected rats were used as controls (normal rats). • Neural activity was recorded in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and field potentials were acquired in response to intravesical pressure steps via a suprapubic catheter. Field potentials were recorded under control conditions, after stimulation of bladder mucosal purinergic receptors with intravesical ATP (1 mm), and after intravenous injection of the P2X3/P2X2/3 antagonist AF-353 (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg). • Cystometry was performed in urethaneanaesthetised rats intravesically infused with saline. AF-353 (10 mg/kg) was systemically applied after baseline recordings; the rats also received a second dose of AF-353 (20 mg/kg). Changes in the frequency of voiding (VC) and non-voiding (NVC) contractions were evaluated. RESULTS • SCI rats had significantly higher frequencies for field potentials and NVC than NL rats. Intravesical ATP increased field potential frequency in control but not SCI rats, while systemic AF-353 significantly reduced this parameter in both groups. • AF-353 also reduced the inter-contractile interval in control but not in SCI rats; however, the frequency of NVC in SCI rats was significantly reduced. CONCLUSION • The P2X3/P2X2/3 receptors on bladder afferent nerves positively regulate sensory activity and NVCs in overactive bladders. PMID:22540742

  18. Neurogenic pulmonary edema following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis associated with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Reiichiro; Sugita, Yasuo; Arakawa, Kenji; Nakashima, Shinji; Umeno, Yumi; Todoroki, Keita; Yoshida, Tomoko; Takase, Yorihiko; Kage, Masayoshi; Oshima, Koichi; Yano, Hirohisa

    2015-08-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant central nervous system insult. Only a few cases of NPE after Cryptococcal meningitis have been reported. We report a case of NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. A 40-year-old man with no medical history was hospitalized for disturbance of consciousness. Blood glucose level was 124 mg/dL. Non-contrast head computed tomography showed no abnormalities. Lumbar puncture revealed a pressure of over 300 mm H2 O and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) confirmed a white blood cell count of 65/mm(3) . The CSF glucose level was 0 mg/dL. The patient was empirically started on treatment for presumptive bacterial and viral meningitis. Four days after, the patient died in a sudden severe pulmonary edema. Autopsy was performed. We found at autopsy a brain edema with small hemorrhage of the right basal ganglia, severe pulmonary edema and mild cardiomegaly. Histologically, dilated Virchow-Robin spaces, crowded with Cryptococci were observed. In the right basal ganglia, Virchow-Robin spaces were destroyed with hemorrhage and Cryptococci spread to parenchyma of the brain. No inflammatory reaction of the lung was seen. Finally, acute pulmonary edema in this case was diagnosed as NPE following Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis. After autopsy, we found that he was positive for serum antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  19. Stem cells with neurogenic potential and steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Iván

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent stem cells with differentiation potential to neural phenotypes have been described and characterized in the last decades. Embryonic stem cells, as well as neural stem cells from developing and adult nervous system, can differentiate into different types of neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Although the initially identified actions of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone are related to sexual reproductive functions, recent evidence shows that these steroid hormones modulate development, physiology and survival of nerve cells. Furthermore, neurosteroids can be synthesized in the developing and adult nervous system. A description of the molecular modulatory actions of sex steroid hormones on the Central Nervous System is presented. The main focus of this review is to summarize the described effects of steroid hormones (progesterone, allopregnanolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, estradiol and androgens) on cell parameters relevant to stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. The overall conclusion is that steroid hormones influence stem cell behavior by several mechanisms, namely regulation of gene expression by binding to their cognate receptors, activation of intracellular pathways involving kinases or intracellular calcium signaling, and modulation of receptors for neurotransmitters; in some instances, these hormones can substitute or modulate the action of growth factors, and also directly influence self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation or cell death of neurogenic stem cells.