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Sample records for diabetic neurogenic bladder

  1. Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dorsher, Peter T.; McIntosh, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital anomalies such as meningomyelocele and diseases/damage of the central, peripheral, or autonomic nervous systems may produce neurogenic bladder dysfunction, which untreated can result in progressive renal damage, adverse physical effects including decubiti and urinary tract infections, and psychological and social sequelae related to urinary incontinence. A comprehensive bladder-retraining program that incorporates appropriate education, training, medication, and surgical interventions can mitigate the adverse consequences of neurogenic bladder dysfunction and improve both quantity and quality of life. The goals of bladder retraining for neurogenic bladder dysfunction are prevention of urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, detrusor overdistension, and progressive upper urinary tract damage due to chronic, excessive detrusor pressures. Understanding the physiology and pathophysiology of micturition is essential to select appropriate pharmacologic and surgical interventions to achieve these goals. Future perspectives on potential pharmacological, surgical, and regenerative medicine options for treating neurogenic bladder dysfunction are also presented. PMID:22400020

  2. Neurogenic bladder

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause skin to break down and lead to pressure sores Kidney damage if the bladder becomes too full, ... More Tumor Patient Instructions Multiple sclerosis - discharge Preventing pressure ulcers Review Date 5/30/2016 Updated by: Amit ...

  3. Neuromodulation in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Melissa T.

    2016-01-01

    While neuromodulation is a well-established treatment option for patients with non-neurogenic overactive bladder and urinary retention, its applicability to the neurogenic bladder population has only recently been examined more in depth. In this article we will discuss the outcomes, contraindications, and special considerations of sacral and percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:26904417

  4. Emphysematous Pyelonephritis Caused by Citrobacter freundii in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes and Neurogenic Bladder.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jeong; Park, Ji Sang; Lim, Hye Jin; Jung, Jihye; Shin, Dong Geum; Lee, Ki-Deok; Jung, Yoon Young; Min, Kyung Wan; Han, Kyung-Ah

    2013-09-01

    Emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN) is a rare, life-threatening complication of upper urinary tract infections that is characterized by the presence of gas in the renal parenchyma and perirenal space. It commonly occurs in diabetic patients. Escherichia coli are the most common causative organisms, with few reports implicating Citrobacter freundii as the etiologic agent in EPN. A 57-year-old woman with diabetes and neurogenic bladder visited at our department with confused mentality, myalgia, and general weakness. Further investigation revealed that the patient suffered from unilateral EPN with sepsis caused by C. freundii. The patient's condition was improved considerably with percutaneous drainage and use of intravenous antibiotics for several weeks. However, renal function eventually deteriorated to permanent renal failure, which required hemodialysis. In conclusion, C. freundii may be the causative pathogen of EPN in a patient with type 2 diabetes and neurogenic bladder.

  5. [Disorders of bladder compliance and neurogenic bladder].

    PubMed

    Chartier-Kastler, E; Comperat, E; Ruffion, A

    2007-05-01

    Bladder compliance is defined as the relationship between change in bladder volume and change in detrusor pressure (DV/DP). The pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance is still poorly understood. Experimental reduction of blood flow in the bladder wall, bilateral hypogastric nerve section in rats, the study of spinalized rat bladders, and reduction of oestrogen impregnation show that these conditions induce loss of the viscoelastic properties of the bladder. With the arrival of new treatments active on afferent and/or efferent pathways or on the central nervous system, it is very important to improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic disorders of bladder compliance. The reversibility of these disorders constitutes a major therapeutic challenge and their functional consequences constitute a crucial prognostic element of neurogenic bladder. Disorders of bladder compliance can be assessed clinically from two points of view: 1) The natural history of onset of these disorders in neurogenic bladder. Clinical experience demonstrates certain risk factors for the development of these disorders, such as the voiding mode (intermittent self-catheterization or by a carer versus indwelling catheter), the level of the spinal cord lesion (suprasacral versus sacral, incomplete versus complete, and cauda equina lesions), and the presence of myelomeningocele. 2) Data derived from conservative management of these disorders in patients with neurogenic bladder: urethral dilatation, various types of sphincterotomy, vesical denervation, alpha-blockers, sympatholytics, vanilloids (resiniferatoxin and capsaicin), intra-detrusor botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen have been shown to improve disorders of compliance of neurogenic bladder.

  6. Bulbocavernosus Reflex Test for Diagnosis of Pudendal Nerve Injury in Female Patients with Diabetic Neurogenic Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiaoting; Wang, Xun; Huang, Huanjie; Ni, Peiqi; Lin, Yuanshao; Shao, Bei

    2016-01-01

    The study was designed to investigate the clinical application and significance of the bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR) test for diagnosing diabetic neurogenic bladder (DNB) in female subjects. In this study, 68 female patients with DNB and 40 female normal controls were subjected to a nerve conduction study (NCS) of all four limbs and the BCR test. The data were analyzed and compared, and the corresponding diagnostic sensitivities were discussed. Mean BCR latency for female DNB patients was significantly prolonged, compared to that of the control group, suggesting pudendal nerve injuries in female DNB patients. Moreover, DNB patients were categorized according to the diabetes course. Compared to that of Group A (diabetes course < 5 y), the mean BCR latency was significantly prolonged in Group B (diabetes course between 5 and 10 y) and then further prolonged in Group C (diabetes course > 10 y), which were all longer than the control group. Furthermore, compared with that of the controls, the mean BCR latency was prolonged in DNB patients with or without NCS abnormalities in limbs. Nevertheless, no significant difference was observed in BCR latency between DNB patients with and without NCS abnormalities. Significantly increasing trends were also observed in the NCS and BCR abnormality rates along with increased diabetes course. Most importantly, compared with the NCS of limbs, the BCR test was more sensitive in diagnosing DNB in the female subjects. Overall, our findings suggest that the BCR test would help to assess the pudendal nerve injury in female DNB patients, which might be a potential diagnostic tool in the clinic. PMID:28053822

  7. Augmentation cystoplasty in neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Kocjancic, Ervin; Demirdağ, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to update the indications, contraindications, technique, complications, and the tissue engineering approaches of augmentation cystoplasty (AC) in patients with neurogenic bladder. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for the keywords "augmentation cystoplasty," "neurogenic bladder," and "bladder augmentation." Additional relevant literature was determined by examining the reference lists of articles identified through the search. The update review of of the indications, contraindications, technique, outcome, complications, and tissue engineering approaches of AC in patients with neurogenic bladder is presented. Although some important progress has been made in tissue engineering AC, conventional AC still has an important role in the surgical treatment of refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:27617312

  8. Neurogenic bladder in Hunter's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, K; Moda, Y; Sone, A; Tanaka, H; Hino, Y

    1994-01-01

    We encountered a rare patient with Hunter's syndrome who exhibited urinary retention as a result of a neurogenic bladder, uninhibited detrusor contractions, and detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia. Neurological findings were consistent with cervical myelopathy and cervical MR imaging showed very narrow segments at the cord level C2-4. We speculate that this Hunter's syndrome patient has cervical myelopathy and that this neurological dysfunction causes the neurogenic bladder. PMID:8014981

  9. Staphylococcus saprophyticus native valve endocarditis in a diabetic patient with neurogenic bladder: A case report.

    PubMed

    Magarifuchi, Hiroki; Kusaba, Koji; Yamakuchi, Hiroki; Hamada, Yohei; Urakami, Toshiharu; Aoki, Yosuke

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with 2-day history of malaise and dyspnea. He had mitral prolapse and type II diabetes mellitus with neurogenic bladder, which was cared for by catheterization on his own. On arrival the patient was in septic condition with hypoxemia, and physical examination revealed systolic murmur at the apex. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed vegetation of the mitral and the aortic valve. The presence of continuous bacteremia was confirmed by multiple sets of blood culture, whereby gram-positive cocci was retrieved and identified as Staphylococcus saprophyticus (S. saprophyticus) both phenotypically and genetically. Because two major criteria of the Modified Duke Criteria were met, the patient was diagnosed with native valve endocarditis due to S. saprophyticus. The urine culture was also positive for gram-positive cocci, phenotypically identified as Staphylococcus warneri, which was subsequently identified as S. saprophyticus with the use of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry), indicating strongly that the intermittent catheterization-associated urinary tract infection resulted in bacteremia that eventually lead to infective endocarditis. This patient was treated with vancomycin and clindamycin. Because of multiple cerebral infarctions, the patient underwent mitral and aortic valve replacement on hospital day 5. Blood culture turned negative at 6th hospital day. Antibiotic therapy was continued for six weeks after surgery. The patient's clinical course was uneventful thereafter, and was discharged home. This is the first case report of native valve endocarditis caused by S. saprophyticus of confirmed urinary origin.

  10. Neurogenic and non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nijman, R J

    2001-11-01

    Children with a neurological defect have a clear cause for their bladder dysfunction; however, in neurologically normal children the cause of their incontinence is usually unclear. When no anatomical abnormalities seem to be present a functional problem is generally the cause. This type of incontinence is referred to as 'functional incontinence'. The different forms of bladder and sphincter dysfunction will be discussed and treatment modalities described. As the treatment modalities in children with neuropathic bladders focus on medical and especially surgical options, special attention is paid to new developments in surgical treatment. For those with functional incontinence treatment options are more variable and the new developments are described.

  11. Retrograde pyelonephritis and lumbar spondylitis as a result of Salmonella typhi in a type 2 diabetes patient with neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tatsuya; Bouchi, Ryotaro; Minami, Isao; Ohara, Norihiko; Nakano, Yujiro; Nishitani, Rie; Murakami, Masanori; Takeuchi, Takato; Akihisa, Momoko; Fujita, Masamichi; Izumiyama, Hajime; Hashimoto, Koshi; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of a 62-year-old diabetic woman with acute pyelonephritis and spondylitis caused by Salmonella typhi. She was admitted to Tokyo Medical Dental University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, because of unconsciousness and was diagnosed with sepsis by retrograde pyelonephritis as a result of Salmonella typhi. Antibiotics treatment was immediately started; however, she subsequently developed lumbar spondylitis, and long-term conservative treatment with antibiotics and a fixing device were required. This is the first report of a diabetic patient who developed retrograde urinary tract infection with Salmonella typhi, followed by sepsis and spondylitis. The infection could be a result of diabetic neuropathy, presenting neurogenic bladder and hydronephrosis. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotics and became asymptomatic with normal inflammatory marker levels, and no clinical sign of recurrence was observed in the kidney and spine at 4 months.

  12. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  13. [Neurogenic bladder: pathophysiology of the disorder of compliance].

    PubMed

    Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Ayoub, Nadim; Even-Schneider, Alexia; Richard, François; Soler, Jean-Marc; Denys, Pierre

    2004-09-01

    Bladder compliance is defined by the ratio of the increase of intravesical pressures to the increase of volume (_V/_P). The pathophysiology of disorders of compliance in neurogenic bladder is still poorly elucidated. It can be evaluated in terms of three elements: 1) The natural history of the appearance of these disorders in neurogenic bladders. Clinical experience shows the existence of prognostic factors that determine the development of these disorders, such as the voiding mode adopted (self-catheterization/hetero-catheterization versus indwelling catheter), the level of the spinal cord lesion (suprasacral versus sacral, incomplete versus complete, and cauda equina lesions), and the presence of meningomyelocele. 2). Data derived from conservative management of these disorders in neurogenic bladders: urethral dilatation, various sphincterotomies, bladder disafferentation, alpha-blockers, vanilloids (resiniferatoxin and capsaicin), intra-detrusor botulinum toxin and intrathecal baclofen, have demonstrated a marked improvement of disorders of compliance associated with neurogenic bladder 3). Data derived from experimentations. Morphometric studies on animal or human bladder strips have demonstrated an increased expression of proteolytic enzymes and endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (MMP-1) and type III collagen mRNA in hypocompliant neurogenic bladders. Reduction of bladder wall blood flow, bilateral section of hypogastric nerves in rats, study of the bladders of spinalized rats, and reduction of oestrogenic hormone impregnation, show that these conditions induce loss of the viscoelastic properties of the bladder With the arrival of new treatments, active on afferent and/or efferent pathways or even on the central nervous system, it is very important to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of disorders of compliance in neurogenic bladders. Reversibility of these disorders constitutes a major therapeutic challenge and its functional

  14. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  15. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  16. Effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on the bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li-Ping; Fan, Fan; Tang, Ai-Ling; Ye, Wen-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder is a common complication of spinal cord injury and results in urinary bladder dysfunction through lost control of micturition, or urination. Although several treatment options exist, the efficacies of many of these treatments are unknown. In particular, electroacupuncture and bladder training have had some success as individual treatments. The aim of this study was to explore effects of electroacupuncture combined with bladder training on bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after spinal cord injury (SCI) above the sacral segment. Forty-two patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI were evenly divided into two groups (n=21) and given only bladder function training (control group) or electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training (treatment group). Urodynamic changes, IPSS score, and therapeutic efficacy were compared between groups pre- and post-treatment. After either treatment, patients had higher bladder volume and bladder compliance, but lower residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure, compared to pre-treatment (P<0.05). Compared to controls, treatment group patients had significantly increased bladder volume and bladder compliance, but significantly decreased residual urine volume, bladder pressure, rectal pressure, and detrusor pressure (P<0.05). Treatment group patients had lower IPSS scores post-treatment (P<0.05) and better therapeutic efficacy (P<0.05) than control group patients. Altogether, our results suggest that electroacupuncture combined with bladder function training can clinically improve bladder function of patients with neurogenic bladder after SCI above the sacral segment. PMID:24995093

  17. Not all neurogenic bladders are the same: a proposal for a new neurogenic bladder classification system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NGB) has long been defined as a clinical entity that describes a heterogeneous collection of syndromes. The common theme is a bladder disorder concomitant with a neurologic disorder. This definition does not give the clinician much information about the bladder disorder, nor how to treat it, or even what the natural history of the disorder is likely to be. It may be time for a new classification scheme to better define the bladder defect and prognosis, as well as inform treatment. We propose a classification system based on seven categories, each having a neurologic defect in a distinct anatomic location. This is termed SALE (Stratify by Anatomic Location and Etiology). In addition, the presence or absence of bowel dysfunction and autonomic dysreflexia will be reported. In the future, as more definite prognostic information can be gleaned from biomarkers, we anticipate adding urinary nerve growth factor (NGF) and urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels to the definition. We expect the SALE system to efficiently describe a patient suffering from NGB and simultaneously inform the most appropriate treatment, follow-up regimen, and long-term prognosis. PMID:26904408

  18. Evaluation and Management of Neurogenic Bladder: What Is New in China?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder (NB) or neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD), a dysfunction of the urinary bladder and urethra due to disease of the central nervous system or peripheral nerves, is a major global medical and social problem. Numerous nervous system abnormalities, such as: stroke, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord tumors, congenital spina bifida, and diabetes, can cause NB/NLUTD. There are two major types of bladder control problems associated with NB/NLUTD: the bladder becomes either overactive or underactive depending on the nature, level, and extent of nerve damage. This review specifically focuses on the diagnosis and management of NB/NLUTD in China as well as on recent efforts to treat this disease. PMID:26266405

  19. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  20. Persistent neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to infantile botulism.

    PubMed

    Breinbjerg, Anders; Rittig, Søren; Kamperis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-13

    We present a child, 5 months of age, diagnosed with infantile botulism, showing the signs of neurogenic bladder dysfunction. The patient presented with progressive muscle weakness, hypotonia, suckling and swallowing problems and absent peripheral reflexes at clinical examination. Botulinum neurotoxin type A was detected in her serum, confirming the diagnosis. Starting at day 6, the girl presented with a urinary retention initially necessitating free bladder drainage and subsequently intermittent catheterisation. After 6 weeks in intensive care, the patient recovered but the bladder underactivity persisted. Four months following recovery, a urodynamic evaluation was performed, showing a near normal detrusor activity and normal bladder emptying, and the catheterisation was ceased. At 6 months, the girl was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and bladder emptying problems, which persisted, and clean intermittent catheterisation was started. The final urodynamic evaluation, a year and a half after her initial presentation, revealed a normal detrusor activity and an adequate bladder emptying.

  1. Urofacial syndrome: a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K; Tyritzis, S; Karakos, C; Skolarikos, A

    2011-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome (Ochoa syndrome) is considered to represent a subgroup of the non-neurogenic bladder dysfunction, characterized by non-neuropathic bladder-sphincter dysfunction, along with a characteristic inversion of the facial expression with laughing. Recent research suggests that it is probably a genetic inherited disease transmitted in an autosomal recessive fashion and might represent a distinct entity. We report a case of this syndrome in a 14-year-old boy who presented with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis, and bladder dilation.

  2. Pharmacotherapy in Pediatric Neurogenic Bladder Intravesical Botulinum Toxin Type A

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Cristian; Burek, Carol; Durán, Victor; Corbetta, Juan Pablo; Weller, Santiago; Juan, Bortagaray; López, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    When the neurogenic bladder is refractory to anticholinergics, botulinum toxin type A is used as an alternative. The neurotoxin type A reduces bladder pressure and increases its capacity and wall compliance. Additionally, it contributes to improving urinary continence and quality of life. This novel therapy is ambulatory with a low incidence of adverse effects. Due to its transitory effect, it is necessary to repeat the injections in order to sustain its therapeutic effect. In these review article we talk about Mechanism of Action, Indications, effects, administration and presentations of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in pediatric patients. Also, we make references to controversial issues surrounding its use. A bibliographic search was done selecting articles and revisions from Pubmed. The key words used were botulinum toxin A, neurogenic bladder, and children. The search was limited to patients younger than 18 years of age and reports written in English in the past ten years. PMID:22720170

  3. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  4. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K N; Karakos, C D

    2010-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  5. Renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder

    PubMed Central

    Olandoski, Karen Previdi; Koch, Vera; Trigo‐Rocha, Flavio Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of renal function in children with congenital neurogenic bladder is an important goal of treatment for the disease. This study analyzed the evolution of renal function in patients with congenital neurogenic bladder. METHODS: We reviewed the records of 58 pediatric patients with respect to the following attributes: gender, age, etiology of neurogenic bladder, reason for referral, medical/surgical management, episodes of treated urinary tract infections, urodynamics, DMSA scintigraphy, weight, height, blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis. Statistical analysis was performed, adopting the 5% significance level. RESULTS: The mean age at presentation was 4.2 ± 3.5 years. Myelomeningocele was the most frequent etiology (71.4%). Recurrent urinary tract infection was the reason for referral in 82.8% of the patients. Recurrent urinary tract infections were diagnosed in 84.5% of the patients initially; 83.7% of those patients experienced improvement during follow‐up. The initial mean glomerular filtration rate was 146.7 ± 70.1 mL/1.73 m2/min, and the final mean was 193.6 ± 93.6 mL/1.73 m2/min, p  =  0.0004. Microalbuminuria was diagnosed in 54.1% of the patients initially and in 69% in the final evaluation. Metabolic acidosis was present in 19% of the patients initially and in 32.8% in the final assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Patient referral to a pediatric nephrologist was late. A reduction in the number of urinary tract infections was observed with adequate treatment, but microalbuminuria and metabolic acidosis occurred frequently despite adequate management. PMID:21484032

  6. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults.

    PubMed

    Allio, Bryce Andrew; Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-02-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson's, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

  7. Urodynamic and physiologic patterns associated with the common causes of neurogenic bladder in adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Andrew Charles

    2016-01-01

    The clinical presentation of the neurogenic bladder can be as vast as the pathologic causes however urodynamics (UDS) can help guide clinical decision-making and help simplify a complex disease state. UDS may be considered as the gold standard in helping to break down complex and multifactorial voiding dysfunction into manageable goals; these include protecting the upper tracts, limiting urinary tract infections (UTI) via avoiding urinary stasis, and maintaining quality of life. Included within are examples of normal to pathologic tracings including normal filling and voiding, detrusor sphincteric coordination, changes in compliance, etc. Additionally we have provided expected UDS findings based on neurogenic disease process, including but not limited to, Parkinson’s, dementia, multiple sclerosis (MS) and spinal cord injury based on lesion location. Pattern recognition and understanding of UDS can help lead to quality of life improvements and optimal management for the patient with neurogenic bladder dysfunction. PMID:26904410

  8. Congenital causes of neurogenic bladder and the transition to adult care

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The population of patients with congenital genitourinary disorders has unique healthcare demands that require an additional interpersonal and medical skillset. Adults with congenital neurogenic bladder may have complex urinary anatomy, abnormal bladder function and atypical voiding mechanisms. While initial surgery and care of these patients is typically managed by a pediatric urologist, growth and development into adulthood necessitates transition of care to an adult care team. Failure of transition to adult care has been demonstrated to result in lower quality healthcare and increased risk of developing preventable complications. PMID:26904411

  9. Acute abdomen caused by bladder rupture attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous bladder rupture is a rare and serious event with high mortality. It is not often considered in the patient presenting with peritonitis. This often leads to delays in diagnosis. There are very few case reports of true spontaneous rupture in the literature. This is the first such reported case in which bladder rupture was attributable to neurogenic bladder dysfunction following a stroke. Case presentation We report the case of a 67-year-old Caucasian man who presented with lower abdominal pain and a peritonitic abdomen. He had a long-term urethral catheter because of urinary retention following a previous stroke. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics before a surgical opinion was sought. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture. After repair of the defect, he eventually made a full recovery. Conclusion In this unusual case report, we describe an example of a serious event in which delays in diagnosis may lead to increased morbidity and mortality. To date, no unifying theory explaining why rupture occurs has been postulated. We conducted a thorough literature search to examine the etiological factors in other published cases. These etiological factors either increase intra-vesical pressure or decrease the strength of the bladder wall. We hope that by increasing awareness of these etiological factors, spontaneous bladder rupture may be diagnosed earlier and appropriate therapy started. PMID:21714888

  10. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  11. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matthew O. Fraser, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Institute for Medical...Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0445...behind non-voiding contractions (NVC) of the bladder seen with filling following suprasacral spinal cord injury (SCI). The most significant findings

  12. Health promotion in motion: improving quality of life for persons with neurogenic bladder and bowel using assistive technology.

    PubMed

    Kachourbos, M J; Creasey, G H

    2000-01-01

    The neurogenic bladder and bowel lead to many complications in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Management of these neurological complications is a multidimensional challenge for persons with SCI and their caregivers, and can affect the person medically, economically, socially, and personally. This may result in social isolation, poor self-image, and overall decreased quality of life (QOL). When facing this challenge, nurses working with persons with SCI must expand their practice to include more than traditional preventive care. A newly available technique for promoting health with a neurogenic bladder and bowel is the VOCARE Bladder and Bowel Control System. Sixteen persons with SCI who received this system were interviewed by telephone and asked for their recollections of health and QOL pre-operatively in relation to bladder and bowel care and to rate changes in their QOL post-implant. Post-operatively, the recipients reported improved health, a decrease in costs of management of their neurogenic bladder and bowel, increased independence leading to less social isolation, increased sense of control, increased feelings of self-worth, and overall improvement in QOL. These outcomes illustrate the global impact that can be made on the lives of persons with SCI by health services that go beyond prevention of complications and into the realm of health promotion.

  13. Evaluation of educational content of YouTube videos relating to neurogenic bladder and intermittent catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Tsang, Brian; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many patients conduct internet searches to manage their own health problems, to decide if they need professional help, and to corroborate information given in a clinical encounter. Good information can improve patients’ understanding of their condition and their self-efficacy. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) featuring neurogenic bladder (NB) require knowledge and skills related to their condition and need for intermittent catheterization (IC). Methods: Information quality was evaluated in videos accessed via YouTube relating to NB and IC using search terms “neurogenic bladder intermittent catheter” and “spinal cord injury intermittent catheter.” Video content was independently rated by 3 investigators using criteria based on European Urological Association (EAU) guidelines and established clinical practice. Results: In total, 71 videos met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 12 (17%) addressed IC and 50 (70%) contained information on NB. The remaining videos met inclusion criteria, but did not contain information relevant to either IC or NB. Analysis indicated poor overall quality of information, with some videos with information contradictory to EAU guidelines for IC. High-quality videos were randomly distributed by YouTube. IC videos featuring a healthcare narrator scored significantly higher than patient-narrated videos, but not higher than videos with a merchant narrator. About half of the videos contained commercial content. Conclusions: Some good-quality educational videos about NB and IC are available on YouTube, but most are poor. The videos deemed good quality were not prominently ranked by the YouTube search algorithm, consequently user access is less likely. Study limitations include the limit of 50 videos per category and the use of a de novo rating tool. Information quality in videos with healthcare narrators was not higher than in those featuring merchant narrators. Better material is required to improve patients

  14. Genetic Evaluation of E. coli Strains Isolated from Asymptomatic Children with Neurogenic Bladders

    PubMed Central

    Kryger, John; Burleigh, Alexandra; Christensen, Melissa; Hopkins, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to describe the genetic profiles of E. coli that colonize asymptomatic pediatric neurogenic bladders. E. coli was isolated from 25 of 80 urine samples. Patients were excluded if they presented with symptomatic urinary tract infection or received treatment with antibiotics in the preceding three months. Multiplex PCR was performed to determine E. coli phylotype (A, B1, B2, and D) and the presence of seven pathogenicity islands (PAIs) and 10 virulence factors (VFs). E. coli strains were predominantly of the B1 and B2 phylotype, with few strains in the A or D phylotype. The PAIs IV536, ICFT073, and IICFT073 had the highest prevalence: 76%, 64%, and 48%, respectively. The PAIs II536, IJ96, and IIJ96 were less prevalent: 28%, 20%, and 24%, respectively. The most prevalent VF was vat (40%), while the least prevalent VFs were sfa (8%) and iha (12%). None of the strains carried the VF fyuA, which is very common in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). The genetic profiles of E. coli in this cohort seem to be more similar to UPEC than to commensal E. coli. However, they appear to have reduced virulence potential that allows them to colonize asymptomatically. PMID:26609542

  15. Inosine attenuates spontaneous activity in the rat neurogenic bladder through an A2B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Claire; Cristofaro, Vivian; Sack, Bryan S.; Lukianov, Stefan N.; Schäfer, Mattias; Chung, Yeun Goo; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). A recent report by us demonstrated an improvement in NDO in SCI rats following chronic systemic treatment with the purine nucleoside inosine. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of inosine underlying improvement of NDO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection at T8. Inosine (1 mM) delivered intravesically to SCI rats during conscious cystometry significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions. In isolated tissue assays, inosine (1 mM) significantly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous activity (SA) in SCI bladder muscle strips. This effect was prevented by a pan-adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943, but not by A1 or A3 receptor antagonists. The A2A antagonist ZM241385 and A2B antagonist PSB603 prevented the effect of inosine. The effect of inosine was mimicked by the adenosine receptor agonist NECA and the A2B receptor agonist BAY60-6583. The inhibition of SA by inosine was not observed in the presence of the BK antagonist, iberiotoxin, but persisted in the presence of KATP and SK antagonists. These findings demonstrate that inosine acts via an A2B receptor-mediated pathway that impinges on specific potassium channel effectors. PMID:28294142

  16. Stimulation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels inhibits neurogenic contraction of human bladder from patients with urinary symptoms and reverses acetic acid-induced bladder hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    La Fuente, José M; Fernández, Argentina; Cuevas, Pedro; González-Corrochano, Rocío; Chen, Mao Xiang; Angulo, Javier

    2014-07-15

    We have analysed the effects of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) stimulation on neurogenic and myogenic contraction of human bladder from healthy subjects and patients with urinary symptoms and evaluated the efficacy of activating BK to relief bladder hyperactivity in rats. Bladder specimens were obtained from organ donors and from men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Contractions elicited by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and carbachol (CCh) were evaluated in isolated bladder strips. in vivo cystometric recordings were obtained in anesthetized rats under control and acetic acid-induced hyperactive conditions. Neurogenic contractions of human bladder were potentiated by blockade of BK and small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK) but were unaffected by the blockade of intermediate calcium-activated potassium channels (IK). EFS-induced contractions were inhibited by BK stimulation with NS-8 or NS1619 or by SK/IK stimulation with NS309 (3µM). CCh-induced contractions were not modified by blockade or stimulation of BK, IK or SK. The anti-cholinergic agent, oxybutynin (0.3µM) inhibited either neurogenic or CCh-induced contractions. Neurogenic contractions of bladders from BPH patients were less sensitive to BK inhibition and more sensitive to BK activation than healthy bladders. The BK activator, NS-8 (5mg/kg; i.v.), reversed bladder hyperactivity induced by acetic acid in rats, while oxybutynin was ineffective. NS-8 did not significantly impact blood pressure or heart rate. BK stimulation specifically inhibits neurogenic contractions in patients with urinary symptoms and relieves bladder hyperactivity in vivo without compromising bladder contractile capacity or cardiovascular safety, supporting its potential therapeutic use for relieving bladder overactivity.

  17. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0–10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. Results: The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18–56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1–2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8

  18. Diabetic Neuropathy and Axon Reflex-Mediated Neurogenic Vasodilatation in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Bril, Vera; Orszag, Andrej; Ng, Eduardo; Nwe, Patti; Perkins, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Axon reflex-mediated neurogenic vasodilatation in response to cutaneous heating may reflect early, pre-clinical small fibre dysfunction. We aimed to evaluate the distribution of the vascular flare area measured by laser doppler imaging (“LDIFLARE area”) in type 1 diabetes and in healthy volunteers. Research and Methods Concurrent with clinical and electrophysiological examination to classify diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSP), LDIFLARE area (cm2) was determined in 89 type 1 diabetes subjects matched to 64 healthy volunteers. We examined the association and diagnostic performance of LDI with clinical and subclinical measures of DSP and its severity. Results Compared to the 64 healthy volunteers, the 56 diabetes controls without DSP had significantly lower LDIFLARE area (p = 0.006). The 33 diabetes cases with DSP had substantially lower LDIFLARE area as compared to controls without DSP (p = 0.002). There was considerable overlap in LDIFLARE area between all groups such that the ROC curve had an AUC of 0.72 and optimal sensitivity of 70% for the detection of clinical DSP. Use of a subclinical definition for DSP, according to subclinical sural nerve impairment, was associated with improved AUC of 0.75 and sensitivity of 79%. In multivariate analysis higher HbA1c and body mass index had independent associations with smaller LDIFLARE area. Conclusions Axon reflex-mediated neurogenic vasodilatation in response to cutaneous heating is a biomarker of early nerve dysfunction in DSP. Its independent association with glycemic exposure in diabetes subjects and both glycemic exposure and BMI in healthy volunteers highlights the existence of small-fibre dysfunction in the natural history of DSP. PMID:22529938

  19. The Factors That Affect Improvement of Neurogenic Bladder by Severe Lumbar Disc Herniation in Operation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Joon Bok; Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Ji-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study analyzed retrospectively the bladder function of patients after early surgery for cauda equina syndrome (CES) performed within 24 or 48 hours, or after 48 hours of the onset of autonomic symptoms. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 31 patients after decompression surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) who had been diagnosed with CES between January 2001 and December 2014 at Inha University Hospital. The following factors were assessed to evaluate the influence of time to surgery: bladder function, rectal incontinence, sexual dysfunction, LDH level, and degree of spinal canal compression. Results After decompression, the outcome group was categorized into normal bladder function and abnormal bladder function. The patients operated on within 48 hours showed an improved postoperative outcome. Among 16 patients operated on within 48 hours, 13 (81%) recovered normal bladder function. In contrast, among 15 patients with decompression after 48 hours, 6 (40%) recovered normal bladder function. Among 21 patients with mild bladder dysfunction at admission, 16 (76%) recovered normal bladder function after decompression. Conclusion Our study suggests that patients who have decompression surgery within 48 hours of the onset of bladder dysfunction, improve their chances of recovering bladder function than those who have a late operation (>48 hours). Also, patients with mild bladder dysfunction are more likely to recover bladder function after decompression, than patients with severe bladder dysfunction. PMID:27799991

  20. Quick note on tissue engineering-based surgical measures to treat patients with neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/sphincter dyssynergia.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Contardo

    2015-01-01

    To treat the neurogenic bladder-due detrusor/urethral rhabdosphincter dyssynergia, early combined clean intermittent catheterization/ pharmacotherapy (anticholinergic-, β3-adrenoceptor agonist drugs) management may be at times crowned with success of preserving an adequate bladder compliance and renal safe conditions.The persistence, instead, of elevated bladder filling pressure levels with high voiding pressure/uroflow values, together with aberrant urethral rhabdosphincter electromyographic findings, make necessary the resort to surgery strategies, among which - a part from rhabdosphincterotomy or alternatively intrasphincteric botulinum A toxin injection or urethral stent insertion - the bladder augmentation cystoplasty, with either reconfigurated bowel- or gastric segment, is today the most efficacious surgical measure to increase the bladder urinary storage meanwhile lowering bladder filling pressure. Given the enterocistoplasty-dependent both potential systemic metabolic imbalances - such as hyperchloremic acidosis/hypokaliemia, hyperoxaluria, bone demineralization, chologenic diarrhoea/steatorrhoea, vit B12 deficiency - together with bowel prosthetic mucus overproduction-due recurrent stone formation, and, sometimes, malignant complications particularly at the intestinal-urinary tract suture line, tissue engineering techniques have been taken into consideration, more than twenty years ago, as alternative measure for bladder augmentation cystoplasty, until to reach successful clinical validation just in patients suffering from either congenital dysraphism- or acquired spinal cord injury-dependent neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, also the tissue engineering-made augmentation cistoplasty, as well as that bowel-based one, unfortunately remains influenced by spinal cord neuropathydue dysfunctional effects, hence the tissue engineering research could be today directed to suitably overcome such disadvantageous conditions.

  1. Voltage-gated K+ channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 regulate myogenic and neurogenic contractions of rat urinary bladder smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Muyan; Kellett, Whitney F.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the voltage-gated K+ (KV) channel family are suggested to control the resting membrane potential and the repolarization phase of the action potential in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). Recent studies report that stromatoxin-1, a peptide isolated from tarantulas, selectively inhibits KV2.1, KV2.2, KV4.2, and KV2.1/9.3 channels. The objective of this study was to investigate whether KV channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 participate in the regulation of rat UBSM contractility and to identify their molecular fingerprints. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone in isolated UBSM strips. However, stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) had no effect on the UBSM contractions induced by depolarizing agents such as KCl (20 mM) or carbachol (1 μM). This indicates that, under conditions of sustained membrane depolarization, the KV channels sensitive to stromatoxin-1 have no further contribution to the membrane excitability and contractility. Stromatoxin-1 (100 nM) increased the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions, suggesting also a role for these channels in neurogenic contractions. RT-PCR experiments on freshly isolated UBSM cells showed mRNA expression of KV2.1, KV2.2, and KV9.3, but not KV4.2 channel subunits. Protein expression of KV2.1 and KV2.2 channels was detected using Western blot and was further confirmed by immunocytochemical detection in freshly isolated UBSM cells. These novel findings indicate that KV2.1 and KV2.2, but not KV4.2, channel subunits are expressed in rat UBSM and play a key role in opposing both myogenic and neurogenic UBSM contractions. PMID:20393158

  2. Conditional Electrical Stimulation in Animal and Human Models for Neurogenic Bladder: Working Toward a Neuroprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Powell, C R

    2016-12-01

    Sacral neuromodulation has had a tremendous impact on the treatment of urinary incontinence and lower urinary tract symptoms for patients with neurologic conditions. This stimulation does not use real-time data from the body or input from the patient. Incorporating this is the goal of those pursuing a neuroprosthesis to enhance bladder function for these patients. Investigators have demonstrated the effectiveness of conditional (also called closed-loop) feedback in animal models as well as limited human studies. Dorsal genital nerve, pudendal nerve, S3 afferent nerve roots, S1 and S2 ganglia have all been used as targets for stimulation. Most of these have also been used as sources of afferent nerve information using sophisticated nerve electrode arrays and filtering algorithms to detect significant bladder events and even to estimate the fullness of the bladder. There are problems with afferent nerve sensing, however. Some of these include sensor migration and low signal to noise ratios. Implantable pressure sensors have also been investigated that have their own unique challenges, such as erosion and sensor drift. As technology improves, an intelligent neuroprosthesis with the ability to sense significant bladder events and stimulate as needed will evolve.

  3. Ovalbumin-induced neurogenic inflammation in the bladder of sensitized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Giuliani, Sandro; Scotland, Ramona; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    1998-01-01

    We have developed and characterized a model of immediate hypersensitivity/inflammation of the urinary bladder in vivo induced by local application of ovalbumin (OA) in OA- sensitive female rats. Two parameters of the inflammatory response were assessed following OA challenge: plasma protein extravasation (PPE) and changes in smooth muscle reactivity. The former was estimated by measurement of Evans blue extravasation at 0.5, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h time point following in vivo challenge. Changes in reactivity were determined by measurement of isotonic tension responses of urinary bladder strips following OA challenge in vitro.Acute in vivo intravesical OA challenge (10 mg in 0.3 ml saline) in actively sensitized female Wistar rats caused a time-dependent PPE in the urinary bladder which was biphasic with peak responses at 2–4 and 24 h.The PPE response to acute OA challenge, above base-line, at 2 h was abolished by systemic capsaicin pretreatment (50 mg kg−1, s.c., 4 days before use) (P<0.05) whilst the response at 24 h was unaffected. The 2 h time point was then used for further studies.Degranulation of mast cells, achieved by pretreatment with compound 48/80 (5 mg kg−1, s.c. for 3 consecutive days), completely abolished the PPE response to OA challenge at the 2 h time point.The tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140333 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.), abolished the 2 h PPE response whilst the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist MEN 11420 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.) appeared to reduce the response by approximately 50% but this did not reach significance. The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist, Hoe 140 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.), similarly to SR 140333, blocked the 2 h PPE response to OA, whereas the selective B1 receptor antagonist B 9858 (0.1 μmol kg−1, i.v.) had no significant effect. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) achieved by pretreatment with the COX inhibitor dexketoprofen (5.3 μmol kg−1, i.v.) also blocked the

  4. Association Between Overactive Bladder and Polyneuropathy in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder that often leads to complications. We aimed to correlate two complications of DM, polyneuropathy and hyperactive bladder syndrome, using noninvasive measures, such as screening tests. Methods We included 80 female and 40 male type 2 diabetic patients in this prospective study. Diabetic polyneuropathy evaluations were conducted using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 Questions (DN4), and overactive bladder (OAB) evaluations were performed using the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire (OAB-V8). The patients were also evaluated for retinopathy and nephropathy. The diabetic male and female patients with or without OAB were chosen and compared for microvascular complications (polyneuropathy, retinopathy, and nephropathy). Results There were no significant correlations between OAB and retinopathy as well as between OAB and nephropathy among diabetic patients (female patients, P>0.05; male patients, P>0.05). However, the patients with OAB were significantly more likely to develop polyneuropathy (female patients, P<0.05; male patients, P<0.05). Conclusions In diabetic patients, OAB and diabetic peripheral neuropathy are significantly correlated. These correlations were demonstrated using short, understandable, valid, and reliable disease-specific tests without invasive measures. Using these screening tests, both neurologists and urologists can easily diagnose these complications. PMID:27706007

  5. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Seema; Sharma, Vipin; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-06-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis.

  6. Sacral Agenesis with Neurogenic Bladder Dysfunction—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Seema; Awasthi, Bhanu; Sehgal, Manik; Singla, Deeksha A

    2015-01-01

    Sacral agenesis (part of the caudal regression syndrome) is a rare and severe sacral developmental abnormality. It is a congenital malformation of unknown aetiology with possible involvement of genetic and teratogenic factors. It is described by various degrees of developmental failure, the most extreme and rare being sirenomelia or mermaid syndrome. The associated malformations comprise anorectal, vertebral, urological, genital, and lower limb anomalies. Approximately 15-20% mothers of these children have insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. The case is being reported for its rarity and educative value because prognosis is good in isolated sacral agenesis. PMID:26266174

  7. Lack of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel modulates the development of neurogenic bladder dysfunction induced by cross-sensitization in afferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bladder pain of unknown etiology has been associated with co-morbid conditions and functional abnormalities in neighboring pelvic organs. Mechanisms underlying pain co-morbidities include cross-sensitization, which occurs predominantly via convergent neural pathways connecting distinct pelvic organs. Our previous results showed that colonic inflammation caused detrusor instability via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) signaling pathways, therefore, we aimed to determine whether neurogenic bladder dysfunction can develop in the absence of TRPV1 receptors. Methods Adult male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and TRPV1−/− (knockout) mice were used in this study. Colonic inflammation was induced by intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). The effects of transient colitis on abdominal sensitivity and function of the urinary bladder were evaluated by cystometry, contractility and relaxation of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) in vitro to various stimuli, gene and protein expression of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and pelvic responses to mechanical stimulation. Results Knockout of TRPV1 gene did not eliminate the development of cross-sensitization between the colon and urinary bladder. However, TRPV1−/− mice had prolonged intermicturition interval and increased number of non-voiding contractions at baseline followed by reduced urodynamic responses during active colitis. Contractility of DSM was up-regulated in response to KCl in TRPV1−/− mice with inflamed colon. Application of Rho-kinase inhibitor caused relaxation of DSM in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice during colonic inflammation. TRPV1−/− mice demonstrated blunted effects of TNBS-induced colitis on expression and function of voltage-gated sodium channels in bladder sensory neurons, and delayed development of abdominal hypersensitivity upon colon-bladder cross-talk in genetically modified animals. Conclusions The lack of TRPV1 receptors

  8. Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    John, Cynthia A; Day, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    Central neurogenic diabetes insipidus, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome are secondary events that affect patients with traumatic brain injury. All 3 syndromes affect both sodium and water balance; however, they have differences in pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Differentiating between hypernatremia (central neurogenic diabetes insipidus) and the 2 hyponatremia syndromes (syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome) is critical for preventing worsening neurological outcomes in patients with head injuries.

  9. Bladder Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequent, urgent urination Bladder cancer Doctors diagnose bladder diseases using different tests. These include urine tests, x- ... National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  10. Effects of Physiotherapy in the Treatment of Neurogenic Bladder in Patients Infected with Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosana C.P.; Neto, José A.; Andrade, Luciana; Oliveira, Tatiane S. S.; Santos, Dislene N.; Oliveira, Cassius J.V.; Prado, Márcio J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy for urinary manifestations in patients with HTLV-1-associated lower urinary tract dysfunction. Methods Open clinical trial with 21 patients attending the physiotherapy clinic of the Hospital Universitário, Bahia, Brazil. Combinations of behavioral therapy, perineal exercises and intravaginal/intra-anal electrical stimulation were used. Results The mean age was 54±12 years and 67% were female. After treatment, there was an improvement in symptoms of urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence, nocturia and in the sensation of incomplete emptying (p<0.001). There was also a reduction in the overactive bladder symptom score from 10±4 to 6±3 (p<0.001) and an increasing in the perineal muscle strength (p<0.001). The urodynamic parameters improved, with reduction in the frequency of patients with detrusor hyperactivity from 57.9% to 42.1%; detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) from 31.6% to 5.3%; detrusor hypocontractility from 15.8% to 0% and detrusor areflexia from 10.5% to 0%, with positive repercussions in the quality of life in all patients. Conclusion Physiotherapy was effective in cases of HTLV-1-associated neurogenic bladder, reducing symptoms, increasing perineal muscle strength, improving urodynamic parameters and quality of life. PMID:26724409

  11. An unresolved relationship: the relationship between lesion severity and neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarifakioglu, Banu; Yalbuzdağ, Şeniz Akcay; Saraçgil Coşar, Sacide Nur

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to investigate the relationship between the severity of the spinal lesion and urodynamic findings, bladder drainage method at discharge, and incidence of renal calculi in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Studydesign Retrospective. Setting In-patient rehabilitation unit of a tertiary research hospital. Methods A total of 131 patients who were admitted to our clinic with a diagnosis of SCI and placed into a rehabilitation program were included in the study. The severity of the lesion was determined according to the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). We evaluated the relationship between the severity of the lesion and the detrusor hyperactivity and compliance as determined by urodynamic investigation, the bladder drainage method used at discharge, and the renal calculi rate as determined by ultrasonography. Results While no difference was found between the patients with complete and incomplete injuries in terms of age, sex, disease duration, detrusor hyperactivity and compliance, the bladder drainage method was found to show a significant change according to the severity of the lesion. None of the patients were found to have hydronephrosis and the rate of renal calculi showed no statistically significant difference according to the severity of the lesion. Conclusions We concluded that urodynamic examination is required in each patient with SCI as the severity of the lesion is not sufficient to determine the bladder type, and patients with complete and incomplete injuries should be monitored with the same sensitivity in terms of complications. PMID:26322550

  12. Controversies Related to Diabetes and Risk of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spradling, Kyle; Youssef, Ramy F

    2016-03-15

    In recent years, a growing number of case-control and cohort studies have suggested that patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) may have a higher risk of developing bladder cancer (BC). However, the body of evidence linking DM and BC is controversial and largely composed of observational studies with significant heterogeneity in study design. In this review, we outline the current body of evidence associating DM with BC. We also highlight the evidence surrounding the relationship between BC and two antidiabetic medications, metformin and pioglitazone. Currently, not enough evidence is available to decisively conclude that DM is associated with an increased risk for development of BC. Similarly, the current body of evidence is inadequate to establish a causal relationship between pioglitazone and BC nor a protective relationship between metformin and BC.

  13. Possible link of pioglitazone with bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kanta; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Honjo, Sachiko; Kawasaki, Yukiko; Mori, Kanako; Tatsuoka, Hisato; Matsuoka, Atsuko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Hiroki; Fujikawa, Jun; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    We retrospectively examined the frequency of bladder cancer in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes in relation to use of pioglitazone. Among a total of 663 patients identified to be taking pioglitazone, 9 had bladder cancer (1.36%). Overall the hazard ratio of 1.75 [95% CI: 0.89-3.45] for pioglitazone for bladder cancer was not significant. However the prevalence of bladder cancer was 2.10% in patients taking pioglitazone for less than 24 months which was significant increased (HR 2.73 [95% CI: 1.11-6.72]).

  14. Rosiglitazone Use and the Risk of Bladder Cancer in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene; Jang, Suk-Yong; Kim, Gyuri; Lee, Yong-Ho; Choe, Eun Yeong; Nam, Chung Mo; Kang, Eun Seok

    2016-02-01

    Patients with diabetes have a higher incidence of bladder cancer; however, the association between thiazolidinedione use and bladder cancer risk has been controversial. We aimed to investigate whether pioglitazone or rosiglitazone use is associated with bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.This nationwide nested case-control study used data set obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002 to 2013. Among the 47,738 patients with incident diabetes, 85 cases of newly diagnosed bladder cancer and 850 controls (1:10 matched by age, sex, index year, and diabetes diagnosis year) were recruited. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and bladder cancer were diagnosed using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision code.More cases of bladder cancer were diagnosed in men (81.2%), and the stratified age peaked at 70 to 79 years old. Exclusive rosiglitazone use raised the incidence of bladder cancer (odds ratio [OR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI ] = 1.48-6.37). The risk of bladder cancer started to increase after less than 3 months use (OR = 3.30, 95% CI = 1.02-10.70) and peaked at 3 to 12 months of rosiglitazone use (OR = 4.48, 95% CI = 1.51-13.31). Patients were first exposed to exclusive rosiglitazone within 1 year (OR = 11.74, 95% CI = 2.46-56.12) and those who had consistently used it for 1 year (OR = 4.48 95% CI = 1.51-13.31), had higher risks of bladder cancer compared with nonthiazolidinedione users. Neither pioglitazone use nor exclusive pioglitazone use were associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer.Rosiglitazone use is associated with an increased risk of incident bladder cancer independent of age and sex in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The highest odds of bladder cancer in rosiglitazone users was seen in those with <1 year of exposure.

  15. Functional and biochemical characteristics of urinary bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To re-examine the function of the urinary bladder in vivo as well as to determine the functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors in long-term alloxan-induced diabetes rats. Methods Two-month-old male Wistar rats were injected with alloxan and the animals showing blood glucose levels >300mg/dL together with age-paired untreated animals were kept for 11 months. Body weight, bladder weight, blood glucose, and urinary volume over a period of 24 hours were determined in both groups of animals. A voiding cystometry in conscious control and diabetic rats was performed to determine maximal micturition pressure, micturition contraction interval and duration as well as voided and post-voiding residual volume. In addition, concentration-response curves for bethanechol in isolated bladder strips, as well as [3H]-N methyl-scopolamine binding site characteristics in bladder homogenates were determined. Results Mean bladder weight was 162.5±21.2mg versus 290±37.9mg in control and treated animals, respectively (p<0.05). Micturition contraction amplitude (34.6±4.7mmHg versus 49.6±2.5mmHg), duration (14.5±1.7 seconds versus 23.33±4.6 seconds) and interval (87.5±17.02 seconds versus 281.11±20.24 seconds) were significantly greater in alloxan diabetic rats. Voided urine volume per micturition contraction was also significantly higher in diabetic animals. However the post-voiding residual volume was not statistically different. Bethanechol potency (EC50 3µM versus 5µM) and maximal effect (31.2±5.9g/g versus 36.1±6.8g/g) in isolated bladder strips as well as number (169±4fmol/mg versus 176±3fmol/mg protein) and affinity (0.69±0.1nM versus 0.57±0.1nM) of bladder muscarinic receptors were also not statistically different. Conclusion Bladder function in vivo is altered in chronic alloxan-induced diabetes rats without changes in functional and biochemical characteristics of bladder muscarinic receptors. PMID:26466064

  16. Oxidative stress status accompanying diabetic bladder cystopathy results in the activation of protein degradation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kanika, Nirmala; Chang, Jinsook; Tong, Yuehong; Tiplitsky, Scott; Lin, Juan; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Tar, Moses; Chance, Mark; Christ, George J.; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the role that oxidative stress plays in the development of diabetic cystopathy. Materials and methods Comparative gene expression in the bladder of non-diabetic and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced 2-month-old diabetic rats was carried out using microarray analysis. Evidence of oxidative stress was investigated in the bladder by analyzing glutathione S-transferase activity, lipid peroxidation, and carbonylation and nitrosylation of proteins. The activity of protein degradation pathways was assessed using western blot analysis. Results Analysis of global gene expression showed that detrusor smooth muscle tissue of STZ-induced diabetes undergoes significant enrichment in targets involved in the production or regulation of reactive oxygen species (P = 1.27 × 10−10). The microarray analysis was confirmed by showing that markers of oxidative stress were all significantly increased in the diabetic bladder. It was hypothesized that the sequelae to oxidative stress would be increased protein damage and apoptosis. This was confirmed by showing that two key proteins involved in protein degradation (Nedd4 and LC3B) were greatly up-regulated in diabetic bladders compared to controls by 12.2 ± 0.76 and 4.4 ± 1.0-fold, respectively, and the apoptosis inducing protein, BAX, was up-regulated by 6.76 ± 0.76-fold. Conclusions Overall, the findings obtained in the present study add to the growing body of evidence showing that diabetic cystopathy is associated with oxidative damage of smooth muscle cells, and results in protein damage and activation of apoptotic pathways that may contribute to a deterioration in bladder function. PMID:21518418

  17. Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Bladder Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhoujun; Zhong, Shan; Wang, Xianjin; Lu, Yingli; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that diabetes mellitus (DM) may be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer. To provide a quantitative assessment of this association, we evaluated the relation between DM and incidence and mortality of bladder cancer in an updated meta-analysis of cohort studies. Methods We identified cohort studies by searching the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, through 31 March 2012. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with random-effects models. Results A total of 29 cohort studies (27 articles) were included in this meta-analysis. DM was associated with an increased incidence of bladder cancer (RR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.08–1.54), with significant evidence of heterogeneity among these studies (p<0.001, I2 = 94.9%). In stratified analysis, the RRs of bladder cancer were 1.36 (1.05–1.77) for diabetic men and 1.28 (0.75–2.19) for diabetic women, respectively. DM was also positively associated with bladder cancer mortality (RR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.14–1.55), with evident heterogeneity between studies (p = 0.002, I2 = 63.3%). The positive association was observed for both men (RR 1.54, 95% CI: 1.30–1.82) and women (RR 1.50, 95% CI: 1.05–2.14). Conclusion These findings suggest that compared to non-diabetic individuals, diabetic individuals have an increased incidence and mortality of bladder cancer. PMID:23437204

  18. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    voiding contractions (NVC) during normal bladder filling. These NVC are responsible for incontinence episodes, bladder and bladder neck damage, as...eliminated, however, voiding occurred by a combination of augmented overflow incontinence (NVC-driven and a vesicosomatic reflex of the hindquarters...spinal micturition reflex, but rather an augmented overflow incontinence with a locomotor component (High amplitude pressure swings in bottom trace

  19. Spontaneous Urinary Bladder Perforation: An Unusual Presentation of Diabetes Mellitus☆

    PubMed Central

    Kabarriti, Abdo E.; Ramchandani, Parvati; Guzzo, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare event, which requires immediate medical attention due to its extremely high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 36-year-old man who presented with acute-onset abdominal pain without any inciting events. His glucose level at the time of presentation was 1107 mg/dL. On initial abdominal imaging, it was believed that he had a large pelvic mass likely originating from the bladder. On further workup at our hospital, it was discovered that he had an intraperitoneal perforation after which he underwent an exploratory laparotomy and a cystorrhaphy. PMID:26955559

  20. Neurogenic bladder: etiology and assessment

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    A review of the various causes of neurologic impairment to the lower urinary tract in children was the aim of this presentation. The emphasis was on diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment that strive to maintain as normal a function as possible in order to achieve eventual urinary continence and health of the upper urinary tract. The latest principles based on the most up to date evidence are promulgated but with an eye towards historical prospective. The reader should gain an adequate understanding of various disorders that comprise this condition and feel comfortable with proposing options for management when faced with the responsibility of caring for an affected child. PMID:18270749

  1. Association between metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes mellitus and oncological outcomes of bladder cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cantiello, Francesco; Cicione, Antonio; Salonia, Andrea; Autorino, Riccardo; De Nunzio, Cosimo; Briganti, Alberto; Gandaglia, Giorgio; Dell'Oglio, Paolo; Capogrosso, Paolo; Damiano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of several metabolic abnormalities, its prevalence is increasing worldwide. To summarize the most recent evidence regarding the relationship between metabolic syndrome, its components and the oncological outcomes in bladder cancer patients, a National Center for Biotechnology Information PubMed search for relevant articles either published or e-published up to March 2014 was carried out by combining the following Patient population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome terms: metabolic syndrome, obesity, body mass index, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, bladder cancer, risk, mortality, cancer specific survival, disease recurrence and progression. Metabolic syndrome is a complex, highly prevalent disorder, and central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension are its main components. Published findings would suggest that metabolic syndrome per se might be associated with an increased risk of bladder cancer in male patients, but it did not seem to confer a risk of worse prognosis. Considering the primary components of metabolic syndrome (hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia), available data are uncertain, and it is no possible to reach a conclusion yet on either a direct or an indirect association with bladder cancer risk and prognosis. Only with regard to type 2 diabetes mellitus, available data would suggest a potential negative correlation. However, as the evaluation of bladder cancer risk and prognosis in patients with metabolic disorders is certainly complex, further studies are urgently required to better assess the actual role of these metabolic disorders.

  2. Chronic treatment with taurine ameliorates diabetes-induced dysfunction of nitric oxide-mediated neurogenic and endothelium-dependent corpus cavernosum relaxation in rats.

    PubMed

    Dalaklioglu, Selvinaz; Kuscu, Nilay; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Bayram, Zeliha; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Ozdem, Sadi Satilmis

    2014-08-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effect of chronic taurine treatment on corpus cavernosum dysfunction in diabetic rats and to investigate possible underlying mechanisms. Thirty male rats were randomized to three groups of 10 each, including control, diabetic, and taurine-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin (STZ, single intraperitoneal dose of 50 mg/kg body weight). Taurine was administered orally for 12 weeks (1% w/v in drinking water) from the day on which STZ was injected. At the end of the 12th week, strips of corpus cavernosum were suspended in an organ bath system for functional studies. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation were evaluated by acetylcholine (ACh, 0.1-100 μm) and electrical field stimulation (EFS, 30 V, 5 ms, 2-32 Hz), respectively. The expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), phosphorylated eNOS (p-eNOS) (Ser-1177), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), NADPH oxidase subunit gp91(phox) , Rho A, and Rho kinase in corpus cavernosum were semi-quantitatively assessed by immunohistochemistry. Induction of diabetes resulted in significant inhibition of NO-mediated endothelium-dependent and neurogenic corpus cavernosum relaxation. Furthermore, eNOS, p-eNOS, and nNOS expressions decreased significantly in diabetic rats compared to controls, while gp91(phox) , RhoA and Rho kinase expressions increased significantly. The diminished relaxation response to ACh and EFS as well as diabetes-related changes in expressions of these proteins in corpus cavernosum of diabetic rats was significantly improved by taurine. Taurine treatment improves NO-mediated relaxations of corpus cavernosum in diabetic rats probably by inhibiting NADPH oxidase/Rho kinase pathways.

  3. Prevalence of Gall Bladder Stones among Type 2 Diabetic Patients in Benghazi Libya: A Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elmehdawi, RR; Elmajberi, SJ; Behieh, A; Elramli, A

    2009-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus and gall bladder stones are both common and costly diseases. Increasing age, female gender, overweight, familial history of the disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus is all associated with an increased risk of gallstones. Several studies from around the world reported an increased prevalence of gall bladder stones in patients with diabetes mellitus. Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to define the frequency of gall bladder stones among Libyan diabetics and to evaluate the possible associated risk factors in these patients. Patients and methods: A case-control study was performed during 2007 at Benghazi Diabetes and endocrinology Center. The study involved 161 randomly selected type-2 diabetic patients under regular follow up at the center, and 166 age and sex matched non-diabetic outpatients at the 7th of October teaching hospital. Real-time abdominal ultrasound was performed by two radiologists to examine the abdomen after an overnight fast. Results: About 40% of the diabetic cohort had gall bladder stones as compared to 17.5% of non-diabetic patients. Females were significantly more affected than males. Patients with gall bladder stones were significantly older and had a significantly higher body mass index than those without stones. Conclusion: The prevalence of gallstones in Libyan diabetic patients is higher than the rates reported in other parts of the world. Libyan diabetic patients with gallstones tend to be older and more obese than those without gallstones. Duration of diabetes mellitus and type of treatment does not seem to influence the frequency of gall bladder stones among Libyan diabetics. PMID:21483499

  4. Neurogenic cough.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Noordzij, J Pieter; Rosen, Clark A; Cohen, Seth; Sulica, Lucian

    2015-07-01

    We review contemporary concepts of the pathophysiology of neurogenic cough, and its evaluation and treatment based on scientific publications addressing neurogenic cough. Neurogenic cough is thought to be the result of sensory neuropathy, most commonly idiopathic. Because it is principally a sensory phenomenon, clinical evaluation is challenging, the diagnosis most often being made by exclusion. Identification of motor paresis, either by laryngoscopy or laryngeal electromyography, may suggest the presence of sensory neuropathy. The utility of amitriptyline and gabapentin has been demonstrated in randomized clinical trials, and retrospective series and case reports have suggested efficacy of pregabalin, baclofen, and botulinum toxin. Sensory neuropathy appears to be an important cause of chronic refractory cough, and appears amenable to treatment with a variety of pharmacologic agents.

  5. Pioglitazone and bladder cancer in human studies: is it diabetes itself, diabetes drugs, flawed analyses or different ethnicities?

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews human observations on pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk. The PROspective pioglitAzone Clinical Trial In macroVascular Events trial showed an imbalance in bladder cancer between users of pioglitazone and placebo (14 versus six cases, p = 0.069). However, after excluding bladder cancer probably ascribed to other etiology, a blind assessment concluded that the imbalance might not be related to pioglitazone. Epidemiologic studies conducted in the United States and France using insurance databases independently suggested that pioglitazone use for >2 years might confer a 20%-40% higher risk. Another study evaluating bladder cancer risk in diabetic patients using the National Health Insurance in Taiwan did not find any incident bladder cancer case among 422 pioglitazone users for a follow-up of up to 3 years. Because observational studies may suffer from selection and information bias, and inadequate adjustment for confounders may inflate the estimated risk, causal inference from these studies should be interpreted with caution. While investigating cancer risk associated with a medication, indication bias should also be attended, especially when the medication is used at a late stage of the disease. Because pioglitazone is usually a second or third line antidiabetic agent, the users are always characterized by older age, longer diabetes duration, poorer glycemic control, and higher rates of complications and comorbidities. Biased estimates will also result if these differences are not appropriately addressed in the analyses. Current evidence neither concludes nor excludes a causal role of pioglitazone on bladder cancer. Clinical trials aiming at evaluating the risk of cancer associated with a medication is not ethical and may not be expected to provide an answer on the issue of pioglitazone-related bladder cancer. However, a meta-analysis using all available clinical trials to compare the bladder cancer risk between pioglitazone and comparators

  6. The effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in the progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Rahmani, Arshad H; Khan, Amjad A; Aly, Salah Mesalhy

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy is a major public health and economical burden worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the molecular mechanisms that induce or develop bladder carcinomas and diabetic retinopathy progression are poorly understood but it might be due to the disturbance in balance between angiogenic factors such as VEGF and antiangiogenic factors such as pigment epithelium derived growth factor. VEGF is one of the important survival factors for endothelial cells in the process of normal physiological and abnormal angiogenesis and induce the expression of antiapoptotic proteins in the endothelial cells. It is also the major initiator of angiogenesis in cancer and diabetic retinopathy, where it is up-regulated by oncogenic expression and different type of growth factors. The alteration in VEGF and VEGF receptors gene and overexpression, determines a diseases phenotype and ultimately the patient’s clinical outcome. However, expressional and molecular studies were made on VEGF to understand the exact mechanism of action in the genesis and progression of bladder carcinoma and diabetic retinopathy , but still how VEGF mechanism involve in such type of disease progression are not well defined. Some other factors also play a significant role in the process of activation of VEGF pathways. Therefore, further detailed analysis via molecular and therapeutic is needed to know the exact mechanisms of VEGF in the angiogenesis pathway. The detection of these types of diseases at an early stage, predict how it will behave and act in response to treatment through regulation of VEGF pathways. The present review aimed to summarize the mechanism of alteration of VEGF gene pathways, which play a vital role in the development and progression of bladder cancer and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:23641300

  7. Pioglitazone prescription increases risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Shiyao; Tang, Yu-hong; Zhao, Guobin; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Dehou; Zhang, Ye

    2014-03-01

    Pioglitazone is widely used for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, but evidence regarding the association between pioglitazone and bladder cancer risk is confusing. A systematic search of databases was carried out, and other relevant papers were also identified. Then, the analyses were conducted according to the PRISMA and MOOSE guidelines. After quality assessment, nine datasets from 10 available studies were included on the basis of inclusion criteria. The incidence of bladder cancer among pioglitazone ever users and never users, pooled from four cohort and one randomized studies, were 84.51 and 66.68 per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Nine studies representing 2,596,856 diabetic patients were recognized as eligible for overall study; the result suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients exposed to pioglitazone. A persistent significance was detected after being adjusted by age, gender, and use of other diabetes medications. Subgroup analyses indicated that the significantly increased incidence of bladder cancer was found in men, but not in women. Additionally, the analyses addressing increasing exposure to pioglitazone observed a dose-response relation between exclusive ever use of pioglitazone and bladder cancer in terms of cumulative duration of use and cumulative dosage. With some limitations, our results suggest an increased risk of bladder cancer in diabetic patients using pioglitazone, especially for men with long-term and high-dose exposure. Additional studies are needed to provide more precise evidences to support our results.

  8. Pioglitazone does not increase the risk of type II diabetes in patients with bladder cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Dong, Youhong; Wang, Anping

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the retrospective study was to analyze the effect of pioglitazone on the expression of tumor tissue inflammation factor interleukin (IL)-8, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) of type II diabetes in bladder cancer patients. In addition, whether there was a correlation between pioglitazone and the occurrence of male bladder cancer was also investigated. In total, 42 male cases diagnosed with type II diabetes secondary to bladder cancer were selected. Forty male cases, with simplex type II diabetes but not with bladder cancer, served as the control. Tumor biopsy specimens were collected to detect the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF. The results showed that the expression of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF of the simplex diabetes group was significantly lower than that of the secondary to tumor group (P<0.05). The comparison of the two groups in terms of daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone, duration of diabetes, average fasting blood sugar and glycated hemoglobin levels, was not statistically significant. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF were independent risk factors for the occurrence of bladder cancer (P<0.05), but were not associated with daily dose and time of oral pioglitazone (P>0.05). In conclusion, oral pioglitazone may not increase the risk of type II diabetes patients with bladder cancer. However, the occurrence of bladder cancer be associated with the increasing expression levels of IL-8, M-CSF and VEGF.

  9. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction in a Type II Diabetic Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyang; Qiu, Xuefeng; Shindel, Alan W.; Ning, Hongxiu; Ferretti, Ludovic; Jin, Xunbo; Lin, Guiting; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a broad constellation of voiding complaints that are often multifactorial and resistant to currently available therapies. The leading causes of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) include alterations in the bladder smooth muscle, neuronal degeneration, and urothelial dysfunction. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), a type of mesenchymal stromal cells, have shown promise as a novel tissue regenerative technique that may have utility in DBD. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy and mechanism by which ADSCs may ameliorate DBD in rats fed a high-fat diet and treated with low-dose streptozotocin to induce type II diabetes. Improved voiding function was noted in ADSCs-treated rats as compared with phosphate-buffered saline-treated rats. Though some ADSCs differentiated into smooth muscle cells, paracrine pathway seems to play a main role in this process, thus resulting in reduction of apoptosis and preservation of “suburothelial capillaries network.” PMID:22008016

  10. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin-use and risk of bladder cancer in a large cohort study.

    PubMed

    Newton, Christina C; Gapstur, Susan M; Campbell, Peter T; Jacobs, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with increased bladder cancer incidence in some, but not all, studies. Many studies had limited statistical power and few examined risk by insulin-use, duration of diabetes or cancer stage. We examined the association between T2DM and bladder cancer incidence in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort, a large prospective study with information on insulin-use and duration of diabetes. Diabetes and insulin-use were ascertained from a questionnaire at study enrollment in 1992 or 1993 and updated in 1997 and every 2 years thereafter. During follow-up through 2007, 1,852 cases of incident bladder cancer were identified among 172,791 participants. Multivariable adjusted relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using extended Cox regression modeling. There were no associations of T2DM with the risk of bladder cancer overall (RR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.87-1.17), noninvasive disease (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.76-1.14) or invasive disease (RR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.91-1.40). Compared to participants without T2DM, risk of invasive bladder cancer was higher among participants who had had T2DM for >15 years (RR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.09-2.43) and among those using insulin (RR = 1.64, 95% CI: 1.18-2.27). These results do not support an association of T2DM with overall bladder cancer incidence, but do suggest positive associations of long-term T2DM and insulin-use or other factors correlated with severe diabetes, with invasive bladder cancer incidence.

  11. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Philyppov, Igor B.; Paduraru, Oksana N.; Gulak, Kseniya L.; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M.

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (˂17 °C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors – tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation. PMID:26935999

  12. TRPA1-dependent regulation of bladder detrusor smooth muscle contractility in normal and type I diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Philyppov, Igor B; Paduraru, Oksana N; Gulak, Kseniya L; Skryma, Roman; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Shuba, Yaroslav M

    2016-01-01

    TRPA1 is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel that is activated by painful low temperatures (<17°C), irritating chemicals, reactive metabolites and mediators of inflammation. In the bladder TRPA1 is predominantly expressed in sensory afferent nerve endings, where it mediates sensory transduction. The contractile effect of its activation on detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is explained by the release from sensory afferents of inflammatory factors - tachykinins and prostaglandins, which cause smooth muscle cell contraction. Diabetes is a systemic disease, with common complications being diabetic cystopathies and urinary incontinence. However, data on how diabetes affects bladder contractility associated with TRPA1 activation are not available. In this study, by using a rat model with streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes, contractility measurements of DSM strips in response to TRPA1-activating and modulating pharmacological agents and assessment of TRPA1 mRNA expression in bladder-innervating dorsal root ganglia, we have shown that diabetes enhances the TRPA1-dependent mechanism involved in bladder DSM contractility. This is not due to changes in TRPA1 expression, but mainly due to the general inflammatory reaction caused by diabetes. The latter leads to an increase in cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostaglandin synthesis through the mechanisms associated with substance P activity. This results in the enhanced functional coupling between the tachykinin and prostanoid systems, and the concomitant increase of their impact on DSM contractility in response to TRPA1 activation.

  13. Risk of bladder cancer in patients with diabetes: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zeegers, Maurice P; Bazelier, Marloes T; De Bruin, Marie L; Buntinx, Frank; de Vries, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the association between diabetes, and both urinary bladder cancer (UBC) risk and mortality. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) linked to the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus type 1 or 2, or using antidiabetic drugs (ADDs), were compared to matched non-diabetic controls. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the risk and mortality of UBC. We adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and body mass index. Results The cohort included 329 168 patients using ADD, and 307 315 controls with 1295 and 1071 patients, respectively, diagnosed as having UBC during follow-up. The adjusted HRs of UBC were 0.77 (95% CI 0.57 to 1.05) and 1.04 (95% CI 0.96 to 1.14) for type 1 and 2 diabetes, respectively. These results were similar if we restricted our analysis to an inception cohort. We noticed a small increased risk during the first year after diagnosis (HR=1.26 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.52)), which could be explained by detection bias. There was no influence of the severity of diabetes as measured by the glycated haemoglobin. Mortality of UBC was not increased for patients with either type 1 (HR=0.95 (95% CI 0.39 to 2.34)) or type 2 diabetes (HR=1.16 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.46)). Conclusions Neither the risk of UBC nor the mortality from UBC was increased in patients with type 1 and patients with type 2 diabetes in the CPRD data. PMID:26033947

  14. Alterations in urinary bladder M2-muscarinic receptor protein and mRNA in 2-week streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Tong, Y C; Chin, W T; Cheng, J T

    1999-12-31

    The M2 receptor (M2-mAChR) is quantitatively the dominant muscarinic subtype in animal bladders. The alterations in its protein quantity and biosynthesis during diabetic cystopathy were investigated. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: (1) 2-week-old diabetics; and (2) normoglycemic control rats. Diabetes was induced by single intravenous injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin. The amount of M2 receptor protein in the rat bladder body tissue was measured by Western immunoblotting using monoclonal antibodies. For determination of M2 muscarinic receptor mRNA in the bladder tissue, the method of Northern blotting was employed. The results of the Western immunoblotting showed that the amount of M2-mAChR protein in the diabetic bladder was significantly increased by 40.0 +/- 6.2% when compared with the control bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The Northern blotting demonstrated a 69.3 +/- 8.5% increase of the M2-mAChR mRNA in the diabetic bladder (P < 0.05, n = 8). The findings of the present study demonstrated an up-regulation of M2-mAChR biosynthesis in the diabetic urinary bladder. This phenomenon could lead to increased reactivity to acetylcholine and thus results in detrusor instability.

  15. Effects of Moderate Alcohol Intake in the Bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Yong Sun; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Kim, Sae Woong; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Kim, Dai Jin; Lee, Ji Youl

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is related with a number of cystopathic complications. However, there have been no studies about the influence of alcohol consumption in the bladder of type 2 diabetes. Thus, we investigated the effect of moderate alcohol intake in the bladder of the Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) diabetic rat. The non-diabetic Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO, n=14) and the OLETF control group (n=14) were fed an isocaloric diet; the LETO (n=14) and the OLETF ethanol group (n=14) were fed 36% ethanol 7 g/kg/day. After ten weeks, muscarinic receptors, RhoGEFs, myogenic change, and the level of oxidative stress were evaluated. Moderate alcohol intake significantly decreased excessive muscarinic receptor and Rho kinase expressions in the OLETF rats compared with the LETO rats. In addition, iNOS and collagen expression were not changed in the OLETF rats in spite of alcohol consumption. Superoxide dismutase levels, which is involved in antioxidant defense, in the LETO rats were significantly decreased after alcohol consumption, however those in the OLETF rats were similar. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces the oxidative stress, and may prevent molecular and pathologic changes of the bladder of rats with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Biomatrices for bladder reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsueh-Kung; Madihally, Sundar V; Palmer, Blake; Frimberger, Dominic; Fung, Kar-Ming; Kropp, Bradley P

    2015-03-01

    There is a demand for tissue engineering of the bladder needed by patients who experience a neurogenic bladder or idiopathic detrusor overactivity. To avoid complications from augmentation cystoplasty, the field of tissue engineering seeks optimal scaffolds for bladder reconstruction. Naturally derived biomaterials as well as synthetic and natural polymers have been explored as bladder substitutes. To improve regenerative properties, these biomaterials have been conjugated with functional molecules, combined with nanotechology, or seeded with exogenous cells. Although most studies reported complete and functional bladder regeneration in small-animal models, results from large-animal models and human clinical trials varied. For functional bladder regeneration, procedures for biomaterial fabrication, incorporation of biologically active agents, introduction of nanotechnology, and application of stem-cell technology need to be standardized. Advanced molecular and medical technologies such as next generation sequencing and magnetic resonance imaging can be introduced for mechanistic understanding and non-invasive monitoring of regeneration processes, respectively.

  17. [Neurogenic urinary incontinence. Value of surgical management].

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2008-06-01

    Damage to the CNS, the cauda equina, and the pelvic nerval structures causes neurogenic bladder dysfunction with neurogenic urinary incontinence (NUI). The definitive diagnosis of NUI is made with urodynamic examination methods. The most frequent cause of NUI is neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The treatment concept must take into account the physical and emotional restrictions. The treatment of NUI due to NDO is a domain of conservative therapy, i.e., mostly antimuscarinics and intermittent catheterization (IC). In about 30%, there is a good chance for therapy failures. An advancement in therapy is the injection of BTX-A into the detrusor. The missing drug approval is a disadvantage.Operative treatments are considered if conservative and minimally invasive therapies are unsuccessful. Sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and sacral anterior root stimulator implantation (SARSI) are available as organ-preserving techniques only for paraplegics with NDO and reflex urinary incontinence and neuromodulation for the other forms of NDO provided that a successful percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE) test has previously taken place. Augmentation cystoplasty is indicated if SDAF and neuromodulation cannot be used and the bladder wall is damaged irreversibly by fibrosis. Kidney function of at least 25% and acceptance of IC are prerequisites. Myectomy (autoaugmentation) has an indication similar to augmentation cystoplasty but there must not be any fibrosis. Bladder neck insufficiency (BNI) caused by paralysis or iatrogenically can be treated by the implantation of an alloplastic sphincter high at the bladder neck. A stable reservoir function is required. If not all methods are possible, the ileum conduit or the suprapubic bladder fistula can be the last resort.

  18. Endogenous Stem Cells Were Recruited by Defocused Low-Energy Shock Wave in Treating Diabetic Bladder Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yang; Xu, Lina; Zhao, Yong; Wang, Muwen; Jin, Xunbo; Zhang, Haiyang

    2017-04-01

    Defocused low-energy shock wave (DLSW) has been shown effects on activating mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vitro. In this study, recruitment of endogenous stem cells was firstly examined as an important pathway during the healing process of diabetic bladder dysfunction (DBD) treated by DLSW in vivo. Neonatal rats received intraperitoneal injection of 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) and then DBD rat model was created by injecting streptozotocin. Four weeks later, DLSW treatment was performed. Afterward, their tissues were examined by histology. Meanwhile, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were treated by DLSW in vitro. Results showed DLSW ameliorated voiding function of diabetic rats by recruiting EdU(+)Stro-1(+)CD34(-) endogenous stem cells to release abundant nerve growth factor (NGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Some EdU(+) cells overlapped with staining of smooth muscle actin. After DLSW treatment, ADSCs showed higher migration ability, higher expression level of stromal cell-derived factor-1 and secreted more NGF and VEGF. In conclusion, DLSW could ameliorate DBD by recruiting endogenous stem cells. Beneficial effects were mediated by secreting NGF and VEGF, resulting into improved innervation and vascularization in bladder.

  19. Risk of bladder cancer among patients with diabetes treated with a 15 mg pioglitazone dose in Korea: a multi-center retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sang-Man; Song, Sun Ok; Jung, Chang Hee; Chang, Jin-Sun; Suh, Sunghwan; Kang, Seung Min; Jung, Inkyung; Park, Cheol-Young; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Cho, Jae Hyoung; Lee, Byung-Wan

    2014-02-01

    It has not yet been determined whether chronic exposure to relatively low doses of pioglitazone increases risk of bladder cancer. We aimed to assess the risk of bladder cancer associated with pioglitazone in Korean patients. This was a retrospective cohort study of diabetic patients who had ≥ 2 clinic visits between November 2005 and June 2011 at one of four tertiary referral hospitals in Korea. A prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort was conducted to further adjust confounders. A total of 101,953 control patients and 11,240 pioglitazone-treated patients were included, in which there were 237 and 30 cases of incidental bladder cancer (64.9 and 54.9 per 100,000 person-years; age, sex-adjusted HR 1.135, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.769-1.677), respectively. In the prevalent case-control analysis nested within the cohort, use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months, but not ever use of pioglitazone, was associated with an increased rate of bladder cancer as compared to never use of pioglitazone. In conclusion, we failed to exclude the possible association between use of pioglitazone for a duration of > 6 months and bladder cancer.

  20. Neurogenic muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Katzberg, Hans D

    2015-08-01

    Muscle cramps are sustained, painful contractions of muscle and are prevalent in patients with and without medical conditions. The objective of this review is to present updates on the mechanism, investigation and treatment of neurogenic muscle cramps. PubMed and Embase databases were queried between January 1980 and July 2014 for English-language human studies. The American Academy of Neurology classification of studies (classes I-IV) was used to assess levels of evidence. Mechanical disruption, ephaptic transmission, disruption of sensory afferents and persistent inward currents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurogenic cramps. Investigations are directed toward identifying physiological triggers or medical conditions predisposing to cramps. Although cramps can be self-limiting, disabling or sustained muscle cramps should prompt investigation for underlying medical conditions. Lifestyle modifications, treatment of underlying conditions, stretching, B-complex vitamins, diltiezam, mexiletine, carbamazepine, tetrahydrocannabinoid, leveteracitam and quinine sulfate have shown evidence for treatment.

  1. A comprehensive review of urologic complications in patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Arrellano-Valdez, Fernando; Urrutia-Osorio, Marta; Arroyo, Carlos; Soto-Vega, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a chronic disease characterized by hyperglycemia, as a result of abnormal insulin production, insulin function, or both. DM is associated with systemic complications, such as infections, neuropathy and angiopathy, which involve the genitourinary tract. The three most significant urologic complications include: bladder cystopathy, sexual dysfunction and urinary tract infections. Almost half of the patients with DM have bladder dysfunction or cystopathy, which can be manifested in women as hypersensitivity (in 39-61% of the diabetic women) or neurogenic bladder. In males it can be experienced as lower urinary tract symptoms (in 25% of diabetic males with a nearly twofold increased risk when seen by age groups). Additionally, an increased prostate volume affects their micturition as well as their urinary tract. Involving sexual dysfunction in women, it includes reduced libido, decreased arousal, clitoral erectile dysfunction and painful or non-sensitive intercourse; and in diabetic males it varies from low libido, ejaculatory abnormalities and erectile dysfunction. Globally, sexual disorders have a prevalence of 18-42%. Erectile dysfunction is ranked as the third most important complication of DM. Urinary tract infections are observed frequently in diabetic patients, and vary from emphysematous infections, Fournier gangrene, staghorn infected lithiasis to repetitive bacterial cystitis. The most frequent finding in diabetic women has been lower urinary tract infections. Because of the high incidence of obesity worldwide and its association with diabetes, it is very important to keep in mind the urologic complication associated with DM in patients, in order to better diagnose and treat this population.

  2. Pioglitazone use and risk of bladder cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study using datasets from four European countries

    PubMed Central

    Heintjes, Edith M; Williams, Rachael; Hoti, Fabian; Christopher, Solomon; Majak, Maila; Kool-Houweling, Leanne; Strongman, Helen; Linder, Marie; Dolin, Paul; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between pioglitazone use and bladder cancer risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Retrospective cohort study using propensity score matched cohorts. Settings Healthcare databases from Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Data comprised country specific datasets of linked records on prescriptions, hospitals, general practitioners, cancer, and deaths. Participants Patients with type 2 diabetes who initiated pioglitazone (n=56 337) matched with patients with type 2 diabetes in the same country exposed to diabetes drug treatments other than pioglitazone (n=317 109). Two matched cohorts were created, using a 1:1 fixed ratio (nearest match cohort) and a 1:10 variable ratio (multiple match cohort). Patients were matched on treatment history and propensity scores accounting for several variables associated with pioglitazone initiation. Main outcome measures Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox’s proportional hazards model with adjustments for relevant confounders. To assess the robustness of the findings, several sensitivity and stratified analyses were performed. Results In the cohort exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 130 bladder cancers occurred over a mean follow-up time of 2.9 years. In the nearest match and multiple match cohorts not exposed to pioglitazone treatment, 153 and 970 bladder cancers were recorded, with a mean follow‑up time of 2.8 and 2.9 years, respectively. With regards to bladder cancer risk, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients ever exposed versus never exposed to pioglitazone was 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.75 to 1.30) and 1.00 (0.83 to 1.21) in the nearest and multiple match cohorts, respectively. Increasing duration of pioglitazone use and increasing cumulative dose were not associated with risk of bladder cancer (>48 months of pioglitazone use, adjusted hazard ratio 0.86 (0.44 to 1.66); >40 000 mg cumulative dose, 0.65 (0.33 to 1

  3. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  4. Bladder Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ, much like a balloon, that stores urine. Pelvic floor muscles help hold urine in the bladder. The ... the bathroom more often. The bladder wall and pelvic floor muscles may weaken. Weak bladder wall muscles may ...

  5. Primary neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R. C.; Cartlidge, N. E. F.; Millac, P.

    1970-01-01

    Eight further cases of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension are described together with a necropsy study on one case. Three cases showed evidence of autonomic dysfunction in isolation, while in five cases this was accompanied by evidence of more diffuse central nervous system degeneration. (Parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dementia, pyramidal signs, bulbar weakness, and muscular wasting were all seen in varying proportions.) The various clinical presentations, investigations, pathology, treatment, and prognosis are discussed. In the experience of the authors, when assessed, an abnormal Valsalva response is invariable, confirming the breakdown of the circulatory reflex. A normal vasopressor response is likewise invariable, eliminating an abnormality of blood vessels themselves, and confirming the lesion as neurogenic. The demonstration of loss of sweating to indirect body heating, which also is usual suggests that the defect is central or on the efferent side of the reflex and a normal pilo-erector response to acetylcholine confirms this as preganglionic. Emphasis is laid on the non-specificity of many accepted physiological tests in this disorder and on the delay in diagnosis consequent upon the variable presentation. PMID:5431725

  6. [Neurogenic foot deformities].

    PubMed

    Senst, S

    2010-01-01

    There is a multitude of neurological diseases which may lead to neuro-orthopaedic problems and subsequently to neurogenic foot deformities. For this reason the diagnostician will be consistently surprised that there is a great multitude of different foot abnormalities and that not only the typical spastic talipes equines dominates. Of particular significance here is that these deformities almost always develop progressively, whereas most diseases persist per se, cerebral palsy being a typical case in point. However, in MMC (myelomeningocele) patients, there is also the danger of a worsening of the basic problem in the case of tethered cord syndrome. Unlike congenital talipes equinovarus, neuro-orthopaedic talipes equinovarus often shows over- or undercorrection postoperatively due to a shift in muscle imbalance. It is important, therefore, that the basis of conservative therapy include regular physiotherapy and orthoses during the day and, if necessary, at night. Botulinum toxin has been established as an additional measure for spasticity; however, this cannot always prevent surgical intervention, but is able to delay this to a better point in the development of the child/patient. The present article describes the diversity of neurological deformities and presents conservative as well as surgical therapeutic approaches.

  7. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Bailén, M; Rucabado Aguilar, L; López Martínez, A

    2006-01-01

    The existence of stunned myocardium and reversible myocardial dysfunction is widely described and accepted in patients suffering ischemic heart disease. However, it cannot be exclusive to coronary disease. Classically, the appearance of electrocardiographic changes in the critical neurological disease has been described. However, at present, it seems to be observed that some of these patients with critical neurological disease could have variable grades of myocardial dysfunction, which is generally reversible in the surviving patients. This myocardial dysfunction, which could affect critically ill neurological patients, has traits similar to stunned myocardium generated in coronary patients since: a) it is generally associated to electrocardiographic changes, b) it can be accompanied by segmental contractility disorders and even c) it may be accompanied by a certain increase of cardiac biomarkers. Although its etiopathogeny is unknown, it could be related with the severity of the primary neurological disease. Its prophylaxis and prognosis are also unknown. It could be related with neurogenic edema, with hemodynamic instability, and could also play a very important role in brain death and in organ donation.

  8. Bladder stones

    MedlinePlus

    Stones - bladder; Urinary tract stones; Bladder calculi ... Benway BM, Bhayani SB. Lower urinary tract calculi. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 55. Sharma R, ...

  9. Bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... workers, aluminum workers, leather workers, truck drivers, and pesticide applicators are at the highest risk. Chemotherapy: The ... Avoid exposure to chemicals linked to bladder cancer. Alternative Names Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder; Urothelial ...

  10. Bladder cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, H. Y.; Griffiths, T. R.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common cancer in England and Wales. The most common presenting symptom is macroscopic haematuria. The management options for superficial and invasive bladder cancer depend on the stage at presentation. Most superficial bladder cancers are managed by transurethral resection and cytoscopic follow-up. The prognosis for patients with invasive bladder cancer is less good. The role of chemical, radiotherapeutic and surgical intervention are discussed. PMID:9015464

  11. How botulinum toxin in neurogenic detrusor overactivity can reduce upper urinary tract damage?

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Maximilien; Grise, Philippe; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin are the cornerstone of medical treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The primary aim of this treatment is to ensure a low pressure regimen in the urinary bladder, but the mechanisms leading to long-term protection of the urinary tract remain poorly understood. In this paper, we highlight the potential benefits of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin regarding local effects on the bladder structures, urinary tract infections, stone disease, vesico ureteral reflux, hydronephrosis, renal function based on a comprehensive literature review. PMID:26981445

  12. Best practice in the assessment of bladder function in infants

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Michael; Castagnetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review normal developmental bladder physiology in infants and bladder dysfunction in conditions such as neurogenic bladder, posterior urethral valves and high grade vesicoureteric reflux. We contrast the classical concept that bladder function in nontoilet-trained children is thought to be ‘reflexive’ or ‘uninhibited’, with the results of more recent research showing that infants most commonly have a stable detrusor. The infant bladder is physiologically distinct from the state seen in older children or adults. The voiding pattern of the infant is characterized by an interrupted voiding stream due to lack of proper urinary sphincter relaxation during voiding. This is called physiologic detrusor sphincter dyscoordination and is different from the pathologic ‘detrusor sphincter dyssynergy’ seen in patients with neurogenic bladder. Urodynamic abnormalities in neonates born with spina bifida are common and depend on the level and severity of the spinal cord malformation. Upper neuron lesions most commonly lead to an overactive bladder with or without detrusor sphincter dyssynergy while a lower neuron lesion is associated with an acontractile detrusor with possible denervation of the external urinary sphincter. In infants with neurogenic bladder, the role of ‘early prophylactic treatment (clean intermittent catheterization and anticholinergics)’ versus initial ‘watchful waiting and treatment as needed’ is still controversial and needs more research. Many urodynamic-based interventions have been suggested in patients with posterior urethral valves and are currently under scrutiny, but their impact on the long-term outcome of the upper and lower urinary tract is still unknown. Cumulative data suggest that there is no benefit to early intervention regarding bladder function in infants with high-grade vesicoureteric reflux. PMID:25083164

  13. Bladder Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Diagnostic Ultrasound Corporation's Bladder Scan Monitor continuously records and monitors bladder fullness and alerts the wearer or caretaker when voiding is required. The sensor is held against the lower abdomen by a belt and connected to the monitor by a cable. The sensor obtains bladder volume data from sound waves reflecting off the bladder wall. The device was developed by Langley Research Center, the Ames Research Center and the NASA Technology Applications Team. It utilizes Langley's advanced ultrasound technology. It is licensed to the ARC for medical applications, and sublicensed to Diagnostics Ultrasound. Central monitoring systems are planned for the future.

  14. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review.

    PubMed

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient's quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor.

  15. Implantable Bladder Sensors: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Dakurah, Mathias Naangmenkpeong; Koo, Chiwan; Choi, Wonseok; Joung, Yeun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The loss of urinary bladder control/sensation, also known as urinary incontinence (UI), is a common clinical problem in autistic children, diabetics, and the elderly. UI not only causes discomfort for patients but may also lead to kidney failure, infections, and even death. The increase of bladder urine volume/pressure above normal ranges without sensation of UI patients necessitates the need for bladder sensors. Currently, a catheter-based sensor is introduced directly through the urethra into the bladder to measure pressure variations. Unfortunately, this method is inaccurate because measurement is affected by disturbances in catheter lines as well as delays in response time owing to the inertia of urine inside the bladder. Moreover, this technique can cause infection during prolonged use; hence, it is only suitable for short-term measurement. Development of discrete wireless implantable sensors to measure bladder volume/pressure would allow for long-term monitoring within the bladder, while maintaining the patient’s quality of life. With the recent advances in microfabrication, the size of implantable bladder sensors has been significantly reduced. However, microfabricated sensors face hostility from the bladder environment and require surgical intervention for implantation inside the bladder. Here, we explore the various types of implantable bladder sensors and current efforts to solve issues like hermeticity, biocompatibility, drift, telemetry, power, and compatibility issues with popular imaging tools such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We also discuss some possible improvements/emerging trends in the design of an implantable bladder sensor. PMID:26620894

  16. Botulinum toxin injections for treating neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Bayrak, Ömer; Sadioğlu, Erkan; Onur, Rahmi

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a disorder that can cause high intravesical pressure, decreased capacity, decreased bladder compliance, and upper urinary system damage. The current treatment options for NDO are established on the basis of agents that block parasympathetic innervation of the detrusor and inhibit involuntary bladder contractions. Several side effects, such as dryness of mouth, constipation, dyspepsia, changes in visual accommodation, somnolence, and being unable to obtain consistently favorable results, caused by anticholinergic agents, which are frequently used for this purpose, decrease the patient’s compliance to treatment. Procedures such as neuromodulation, auto-augmentation, and enterocystoplasty are surgical options, and they could be used as the last alternative. Thus, botulinum toxin (BTX) injections to the detrusor have been commonly performed in recent years and lead to satisfactory results. The mechanism of action of BTX in NDO is based on the principal of smooth muscle relaxation in the bladder by the transient inhibition of neuromuscular nerve signals. The aim is to decrease acetylcholine secretion by blocking presynaptic vesicles in the neuromuscular junction. When studies were evaluated, it was observed that BTX injections to the detrusor muscle are a necessary and effective option in patients with incontinence caused by NDO. This treatment option could be indicated in situations where anticholinergic agents are not effective or could not be tolerated, and it could be a valuable alternative to major surgical treatments. In this review, we evaluated the effectiveness and reliability of BTX in patients with NDO. PMID:26623152

  17. Bladder hernia.

    PubMed

    Nicola, Massimiliano; De Luca, Francesco

    2006-06-01

    Bladder hernia is a rare condition, but crural herniation of the bladder into the scrotum is very rare. A case of bladder hernia presenting with urological symptoms is described. A 71-year-old man presented to the urological ward complaining for persistent frequency and nocturia associated with loss offorce and decrease of caliber of the urinary stream and the presence of a large mass of the right scrotum. An IVP (intra venous pyelography) showed a large herniation of the bladder through the right inguinal canal into the scrotum. An inguinal incision was made and a crural hernia was identified. The hernia sac, containing bowel and bladder, was dissectedfreefrom the spermatic cord and the testis and the hernia defect was repaired.

  18. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetes What is Diabetes? Too Much Glucose in the Blood Diabetes means ... high, causing pre-diabetes or diabetes. Types of Diabetes There are three main kinds of diabetes: type ...

  19. Understanding migraine: Potential role of neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation, a well-defined pathophysiologial process is characterized by the release of potent vasoactive neuropeptides, predominantly calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP), and neurokinin A from activated peripheral nociceptive sensory nerve terminals (usually C and A delta-fibers). These peptides lead to a cascade of inflammatory tissue responses including arteriolar vasodilation, plasma protein extravasation, and degranulation of mast cells in their peripheral target tissue. Neurogenic inflammatory processes have long been implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of various human diseases of the nervous system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, urogenital tract, and skin. The recent development of several innovative experimental migraine models has provided evidence suggestive of the involvement of neuropeptides (SP, neurokinin A, and CGRP) in migraine headache. Antidromic stimulation of nociceptive fibers of the trigeminal nerve resulted in a neurogenic inflammatory response with marked increase in plasma protein extravasation from dural blood vessels by the release of various sensory neuropeptides. Several clinically effective abortive antimigraine medications, such as ergots and triptans, have been shown to attenuate the release of neuropeptide and neurogenic plasma protein extravasation. These findings provide support for the validity of using animal models to investigate mechanisms of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. These also further strengthen the notion of migraine being a neuroinflammatory disease. In the clinical context, there is a paucity of knowledge and awareness among physicians regarding the role of neurogenic inflammation in migraine. Improved understanding of the molecular biology, pharmacology, and pathophysiology of neurogenic inflammation may provide the practitioner the context-specific feedback to identify the novel and most effective therapeutic approach to treatment

  20. Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    White, Nicola; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a condition affecting millions of individuals in the United States. Anticholinergics are the mainstay of treatment. Bladder botulinum toxin injections have shown an improvement in symptoms of OAB equivalent to anticholinergic therapy. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation can decrease symptoms of urinary frequency and urge incontinence. Sacral neuromodulation for refractory patients has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of OAB, urge incontinence, and urinary retention. Few randomized, head-to-head comparisons of the different available alternatives exist; however, patients now have increasing options to manage their symptoms and improve their quality of life.

  1. Droxidopa in neurogenic orthostatic hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Horacio; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Palma, Jose-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is a fall in blood pressure on standing due to reduced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals. nOH is a feature of several neurological disorders that affect the autonomic nervous system, most notably Parkinson disease (PD), multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure and other autonomic neuropathies. Droxidopa, an orally active synthetic amino acid that is converted to norepinephrine by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa-decarboxylase), was recently approved by the FDA for the short-term treatment of nOH. It is presumed to raise blood pressure by acting at the neurovascular junction to increase vascular tone. This review summarizes the pharmacological properties of droxidopa, its mechanism of action, and the efficacy and safety results of clinical trials. PMID:26092297

  2. Pathophysiology and animal modeling of underactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Pradeep; Smith, Phillip P; Kuchel, George A; de Groat, William C; Birder, Lori A; Chermansky, Christopher J; Adam, Rosalyn M; Tse, Vincent; Chancellor, Michael B; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2014-09-01

    While the symptomology of underactive bladder (UAB) may imply a primary dysfunction of the detrusor muscle, insights into pathophysiology indicate that both myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms need to be considered. Due to lack of proper animal models, the current understanding of the UAB pathophysiology is limited, and much of what is known about the clinical etiology of the condition has been derived from epidemiological data. We hereby review current state of the art in the understanding of the pathophysiology of and animal models used to study the UAB.

  3. Refinement in the Management of the Denervated Canine Urinary Bladder Using an Abdominal Vesicostomy

    PubMed Central

    Agelan, Alexis; Braverman, Alan S.; Dean, Gregory E.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the neurogenic bladder in canine models of spinal cord injury presents challenges in ensuring bladder drainage. While vesicostomy is routine for humans, the procedure is not common in canines. Our study of bladder reinnervation involved transection of the nerve roots that mediate bladder contraction in 34 canines. An abdominal vesicostomy was created by fixing the everted mucosa to the skin incision. After euthanasia, we assessed the contractility of in vitro bladder muscle strips in response to muscarinic receptor stimulation. There were a total of 11 complications in 9 of the 34 animals. In two animals, the vesicostomy narrowed such that it could not be catheterized and in two other animals the vesicostomy closed to between 5 and 10 mm diameter. Another animal removed the stitches prior to complete healing, requiring further surgical procedures. In five animals, partial prolapse of the bladder through the vesicostomy required surgical repair, and in one animal the bladder became infected and required antibiotic treatment. In the few animals in which irritation resulted from the constant contact of urine with the skin, daily topical application of petrolatum ointment alleviated this symptom. Gross inspection of the bladder at euthanasia and in vitro contractility of bladder muscle strips from these animals revealed no evidence of changes associated with bladder hypertrophy. This study demonstrated that permanent cutaneous vesicostomy is an optimal refinement method for management of the neurogenic bladder in canines. The procedure avoids the distress as well as potential bladder hypertrophy induced by multiple daily interventions to empty the bladder by either catheterization or manual compression. PMID:18506057

  4. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the development of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO).

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Santos, João; Morgado, Marlene; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Gray, Susannah M Y; McCloskey, Karen D; Allen, Shelley; Cruz, Francisco; Cruz, Célia Duarte

    2015-02-04

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a well known consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI), recognizable after spinal shock, during which the bladder is areflexic. NDO emergence and maintenance depend on profound plastic changes of the spinal neuronal pathways regulating bladder function. It is well known that neurotrophins (NTs) are major regulators of such changes. NGF is the best-studied NT in the bladder and its role in NDO has already been established. Another very abundant neurotrophin is BDNF. Despite being shown that, acting at the spinal cord level, BDNF is a key mediator of bladder dysfunction and pain during cystitis, it is presently unclear if it is also important for NDO. This study aimed to clarify this issue. Results obtained pinpoint BDNF as an important regulator of NDO appearance and maintenance. Spinal BDNF expression increased in a time-dependent manner together with NDO emergence. In chronic SCI rats, BDNF sequestration improved bladder function, indicating that, at later stages, BDNF contributes NDO maintenance. During spinal shock, BDNF sequestration resulted in early development of bladder hyperactivity, accompanied by increased axonal growth of calcitonin gene-related peptide-labeled fibers in the dorsal horn. Chronic BDNF administration inhibited the emergence of NDO, together with reduction of axonal growth, suggesting that BDNF may have a crucial role in bladder function after SCI via inhibition of neuronal sprouting. These findings highlight the role of BDNF in NDO and may provide a significant contribution to create more efficient therapies to manage SCI patients.

  5. An integrative review of standardized clinical evaluation tool utilization in anticholinergic drug trials for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Stothers, L; Tsang, B; Nigro, M; Lazare, D; Macnab, A

    2016-01-01

    Study design: To review prospective and randomized trials studying anticholinergic therapy for neurogenic bladder in SCI to identify whether trials included standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures now recognized to enhance clinical trial data. Methods: A systematic search via EMBASE, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), HTA (Health Technology Assessment), CMR (Comprehensive Microbial Resource), HAPI (Health and Psychosocial Instruments) and PsycINFO using the key term spinal cord injury crossed with oxybutynin, tolterodine, darifenacin, solifenacin, fesoterodine, trospium chloride, propiverine, propantheline and anticholinergic(s) for 1946–2015 inclusive. We then collated whether standardized clinical tools, measures and descriptors were used within each study identified: American Spine Injury Association (ASIA) impairment scale; symptom scores validated in SCI; technical methodology for urodynamics/video urodynamics; urinary diaries; and standardized urologic terminology. Results: A total of 1225 entries with 610 unique articles were identified, 14 randomized and 16 prospective studies. In 6/30 the population comprised SCI patients with neurogenic bladder alone; the remainder included mixed neurogenic etiologies. Classification using the ASIA impairment scale was used in <10% of studies; none used symptom scores validated in SCI; <50% reported urodynamic test methodology fully, incorporated urinary diaries or used International Continence Society Standardization Subcommittee urinary tract terminology. Conclusion: Integrative review of trials from 1946 to 2015 identified infrequent use of standardized clinical evaluation tools and reporting measures. Data from future trials evaluating therapies for neurogenic bladder would likely be more applicable to specific SCI patients if current standardized classification and descriptors now available were used consistently: for example, the ASIA scale

  6. Cervicobrachial pain - How Often is it Neurogenic?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, N. Sreekumaran; Bhat, Anil K; Solomon, John M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neck pain associated with pain in the arm (cervicobrachial pain) is a common complaint in patients seeking physiotherapy management. The source of symptoms for this complaint is commonly presumed to be neural. However, this pain pattern could also result from various other innervated tissue structures of the upper quarter. Knowledge about frequency of neural structures being a predominant source of symptoms would help in implementing appropriate therapeutic strategies such as neural tissue mobilization along with other complimentary therapies for optimal outcomes. Aim To determine the frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic. Materials and Methods Participants (n=361) aged between 20-65 years, reporting cervicobrachial pain were screened for neurogenic nature of symptoms. These physical signs included: active and passive movement dysfunction, adverse responses to neural tissue provocation tests, tenderness on palpating nerve trunks and related cutaneous tissues and evidence of a related local area of pathology (Clinical/radiological). The consistency of all these signs was checked to identify a significant neural involvement. Results Descriptive statistics were used to analyse data. Of 361 participants, 206 were males (44.6 ±10.8 years) and 155 were females (41.8 ± 11.2 years). The frequency of neurogenic cervicobrachial pain was determined to be 19.9% (n=72) and the non-neurogenic sources for symptoms were attributed to 80.1% (n=289) of screened participants. Conclusion Lower frequency of cervicobrachial pain being neurogenic indicates thorough screening for appropriate therapeutic interventions to be successful. PMID:27134988

  7. Mechanisms involved in new therapies for overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Francisco

    2004-03-01

    During the last few years, vanilloid substances and botulinum-A toxin were extensively investigated as new therapies for overactive bladder. Intravesical administration of capsaicin or resiniferatoxin--2 members of the vanilloid family--has been shown to increase bladder capacity and decrease urge incontinence in patients with neurogenic, as well as nonneurogenic, forms of detrusor overactivity. In addition, vanilloids have been shown also to reduce bladder pain in patients with hypersensitive disorders. Vanilloids are exogenous ligands of vanilloid receptor type 1 (VR1), an ion channel present in the membrane of type C primary afferent nerve fibers. This receptor, which plays a key role in pain perception and control of the micturition reflex, may be upregulated by nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophic molecule detected in high concentrations in overactive detrusor tissue. Vanilloids, by reducing uptake of NGF through sensory neurons, may counteract VR1 upregulation. Intravesical injections of botulinum-A toxin, a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum, were shown to increase bladder capacity and to decrease urge incontinence episodes in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity. Botulinum-A toxin impedes the release of acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve endings at the neuromuscular junction, leading to paralysis of the detrusor smooth muscle.

  8. Traumatic injury of the bladder and urethra

    MedlinePlus

    ... urethra; Bruised bladder; Urethral injury; Bladder injury; Pelvic fracture; Urethral disruption ... bladder wall. Less than 1 in 10 pelvic fractures lead to bladder injury. Other causes of bladder ...

  9. An unusual cause of death: spontaneous urinary bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Limon, Onder; Unluer, Erden Erol; Unay, Fulya Cakalagaoglu; Oyar, Orhan; Sener, Aslı

    2012-11-01

    Spontaneous urinary bladder perforation is a rare and life-threatening condition similar to traumatic and iatrogenic perforation. The connection with the underlying bladder damage due to previous radiotherapy, inflammation, malignancy, obstruction, or other causes can be found in almost all cases. The symptoms are often nonspecific, and misdiagnosis is common. Here, we present a case of spontaneous urinary bladder perforation due to bladder necrosis in a diabetic woman. She presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Exploratory laparotomy was performed by surgeons and revealed necrosis of the anterior and lateral walls of the urinary bladder. Microscopic examination revealed necrotic changes throughout the bladder wall. Ghost-like cellular outlines were compatible with coagulative necrosis. Clusters of bacteria were also present in some necrobiotic tissues. Malignant cells were not present. It appears probable that the infection was due to local interference with the blood supply (arterial, capillary, or venous) combined with the systemic metabolic upset that led to the bladder condition. In our case, we observed partial necrosis of the bladder rather than distortion of the entire blood supply to the bladder as consequences of the microvascular effects of diabetes. Urinary bladder perforation must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with free fluid in the abdomen/peritonitis, decreased urine output, and hematuria, and in whom increased levels of urea/creatinine are detected in serum and/ or peritoneal fluid aspirate.

  10. Distribution of interstitial cells of Cajal in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced myelomeningocele

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Ali; Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Hakgüder, Gülce; Ateş, Oğuz; Özer, Erdener; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelomeningocele (MMC) is one of the most common reason of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in children. Although neurogenic bladder dysfunction occurrence is related with bladder innervation, also there are some changes seen in the smooth muscle and neural cells of the bladder. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are the pacemaker cells found in organs with peristaltic activity. Although it has been shown that ICC are diminished in the rat urinary bladder with traumatic spinal cord injury, there is no data about ICC in fetal rat bladders with MMC. This study has been conducted to investigate the ICC in the bladders of fetal rats with retinoic acid induced MMC. Materials and methods Time dated pregnant Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups. In MMC group, dams were fed with gavage solution containing 60 mg/kg all-trans retinoic acid dissolved in olive oil on 10. embryologic day. Sham group animals were fed only olive oil. Control group dams were fed with standard rat chow. Fetuses were delivered by cesarean section and harvested on 22. embryologic day. MMC was identified by observing MMC sacs at the back of the fetuses. Distribution of ICCs were evaluated using immunohistochemical staining. Results ICCs were found in all groups, which have the same morphological features that had been described earlier in the gastrointestinal tract and the bladder. The density of the ICC in the MMC group was found to be significantly decreased when compared with the control and the sham groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The density of the ICC in the urinary bladder decreased in the neurogenic bladder developed in MMC. PMID:27909623

  11. [Bladder augmentation in children: experience with 15 cases].

    PubMed

    Nortes, L; Zambudio, G A

    1996-07-01

    From 1993 to 1995 bladder augmentation was performed in 11 female and 4 male patients from 1 to 13 years old (average age 6.7 years). Indications included neurogenic bladder, extrophy and epispadias with small bladder. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt had been performed in 6 patients for hydrocephalus. We used 22 segments since 5 patients had 2 segments. Segments included sigmoid in 12 cases, stomach in 5, small bowel in 1, cecum and appendix in 2. We have used the AMS-800 artificial urinary sphincter in 7 patients. Upper tracts and renal function have remained stable in these patients. Continence was achieved in 7 of 9 cases with augmentation, and in 6 of those patients with artificial urinary sphincter. The most common complication was leaks and the hematuria-dysuria syndrome when stomach was used.

  12. [Diabetic neuropathy. III: Autonomic neuropathy. Genito-urinary system].

    PubMed

    Gentile, S; Bronzino, P; Persico, M; Marmo, R; Costume, A; Contaldi, P; Stroffolini, T

    1984-04-21

    When considering urogenital complaints occurring during diabetic autonomous neurotherapy , three clinical situations are important due to their frequency and the clinical situation, the considerable effect they have on quality of life. In addition they may also be responsible for severe complications as in the case of diabetic cystopathy . This syndrome is the cause of considerable subjective disturbances even though it may be diagnosed instrumentally in its early, completely asymptomatic stage. The complaint evolves inevitably towards bladder denervation, chronic urinary retention and more or less severe septic complications. Retrograde ejaculation may lead to the loss of procreative ability as in the case of neurogenic impotence in diabetics. These three autonomous neuropathic situations occur quite frequently, especially in older subjects who have suffered from diabetes for more than ten years. Often the three syndromes are interconnected or linked to autonomous or peripheric neuropathic complaints affecting other areas. The few therapeutic measures practised have not proved very conclusive. Only a diligent examination of signs and symptoms with the aim of early diagnosis and the maintenance of good glycometabolic balance are considered to be at all effective as preventive measures.

  13. Diabetes and Sexual and Urologic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Troublesome bladder symptoms and changes ... early onset of these sexual and urologic problems. Diabetes and Sexual Problems Both men and women with ...

  14. [A case of death due to neurogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Ogata, M; Ago, K; Ago, M; Tsuganezawa, O

    1992-04-01

    An autopsy case of death due probably to neurogenic shock (primary shock) is reported. A 14-year-old boy got into a fight with his elder brother and received blows against the chest and abdomen. The young boy fell down senseless on the floor and had a spasm. An ambulance was called, but he was dead on arrival at a hospital. An autopsy revealed no external injuries on the chest and abdomen. There was no evidence of preexisting disease. On histological examination, there were signs of acute cardiac failure; edema of the lungs, liver and gall bladder, partial myofibrillar degeneration and cytoplasmic vacuoles in the media of a small coronary artery. Thus, the autopsy did not give any explanation of the fatality. It seems probable, however, that the blow(s) against the abdomen (the solar plexus) caused a fatal shock (vagal inhibition). In addition, the adrenal cortices (especially the zona fasciculata) were narrowed and the aorta was slightly narrow in caliber. It is likely that these hypoplasia might affect the fatal shock consequent to very slight injuries.

  15. Introduction to Neurogenic Communication Disorders. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Robert H.

    This book provides an overview of the causes and symptoms, and the typical courses, treatments, and outcomes of neurogenic communication disorders. Chapter 1 reviews the human nervous system and neurologic causes of adult communication disorders. Chapter 2 discusses the neurologic assessment and arriving at a diagnosis, including the neurologist's…

  16. Suburothelial Bladder Contraction Detection with Implanted Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Fletter, Paul C.; Ferry, Elizabeth K.; Zhu, Hui; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Damaser, Margot S.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Managing bladder pressure in patients with neurogenic bladders is needed to improve rehabilitation options, avoid upper tract damage, incontinence, and their associated co-morbidities and mortality. Current methods of determining bladder contractions are not amenable to chronic or ambulatory settings. In this study we evaluated detection of bladder contractions using a novel piezoelectric catheter-free pressure sensor placed in a suburothelial bladder location in animals. Methods Wired prototypes of the pressure monitor were implanted into 2 nonsurvival (feline and canine) and one 13-day survival (canine) animal. Vesical pressures were obtained from the device in both suburothelial and intraluminal locations and simultaneously from a pressure sensing catheter in the bladder. Intravesical pressure was monitored in the survival animal over 10 days from the suburothelial location and necropsy was performed to assess migration and erosion. Results In the nonsurvival animals, the average correlation between device and reference catheter data was high during both electrically stimulated bladder contractions and manual compressions (r = 0.93±0.03, r = 0.89±0.03). Measured pressures correlated strongly (r = 0.98±0.02) when the device was placed in the bladder lumen. The survival animal initially recorded physiologic data, but later this deteriorated. However, endstage intraluminal device recordings correlated (r = 0.85±0.13) with the pressure catheter. Significant erosion of the implant through the detrusor was found. Conclusions This study confirms correlation between suburothelial pressure readings and intravesical bladder pressures. Due to device erosion during ambulatory studies, a wireless implant is recommended for clinical rehabilitation applications. PMID:28060842

  17. Research Findings on Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Phani B.; Patra, Sayani

    2015-01-01

    Several physiopathologic conditions lead to the manifestation of overactive bladder (OAB). These conditions include ageing, diabetes mellitus, bladder outlet obstruction, spinal cord injury, stroke and brain injury, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, interstitial cystitis, stress and depression. This review has discussed research findings in human and animal studies conducted on the above conditions. Several structural and functional changes under these conditions have not only been observed in the lower urinary tract, but also in the brain and spinal cord. Significant changes were observed in the following areas: neurotransmitters, prostaglandins, nerve growth factor, Rho-kinase, interstitial cells of Cajal, and ion and transient receptor potential channels. Interestingly, alterations in these areas showed great variation in each of the conditions of the OAB, suggesting that the pathophysiology of the OAB might be different in each condition of the disease. It is anticipated that this review will be helpful for further research on new and specific drug development against OAB. PMID:26195957

  18. Modulation of nerve-evoked contractions by β3-adrenoceptor agonism in human and rat isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Céline; Rekik, Moèz; Camparo, Philippe; Botto, Henry; Rischmann, Pascal; Lluel, Philippe; Palea, Stefano; Westfall, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of β3-adrenoceptors has been shown to have a direct relaxant effect on urinary bladder smooth muscle from both rats and humans, however there are very few studies investigating the effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonists on nerve-evoked bladder contractions. Therefore in the current study, the role of β3-adrenoceptors in modulating efferent neurotransmission was evaluated. The effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonism on neurogenic contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were compared with effects on contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (Ach) and αβ-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβ-meATP) in order to determine the site of action. Isoproterenol inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of human bladder (pD2=6.79; Emax=65%). The effect of isoproterenol was selectively inhibited by the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748,337 (pKB=7.34). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach (0.5-1μM) were inhibited 25% by isoproterenol (3μM) while contractions to 10Hz in the same strip were inhibited 67%. The selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316,243 inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of rat bladder (pD2=7.83; Emax=65%). The effects of CL-316,243 were inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by L-748,337 (pA2=6.42). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach and αβ-meATP were significantly inhibited by CL-316,243, 29% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the activation of β3-adrenoceptors inhibits neurogenic contractions of both rat and human urinary bladder. Contractions induced by exogenously applied parasympathetic neurotransmitters are also inhibited by β3-agonism however the effect is clearly less than on neurogenic contractions (particularly in human), suggesting that in addition to a direct effect on smooth muscle, activation of prejunctional β3-adrenoceptors may inhibit neurotransmitter release.

  19. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sexuality Life after Radical Cystectomy Women and Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy To watch the recordings and download the transcripts, click here! Look for more topics coming this spring! Bladder cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed cancer in ...

  20. Bladder function - neurological control

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with urine, sensory nerves send impulses to the brain indicating that the bladder is full. The sensory ... cord to relay this information. In turn, the brain sends impulses back to the bladder instructing the ...

  1. Neurogenic stunned myocardium in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kerro, Ali; Woods, Timothy; Chang, Jason J

    2017-04-01

    "Stunned myocardium," characterized by reversible left ventricular dysfunction, was first described via animal models using transient coronary artery occlusion. However, this phenomenon has also been noted with neurologic pathologies and collectively been labeled "neurogenic stunned myocardium" (NSM). Neurogenic stunned myocardium resulting from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a challenging pathology due to its diagnostic uncertainty. Traditional diagnostic criteria for NSM after SAH focus on electrocardiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities and troponemia. However, tremendous heterogeneity still exists. Traditional pathophysiological mechanisms for NSM encompassed hypothalamic and myocardial perivascular lesions. More recently, research on pathophysiology has centered on myocardial microvascular dysfunction and genetic polymorphisms. Catecholamine surging as a mechanism has also gained attention with particular focus placed on the role of adrenergic blockade in both the prehospital and acute settings. Management remains largely supportive with case reports acknowledging the utility of inotropes such as dobutamine and milrinone and intra-aortic balloon pump when NSM is accompanied by cardiogenic shock. Neurogenic stunned myocardium that follows SAH can result in many complications such as arrhythmias, pulmonary edema, and prolonged intubation, which can negatively impact long-term recovery from SAH and increase morbidity and mortality. This necessitates the need to accurately diagnose and treat NSM.

  2. Stem Cell Therapy in Bladder Dysfunction: Where Are We? And Where Do We Have to Go?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Rae; Song, Yun Seob; Lee, Hong Jun

    2013-01-01

    To date, stem cell therapy for the bladder has been conducted mainly on an experimental basis in the areas of bladder dysfunction. The therapeutic efficacy of stem cells was originally thought to be derived from their ability to differentiate into various cell types. Studies about stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction have been limited to an experimental basis and have been less focused than bladder regeneration. Bladder dysfunction was listed in MESH as “urinary bladder neck obstruction”, “urinary bladder, overactive”, and “urinary bladder, neurogenic”. Using those keywords, several articles were searched and studied. The bladder dysfunction model includes bladder outlet obstruction, cryoinjured, diabetes, ischemia, and spinal cord injury. Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs), bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs), and skeletal muscle derived stem cells (SkMSCs) are used for transplantation to treat bladder dysfunction. The main mechanisms of stem cells to reconstitute or restore bladder dysfunction are migration, differentiation, and paracrine effects. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction and to provide the status of stem cell therapy for bladder dysfunction. PMID:24151627

  3. Prolonged Cardiac Dysfunction After Intraparenchymal Hemorrhage and Neurogenic Stunned Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Wilson, Thomas; Sharma, Deepak; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction occurring secondary to neurologic disease, termed neurogenic stunned myocardium, is an incompletely understood phenomenon that has been described after several distinct neurologic processes. We present a case of neurogenic stunned myocardium, discovered intraoperatively after anesthetic induction, in a patient who presented to our operating room with a recent intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We discuss the longitudinal cardiac functional course after neurogenic stunned myocardium. Lastly, we discuss the pathophysiology of neurogenic stunned myocardium, as well as its implications for anesthesiologists caring for neurosurgical patients. PMID:26462162

  4. Pathomechanism of Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome and Mapping the Heterogeneity of Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) is a heterogeneous syndrome which is usually characterized by urinary frequency, nocturia, and bladder pain. Several pathomechanisms have been proposed, including uroepithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, neurogenic inflammation, autoimmunity, and occult urinary tract infections. It is possible that an inflammatory process alters regulation of urothelial homeostasis and results in dysfunction of the bladder epithelium. Different phenotypes of IC/BPS have been explored including Hunner and non-Hunner type IC, hypersensitive bladder, and bladder pain both with and without functional somatic syndrome. Different gene expressions have also been found in different IC phenotypes. Abnormal expressions of uroplakin, chondroitin sulfate and adhesive protein E-cadherin, tight junction protein zonula occludens-1 in IC/BPS bladder suggest abnormal epithelial differentiation in this bladder disease. Analysis of inflammatory proteins, or cytokines in the urine or serum provides another diagnostic foundation forIC/BPS subtypes. The involvement of IC/BPS in systemic functional somatic syndrome and other pelvic organ diseases might also subdivide subtypes of IC/BPS. Chronic inflammation, increased urothelial apoptosis, and abnormal urothelial function are closely associated in IC bladders. This article reviews recent research on the pathomechanisms of IC, which might help us in mapping the heterogeneity of the disease. PMID:27915472

  5. The Role(s) of Cytokines/Chemokines in Urinary Bladder Inflammation and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Eric J.; Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS)/interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by pain, pressure, or discomfort perceived to be bladder related and with at least one urinary symptom. It was recently concluded that 3.3–7.9 million women (>18 years old) in the United States exhibit BPS/IC symptoms. The impact of BPS/IC on quality of life is enormous and the economic burden is significant. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of BPS/IC are unknown, numerous theories including infection, inflammation, autoimmune disorder, toxic urinary agents, urothelial dysfunction, and neurogenic causes have been proposed. Altered visceral sensations from the urinary bladder (i.e., pain at low or moderate bladder filling) that accompany BPS/IC may be mediated by many factors including changes in the properties of peripheral bladder afferent pathways such that bladder afferent neurons respond in an exaggerated manner to normally innocuous stimuli (allodynia). The goals for this review are to describe chemokine/receptor (CXCL12/CXCR4; CCL2/CCR2) signaling and cytokine/receptor (transforming growth factor (TGF-β)/TGF-β type 1 receptor) signaling that may be valuable LUT targets for pharmacologic therapy to improve urinary bladder function and reduce somatic sensitivity associated with urinary bladder inflammation. PMID:24738044

  6. Neoadjuvant Intravesical Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Bladder Carcinoma Who Are Undergoing Cystectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Bladder Adenocarcinoma; Bladder Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer

  7. Restoration of Bladder and Bowel Function Using Electrical Stimulation and Block after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    clinical trial have been ordered from the manufacturer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injuries, Neurogenic Bladder, Electric Stimulation 16... Clinical  Trial 3. Participant recruitment, surgery, participant evaluation for Stage 1 4. Surgery, participant evaluation for Stage 2 5. Data analysis and...publication This is a prospective Phase 1 clinical trial of an implanted electrical stimulator to improve both continence and voiding in human

  8. Extraperitoneal Rupture of a Bladder Diverticulum and the Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography Cystography.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koichi; Takase, Yasukazu; Saito, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Nontraumatic rupture of the bladder is less widely recognized than traumatic rupture, with a challenging early diagnosis due to high variability in clinical presentations. We report a case of extraperitoneal rupture of a bladder diverticulum in a patient with diabetes mellitus who presented with paralytic ileus. Despite conservative management, the patient developed sepsis requiring surgical treatment. Urinary tract infection and bladder outlet obstruction were considered to be potential mechanisms of the rupture. Multidetector computed tomography cystography should be used as the first-line modality when evaluating for a suspected bladder rupture, even in patients with nontraumatic bladder rupture.

  9. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E U; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-10-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  10. Long-term outcomes of urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, E. U.; Singh, Gurpreet

    2013-01-01

    The advent of specialized spinal units and better understanding of the pathophysiology of neurogenic urinary tract dysfunction has made long-term survival of these patients a reality. This has, in turn, led to an increase in quality and choice of management modalities offered to these patients including complex anatomic urinary tract reconstructive procedures tailored to the unique needs of each individual with variable outcomes. We performed a literature review evaluating the long-term outcomes of these reconstructive procedures. To achieve this, we conducted a world-wide electronic literature search of long-term outcomes published in English. As the premise of this review is long-term outcomes, we have focused on pathologies where evidence of long-term outcome is available such as patients with spinal injuries and spina bifida. Therapeutic success following urinary tract reconstruction is usually measured by preservation of renal function, improvement in quality-of-life, the satisfactory achievement of agreed outcomes and the prevention of serious complications. Prognostic factors include neuropathic detrusor overactivity; sphincter dyssynergia; bladder over distension; high pressure storage and high leak point pressures; vesicoureteric reflex, stone formation and urinary tract infections. Although, the past decade has witnessed a reduction in the total number of bladder reconstructive surgeries in the UK, these procedures are essentially safe and effective; but require long-term clinical and functional follow-up/monitoring. Until tissue engineering and gene therapy becomes more mainstream, we feel there is still a place for urinary tract reconstruction in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. PMID:24235796

  11. Multiple Uric Acid Bladder Stones: Clinical Presentation and Endoscopic Management

    PubMed Central

    Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda; Chueh, Shih-Chieh Jeff; Shen, Shujane

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Bladder urinary calculi occur in 3%–8% of men with bladder outlet obstruction, and although most of them are composed of calcium, in a few cases uric acid bladder stones are diagnosed. Case Presentation: We present clinical images and therapeutic management of a 65-year-old diabetic man with significant prostate enlargement and >30 bladder stones, the largest being 17 mm. Despite the large stone burden, the patient was managed by cystolithotripsy. Remarkably, stone composition analysis revealed 100% uric acid stone. Intraoperative and postoperative course were uneventfully. Conclusion: Uric acid bladder stone pathogenesis seems to be multifactorial with local and systemic factors contributing in different manners and even large stone burdens may be cystoscopically managed. PMID:28265592

  12. The use of cystometry in small rodents: a study of bladder chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Uvin, Pieter; Everaerts, Wouter; Pinto, Silvia; Alpízar, Yeranddy A; Boudes, Mathieu; Gevaert, Thomas; Voets, Thomas; Nilius, Bernd; Talavera, Karel; De Ridder, Dirk

    2012-08-21

    The lower urinary tract (LUT) functions as a dynamic reservoir that is able to store urine and to efficiently expel it at a convenient time. While storing urine, however, the bladder is exposed for prolonged periods to waste products. By acting as a tight barrier, the epithelial lining of the LUT, the urothelium, avoids re-absorption of harmful substances. Moreover, noxious chemicals stimulate the bladder's nociceptive innervation and initiate voiding contractions that expel the bladder's contents. Interestingly, the bladder's sensitivity to noxious chemicals has been used successfully in clinical practice, by intravesically infusing the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin to treat neurogenic bladder overactivity. This underscores the advantage of viewing the bladder as a chemosensory organ and prompts for further clinical research. However, ethical issues severely limit the possibilities to perform, in human subjects, the invasive measurements that are necessary to unravel the molecular bases of LUT clinical pharmacology. A way to overcome this limitation is the use of several animal models. Here we describe the implementation of cystometry in mice and rats, a technique that allows measuring the intravesical pressure in conditions of controlled bladder perfusion. After laparotomy, a catheter is implanted in the bladder dome and tunneled subcutaneously to the interscapular region. Then the bladder can be filled at a controlled rate, while the urethra is left free for micturition. During the repetitive cycles of filling and voiding, intravesical pressure can be measured via the implanted catheter. As such, the pressure changes can be quantified and analyzed. Moreover, simultaneous measurement of the voided volume allows distinguishing voiding contractions from non-voiding contractions. Importantly, due to the differences in micturition control between rodents and humans, cystometric measurements in these animals have only limited translational value. Nevertheless, they are

  13. A role for the Drosophila neurogenic genes in mesoderm differentiation.

    PubMed

    Corbin, V; Michelson, A M; Abmayr, S M; Neel, V; Alcamo, E; Maniatis, T; Young, M W

    1991-10-18

    The neurogenic genes of Drosophila have long been known to regulate cell fate decisions in the developing ectoderm. In this paper we show that these genes also control mesoderm development. Embryonic cells that express the muscle-specific gene nautilus are overproduced in each of seven neurogenic mutants (Notch, Delta, Enhancer of split, big brain, mastermind, neuralized, and almondex), at the apparent expense of neighboring, nonexpressing mesodermal cells. The mesodermal defect does not appear to be a simple consequence of associated neural hypertrophy, suggesting that the neurogenic genes may function similarly and independently in establishing cell fates in both ectoderm and mesoderm. Altered patterns of beta 3-tubulin and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the mutants indicate a role for the neurogenic genes in development of most visceral and somatic muscles. We propose that the signal produced by the neurogenic genes is a general one, effective in both ectoderm and mesoderm.

  14. ["Pathophysiology and treatment of the overactive bladder"].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Osamu

    2005-09-01

    The International Continence Society (ICS) recently derived a consensus symptomatic definition of overactive bladder (OAB) as urinary urgency, with or without urge incontinence, usually with frequency and nocturia. These symptom combinations are suggestive of urodynamically demonstrable detrusor overactivity. The etiology of OAB falls into two broad categories: neurogenic and nonneurogenic. It is not easy to confirm the etiology of OAB in patients with bladder outlet obstruction and neurological disease. This debate has attempted to examine the pathophysiology of OAB and to determine the optimal treatment strategy in a patient with two diseases possibly causing OAB. A 75-year-old man visited our hospital due to symptoms of OAB (urgency, nocturia, and urge incontinence) occurring after cerebrovascular accidents. Urge incontinence worsened concomitantly with the appearance of turbid urine. Urinary tract infection was accompanied by 84 ml of post-void residual. The prostate volume and PSA value were 28 ml and 1.2 ng/ml, respectively. The total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and Quality of Life (QOL) Index were 23 and 5, respectively. IPSS for storage symptoms was higher than that for obstructive symptoms. The maximum flow rate, measured after treatment for UTI, was 9.4 ml/s. Two debaters discuss the treament modality, TURP, or pharmacotherapy.

  15. Use of Optical Mapping to Evaluate Mechanisms and New Therapies for Bladder Dysfunction Due to Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    extended to pathological models including; spinal cord injury, partial bladder outlet obstruc- tion, diabetes , and neurodegenerative diseases. IC...Physiol Renal Physiol 2013;305:F663–71. 26. Schwen Z, Matsuta Y, Shen B, et al. Inhibition of bladder overactivity by duloxetine in combination with foot ...molecular and structural levels have been reported in both patients and animals associated with disorders such as bladder pain syndrome and diabetic

  16. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  17. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance.

  18. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-09-23

    Essential facts Type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect 3.2 million people in the UK. Diabetes is associated with serious complications, including heart disease and stroke, which can lead to disability and premature death. It is the leading cause of preventable sight loss in people of working age in the UK. A quarter of people with diabetes will have kidney disease at some point in their lives, and the condition increases the risk of amputation. Good diabetes management has been shown to reduce the incidence of these serious complications.

  19. Cotransplantation with specific populations of spina bifida bone marrow stem/progenitor cells enhances urinary bladder regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun K; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Marks, Andrew J; Kollhoff, David M; Rao, Manoj V; Hota, Partha V; Matoka, Derek J; Edassery, Seby L; Thaker, Hatim; Sarwark, John F; Janicki, Joseph A; Ameer, Guillermo A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2013-03-05

    Spina bifida (SB) patients afflicted with myelomeningocele typically possess a neurogenic urinary bladder and exhibit varying degrees of bladder dysfunction. Although surgical intervention in the form of enterocystoplasty is the current standard of care in which to remedy the neurogenic bladder, it is still a stop-gap measure and is associated with many complications due to the use of bowel as a source of replacement tissue. Contemporary bladder tissue engineering strategies lack the ability to reform bladder smooth muscle, vasculature, and promote peripheral nerve tissue growth when using autologous populations of cells. Within the context of this study, we demonstrate the role of two specific populations of bone marrow (BM) stem/progenitor cells used in combination with a synthetic elastomeric scaffold that provides a unique and alternative means to current bladder regeneration approaches. In vitro differentiation, gene expression, and proliferation are similar among donor mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), whereas poly(1,8-octanediol-cocitrate) scaffolds seeded with SB BM MSCs perform analogously to control counterparts with regard to bladder smooth muscle wall formation in vivo. SB CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells cotransplanted with donor-matched MSCs cause a dramatic increase in tissue vascularization as well as an induction of peripheral nerve growth in grafted areas compared with samples not seeded with hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Finally, MSC/CD34(+) grafts provided the impetus for rapid urothelium regeneration. Data suggest that autologous BM stem/progenitor cells may be used as alternate, nonpathogenic cell sources for SB patient-specific bladder tissue regeneration in lieu of current enterocystoplasty procedures and have implications for other bladder regenerative therapies.

  20. Urosepsis complicated by a spontaneous bladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2011-11-08

    The authors present a case of a 72-year-old diabetic male s/p pelvic irradiation for prostate carcinoma who arrived in the emergency department with complaints of shaking chills. After admission for urosepsis, he developed severe abdominal pain and examination revealed a diffusely tender abdomen. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous urinary bladder perforation and underwent surgery. After several weeks of intravenous antibiotics, he was discharged with multiple drains in place and bilateral nephrostomy tubes.

  1. Addressing ketamine bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    The rise in ketamine misuse means more health professionals will need to diagnose, refer and treat ketamine bladder syndrome. Prevention and raising awareness of the problem among multidisciplinary teams will help limit damage to the bladder as well as making treatment and management more effective.

  2. Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lomberk, Gwen

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatologists have often divided research of the pancreas based upon the origin of the function or disease, namely the endocrine or exocrine pancreas. In fact, as a result, many of our meetings and conferences have followed separate paths. Interestingly, among patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, both disorders of the exocrine pancreas, diabetes is common. However, the clinical features of the diabetes associated with these two differ. Peripheral insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia are the predominant diabetic traits in pancreatic cancer, while reduced islet cell mass and impaired insulin secretion are observed more often in chronic pancreatitis. The causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer remains an intriguing but unanswered question. Since diabetes often precedes pancreatic cancer, it is regarded as a potential risk factor for malignancy. On the other hand, there remains the possibility that pancreatic cancer secretes diabetogenic factors. Regardless of how the science ultimately illuminates this issue, there is increasing interest in utilizing screening for diabetes to aid early detection of pancreatic tumor lesions. Therefore, in this issue of Pancreatology and the Web, we explore the topic of diabetes to keep us alert to this very important association, even if we study diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  3. Neurovascular aspects of skin neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Brain, Susan D

    2011-12-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is involved in skin inflammation. It is hypothesized that it is involved in the pathogenesis of the common chronic cutaneous vascular disorder rosacea, but the exact mechanism of action is currently unknown. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) are widely expressed on primary sensory neuron endings and non-neuronal cells such as keratinocytes. Here we describe the potential for TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors to be involved in the pathophysiology of rosacea due to their polymodal activation, including cold and hot temperature, pungent products from vegetable and spices, reactive oxygen species, and mechanical stimuli. We discuss the role of both receptors and the sensory neuropeptides that they release in inflammation and pain sensation and evidence suggesting that both TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors may be promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of the inflammatory symptoms of rosacea.

  4. Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Saracen, A; Kotwica, Z; Woźniak-Kosek, A; Kasprzak, P

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is observed in cerebral injuries and has an impact on treatment results, being a predictor of fatal prognosis. In this study we retrospectively reviewed medical records of 250 consecutive patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) for the frequency and treatment results of NPE. The following factors were taken under consideration: clinical status, aneurysm location, presence of NPE, intracranial pressure (ICP), and mortality. All patients had plain- and angio-computer tomography performed. NPE developed most frequently in case of the aneurysm located in the anterior communicating artery. The patients with grades I-III of SAH, according to the World Federation of Neurosurgeons staging, were immediately operated on, while those with poor grades IV and V had only an ICP sensor's implantation procedure performed. A hundred and eighty five patients (74.4 %) were admitted with grades I to III and 32 patients (12.8 %) were with grade IV and V each. NPE was not observed in SAH patients with grade I to III, but it developed in nine patients with grade IV and 11 patients with grade V. Of the 20 patients with NPE, 19 died. Of the 44 poor grade patients (grades IV-V) without NPE, 20 died. All poor grade patients had elevated ICP in a range of 24-56 mmHg. The patients with NPE had a greater ICP than those without NPE. Gender and age had no influence on the occurrence of NPE. We conclude that the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema in SAH patients with poor grades is a fatal prognostic as it about doubles the death rate to almost hundred percent.

  5. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fougere, Renée J.; Currie, Katharine D.; Nigro, Mark K.; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of

  6. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Fougere, Renée J; Currie, Katharine D; Nigro, Mark K; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2016-09-15

    Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of life.

  7. Origins of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David

    2016-05-23

    Bladder cancer, one of the most frequently occurring human cancers, develops via two tracks referred to as papillary and nonpapillary that correspond to clinically different forms of the disease. Most bladder cancers are chemically induced, with tobacco smoking being the leading risk factor. Recent advances in bladder cancer research have enhanced our understanding of the origin of this disease from urothelial progenitor cells via field effects along papillary/luminal and nonpapillary/basal pathways. Evident from the outset of the disease, the diversity of the luminal and basal pathways, together with cell lineage tracing studies, postulates the origin of molecularly distinct subtypes from different uroprogenitor cells. The molecular mechanisms initiating field effects involve a new class of genes referred to as forerunner (FR) genes that generally map around major tumor suppressors such as RB1. These genes are silenced, predominantly by hypermethylation and less frequently by mutations, and drive the expansion of intraurothelial preneoplastic cells. Different FR genes are involved in various molecular subtypes of bladder cancer and they sensitize the uroprogenitor cells to the development of luminal and basal bladder cancers in animal models. In human bladder cancer, luminal and basal forms have dissimilar clinical behavior and response to conventional and targeted chemotherapeutic manipulations. These new research developments hold the promise of expanding our armamentarium of diagnostic and treatment options for patients with bladder cancer and improving our ability to select patients most likely to respond to a specific therapy.

  8. [Neurogenic stunned myocardium in Pediatrics. A case report].

    PubMed

    Alados Arboledas, F J; Millán-Miralles, L; Millán-Bueno, M P; Expósito-Montes, J F; Santiago-Gutierrez, C; Martínez Padilla, M C

    2015-10-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is an unusual clinical entity. It mimics an acute coronary syndrome with electrocardiographic abnormalities, cardiac dysfunction and elevated cardiac enzymes with absence of obstructive coronary disease. It may occur after a neurosurgical procedure. A case is presented of neurogenic stunned myocardium occurring in a child after removal of a posterior fossa medulloblastoma. The patient developed nodal tachycardia with hemodynamic impairment. The clinical course was satisfactory due to antiarrhythmic therapy, with biochemical, echocardiographic, and clinical improvement within a week.

  9. Dual effect of GABA on the contractile activity of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Maggi, C A; Santicioli, P; Meli, A

    1985-06-01

    The effects of GABA and related substances were examined in isolated detrusor strips from the dome of the guinea-pig urinary bladder. GABA (0.01-1 mM) produced concentration-related phasic contractions of isolated strips from the guinea-pig urinary bladder dome. This effect of GABA was mimicked by homotaurine and muscimol, selective GABAA receptor agonists but not by (+/-)-baclofen, a selective GABAB receptor agonist. A specific cross desensitization was observed between GABA, homotaurine and muscimol but not between (+/-)-baclofen and GABA. GABA (1 mM)-induced contractions were antagonized by picrotoxin, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist. GABA-induced contractions were almost abolished by tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM, TTX) thus indicating their neurogenic origin. In addition GABA-induced contractions were partially antagonized by atropine (to about the same extent as those produced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP), a ganglionic stimulant), but were unaffected by hexamethonium (10 microM), phentolamine (0.2 microM) or indomethacin (5 microM). In the presence of GABA the contractile effect of both DMPP (TTX-sensitive) and acetylcholine (ACh, TTX-insensitive) were significantly reduced. Similar findings were obtained with DMPP, i.e. in preparations exposed to this ganglionic stimulant both GABA- and ACh-induced contractions were depressed. Homotaurine but not (+/-)-baclofen mimicked the depressant effect of GABA on DMPP-induced contractions. The depressant effect of GABA on ACh-induced contractions of the guinea-pig urinary bladder was neurogenic in origin, i.e., was not observed in preparations exposed to TTX. These experiments indicate that GABA has a dual effect on the contractile behaviour of the guinea-pig isolated urinary bladder. Recently it has been proposed that endogenous GABA plays a neuromodulatory role in this organ. Our data suggest that in the early phase of neurogenic activation of detrusor muscle (micturition reflex) GABA might transiently

  10. An unusual case of non-disseminated bladder aspergillosis in a setting of transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Siddappa, S; Mythri, K M; Kowsalya, R; Shivalingaiah, M

    2012-01-01

    A bladder infection of Aspergillus with no evidence of dissemination is rare. We present a case of Aspergillus infection with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder without any evidence of systemic involvement. A 65-year-old male diabetic whose main complaints were intermittent painful haematuria and nocturia had undergone nephroureterectomy a year and a half back for transitional cell carcinoma of right renal pelvis. Cystoscopy revealed bladder mucosa having fixed broad tumour with encrustation and bleeding on touch at the right vesico-ureteric junction. The histopathologic diagnosis was a high-grade transitional carcinoma with Aspergillus infection. Fungal culture of urine obtained after bladder wash yielded Aspergillus fumigatus.

  11. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tract Infections and Related Conditions Urinary Tract Infections Bedwetting Kidneys and Urinary Tract Urine Tests X-Ray ... Bladder) Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) Your Urinary System Bedwetting Urinary Tract Infections Kidneys and Urinary Tract Bedwetting ( ...

  12. What Is Bladder Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder, which is called the urothelium or transitional epithelium . As the cancer grows into or through the ... in the inner layer of cells (the transitional epithelium) but have not grown into the deeper layers. ...

  13. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bladder area and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  14. Intravesical therapy for overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert J

    2005-11-01

    Overactive bladder and urgency incontinence are common conditions generally treated with oral anticholinergic therapy. Despite the development of new antimuscarinic agents, many patients do not tolerate or fail to respond to oral therapy. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative method of managing bladder overactivity. Intravesical instillation of anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and atropine can achieve cholinergic blockade without producing systemic side effects. Botulinum A toxin injected directly into the detrusor has been shown in preliminary studies to increase bladder capacity and decrease uncontrolled bladder contractility for up to 6 months. Intravesical local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine block the conduction of unmyelinated C fibers and when administered into the bladder, lead to an increase in functional bladder capacity. Intravesical capsaicin and resiniferatoxin also affect afferent innervation by blocking C-fiber afferents, leading to decreased bladder contractility and increased bladder capacity. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative treatment for the management of overactive bladder.

  15. DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Loki

    2015-01-01

    A new study shows that statin therapy before diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is not associated with an increased risk of microvascular disease and might even be beneficial for retinopathy and neuropathy. These data suggest a potential protective effect of statins in specific complications, which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:25366041

  16. Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... retinopathy gets worse, it may lead to blindness.Laser surgery can often be used to treat or slow down retinopathy, especially if the problem is found early. People who have diabetes should have an eye exam once a year.Warning signs of eye problemsCall your doctor if you ...

  17. [Primary neurogenic and myogenic disorders of posture].

    PubMed

    Schranz, C; Meinck, H-M

    2004-05-01

    Disturbance of posture may occur in a variety of neurological disorders and occasionally is the presenting or even the only sign. In the majority of cases, the head or the trunk or both are bent forward (bent spine syndrome, dropped head syndrome). A feature of these primary neurogenic or myogenic postural disturbances that is in contrast to antalgic contraction or ankylosis is that they are not fixed, but the trunk or head are easily erected by the examiner and show a characteristic sagging. Neuromuscular disorders are a frequent cause. They may be confined to the paraspinal muscles. Axial computed tomography of the spine, electromyography of the involved muscles, and muscle biopsy help to make the diagnosis. However, also central movement disorders may lead to a sagging of the head or trunk or of both due to a lessened tone of the head and trunk extensors. This is frequently seen in the various parkinsonian syndromes which may, however, occur in association with a focal myopathy of the paraspinal muscles. Occasionally, sagging of the trunk is seen as a side effect of neuropharmacologic medication. Sagging of the trunk or head should be differentiated from a pathologically increased innervation of the ventral muscles in dystonic movement disorders such as antecollis or camptocormia. Pathologic reclination of the head or trunk or both is a rare disturbance of posture. It may occur in dystonia (retrocollis) or, occasionally, as a consequence of musculotendinous contractures secondary to certain neuromuscular disorders such as the rigid spine syndrome.

  18. Microglia participate in neurogenic regulation of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao Z; Li, You; Li, Liang; Shah, Kandarp H; Bernstein, Kenneth E; Lyden, Patrick; Shi, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is associated with neuroinflammation and increased sympathetic tone. Interference with neuroinflammation by an anti-inflammatory reagent or overexpression of interleukin-10 in the brain was found to attenuate hypertension. However, the cellular mechanism of neuroinflammation, as well as its impact on neurogenic regulation of blood pressure, is unclear. Here, we found that hypertension, induced by either angiotensin II or l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, is accompanied by microglial activation as manifested by microgliosis and proinflammatory cytokine upregulation. Targeted depletion of microglia significantly attenuated neuroinflammation, glutamate receptor expression in the paraventricular nucleus, plasma vasopressin level, kidney norepinephrine concentration, and blood pressure. Furthermore, when microglia were preactivated and transferred into the brains of normotensive mice, there was a significantly prolonged pressor response to intracerebroventricular injection of angiotensin II, and inactivation of microglia eliminated these effects. These data demonstrate that microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, are the major cellular factors in mediating neuroinflammation and modulating neuronal excitation, which contributes to the elevated blood pressure.

  19. AAEM minimonograph #46: neurogenic muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, L

    1996-07-01

    Muscle hypertrophy occurs uncommonly in several neurogenic disorders including neuropathies, radiculopathies, spinal muscular atrophy, and post-polio syndrome. Its pathogenesis varies in different circumstances. In the presence of generalized myokymia and neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome), symmetrical hypertrophy appears to be the result of continuous spontaneous electrical stimulation of myofibers and, in some cases, results in type 1 myofiber preponderance. Focal hypertrophy occurring with radiculopathies and mononeuropathies was associated with complex repetitive discharges (CRDs) in approximately half the cases. CRDs may play a role in the pathogenesis of myofiber hypertrophy by continuous myofiber stimulation, but in some cases, with and without CRDs, myofiber hypertrophy may be related to mechanical events. Muscle enlargement seen in old polio appears to involve a significant degree of pseudohypertrophy, although some myofiber hypertrophy occurs. The symmetrical occurrence of hypertrophy in genetically determined disorders, such as spinal muscular atrophy, and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy types 1 and 2 may have both a genetic and a mechanical basis in addition to pseudohypertrophy in some cases.

  20. Teaching self-catheterization skills to children with neurogenic bladder complications.

    PubMed Central

    Neef, N A; Parrish, J M; Hannigan, K F; Page, T J; Iwata, B A

    1989-01-01

    We examined the effects of simulation training on the acquisition of self-catheterization skills in 2 female children with spina bifida. Based on a task analysis, the children were taught to perform on a doll each of the components of preparation, and, using a mirror to locate the urinary meatus, to insert and remove the catheter and to clean-up. Before, during, and after training, the children's performance of the skills on the doll and on themselves was assessed. Results of a multiple baseline design across subjects and skill components showed that doll training facilitated the children's acquisition of self-catheterization skills. PMID:2793631

  1. Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy: defective neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Westerman, R A; Block, A; Nunn, A; Delaney, C A; Hahn, A; Dennett, X; Carr, R W

    1992-01-01

    Hereditary sensory radicular neuropathy exhibits autosomal dominant inheritance with complete penetrance in males and incomplete penetrance in females. Newer tests of small sensory nerve function were used in screening 8 family members aged between 14 and 66 years. All exhibited some frequent features of the disorder with an onset in the 2nd or 3rd decade, foot ulceration, foot callus, loss of pin prick, thermal and light touch sensation, and some reduction in vibration acuity and proprioception in the lower limbs. The hands were involved in 3 of 8, muscle involvement was present in 5 of 8, but deafness was not detected by audiometry. Nerve conduction velocity, sensory action potentials, latency and amplitude, thermal acuity, vibration acuity and axon reflex flares were measured in all patients. One sural nerve biopsy confirmed the presence of peripheral fibre loss in this predominantly sensory neuropathy. Chemically evoked axon reflex tests were used to evaluate the extent of primary sensory nerve fibre involvement. All patients were tested using a Moor MBF 3-D dual channel laser Doppler velocimeter. Acetylcholine or phenylephrine iontophoretically applied as 16 mC doses evoked absent or tiny axon reflexes in areas of impaired pin prick sensation. By contrast, direct microvascular dilator responses to nitroprusside (smooth muscle dependent) and acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) were present but somewhat reduced in areas with defective neurogenic inflammation. These results differ significantly from the responses obtained in age-matched healthy controls (P < 0.05). Foot pressure analysis was performed for orthoses in 2 affected members with foot ulceration using the Musgrave Footprint system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Bladder Control and Nerve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the sphincter muscles relax to allow urine to pass through the urethra as the bladder contracts to ... contract at the same time, so urine cannot pass easily. Drug therapy for an uncoordinated bladder and ...

  3. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  4. [Standard pharmacological treatment and new therapies for overactive bladder].

    PubMed

    Del Popolo, Giulio; Mencarini, Marco; Li Marzi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of overactive bladder (OAB) in adult males varies from 10.2% to 17.4%, and in females from 7.7 to 31.3. 16.5% of the adult population presents symptoms consistent with OAB; of these, 37.2% are actually affected. The OAB has a significant effect on the quality of life. Initial treatment includes behavioral therapy, physiotherapy and antimuscarinic drugs. In patients where behavioral modifications fail, treatment is associated with antimuscarinics. The antimuscarinic agents used to treat OAB showed some efficacy, but adverse events too, such as dry mouth, constipation, headache and blurred vision. In selected cases unresponsive to antimuscarinic therapy, it is possible to use second-line treatments represented by sacral neuromodulation and botulinum toxin type A both for idiopathic detrusor overactivity, where it is still an experimental treatment, and for neurogenic cases with 2011 FDA approval. Surgical options represent the last choice for selected cases.

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Dadhania, Vipulkumar; Czerniak, Bogdan; Guo, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignancy in the urinary bladder which may arise primarily in the bladder as well as secondarily from a number of other organs. Our aim is to provide updated information on primary and secondary bladder adenocarcinomas, with focus on pathologic features, differential diagnosis, and clinical relevance. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma exhibits several different growth patterns, including enteric, mucinous, signet-ring cell, not otherwise specified, and mixed patterns. Urachal adenocarcinoma demonstrates similar histologic features but it can be distinguished from bladder adenocarcinoma on careful pathologic examination. Secondary bladder adenocarcinomas may arise from the colorectum, prostate, endometrium, cervix and other sites. Immunohistochemical study is valuable in identifying the origin of secondary adenocarcinomas. Noninvasive neoplastic glandular lesions, adenocarcinoma in situ and villous adenoma, are frequently associated with bladder adenocarcinoma. It is also important to differentiate bladder adenocarcinoma from a number of nonneoplastic lesions in the bladder. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma has a poor prognosis largely because it is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. Urachal adenocarcinoma shares similar histologic features with bladder adenocarcinoma, but it has a more favorable prognosis than bladder adenocarcinoma, partly due to the relative young age of patients with urachal adenocarcinoma. PMID:26309895

  7. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies. PMID:28098199

  8. Optogenetic Modulation of Urinary Bladder Contraction for Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Ki; Jang, Ja Yun; An, Jieun; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Kang, Tong Mook; Shin, Hyun Joon; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis

    2017-01-01

    As current clinical approaches for lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction such as pharmacological and electrical stimulation treatments lack target specificity, thus resulting in suboptimal outcomes with various side effects, a better treatment modality with spatial and temporal target-specificity is necessary. In this study, we delivered optogenetic membrane proteins, such as channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (NpHR), to bladder smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of mice using either the Cre-loxp transgenic system or a viral transfection method. The results showed that depolarizing ChR2-SMCs with blue light induced bladder contraction, whereas hyperpolarizing NpHR-SMCs with yellow light suppressed PGE2-induced overactive contraction. We also confirmed that optogenetic contraction of bladder smooth muscles in this study is not neurogenic, but solely myogenic, and that optogenetic light stimulation can modulate the urination in vivo. This study thus demonstrated the utility of optogenetic modulation of smooth muscle as a means to actively control the urinary bladder contraction with spatial and temporal accuracy. These features would increase the efficacy of bladder control in LUT dysfunctions without the side effects of conventional clinical therapies.

  9. Detrusor underactivity and the underactive bladder: Symptoms, function, cause-what do we mean? ICI-RS think tank 2014.

    PubMed

    Smith, Phillip P; Birder, Lori A; Abrams, Paul; Wein, Alan J; Chapple, Chris R

    2016-02-01

    Impaired bladder emptying is a well-recognized cause of lower urinary tract symptoms. However, the symptoms produced do not always relate to voiding, and may include frequency, urgency and incontinence. Conversely, the etiology of symptoms of disturbed voiding is not necessarily dependent upon objectively impaired voiding. Terms including underactive bladder, detrusor underactivity, and impaired contractility describe aspects of these problems, and have been used somewhat interchangeably. It is possible that the present lack of effective therapy in many cases relates to both etiologic and diagnostic uncertainty stemming from terminologic imprecision. Detrusor underactivity has a standardized definition, unlike underactive bladder and impaired contractility. The relationships of symptoms, function, and cause were the focus of a 2014 ICI-RS Think Tank entitled Does Detrusor Underactivity Exist, and if so it is neurogenic, myogenic, or both? This review presents a summary of the problem and the Think Tank conclusions. A terminologic hierarchy and specific research goals are presented.

  10. Aerosol transfer of bladder urothelial and smooth muscle cells onto demucosalized colonic segments for bladder augmentation: in vivo, long term, and functional pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Hidas, Guy; Lee, Hak J.; Bahoric, Andrej; Kelly, Maryellen S.; Watts, Blake; Liu, Zhongbo; Saharti, Samah; Lusch, Achim; Alamsahebpour, Alireza; Kerbl, David; Truong, Hung; Zi, Xiaolin; Khoury, Antoine E.

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate permeability of the new urothelial lining to water. To determine if the aerosol transfer of bladder cells would have behaved differently in the neurogenic bladder population, this experiment should have been performed in animals with neuropathic bladders. Conclusion Aerosol spraying of single cell suspension of urothelial and muscular cells with fibrin glue resulted in coverage of the demucosalized intestinal segment with a uniform urothelial layer. This new lining segment was durable without regrowth of colonic mucosa after 6 months. The new reconstituted segment absorbs and secretes significantly less than control colocystoplasty. PMID:26022502

  11. Bladder outlet obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrowing of the urethra Tests to determine how fast urine flows out of the body ( uroflowmetry ) Tests to see how much the urine flow is blocked and how well the bladder contracts (urodynamic testing) Ultrasound to locate the blockage of urine and find ...

  12. Urinary bladder xanthomatous cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shrenik J.; Ajitsaria, Vineet; Singh, Vineet

    2017-01-01

    Xanthoma cystitis of urinary bladder is a rare entity and may present as an intravesical mass. A 38-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and imaging was done which was suggestive of a malignant mass with surrounding tissue infiltration. Partial cystectomy was performed, and histological examination of the mass showed xanthomatous cystitis. PMID:28197037

  13. Postmenopausal overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Bladder storage symptoms have a severe impact on many areas as regards the quality of life including health-related, social, psychological and working functions. Pharmacotherapy of lower urinary tract stores (LUTS) has been developed to optimize neural control of the lower urinary tract in pathologic states. The bladder can be overactive or underactive. Overactive bladder (OAB) is highly prevalent and is associated with considerable morbidity, especially in aging population. Therefore, an effective treatment of OAB must result in a meaningful reduction in urinary symptoms. Pharmacotherapy for the OAB must be individualized based on the degree of bother, medication side-effect profile, concomitant comorbidities and current medication regimen. Antimuscarinic agents will continue to represent the current gold standard for the first-line pharmacological management of OAB. Alternatively to antimuscarinic therapy, β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, due to their efficacy and favorable adverse event profile, are a novel and attractive option of pharmacological treatment of overactive bladder symptoms. A combination of selective antimuscarinic and β3-adrenergic receptor agonists, agents with the different mechanism of action, gives a new treatment option for the patient with OAB according to its harms profile. A number of putative novel therapeutic agents is under clinical evaluations that may ultimately provide alternative or combination treatment options for OAB in the nearest future. PMID:26327873

  14. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO POLLUTANT-INDUCED AIRWAY INFLAMMATION IS NEUROGENICALLY MEDIATED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurogenic inflammation in the airways involves the activation of sensory irritant receptors (capsaicin, VR1) by noxious stimuli and the subsequent release of neuropeptides (e.g., SP, CGRP, NKA) from these fibers. Once released, these peptides initiate and sustain symptoms of ...

  15. Neurogenic hypertension related to basilar impression. Case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, L D; Papadopoulos, S M; Hoff, J T

    1993-12-01

    The authors report the resolution of essential hypertension following transoral odontoidectomy and medullary decompression in a 39-year-old woman with basilar invagination. Current understanding of central regulation of the cardiovascular system is discussed and the pertinent neuroanatomy illustrated. Experimental and clinical evidence supporting the role of neurogenic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of hypertension is reviewed.

  16. Neurogenic tumors of the duodenum in patients with neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, J.M.; Han, S.Y.; Colcher, H.; Halpern, N.B.

    1983-10-01

    Neurogenic tumors of the duodenum may occur in patients with neurofibromatosis. They may be solitary or multiple and are located distal to the duodenal bulb. The presenting complaints may be hematemesis, vomiting, or jaundice. The lesions are generally benign and have a low potential for malignant degenertion. Four cases are reported.

  17. Long-term follow-up after botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) injection into the detrusor for treatment of neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity in children

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Tanja; Koen, Mark; Berger, Christoph; Riccabona, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To prove the long-term efficacy of BTX-A injection in the management of children with neurogenic detrusor hyperactivity. Materials and methods 28 out of 145 children with neurogenic bladder (15 male and 13 female, mean age 10.7 years) who were treated between 2002 and 2010 and became non-responders to conservative treatment were included into the retrospective study. We injected 10-12 U/kg of BTX-A (Botox®) into the detrusor at 20-30 sites, sparing the trigone. The mean follow-up was 48 months (range 6-84 months). Results Group 1. 14 patients had a single injection of BTX-A. Five of them were successful. Mean bladder reflex volume increased (from 62.9 to 117.5 ml), maximum detrusor pressure decreased (from 59 to 37.5 cm H2O), detrusor compliance increased (from 4.8 to 9.5 ml/cm H2O), and leak-point-pressure decreased (from 46.5 to 24.2 cm H2O). Four patients did not respond and were treated by ileocystoplasty. Another five were lost to follow-up. Group 2. 14 patients had repeated (mean 2.5) injections of BTX-A with a mean interval of 13.7 months. In thirteen patients, urodynamic parameters of the first and last injection were similar to those obtained in Group 1, showing a good response. One patient received an ileocystoplasty. Conclusion BTX-A is a safe alternative in the treatment of detrusor hyperactivity in children with myelomeningocele (MMC). The efficacy lasted a mean of 12 months and urodynamic response was unchanged even after several injections. In our series, 21.7% of children with severe low-compliance bladders were non-responders. PMID:24578954

  18. Murine bladder wall biomechanics following partial bladder obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph; Drzewiecki, Beth A; Merryman, W David; Pope, John C

    2013-10-18

    Evaluation of bladder wall mechanical behavior is important in understanding the functional changes that occur in response to pathologic processes such as partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO). In the murine model, the traditional approach of cystometry to describe bladder compliance can prove difficult secondary to small bladder capacity and surgical exposure of the bladder. Here, we explore an alternative technique to characterize murine mechanical properties by applying biaxial mechanical stretch to murine bladders that had undergone pBOO. 5-6 week old female C57/Bl6 mice were ovariectomized and subjected to pBOO via an open surgical urethral ligation and sacrificed after 4 weeks (n=12). Age matched controls (n=6) were also analyzed. Bladders were separated based on phenotype of fibrotic (n=6) or distended (n=6) at the time of harvest. Biaxial testing was performed in modified Kreb's solution at 37°C. Tissue was preconditioned to 10 cycles and mechanical response was evaluated by comparing axial strain at 50kPa. The normal murine bladders exhibited anisotropy and were stiffer in the longitudinal direction. All mice showed a loss of anisotropy after 4 weeks of pBOO. The two phenotypes observed after pBOO, fibrotic and distended, exhibited less and more extensibility, respectively. These proof-of-principle data demonstrate that pBOO creates quantifiable changes in the mechanics of the murine bladder that can be effectively quantified with biaxial testing.

  19. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-02-29

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder.

  20. Botulinum toxin A for the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Fan; Chiu, Hung-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Chang, Chao-Hsiang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung

    2016-01-01

    The standard treatment for overactive bladder starts with patient education and behavior therapies, followed by antimuscarinic agents. For patients with urgency urinary incontinence refractory to antimuscarinic therapy, currently both American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines suggested that intravesical injection of botulinum toxin A should be offered. The mechanism of botulinum toxin A includes inhibition of vesicular release of neurotransmitters and the axonal expression of capsaicin and purinergic receptors in the suburothelium, as well as attenuation of central sensitization. Multiple randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrated that botulinum toxin A to be an effective treatment for patients with refractory idiopathic or neurogenic detrusor overactivity. The urinary incontinence episodes, maximum cystometric capacity, and maximum detrusor pressure were improved greater by botulinum toxin A compared to placebo. The adverse effects of botulinum toxin A, such as urinary retention and urinary tract infection, were primarily localized to the lower urinary tract. Therefore, botulinum toxin A offers an effective treatment option for patients with refractory overactive bladder. PMID:26938559

  1. Isolated bladder aspergillosis as the primary presentation of non-oliguric acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Dervisoglu, Erkan; Dikmen, Emre; Filinte, Deniz; Yilmaz, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    A 70-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with acute obstructive non-oliguric renal failure. Abdominal CT revealed obstructive hydronephrosis and irregular thickening of the bladder wall. Upon cystoscopy, samples of tissue were taken and found to be positive for Aspergillus spp. on histology, indicating infection of the bladder wall. The patient was treated successfully by means of a percutaneous nephrostomy and a 30-day course of caspofungin.

  2. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  3. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  4. Deciphering the Roles of Thiazolidinediones and PPARγ in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Melody; McBeth, Lucien; Sindhwani, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    The use of thiazolidinedione (TZD) therapy in type II diabetic patients has proven useful in the lowering of blood glucose levels. However, recent investigations have shown that there may be potential health concerns associated, including the risk of developing bladder cancer as well as complications in the cardiovasculature. TZDs are ligands for the nuclear receptor PPARγ, and activation causes lipid uptake and insulin sensitization, both of which are critical processes for diabetic patients whose bodies are unable to utilize insulin effectively. Several studies have shown that PPARγ/TZDs decrease IGF-1 levels and, thus, reduce cancer growth in carcinomas such as the pancreas, colon, liver, and prostate. However, other studies have shed light on the potential of the receptor as a biomarker for uroepithelial carcinomas, particularly due to its stimulatory effect on migration of bladder cancer cells. Furthermore, PPARγ may provide the tumor-promoting microenvironment by de novo synthesis of nutrients that are needed for bladder cancer development. In this review, we closely examine the TZD class of drugs and their effects on PPARγ in patient studies along with additional molecular factors that are positive modulators, such as protein phosphatase 5 (PP5), which may have considerable implications for bladder cancer therapy. PMID:28348577

  5. Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder)

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  6. [Diet in bladder cancer ethiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, V; Ilić, M; Janković, S; Djokić, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show influence of different foods on bladder cancer appearance, as well as possible consequent ways of prevention. Consuption of food rich in animal fat and cholesterol, fried foods, especially several times used cookin oil for frying, processed meat with additives (nitrates, nitrites, azo-colourrs) can influence bladder cancer occurrence. Regularly, continous consumption of fermented milk products, which contains come types of milky--acids bacterias, is considered as protective factor in developing bladder cancer. Reports that fruit and vegetable are protective food items are pretty consistent. Data about mineral intake and bladder cancer are obscure.

  7. Urogynecological conditions associated with overactive bladder symptoms in women

    PubMed Central

    Forde, James C.; Davila, Jonathan L.; Marks, Brian K.; Epstein, Matthew; Tsui, Johnson F.; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Blaivas, Jerry G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder symptoms (OAB) affect 9–43% of women and are associated with underlying disorders, including pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). The aim of this study is to identify urogynecological conditions associated with OAB symptoms. Methods This prospective, institutional review board-approved study included women referred to a tertiary centre with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). All women completed the self-administered OAB questionnaire (OABSS). Those with an OABSS ≥8, the cutoff, were considered to have OAB symptoms. Patients underwent a history and physical examination (including Baden-Walker prolapse grading and stress test), 24-hour voiding diary, pad test (for urinary incontinence), urinalysis, and uroflow with post-void residual volume. Patients were classified clinically into the following: idiopathic OAB, SUI, POP, bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) neurogenic bladder (NGB), recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI), and miscellaneous. Results In total, 148 women met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 67 years. Only 27% had no comorbid conditions and were considered idiopathic OAB. Associated urogynecological conditions included SUI in 37%, POP in 26%, miscellaneous conditions in 18%, recurrent UTI in 11%, NGB in 9%, and BOO in 8%. Some patients met criteria for more than one category, thus the total is greater than 100%. Conclusions In a tertiary care setting, a significant proportion of women with OAB symptoms have underlying conditions that may cause or contribute to their symptoms. Appropriate evaluation is desirable to enhance our understanding of the relationship of these conditions to the diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and pathophysiology of OAB. PMID:28360952

  8. Does Reduction of Number of Intradetrusor Injection Sites of aboBoNTA (Dysport®) Impact Efficacy and Safety in a Rat Model of Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity?

    PubMed Central

    Huynh Le Maux, Amélie; Pignol, Bernadette; Behr-Roussel, Delphine; Blachon, Jean-Luc; Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne; Compagnie, Sandrine; Picaut, Philippe; Bernabé, Jacques; Giuliano, François; Denys, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Intradetrusor injections of Botulinum toxin A—currently onabotulinumtoxinA—is registered as a second-line treatment to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). The common clinical practice is 30 × 1 mL injections in the detrusor; however, protocols remain variable and standardization is warranted. The effect of reducing the number of injection sites of Dysport® abobotulinumtoxinA (aboBoNTA) was assessed in the spinal cord-injured rat (SCI). Nineteen days post-spinalization, female rats received intradetrusor injections of saline or aboBoNTA 22.5 U distributed among four or eight sites. Two days after injection, continuous cystometry was performed in conscious rats. Efficacy of aboBoNTA 22.5 U was assessed versus aggregated saline groups on clinically-relevant parameters: maximal pressure, bladder capacity, compliance, voiding efficiency, as well as amplitude, frequency, and volume threshold for nonvoiding contractions (NVC). AboBoNTA 22.5 U significantly decreased maximal pressure, without affecting voiding efficiency. Injected in four sites, aboBoNTA significantly increased bladder capacity and compliance while only the latter when in eight sites. AboBoNTA significantly reduced NVC frequency and amplitude. This preclinical investigation showed similar inhibiting effects of aboBoNTA despite the number of sites reduction. Further studies are warranted to optimize dosing schemes to improve the risk-benefit ratio of BoNTA-based treatment modalities for NDO and further idiopathic overactive bladder. PMID:26694464

  9. The treatment of erectile dysfunction in patients with neurogenic disease

    PubMed Central

    Brant, William O.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) related to compromise of the nervous system is an increasingly common occurrence. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of ED, the myriad of disorders affecting the neurotransmission of erectogenic signals, and improved awareness and diagnosis of ED. Nevertheless, neurogenic ED remains poorly understood and characterized. Disease related factors such as depression, decreased physical and mental function, the burden of chronic illness, and loss of independence may preclude sexual intimacy and lead to ED as well. The amount of data regarding treatment options in subpopulations of differing neurologic disorders remains scarce except for men with spinal cord injury. The treatment options including phosphodiesterase inhibitors, intracavernosal or intraurethral vasoactive agents, vacuum erection devices (VED) and penile prosthetic implantation remain constant. This review discusses the options in specific neurologic conditions, and briefly provides insight into new and future developments that may reshape the management of neurogenic ED. PMID:26904415

  10. Neurogenic muscle hypertrophy in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Zutelija Fattorini, Matija; Gagro, Alenka; Dapic, Tomislav; Krakar, Goran; Marjanovic, Josip

    2017-01-01

    Muscular hypertrophy secondary to denervation is very rare, but well-documented phenomena in adults. This is the first report of a child with neurogenic unilateral hypertrophy due to S1 radiculopathy. A 12-year-old girl presented with left calf hypertrophy and negative history of low back pain or trauma. The serum creatinine kinase level and inflammatory markers were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed muscle hypertrophy of the left gastrocnemius and revealed a protruded lumbar disc at the L5-S1 level. The protruded disc abuts the S1 root on the left side. Electromyography showed mild left S1 radiculopathy. Passive stretching and work load might clarify the origin of neurogenic hypertrophy but there is still a need for further evidence. Clinical, laboratory, magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography findings showed that S1 radiculopathy could be a cause of unilateral calf swelling in youth even in the absence of a history of back or leg pain.

  11. Effects of Radiation Therapy on Established Neurogenic Heterotopic Ossification

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is frequently seen on rehabilitation units after spinal cord injuries, fractures, brain injuries, and limb amputations. Currently, there is no effective treatment for HO other than prophylaxis with anti-inflammatory medications, irradiation, and bisphosphonate administration. These prophylactic treatments are not effective for managing ectopic bone once it has formed. Here we describe three cases of established neurogenic HO treated with radiation therapy (RT). All patients had decreased serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone-specific ALP levels with decreased pain but increased range of motion immediately after RT. Post-treatment X-rays revealed no further growth of the HO. All patients maintained clinical and laboratory improvements 4 or 6 months after the RT. Our results suggest that RT is safe and effective in decreasing pain and activity of neurogenic HO. PMID:28119846

  12. Neurogenic neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Littlejohn, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Although fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) have distinct clinical phenotypes, they do share many other features. Pain, allodynia and dysaesthesia occur in each condition and seem to exist on a similar spectrum. Fibromyalgia and CRPS can both be triggered by specific traumatic events, although fibromyalgia is most commonly associated with psychological trauma and CRPS is most often associated with physical trauma, which is frequently deemed routine or minor by the patient. Fibromyalgia and CRPS also seem to share many pathophysiological mechanisms, among which the most important are those involving central effects. Nonetheless, peripheral effects, such as neurogenic neuroinflammation, are also important contributors to the clinical features of each of these disorders. This Review highlights the differing degrees to which neurogenic neuroinflammation might contribute to the multifactorial pathogenesis of both fibromyalgia and CRPS, and discusses the evidence suggesting that this mechanism is an important link between the two disorders, and could offer novel therapeutic targets.

  13. Protocol for a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial investigating sacral neuromodulation for neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sacral neuromodulation has become a well-established and widely accepted treatment for refractory non-neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, but its value in patients with a neurological cause is unclear. Although there is evidence indicating that sacral neuromodulation may be effective and safe for treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction, the number of investigated patients is low and there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Methods and design This study is a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind multicenter trial including 4 sacral neuromodulation referral centers in Switzerland. Patients with refractory neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction are enrolled. After minimally invasive bilateral tined lead placement into the sacral foramina S3 and/or S4, patients undergo prolonged sacral neuromodulation testing for 3–6 weeks. In case of successful (defined as improvement of at least 50% in key bladder diary variables (i.e. number of voids and/or number of leakages, post void residual) compared to baseline values) prolonged sacral neuromodulation testing, the neuromodulator is implanted in the upper buttock. After a 2 months post-implantation phase when the neuromodulator is turned ON to optimize the effectiveness of neuromodulation using sub-sensory threshold stimulation, the patients are randomized in a 1:1 allocation in sacral neuromodulation ON or OFF. At the end of the 2 months double-blind sacral neuromodulation phase, the patients have a neuro-urological re-evaluation, unblinding takes place, and the neuromodulator is turned ON in all patients. The primary outcome measure is success of sacral neuromodulation, secondary outcome measures are adverse events, urodynamic parameters, questionnaires, and costs of sacral neuromodulation. Discussion It is of utmost importance to know whether the minimally invasive and completely reversible sacral neuromodulation would be a valuable treatment option for

  14. A dangerous Cushing response in a child: neurogenic heart damage.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Francesco; Calvi, Maria Rosa; Beretta, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Cushing response, which acts to preserve cerebral blood flow by inducing arterial hypertension, could induce neurogenic heart damage through hyperactivation of autonomic nervous system. Most of clinical reports describe neurogenic heart damage as a self-limiting condition clinically characterized by electrocardiographic abnormalities in the setting of an acute neurologic insult. Here we describe a case of life-threatening cardiac dysfunction immediately after a massive intracerebral hemorrhage in a healthy 7-year-old child. The low probability of ischemic heart disease, the poor increase of cardiac necrosis markers, the localization of regional wall motion abnormalities that are not typical for coronary artery disease, and reversibility after brain surgical decompression are consistent all with neurogenic heart damage. Acute decrease of brain oxygen delivery caused by cardiac dysfunction worsens secondary brain injury in the setting of an acute neurologic insult. Thus, Cushing response, which is a physiological mechanism of cerebral protection, could become a double-edged sword when massive sympathetic activation makes the myocardium stunned.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: bladder cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 1. BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95(4): ... SA, James ND, Jankowski JA, Wallace DM. Molecular pathways in bladder cancer: part 2. BJU Int. 2005 Mar;95(4): ...

  16. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Velásquez, Zahady D.; Muñoz, Rosa I.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as “neurogenic niche”. Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their

  17. Exosomes as Novel Regulators of Adult Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Castro, Maite A; Burgos, Patricia V; Velásquez, Zahady D; Muñoz, Rosa I; Lafourcade, Carlos A; Troncoso-Escudero, Paulina; Wyneken, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis has been convincingly demonstrated in two regions of the mammalian brain: the sub-granular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) in the hippocampus, and the sub-ventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles (LV). SGZ newborn neurons are destined to the granular cell layer (GCL) of the DG, while new neurons from the SVZ neurons migrate rostrally into the olfactory bulb (OB). The process of adult neurogenesis persists throughout life and is supported by a pool of neural stem cells (NSCs), which reside in a unique and specialized microenvironment known as "neurogenic niche". Neurogenic niches are structured by a complex organization of different cell types, including the NSC-neuron lineage, glial cells and vascular cells. Thus, cell-to-cell communication plays a key role in the dynamic modulation of homeostasis and plasticity of the adult neurogenic process. Specific cell-cell contacts and extracellular signals originated locally provide the necessary support and regulate the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of NSCs. Furthermore, extracellular signals originated at distant locations, including other brain regions or systemic organs, may reach the niche through the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or the vasculature and influence its nature. The role of several secreted molecules, such as cytokines, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, in the biology of adult NSCs, has been systematically addressed. Interestingly, in addition to these well-recognized signals, a novel type of intercellular messengers has been identified recently: the extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs, and particularly exosomes, are implicated in the transfer of mRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), proteins and lipids between cells and thus are able to modify the function of recipient cells. Exosomes appear to play a significant role in different stem cell niches such as the mesenchymal stem cell niche, cancer stem cell niche and pre-metastatic niche; however, their roles

  18. Our patients followed up with a diagnosis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Mehmet Yusuf; Yıldızdaş, Rıza Dinçer; Yükselmiş, Ufuk; Horoz, Özden Ögür

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical situation which developes as a result of central nervous system injury. It is rare in the childhood. Neurogenic pulmonary edema is a clinical diagnosis. Although the pathogenesis is not elucidated well, there is increase in pulmonary interstitial and alveolar fluid. The main principle in treatment of neurogenic pulmonary edema is supportive treatment and decreasing intracranial pressure as in acute respiratory distress syndrome. In this article, clinical properties of our two patients diagnosed with neurogenic pulmonary edema developed as a result of central nervous system injury are presented. PMID:26884694

  19. Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Bladder Cancer Cell Transitional; Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer; Bladder Cancer; Urinary Bladder; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urinary Bladder Neoplasms; Urologic Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urinary Bladder Diseases; Urologic Diseases

  20. Chemoprevention of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Lamm, Donald L

    2002-02-01

    The data presented herein, although highly supportive for a protective role of various nutrients against bladder cancer, are far from definitive. Many authorities question the validity of current recommendations for nutritional chemoprevention against bladder cancer. The reason for the wide variations reported in epidemiologic studies lies in the nature of observational studies. Dietary studies are limited in their conclusions because the protection afforded by the consumption of a particular nutrient may be multifactorial, with different components of the food exerting potential chemopreventive effects. Furthermore, measuring levels of nutrients in the food intake of populations is confounded by factors that might affect these levels and also the incidence of cancer. For example, vitamin A can come from animal or vegetarian sources. Because animal fat has been identified as a potential carcinogen in man, depending on the source of the vitamin, varying levels of protection might be deduced. In addition, chemoprevention studies using dietary supplements are expected to have mild effects, and large studies would be required to confirm statistical significance. Even with agents such as intravesical chemotherapy, only half the studies achieve statistical significance [29]. Prospective randomized trials with a large sample size, longer follow-up, and an extended duration of treatment are needed to clarify the association between micronutrients and cancer protection. With these caveats in mind, several recommendations can be made. Simple measures, such as drinking more fluids (especially water), can have a profound impact on the incidence of bladder cancer. Vitamins are being extensively studied in chemopreventive trials for different cancers. There is strong evidence for a chemoprotective effect of vitamin A in bladder cancer. The authors recommend 32,000 IU/day of vitamin A initially, with lower doses (24,000 IU) for persons less than 50 kg. Because liver toxicity is a

  1. OnabotulinumtoxinA Urethral Sphincter Injection as Treatment for Non-neurogenic Voiding Dysfunction – A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chung-Cheng; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-01-01

    Non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction including dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity caused by a spastic or non-relaxing external urethral sphincter can theoretically be treated by injections of botulinum A toxin into the external urethral sphincter. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was designed to determine the clinical efficacy of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injections in patients with dysfunctional voiding or detrusor underactivity. Patients with medically refractory dysfunctional voiding (n = 31) or detrusor underactivity (n = 31) were randomly allocated in a 2:1 ratio to receive either onabotulinumtoxinA (100 U) (n = 38) or placebo (normal saline) (n = 24). There were no significant differences in subjective or objective parameters between patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA and those who received saline injection therapy, and the overall success rate was 43.5% (reduction in Patient perception of Bladder Condition by ≥2: onabotulinumtoxinA 36.8% vs placebo 54.2%, p = 0.114). The results were similar between the dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity subgroups; however, a significant reduction in detrusor voiding pressure was only observed in dysfunctional voiding patients who received onabotulinumtoxinA. Repeat urethral sphincter onabotulinumtoxinA injections offered greater therapeutic effects in both dysfunctional voiding and detrusor underactivity patients. For patients with non-neurogenic voiding dysfunction, the success rate of onabotulinumtoxinA urethral sphincter injection was not superior to placebo. PMID:27958325

  2. Bladder Injury During Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tarney, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean section is the most common surgery performed in the United States with over 30% of deliveries occurring via this route. This number is likely to increase given decreasing rates of vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) and primary cesarean delivery on maternal request, which carries the inherent risk for intraoperative complications. Urologic injury is the most common injury at the time of either obstetric or gynecologic surgery, with the bladder being the most frequent organ damaged. Risk factors for bladder injury during cesarean section include previous cesarean delivery, adhesions, emergent cesarean delivery, and cesarean section performed at the time of the second stage of labor. Fortunately, most bladder injuries are recognized at the time of surgery, which is important, as quick recognition and repair are associated with a significant reduction in patient mortality. Although cesarean delivery is a cornerstone of obstetrics, there is a paucity of data in the literature either supporting or refuting specific techniques that are performed today. There is evidence to support double-layer closure of the hysterotomy, the routine use of adhesive barriers, and performing a Pfannenstiel skin incision versus a vertical midline subumbilical incision to decrease the risk for bladder injury during cesarean section. There is also no evidence that supports the creation of a bladder flap, although routinely performed during cesarean section, as a method to reduce the risk of bladder injury. Finally, more research is needed to determine if indwelling catheterization, exteriorization of the uterus, and methods to extend hysterotomy incision lead to bladder injury. PMID:24876830

  3. Botulinum toxin type A-induced changes in the chemical coding of dorsal root ganglion neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bossowska, A; Majewski, M

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin, which in recent years has been effectively applied in experimental treatments of many neurogenic disorders of the urinary bladder. BTX is a selective, presynaptically-acting blocking agent of acetylcholine release from nerve terminals what, in turn, leads to the cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. However, application of this toxin in urological practice is still in the developmental stages and the full mechanism of its action remain elusive. Thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder after BTX treatment. Retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was injected into the urinary bladder wall in six juvenile female pigs and three weeks later, intramural bladder injections of BTX (100 IU per animal) were carried out in all the animals. After a week, DRG from L1 to Cql were harvested from the pigs and neurochemical characterization of FB+ neurons was performed using double- labeling immunofluorescence technique on 10-microm-thick cryostat sections. BTX injections led to a significant decrease in the number of FB+ neurons containing substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), calbindin (CB), somatostatin (SOM) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) when compared with that found in the healthy animals (19% vs. 45%, 18% vs. 36%, 0.6% vs. 3%, 0.4 vs. 4% and 0.1% vs. 6%, respectively) These data demonstrated that BTX changed the chemical coding of bladder sensory neurons, and therefore this drug should be taken into consideration when it planning experimental therapy of selected neurogenic bladder disorders.

  4. Underactive Bladder in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chi; Plata, Mauricio; Lamb, Laura E; Chancellor, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    Overactive bladder is one of the most common bladder problems, but an estimated 20 million Americans have underactive bladder (UAB), which makes going to the bathroom difficult, increases the risk of urinary tract infections, and even leads to institutionalization. This article provides an overview of UAB in older adults, and discusses the prevalence, predisposing factors, cause, clinical investigations, and treatments. At present, there is no effective therapy for UAB. A great deal of work still needs to be done on understanding the pathogenesis and the development of effective therapies.

  5. Bladder diverticulitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Michael; Jeanmonod, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Bladder diverticulum, an outpouching of the mucosa through the muscular wall of the bladder, is a multifactorial disease process that can be either acquired or congenital. Although small diverticuli are usually asymptomatic, a large diverticulum may result in hematuria, urinary tract infection, acute abdomen due to its rupture, acute urinary retention, or neoplasm formation. We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and was ultimately diagnosed with bladder diverticulitis, a disease not previously described in the literature.

  6. Curative effect assessment of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu-Zhao; Guo, Lei; Zhang, Fu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    AIM To observe the curative effect of bandage contact lens in neurogenic keratitis. METHODS Twenty cases of neurogenic keratitis were studied at the Department of Ophthalmology, the first Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, between October 2012 and June 2013. These included 13 males and 7 females, aged from 35 to 88y. Patients were voluntarily divided into an experimental group (lens wearing group, n=10) and control group (drug therapy, n=10). In experimental group patients wore silicone hydrogel bandage soft contact lens. Both groups used the following eyedrops: 0.5% levofloxacin TID; 0.5% Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose QID; fibroblast growth factor BID; ganciclovir BID [cases complicated with herpes simplex virus (HSV)]; compound tropicamide BID (cases concurrent hypopyon). The healing time of corneal ulcer and complication rates were observed in the two groups. RESULTS The healing time of corneal ulcer in the experimental group was 10.80±4.44d versus 46.70±13.88d in the control group (P<0.05). No complications occurred in the experimental group, except for the lens falling off twice in one case, the patient recovered eight days after rewearing the lens. While in the control group, all cases vascularized, 2 cases were complicated with descemetocele that recovered with amniotic membrane transplantation and 1 case was complicated with corneal perforation that recovered by autologous conjunctival flap covering. CONCLUSION Bandage contact lens is a safe and effective method of treating neurogenic keratitis and significantly shortened the healing time of corneal ulcer. PMID:25540750

  7. Neurogenic pulmonary edema: successful treatment with IV phentolamine.

    PubMed

    Davison, Danielle L; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Selassie, Leelie; Tevar, Rahul; Junker, Christopher; Seneff, Michael G

    2012-03-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the acute onset of pulmonary edema following a significant CNS insult. The cause is believed to be a surge of catecholamines that results in cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Although there are myriad case reports describing CNS events that are associated with this syndrome, few studies have identified specific treatment modalities. We present a case of NPE caused by an intracranial hemorrhage from a ruptured arteriovenous malformation. We uniquely document a rise and fall of serum catecholamine levels correlating with disease activity and a dramatic clinical response to IV phentolamine.

  8. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  9. [Advance of neurogenic erectile dysfunction therapy by stem cells].

    PubMed

    Shen, Han-Jian; Zhu, Guang-You

    2010-06-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction (NED) commonly results from erectile nerve damage. Recent researches have focused on the preclinical study of stem cell-based therapies targeted at repairing and protecting nervi erigentes. In this paper, researches of NESCs, MDSCs, ASCs and MSCs in NED are reviewed. Early studies have demonstrated that stem cells and gene modified stem cells were effective to the therapy of ED, even likely to cure ED. Stem cells are expected to be applied in the clinical therapy of NED. Stem cells as a new therapy technique will bring up a new challenge in forensic clinical medicine.

  10. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is one of the inhibitory mediators in the urinary bladder outlet region. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced relaxations of the pig bladder neck. Experimental approach Urothelium-denuded strips of pig bladder were mounted in organ baths for isometric force recordings of responses to 5-HT and electrical field stimulation (EFS). Key results After phenylephrine-induced contraction, 5-HT and 5-HT receptor agonists concentration-dependently relaxed the preparations, with the potency order: 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) > 5-HT = RS67333 > (±)-8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralinhydrobromide > m-chlorophenylbiguanide > α-methyl-5-HT > ergotamine. 5-HT and 5-CT relaxations were reduced by the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (2R)-1-[(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-[2-(4-methyl-1-piperidinyl)ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride and potentiated by (S)-N-tert-butyl-3-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl)-2-phenylpropanamide dihydrochloride (WAY 100135) and cyanopindolol, 5-HT1A and 5-HT1A/1B receptor antagonists respectively. Inhibitors of 5-HT1B/1D, 5-HT2, 5-HT2B/2C, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5A and 5-HT6 receptors failed to modify 5-HT responses. Blockade of monoamine oxidase A/B, noradrenergic neurotransmission, α-adrenoceptors, muscarinic and purinergic receptors, nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase and prostanoid synthesis did not alter relaxations to 5-HT. Inhibitors of Ca2+-activated K+ and ATP-dependent K+ channels failed to modify 5-HT responses but blockade of neuronal voltage-gated Na+-, Ca2+-and voltage-gated K+ (Kv)-channels potentiated these relaxations. Adenylyl cyclase activation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibition potentiated and reduced, respectively, 5-HT-induced responses. Under non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic conditions, EFS induced neurogenic, frequency-dependent, relaxations which were resistant to WAY 100135 and cyanopindolol. Conclusions and implications 5-HT relaxed

  11. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Wechsler, R.J.; Brennan, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB.

  12. A One Year Prospective Study of Neurogenic Stuttering Following Stroke: Incidence and Co-Occurring Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, C.; van Wieringen, A.; Sunaert, S.; Thijs, V.; De Nil, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    In this prospective study, data on incidence, stuttering characteristics, co-occurring speech disorders, and recovery of neurogenic stuttering in a large sample of stroke participants were assessed. Following stroke onset, 17 of 319 participants (5.3%; 95% CI, 3.2-8.3) met the criteria for neurogenic stuttering. Stuttering persisted in at least…

  13. High-dose insulin therapy for neurogenic-stunned myocardium after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Devos, Justine; Peeters, André; Wittebole, Xavier; Hantson, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    A 44-year-old woman with a history of complicated type 2 diabetes mellitus presented with a diagnosis of right-hemispheric ischaemic stroke. She developed acute respiratory distress with radiological evidence of pulmonary oedema. The ECG showed poorly significant ST-segment changes, with a minimal increase of cardiac biomarkers. Echocardiography showed a severely depressed left ventricular function, with also low values of cardiac output at invasive monitoring. The possibility of neurogenic-stunned myocardium was discussed and a metabolic resuscitation with high-dose insulin was proposed. An intravenous bolus of 80 units of insulin (0.72 IU/kg) was followed by a continuous infusion at the rate of 160 IU/h (1.45 IU/kg/h). The treatment led to a rapid and sustained improvement of the haemodynamic condition and was well tolerated. In comparison with dobutamine, insulin had significant inotropic effects without tachycardia. The patient unfortunately died on day 35, from respiratory complications after poor neurological recovery. PMID:23175002

  14. [Evolution of urinary bladder substitution].

    PubMed

    Kock, N G

    1992-11-01

    The historical background to the currently used methods for continent bladder substitution is shortly outlined. The significance for the patient's quality of life of various methods for bladder reconstruction or urinary diversion is briefly discussed. The importance of reservoir configuration for achieving a high compliant urinary receptacle is pointed out. Factors affecting reabsorption of urinary constituents are stressed and the significance of an antireflux mechanism is discussed. Currently the majority of patients undergoing cystectomy for cancer or for other reasons can be offered bladder substitutes providing continence and easy emptying; that is, complete control over voiding. This can be achieved by orthotopic bladder reconstruction or by diverting the urine to the augmented and valved rectum or to the skin via a continent intestinal reservoir.

  15. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  16. Carotid body overactivity induces respiratory neurone channelopathy contributing to neurogenic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Davi J A; Machado, Benedito H; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-07-15

    Why sympathetic activity rises in neurogenic hypertension remains unknown. It has been postulated that changes in the electrical excitability of medullary pre-sympathetic neurones are the main causal mechanism for the development of sympathetic overactivity in experimental hypertension. Here we review recent data suggesting that enhanced sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension is, at least in part, dependent on alterations in the electrical excitability of medullary respiratory neurones and their central modulation of sympatho-excitatory networks. We also present results showing a critical role for carotid body tonicity in the aetiology of enhanced central respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity in neurogenic hypertension. We propose a novel hypothesis of respiratory neurone channelopathy induced by carotid body overactivity in neurogenic hypertension that may contribute to sympathetic excess. Moreover, our data support the notion of targeting the carotid body as a potential novel therapeutic approach for reducing sympathetic vasomotor tone in neurogenic hypertension.

  17. Paraganglioma of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Adraktas, Dionesia; Caserta, Melanie; Tchelepi, Hisham

    2014-09-01

    Extra-adrenal paragangliomas of the urinary bladder are rare. Typically, patients present with symptoms related to catecholamine hypersecretion or mass effect, but these tumors can also be encountered incidentally on imaging studies obtained for a different purpose. It is important to recognize the key imaging features of this entity so that it may be suggested as a possible differential diagnosis in the setting of a newly identified bladder mass.

  18. Bladder cancer epidemiology and genetic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Haiyan; Wang, Meilin; Zhang, Zhengdong

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the most common malignancy of the urinary system. The incidence of bladder cancer of men is higher than that of women (approximately 4:1). Here, we summarize the bladder cancer-related risk factors, including environmental and genetic factors. In recent years, although the mortality rate induced by bladder cancer has been stable or decreased gradually, the public health effect may be pronounced. The well-established risk factors for bladder cancer are cigarette smoking and occupational exposure. Genetic factors also play important roles in the susceptibility to bladder cancer. A recent study demonstrated that hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is associated with increased risk of bladder cancer. Since 2008, genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to identify the susceptibility loci for bladder cancer. Further gene-gene or gene-environment interaction studies need to be conducted to provide more information for the etiology of bladder cancer. PMID:23720672

  19. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M; Angerer, Robert C

    2016-01-15

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo.

  20. [Neurological Signs and Symptoms of True Neurogenic Thoracic Outlet Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Higashihara, Mana; Konoeda, Fumie; Sonoo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a well-known disorder, but many aspects of its pathology, including its definition, has been disputed. True neurogenic TOS (TN-TOS) is a rare but well-defined clinical condition. TN-TOS results from the compression of the C8/T1 roots (dominant for the T1 root) or the proximal lower trunk of the brachial plexus by a fibrous band. The band extends from the first rib to either the tip of an elongated C7 transverse process or a rudimentary cervical rib. The most common presenting symptoms of TN-TOS are insidious-onset atrophy and weakness of the intrinsic hand muscles, predominantly in the thenar eminence and radial digit flexors. Nerve conduction studies demonstrate pathognomonic findings: severely attenuated compound muscle action potential of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, and usually, loss of the sensory nerve action potential of the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve. Numbness and sensory loss are typically observed, mainly in the medial forearm, although they are usually mild, and may be absent in some patients. Severe pain or paresthesia proximal to the elbow is not observed. The classical concept of TOS underlie nonspecific neurogenic TOS. It has been primarily diagnosed using provocative maneuvers. However, there is controversy regarding its pathological conceptualization and existence, as objective evidence of the disease is still lacking.

  1. Epigenetic regulation of stemness maintenance in the neurogenic niches

    PubMed Central

    Montalbán-Loro, Raquel; Domingo-Muelas, Ana; Bizy, Alexandra; Ferrón, Sacri R

    2015-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are two zones that contain neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity to give rise to neurons and glia during the entire life of the animal. Spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in the NSCs population is established and maintained by the coordinated interaction between transcription factors and epigenetic regulators which control stem cell fate. Epigenetic mechanisms are heritable alterations in genome function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence itself but that modulate gene expression, acting as mediators between the environment and the genome. At the molecular level, those epigenetic mechanisms comprise chemical modifications of DNA such as methylation, hydroxymethylation and histone modifications needed for the maintenance of NSC identity. Genomic imprinting is another normal epigenetic process leading to parental-specific expression of a gene, known to be implicated in the control of gene dosage in the neurogenic niches. The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from NSCs by expression of defined transcription factors, provide key insights into fundamental principles of stem cell biology. Epigenetic modifications can also occur during reprogramming of NSCs to pluripotency and a better understanding of this process will help to elucidate the mechanisms required for stem cell maintenance. This review takes advantage of recent studies from the epigenetic field to report knowledge regarding the mechanisms of stemness maintenance of neural stem cells in the neurogenic niches. PMID:26029342

  2. Neurogenic gene regulatory pathways in the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zheng; Angerer, Lynne M.; Angerer, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    During embryogenesis the sea urchin early pluteus larva differentiates 40-50 neurons marked by expression of the pan-neural marker synaptotagmin B (SynB) that are distributed along the ciliary band, in the apical plate and pharyngeal endoderm, and 4-6 serotonergic neurons that are confined to the apical plate. Development of all neurons has been shown to depend on the function of Six3. Using a combination of molecular screens and tests of gene function by morpholino-mediated knockdown, we identified SoxC and Brn1/2/4, which function sequentially in the neurogenic regulatory pathway and are also required for the differentiation of all neurons. Misexpression of Brn1/2/4 at low dose caused an increase in the number of serotonin-expressing cells and at higher dose converted most of the embryo to a neurogenic epithelial sphere expressing the Hnf6 ciliary band marker. A third factor, Z167, was shown to work downstream of the Six3 and SoxC core factors and to define a branch specific for the differentiation of serotonergic neurons. These results provide a framework for building a gene regulatory network for neurogenesis in the sea urchin embryo. PMID:26657764

  3. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability. PMID:24364023

  4. Analysis of carbonated thin liquids in pediatric neurogenic dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Lundine, Jennifer P.; Bates, David G.; Yin, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspiration of liquids is a serious complication of neurological impairments such as traumatic brain injury or stroke. Carbonated liquids have been examined as a possible alternative to thickened liquids to help reduce aspiration in cases of dysphagia in adults, but no published literature to the best of our knowledge has evaluated this technique in children. If carbonated liquids result in safer swallowing in children, they could provide a preferred alternative to thickened liquids. Objective This pilot study examined whether carbonated thin liquids (CARB) improved swallowing compared to noncarbonated thin liquids (NOCARB) for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Materials and methods Twenty-four children admitted to a level I trauma center for acute neurological injury/disease were evaluated via videofluoroscopic swallow studies. Four descriptive outcome measures were contrasted. Results CARB significantly decreased pooling (P=0.0006), laryngeal penetration/aspiration (P=0.0044) and Penetration-Aspiration Scale scores (P=0.0127) when compared to NOCARB. On average, CARB improved scores on the Penetration-Aspiration Scale by 3.7 points for participants who aspirated NOCARB. There was no significant difference in pharyngeal residue noted between CARB and NOCARB (P=0.0625). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that carbonated thin liquids may provide an alternative to thickened liquids for children with neurogenic dysphagia. Implications for future research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:25758792

  5. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication.

    PubMed

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-12-16

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability.

  6. Pathophysiology of diabetic sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Morano, S

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common in patients with diabetes mellitus. Vascular, neurological and hormonal alterations are involved in this complication. Many studies showed altered endothelium-dependent and neurogenic relaxations in corpus cavernosum from diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction (ED). This finding has been associated with a lack of nitric oxyde (NO) production and a significant increase in NO synthase (NOS) binding sites in penile tissues, induced by diabetes. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) concur to diabetic vascular complications by quenching NO activity and by increasing the expression of mediators of vascular damage such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), possessing permeabilizing and neoangiogenic effects, and endothelin-1 (ET-1), with vaso-constricting and mitogenic action. Moreover, the differential gene expression for various growth factors in penile tissues may be involved in the pathophysiology of ED associated with diabetes. Neuropathy is also likely to be an important cause of diabetic ED: morphological alterations of autonomic nerve fibers in cavernosal tissue of patients with diabetic ED have been demonstrated. Finally, androgens enhance nNOS gene expression in the penile corpus cavernosum of rats, suggesting that they play a role in maintaining NOS activity. However, sexual dysfunctions in women with diabetes has received less attention in clinical research. Several studies suggest an increased prevalence of deficient vaginal lubrication, making sexual intercourse unpleasant. Sexual dysfunction is associated with lower overall quality of marital relation and more depressive symptoms in diabetic women.

  7. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; Macdiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-10-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, 'healthy' bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  8. Overactive bladder in children.

    PubMed

    Franco, Israel

    2016-09-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a ubiquitous syndrome that is defined by urinary urgency with, or without urinary incontinence. OAB is observed in all parts of the world, with a prevalence of 5-12% in children (5-10 years of age) and a prevalence of 0.5% in older adolescents (16-18 years of age). Published data indicate that around a third of children with OAB are likely to become adults with similar complaints. Studies in children and in adults with OAB indicate that these individuals are more likely to also have anxiety, depression and attention deficit problems, and that appropriate treatment of these comorbidities can often improve the patient's OAB symptoms. Furthermore, data from twin studies and familial surveys seem to indicate a genetic component of OAB. Pharmacological treatments of OAB in children have improved in the past 5 years, moving beyond anticholinergic agents and including the off-label use of α-blockers, β3-agonists and intravesical botulinum toxin. Use of several different electrical stimulation techniques is also effective, both as first-line treatments, and for patients with treatment-refractory symptoms. Overall the outlook of children with OAB seems to be improving, with a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Treatment modalities that target the source of the underlying problem, especially in children, are likely to provide the best patient outcomes.

  9. Overactive bladder in children

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Sophie; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a highly prevalent disorder in the pediatric population. This condition is especially troublesome for pediatric patients and their families when associated with incontinence, since it negatively affects self-esteem and impairs children’s development. From the patient’s perspective, urgency and urge incontinence can have a significant impact, negatively affecting their quality of life. For a therapy to have true benefit, changes must not only be statistically significant, but must also be perceived as meaningful by the patient. A stepwise approach is favoured to treat this pathology, starting with behavioural therapy, followed by medical management, and eventually more invasive procedures. Antimuscarinic agents are the mainstay of medical treatment for OAB. Oxybutynin is the most commonly used antimuscarinic in the pediatric population. However, some patients have a suboptimal response to antimuscarinics and many experience bothersome side effects, which have been documented with all antimuscarinics to a significantly higher degree than placebo. Although there have been reports about the use of tolterodine, fesoterodine, trospium, propiverine, and solifenacin in children, to date, only oxybutynin has been officially approved for pediatric use by medical authorities in North America. This review will address alternative treatment options for pediatric patients presenting with OAB, from conservative measures to more invasive therapies. PMID:28265325

  10. Diabetic neuropathy, A review of clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, A M; Abraira, C

    1976-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy in some form or other afflicts a majority of patients with diabetes mellitus. Neuropathic disturbance of sensory, motor or autonomic nerves may occur singly or in combination. Cranial nerve and other mononeuropathies generally resolve spontaneously. Autonomic neuropathy which can result in orthostatic hypotension, gastroparesis diabeticorum, nocturnal diarrhea, atonic bladder and impotence, although chronic, may wax and wane in clinical severity. Neuritis, disesthesias and painful sensory neuritis may resolve with good diabetic control; on occasion, diphenylhydantoin has been of therapeutic benefit.

  11. Bladder and bowel dysfunction in children: An update on the diagnosis and treatment of a common, but underdiagnosed pediatric problem

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Joana Dos; Lopes, Roberto I.; Koyle, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD) describes a spectrum of lower urinary symptoms (LUTS) accompanied by fecal elimination issues that manifest primarily by constipation and/or encopresis. This increasingly common entity is a potential cause of significant physical and psychosocial burden for children and families. BBD is commonly associated with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs), which at its extreme may lead to renal scarring and kidney failure. Additionally, BBD is frequently seen in children diagnosed with behavioural and neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Patients with concomitant BBD and neuropsychiatric disorders have less favourable treatment outcomes. Early diagnosis and treatment of BBD are critical to avoid secondary comorbidities that can adversely impact children’s kidney and bladder function, and psychosocial well-being. The majority of patients will improve with urotherapy, adequate fluid intake, and constipation treatment. Pharmacological treatment must only be considered if no improvement occurs after intensive adherence to at least six months of urotherapy ± biofeedback and constipation treatment. Anticholinergics remain the mainstay of medical treatment. Selective alpha-blockers appear to be effective for improving bladder emptying in children with non-neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO), incontinence, recurrent UTIs, and increased post-void residual (PVR) urine volumes. Alpha-1 blockers can also be used in combination with anticholinergics when overactive bladder (OAB) coexists with functional bladder outlet obstruction. Minimally invasive treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA bladder injections, and recently neurostimulation, are promising alternatives for the management of BBD refractory to behavioural and pharmacological treatment. In this review, we discuss clinical presentation, diagnostic approach, and indications

  12. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Bladder & Bowel Function Problems with bladder and bowel function are common but distressing for ... embarrassed by – these issues.  Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association.  Visit www. stroke. org ...

  13. Genetic and Epigenetic Alterations in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a high rate of recurrence and poor outcomes as a result of relapse. Bladder cancer patients require lifelong invasive monitoring and treatment, making bladder cancer one of the most expensive malignancies. Lines of evidence increasingly point to distinct genetic and epigenetic alteration patterns in bladder cancer, even between the different stages and grades of disease. In addition, genetic and epigenetic alterations have been demonstrated to play important roles during bladder tumorigenesis. This review will focus on bladder cancer-associated genomic and epigenomic alterations, which are common in bladder cancer and provide potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27915480

  14. Treatment of bladder cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Surgical treatment of common bladder cancers; Radiation therapy of common bladder cancers; Chemotherapy of common bladder cancers; Immunotherapy of common bladder cancers; Multimodal treatment of common bladder cancers; Other treatment modalities of common bladder cancers; Treatment of less common bladder cancers; Reviews of treatment of bladder cancers.

  15. Molecular pathology and biomarkers of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Czerniak, Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    Bladder cancer originates in the epithelial lining of the bladder's mucosa and develops in association with several habitual, industrial, and environmental risk factors via papillary and non-papillary pathways. In this chapter we review novel concepts concerning the molecular mechanisms of early field change in bladder neoplasia stemming from whole-organ genomic mapping studies. These mechanisms are discussed in the context of molecular pathogenesis of bladder cancer and in relation to treatment and biomarker-based detection strategies.

  16. Neurogenic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sann, H; Dux, M; Schemann, M; Jancsó, G

    1996-11-29

    In contrast to the skin and some visceral organs the capability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of evoking an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract is equivocal. We have therefore investigated the neurogenic plasma extravasation induced by local application of capsaicin to the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the rat. Permeable vessels were visualised histologically with the vascular labelling technique using colloidal silver. In the smooth muscle layer of the small intestine, capsaicin elicited a 3-fold increase in the density of labelled blood vessels (diameter, 7-35 microns). Significant capsaicin-evoked plasma extravasation was also observed in the submucosa of the jejunum and ileum, and in the basal layer of the jejunal mucosa. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was not noted in the stomach and the colon. The data suggest the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents in inflammatory processes in the rat small intestine.

  17. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  18. Unlocking the Neurogenic Potential of Mammalian Müller Glia

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaohuan; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Müller glia (MG) are the primary support cells in the vertebrate retina, regulating homeostasis in one of the most metabolically active tissues. In lower vertebrates such as fish, they respond to injury by proliferating and reprogramming to regenerate retinal neurons. In mammals, MG may also react to injury by proliferating, but they fail to initiate regeneration. The barriers to regeneration could be intrinsic to mammalian MG or the function of the niche that cannot support the MG reprogramming required for lineage conversion or both. Understanding these mechanisms in light of those being discovered in fish may lead to the formulation of strategies to unlock the neurogenic potential of MG and restore regeneration in the mammalian retina. PMID:27572710

  19. Bladder trauma: multidetector computed tomography cystography.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Charbel; Kanth, Nalini

    2011-08-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cystography is rapidly becoming the most recommended study for evaluation of the bladder for suspected trauma. This article reviews the bladder trauma with emphasis on the application of MDCT cystography to traumatic bladder injuries using a pictorial essay based on images collected in our level I trauma center.

  20. Bladder Outlet Obstruction: Causes in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... is the most common cause of bladder outlet obstruction in men Scarring of the urinary channel (urethra) or bladder neck, as a result of injury or surgery Use of certain medications, including antihistamines, decongestants ... of bladder outlet obstruction is important to prevent serious problems caused by ...

  1. [Occupational hazards and bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Nizamova, R S

    1991-01-01

    Occupational exposure to health hazards was studied in 258 industrial workers who had developed cancer of the bladder against 454 matched controls. All the test subjects and controls were residents of the Tambov Province centers of chemical industry. Statistical significance (relative risk-4.7) was established for exposure to aromatic amines. For those contacting with aniline dyes the relative risk (RR) made up 2.4. The risk to develop bladder cancer in powder shops (RR-3.2) was attributed to the hazards of dyes and diphenylamine. In leather-shoe and textile industry the exposure to dyes was not safe (RR-6.1), neither was it to chemicals, oil products, pesticides, overheating (RR-3.2, 1.6, 3.2 and 2.9, respectively). It is stated that in line with a significant risk to develop bladder cancer at exposure to aromatic amines there exist a number of occupational factors contributing to this risk.

  2. Circulating Biomarkers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nandagopal, Lakshminarayanan; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease characterized by multiple unmet needs in the realm of diagnosis, clinical staging, monitoring and therapy. There is an urgent need to develop precision medicine for advanced urothelial carcinoma. Given the difficulty of serial analyses of metastatic tumor tissue to identify resistance and new therapeutic targets, development of non-invasive monitoring using circulating molecular biomarkers is critically important. Although the development of circulating biomarkers for the management of bladder cancer is in its infancy and may currently suffer from lower sensitivity of detection, they have inherent advantages owing to non-invasiveness. Additionally, circulating molecular alterations may capture tumor heterogeneity without the sampling bias of tissue biopsy. This review describes the accumulating data to support further development of circulating biomarkers including circulating tumor cells, cell-free circulating tumor (ct)-DNA, RNA, micro-RNA and proteomics to improve the management of bladder cancer. PMID:28035318

  3. Pioglitazone has a dubious bladder cancer risk but an undoubted cardiovascular benefit.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R E J

    2015-03-01

    On 8 April 2014, a US jury ordered Takeda and Eli Lilly to pay $9 bn in punitive damages after finding that they had concealed the cancer risks associated with pioglitazone. By contrast, on 28 August 2014, the long-awaited outcome of the 10-year Kaiser Permanente Northern California study was announced. That study was specifically designed to investigate whether patients exposed to pioglitazone were at an increased risk of bladder cancer and found no association; thus, at last, the controversial issue has been resolved. A review, in retrospect, of the story of the proposed link between pioglitazone and bladder cancer reveals flaws at every stage. In 2012, a BMJ editorial, in keeping with some other contemporary reports, stated 'it can confidently be assumed that pioglitazone increases the risk of bladder cancer'. Examination of the information which led to such a statement shows that: 1) the pre-clinical findings of bladder cancer in male rats is not indicative of human risk; 2) there is no association between bladder cancer and pioglitazone in randomized controlled trials, once cases that could not plausibly be related to treatment are removed; and 3) the observational studies that have suggested a link have over-extrapolated from the data: pioglitazone-treated patients had more risk factors for bladder cancer than those not treated with pioglitazone. Meanwhile careful study of randomized controlled trials shows evidence of cardiovascular benefit from pioglitazone in Type 2 diabetes, a condition which results, more than anything, in premature cardiovascular death and morbidity.

  4. Diabetes and Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Fujimaki, Shin; Wakabayashi, Tamami; Takemasa, Tohru; Asashima, Makoto; Kuwabara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common serious metabolic diseases that results in hyperglycemia due to defects of insulin secretion or insulin action or both. The present review focuses on the alterations to the diabetic neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle, including stem cells in both tissues, and the preventive effects of physical activity on diabetes. Diabetes is associated with various nervous disorders, such as cognitive deficits, depression, and Alzheimer's disease, and that may be caused by neural stem cell dysfunction. Additionally, diabetes induces skeletal muscle atrophy, the impairment of energy metabolism, and muscle weakness. Similar to neural stem cells, the proliferation and differentiation are attenuated in skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. However, physical activity is very useful for preventing the diabetic alteration to the neuronal tissues and skeletal muscle. Physical activity improves neurogenic capacity of neural stem cells and the proliferative and differentiative abilities of satellite cells. The present review proposes physical activity as a useful measure for the patients in diabetes to improve the physiological functions and to maintain their quality of life. It further discusses the use of stem cell-based approaches in the context of diabetes treatment. PMID:26075247

  5. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  6. [Rare cases of bladder stones].

    PubMed

    Sampalmieri, Gregorio; Moretti, Antonello; Sampalmieri, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We present here two special cases of urolithiasis. The first one shows a giant bladder lithiasis resulting in severe renal insufficiency in a 63-year-old patient, who had previously had nicturia (2-3 times), occasional episodes of urinary frequency and burning micturition, in the absence of renal colic, hematuria or interrupted urination. The second case referes to an 85-year-old man suffering from prostatic enlargement and bladder stones, hospitalized to undergo intervention of trans-vesical prostatic adenomectomy, during which two star-shaped stones were found without obvious symptoms.

  7. Social stress induces changes in urinary bladder function, bladder NGF content, and generalized bladder inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Mingin, Gerald C; Peterson, Abbey; Erickson, Cuixia Shi; Nelson, Mark T; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2014-10-01

    Social stress may play a role in urinary bladder dysfunction in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we explored changes in bladder function caused by social stress using mouse models of stress and increasing stress. In the stress paradigm, individual submissive FVB mice were exposed to C57BL/6 aggressor mice directly/indirectly for 1 h/day for 2 or 4 wk. Increased stress was induced by continuous, direct/indirect exposure of FVB mice to aggressor mice for 2 wk. Stressed FVB mice exhibited nonvoiding bladder contractions and a decrease in both micturition interval (increased voiding frequency) and bladder capacity compared with control animals. ELISAs demonstrated a significant increase in histamine protein expression with no change in nerve growth factor protein expression in the urinary bladder compared with controls. Unlike stressed mice, mice exposed to an increased stress paradigm exhibited increased bladder capacities and intermicturition intervals (decreased voiding frequency). Both histamine and nerve growth factor protein expression were significantly increased with increased stress compared with control bladders. The change in bladder function from increased voiding frequency to decreased voiding frequency with increased stress intensity suggests that changes in social stress-induced urinary bladder dysfunction are context and duration dependent. In addition, changes in the bladder inflammatory milieu with social stress may be important contributors to changes in urinary bladder function.

  8. Medial antebrachial cutaneous sensory studies in the evaluation of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kothari, M J; Macintosh, K; Heistand, M; Logigian, E L

    1998-05-01

    Over 3 years, we studied 8 patients with neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) and tested the medial antebrachial sensory response (MASR) to determine its diagnostic value. The MASR and ulnar sensory response (USR) were abnormal in all 8 patients. Seven had a low median motor response (MMR) with a low USR. In 1, the MASR and USR were abnormal but the MMR was normal. We conclude that the MASR is of diagnostic value in patients with neurogenic TOS.

  9. Drinking to near death--acute water intoxication leading to neurogenic stunned myocardium.

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Lia I; Lovallo, Emily; Schnorr, C Daniel; Mantuani, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a rare disease entity that has been typically described as a consequence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and, less commonly, seizures. Here we describe a case of a healthy young woman who drank excessive free water causing acute hyponatremia complicated by cerebral edema and seizure, leading to cardiogenic shock from neurogenic stunned myocardium. Two days later, she had complete return of her normal cardiac function.

  10. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder.

  11. Bladder health across the life course.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, P; Marschall-Kehrel, D; King, S; Lukacz, E

    2013-05-01

    Influences on bladder health begin during infancy and continue throughout the lifespan. Bladder anatomy and physiology change as individuals age, and the risk and propensity for bladder conditions, including lower urinary tract symptoms, throughout life are related to factors specific to age, sex, and life events. Bladder habits and dysfunctions at one stage of life may affect bladder health in subsequent stages. However, bladder problems are neither a normal part of aging nor inevitable at any stage of life. Many of the factors that negatively impact bladder health at all ages may be modifiable, and healthy bladder habits may prevent or reverse bladder dysfunctions that can occur naturally or in response to life events. There are opportunities to further define and promote healthy bladder habits through focused research and heightened public awareness of the importance of bladder health, which may lead to improvements in overall health and quality of life. It is our hope that this paper will inform and encourage public health initiatives and research programs aimed at this goal.

  12. Pioglitazone use and the risk of bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsin-Wei; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Ho, Shu-Chen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to identify the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. A nested case-control study was performed using a representative database randomly sampled from National Health Insurance enrollees. The source cohort consisted of newly diagnosed diabetic patients from 1997 to 2009. Cases were identified as those with a diagnosis of bladder cancer from 2002 to 2009. For each case, four matched control individuals were randomly selected. A multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate the relative magnitude of risk in relation to the use of pioglitazone. In total, 259 cases and 1036 controls were identified. The prevalent use of pioglitazone is similar in cases and controls (adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.58-2.49). Compared to nonusers, these values were 1.08 (0.41-2.88) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use ≤ 8268 mg and 1.35 (0.48-3.79) for those with cumulative pioglitazone use > 8268 mg. This study does not provide support for the risk association between pioglitazone exposure and bladder cancer. Further confirmation is needed due to the limitation of small case number with relatively shorter exposure duration and lower cumulative dose.

  13. Stem Cells in Functional Bladder Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Smolar, Jakub; Salemi, Souzan; Horst, Maya; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conditions impairing bladder function in children and adults, such as myelomeningocele, posterior urethral valves, bladder exstrophy or spinal cord injury, often need urinary diversion or augmentation cystoplasty as when untreated they may cause severe bladder dysfunction and kidney failure. Currently, the gold standard therapy of end-stage bladder disease refractory to conservative management is enterocystoplasty, a surgical enlargement of the bladder with intestinal tissue. Despite providing functional improvement, enterocystoplasty is associated with significant long-term complications, such as recurrent urinary tract infections, metabolic abnormalities, stone formation, and malignancies. Therefore, there is a strong clinical need for alternative therapies for these reconstructive procedures, of which stem cell-based tissue engineering (TE) is considered to be the most promising future strategy. This review is focused on the recent progress in bladder stem cell research and therapy and the challenges that remain for the development of a functional bladder wall. PMID:27781020

  14. Pathobiology and Chemoprevention of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Takuji; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Kuno, Toshiya; Suzuki, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of bladder cancer has improved considerably over the past decade. Translating these novel pathobiological discoveries into therapies, prevention, or strategies to manage patients who are suspected to have or who have been diagnosed with bladder cancer is the ultimate goal. In particular, the chemoprevention of bladder cancer development is important, since urothelial cancer frequently recurs, even if the primary cancer is completely removed. The numerous alterations of both oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis represent novel targets for therapy and prevention. In addition, knowledge about these genetic alterations will help provide a better understanding of the biological significance of preneoplastic lesions of bladder cancer. Animal models for investigating bladder cancer development and prevention can also be developed based on these alterations. This paper summarizes the results of recent preclinical and clinical chemoprevention studies and discusses screening for bladder cancer. PMID:21941546

  15. Bladder Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing bladder cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  16. Ultrasonic lithotripsy of bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Cetin, S; Ozgür, S; Yazicioğlu, A; Unsal, K; Ilker, Y

    1988-01-01

    In the second half of 1985, 15 patients with 25 bladder stones were treated with Lutzeyer's Ultrasonic Lithotriptor. Of the patients 13 underwent additional operations, mostly transurethral resection of the prostate. The average duration of lithotripsy was 30.5 minutes. Some difficulties were experienced especially when drilling hard stones and as a complication late urethral bleeding occurred in one patient.

  17. Modulation of bladder afferent signals in normal and spinal cord-injured rats by purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Alvaro; Somogyi, George T.; Boone, Timothy B.; Ford, Anthony P.; Smith, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE • To evaluate the role of bladder sensory purinergic P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors on modulating the activity of lumbosacral neurones and urinary bladder contractions in vivo in normal or spinal cord-injured (SCI) rats with neurogenic bladder overactivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS • SCI was induced in female rats by complete transection at T8 – T9 and experiments were performed 4 weeks later, when bladder overactivity developed. Non-transected rats were used as controls (normal rats). • Neural activity was recorded in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord and field potentials were acquired in response to intravesical pressure steps via a suprapubic catheter. Field potentials were recorded under control conditions, after stimulation of bladder mucosal purinergic receptors with intravesical ATP (1 mm), and after intravenous injection of the P2X3/P2X2/3 antagonist AF-353 (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg). • Cystometry was performed in urethaneanaesthetised rats intravesically infused with saline. AF-353 (10 mg/kg) was systemically applied after baseline recordings; the rats also received a second dose of AF-353 (20 mg/kg). Changes in the frequency of voiding (VC) and non-voiding (NVC) contractions were evaluated. RESULTS • SCI rats had significantly higher frequencies for field potentials and NVC than NL rats. Intravesical ATP increased field potential frequency in control but not SCI rats, while systemic AF-353 significantly reduced this parameter in both groups. • AF-353 also reduced the inter-contractile interval in control but not in SCI rats; however, the frequency of NVC in SCI rats was significantly reduced. CONCLUSION • The P2X3/P2X2/3 receptors on bladder afferent nerves positively regulate sensory activity and NVCs in overactive bladders. PMID:22540742

  18. Autoantibody-mediated bowel and bladder dysfunction in a patient with chronic, nondiabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael W; Gordon, Thomas P; McCombe, Pamela A

    2008-04-01

    Physiological techniques can be used to detect novel autoantibodies causing alteration of autonomic function after passive transfer to mice. Previously, such antibodies have been detected in patients with type I diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, and Sjogren's syndrome. We now describe a patient with an idiopathic nondiabetic neuropathy with prominent autonomic symptoms, including bladder and bowel dysfunction. Physiological assays of whole colon and bladder were used to determine the presence in the patient serum of functional autoantibodies capable of mediating autonomic dysfunction. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from this patient was able to disrupt bladder and bowel function on passive transfer to mice. This is a new pattern of autoantibody-mediated abnormality. Although the target antigen is unknown, it is likely to be a cell-surface receptor or ion channel. This case highlights the usefulness of passive transfer studies in detecting functional antibodies in patients with autonomic neuropathy.

  19. The use of bi-layer silk fibroin scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa matrices to support bladder tissue regeneration in a rat model of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yeun Goo; Algarrahi, Khalid; Franck, Debra; Tu, Duong D.; Adam, Rosalyn M.; Kaplan, David L.; Estrada, Carlos R.; Mauney, Joshua R.

    2014-01-01

    Adverse side-effects associated with enterocystoplasty for neurogenic bladder reconstruction have spawned the need for the development of alternative graft substitutes. Bi-layer silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds and small intestinal submucosa (SIS) matrices were investigated for their ability to support bladder tissue regeneration and function in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI). Bladder augmentation was performed with each scaffold configuration in SCI animals for 10 wk of implantation and compared to non-augmented control groups (normal and SCI alone). Animals subjected to SCI alone exhibited a 72% survival rate (13/18) while SCI rats receiving SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds displayed respective survival rates of 83% (10/12) and 75% (9/12) over the course of the study period. Histological (Masson’s trichrome analysis) and immunohistochemical (IHC) evaluations demonstrated both implant groups supported de novo formation of smooth muscle layers with contractile protein expression [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and SM22α] as well as maturation of multi-layer urothelia expressing cytokeratin (CK) and uroplakin 3A proteins. Histomorphometric analysis revealed bi-layer SF and SIS scaffolds respectively reconstituted 64% and 56% of the level of α-SMA+ smooth muscle bundles present in SCI-alone controls, while similar degrees of CK+ urothelium across all experimental groups were detected. Parallel evaluations showed similar degrees of vascular area and synaptophysin+ boutons in all regenerated tissues compared to SCI-alone controls. In addition, improvements in certain urodynamic parameters in SCI animals, such as decreased peak intravesical pressure, following implantation with both matrix configurations were also observed. The data presented in this study detail the ability of acellular SIS and bi-layer SF scaffolds to support formation of innervated, vascularized smooth muscle and urothelial tissues in a neurogenic bladder model. PMID:24917031

  20. Stem cells with neurogenic potential and steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Iván

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent and multipotent stem cells with differentiation potential to neural phenotypes have been described and characterized in the last decades. Embryonic stem cells, as well as neural stem cells from developing and adult nervous system, can differentiate into different types of neurons, astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Although the initially identified actions of estradiol, progesterone and testosterone are related to sexual reproductive functions, recent evidence shows that these steroid hormones modulate development, physiology and survival of nerve cells. Furthermore, neurosteroids can be synthesized in the developing and adult nervous system. A description of the molecular modulatory actions of sex steroid hormones on the Central Nervous System is presented. The main focus of this review is to summarize the described effects of steroid hormones (progesterone, allopregnanolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, estradiol and androgens) on cell parameters relevant to stem cells, both in vitro and in vivo. The overall conclusion is that steroid hormones influence stem cell behavior by several mechanisms, namely regulation of gene expression by binding to their cognate receptors, activation of intracellular pathways involving kinases or intracellular calcium signaling, and modulation of receptors for neurotransmitters; in some instances, these hormones can substitute or modulate the action of growth factors, and also directly influence self-renewal, proliferation, differentiation or cell death of neurogenic stem cells.

  1. Skin blood flow response to locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses in the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Shen, Sa; Foreman, Robert D; Ennis, William J

    2013-09-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most common complications in diabetics, causing significant disabilities and decreasing the quality of life. Impaired microvascular reactivity contributes to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for the impaired microvascular reactivity in response to extrinsic causative factors of foot ulcers such as mechanical and thermal stresses have not been well investigated. A total of 26 participants were recruited into this study, including 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 healthy controls. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure skin blood flow at the first metatarsal head in response to a mechanical stress at 300mmHg and a fast thermal stress at 42°C. Wavelet analysis of skin blood flow oscillations was used to assess metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic controls. Our results indicated that diabetics have significantly decreased metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic responses to thermal stress, especially in the neurogenic and myogenic controls during the first vasodilatory response and in the metabolic control during the second vasodilatory response. Diabetics have a significantly decreased myogenic response to mechanical stress during reactive hyperemia. Our findings demonstrate that locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses can be used to assess microvascular reactivity and risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  2. Current and future drugs for treatment of MS-associated bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, K-E

    2014-07-01

    A majority of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) will develop lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) during the course of the disease. Even if antimuscarinic (anticholinergic) treatment is currently the mainstay of conservative treatment of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), including MS-induced NDO, extensive data regarding their effectiveness and safeness are lacking. When antimuscarinic medications fail to prove efficacious, a further option is intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxin A. In several studies, more than half (and up 76%) of the patients treated with onabotulinumtoxin A experienced significant improvement in symptoms or even achieved complete continence. Cannabis extracts have shown some promise but has still not gained wide acceptance as an effective treatment. Over the last few years many new disease-modifying drugs that have been approved and introduced for treatment of MS. These drugs may have effects not only on the MS disease process, but also on the disease symptoms, including LUTS. However, MS is not primarily a bladder disease and treatment of the underlying pathophysiology should be the main goal of treatment. Since most of the urology drugs are targeting LUTS, these drugs should be regarded as "adds on" to treatments modifying the underlying disorder. Considering that most of these drugs have not been studied specifically with respect to efficacy on LUTS, and since they are not without significant side effects, it seems important that if and when they are going to be used for treatment of bladder symptoms should be a joint decision between the neurologist and urologist taking care of the patient.

  3. Managing chronic bladder diseases with the administration of exogenous glycosaminoglycans: an update on the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lazzeri, Massimo; Hurle, Rodolfo; Casale, Paolo; Buffi, NicolòMaria; Lughezzani, Giovanni; Fiorini, Girolamo; Peschechera, Roberto; Pasini, Luisa; Zandegiacomo, Silvia; Benetti, Alessio; Taverna, Gianluigi; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Barbagli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of acute chronic cystitis and other ‘sensory’ disorders, i.e. painful bladder syndrome (PBS) or interstitial cystitis (IC), often remains multifactorial, there is a wide consensus that such clinical conditions may arise from a primary defective urothelium lining or from damaged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). A ‘cascade’ of events starting from GAG injury, which fails to heal, may lead to chronic bladder epithelial damage and neurogenic inflammation. To restore the GAG layer is becoming the main aim of new therapies for the treatment of chronic cystitis and PBS/IC. Preliminary experiences with GAG replenishment for different pathological conditions involving the lower urinary tract have been reported. There is a range of commercially available intravesical formulations of these components, alone or in combination. Literature evidence shows that exogenous intravesical hyaluronic acid markedly reduces recurrences of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Patients treated with exogenous GAGs have fewer UTI recurrences, a longer time to recurrence and a greater improvement in quality of life. Exogenous intravesical GAGs have been used for the treatment of PBS/IC. Despite the limitations of most of the studies, findings confirmed the role of combination therapy with hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate as a safe and effective option for the treatment of PBS/IC. To prevent and/or treat radiotherapy and chemotherapy induced cystitis, GAG replenishment therapy has been used showing preliminary encouraging results. The safety profile of exogenous GAGs has been reported to be very favourable, without adverse events of particular significance. PMID:27034722

  4. A model to predict bladder shapes from changes in bladder and rectal filling.

    PubMed

    Lotz, Heidi T; Remeijer, Peter; van Herk, Marcel; Lebesque, Joos V; de Bois, Josien A; Zijp, Lambert J; Moonen, Luc M

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a model that quantifies in three dimensions changes in bladder shape due to changes in bladder and/or rectal volume. The new technique enables us to predict changes in bladder shape over a short period of time, based on known urinary inflow. Shortly prior to the treatment, the patient will be scanned using a cone beam CT scanner (x-ray volume imager) that is integrated with the linear accelerator. After (automated) delineation of the bladder, the model will be used to predict the short-term shape changes of the bladder for the time interval between image acquisition and dose delivery. The model was developed using multiple daily CT scans of the pelvic area of 19 patients. For each patient, the rigid bony structure in follow-up scans was matched to that of the planning CT scan, and the outer bladder and rectal wall were delineated. Each bladder wall was subdivided in 2500 domains. A fixed reference point inside the bladder was used to calculate for each bladder structure a "Mercator-like" 2D scalar map (similar to a height map of the globe), containing the distances from this reference point to each domain on the bladder wall. Subsequently, for all bladder shapes of a patient and for all domains on the wall individually, the distance to the reference point was fitted by a linear function of both bladder and rectal volume. The model uses an existing bladder structure to create a new structure via expansion (or contraction), until the expressed volume is reached. To evaluate the predictive power of the model, the jack-knife method was used. The errors in the fitting procedure depended on the part of the bladder and range from 0 to 0.5 cm (0.2 cm on average). It was found that a volume increase of 150 cc can lead to a displacement up to about 2.5 cm of the cranial part of the bladder. With the model, the uncertainty in the position of the bladder wall can be reduced down to a maximum value of about 0.5 cm in case the bladder

  5. Ultrasound and Biomarker Tests in Predicting Cancer Aggressiveness in Tissue Samples of Patients With Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Bladder Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  6. Emulating a Fish Swim Bladder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesenka, James; Meredith, Dawn; Bolker, Jessica; Schubert, Christopher; Kraut, Gertrud

    2009-10-01

    The University of New Hampshire and the University of New England are developing biologically relevant physics laboratories for their predominantly health science audiences. Buoyancy plays an important role in a variety of biological processes. We describe an inexpensive laboratory activity based on the Cartesian Diver that allows students to quantitatively emulate the swim bladder of a fish. Inflation of the ``bladder'' is externally controlled through an external gas syringe or squeezing on the plastic water containment vessel (a 2L soda bottle). The students can accurately determine the volume of a ``fish'' at the point of neutral buoyancy by visual measurement of the trapped air pocket. A simple electronic gas pressure sensor allows the hydrostatic pressure on the fish to be analyzed simultaneously.

  7. Role of angiogenesis in urothelial bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Górnicka, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bladder cancer is the most common urinary tract malignancy in western countries. In recent years, extensive research has suggested that angiogenesis plays an important role in bladder cancer biology, contributing to tumor growth and progression. Material and methods In this review, we discuss general mechanisms of angiogenesis and highlight the influence of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, and cancer stem cells on bladder cancer biology, their relation to disease progression, and potential use in novel targeted therapies. Results Expression of a number of proangiogenic factors, including HIF-1, VEGF, bFGF, IL-8 and MMPs, as well as anti-angiogenic factor TSP-1, was found to be altered in bladder tumors. Involvement of cancer stem cells in bladder cancer development was also proposed. Conclusions High expression of most pro-angiogenic factors correlated with disease progression and shorter patient survival, but discrepancies between studies urge us to continue evaluating the significance of angiogenesis in bladder cancer. PMID:27729991

  8. Bladder tear during revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Jonathan N; Halim, Andrea; Keggi, Kristaps J

    2014-08-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) and revision total hip arthroplasty are among the most commonly performed orthopedic procedures. There are many reported complications of THA, but intrapelvic complications are a rare subset. Bladder injuries have infrequently been described in association with this common procedure. We present an unusual case of a bladder tear occurring intraoperatively during a revision THA. It is suspected that the patient's history of multiple prior hip procedures caused adhesions of the bladder to the pelvic floor and predisposed the bladder to injury during acetabular revision. Previous reports of bladder injury relating to THA have described thermal necrosis, component migration, and occasional direct perforation. There are no prior case reports describing bladder tears related to adhesions occurring intraoperatively during revision THA. This case report highlights the importance of surgeon awareness of an unusual complication. In this case, intraoperative and postoperative recognition of a hematuria diagnosis led to the appropriate treatment, and this patient had an acceptable outcome.

  9. [The latest news on bladder cancer].

    PubMed

    Retz, M; Lehmann, J; Nawroth, R; Gschwend, J E

    2007-07-01

    A review of the current literature provides new scientific insights into the diagnosis, prognosis and novel molecular targets for bladder cancer. The new WHO classification refines our staging system and influences treatment options. International clinical databases provide new tools for calculating the individual risk for bladder cancer recurrence and progression. Systematic gene cluster analysis defines multimarker panels that can serve as robust predictors of outcome. Discoveries of new signaling pathways in bladder cancer are leading to novel molecular targets for innovative therapies.

  10. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis of bladder].

    PubMed

    Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cystoscopic and pathologic patterns in 190 patients hospitalized for differential diagnosis or treatment of genitourinary tuberculosis in 2008-2011 was performed. All patients underwent polyfocal biopsy followed by pathologic examination of biopsy specimens. Furthermore, a comparison of results ofpathomorphological studies of tissue obtained by biopsy and after cystectomy was conducted. Cystoscopy in all patients with tuberculosis of the bladder (TB) revealed the reduced bladder capacity in contrast to patients with other urological diseases. Deformation of orifices, trabecularity and contact bleeding were observed in 66.7 to 94.4% of cases in patients with TB, which were significantly more common than in other diseases. Polymorphism of pathological pattern and the lack of specific changes in the majority of patients with TB were noted; multinucleated Pirogov-Langhans cells were found only in 11.8% of cases, and only in biopsies, whereas in the tissues obtained after cystectomy in same patients, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were observed. The algorithm of diagnosis of tuberculosis of the bladder is suggested.

  11. Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... History Research Resources Research at NIDDK Meetings & Events Technology Advancement & Transfer Health Information Diabetes Digestive Diseases Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  12. Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent BCG-Unresponsive Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Recurrent Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0a Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage 0is Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage I Bladder Cancer With Carcinoma In Situ; Stage I Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

  13. Ruptured urinary bladder in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Roussel, A J; Ward, D S

    1985-06-15

    A yearling Holstein heifer was admitted with abdominal pain and bilateral, ventral abdominal distention. Bladder rupture was diagnosed by abdominocentesis and endoscopy. Correction of metabolic derangements was accomplished by volume diuresis, with maintenance of a urethral catheter before surgical repair of the bladder. The cause of the bladder rupture was believed to be related to adhesions resulting from previous surgery for urachal abscessation. Bladder rupture, which usually occurs in bulls or steers secondary to urolithiasis or in cows after dystocia, also should be considered in prepartum heifers with dehydration, abdominal pain, and abdominal distention.

  14. Characterization of the spectrum of hemodynamic profiles in trauma patients with acute neurogenic shock☆

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Richard L.; Baker, Stephen D.; Sterling, Sarah A.; Porter, John M; Jones, Alan E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Neurogenic shock considered a distributive type of shock secondary to loss of sympathetic outflow to the peripheral vasculature. In this study, we examine the hemodynamic profiles of a series of trauma patients with a diagnosis of neurogenic shock. Methods Hemodynamic data were collected on a series of trauma patients determined to have spinal cord injuries with neurogenic shock. A well-established integrated computer model of human physiology was used to analyze and categorize the hemodynamic profiles from a system analysis perspective. A differentiation between these categories was presented as the percent of total patients. Results Of the 9 patients with traumatic neurogenic shock, the etiology of shock was decrease in peripheral vascular resistance (PVR) in 3 (33%; 95% confidence interval, 12%–65%), loss of vascular capacitance in 2 (22%; 6%–55%) and mixed peripheral resistance and capacitance responsible in 3 (33%; 12%–65%), and purely cardiac in 1 (11%; 3%–48%). The markers of sympathetic outflow had no correlation to any of the elements in the patients' hemodynamic profiles. Conclusions Results from this study suggest that hypotension of neurogenic shock can have multiple mechanistic etiologies and represents a spectrum of hemodynamic profiles. This understanding is important for the treatment decisions in managing these patients. PMID:23566731

  15. Neurogenic Fever after Acute Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Qualitative Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Katherine E.; Oleson, Christina V.; Schroeder, Gregory D.; Sidhu, Gursukhman S.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To determine the incidence, pathogenesis, and clinical outcomes related to neurogenic fevers following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods  A systematic review of the literature was performed on thermodysregulation secondary to acute traumatic SCI in adult patients. A literature search was performed using PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Scopus. Using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven relevant articles were obtained. Results  The incidence of fever of all origins (both known and unknown) after SCI ranged from 22.5 to 71.7% with a mean incidence of 50.6% and a median incidence of 50.0%. The incidence of fever of unknown origin (neurogenic fever) ranged from 2.6 to 27.8% with a mean incidence of 8.0% and a median incidence of 4.7%. Cervical and thoracic spinal injuries were more commonly associated with fever than lumbar injuries. In addition, complete injuries had a higher incidence of fever than incomplete injuries. The pathogenesis of neurogenic fever after acute SCI is not thoroughly understood. Conclusion  Neurogenic fevers are relatively common following an acute SCI; however, there is little in the scientific literature to help physicians prevent or treat this condition. The paucity of research underscored by this review demonstrates the need for further studies with larger sample sizes, focusing on incidence rate, clinical outcomes, and pathogenesis of neurogenic fever following acute traumatic SCI. PMID:27556002

  16. Non-neurogenic SVZ-like niche in dolphins, mammals devoid of olfaction.

    PubMed

    Parolisi, Roberta; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2017-02-25

    Adult neurogenesis has been implicated in brain plasticity and brain repair. In mammals, it is mostly restricted to specific brain regions and specific physiological functions. The function and evolutionary history of mammalian adult neurogenesis has been elusive so far. The largest neurogenic site in mammals (subventricular zone, SVZ) generates neurons destined to populate the olfactory bulb. The SVZ neurogenic activity appears to be related to the dependence of the species on olfaction since it occurs at high rates throughout life in animals strongly dependent on this function for their survival. Indeed, it dramatically decreases in humans, who do not depend so much on it. This study investigates whether the SVZ neurogenic site exists in mammals devoid of olfaction and olfactory brain structures, such as dolphins. Our results demonstate that a small SVZ-like region persists in these aquatic mammals. However, this region seems to have lost its neurogenic capabilities since neonatal stages. In addition, instead of the typical newly generated neuroblasts, some mature neurons were observed in the dolphin SVZ. Since cetaceans evolved from terrestrial ancestors, non-neurogenic SVZ may indicate extinction of adult neurogenesis in the absence of olfactory function, with the retention of an SVZ-like anatomical region either vestigial or of still unknown role.

  17. PET imaging of neurogenic activity in the adult brain: Toward in vivo imaging of human neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yasuhisa; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    Neural stem cells are present in 2 neurogenic regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), and continue to generate new neurons throughout life. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is linked to a variety of psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, and to the therapeutic effects of antidepressants, as well as learning and memory. In vivo imaging for hippocampal neurogenic activity may be used to diagnose psychiatric disorders and evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. However, these imaging techniques remain to be established until now. Recently, we established a quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) imaging technique for neurogenic activity in the adult brain with 3'-deoxy-3'-[(18)F]fluoro-L-thymidine ([(18)F]FLT) and probenecid, a drug transporter inhibitor in blood-brain barrier. Moreover, we showed that this PET imaging technique can monitor alterations in neurogenic activity in the hippocampus of adult rats with depression and following treatment with an antidepressant. This PET imaging method may assist in diagnosing depression and in monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants. In this commentary, we discuss the possibility of in vivo PET imaging for neurogenic activity in adult non-human primates and humans.

  18. Surgical therapy of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (hyperreflexia) in paraplegic patients by sacral deafferentation and implant driven micturition by sacral anterior root stimulation: methods, indications, results, complications, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kutzenberger, J

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord injured patients with a suprasacral lesion usually develop a spastic bladder. The neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) and the overactive external sphincter cause incontinence and threaten these patients with recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI), renal failure and autonomic dysreflexia. All of these severe disturbances may be well managed by sacral deafferentation (SDAF) and implantation of a sacral anterior root stimulator (SARS). Since September 1986 to December 2002, 464 paraplegic patients (220 females, 244 males) received a SDAF-SARS. The SDAF was done intradurally in almost all cases, which means that we used a single operation field to do a two-stages procedure (SDAF and SARS). The results include data on 440 patients with a mean follow-up of 8.6 years (18 months to 18 years) until December 2004. The complete deafferentation was successful in 95.2%. Of these patients, 420 paraplegics use the SARS for voiding, (frequency 4.7 per day) and 401 for defecation (frequency 4.7 per week). Continence was achieved in 364 patients (83%). UTIs decreased from 6.3 per year preoperatively to 1.2 per year postoperatively. Kidney function remained stable. Early complications were 6 CSF leaks and 5 implant infections. Late compli cations included receiver or cable failures and required surgical repair in 44 patients. A step-by-step program for trouble-shooting distinguishes implant failure from myogenic or neurogenic failure. SDAF is able to restore the reservoir function of urinary bladder and makes the patient achieve continence. Autonomic dysreflexia disappeared in most cases. By accurate adjustment of stimulation parameters, it is possible for the patient to have a low resistance micturition. The microsurgical technique requires intensive education. In addition, the therapist should be able to manage late complications.

  19. Is diabetes mellitus associated with clinical outcomes in aging males treated with transurethral resection of prostate for bladder outlet obstruction: implications from Taiwan Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Hsiang; Hou, Chen-Pang; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Juang, Horng-Heng; Chang, Phei-Lang; Yang, Pei-Shan; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chen, Chien-Lun; Tsui, Ke-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) and clinical outcomes between diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and non-diabetic (non-DM) patients receiving transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P). Methods This analysis was a retrospective cohort study using 13 years (2000–2012) of claims data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). A total of 4,887 patients who had persistent LUTSs and underwent TUR-P for prostate enlargement (benign prostate enlargement [BPE]) were enrolled and divided into two groups: DM and non-DM groups. The patients’ characteristics, postoperative clinical outcomes, and the medication records after TUR-P were compared. Chi-square test was used for categorical variables and independent samples t-test for continuous variables. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to compare the risk of postoperative outcomes. Finally, we estimated the medication-free survival rate after TUR-P using Kaplan–Meier method and compared it between study groups using log-rank test. Results DM group patients had a higher prevalence of comorbidities. Postoperatively, the DM group had lower rates of urinary tract infection (UTI; odds ratio [OR], 0.78; P=0.009) and higher rates of urinary retention requiring catheterization (OR, 1.35; P=0.01) within 1 month after TUR-P. A higher proportion of patients with DM took anti-muscarinics (OR, 1.23; P=0.032) within the first 3 months and α-blockers (OR, 1.18; P=0.049) during 3–12 months after receiving TUR-P. Overall, the DM group patients had a worse postoperative medication-free survival compared to that of non-DM group patients (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.14; P=0.005). Conclusion DM patients require higher rates of continuing medication after TUR-P, especially anti-muscarinics in 3 months postoperatively and alpha-blocker after 3 months postoperatively. DM patients also had higher incidence of urine retention after surgery. DM patients had relatively

  20. [Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez Cruz, Oswaldo; Careaga Benítez, Ricardo

    2007-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an uncommon pathology; its incidence varies from two to six cases in 100,000 pregnancies. It has multiple etiologies and it is classified in central and neurogenic. Patients with diabetes insipidus generally show intense thirst, polyuria, neurologic symptoms and hypernatremia. It does not seem to alter the patient's fertility. Diabetes insipidus is usually associated with pre-eclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and fatty liver disease of pregnancy. This is a report of a case seen at the Hospital General de Cholula, in Puebla, Mexico. A 19 year-old female, with 37.2 weeks of pregnancy, had a history of Langerhans cell histiocytosis since she was four years. Patient was treated with intranasal desmopressin until 2005. She went to an obstetric evaluation; laboratory and cabinet studies were obtained. A healthy 1900 g female was obtained through vaginal delivery, with a 7/9 Apgar score. We should be familiarized with this uncommon pathology because of its association with several obstetric emergencies.

  1. A comparison of hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation induced by melittin and capsaicin in humans.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, H; Andersen, O K; Drewes, A M; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2003-02-13

    Melittin (a main compound of bee venom) and capsaicin were injected intradermally in healthy human volunteers: (1) to study secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (static hyperalgesia and dynamic hyperalgesia) around the injection site; and (2) to correlate the sensory changes to the neurogenic inflammation assessed by laser-doppler blood flowmetry. Melittin 50 microg and capsaicin 10 microg induced comparable spontaneous pain and increased blood flow (neurogenic inflammation). Intradermal injection of melittin induced regions of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia around the injection site, however, they were not as large as the hyperalgesia induced by capsaicin. This is the first report studying mechanical hyperalgesia induced by melittin in humans, and the results were in agreement with the previous observations in rats. Melittin seems to be a valuable model to study a possible contribution of neurogenic inflammation to hyperalgesia in humans.

  2. Neurogenic detrusor overactivity is associated with decreased expression and function of the large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Afeli, Serge A Y; Parajuli, Shankar P; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from a variety of neurological diseases such as spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, and multiple sclerosis often develop neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), which currently lacks a universally effective therapy. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NDO is associated with changes in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel expression and function. DSM tissue samples from 33 patients were obtained during open bladder surgeries. NDO patients were clinically characterized preoperatively with pressure-flow urodynamics demonstrating detrusor overactivity, in the setting of a clinically relevant neurological condition. Control patients did not have overactive bladder and did not have a clinically relevant neurological disease. We conducted quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology on freshly-isolated DSM cells, and functional studies on DSM contractility. qPCR experiments revealed that DSM samples from NDO patients showed decreased BK channel mRNA expression in comparison to controls. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated reduced whole cell and transient BK currents (TBKCs) in freshly-isolated DSM cells from NDO patients. Functional studies on DSM contractility showed that spontaneous phasic contractions had a decreased sensitivity to iberiotoxin, a selective BK channel inhibitor, in DSM strips isolated from NDO patients. These results reveal the novel finding that NDO is associated with decreased DSM BK channel expression and function leading to increased DSM excitability and contractility. BK channel openers or BK channel gene transfer could be an alternative strategy to control NDO. Future clinical trials are needed to evaluate the value of BK channel opening drugs or gene therapies for NDO treatment and to identify any possible adverse effects.

  3. The Effects of Acupuncture on Bladder Interstitial Cells of Cajal Excitability in Rats with Overactive Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qi-fan; Hou, Yuen-hao; Hou, Wen-guang; Lin, Zhi-xian; Tang, Kang-min; Chen, Yue-lai

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture treatment has an effect on patients with an overactive bladder, but the mechanism of its action remains to be clarified. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of acupuncture on bladder overactivity, and the excitability of interstitial cells of Cajal of the bladder in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction. Electroacupuncture (continuous wave, 30 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to stimulate the Ciliao point (BL32) and the Huiyang point (BL35) of rats for 20 min, 3 days. Results showed that acupuncture suppressed detrusor unstable contraction frequency and decreased detrusor maximum pressure in the bladder filling period. Compared with the normal control rats, HCN2 mRNA and protein expression within the bladder were upregulated and were reversed by electroacupuncture in overactive bladder rats as determined by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, in-vitro cell-cultured OAB rats bladder interstitial cells of Cajal intracellular Ca2+ concentration were higher than normal control rats, which were lowered after acupuncture treatment. These findings suggest that acupuncture stimulation can suppress bladder overactivity, and regulate the excitability of bladder interstitial cells of Cajal in treatment of overactive bladder myogenic mechanism. PMID:24194780

  4. Characterization of multiciliated ependymal cells that emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takashi; Sawada, Masato; Takase, Hiroshi; Nakai, Chiemi; Herranz-Pérez, Vicente; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Kaneko, Naoko; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Sawamoto, Kazunobu

    2016-10-15

    In mammals, ventricular walls of the developing brain maintain a neurogenic niche, in which radial glial cells act as neural stem cells (NSCs) and generate new neurons in the embryo. In the adult brain, the neurogenic niche is maintained in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) of the lateral wall of lateral ventricles and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the neonatal V-SVZ, radial glial cells transform into astrocytic postnatal NSCs and multiciliated ependymal cells. On the other hand, in zebrafish, radial glial cells continue to cover the surface of the adult telencephalic ventricle and maintain a higher neurogenic potential in the adult brain. However, the cell composition of the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish brain has not been investigated. Here we show that multiciliated ependymal cells emerge in the neurogenic niche of the aged zebrafish telencephalon. These multiciliated cells appear predominantly in the dorsal part of the ventral telencephalic ventricular zone, which also contains clusters of migrating new neurons. Scanning electron microscopy and live imaging analyses indicated that these multiple cilia beat coordinately and generate constant fluid flow within the ventral telencephalic ventricle. Analysis of the cell composition by transmission electron microscopy revealed that the neurogenic niche in the aged zebrafish contains different types of cells, with ultrastructures similar to those of ependymal cells, transit-amplifying cells, and migrating new neurons in postnatal mice. These data suggest that the transformation capacity of radial glial cells is conserved but that its timing is different between fish and mice. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2982-2992, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The recommendations of a consensus panel for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and associated supine hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Schmidt, Peter; Biaggioni, Italo; Frazier-Mills, Camille; Freeman, Roy; Isaacson, Stuart; Karabin, Beverly; Kuritzky, Louis; Lew, Mark; Low, Phillip; Mehdirad, Ali; Raj, Satish R; Vernino, Steven; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2017-01-03

    Neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) is common in patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, pure autonomic failure, dementia with Lewy bodies, and peripheral neuropathies including amyloid or diabetic neuropathy. Due to the frequency of nOH in the aging population, clinicians need to be well informed about its diagnosis and management. To date, studies of nOH have used different outcome measures and various methods of diagnosis, thereby preventing the generation of evidence-based guidelines to direct clinicians towards 'best practices' when treating patients with nOH and associated supine hypertension. To address these issues, the American Autonomic Society and the National Parkinson Foundation initiated a project to develop a statement of recommendations beginning with a consensus panel meeting in Boston on November 7, 2015, with continued communications and contributions to the recommendations through October of 2016. This paper summarizes the panel members' discussions held during the initial meeting along with continued deliberations among the panel members and provides essential recommendations based upon best available evidence as well as expert opinion for the (1) screening, (2) diagnosis, (3) treatment of nOH, and (4) diagnosis and treatment of associated supine hypertension.

  6. Melatonin-receptor-1-deficiency affects neurogenic differentiation factor immunoreaction in pancreatic islets and enteroendocrine cells of mice.

    PubMed

    Shalabi, Andree; Fischer, Claudia; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic differentiation factor (NeuroD) is a transcription factor involved in the differentiation of neurons and in the control of energy balance and metabolism. It plays a key role in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Melatonin is an important rhythmic endocrine signal within the circadian system of mammals and modulates insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. In the mouse pars tuberalis, NeuroD mRNA levels show day/night variation, which is independent of the molecular clock gene mPER1 but depends on the functional melatonin receptor 1 (MT1). So far, little is known about the effect of melatonin on NeuroD synthesis in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus, NeuroD protein levels and cellular localization were analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pancreatic islets and duodenal enteroendocrine cells of MT1- and mPER1-deficienct mice. In addition, the localization of NeuroD-positive cells was analyzed by double-immunofluorescence and confocal laser microscopy. In duodenal enteroendocrine cells and pancreatic islets of WT and PER1-deficient mice, NeuroD immunoreaction showed a peak during the early subjective night. In contrast, this peak was absent in MT1-deficent mice. These data suggest that melatonin, by acting on MT1 receptors, affects NeuroD expression in the gastrointestinal tract and thus might contribute to circadian regulation in metabolic functions.

  7. Improving Outcomes in Patients With Refractory Idiopathic and Neurogenic Detrusor Overactivity: Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, David A; Schneider, Lynne Kolton; Watanabe, Thomas K

    2015-09-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is a lower urinary tract dysfunction commonly seen in rehabilitation settings. The emotional, medical, and financial consequences of NDO can be substantial and management typically requires a multidisciplinary team approach. Physiatrists need to be able to identify patients who require referral to specialists for diagnostic testing or higher-tiered treatment and need to engender open lines of communication between their patients and all treating clinicians. This requires an understanding of the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunctions.

  8. Bladder aspergillosis detected by urine cytology.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Girón, Rafael; Martínez-Torre, Santiago; Mosquera-Martínez, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    Bladder aspergillosis is an unusual infection. We report the case of a 79-year-old man with clinical records of transitional cell carcinoma diagnosed 5 years ago. The presence of a fruiting body and septate hyphae in urine cytological smears were the key for a final diagnosis of fungal bladder infection caused by Aspergillus niger.

  9. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  10. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Sabatini, S.; Kurtzman, N.A. )

    1987-12-01

    Unidirectional {sup 45}Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (J{sup net}{sub Ca}) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed J{sup net}{sub Ca} to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that J{sup net}{sub Ca} was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, J{sup net}{sub Ca} decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, J{sup net}{sub Ca} was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue {sup 45}Ca content was {approx equal}30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa.

  11. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-01

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  12. Automatic bladder segmentation on CBCT for multiple plan ART of bladder cancer using a patient-specific bladder model.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; Betgen, Anja; Hulshof, Maarten; Bel, Arjan

    2012-06-21

    In multiple plan adaptive radiotherapy (ART) strategies of bladder cancer, a library of plans corresponding to different bladder volumes is created based on images acquired in early treatment sessions. Subsequently, the plan for the smallest PTV safely covering the bladder on cone-beam CT (CBCT) is selected as the plan of the day. The aim of this study is to develop an automatic bladder segmentation approach suitable for CBCT scans and test its ability to select the appropriate plan from the library of plans for such an ART procedure. Twenty-three bladder cancer patients with a planning CT and on average 11.6 CBCT scans were included in our study. For each patient, all CBCT scans were matched to the planning CT on bony anatomy. Bladder contours were manually delineated for each planning CT (for model building) and CBCT (for model building and validation). The automatic segmentation method consisted of two steps. A patient-specific bladder deformation model was built from the training data set of each patient (the planning CT and the first five CBCT scans). Then, the model was applied to automatically segment bladders in the validation data of the same patient (the remaining CBCT scans). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the training data to model patient-specific bladder deformation patterns. The number of PCA modes for each patient was chosen such that the bladder shapes in the training set could be represented by such number of PCA modes with less than 0.1 cm mean residual error. The automatic segmentation started from the bladder shape of a reference CBCT, which was adjusted by changing the weight of each PCA mode. As a result, the segmentation contour was deformed consistently with the training set to fit the bladder in the validation image. A cost function was defined by the absolute difference between the directional gradient field of reference CBCT sampled on the corresponding bladder contour and the directional gradient field of validation

  13. Bladder cancer documentation of causes: multilingual questionnaire, 'bladder cancer doc'.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Abreu-Villaca, Yael; Anbari Attar, Rowshanak; Angeli-Greaves, Miriam; Aslam, Muhammad; Basaran, Nursen; Belik, Rouslana; Butryee, Chaniphun; Dalpiaz, Orietta; Dzhusupov, Keneshbek; Ecke, Thorsten H; Galambos, Henrieta; Galambos, Henrieta; Gerilovica, Helena; Gerullis, Holger; Gonzalez, Patricia Casares; Goossens, Maria E; Gorgishvili-Hermes, Lela; Heyns, Chris F; Hodzic, Jasmin; Ikoma, Fumihiko; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kang, Boo-Hyon; Kiesswetter, Ernst; Krishnamurthi, Kannan; Lehmann, Marie-Louise; Martinova, Irina; Mittal, Rama Devi; Ravichandran, Beerappa; Romics, Imre; Roy, Bidyut; Rungkat-Zakaria, Fransiska; Rydzynski, Konrad; Scutaru, Cristian; Shen, Jianhua; Soufi, Maria; Toguzbaeva, Karlygash; Vu Duc, Trinh; Widera, Agata; Wishahi, Mohamed; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-06-01

    There is a considerable discrepancy between the number of identified occupational-related bladder cancer cases and the estimated numbers particularly in emerging nations or less developed countries where suitable approaches are less or even not known. Thus, within a project of the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centres in Occupational Health, a questionnaire of the Dortmund group, applied in different studies, was translated into more than 30 languages (Afrikaans, Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Kannada, Kazakh, Kirghiz, Korean, Latvian, Malay, Persian (Farsi), Polish, Portuguese, Portuguese/Brazilian, Romanian, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Slovak, Spanish, Spanish/Mexican, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Urdu, Vietnamese). The bipartite questionnaire asks for relevant medical information in the physician's part and for the occupational history since leaving school in the patient's part. Furthermore, this questionnaire is asking for intensity and frequency of certain occupational and non-occupational risk factors. The literature regarding occupations like painter, hairdresser or miner and exposures like carcinogenic aromatic amines, azo dyes, or combustion products is highlighted. The questionnaire is available on www.ifado.de/BladderCancerDoc.

  14. Beta adrenergic modulation of spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field-stimulated contractions in isolated strips of rat urinary bladder from normal animals and animals with partial bladder outflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, J I; Rouget, C; Palea, S; Granato, C; Korstanje, C

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous microcontractions and electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contractions in isolated rat bladder strips from normal and from 6 weeks partial bladder outflow obstruction (pBOO) animals were studied to identify the potential site of action for the β3-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist mirabegron in detrusor overactivity in rats. For this, effects of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline and mirabegron were tested in presence or absence of selective antagonists for β-AR subtypes, namely CGP-20712A for β1-AR, ICI-118,551 for β2-AR, and L-748,337 for β3-AR. In detrusor strips from both normal and obstructed animals, EFS-induced contractions were weakly affected by isoprenaline and even less so by mirabegron. In contrast, microcontraction activity was more potently reduced by isoprenaline (pIC50 7.3; Emax ±85 %), whereas mirabegron showed a small effect. In pBOO strips, concentration response curves for isoprenaline and mirabegron at inhibition of EFS and spontaneous microcontractions were similar to those in normal strips. Isoprenaline-induced inhibition of microcontractions and EFS was antagonized by the β1-AR antagonist, but not by the β2- and β3-AR antagonists. In the context of β3-AR-mediated bladder functions for mirabegron in other experiments, the current data question a role for effects at spontaneous microcontractions, or neurogenic detrusor stimulation in the mode of action for mirabegron in vivo, since functional bladder effects for mirabegron are reported to occur at much lower concentrations.

  15. Pathophysiology of bladder dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Tateno, Fuyuki; Kishi, Masahiko; Tsuyuzaki, Yohei; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) is a common non-motor disorder in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, bladder dysfunction is sometimes non-responsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine basal ganglia-frontal circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. The pathophysiology of the bladder dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life.

  16. Spectroscopic Imaging of Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Gandour-Edwards, R; Ramsamooj, R; deVere White, R

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of developing bladder cancer detection methods using intrinsic tissue optical properties is the focus of this investigation. In vitro experiments have been performed using polarized elastic light scattering in combination with tissue autofluorescence in the NIR spectral region under laser excitation in the green and red spectral regions. The experimental results obtained from a set of tissue specimens from 25 patients reveal the presence of optical fingerprint characteristics suitable for cancer detection with high contrast and accuracy. These photonic methods are compatible with existing endoscopic imaging modalities which make them suitable for in-vivo application.

  17. Diabetes Insipidus and Polydipsia in a Patient with Asperger's Disorder and an Empty Sella: A Case Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raja, Michele; Azzoni, Antonella; Giammarco, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Describes an Italian patient with Asperger disorders, Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus, and Primary Empty Sella. His response to vasopressin treatment suggested a concomitant presence of primary polydipsia. Implications of the observed concurrence of these rare disorders are discussed in relation to diagnosis and pathogenesis. (Author/CR)

  18. Protective effect of preserved bladder-filling sensation on upper urinary tract in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ersöz, Murat; Sayılır, Selçuk

    2014-10-01

    In this study the possible preventive effect of bladder-filling sensation (BFS) on upper urinary tract deterioration (UUTD) in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients was investigated. Eighty-four (60 males, 24 females) patients with SCI who underwent neurourological assessment and urodynamic examinations because of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction and were prescribed appropriate bladder management and were under follow-up and whose disease duration was at least 3 years were included in the study. Bladder-filling sensation was categorised as "absent", "partially preserved" or "preserved", and as "normal" (preserved) and "abnormal" (partially preserved, absent). Presence of hydronephrosis, renal stones, and chronic pyelonephritis in any renal USG or IVP performed during the follow-up period were accepted as criteria of UUTD. The frequencies of UUTD for BFS subgroups were determined and compared. Mean age and mean disease duration were 38.4 ± 13.0 years and 72.2 ± 36.2 months. The frequency of UUTD was 31/84 (36.9 %) in the study population. The frequencies of UUTD were 0/8 (0 %), 22/53 (41.5 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) for "preserved" "partially preserved" and "absent" BFS subgroups, respectively (p = 0.074). There was a statistically significant difference between normal BFS [0/8 (0 %)] and abnormal BFS [31/76 (40.8 %)] subgroups (p = 0.024). According to the results of our study preserved (normal) bladder-filling sensation has protective effect on upper urinary tract in patients with SCI.

  19. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidneys & How They Work Kidney Disease A-Z Diabetes Insipidus What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that ... produce more urine. What are the types of diabetes insipidus? The types of diabetes insipidus include central ...

  20. Diabetes - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  1. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  2. Underactive bladder in women: is there any evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Joshua A.; Brown, Elizabeth T.; Kaufman, Melissa R.; Dmochowski, Roger R.; Reynolds, W. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Underactive bladder (UAB) is a clinical symptom complex only recently gaining recognition as a clinical diagnosis. Lack of consensus agreement on a definition of UAB has limited its recognition and diagnosis in clinical practice. The purposes of this review are to: present existing definitions of UAB, review recent data regarding clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of the condition, and examine up-to-date hypotheses regarding its pathophysiology, with a focus on women. Recent findings The process to develop a consensus definition for UAB as a clinical symptom complex is ongoing. Symptoms associated with UAB, such as weak stream, straining to void, and history of urinary retention are well correlated to detrusor underactivity on urodynamics, which frequently develops in elderly women. In addition to aging, UAB may be the end stage of a variety of contributing pathologic conditions such as diabetes and ischemic disease. In some women, UAB may result from a progression from overactive bladder to UAB. Summary Existing evidence supports UAB in women as a symptom complex with a clinical and pathophysiologic profile distinguishable from other lower urinary tract-associated clinical conditions. Consensus definitions of clinical and urodynamic diagnostic parameters will be essential to more widespread recognition of UAB. PMID:26927630

  3. Neurogenic Language Disorders in Children. International Association of Logopedics and Phoniatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbro, Franco, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    Language disorders in children are one of the most frequent causes of difficulties in communication, social interaction, learning and academic achievement. It has been estimated that over 5% of children present with some kind of language disorder. This volume illustrates the state of the art in neurogenic language disorders in children. The most…

  4. Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation Related to Post-Hypoxic Thalamic Lesion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Gençpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Haspolat, Şenay; Dursun, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH) is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role for the thalamus in regulating ventilation. PMID:27127601

  5. Comprehensive Expression Map of Transcription Regulators in the Adult Zebrafish Telencephalon Reveals Distinct Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Diotel, Nicolas; Rodriguez Viales, Rebecca; Armant, Olivier; März, Martin; Ferg, Marco; Rastegar, Sepand; Strähle, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish has become a model to study adult vertebrate neurogenesis. In particular, the adult telencephalon has been an intensely studied structure in the zebrafish brain. Differential expression of transcriptional regulators (TRs) is a key feature of development and tissue homeostasis. Here we report an expression map of 1,202 TR genes in the telencephalon of adult zebrafish. Our results are summarized in a database with search and clustering functions to identify genes expressed in particular regions of the telencephalon. We classified 562 genes into 13 distinct patterns, including genes expressed in the proliferative zone. The remaining 640 genes displayed unique and complex patterns of expression and could thus not be grouped into distinct classes. The neurogenic ventricular regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes, suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic niches in the telencephalon. In summary, the small telencephalon of the zebrafish shows a remarkable complexity in TR gene expression. The adult zebrafish telencephalon has become a model to study neurogenesis. We established the expression pattern of more than 1200 transcription regulators (TR) in the adult telencephalon. The neurogenic regions express overlapping but distinct sets of TR genes suggesting regional differences in the neurogenic potential. J. Comp. Neurol. 523:1202–1221, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25556858

  6. A Clinician Survey of Speech and Non-Speech Characteristics of Neurogenic Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theys, Catherine; van Wieringen, Astrid; De Nil, Luc F.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents survey data on 58 Dutch-speaking patients with neurogenic stuttering following various neurological injuries. Stroke was the most prevalent cause of stuttering in our patients, followed by traumatic brain injury, neurodegenerative diseases, and other causes. Speech and non-speech characteristics were analyzed separately for…

  7. Leiomyosarcoma of the Oropharynx and Neurogenic Tumors in a Young Patient With Turner's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Apice, Gaetano; Silvestro, Giustino; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Ionna, Francesco; De Rosa, Vincenzo; Borghese, Annamaria; Ninfo, Vito

    2001-01-01

    Patient: A case of Turner's syndrome developing a leiomyosarcoma of the oropharynx and metachronous neurogenic tumors (mediastinal ‘ganglioneuroblastoma intermixed’, subcutaneous neurilemoma) is described. Discussion: To our knowledge, this case is the second reported leiomyosarcoma in a patient with Turner's syndrome. Also the site of involvement (palate and oropharynx) is particularly unusual for the already rare leiomyosarcomas in the young age. PMID:18521442

  8. Influence of behavior modification on overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Burgio, Kathryn L

    2002-11-01

    Behavioral interventions have been used for decades to treat urge incontinence and other symptoms of overactive bladder. Perhaps the earliest form of treatment was the bladder drill, an intensive intervention designed to increase the interval between voids to establish a normal frequency of urination and normalization of bladder function. Bladder training is a modification of bladder drill that is conducted more gradually on an outpatient basis and has resulted in significant reduction of incontinence in older, community-dwelling women. Multicomponent behavioral training is another form of behavioral treatment that includes pelvic floor muscle training and exercise. This intervention focuses less on voiding habits and more on altering the physiologic responses of the bladder and pelvic floor muscles. Using biofeedback or other teaching methods, patients learn strategies to inhibit bladder contraction using pelvic floor muscle contraction and other urge suppression strategies. Although behavioral and drug therapies are known to be highly effective for reducing urge incontinence, few patients are cured with either treatment alone. Thus, future research should explore ways to enhance the effectiveness of these conservative therapies. Although the mechanisms by which behavioral treatments work have not been established, there is some evidence that behavioral and drug interventions may operate by different mechanisms, suggesting that they may have additive effects and that combining them may result in better outcomes. Future research needs to examine the mechanisms by which these therapies reduce incontinence and whether combining behavioral and drug treatment will result in better outcomes than either therapy alone.

  9. The impact of pioglitazone on bladder cancer and cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther J; Marcy, Todd R

    2014-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a chronic condition with increasing prevalence and severe complications. Thiazolidinediones have been marketed since 1997 and are effective glucose-lowering drugs, but individual drugs within the class have been linked to serious adverse effects that resulted in the removal of troglitazone from the market, restrictions to rosiglitazone's use, and a warning added to pioglitazone's label. In 2007, a meta-analysis linked rosiglitazone to myocardial infarction (MI). Pioglitazone does not appear to share this risk. To the contrary, pioglitazone may reduce risk for MI. However, retrospective evaluations have increasingly linked pioglitazone to a higher risk of bladder cancer that appears to be time- and dose-dependent. Pioglitazone remains a medication appropriate for consideration in the management of T2DM; however, clinicians and patients should weigh its risks compared with alternatives, with a regular review of risks.

  10. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  11. [Placenta percreta with bladder invasion. Case report].

    PubMed

    Torres Gómez, Luis Guillermo; Torres Farías, Emigdio; Rodríguez Sandoval, Rosa María

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman, who had two previous caesarean sections, attended for the first time at 18 weeks of gestation. Pelvic ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging showed a placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder. A caesarean section was carried out at 27th week of gestation for preterm premature rupture of membranes. Placental tissue was firmly attached to the anterior surface of the bladder. A cesarean hysterectomy was performed with bilateral anterior internal iliac artery ligation before hysterectomy was finished. The bladder was repaired, leaving a suprapubic catheter.

  12. Paroxetine Can Enhance Neurogenesis during Neurogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Maliheh; Razavi, Shahnaz; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some antidepressant drugs can promote neuronal cell proliferation in vitro as well as hippocampal neurogenesis in human and animal models. Furthermore, adipose tissue is an available source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (hAD-SCs) may be a suitable source for regenerative medical applications. Since there is no evidence for the effect of Paroxetine as the most commonly prescribed antidepressant drug for neurogenic potential of hADSCs, an attempt was made to determine the effect of Paroxetine on proliferation and neural differentiation of hADSCs. Methods: ADSCs were isolated from human abdominal fat. These cells differentiated to neuron-like cells and were treated with Paroxetine. 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and immunofluorescence technique were used for assessment of cell proliferation and neurogenic differentiation potential of induced cells, respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that Paroxetine significantly increased the proliferation rate of induced hADSCs (p<0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Paroxetine treatment during neurogenic differentiation could enhance the mean percentage of Nestin and MAP2 (Microtubule-associated protein-2) positive cells but the mean percentage of GFAP (Glial acidic fibrillary protein) positive cells significantly decreased relative to control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our results provide evidence that Paroxetine can promote proliferation and differentiation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs. Moreover, Paroxetine can reduce gliogenesis of induced hADSCs during neurogenic differentiation. PMID:27920882

  13. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  14. Water homeostasis and diabetes insipidus in horses.

    PubMed

    Schott, Harold C

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disorder of horses characterized by profound polyuria and polydipsia (PU/PD), which can be caused by loss of production of arginine vasopressin (AVP). This condition is termed neurogenic or central DI. DI may also develop with absence or loss of AVP receptors or activity on the basolateral membrane of collecting-duct epithelial cells. This condition is termed nephrogenic DI. Equine clinicians may differentiate true DI from more common causes of PU/PD by a systematic diagnostic approach. DI may not be a correctable disorder, and supportive care of affected horses requires an adequate water source.

  15. Diabetes mellitus: influences on cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and cancer are common conditions, and their co-diagnosis in the same individual is not infrequent. The relative risks associated with type 2 diabetes are greater than twofold for hepatic, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The relative risk is somewhat lower, at 1.2-1.5-fold for colorectal, breast, and bladder cancers. In comparison, the relative risk of lung cancer is less than 1. The evidence for other malignancies (e.g. kidney, non-Hodgkin lymphoma) is inconclusive, whereas prostatic cancer occurs less frequently in male patients with diabetes. The potential biologic links between the two diseases are incompletely understood. Evidence from observational studies suggests that some medications used to treat hyperglycemia are associated with either increased or reduced risk of cancer. Whereas anti-diabetic drugs have a minor influence on cancer risk, drugs used to treat cancer may either cause diabetes or worsen pre-existing diabetes. If hyperinsulinemia acts as a critical link between the observed increased cancer risk and type 2 diabetes, one would predict that patients with type 1 diabetes would have a different cancer risk pattern than patients with type 2 diabetes because the former patients are exposed to lower levels of exogenous administered insulin. Obtained results showed that patients with type 1 diabetes had elevated risks of cancers of the stomach, cervix, and endometrium. Type 1 diabetes is associated with a modest excess cancer risk overall and risks of specific cancers that differ from those associated with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Bladder filling variation during radiation treatment of prostate cancer: Can the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner and biofeedback optimize bladder filling?

    SciTech Connect

    Stam, Marcel R. . E-mail: m.stam@rther.umcn.nl; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Vight, Lisette P. van der; Kaanders, Johannes; Visser, Andries G.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a bladder ultrasound scanner in achieving a better reproducible bladder filling during irradiation of pelvic tumors, specifically prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: First, the accuracy of the bladder ultrasound scanner relative to computed tomography was validated in a group of 26 patients. Next, daily bladder volume variation was evaluated in a group of 18 patients. Another 16 patients participated in a biofeedback protocol, aiming at a more constant bladder volume. The last objective was to study correlations between prostate motion and bladder filling, by using electronic portal imaging device data on implanted gold markers. Results: A strong correlation between bladder scanner volume and computed tomography volume (r = 0.95) was found. Daily bladder volume variation was very high (1 Sd = 47.2%). Bladder filling and daily variation did not significantly differ between the control and the feedback group (47.2% and 40.1%, respectively). Furthermore, no linear correlations between bladder volume variation and prostate motion were found. Conclusions: This study shows large variations in daily bladder volume. The use of a biofeedback protocol yields little reduction in bladder volume variation. Even so, the bladder scanner is an easy to use and accurate tool to register these variations.

  17. Differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using 3D textural features: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaopan; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Yang; Tian, Qiang; Zhang, Guopeng; Lu, Hongbing

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating bladder tumors from wall tissues is of critical importance for the detection of invasion depth and cancer staging. The textural features embedded in bladder images have demonstrated their potentials in carcinomas detection and classification. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of differentiating bladder carcinoma from bladder wall using three-dimensional (3D) textural features extracted from MR bladder images. The widely used 2D Tamura features were firstly wholly extended to 3D, and then different types of 3D textural features including 3D features derived from gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and grey level-gradient co-occurrence matrix (GLGCM), as well as 3D Tamura features, were extracted from 23 volumes of interest (VOIs) of bladder tumors and 23 VOIs of patients' bladder wall. Statistical results show that 30 out of 47 features are significantly different between cancer tissues and wall tissues. Using these features with significant differences between these two types of tissues, classification performance with a supported vector machine (SVM) classifier demonstrates that the combination of three types of selected 3D features outperform that of using only one type of features. All the observations demonstrate that significant textural differences exist between carcinomatous tissues and bladder wall, and 3D textural analysis may be an effective way for noninvasive staging of bladder cancer.

  18. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Erik; Larsson, Heidi; Nørgaard, Mette; Thind, Peter; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data) is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC) in Denmark. Study population All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47%) patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC) and 512 (53%) were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC). A total of 300 (31%) patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50%) received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21). One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%). One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18). Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5) in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39) and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31) in 2013. Conclusion This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and monitor treatment and mortality. In the future, DaBlaCa-data will be a valuable data source and expansive observational studies on BC will be available. PMID:27822081

  19. Urodynamic assessment of bladder and urethral function among men with lower urinary tract symptoms after radical prostatectomy: A comparison between men with and without urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hansol; Kim, Ki Bom; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Myong; Cho, Sung Yong; Oh, Seung-June

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared bladder and urethral functions following radical prostatectomy (RP) between men with and without urinary incontinence (UI), using a large-scale database from SNU-experts-of-urodynamics-leading (SEOUL) Study Group. Materials and Methods Since July 2004, we have prospectively collected data on urodynamics from 303 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) following RP at three affiliated hospitals of SEOUL Study Group. After excluding 35 patients with neurogenic abnormality, pelvic irradiation after surgery, or a history of surgery on the lower urinary tract, 268 men were evaluated. We compared the urodynamic findings between men who had LUTS with UI (postprostatectomy incontinence [PPI] group) and those who had LUTS without UI (non-PPI group). Results The mean age at an urodynamic study was 68.2 years. Overall, a reduced bladder compliance (≤20 mL/cmH2O) was shown in 27.2% of patients; and 31.3% patients had idiopathic detrusor overactivity. The patients in the PPI group were older (p=0.001) at an urodynamic study and had a lower maximum urethral closure pressure (MUCP) (p<0.001), as compared with those in the non-PPI group. Bladder capacity and detrusor pressure during voiding were also significantly lower in the PPI group. In the logistic regression, only MUCP and maximum cystometric capacity were identified as the related factor with the presence of PPI. Conclusions In our study, significant number of patients with LUTS following RP showed a reduced bladder compliance and detrusor overactivity. PPI is associated with both impairment of the urethral closuring mechanism and bladder storage dysfunction. PMID:26682020

  20. Cystometric analysis of the transplanted bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Jeová Nina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Cystometric evaluation of the bladder after autotransplant and isogeneic transplant in female rats. Material and Methods Two groups were constituted: (A) bladder autotransplant with two subgroups: R1 – (control) and R2 – (bladder transplant); (B) isogeneic bladder transplant with three subgroups; T1 – (control); T2–T3, two subgroups observed for 30 and 60 days after transplant, respectively. All animals underwent cystometric evaluation. Afterwards, the bladders were removed for histological study. Results The transplanted bladders did not show significant changes in filling/storage and emptying/micturition functions after 30 and 60 days of evolution. Upon macroscopical evaluation, there was good revascularization and the tissue was well preserved. Cystometry results: Did not show significant differences in the micturition pressure in subgroups T2-T3, but did between subgroups R1−R2, T1−T2, and T1−T3. Significant differences were verified in the micturition interval between T1−T3, T2−T3, but not between R1−R2, T1−T2. There was significant difference in the micturition duration between T1−T3 but not between R1−R2, T1−T2 and T2−T3. No fistula was noted on the suture site nor leakage of urine in the abdominal cavity or signs of necrosis or retraction were observed. Conclusions Transplant of the bladder was shown to be a viable procedure. The results indicate that there was structural and functional regeneration of transplanted bladders, and these results indicate that it is possible that vascular endothelium growth and neurogenesis factors are involved and activated in the process of the preservation or survival of the transplanted organ. PMID:28124533

  1. [Management of neuropathic bladder in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, A; Patti, F; Reggio, A

    2004-05-01

    It is estimated that almost 70% of patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS) suffer from urinary symptoms, with devastant impact on Quality of Life (QoL). The major aims of management should be to ameliorate the patients quality of life and to prevent the frequent complications of bladder dysfunction such as infention and renal damage. Therapy can usually eliminate or reduce the symptoms of neuropathic bladder. In the following pages is discussed the complex management of urinary symptoms in MS patients.

  2. [Intravesical treatment of overactive bladder syndrome].

    PubMed

    Haferkamp, A; Hohenfellner, M

    2006-10-01

    Overactive bladder and urgency incontinence are common conditions generally treated with oral anticholinergic medication. Despite the development of new antimuscarinic substances, many patients are refractory to or cannot tolerate the oral therapy due to severe side effects. Intravesical instillation therapy can provide an alternative method to manage detrusor overactivity. Intravesical instillation of anticholinergics such as oxybutynin and trospium chloride can achieve cholinergic blockade without producing systemic side effects. Botulinum toxin type A injections into the detrusor have been shown to increase bladder capacity and to decrease detrusor overactivity for 6 or more months. Intravesical local anesthetics such as lidocaine and bupivacaine block the conduction of unmyelinated C fibers which results in an increase of functional bladder capacity. Intravesical capsaicin and resiniferatoxin also affect the afferent C fiber innervation of the bladder, leading to a decrease in detrusor overactivity and also an increased bladder capacity. The use of intravesical anticholinergics and of local anesthetic medications, both known for their short-term efficacy, is limited due to the necessity of daily intermittent catheterization. In conclusion, intravesical therapies can provide an alternative treatment for the management of overactive bladder.

  3. Deletion of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b in proopiomelanocortin neurons reduces neurogenic control of blood pressure and protects mice from leptin- and sympatho-mediated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Butler, Benjamin R; Herren, David J; Brands, Michael W; Bence, Kendra K; Belin de Chantemèle, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (Ptp1b), which represses leptin signaling, is a promising therapeutic target for obesity. Genome wide deletion of Ptp1b, increases leptin sensitivity, protects mice from obesity and diabetes, but alters cardiovascular function by increasing blood pressure (BP). Leptin-control of metabolism is centrally mediated and involves proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. Whether these neurons contribute to leptin-mediated increases in BP remain unclear. We hypothesized that increasing leptin signaling in POMC neurons with Ptp1b deletion will sensitize the cardiovascular system to leptin and enhance neurogenic control of BP. We analyzed the cardiovascular phenotype of Ptp1b+/+ and POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice, at baseline and after 7 days of leptin infusion or sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. POMCPtp1b deletion did not alter baseline cardiovascular hemodynamics (BP, heart rate) but reduced BP response to ganglionic blockade and plasma catecholamine levels that suggests a decreased neurogenic control of BP. In contrast, POMC-Ptp1b deletion increased vascular adrenergic reactivity and aortic α-adrenergic receptors expression. Chronic leptin treatment reduced vascular adrenergic reactivity and blunted diastolic and mean BP increases in POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice only. Similarly POMC-Ptp1b-/- mice exhibited a blunted increased in diastolic and mean BP accompanied by a gradual reduction in adrenergic reactivity in response to chronic vascular sympatho-activation with phenylephrine. Together these data rule out our hypothesis but suggest that deletion of Ptp1b in POMC neurons protects from leptin- and sympatho-mediated increases in BP. Vascular adrenergic desensitization appears as a protective mechanism against hypertension, and POMC-Ptp1b as a key therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions associated with obesity.

  4. Circadian Kinetics of Cell Cycle Progression in Adult Neurogenic Niches of a Diurnal Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Akle, Veronica; Stankiewicz, Alexander J; Kharchenko, Vasili; Yu, Lili; Kharchenko, Peter V; Zhdanova, Irina V

    2017-02-15

    The circadian system may regulate adult neurogenesis via intracellular molecular clock mechanisms or by modifying the environment of neurogenic niches, with daily variation in growth factors or nutrients depending on the animal's diurnal or nocturnal lifestyle. In a diurnal vertebrate, zebrafish, we studied circadian distribution of immunohistochemical markers of the cell division cycle (CDC) in 5 of the 16 neurogenic niches of adult brain, the dorsal telencephalon, habenula, preoptic area, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. We find that common to all niches is the morning initiation of G1/S transition and daytime S-phase progression, overnight increase in G2/M, and cycle completion by late night. This is supported by the timing of gene expression for critical cell cycle regulators cyclins D, A2, and B2 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p20 in brain tissue. The early-night peak in p20, limiting G1/S transition, and its phase angle with the expression of core clock genes, Clock1 and Per1, are preserved in constant darkness, suggesting intrinsic circadian patterns of cell cycle progression. The statistical modeling of CDC kinetics reveals the significant circadian variation in cell proliferation rates across all of the examined niches, but interniche differences in the magnitude of circadian variation in CDC, S-phase length, phase angle of entrainment to light or clock, and its dispersion. We conclude that, in neurogenic niches of an adult diurnal vertebrate, the circadian modulation of cell cycle progression involves both systemic and niche-specific factors.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study establishes that in neurogenic niches of an adult diurnal vertebrate, the cell cycle progression displays a robust circadian pattern. Common to neurogenic niches located in diverse brain regions is daytime progression of DNA replication and nighttime mitosis, suggesting systemic regulation. Differences between neurogenic niches in the phase and degree of S-phase entrainment to the

  5. Circadian Kinetics of Cell Cycle Progression in Adult Neurogenic Niches of a Diurnal Vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Alexander J.; Kharchenko, Vasili; Yu, Lili; Kharchenko, Peter V.

    2017-01-01

    The circadian system may regulate adult neurogenesis via intracellular molecular clock mechanisms or by modifying the environment of neurogenic niches, with daily variation in growth factors or nutrients depending on the animal's diurnal or nocturnal lifestyle. In a diurnal vertebrate, zebrafish, we studied circadian distribution of immunohistochemical markers of the cell division cycle (CDC) in 5 of the 16 neurogenic niches of adult brain, the dorsal telencephalon, habenula, preoptic area, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. We find that common to all niches is the morning initiation of G1/S transition and daytime S-phase progression, overnight increase in G2/M, and cycle completion by late night. This is supported by the timing of gene expression for critical cell cycle regulators cyclins D, A2, and B2 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p20 in brain tissue. The early-night peak in p20, limiting G1/S transition, and its phase angle with the expression of core clock genes, Clock1 and Per1, are preserved in constant darkness, suggesting intrinsic circadian patterns of cell cycle progression. The statistical modeling of CDC kinetics reveals the significant circadian variation in cell proliferation rates across all of the examined niches, but interniche differences in the magnitude of circadian variation in CDC, S-phase length, phase angle of entrainment to light or clock, and its dispersion. We conclude that, in neurogenic niches of an adult diurnal vertebrate, the circadian modulation of cell cycle progression involves both systemic and niche-specific factors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study establishes that in neurogenic niches of an adult diurnal vertebrate, the cell cycle progression displays a robust circadian pattern. Common to neurogenic niches located in diverse brain regions is daytime progression of DNA replication and nighttime mitosis, suggesting systemic regulation. Differences between neurogenic niches in the phase and degree of S-phase entrainment to

  6. The use of laser acupuncture for the treatment of neurogenic pruritus in a child--a case history.

    PubMed

    Stellon, Anthony

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the successful treatment using laser acupuncture of a six year old girl with neurogenic pruritus of the abdomen. It is the first case report of neurogenic pruritus treated by laser acupuncture. The main advantage of using low energy laser, as opposed to acupuncture needles, to stimulate points, is that low energy laser causes little or no sensation, which is particularly useful when treating children.

  7. Bladder explosion during transurethral resection of prostate: Bladder diverticula as an additional risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, D. Paul

    2017-01-01

    Vesical explosion during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is a very rare occurrence. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. The literature was reviewed pertaining to the etiology of bladder explosion during transurethral resection. The underlying mechanism for intravesical explosion is the generation and trapping of explosive gasses under the dome of the bladder which eventually detonates when it comes into contact with the cautery electrode during TURP. Various techniques have been suggested to prevent this dreaded complication. A 75-year-old male with chronic retention of urine underwent TURP. There was Grade 2 trilobar enlargement of the prostate. There were multiple diverticula with one large diverticulum in the dome of the bladder. During hemostasis, there was a loud pop sound and the bladder exploded. Lower midline laparotomy was performed and the intraperitoneal bladder rupture was repaired. He had an uneventful postoperative recovery, and he is asymptomatic at 6 months of follow-up. Even though all the precautions were taken to avoid this complication, bladder rupture was encountered. The presence of multiple diverticula is being suggested as an additional risk factor for this complication as the bladder is thinned out and also possibly due to trapping of air bubble within the diverticulum. In such cases where there are multiple bladder diverticula, the employment of a suprapubic trocar for continuous drainage of the air bubble, could well be a practical consideration. PMID:28216933

  8. Diabetic Retinopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Diabetic Retinopathy What Is Diabetic Retinopathy? Click for more information Can Cause Vision ... vision loss and even blindness can result. Other Diabetic Eye Diseases In addition to diabetic retinopathy, other ...

  9. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Insulin, Medicines, & Other Diabetes Treatments Taking insulin or other diabetes medicines is ... also available. What medicines might I take for diabetes? The medicine you take will vary by your ...

  10. Advanced glycation end products facilitate bacterial adherence in urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Izgi, Kenan; Bicer, Fuat; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-07-01

    Diabetic individuals have increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI), a common, painful condition. During diabetes mellitus, non-enzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and protein amine groups result in excessive production of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that accumulate in tissues. Since bacteria adhere to cell surfaces by binding to carbohydrates, we hypothesized that adherence of bacteria to the bladder in diabetics may be enhanced by accumulation of AGEs on urothelial surface proteins. Using a murine model of UTI, we observed increased adherence of type 1 fimbriated uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) to the bladder in streptozotocin-induced diabetic female mice compared with age-matched controls, along with increased concentrations of two common AGEs in superficial urothelial cells from diabetic bladders. Several lectins with different specificities exhibited increased binding to urothelial homogenates from diabetic mice compared with controls, and two of those lectins also bound to AGEs. Furthermore, mannose-binding type 1 fimbriae isolated from UPEC bound to different AGEs, and UPEC adherence to the bladder in diabetic mice, were inhibited by pretreatment of mice with the AGE inhibitor pyridoxamine. These results strongly suggest a role for urothelial AGE accumulation in increased bacterial adherence during UTI in diabetes.

  11. Pharmacotherapy of overactive bladder in adults: a review of efficacy, tolerability, and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Jayarajan, Jyotsna; Radomski, Sidney B

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Overactive bladder (OAB) is a prevalent condition that has a significant impact on quality of life. The usual treatment approach is both behavioral and pharmacological. The first-line pharmacological treatment commonly utilizes anticholinergic agents, which may be limited by their tolerability, efficacy, and long-term compliance. Developments in elucidating the pathophysiology of OAB and alternative targets for pharmacological therapy have led to newer agents being developed to manage this condition. These agents include mirabegron and botulinum toxin, which have alternate mechanism of action and avoid the anticholinergic side effects. Objectives To provide an update for clinicians managing OAB with an overview of the existing and newer medical options for OAB, including pharmacology, efficacy, side-effect profile, tolerability, and impact on patient quality of life. Methods PubMed and Medline were searched for randomized controlled drug trials in adults with OAB, meta-analyses of medical therapy for OAB, and individual drug names, including the keywords efficacy, tolerability, quality of life, and compliance. Nonhuman studies, pediatric trials, and those involving patients with neurogenic bladder dysfunction (with the exception of studies involving botulinum toxin A) were excluded. Results There is level 1, Grade A evidence to support the efficacy of anticholinergic drugs, botulinum toxin, and mirabegron for OAB. Long-term compliance with anticholinergic medications is limited. The mechanism of action, effectiveness, and side effects of these drugs are discussed, and where the data are available compared with other OAB medications. Conclusion Most of the anticholinergic agents have comparative efficacies and core side-effect profiles, with individual variations relating to their muscarinic receptor selectivity, pharmacokinetics, and metabolism. Newer agents, with alternative sites of action, such as mirabegron and botulinum toxin, provide additional

  12. Diminished Neurogenic Femoral Artery Vasoconstrictor Response in a Zucker Obese Rat Model: Differential Regulation of NOS and COX Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ana Cristina; Hernández, Medardo; Novella, Susana; Martínez, María Pilar; Pagán, Rosa María; Hermenegildo, Carlos; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Benedito, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Objective Peripheral arterial disease is one of the macrovascular complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study addresses femoral artery regulation in a prediabetic model of obese Zucker rats (OZR) by examining cross-talk between endothelial and neural factors. Methods and Results Arterial preparations from lean (LZR) and OZR were subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS) on basal tone. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform expression patterns were determined by immunohistochemical labelling and Western blotting. Results indicate significantly reduced noradrenergic contractions in preparations from OZR compared with those of LZR. Functional inhibition of endothelial NOS (eNOS) indicated a predominant role of this isoform in LZR and its modified activity in OZR. Neural (nNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) were activated and their expression was higher in femoral arteries from OZR. Neurotransmission modulated by large-conductance Ca2+-activated (BKCa) or voltage-dependent (KV) K+ channels did not seem compromised in the obese animals. Endothelial COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed in LZR and an additional adventitial location of COX-2 was also observed in OZR, explaining the higher COX-2 protein levels detected in this group. Prostanoids derived from both isoforms helped maintain vasoconstriction in LZR while in OZR only COX-2 was active. Superoxide anion inhibition reduced contractions in endothelium-intact arteries from OZR. Conclusions Endothelial dysfunction led to reduced neurogenic vasoconstriction in femoral arteries from OZR. In a setting of obesity, NO-dependent nNOS and iNOS dilation activity could be an alternative mechanism to offset COX-2- and reactive oxygen species-mediated vasoconstriction, along with impaired endothelial NO relaxation. PMID:25216050

  13. Neurogenic pathways in remote ischemic preconditioning induced cardioprotection: Evidences and possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aulakh, Amritpal Singh; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Singh, Nirmal

    2017-01-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) is an intrinsic phenomenon whereby 3~4 consecutive ischemia-reperfusion cycles to a remote tissue (noncardiac) increases the tolerance of the myocardium to sustained ischemiareperfusion induced injury. Remote ischemic preconditioning induces the local release of chemical mediators which activate the sensory nerve endings to convey signals to the brain. The latter consequently stimulates the efferent nerve endings innervating the myocardium to induce cardioprotection. Indeed, RIPC-induced cardioprotective effects are reliant on the presence of intact neuronal pathways, which has been confirmed using nerve resection of nerves including femoral nerve, vagus nerve, and sciatic nerve. The involvement of neurogenic signaling has been further substantiated using various pharmacological modulators including hexamethonium and trimetaphan. The present review focuses on the potential involvement of neurogenic pathways in mediating remote ischemic preconditioning-induced cardioprotection. PMID:28280407

  14. Neurogenic inflammation and the peripheral nervous system in host defense and immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Isaac M; von Hehn, Christian A; Woolf, Clifford J

    2012-07-26

    The peripheral nervous and immune systems are traditionally thought of as serving separate functions. The line between them is, however, becoming increasingly blurred by new insights into neurogenic inflammation. Nociceptor neurons possess many of the same molecular recognition pathways for danger as immune cells, and, in response to danger, the peripheral nervous system directly communicates with the immune system, forming an integrated protective mechanism. The dense innervation network of sensory and autonomic fibers in peripheral tissues and high speed of neural transduction allows rapid local and systemic neurogenic modulation of immunity. Peripheral neurons also seem to contribute to immune dysfunction in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Therefore, understanding the coordinated interaction of peripheral neurons with immune cells may advance therapeutic approaches to increase host defense and suppress immunopathology.

  15. Precocious puberty: clinical and endocrine profile and factors indicating neurogenic precocity in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anurag; Sharma, Jyoti; Kabra, Madhulika; Kumar Gupta, Arun; Menon, P S N

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical and endocrine profile of patients with precocious puberty followed up in a tertiary care hospital. Records of 140 patients (114 girls, 26 boys) with precocious puberty were reviewed. Clinical features including age of onset, stage of pubertal development, presenting symptoms, features suggestive of CNS involvement and family history were analyzed. Endocrine investigations included basal and GnRH-stimulated levels of LH and FSH as well as 17OHP, DHEA, hCG and thyroid profile. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasonography and CNS imaging were correlated with clinical features. Girls outnumbered boys in this series (4.4:1). Neurogenic central isosexual precocious puberty (CIPP) was more common in boys (10 out of 18, 55.6%) than girls (16 out of 77, 20.8%). The most common cause of neurogenic CIPP was hypothalamic hamartoma present in five girls and four boys. Other causes of neurogenic CIPP included neurotuberculosis, pituitary adenoma, hydrocephalus, post radiotherapy, CNS tumors and malformations. Peripheral precocious puberty (PPP) was secondary to adrenal causes in boys and ovarian cysts in girls. Benign variants of precocious puberty, such as premature thelarche and premature adrenarche, were present in 23 and six girls, respectively. Hypothyroidism was present in four girls and McCune-Albright syndrome in one girl. Girls with neurogenic CIPP had a lower age of onset as compared to idiopathic CIPP (3.6 +/- 2.7 years vs 5.4 +/- 2.5 years, p = 0.014). The lowest age of onset was seen in girls with hypothalamic hamartoma (1.6 +/- 0.9 years). Forty-seven girls with CIPP (seven neurogenic and 40 idiopathic) presented after the age of 6 years. Features of CNS involvement, in the form of seizures, mental retardation, raised intracranial tension or focal neurological deficits, were present in seven girls (43.8%) and four boys (40%), and gelastic seizures were present in three children. Girls with CIPP had greater bone age

  16. [A case of true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome accompanied by an aberrant right subclavian artery].

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Saito, Takanori; Yokota, Ichiro; Kowa, Hisatomo; Kanda, Fumio; Toda, Tatsushi

    2015-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman experienced progressive intrinsic muscle wasting on the right hand over a period of 7 years. The distribution of muscular atrophy and weakness was consistent with the area innervated by the right C8 and Th1 nerve roots. Neurophysiological examination suggested a right lower trunk lesion. An elongated right transverse process of the C7 vertebra and an aberrant subclavian artery were detected on computed tomography images, and the right lower trunk of the brachial plexus appeared to be lifted upward on magnetic resonance images. The patient was diagnosed with true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. A fibrous band extending from the elongated transverse process was found during surgery, and symptoms did not progress further after resection of the band. True neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome can cause monomelic amyotrophy, and localized neuroimaging and detailed neurophysiological examination were useful for diagnosis.

  17. A Case of Neuro-Behcet’s Disease Presenting with Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation

    PubMed Central

    Alkhachroum, Ayham M.; Saeed, Saba; Kaur, Jaspreet; Shams, Tanzila; De Georgia, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: Central hyperventilation Symptoms: Hyperventilation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Behcet’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder usually characterized by the triad of oral ulcers, genital ulcers, and uveitis. Central to the pathogenesis of Behcet’s disease is an autoimmune vasculitis. Neurological involvement, so called “Neuro-Behcet’s disease”, occurs in 10–20% of patients, usually from a meningoencephalitis or venous thrombosis. Case Report: We report the case of a 46-year-old patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease who presented with central neurogenic hyperventilation as a result of brainstem involvement from venulitis. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, central neurogenic hyperventilation has not previously been described in a patient with Neuro-Behcet’s disease. PMID:26965646

  18. The link between vascular dysfunction, bladder ischemia, and aging bladder dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Boedtkjer, Donna B.; Forman, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The vascular supply to the human bladder is derived mainly from the superior and inferior vesical arteries, the latter being directly connected to the internal iliac artery. Aging is associated with an impairment of blood vessel function and changes may occur in the vasculature at the molecular, cellular and functional level. Pelvic arterial insufficiency may play an important role in the development of bladder dysfunctions such as detrusor overactivity (DO) and the overactive bladder syndrome. Chronic ischemia-related bladder dysfunction may progress to bladder underactivity and it would be desirable to treat not only lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) induced by chronic ischemia, but also the progression of the morphological bladder changes. Studies in experimental models in rabbits and rats have shown that pelvic arterial insufficiency may result in significant bladder ischemia with reduced bladder wall oxygen tension. In turn, this will lead to oxidative stress associated with upregulation of oxidative stress-sensitive genes, increased muscarinic receptor activity, ultrastructural damage, and neurodegeneration. The phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor tadalafil, the α1-adrenoceptor (AR) blocker silodosin, the β3-AR agonist mirabegron, and the free radical scavenger melatonin, exerted a protecting effect on urodynamic parameters, and on functional and morphological changes of the bladder demonstrable in vitro. Since the agents tested are used clinically for relieving LUTS, the results from the animal models seem to have translational value, and may be of relevance for designing clinical studies to demonstrate if the drugs may prevent progression of ischemia-related functional and morphological bladder changes. PMID:28042309

  19. Transcriptional and translational plasticity in rodent urinary bladder TRP channels with urinary bladder inflammation, bladder dysfunction, or postnatal maturation.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Liana; Girard, Beatrice M; May, Victor; Vizzard, Margaret A

    2012-11-01

    These studies examined the transcriptional and translational plasticity of three transient receptor potential (TRP) channels (TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV4) with established neuronal and non-neuronal expression and functional roles in the lower urinary tract. Mechanosensor and nociceptor roles in either physiological or pathological lower urinary tract states have been suggested for TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPV4. We have previously demonstrated the neurochemical, organizational, and functional plasticity in micturition reflex pathways following induction of urinary bladder inflammation using the antineoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide. More recently, we have characterized similar plasticity in micturition reflex pathways in a transgenic mouse model with chronic urothelial overexpression (OE) of nerve growth factor (NGF) and in a transgenic mouse model with deletion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). In addition, the micturition reflex undergoes postnatal maturation that may also reflect plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression. Thus, we examined plasticity in urinary bladder TRP channel expression in diverse contexts using a combination of quantitative, real-time PCR and western blotting approaches. We demonstrate transcriptional and translational plasticity of urinary bladder TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRVP4 expression. Although the functional significance of urinary bladder TRP channel plasticity awaits further investigation, these studies demonstrate context- (inflammation, postnatal development, NGF-OE, VIP deletion) and tissue-dependent (urothelium + suburothelium, detrusor) plasticity.

  20. Relationship between Schistosomiasis and Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, M. H.; Sheweita, S. A.; O’Connor, P. J.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma of the urinary bladder is the most common malignancy in the Middle East and parts of Africa where schistosomiasis is a widespread problem. Much evidence supports the association between schistosomiasis and bladder cancer: this includes the geographical correlation between the two conditions, the distinctive patterns of gender and age at diagnosis, the clinicopathological identity of schistosome-associated bladder cancer, and extensive evidence in experimentally infected animals. Multiple factors have been suggested as causative agents in schistosome-associated bladder carcinogenesis. Of these, N-nitroso compounds appear to be of particular importance since they were found at high levels in the urine of patients with schistosomiasis-associated bladder cancer. Various strains of bacteria that can mediate nitrosation reactions leading to the formation of N-nitrosamines have been identified in the urine of subjects with schistosomiasis at higher intensities of infection than in normal subjects. In experimental schistosomiasis, the activities of carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes are increased soon after infection but are reduced again during the later chronic stages of the disease. Not only could this prolong the period of exposure to activated N-nitrosamines, but also inflammatory cells, sitmulated as a result of the infection, may induce the endogenous synthesis of N-nitrosamines as well as generating oxygen radicals. Higher than normal levels of host cell DNA damage are therefore anticipated, and they have indeed been observed in the case of alkylation damage, together with an inefficiency in the capacity of relevant enzymes to repair this damaged DNA. In experimental schistosomiasis, it was also found that endogenous levels of host cell DNA damage were related to the intensity of infection. All of these factors could contribute to an increased risk of bladder cancer in patients with schistosomiasis, and in particular, the gene changes observed may have

  1. Women and Diabetes -- Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Women and Diabetes - Diabetes Medicines Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... 1-800-332-1088 to request a form. Diabetes Medicines The different kinds of diabetes medicines are ...

  2. Spinal TRPA1 ion channels contribute to cutaneous neurogenic inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Koivisto, Ari; Pertovaara, Antti

    2010-08-02

    In the spinal dorsal horn, TRPA1 ion channels on central terminals of peptidergic primary afferent nerve fibers regulate transmission to glutamatergic and GABAergic interneurons. Here we determine the cutaneous anti-inflammatory effect of a spinally administered TRPA1 channel antagonist to test the hypothesis that spinal TRPA1 channels contribute to cutaneous neurogenic inflammation induced by sustained noxious stimulation. According to the hypothesis, spinal TRPA1 channels facilitate transmission of injury discharge to GABAergic interneurons that induce a dorsal root reflex, which results in increased release of proinflammatory compounds in the skin. Intraplantar capsaicin, a TRPV1 channel agonist, was used to induce neurogenic inflammation in anesthetized rats that were pretreated intrathecally (i.t.), intraplantarly (i.pl.) or intraperitoneally (i.p.) with vehicle or Chembridge-5861526 (CHEM, a TRPA1 channel antagonist). For assessment of neurogenic inflammation, the capsaicin-induced increase of cutaneous blood flow was determined adjacent to the capsaicin-treated skin site with a laser Doppler flowmeter. Capsaicin-induced a marked increase in cutaneous blood flow. The capsaicin-induced blood flow increase was attenuated in a dose-related fashion by i.t. pretreatment with CHEM (3-10microg). Pretreatment with CHEM at a dose of 3mg/kg i.p. or 20microg i.pl. failed to attenuate the capsaicin-induced increase of blood flow. The results indicate that spinal TRPA1 channels contribute to cutaneous neurogenic inflammation adjacent to the injury site, probably by facilitating a dorsal root reflex in peptidergic primary afferent nerve fibers.

  3. Brain ACE2 shedding contributes to the development of neurogenic hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Kavaljit H.; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Over-activity of the brain Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) is a major contributor to neurogenic hypertension. While over-expression of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme type 2 (ACE2) has been shown to be beneficial in reducing hypertension by transforming Angiotensin (Ang)-II into Ang-(1-7), several groups have reported decreased brain ACE2 expression and activity during the development of hypertension. Objective We hypothesized that ADAM17-mediated ACE2 shedding results in decreased membrane-bound ACE2 in the brain, thus promoting the development of neurogenic hypertension. Methods and Results To test this hypothesis, we used the DOCA-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in non-transgenic (NT) and syn-hACE2 mice over-expressing ACE2 in neurons. DOCA-salt treatment in NT mice led to significant increases in blood pressure, hypothalamic Ang-II levels, inflammation, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, autonomic dysfunction, as well as decreased hypothalamic ACE2 activity and expression, while these changes were blunted or prevented in syn-hACE2 mice. In addition, reduction of ACE2 expression and activity in the brain paralleled a rise in ACE2 activity in the cerebrospinal fluid of NT mice following DOCA-salt treatment and was accompanied by enhanced ADAM17 expression and activity in the hypothalamus. Chronic knockdown of ADAM17 in the brain blunted the development of hypertension and restored ACE2 activity and baroreflex function. Conclusions Our data provide the first evidence that ADAM17-mediated shedding impairs brain ACE2 compensatory activity, thus contributing to the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:24014829

  4. Inhibition by ketamine and amphetamine analogs of the neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations in porcine basilar arteries.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Lai, Su-Yu; Kung, Po-Cheng; Lin, Yo-Cheng; Yang, Hui-I; Chen, Po-Yi; Liu, Ingrid Y; Lua, Ahai Chang; Lee, Tony Jer-Fu

    2016-08-15

    The abuse of ketamine and amphetamine analogs is associated with incidence of hypertension and strokes involving activation of sympathetic activities. Large cerebral arteries at the base of the brain from several species receive dense sympathetic innervation which upon activation causes parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation with increased regional blood flow via axo-axonal interaction mechanism, serving as a protective mechanism to meet O2 demand in an acutely stressful situation. The present study was designed to examine effects of ketamine and amphetamine analogs on axo-axonal interaction-mediated neurogenic nitrergic vasodilation in porcine basilar arteries using techniques of blood-vessel myography, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp, and calcium imaging. In U46619-contracted basilar arterial rings, nicotine (100μM) and electrical depolarization of nitrergic nerves by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS, 8Hz) elicited neurogenic nitrergic vasodilations. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs concentration-dependently inhibited nicotine-induced parasympathetic-nitrergic vasodilation without affecting that induced by TNS, nitroprusside or isoproterenol. Ketamine and amphetamine analogs also concentration-dependently blocked nicotine-induced inward currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing α3β2-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and nicotine-induced inward currents as well as calcium influxes in rat superior cervical ganglion neurons. The potency in inhibiting both inward-currents and calcium influxes is ketamine>methamphetamine>hydroxyamphetamine. These results indicate that ketamine and amphetamine analogs, by blocking nAChRs located on cerebral perivascular sympathetic nerves, reduce nicotine-induced, axo-axonal interaction mechanism-mediated neurogenic dilation of the basilar arteries. Chronic abuse of these drugs, therefore, may interfere with normal sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction mechanism resulting in diminished neurogenic vasodilation

  5. Droxidopa and Reduced Falls in a Trial of Parkinson Disease Patients With Neurogenic Orthostatic Hypotension

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert A.; Heritier, Stephane; Rowse, Gerald J.; Hewitt, L. Arthur; Isaacson, Stuart H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Droxidopa is a prodrug of norepinephrine indicated for the treatment of orthostatic dizziness, lightheadedness, or the “feeling that you are about to black out” in adult patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension caused by primary autonomic failure including Parkinson disease (PD). The objective of this study was to compare fall rates in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension randomized to droxidopa or placebo. Methods Study NOH306 was a 10-week, phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of droxidopa in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension that included assessments of falls as a key secondary end point. In this report, the principal analysis consisted of a comparison of the rate of patient-reported falls from randomization to end of study in droxidopa versus placebo groups. Results A total of 225 patients were randomized; 222 patients were included in the safety analyses, and 197 patients provided efficacy data and were included in the falls analyses. The 92 droxidopa patients reported 308 falls, and the 105 placebo patients reported 908 falls. In the droxidopa group, the fall rate was 0.4 falls per patient-week; in the placebo group, the rate was 1.05 falls per patient-week (prespecified Wilcoxon rank sum P = 0.704; post hoc Poisson-inverse Gaussian test P = 0.014), yielding a relative risk reduction of 77% using the Poisson-inverse Gaussian model. Fall-related injuries occurred in 16.7% of droxidopa-treated patients and 26.9% of placebo-treated patients. Conclusions Treatment with droxidopa appears to reduce falls in PD patients with symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension, but this finding must be confirmed. PMID:27332626

  6. GABAergic signalling in a neurogenic niche of the turtle spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Reali, Cecilia; Fernández, Anabel; Radmilovich, Milka; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar; Russo, Raúl E

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The region that surrounds the central canal (CC) in the turtle spinal cord is a neurogenic niche immersed within already functional circuits, where radial glia expressing brain lipid binding protein (BLBP) behave as progenitors. The behaviour of both progenitors and neuroblasts within adult neurogenic niches must be regulated to maintain the functional stability of the host circuit. In the brain, GABA plays a major role in this kind of regulation but little is known about GABAergic signalling in neurogenic niches of the postnatal spinal cord. Here we explored the action of GABA around the CC of the turtle spinal cord by combining patch-clamp recordings of CC-contacting cells, immunohistochemistry for key components of GABAergic signalling and Ca2+ imaging. Two potential sources of GABA appeared around the CC: GABAergic terminals and CC-contacting neurones. GABA depolarized BLBP+ progenitors via GABA transporter-3 (GAT3) and/or GABAA receptors. In CC-contacting neurones, GABAA receptor activation generated responses ranging from excitation to inhibition. This functional heterogeneity appeared to originate from different ratios of activity of the Na+–K+–2Cl− co-transporter (NKCC1) and the K+–Cl− co-transporter (KCC2). In both progenitors and immature neurones, GABA induced an increase in intracellular Ca2+ that required extracellular Ca2+ and was blocked by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine. Our study shows that GABAergic signalling around the CC shares fundamental properties with those in the embryo and adult neurogenic niches, suggesting that GABA may be part of the mechanisms regulating the production and integration of neurones within operational spinal circuits in the turtle. PMID:21911613

  7. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient.

  8. Botulinum toxin type A reduces capsaicin-evoked pain and neurogenic vasodilatation in human skin.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, Valeria; Capone, Jay Guido; Eleopra, Roberto; Quatrale, Rocco; Sensi, Mariachiara; Gastaldo, Ernesto; Tola, Maria Rosaria; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-07-01

    The effect of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT/A) on pain and neurogenic vasodilatation induced by application to the human skin of thermal stimuli and capsaicin was evaluated in a double blind study. A capsaicin cream (0.5 ml of a 0.075%) was applied to the skin of both forearms of eighteen subjects randomly pretreated with either BoNT/A (Botox) or 0.9% saline (NS). Capsaicin was applied to a skin area either inside (protocol A) or adjacent to the BoNT/A treated area (protocol B). Pre-treatment with BoNT/A did not affect thermal-specific and thermal-pain thresholds (by quantitative sensory testing). However, capsaicin-induced pain sensation (by a visual analogue scale), flare area (by acetate sheet) and changes in cutaneous blood flow (CBF, by laser Doppler flowmetry) were reduced when capsaicin was administered inside (protocol A) the BoNT/A treated area. In Protocol B, capsaicin-induced pain was unchanged, and capsaicin-induced flare/increase in CBF were reduced only in the area treated with BoNT/A, but not in the BoNT/A untreated area. Results indicate that (i) BoNT/A reduces capsaicin-induced pain and neurogenic vasodilatation without affecting the transmission of thermal and thermal-pain modalities; (ii) reduction in capsaicin-induced pain occurs only if capsaicin is administered into the BoNT/A pretreated area; (iii) reduction in neurogenic vasodilatation by BoNT/A does not contribute to its analgesic action. BoNT/A could be tested for the treatment of conditions characterised by neurogenic inflammation and inflammatory pain.

  9. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, F.; Myers, B.; Magnotta, F.

    1998-08-25

    A lightweight, low permeability liner is described for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using tori spherical or near tori spherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film sealed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life. 19 figs.

  10. Lightweight bladder lined pressure vessels

    DOEpatents

    Mitlitsky, Fred; Myers, Blake; Magnotta, Frank

    1998-01-01

    A lightweight, low permeability liner for graphite epoxy composite compressed gas storage vessels. The liner is composed of polymers that may or may not be coated with a thin layer of a low permeability material, such as silver, gold, or aluminum, deposited on a thin polymeric layer or substrate which is formed into a closed bladder using torispherical or near torispherical end caps, with or without bosses therein, about which a high strength to weight material, such as graphite epoxy composite shell, is formed to withstand the storage pressure forces. The polymeric substrate may be laminated on one or both sides with additional layers of polymeric film. The liner may be formed to a desired configuration using a dissolvable mandrel or by inflation techniques and the edges of the film seamed by heat sealing. The liner may be utilized in most any type of gas storage system, and is particularly applicable for hydrogen, gas mixtures, and oxygen used for vehicles, fuel cells or regenerative fuel cell applications, high altitude solar powered aircraft, hybrid energy storage/propulsion systems, and lunar/Mars space applications, and other applications requiring high cycle life.

  11. A molecular analysis of neurogenic placode and cranial sensory ganglion development in the shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P; McCole, R B; Baker, C V H

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the evolution of the genetic control of the development of cranial neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in vertebrates, we cloned and analysed the spatiotemporal expression pattern of six transcription factor genes in a chondrichthyan, the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (lesser-spotted dogfish/catshark). As in other vertebrates, NeuroD is expressed in all cranial sensory ganglia. We show that Pax3 is expressed in the profundal placode and ganglion, strongly supporting homology between the separate profundal ganglion of elasmobranchs and basal actinopterygians and the ophthalmic trigeminal placode-derived neurons of the fused amniote trigeminal ganglion. We show that Pax2 is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial and otic placodes, and confirm that Phox2b is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial placode-derived neurons. We identify Eya4 as a novel marker for the lateral line system throughout its development, expressed in lateral line placodes, sensory ridges and migrating primordia, neuromasts and electroreceptors. We also identify Tbx3 as a specific marker for lateral line ganglia in shark embryos. We use the spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes to characterise the development of neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in the dogfish, with a focus on the epibranchial and lateral line placodes. Our findings demonstrate the evolutionary conservation across all gnathostomes of at least some of the transcription factor networks underlying neurogenic placode development.

  12. Effect of sertraline on proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Jahromi, Maliheh; Amirpour, Nushin; Khosravizadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs are commonly employed for anxiety and mood disorders. Sertraline is extensively used as antidepressant in clinic. In addition, adipose tissue represents an abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells with the ability to differentiate in to multiple lineages. Therefore, human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) may be useful for autologous transplantation. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we assessed the effect of antidepressant drug Sertraline on the proliferation and neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs using MTT assay and immunofluorescence technique respectively. Results: MTT assay analysis showed that 0.5 μM Sertraline significantly increased the proliferation rate of hADSCs induced cells (P < 0.05), while immunofluorescent staining indicated that Sertraline treatment during neurogenic differentiation could be decreased the percentage of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Nestin-positive cells, but did not significantly effect on the percentage of MAP2 positive cells. Conclusion: Overall, our data show that Sertraline can be promoting proliferation rate during neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs after 6 days post-induction, while Sertraline inhibits gliogenesis of induced hADSCs. PMID:24800186

  13. Changes of neural markers expression during late neurogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Khosravizadeh, Zahra; Bahramian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have been done to obtain sufficient number of neural cells for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord, and traumatic brain injury because neural stem cells are limited in central nerves system. Recently, several studies have shown that adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are the appropriate source of multipotent stem cells. Furthermore, these cells are found in large quantities. The aim of this study was an assessment of proliferation and potential of neurogenic differentiation of ADSCs with passing time. Materials and Methods: Neurosphere formation was used for neural induction in isolated human ADSCs (hADSCs). The rate of proliferation was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and potential of neural differentiation of induced hADSCs was evaluated by immunocytochemical and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after 10 and 14 days post-induction. Results: The rate of proliferation of induced hADSCs increased after 14 days while the expression of nestin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and microtubule-associated protein 2 was decreased with passing time during neurogenic differentiation. Conclusion: These findings showed that the proliferation of induced cells increased with passing time, but in early neurogenic differentiation of hADSCs, neural expression was higher than late of differentiation. Thus, using of induced cells in early differentiation may be suggested for in vivo application. PMID:26605238

  14. Development of mechanisms associated with neurogenic-mediated skin inflammation during the growth of rats.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Mihoko; Miyake, Mio; Takeda, Masanori; Muto, Taichiro; Ueda, Norishi; Ito, Komei; Sakamoto, Tatsuo

    2010-04-01

    Neurogenic-mediated inflammation may be associated with several inflammatory skin diseases including atopic dermatitis. However, age-dependent differences in neurogenic-mediated skin responses are not fully understood. We compared skin plasma leakage in rats aged 2 and 8 wk, which was induced by topical capsaicin, topical formalin, and intracutaneous substance P, whose effects are mediated via tachykinin NK1 receptors. Evans blue dye extravasation served as an index of the increase in skin vascular permeability. Capsaicin, formalin, and substance P caused a skin response in a dose-dependent manner in both age groups. However, the skin response was much greater in adults than in pups. In addition, the localization of sensory C-fibers and tachykinin NK1 receptors in the skin was investigated by immunofluorescent staining with antisubstance P and antitachykinin NK1 receptor antibodies, respectively. Substance P-immunoreactive nerves were detected throughout the dermis and tachykinin NK1 receptors were mainly detected in blood vessel walls in the dermis in both age groups. However, they were more sparsely distributed in pups. In conclusion, the weak neurogenic-mediated skin inflammation in pups is probably because of immature neural mechanisms associated with skin inflammation such as reduced innervation of sensory C-fibers and low expression of tachykinin NK1 receptors.

  15. Neurogenic and myogenic motor patterns of rabbit proximal, mid, and distal colon.

    PubMed

    Dinning, P G; Costa, M; Brookes, S J; Spencer, N J

    2012-07-01

    The rabbit colon consists of four distinct regions. The motility of each region is controlled by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. Associating these mechanisms with specific motor patterns throughout all regions of the colon has not previously been achieved. Three sections of the colon (the proximal, mid, and distal colon) were removed from euthanized rabbits. The proximal colon consists of a triply teniated region and a single tenia region. Spatio-temporal maps were constructed from video recordings of colonic wall diameter, with associated intraluminal pressure recorded from the aboral end. Hexamethonium (100 μM) and tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.6 μM) were used to inhibit neural activity. Four distinct patterns of motility were detected: 1 myogenic and 3 neurogenic. The myogenic activity consisted of circular muscle (CM) contractions (ripples) that occurred throughout the colon and propagated in both antegrade (anal) and retrograde (oral) directions. The neural activity of the proximal colon consisted of slowly (0.1 mm/s) propagating colonic migrating motor complexes, which were abolished by hexamethonium. These complexes were observed in the region of the proximal colon with a single band of tenia. In the distal colon, tetrodotoxin-sensitive, thus neurally mediated, but hexamethonium-resistant, peristaltic (anal) and antiperistaltic (oral) contractions were identified. The distinct patterns of neurogenic and myogenic motor activity recorded from isolated rabbit colon are specific to each anatomically distinct region. The regional specificity motor pattern is likely to facilitate orderly transit of colonic content from semi-liquid to solid composition of feces.

  16. Neurogenic pruritus: an unrecognised problem? A retrospective case series of treatment by acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Stellon, Anthony

    2002-12-01

    Intractable localised segmental pruritus without a rash has been reported over the years under various titles depending on the area of the body affected. Notalgia paresthetica and brachioradial pruritus are the two terms used for what is believed to be a form of neuropathy. The clinical observations reported here suggest that other localised cases of pruritus exist that share common clinical features, and the term neurogenic pruritus is suggested to encompass these under one clinical condition. Acupuncture has been used to treat skin conditions, of which pruritus is one symptom. This retrospective study looked at the symptomatic relief of neurogenic pruritus in 16 patients using acupuncture. In 12 cases the affected dermatomes of the body were innervated by cervical spinal nerves, seven innervated by dorsal spinal nerves and four innervated by the lumbar spinal nerves. Seven patients had areas affected by two different regions of the spine. Restricted neck or back movements were noted in patients as were areas of paravertebral spasm or tenderness of the muscles. Total resolution of symptoms as judged by VAS occurred in 75% of patients. Relapse occurred in 37% of patients within 1-12 months following treatment. Acupuncture appeared to be effective in alleviating the distressing symptom of itching in patients presenting with neurogenic pruritus.

  17. Diabetes - tests and checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... High blood pressure Microalbuminuria test Type 1 diabetes Type 2 diabetes Patient Instructions ACE inhibitors Diabetes and exercise Diabetes - eye care Diabetes - foot ulcers Diabetes - keeping ...

  18. Bladder Control Problems in Women: Lifestyle Strategies for Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some foods and beverages can irritate your bladder. Caffeine and alcohol both increase urine production. This can lead to increased frequency and urgency of urination. Caffeine can also cause bladder spasms. Certain acidic fruits — ...

  19. Noninvasive Electromagnetic Detection of Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Vedruccio, Clarbruno; Leucci, Giorgio; Massenio, Paolo; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Vincenzo; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Normal and neoplastic human tissues have different electromagnetic properties. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of noninvasive electromagnetic detection of bladder cancer (BC) by the tissue-resonance interaction method (TRIM-prob). Patients and Methods. Consecutive patients were referred for cystoscopy because of (i) microscopic or gross hematuria and/or irritative voiding symptoms and (ii) bladder ultrasounds and urinary cytology findings negative or just suspicious of malignancy. Patients were first submitted to TRIM-prob bladder scanning by a single investigator and then to cystoscopy by another investigator blind to TRIM-prob data. Results. In 125 evaluated patients cystoscopy was positive for BC in 47 and negative in the remaining 78; conversely, TRIM-prob bladder scanning was positive for BC in 53 and negative in 72. In particular, TRIM-prob scanning yielded 7 false positives and only one false negative; therefore, its overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 97.9%, 89.9%, 86.8%, 98.6%, and 93.6%, respectively. Conclusions. TRIM-prob bladder scanning was a simple and quite accurate method for non-invasive electromagnetic detection of BC. If the elevated positive and negative predictive values will be replicated in further well-designed studies, it could be used to screen asymptomatic patients at high risk of BC. PMID:24563795

  20. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part I.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Overactive bladder syndrome is one of the lower urinary tract dysfunctions with the highest number of scientific publications over the past two decades. This shows the growing interest in better understanding this syndrome, which gathers symptoms of urinary urgency and increased daytime and nighttime voiding frequency, with or without urinary incontinence and results in a negative impact on the quality of life of approximately one out of six individuals - including both genders and almost all age groups. The possibility of establishing the diagnosis just from clinical data made patients' access to specialized care easier. Physiotherapy resources have been incorporated into the urological daily practice. A number of more selective antimuscarinic drugs with consequent lower adverse event rates were released. Recently, a new class of oral drugs, beta-adrenergic agonists has become part of the armamentarium for Overactive Bladder. Botulinum toxin injections in the bladder and sacral neuromodulation are routine modalities of treatment for refractory cases. During the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder, a comprehensive review of the literature related to the evolution of the concept, epidemiology, diagnosis, and management was conducted. This text corresponds to the first part of the review Overactive Bladder 18-years.

  1. Glucocorticoid therapy and risk of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, K; Schned, A; Fortuny, J; Heaney, J; Marsit, C; Kelsey, K T; Karagas, M R

    2009-01-01

    Background: Use of immunosuppressive drugs post organ transplantation, and prolonged use of glucorticoids for other conditions have been associated with subsequent risk of certain malignancies, that is, skin cancers and lymphoma. There is evidence that the incidence of bladder cancer is also elevated among organ transplant recipients, however, it is unknown whether other groups of patients, that is, those taking oral glucocorticoids, likewise are at an increased risk. Methods: In a population-based case–control study in New Hampshire, USA, we compared the use of glucocorticoids in 786 bladder cancer cases and in 1083 controls. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis to compute adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associated with oral glucocorticoid use. Results: In our analysis, the risk of bladder cancer was related to a history of prolonged oral glucocorticoid use (OR=1.85, 95% CI=1.24–2.76, adjusted for age, gender and smoking). Associations with oral glucocorticoid use were stronger for invasive tumours (OR=2.12, 95% CI=1.17–3.85) and tumours with high (3+) p53 staining intensity (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.26–4.36). Conclusion: Our results raise the possibility of an increased risk of bladder cancer from systemic use of glucocorticoids, and a potential role of immune surveillance in bladder cancer aetiology. PMID:19773763

  2. Impaired cytokine expression, neutrophil infiltration and bacterial clearance in response to urinary tract infection in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ahmet; Altuntas, Cengiz Z; Bicer, Fuat; Izgi, Kenan; Hultgren, Scott J; Liu, Guiming; Daneshgari, Firouz

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic patients have increased susceptibility to infections, and urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common type in women with diabetes mellitus. Knowledge of bacterial clearance effectiveness following UTI in diabetics is sparse. In this study, the effects of diabetes on bacterial clearance efficiency and components of the innate immune system in response to UTI in a murine model were investigated. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control female C57BL/6J mice were infected with uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and bacterial load, expression of chemokines, and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder over time were investigated. Expression levels of histone deacetylases were also measured to address a potential mechanism underlying the phenotype. Bacterial clearance during UTI was significantly prolonged in diabetic mice relative to controls. Neutrophil infiltration in bladder tissue and urine, and both mRNA and protein expression of chemokines MIP-2, KC, MCP-1 and IL-6 in bladder tissue were diminished at early time points after infection in diabetic mice relative to controls. In addition, mRNA levels of histone deacetylases 1-5 were increased in diabetic mice. This is the first study to show an association of impaired bacterial clearance in diabetic mice with suppression of UTI-induced chemokine expression and neutrophil infiltration in the bladder.

  3. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jose A.; Rich, Mark A.; Swana, Hubert S.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates. PMID:27747129

  4. Bladder cancer: smoking, beverages and artificial sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Jain, Meera G.

    1974-01-01

    A matched patient-control study of bladder cancer examined the relationship of the disease to occupation, smoking and intake of tea, coffee, cola, alcohol and artificial sweeteners. There was no association of disease with occupation for these patients. Heavy smoking gave relative risks of 6.37 and 4.36 for men and women respectively; there was evidence of a dose-response relationship. Tea and coffee intake did not increase the risk of disease nor did prolonged use of artificial sweeteners. Alcohol and cola intake increased the relative risk of bladder cancer among male smokers. There is some suggestion that smoking interacts with both alcohol and cola intake in the production of bladder cancer. PMID:4429932

  5. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Piyush; Roy, Soumyajit; Tiwari, Vivek; Mohanti, Bidhu K

    2014-01-01

    To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 * 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  6. The underactive bladder: detection and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Osman, Nadir; Mangera, Altaf; Hillary, Christopher; Inman, Richard; Chapple, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The inability to generate a voiding contraction sufficient to allow efficient bladder emptying within a reasonable time frame is a common problem seen in urological practice. Typically, the symptoms that arise are voiding symptoms, such as weak and slow urinary flow. These symptoms can cause considerable bother to patients and impact upon quality of life. The urodynamic finding of inadequate detrusor contraction has been termed detrusor underactivity (DUA). Although a definition is available for this entity, there are no widely accepted diagnostic criteria. Drawing parallels to detrusor overactivity and the overactive bladder, the symptoms arising from DUA have been referred to as the "underactive bladder" (UAB), while attempts to crystallize the definition of UAB are now ongoing. In this article, we review the contemporary literature pertaining to the epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of DUA as well as discuss the definitional aspects that are currently under consideration.

  7. Bladder carcinoma: MDCT cystography and virtual cystoscopy.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Valeria; Sciarra, Alessandro; Di Martino, Michele; Bernardo, Silvia; Vergari, Valeria; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the most common tumor among the low urinary tract, accounting for 90% of cancer cases. Conventional cystoscopy represents the gold standard for diagnosis and local management of bladder carcinoma. As the prevalence of transitional cell carcinoma is four-fold greater in men than in women, the endoscopic procedure presents objective difficulties related to the length and bending of male urethra. The most important problems are represented by intense discomfort for the patient and bleeding; furthermore, the high cost, invasivity, and local complications such as infections and mechanical lesions are well-known drawbacks. Additionally, conventional cystoscopy does not provide information about extravescical extensions of the tumor. CT cystography, combined with virtual cystoscopy, is mandatory for TNM staging of the tumor and also is useful when conventional cystoscopy is inconclusive or cannot be performed. We presents the CT cystography findings with virtual endoscopy correlation and bladder carcinoma appearance.

  8. A flowgraph model for bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Superficial bladder cancer has been the subject of numerous studies for many years, but the evolution of the disease still remains not well understood. After the tumor has been surgically removed, it may reappear at a similar level of malignancy or progress to a higher level. The process may be reasonably modeled by means of a Markov process. However, in order to more completely model the evolution of the disease, this approach is insufficient. The semi-Markov framework allows a more realistic approach, but calculations become frequently intractable. In this context, flowgraph models provide an efficient approach to successfully manage the evolution of superficial bladder carcinoma. Our aim is to test this methodology in this particular case. Results We have built a successful model for a simple but representative case. Conclusion The flowgraph approach is suitable for modeling of superficial bladder cancer. PMID:25080066

  9. Laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty for tuberculous contracted bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Manickam; Senthil, Kallappan; Balashanmugam, T. S.

    2017-01-01

    The stomach is the preferred augmentation option for a contracted bladder in a patient with renal failure. A 49-year-old female presented with right solitary functioning kidney with tuberculous lower ureteric stricture and contracted bladder. Her creatinine was 2.8 mg%. By laparoscopic approach, right gastroepiploic artery based gastric flap was isolated using staplers and used for augmentation and ureteric replacement. At 6-month follow-up, her creatinine was 1.9 mg%, and bladder capacity was 250 ml. She had mild hematuria, which settled with proton pump inhibitors. Laparoscopic gastrocystoplasty is feasible and effective augmentation option in those with renal failure, giving the benefits of minimally invasive approach. PMID:28197034

  10. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  11. Androgen Receptor Signaling in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Chen, Jinbo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Emerging preclinical findings have indicated that steroid hormone receptor signaling plays an important role in bladder cancer outgrowth. In particular, androgen-mediated androgen receptor signals have been shown to correlate with the promotion of tumor development and progression, which may clearly explain some sex-specific differences in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses the available data, suggesting the involvement of androgens and/or the androgen receptor pathways in urothelial carcinogenesis as well as tumor growth. While the precise mechanisms of the functions of the androgen receptor in urothelial cells remain far from being fully understood, current evidence may offer chemopreventive or therapeutic options, using androgen deprivation therapy, in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:28241422

  12. Bladder exstrophy from childhood into adult life.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Chaim, J; Docimo, S G; Jeffs, R D; Gearhart, J P

    1996-01-01

    Exstrophy of the bladder is rare and the incidence of bladder exstrophy is calculated to be from 1 per 30,000 to 50,000 live births with male to female ratio ranging from 1.5-5 to 1(1-4). It was found that persistence or overgrowth of the cloacal membrane on the lower anterior abdominal area, prevents normal mesenchymal ingrowth. This causes divergence of the lower abdominal muscular structures and forces the genital ridges to fuse caudal to the cloacal membrane. The stage of ingrowth of the urorectal septum at the time of rupture determines whether one will produce an exstrophic urinary tract alone (classic bladder exstrophy or epispadias) or cloacal exstrophy with the hindgut interposed between the hemibladders. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8709084

  13. A case of diabetic amyotrophy with severe atrophy and weakness of shoulder girdle muscles showing good response to intravenous immune globulin.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuko; Yanagihara, Chie; Nishimura, Yo; Oka, Nobuyuki

    2007-01-01

    A 45-year-old man with insulin-dependent diabetic mellitus developed progressive asymmetrical weakness and atrophy of both shoulder girdle muscles within 1 year. In the last month, he also developed slight weakness of both thighs. Neuropathology of the sural nerve showed an axonal degeneration and perivascular inflammation and electromyography revealed neurogenic changes. Because of a diagnosis of suspected diabetic amyotrophy, intravenous immunoglobulin was administered. This treatment produced marked improvement. Physicians should take into account the possibility of diabetic amyotrophy in patients with diabetic mellitus showing primary involvement of shoulder girdle muscles marked by weakness and atrophy.

  14. Darifenacin in the treatment of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M; Robinson, D; Cardozo, L

    2005-07-01

    Antimuscarinic drug therapy has been shown to be effective in the management of patients with symptoms of the overactive bladder syndrome (OAB), but the bothersome antimuscarinic adverse effects of dry mouth, constipation, somnolence and blurred vision often affect compliance with medication. The development of bladder selective M3 specific antagonists offers the possibility of increasing efficacy whilst minimising adverse effects. The M3 specific antagonist solifenacin has recently been marketed, and darifenacin will soon be available. The purpose of this article is to review the pharmacology and clinical trial data available for darifenacin, in addition to examining its role in the treatment of the OBS.

  15. Flat carcinoma in Situ of bladder.

    PubMed

    Riddle, P R; Chisholm, G D; Trott, P A; Pugh, R C

    1975-01-01

    36 patients with flat carcinoma in situ of the bladder have been reviewed. Those with widespread disease usually presented with dysuria or obstructive outflow tract symptoms and radical surgery appeared to give better results than radiotherapy. However, when the lesion was confined to small areas of the bladder mucosa, haematuria or pain were the main presenting symptoms and a conservative approach seemed justified. It is suggested that the term flat carcinoma in situ be used for this lesion whose behavior differs significantly from that of the commoner papillary or invasive tumours. The pathological appearances are to be reported elsewhere in full.

  16. Perioperative management of classic bladder exstrophy

    PubMed Central

    Massanyi, Eric Z; Gearhart, John P; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    The exstrophy-epispadias complex is a rare congenital malformation of the genitourinary system, abdominal wall muscles, and pelvic structures. Modern surgical repairs focus on reconstruction of the bladder and its adjacent structures, with the goal of achieving urinary continence, a satisfactory cosmetic result, and a high quality of life. Complex surgery in neonates and young children, as well as a prolonged postoperative course require close collaboration between surgeons, anesthesiologists, intensivists, pediatricians, and an experienced nursing staff. This article will review the spectrum of bladder exstrophy anomalies, the surgical repair, and the perioperative interdisciplinary management. PMID:24400236

  17. Small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Bruno Nagel; Maron, Paulo Eduardo Goulart; Vedovato, Bruno César; Barrese, Tomas Zecchini; Fernandes, Roni de Carvalho; Perez, Marjo Deninson Cardenuto

    2015-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely aggressive and rare tumor. Even though small cell carcinoma most commonly arises from the lungs there are several reports of small cell carcinoma in extrapulmonary sites. Due to its low frequency there is no well-established management for this disease. We report the case of a 61 year-old man with small cell carcinoma of the bladder who underwent radical cystectomy following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We also reviewed the literature for the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25517085

  18. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  19. Diabetic Nephropathy without Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    López-Revuelta, Katia; Méndez Abreu, Angel A.; Gerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Stanescu, Ramona-Ionela; Martínez Marín, Maria Isabel; Pérez Fernández, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy without diabetes (DNND), previously known as idiopathic nodular glomerulosclerosis, is an uncommon entity and thus rarely suspected; diagnosis is histological once diabetes is discarded. In this study we describe two new cases of DNND and review the literature. We analyzed all the individualized data of previous publications except one series of attached data. DNND appears to be favored by recognized cardiovascular risk factors. However, in contrast with diabetes, apparently no factor alone has been demonstrated to be sufficient to develop DNND. Other factors not considered as genetic and environmental factors could play a role or interact. The most plausible hypothesis for the occurrence of DNND would be a special form of atherosclerotic or metabolic glomerulopathy than can occur with or without diabetes. The clinical spectrum of cardiovascular risk factors and histological findings support this theory, with hypertension as one of the characteristic clinical features. PMID:26239683

  20. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  1. Double gall-bladder--two pathologies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, M; Papanas, N; Polychronidis, A; Maltezos, E; Prassopoulos, P; Simopoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    True gall-bladder duplication is a rare biliary anomaly, which is usually discovered as an incidental finding. There are reports of double gall-bladders missed during the first operation. We present the case of a double gall-bladder which, albeit suspected during the operation, was confirmed post-operatively. The patient underwent successful laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the examination of the resected gall-bladder revealed two chambers, only one containing stones. Predisposing factors for the development of gall-stones in one gall-bladder only, as well as surgical options, are briefly discussed.

  2. New discoveries in the molecular landscape of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Roger; Choi, Woonyoung; Ferguson 3rd, J.E.; Metcalfe, Michael J.; Kamat, Ashish M.

    2016-01-01

    We are currently on the cusp of exponential growth in the understanding of the molecular landscape of bladder cancer. Emerging data regarding the mutational burden and targetable genomic and protein alterations in bladder cancer have allowed us to tap into treatments directed toward specific molecular characteristics of bladder cancer. In parallel, these developments will enable us to better select patients for existing treatments of bladder cancer in a step toward personalized therapy. The present article reviews select discoveries that have advanced our understanding of bladder cancer and gives a glimpse of the exciting opportunities on the not-so-distant horizon. PMID:28105319

  3. HpD Photobiology And Photodynamic Therapy Of Bladder Carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chi-Wei

    1988-02-01

    Bladder carcinoma is considered one of the most favorable targets for the application of photodynamic therapy (PDT) due to the accessibility of the bladder for light delivery. Examination of the bladder and surgical procedures are routinely performed by the insertion of an optical instrument called cystoscope through the urethra. Thus, the treatment of bladder cancer by PDT can be conducted through the cystoscope with minimal invasion. However, to achieve optimal results from this treatment, one must consider both the structure of the bladder and the nature of the carcinoma.

  4. A crucial role for the cortico-striato-cortical loop in the pathogenesis of stroke-related neurogenic stuttering.

    PubMed

    Theys, Catherine; De Nil, Luc; Thijs, Vincent; van Wieringen, Astrid; Sunaert, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    Neurogenic stuttering is an acquired speech disorder characterized by the occurrence of stuttering-like dysfluencies following brain damage. Because the onset of stuttering in these patients is associated with brain lesions, this condition provides a unique opportunity to study the neural processes underlying speech dysfluencies. Lesion localizations of 20 stroke subjects with neurogenic stuttering and 17 control subjects were compared using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping. The results showed nine left-hemisphere areas associated with the presence of neurogenic stuttering. These areas were largely overlapping with the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network comprising the inferior frontal cortex, superior temporal cortex, intraparietal cortex, basal ganglia, and their white matter interconnections through the superior longitudinal fasciculus and internal capsule. These results indicated that stroke-induced neurogenic stuttering is not associated with neural dysfunction in one specific brain area but can occur following one or more lesion throughout the cortico-basal ganglia-cortical network. It is suggested that the onset of neurogenic stuttering in stroke subjects results from a disintegration of neural functions necessary for fluent speech.

  5. Effects of electroacupuncture on recent stroke inpatients with incomplete bladder emptying: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuo-Wei; Lin, Chien-Lin; Hung, Chun-Chuang; Chou, Eric Chieh-Lung; Hsieh, Yueh-Ling; Li, Te-Mao; Chou, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background Incomplete bladder emptying (IBE) is defined as having a postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume greater than 100 mL for 2 consecutive days. IBE is common in stroke patients and could necessitate indwelling or intermittent catheterization. The condition is correlated with urinary tract infections, which could impede rehabilitation progress and increase medical costs. Treatment for patients with IBE includes bladder retraining, biofeedback, medication, and botulinum toxin injection, but none of these interventions are completely effective. Methods All patients with acute stroke who were admitted to the rehabilitation ward between August 2010 and April 2011 were included in the study and their PVR urine volume was checked. Electroacupuncture (EA; 1 Hz, 15 minutes) was performed on the acupoints Sanyinjiao (SP6), Ciliao (BL32), and Pangguangshu (BL28) of stroke patients with IBE for a total of ten treatments (five times a week for 2 weeks). Bladder diaries, which included the spontaneous voiding and PVR urine volumes, were recorded during the course of treatment. Results The presence of IBE was not related to sex, history of diabetes mellitus, stroke type (hemorrhagic or ischemic), or stroke location (P > 0.05). Among the 49 patients in the study, nine (18%) had IBE, and seven of the stroke patients with IBE were treated with EA. Increased spontaneous voiding volume and decreased PVR urine volume were noted after ten sessions of EA. Conclusion EA may have beneficial effects on stroke survivors with IBE, thereby making it a potential safe modality with which to improve urinary function. PMID:23152677

  6. Differential Diagnosis and Treatment of Impaired Bladder Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Naoki; Chancellor, Michael B

    2004-01-01

    Although much attention is paid to urinary incontinence, the condition of incomplete bladder emptying is becoming more common with the aging of the US population and the widespread use of anticholinergic drugs to treat overactive bladder. This disorder can often be silent until end-stage presentation of overflow incontinence. In this article, we review the pathophysiologic conditions of the bladder and urethra that can cause impaired bladder emptying and discuss how to evaluate and screen the patient with a bladder that does not empty. In addition, we provide an overview of treatment options available for impaired bladder emptying and consider the research that is under way to find the best therapies for the failing bladder. PMID:16985851

  7. Migrated Mesh Plug Masquerading as a Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dajani, Daoud; Aron, Monish

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The purpose of this case presentation is to demonstrate how erosion of mesh into the bladder can initially present with the same symptoms as bladder malignancy. Case Presentation: A 62-year-old Hispanic male presented with 2 years of hematuria along with imaging concerning for a bladder tumor. The patient underwent cystoscopy with biopsy of a lesion at the anterior bladder. It was ultimately determined that a mesh plug from a prior hernia repair had migrated into the bladder. The mesh plug was excised using the Da Vinci Si robot, which allowed for efficient mobilization of the bladder and other anatomic structures, as well as rapid recovery. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates the need to consider mesh erosion as a cause of hematuria and, furthermore, shows how the robotic approach can help facilitate excision of migrated mesh into the bladder. PMID:28164159

  8. Impact of behaviour and lifestyle on bladder health.

    PubMed

    Burgio, K L; Newman, D K; Rosenberg, M T; Sampselle, C

    2013-06-01

    Bladder conditions, including UTI, UI, and bladder cancer, are highly prevalent and affect a wide range of populations. There are a variety of modifiable behavioral and lifestyle factors that influence bladder health. Some factors, such as smoking and obesity, increase the risk or severity of bladder conditions, whereas other factors, such as pelvic floor muscle exercise, are protective. Although clinical practice may be assumed to be the most appropriate ground for education on behavioral and lifestyle factors that influence bladder health, it is also crucial to extend these messages into the general population through public health interventions to reach those who have not yet developed bladder conditions and to maximize the prevention impact of these behaviors. Appropriate changes in these factors have the potential for an enormous impact on bladder health if implemented on a population-based level.

  9. How frequent are overactive bladder symptoms in women with urodynamic verification of an overactive bladder?

    PubMed Central

    Yeniel, Ahmet Özgür; Ergenoğlu, Mete Ahmet; Meseri, Reci; Aşkar, Niyazi; İtil, İsmail Mete

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between overactive bladder symptoms and urodynamic verification of overactive bladder. Material and Methods Between June 2011 and November 2011, 159 patients underwent urodynamics (UDS) at our urogynecology unit in the Ege University Hospital. Of these, 95 patients who complained of urgency, did not have any overt neurological diseases, bladder outlet obstruction and did not take any medication affecting the lower urinary tract function were evaluated. SPSS (ver. 15.0) was used to evaluate the data and the chi-square test and t test for independent samples were used for analysis. Results The mean age was found to be 54.5±12. Frequency was the most frequent symptom in women with overactive bladder (OAB) (82.1%), nocturia (57.8%) and (57.8%) urgency urinary incontinence followed in frequency. Detrusor over activity incidence was found to be 38.9%. There was no significant relationship between the presence of detrusor over activity (DOA) and OAB symptoms. Leak at urodynamics was found in 46.3% and there is no significant association with detrusor overactivity. Total bladder capacity was found to be significantly lower in women who had DOA (p=0.000). Conclusion It appears that overactive bladder symptoms do not predict detrusor over activity. Urodynamic investigation is not mandatory in the initial management of women with only OAB symptoms. PMID:24592016

  10. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. × Prognosis The prognosis for diabetic ... of diabetic neuropathy may become severe enough to cause depression in some patients. View Full Prognosis Clinical Trials ...

  11. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  12. Pseudosarcomatous and sarcomatous proliferations of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Spiess, Philippe E; Tuziak, Tomasz; Tibbs, Rita F; Bassett, Roland; Tamboli, Pheroze; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, Herbert Barton; Ayala, Alberto G; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2007-05-01

    Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor (PFT), postoperative spindle cell nodule (PSN), sarcoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the bladder are frequently difficult to distinguish histopathologically with significant differences in disease-related outcomes. A retrospective review of our pathology registry over the last 25 years identified 7 PFT, 10 PSN, 18 primary bladder sarcomas, and 17 sarcomatoid carcinomas. Most patients with PFT, PSN, sarcoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma were diagnosed between the ages of 50 to 60 years with PFT and PSN most commonly detected in women. A previous history of urological instrumentation and bladder cancer was present in all patients with PSN but none of the patients with PFT. Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumors were characterized by a tissue culture-like proliferation of myofibroblastic cells with focal atypia and overall cytoarchitectural features mimicking nodular fasciitis. Sarcomas and sarcomatoid carcinomas exhibited cellular atypia, mitotic activity with atypical mitosis, and the presence of necrosis. Transurethral resection was sufficient to control all PFT and PSN with no evidence of distant metastatic spread. In contrast, local recurrences and distant metastases frequently occurred in patients with primary sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma despite aggressive surgical management, which was often combined with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (50% and 65% disease-specific mortality, respectively). Pseudosarcomatous fibromyxoid tumor and PSN have unique clinical and pathologic features that allow their distinction from primary bladder sarcoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma.

  13. Gall stones and carcinoma gall bladder.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S C; Misra, V; Singh, P A; Roy, A; Misra, S P; Gupta, A K

    2000-04-01

    One hundred and fifty surgically resected gall bladder specimens were included in the study to evaluate the relationship between the prevalence of gall stones and histochemical alteration in sequential changes of metaplasia, dysplasia and neoplasia in gall bladder epithelium. Multiple sections were processed and stained with haematoxylin and eosin, Periodic acid Schiff's stain, Alcian blue (pH 2.5)/Periodic acid, Orcein/Alcian blue (pH 2.5) and Alcian Blue/Periodic acid/Potassium borohydride saponifications stains. Details of gall stones present were also noted. Prevalence of gall stones in gall bladders with metaplastic, dysplastic and neoplastic mucosal changes was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than those gall bladders which had no epithelial changes. Increase in sialomucin with a corresponding decrease in sulphomucin was observed from metaplasia to malignancy. Neutral mucin increased in metaplastic cells but was significantly reduced in neoplastic cells. Loss of O-acylation in sialmucin was also present in neoplastic cells. The histochemical changes suggest that chronic injury due to cholelithiasis induces appearance of neutral mucin positive metaplastic cells, which may further dedifferentiate to sialomucin containing dysplastic or neoplastic cells if the stimulation persists.

  14. Intravesical Treatments of Bladder Cancer: Review

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zancong; Shen, Tong; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; O’Donnell, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    For bladder cancer, intravesical chemo/immunotherapy is widely used as adjuvant therapies after surgical transurethal resection, while systemic therapy is typically reserved for higher stage, muscle-invading, or metastatic diseases. The goal of intravesical therapy is to eradicate existing or residual tumors through direct cytoablation or immunostimulation. The unique properties of the urinary bladder render it a fertile ground for evaluating additional novel experimental approaches to regional therapy, including iontophoresis/electrophoresis, local hyperthermia, co-administration of permeation enhancers, bioadhesive carriers, magnetic-targeted particles and gene therapy. Furthermore, due to its unique anatomical properties, the drug concentration-time profiles in various layers of bladder tissues during and after intravesical therapy can be described by mathematical models comprised of drug disposition and transport kinetic parameters. The drug delivery data, in turn, can be combined with the effective drug exposure to infer treatment efficacy and thereby assists the selection of optimal regimens. To our knowledge, intravesical therapy of bladder cancer represents the first example where computational pharmacological approach was used to design, and successfully predicted the outcome of, a randomized phase III trial (using mitomycin C). This review summarizes the pharmacological principles and the current status of intravesical therapy, and the application of computation to optimize the drug delivery to target sites and the treatment efficacy. PMID:18369709

  15. Bladder leiomyoma: Presentation, evaluation and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Khater, Nazih; Sakr, Ghazi

    2012-01-01

    Background Bladder leiomyomas are benign mesenchymal neoplasms and very rare urinary tumours that represent <0.5% of all bladder tumours, with only 250 cases reported worldwide to date. The importance of recognising their characteristic features, leading to their correct treatment, is fundamental. Therefore, we reviewed reports of leiomyomas of the urinary bladder, their causes, clinical presentations, imaging methods and surgical management, updated to 2012. Methods We retrospectively reviewed articles published in the USA, Europe and Asia, from 1953 to date, using PubMed, Medscape, Medline and the several major journals. We report areas of controversies and well-established guidelines. Results We reviewed 36 articles that confirmed, with a high level of evidence-based medicine, that the male to female ratio is equal, the cause of bladder leiomyomas remains unknown, and their most common presentation is obstructive uropathy; endovesical tumours are the most common. Their radiological diagnosis can be made by ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Complete surgical resection is a very effective treatment, associated with almost no recurrence. Conclusion In symptomatic patients a complete surgical resection can give a very good outcome, with almost no recurrence. PMID:26579246

  16. Embryogenesis of bladder exstrophy: A new hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Bharati; Chaudhari, Navin

    2008-01-01

    Aims and Objective: To postulate a hypothesis to explain the embryogenesis of exstrophy bladder based on our clinical observations. Materials and Methods: In 27 cases of exstrophy, we measured the distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease to the root of the penis (clitoris) (B) and the distance between the penis (clitoris) and the scrotum (labia majora) (C). These were compared with age, height and XP distance (distance between xiphisternum and symphysis pubis) matched control group of normal children. The distance between the lowermost inguinal skin crease and the penis (clitoris) (A) was measured in control group. Results: The observation was A = B + C. This implies that in exstrophy bladder, the position of the penis (clitoris) has moved cephalad from the lower border of A to the junction of B and C. Conclusion: Based on the observations, we postulate that abnormal origin of genital tubercle may be the cause of exstrophy bladder. The abnormal origin of primordia of the genital tubercle in more cephalad direction than normal causes wedge effect, which will interfere with the medial migration of the mesoderm as well as the midline approximation of mesodermal structures in the lower abdominal wall, thereby resulting in the exstrophy of bladder. PMID:20011468

  17. Bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

    PubMed

    De Alwis, A C D; Senaratne, A M R D; De Silva, S M P D; Rodrigo, V S D

    2006-09-01

    Masturbation in childhood is a normal behaviour which most commonly begins at 2 months of age, and peaks at 4 years and in adolescence. However excessive masturbation causes anxiety in parents. We describe a boy with a bladder calculus presenting as excessive masturbation.

  18. Arsenic and bladder cancer: observations and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Radosavljević, Vladan; Jakovljević, Branko

    2008-10-01

    Arsenic from drinking water is a well-known risk factor for bladder cancer. The purpose of this paper is to systematize some important yet often overlooked facts considering the relationship between arsenic exposure and the occurrence of bladder cancer. Since the exposure to inorganic arsenic from food, inhaled air, and skin absorption as well as arsenic methylation ability are not fully investigated, our assumption is that the exposure of arsenic only from drinking water is underestimated and its role as a risk factor is highly overestimated. This paper proposes some qualitative and quantitative parameters of arsenic as a risk factor for bladder cancer. The recommended qualitative parameters of arsenic intake are first, pathways of exposure, and second, toxicity and metabolism. The suggested quantitative parameters of arsenic intake include amounts of arsenic absorbed in the body, duration of arsenic exposure, and duration of arsenic presence in the urinary bladder. This approach can be implemented in a systematic classification and explanation of various risk factors and their mutual interactions for other types of cancer or diseases in general.

  19. Somatic mutation of PTEN in bladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aveyard, J S; Skilleter, A; Habuchi, T; Knowles, M A

    1999-01-01

    The tumour suppressor gene PTEN/MMAC1, which is mutated or homozygously deleted in glioma, breast and prostate cancer, is mapped to a region of 10q which shows loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in bladder cancer. We screened 123 bladder tumours for LOH in the region of PTEN. In 53 informative muscle invasive tumours (≥ pT2), allele loss was detected in 13 (24.5%) and allelic imbalance in four tumours (overall frequency 32%). LOH was found in four of 60 (6.6%) informative, non-invasive tumours (pTa/pT1). We screened 63 muscle invasive tumours for PTEN mutations by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and for homozygous deletion by duplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two homozygous deletions were identified but no mutations. Of 15 bladder tumour cell lines analysed, three showed homozygous deletion of all or part of the PTEN gene, but none had mutations detectable by SSCP analysis. Our results indicate that PTEN is involved in the development of some bladder tumours. The low frequency of mutation of the retained allele in tumours with 10q23 LOH suggests that there may be another predominant mechanism of inactivation of the second allele, for example small intragenic deletions, that hemizygosity may be sufficient for phenotypic effect, or that there is another target gene at 10q23. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360673

  20. Application of bladder acellular matrix in urinary bladder regeneration: the state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Gubanska, Iga; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the "holy grail" of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  1. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) Improves the Diabetic Cytopathy (DCP) via Up-Regulation of CGRP and cAMP

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n = 15), DM group (n = 15) and control group (n = 15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG. PMID:23468996

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  3. Organization and cellular arrangement of two neurogenic regions in the adult ferret (Mustela putorius furo) brain.

    PubMed

    Takamori, Yasuharu; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Kosaka, Jun; Yamada, Hisao

    2014-06-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, two neurogenic regions have been characterized, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle (LV) and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). Despite remarkable knowledge of rodents, the detailed arrangement of neurogenic regions in most mammals is poorly understood. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry and cell type-specific antibodies to investigate the organization of two germinal regions in the adult ferret, which belongs to the order Carnivora and is widely used as a model animal with a gyrencephalic brain. From the SVZ to the olfactory bulb, doublecortin-positive cells tended to organize in chain-like clusters, which are surrounded by a meshwork of astrocytes. This structure is homologous to the rostral migratory stream (RMS) described in other species. Different from rodents, the horizontal limb of the RMS emerges directly from the LV, and the anterior region of the LV extends rostrally and reached the olfactory bulb. In the DG, glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells with long radial processes as well as doublecortin-positive cells are oriented in the SGZ. In both regions, doublecortin-positive cells showed characteristic morphology and were positive for polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule, beta-III tubulin, and lamin B1 (intense staining). Proliferating cells were detected in both regions using antibodies against proliferating cell nuclear antigen and phospho-histone H3. These observations demonstrate that the two neurogenic regions in ferrets have a similar cellular composition as those of other mammalian species despite anatomical differences in the brain.

  4. A mathematical model of salt-sensitive hypertension: the neurogenic hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Averina, Viktoria A; Othmer, Hans G; Fink, Gregory D; Osborn, John W

    2015-07-15

    Salt sensitivity of arterial pressure (salt-sensitive hypertension) is a serious global health issue. The causes of salt-sensitive hypertension are extremely complex and mathematical models can elucidate potential mechanisms that are experimentally inaccessible. Until recently, the only mathematical model for long-term control of arterial pressure was the model of Guyton and Coleman; referred to as the G-C model. The core of this model is the assumption that sodium excretion is driven by renal perfusion pressure, the so-called 'renal function curve'. Thus, the G-C model dictates that all forms of hypertension are due to a primary shift of the renal function curve to a higher operating pressure. However, several recent experimental studies in a model of hypertension produced by the combination of a high salt intake and administration of angiotensin II, the AngII-salt model, are inconsistent with the G-C model. We developed a new mathematical model that does not limit the cause of salt-sensitive hypertension solely to primary renal dysfunction. The model is the first known mathematical counterexample to the assumption that all salt-sensitive forms of hypertension require a primary shift of renal function: we show that in at least one salt-sensitive form of hypertension the requirement is not necessary. We will refer to this computational model as the 'neurogenic model'. In this Symposium Review we discuss how, despite fundamental differences between the G-C model and the neurogenic model regarding mechanisms regulating sodium excretion and vascular resistance, they generate similar haemodynamic profiles of AngII-salt hypertension. In addition, the steady-state relationships between arterial pressure and sodium excretion, a correlation that is often erroneously presented as the 'renal function curve', are also similar in both models. Our findings suggest that salt-sensitive hypertension is not due solely to renal dysfunction, as predicted by the G-C model, but may

  5. Neurogenic bowel management after spinal cord injury: A systematic review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Krassioukov, Andrei; Eng, Janice J.; Claxton, Geri; Sakakibara, Brodie M.; Shum, Serena

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To systematically review evidence for the management of neurogenic bowel in individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI). DATA SOURCES Literature searches were conducted for relevant articles, as well as practice guidelines, using numerous electronic databases. Manual searches of retrieved articles from 1950 to July 2009 were also conducted to identify literature. STUDY SELECTION Randomized controlled trials, prospective cohort, case-control, and pre-post studies, and case reports that assessed pharmacological and non-pharmacological intervention for the management of the neurogenic bowel in SCI were included. DATA EXTRACTION Two independent reviewers evaluated each study’s quality, using the PEDro scale for RCTs and the Downs & Black scale for all other studies. Results were tabulated and levels of evidence assigned. DATA SYNTHESIS 2956 studies were found as a result of the literature search. Upon review of the titles and abstracts, 52 studies met the inclusion criteria. Multi-faceted programs are the first approach to neurogenic bowel and are supported by lower levels of evidence. Of the non-pharmacological (conservative and non-surgical) interventions, transanal irrigation is a promising treatment to reduce constipation and fecal incontinence. When conservative management is not effective, pharmacological interventions (e.g., prokinetic agents) are supported by strong evidence for the treatment of chronic constipation. When conservative and pharmacological treatments are not effective, surgical interventions may be considered and are supported by lower levels of evidence in reducing complications. CONCLUSIONS Often, more than one procedure is necessary to develop an effective bowel routine. Evidence is low for non-pharmacological approaches and high for pharmacological interventions. PMID:20212501

  6. Quantifiable diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies through network analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases is strongly based on the histological characterization of muscle biopsies. However, this morphological analysis is mostly a subjective process and difficult to quantify. We have tested if network science can provide a novel framework to extract useful information from muscle biopsies, developing a novel method that analyzes muscle samples in an objective, automated, fast and precise manner. Methods Our database consisted of 102 muscle biopsy images from 70 individuals (including controls, patients with neurogenic atrophies and patients with muscular dystrophies). We used this to develop a new method, Neuromuscular DIseases Computerized Image Analysis (NDICIA), that uses network science analysis to capture the defining signature of muscle biopsy images. NDICIA characterizes muscle tissues by representing each image as a network, with fibers serving as nodes and fiber contacts as links. Results After a ‘training’ phase with control and pathological biopsies, NDICIA was able to quantify the degree of pathology of each sample. We validated our method by comparing NDICIA quantification of the severity of muscular dystrophies with a pathologist’s evaluation of the degree of pathology, resulting in a strong correlation (R = 0.900, P <0.00001). Importantly, our approach can be used to quantify new images without the need for prior ‘training’. Therefore, we show that network science analysis captures the useful information contained in muscle biopsies, helping the diagnosis of muscular dystrophies and neurogenic atrophies. Conclusions Our novel network analysis approach will serve as a valuable tool for assessing the etiology of muscular dystrophies or neurogenic atrophies, and has the potential to quantify treatment outcomes in preclinical and clinical trials. PMID:23514382

  7. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα−/− mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα−/− mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα−/−-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα−/− mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments. PMID:27013951

  8. Environmental Enrichment, Age, and PPARα Interact to Regulate Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Blanco, Eduardo; Lorefice, Clara; Decara, Juan; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands have been shown to modulate recovery after brain insults such as ischemia and irradiation by enhancing neurogenesis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of PPARα receptors on the proliferative rate of neural precursor cells (NPC) in the adult brain. The study was performed in aged Pparα(-/-) mice exposed to nutritional (treats) and environmental (games) enrichments for 20 days. We performed immunohistochemical analyses of cells containing the replicating cell DNA marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU+) and the immature neuronal marker doublecortin (Dcx+) in the main neurogenic zones of the adult brain: subgranular zone of dentate gyrus (SGZ), subventricular zone of lateral ventricles (SVZ), and/or hypothalamus. Results indicated a reduction in the number of BrdU+ cells in the neurogenic zones analyzed as well as Dcx+ cells in the SGZ during aging (2, 6, and 18 months). Pparα deficiency alleviated the age-related reduction of NPC proliferation (BrdU+ cells) in the SVZ of the 18-months-old mice. While no genotype effect on NPC proliferation was detected in the SGZ during aging, an accentuated reduction in the number of Dcx+ cells was observed in the SGZ of the 6-months-old Pparα(-/-) mice. Exposing the 18-months-old mice to nutritional and environmental enrichments reversed the Pparα(-/-)-induced impairment of NPC proliferation in the neurogenic zones analyzed. The enriched environment did not modify the number of SGZ Dcx+ cells in the 18 months old Pparα(-/-) mice. These results identify PPARα receptors as a potential target to counteract the naturally observed decline in adult NPC proliferation associated with aging and impoverished environments.

  9. Brain-targeted ACE2 overexpression attenuates neurogenic hypertension by inhibiting COX mediated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Xia, Huijing; Xu, Ping; Lazartigues, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Overactivity of the renin angiotensin system (RAS), oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenases (COX) in the brain are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We previously reported that Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2) overexpression in the brain attenuates the development of DOCA-salt hypertension, a neurogenic hypertension model with enhanced brain RAS and sympathetic activity. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated whether oxidative stress, mitogen activated protein kinase signaling and cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the brain are modulated by ACE2 in neurogenic hypertension. DOCA-salt hypertension significantly increased expression of Nox-2 (+61 ±5 %), Nox-4 (+50 ±13 %) and nitrotyrosine (+89 ±32 %) and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (−29 ±4 %) and SOD (−31 ±7 %), indicating increased oxidative stress in the brain of non-transgenic mice. This increased oxidative stress was attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing ACE2 in the brain. DOCA-salt-induced reduction of nNOS expression (−26 ±7 %) and phosphorylated eNOS/total eNOS (−30 ±3 %), and enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), were reversed by ACE2 overexpression. In addition, ACE2 overexpression blunted the hypertension-mediated increase in gene and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the PVN. Furthermore, gene silencing of either COX-1 or COX-2 in the brain, reduced microglial activation and accompanied neuro-inflammation, ultimately attenuating DOCA-salt hypertension. Together, these data provide evidence that brain ACE2 overexpression reduces oxidative stress and COX-mediated neuro-inflammation, improves anti-oxidant and nitric oxide signaling, and thereby attenuates the development of neurogenic hypertension. PMID:25489058

  10. Treatment success for overactive bladder with urinary urge incontinence refractory to oral antimuscarinics: a review of published evidence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment options for overactive bladder (OAB) with urinary urge incontinence (UUI) refractory to oral antimuscarinics include: botulinum toxin type A (BoNTA), sacral neuromodulation (SNM), and augmentation cystoplasty (AC). A standard treatment success metric that can be used in both clinical and economic evaluations of the above interventions has not emerged. Our objective was to conduct a literature review and synthesis of published measures of treatment success for OAB with UUI interventions and to identify a treatment success outcome. Methods We performed a literature review of primary studies that used a definition of treatment success in the OAB with UUI population receiving BoNTA, SNM, or AC. The recommended success outcome was compared to generic and disease-specific health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) measures using data from a BoNTA treatment study of neurogenic incontinent patients. Results Across all interventions, success outcomes included: complete continence (n = 23, 44%), ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes (n = 16, 31%), and subjective improvement (n = 13, 25%). We recommend the OAB with UUI treatment success outcome of ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes from baseline. Using data from a neurogenic BoNTA treatment study, the average change in the Incontinence Quality of Life questionnaire was 8.8 (95% CI: -4.7, 22.3) higher for those that succeeded (N = 25) versus those that failed (N = 26). The average change in the SF-6D preference score was 0.07 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.12) higher for those that succeeded versus those that failed. Conclusion A treatment success definition that encompasses the many components of underlying OAB with UUI symptoms is currently not practical as a consequence of difficulties in measuring urgency. The treatment success outcome of ≥ 50% improvement in incontinence episodes was associated with a clinically meaningful improvement in disease-specific HRQoL for those with neurogenic OAB with UUI

  11. Sapanisertib in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Bladder Cancer With TSC1 and/or TSC2 Mutations

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Metastatic Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage III Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; TSC1 Gene Mutation; TSC2 Gene Mutation

  12. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette-Guérin).

  13. Genetics of Bladder Malignant Tumors in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Andrea; Zaini, Johan; Gulìa, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Bladder masses are represented by either benign or malignant entities. Malignant bladder tumors are frequent causes of disease and death in western countries. However, in children they are less common. Additionally, different features are found in childhood, in which non epithelial tumors are more common than epithelial ones. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common pediatric bladder tumor, but many other types of lesions may be found, such as malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT), inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and neuroblastoma. Other rarer tumors described in literature include urothelial carcinoma and other epithelial neoplasms. Rhabdomyosarcoma is associated to a variety of genetic syndromes and many genes are involved in tumor development. PAX3-FKHR and PAX7-FKHR (P-F) fusion state has important implications in the pathogenesis and biology of RMS, and different genes alterations are involved in the pathogenesis of P-F negative and embryonal RMS, which are the subsets of tumors most frequently affecting the bladder. These genes include p53, MEF2, MYOG, Ptch1, Gli1, Gli3, Myf5, MyoD1, NF1, NRAS, KRAS, HRAS, FGFR4, PIK3CA, CTNNB1, FBXW7, IGF1R, PDGFRA, ERBB2/4, MET, BCOR. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) usually shows SMARCB1/INI1 alterations. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene translocations are the most frequently associated alterations in inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Few genes alterations in urothelial neoplasms have been reported in the paediatric population, which are mainly related to deletion of p16/lnk4, overexpression of CK20 and overexpression of p53. Here, we reviewed available literature to identify genes associated to bladder malignancies in children and discussed their possible relationships with these tumors. PMID:27013922

  14. Neurogenic claudication and root claudication treated with calcitonin. A double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Porter, R W; Miller, C G

    1988-09-01

    Forty-two patients with either neurogenic claudication or unilateral root claudication were analyzed in a double-blind comparison of salmon calcitonin (SCT) and placebo, receiving either 100 IU SCT or 1 ml saline four times a week for 8 weeks. Five of 20 SCT and one of 22 placebo patients were classified as responders. There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment groups in the proportion of responders. Seven of eighteen of the placebo group who later received salmon calcitonin improved their walking distance. The authors have not established that this is an organic response.

  15. Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) Channel and Neurogenic Inflammation in Pathogenesis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hang; Li, ShuZhuang

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway obstruction, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and it affects 300 million people worldwide. However, our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie asthma remains limited. Recent studies have suggested that transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), one of the transient receptor potential cation channels, may be involved in airway inflammation in asthma. The present review discusses the relationship between TRPA1 and neurogenic inflammation in asthma, hoping to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of airway inflammation in asthma. PMID:27539812

  16. Back Pain, Neurogenic Symptoms, and Physical Function in Relation to Spondylolisthesis among Elderly Men

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Holton, Kathleen F.; Miller, Jessica; Fink, Howard A.; Kado, Deborah M.; Marshall, Lynn M.; Yoo, Jung U.

    2010-01-01

    Background Context Degenerative spondylolisthesis is a presumed cause of back pain. Previous studies of spondylolisthesis and back pain included only women or combined results for men and women. Comparisons of the frequency of back pain, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations specifically among elderly men with and without spondylolisthesis are needed. Purpose To determine associations of prevalent spondylolisthesis with back pain symptoms, neurogenic symptoms, and functional limitations among elderly men. Study Design/ Setting: Cross-sectional epidemiologic study conducted within the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort. The MrOS cohort is comprised of 5,995 community dwelling men ages ≥65 years who were recruited at 6 US academic medical centers. Extensive self-reported data and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained for all MrOS participants at baseline. Patient Sample For this study, 300 men were selected at random specifically for the evaluation of spondylolisthesis on the baseline spine radiographs. Outcome Measures Standardized questionnaires were used to assess self-reported back pain, leg pain (radiculopathy), lower extremity numbness (paresthesias) and lower extremity weakness occurring in the past 12 months, and to ascertain current difficulty with activities of daily living. Methods In the present study, radiographic spondylolisthesis was classified as forward slip of ≥5%. Prevalence of back pain, neurogenic symptoms and difficulty with activities of daily living were compared between men with and without spondylolisthesis using chisquare or Fisher’s exact tests. Results Spondylolisthesis was present among 92 (31%) men. Among men with and without spondylolisthesis, back pain (63% vs. 67%, p=0.46) and moderate/severe back pain (41% vs. 38%, p=0.76) were reported with similar frequency. Men with spondylolisthesis more often reported radiculopathy (33% vs. 22%, p=0.06), paresthesias (18% vs. 11%, p= 0.10) and weakness (18% vs. 9%, p=0

  17. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of the neurogenic vasopressor response in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, B; Schlicker, E

    1991-12-03

    In pithed rats, the H3 agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (R alpha MeHA) inhibited the electrically induced increase in blood pressure without affecting the vasopressor response to exogenous noradrenaline. The effect of R alpha MeHA was not affected by the H1 and H2 antagonists dimetindene and ranitidine, but attenuated by the H3 antagonist thioperamide. At higher doses, R alpha MeHA itself increased basal blood pressure; this effect was not affected by the H1, H2 and H3 antagonists. In conclusion, the neurogenic vasopressor response can be modulated via H3 receptors, probably located presynaptically on postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibres.

  18. [Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia is a frequent condition in patients admitted to the ICU].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anette Barbre; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann

    2015-03-02

    Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) is a frequent condition in neurological patients admitted to the ICU, particularly in patients with brainstem lesions. The CNS damage itself can predispose to dysphagia, but also the treatment and preventive measures may predispose to and exacerbate the condition. Frequent pneumonia in a neurological patient is a warning signal that should cause screening for dysphagia. Complications are serious and can be fatal. Neurological patients should be examined for NOD before decannulation. Treatment is difficult, so prevention and multidisciplinary neurological rehabilitation is important.

  19. Diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Clara; Karrouz, Wassila; Douillard, Claire; Do Cao, Christine; Cortet, Christine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis; Vantyghem, Marie-Christine

    2013-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) is characterized by hypotonic polyuria greater than 3 liters/24 hours in adults and persisting even during water deprivation. It is mostly due to a defect in arginin-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis (central DI); other causes are: AVP resistance (nephrogenic DI), abnormal thirst regulation (primary polydipsia) or early destruction of AVP by placental enzymes (gestational DI). A thorough medical history is warranted to investigate nocturnal persistence of polyuria (night waking being a good sign of its organic nature) to specify the onset and duration of the trouble, the medication use and the potential hereditary nature of the disorder. The next step is based on weight and blood pressure measurements and especially the quantification of beverages and diuresis over a 24-hour cycle. Assessment of signs of dehydration, bladder distention, pituitary hormone hyper- or hyposecretion, tumor chiasmatic syndrome, granulomatosis and cancer is required. The diagnosis is based on biological assessment, pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and results of a desmopressin test. In severe forms of DI, urine osmolality remains below 250 mOsmol/kg and serum sodium greater than 145 mmol/L. In partial forms of DI (urine osmolality between 250 and 750), the water deprivation test demonstrating the incapacity to obtain a maximal urine concentration is valuable, together with vasopressin or copeptin measurement. The pituitary MRI is done to investigate the lack of spontaneous hyperintensity signal in the posterior pituitary, which marks the absence of AVP and supports the diagnosis of central DI rather than primary polydipsia (although not absolute); it can also recognize lesions of the pituitary gland or pituitary stalk. Acquired central DI of sudden onset should suggest a craniopharyngioma or germinoma if it occurs before the age of 30 years, and metastasis after the age of 50 years. Fifteen to 20% of head trauma lead to hypopituitarism, including DI in 2% of

  20. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  1. Validation of a Quality of Life Scale for Women with Bladder Pain Syndrome/Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M.; Suttorp, Marika J.; Elliott, Marc N.; Clemens, J. Quentin; Berry, Sandra H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To validate a disease-specific scale to measure impact of symptoms of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC), a condition that affects up to 6.5% of U.S. women. Methods Participants were drawn from the RAND Interstitial Cystitis Epidemiology Study (RICE), a telephone probability survey of 146,231 U.S. households. Women who met RICE BPS/IC symptom criteria (n=3,397) completed the 6 -item RAND Bladder Symptom Impact scale (RICE BSI-6). The RICE BSI-6 was adapted from a scale used to assess impact of diabetes on life and sexuality, and modified based on expert input on face validity and focus group work; items specific to diabetic symptoms were eliminated. Validated scales of symptom severity, mental-and physical -health-related QoL, depression, coping, and perceived control were used to assess convergent validity. Results The RICE BSI-6 (α=.92) was significantly related to greater symptom severity, worse general mental and physical health-related QoL, more severe depression symptoms, and lower perceived control over life in general and over BPS/IC symptoms (p-values<.05). It was also associated with less use of distancing coping (p<.05). Conclusion The RICE BSI-6 shows excellent internal consistency and strong convergent validity. It can be used to examine effects of psychosocial and treatment interventions on QoL among women with BPS/IC. PMID:22146841

  2. The vascular and neurogenic factors associated with erectile dysfunction in patients after pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yong; Wendong, Sun; Zhao, Shengtian; Liu, Tongyan; Liu, Yuqiang; Zhang, Xiulin; Yuan, Mingzhen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complication of pelvic fractures. To identify the vascular and neurogenic factors associated with ED, 120 patients admitted with ED after traumatic pelvic fracture between January 2009 and June 2013 were enrolled in this study. All patients answered the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) questionnaire. Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) testing confirmed the occurrence of ED in 96 (80%) patients on whom penile duplex ultrasound and neurophysiological testing were further performed. Of these ED patients 29 (30%) were demonstrated only with vascular abnormality, 41 (42.7%) were detected only with neural abnormality, 26 (27.1%) revealed mixed abnormalities. Of the 55 patients (29+26) with vascular problems, 7 patients (12.7%) with abnormal arterial response to intracavernous injection of Bimix (15mg papaverine and 1mg phentolamine), 31 (56.4%) with corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and 17 (30.9%) had both problems. Of the 67 (41+26) patients with abnormal neurophysiological outcomes, 51 (76.1%) with abnormal bulbocavernosus reflex (BCR), 20 (29.9%) with pathological pudendal nerve evoked potentials (PDEPs) and 25 (37.3%) with abnormal posterior tibial somatosensory nerve evoked potentials (PTSSEPs). Our observation indicated that neurogenic factors are important for the generation of ED in patients with pelvic fracture; venous impotence is more common than arteriogenic ED. PMID:26689522

  3. Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zanni, Giulia; Michno, Wojciech; Di Martino, Elena; Tjärnlund-Wolf, Anna; Pettersson, Jean; Mason, Charlotte Elizabeth; Hellspong, Gustaf; Blomgren, Klas; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Lithium (Li) is a potent mood stabilizer and displays neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, especially in the juvenile, developing brain. Here we characterized lithium distribution in the juvenile mouse brain during 28 days of continuous treatment that result in clinically relevant serum concentrations. By using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry- (ToF-SIMS) based imaging we were able to delineate temporospatial lithium profile throughout the brain and concurrent distribution of endogenous lipids with high chemical specificity and spatial resolution. We found that Li accumulated in neurogenic regions and investigated the effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Lithium increased proliferation, as judged by Ki67-immunoreactivity, but did not alter the number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts at the end of the treatment period. Moreover, ToF-SIMS revealed a steady depletion of sphingomyelin in white matter regions during 28d Li-treatment, particularly in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, cortical levels of cholesterol and choline increased over time in Li-treated mice. This is the first study describing ToF-SIMS imaging for probing the brain-wide accumulation of supplemented Li in situ. The findings demonstrate that this technique is a powerful approach for investigating the distribution and effects of neuroprotective agents in the brain. PMID:28098178

  4. Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Giulia; Michno, Wojciech; Di Martino, Elena; Tjärnlund-Wolf, Anna; Pettersson, Jean; Mason, Charlotte Elizabeth; Hellspong, Gustaf; Blomgren, Klas; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-01-18

    Lithium (Li) is a potent mood stabilizer and displays neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, especially in the juvenile, developing brain. Here we characterized lithium distribution in the juvenile mouse brain during 28 days of continuous treatment that result in clinically relevant serum concentrations. By using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry- (ToF-SIMS) based imaging we were able to delineate temporospatial lithium profile throughout the brain and concurrent distribution of endogenous lipids with high chemical specificity and spatial resolution. We found that Li accumulated in neurogenic regions and investigated the effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Lithium increased proliferation, as judged by Ki67-immunoreactivity, but did not alter the number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts at the end of the treatment period. Moreover, ToF-SIMS revealed a steady depletion of sphingomyelin in white matter regions during 28d Li-treatment, particularly in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, cortical levels of cholesterol and choline increased over time in Li-treated mice. This is the first study describing ToF-SIMS imaging for probing the brain-wide accumulation of supplemented Li in situ. The findings demonstrate that this technique is a powerful approach for investigating the distribution and effects of neuroprotective agents in the brain.

  5. Recent Advances in Neurogenic Small Molecules as Innovative Treatments for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Martí-Marí, Olaia; Estrada, Martín; de la Fuente Revenga, Mario; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system of adult mammals has long been considered as a complex static structure unable to undergo any regenerative process to refurbish its dead nodes. This dogma was challenged by Altman in the 1960s and neuron self-renewal has been demonstrated ever since in many species, including humans. Aging, neurodegenerative, and some mental diseases are associated with an exponential decrease in brain neurogenesis. Therefore, the controlled pharmacological stimulation of the endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs) niches might counteract the neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other pathologies, opening an exciting new therapeutic avenue. In the last years, druggable molecular targets and signalling pathways involved in neurogenic processes have been identified, and as a consequence, different drug types have been developed and tested in neuronal plasticity. This review focuses on recent advances in neurogenic agents acting at serotonin and/or melatonin systems, Wnt/β-catenin pathway, sigma receptors, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2).

  6. ASCL1 reprograms mouse Müller glia into neurogenic retinal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Julia; Wilken, Matthew S.; Ueki, Yumi; Cox, Kristen E.; Sullivan, Jane M.; Taylor, Russell J.; Levine, Edward M.; Reh, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-mammalian vertebrates have a robust ability to regenerate injured retinal neurons from Müller glia (MG) that activate the gene encoding the proneural factor Achaete-scute homolog 1 (Ascl1; also known as Mash1 in mammals) and de-differentiate into progenitor cells. By contrast, mammalian MG have a limited regenerative response and fail to upregulate Ascl1 after injury. To test whether ASCL1 could restore neurogenic potential to mammalian MG, we overexpressed ASCL1 in dissociated mouse MG cultures and intact retinal explants. ASCL1-infected MG upregulated retinal progenitor-specific genes and downregulated glial genes. Furthermore, ASCL1 remodeled the chromatin at its targets from a repressive to an active configuration. MG-derived progenitors differentiated into cells that exhibited neuronal morphologies, expressed retinal subtype-specific neuronal markers and displayed neuron-like physiological responses. These results indicate that a single transcription factor, ASCL1, can induce a neurogenic state in mature MG. PMID:23637330

  7. A case of small round cell tumor of the thoracopulmonary region with myogenic and neurogenic elements.

    PubMed

    Goji, J; Sano, K; Murakami, R; Nakamura, H; Ninomiya, M; Ito, H

    1992-02-01

    We here report a unique case of a young boy with an intrathoracic tumor which consisted of neurogenic and myogenic elements. The initial pathological diagnosis was alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. The tumor tissue from surgical resection was composed of three parts, each showing a different histological appearance, i.e. a monotonous small cell area, an alveolar area, and an area consisting of pleomorphic rhabdomyoblasts. The small round cells in the monotonous area were immunoreactive with the antibodies for Leu7, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), neurofilament proteins (NFP), and beta 2 microglobulin, but not with the antibody for desmin. These cells also had dense core granules. The tumor cells in the alveolar area were immunoreactive with the antibodies for Leu7 and desmin, but not with the antibody for NFP. Pleomorphic rhabdomyoblasts were immunoreactive with the antibody for desmin, but not with the antibodies for Leu7 and NFP. These findings imply that this tumor consisted of neurogenic and myogenic elements and is considered to be a special type of rhabdomyosarcoma.

  8. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  9. The current state of the neurogenic theory of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bradley R; Hen, René

    2015-02-01

    Newborn neurons are continuously added to the adult hippocampus. Early studies found that adult neurogenesis is impaired in models of depression and anxiety and accelerated by antidepressant treatment. This led to the theory that depression results from impaired adult neurogenesis and restoration of adult neurogenesis leads to recovery. Follow up studies yielded a complex body of often inconsistent results, and the veracity of this theory is uncertain. We propose five criteria for acceptance of this theory, we review the recent evidence for each criterion, and we draw the following conclusions: Diverse animal models of depression and anxiety have impaired neurogenesis. Neurogenesis is consistently boosted by antidepressants in animal models only when animals are stressed. Ablation of neurogenesis in animal models impairs cognitive functions relevant to depression, but only a minority of studies find that ablation causes depression or anxiety. Recent human neuroimaging and postmortem studies are consistent with the neurogenic theory, but they are indirect. Finally, a novel drug developed based on the neurogenic theory is promising in animal models.

  10. Effects of sangre de drago in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ulysse; Garcia-Le Gal, Caridad; Le Gal, Grégoire; Boulais, Nicholas; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Dorange, Germaine; Lefeuvre, Luc; Gougerot, Agnés; Misery, Laurent

    2010-09-01

    Sangre de drago (SD) is a viscous bright red resin collected from Croton lechleri trees that grow in the South American jungle. This sap is used extensively in the native pharmacopoeia to treat skin disorders. Its effectiveness as an inhibitor of neurogenic inflammation has been recently demonstrated. To understand the underlying mechanisms of these effects, we examined the ability of SD to reduce substance P (SP) release in an in vitro model of cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI). This model is based on an enzyme immunoassay of SP (an inducer of CNI) in a porcine co-culture of dorsal root ganglion neurons and keratinocytes. After incubation with different concentrations of SD, we noted an immediate and significant dose-dependent decrease in basal SP release, with average values of 32% at 1% SD (v/v) and 26% at 0.1% (v/v). On the other hand, pretreatment (72 or 1 h) of the co-culture with 1% SD (v/v) was sufficient to induce a 111% (72 h) or 65% (1 h) inhibition of capsaicin-induced SP release, while 0.1% SD (v/v) triggered a 109% (72 h) or 30% (1 h) inhibition. We conclude that sangre de drago is a potent inhibitor of CNI through direct inhibition of neuropeptide release by sensory afferent nerves.

  11. SVCT2 vitamin C transporter expression in progenitor cells of the postnatal neurogenic niche

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Patricia; Cisternas, Pedro; Salazar, Katterine; Silva-Alvarez, Carmen; Oyarce, Karina; Jara, Nery; Espinoza, Francisca; Martínez, Agustín D.; Nualart, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Known as a critical antioxidant, recent studies suggest that vitamin C plays an important role in stem cell generation, proliferation and differentiation. Vitamin C also enhances neural differentiation during cerebral development, a function that has not been studied in brain precursor cells. We observed that the rat neurogenic niche is structurally organized at day 15 of postnatal development, and proliferation and neural differentiation increase at day 21. In the human brain, a similar subventricular niche was observed at 1-month of postnatal development. Using immunohistochemistry, sodium-vitamin C cotransporter 2 (SVCT2) expression was detected in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS). Low co-distribution of SVCT2 and βIII-tubulin in neuroblasts or type-A cells was detected, and minimal co-localization of SVCT2 and GFAP in type-B or precursor cells was observed. Similar results were obtained in the human neurogenic niche. However, BrdU-positive cells also expressed SVCT2, suggesting a role of vitamin C in neural progenitor proliferation. Primary neurospheres prepared from rat brain and the P19 teratocarcinoma cell line, which forms neurospheres in vitro, were used to analyze the effect of vitamin C in neural stem cells. Both cell types expressed functional SVCT2 in vitro, and ascorbic acid (AA) induced their neural differentiation, increased βIII-tubulin and SVCT2 expression, and amplified vitamin C uptake. PMID:23964197

  12. Microneedle Electrode Array for Electrical Impedance Myography to Characterize Neurogenic Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Li, Yi; Liu, Mingsheng; Cui, Liying; Yu, Yude

    2016-05-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a noninvasive technique for neuromuscular assessment, wherein a low-intensity alternating current is applied to a muscle, and the consequent surface voltage patterns are evaluated. Commercial wet electrodes are most commonly used for EIM. However, these electrodes are not suitable for use on small muscles, as they do not effectively solve the problem of high electrode-skin contact impedance (ESCI) that negatively influences the quality of recorded biopotentials. To address this problem, we fabricated a novel microneedle electrode array (MEA) that consists of 124-µm-long microneedles. Compared to wet electrodes, the MEA could pierce through the outer skin surface in a painless and micro-invasive manner, and could thus effectively reduce ESCI. The MEA has excellent test-retest reproducibility, with intraclass correlation coefficients exceeding 0.920. When used in combination with EIM, the MEA differentiated the affected muscles from the unaffected muscles in patients with neurogenic myopathy, by using EIM parameters of reactance and phase (p = 0.023 and 0.008, respectively). Thus, the novel MEA is a practical and reusable device for EIM assessment in cases of neurogenic myopathy. However, further refinement of the electrode is needed to enhance the clinical application of the system.

  13. p73 is required for ependymal cell maturation and neurogenic SVZ cytoarchitecture.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cano, L; Fuertes-Alvarez, S; Robledinos-Anton, N; Bizy, A; Villena-Cortes, A; Fariñas, I; Marques, M M; Marin, Maria C

    2016-07-01

    The adult subventricular zone (SVZ) is a highly organized microenvironment established during the first postnatal days when radial glia cells begin to transform into type B-cells and ependymal cells, all of which will form regenerative units, pinwheels, along the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle. Here, we identify p73, a p53 homologue, as a critical factor controlling both cell-type specification and structural organization of the developing mouse SVZ. We describe that p73 deficiency halts the transition of the radial glia into ependymal cells, leading to the emergence of immature cells with abnormal identities in the ventricle and resulting in loss of the ventricular integrity. p73-deficient ependymal cells have noticeably impaired ciliogenesis and they fail to organize into pinwheels, disrupting SVZ niche structure and function. Therefore, p73 is essential for appropriate ependymal cell maturation and the establishment of the neurogenic niche architecture. Accordingly, lack of p73 results in impaired neurogenesis. Moreover, p73 is required for translational planar cell polarity establishment, since p73 deficiency results in profound defects in cilia organization in individual cells and in intercellular patch orientation. Thus, our data reveal a completely new function of p73, independent of p53, in the neurogenic architecture of the SVZ of rodent brain and in the establishment of ependymal planar cell polarity with important implications in neurogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 730-747, 2016.

  14. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  15. An Investigation into the Nature of Non-Voiding Contractions Resulting from Detrusor Hyperreflexia in Neurogenic Bladders Following Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    resulted in an even greater enhancement (~130%, Pɘ.0001). For sympathetic blockers (SA1b), only total autonomic blockade by hexamethonium resulted in a...that blockade of beta -adrenergic receptors did not result in a reduction of TBC suggests that ongoing sympathetic inhibition is not occurring in...chronic SCI rats, and this may be supported by positive the response to beta -receptor agonists. That FBC and VE were positively affected by phentolamine

  16. Bladder cancer: approaches to prevention and control*

    PubMed Central

    Koroltchouk, V.; Stanley, K.; Stjernswärd, J.; Mott, K.

    1987-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the twelfth most common cancer globally, with approximately 170 000 new cases each year; a third of these cases are in the developing countries. There are two major etiological types. The first is more common in the industrialized countries and is associated with exposure to certain occupational and environmental carcinogens, but most importantly with tobacco smoking. The second type is associated with Schistosoma haematobium infection of the urinary tract and is one of the most frequent tumours in eastern Mediterranean and African countries. Both types of bladder cancer are largely preventable. Comprehensive education and legislative approaches are recommended to reduce tobacco consumption and exposure to industrial carcinogens. Safe and effective drugs are available to treat schistosomiasis within integrated control programmes in endemic areas. PMID:3121200

  17. Occult bladder injury after laparoscopic appendicectomy.

    PubMed

    Lad, Meher; Duncan, Sarah; Patten, Darren K

    2013-11-22

    Minimally invasive procedures have revolutionised surgery by reducing pain and the length of hospital stay for patients. These are not simple procedures and training in laparoscopic surgery is an arduous process. Meticulous preparation prior to surgery is paramount to prevent complications. We report a rare complication involving a 35-year-old patient who underwent a laparoscopic appendicectomy for a perforated appendix. Two days after surgery the patient experienced redness and swelling in the lower abdominal region and oliguria. A delayed computer tomography (CT) scan revealed contrast leakage around the bladder spreading within the peritoneal cavity consistent with an intraperitoneal bladder perforation. She underwent urinary catheterisation for 6 days. A follow-up CT cystogram showed no evidence of leakage into the peritoneal cavity. This case highlights the need for thorough preparation prior to laparoscopic surgery and careful manipulation of instruments during routine procedures to minimise the risk of serious patient complications such as the aforementioned.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Sonpavde, Guru; Sternberg, Cora N

    2012-04-01

    Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is an established standard for resectable muscle-invasive bladder cancer, a disease with a pattern of predominantly distant and early recurrences. Pathologic complete remission appears to be an intermediate surrogate for survival when employing combination chemotherapy. Moreover, baseline host and tumor tissue studies may enable the discovery of biomarkers predictive of activity. The neoadjuvant setting also provides a window of opportunity to evaluate novel biologic agents or rational combinations of biologic agents to obtain a signal of biologic activity. The residual tumor after neoadjuvant therapy may be exploited to study the mechanism of action and resistance. Cisplatin-ineligible patients warrant the evaluation of tolerable neoadjuvant regimens. Given that bladder cancer is characterized by initial localized presentation in the vast majority of cases, the paradigm of neoadjuvant therapy may expedite the development of novel systemic agents.

  19. The emerging role of the androgen receptor in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Alan P; Mudryj, Maria

    2015-10-01

    Men are three to four times more likely to get bladder cancer than women. The gender disparity characterizing bladder cancer diagnoses has been investigated. One hypothesis is that androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved in the etiology and progression of this disease. Although bladder cancer is not typically described as an endocrine-related malignancy, it has become increasingly clear that AR signaling plays a role in bladder tumors. This review summarizes current findings regarding the role of the AR in bladder cancer. We discuss work demonstrating AR expression in bladder cancer and its role in promoting formation and progression of tumors. Additionally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting the AR in this disease.

  20. Diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Nevoret, Marie-Laure; Casellini, Carolina; Parson, Henri

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common and troublesome complication of diabetes mellitus, leading to the greatest morbidity and mortality and resulting in a huge economic burden for diabetes care. The clinical assessment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and its treatment options are multifactorial. Patients with DN should be screened for autonomic neuropathy, as there is a high degree of coexistence of the two complications. A review of the clinical assessment and treatment algorithms for diabetic neuropathy, painful neuropathy, and autonomic dysfunction is provided.

  1. LP/SV Bladder Buoyancy Test Comparison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    The buoyant force of the British MK 30 LCX is also unknown; however, this flotation device utilizes a large bladder and may replace the LP/SV. Aim...following inflation using a 45g CO2 canister. Conclusion: In all trials, both flotation devices produced buoyant forces greater that 35 lbs. The British...2. The British use a very similar aircrew flotation device called the MK 30 LCX. It differs from the currently used LP/SV because it utilizes a

  2. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  3. [Management of bladder cancer in unfit patients].

    PubMed

    Mongiat-Artus, P; Pfister, C; Théodore, C; De Crevoisier, R; Guillotreau, J

    2010-03-01

    Adjuvant therapies in bladder cancer are based on risk of recurrence and associated comorbidities (renal failure). Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor for decision. Two adjuvant chemotherapies exist: MVAC or GC. In unfit patients, association (Gemcitabine and Taxanes) could be proposed. Indication of adjuvant radiotherapy depends on metastatic risk and resection margins. Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy should be proposed to selected patients who refuse or are not candidate for radical cystectomy.

  4. Frequent truncating mutations of STAG2 in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Solomon, David A; Kim, Jung-Sik; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gerard, Julia; Zhuang, Dazhong; Zhang, Shizhen; Navai, Neema; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Phillips, Joanna J; Robinson, Brian D; Rubin, Mark A; Volkmer, Björn; Hautmann, Richard; Küfer, Rainer; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Netto, George; Theodorescu, Dan; James, C David; Czerniak, Bogdan; Miettinen, Markku; Waldman, Todd

    2013-12-01

    Here we report the discovery of truncating mutations of the gene encoding the cohesin subunit STAG2, which regulates sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, in 36% of papillary non-invasive urothelial carcinomas and 16% of invasive urothelial carcinomas of the bladder. Our studies suggest that STAG2 has a role in controlling chromosome number but not the proliferation of bladder cancer cells. These findings identify STAG2 as one of the most commonly mutated genes in bladder cancer.

  5. Frequent truncating mutations of STAG2 in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, David A.; Kim, Jung-Sik; Bondaruk, Jolanta; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Ozawa, Tomoko; Gerard, Julia; Zhuang, DaZhong; Zhang, Shizhen; Navai, Neema; Siefker-Radtker, Arleen; Phillips, Joanna J.; Robinson, Brian D.; Rubin, Mark A.; Volkmer, Björn; Hautmann, Richard; Küfer, Rainer; Hogendoorn, Pancras C. W.; Netto, George; Theodorescu, Dan; James, C. David; Czerniak, Bogdan; Miettinen, Markku; Waldman, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the discovery of truncating mutations of the gene encoding the cohesin subunit STAG2, which regulates sister chromatid cohesion and segregation, in 36% of papillary non-invasive urothelial carcinomas and 16% of invasive urothelial carcinomas of the bladder. Our studies suggest that STAG2 plays a role in controlling chromosome number but not proliferation of bladder cancer cells. These findings identify STAG2 as among the most commonly mutated genes in bladder cancer discovered to date. PMID:24121789

  6. [Tissue engineering in urology, new approaches for urinary bladder reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A N; Orlova, N V; Blinova, M I; Iudintseva, N M

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering as applied to urologic pathology is covered extremely poor in the literature despite recently gaining popularity of regenerative medicine. The review reflects the current problems associated with reconstructive surgery of the urinary bladder, experience of the researchers from the United States in implementing cellular technologies for bladder replacement, the problems and prospects of this direction in case of such a severe pathology, as fibrous transformated bladder.

  7. Four cases of bladder exstrophy in two families.

    PubMed Central

    Messelink, E J; Aronson, D C; Knuist, M; Heij, H A; Vos, A

    1994-01-01

    Bladder exstrophy is a rare congenital anomaly, caused by abnormal development of the cloacal membrane. To our knowledge, 18 familial patients with this malformation have been described. Two sets of familial cases with bladder exstrophy are reported here: two cousins and a mother and son and the published reports of the 18 familial cases among 682 index patients with bladder exstrophy are reviewed. Ultrasonography is advocated as the investigation of choice for early prenatal diagnosis. PMID:8071977

  8. Fluorescence detection of bladder cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    D'Hallewin, Marie-Ange; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Guillemin, François

    2002-11-01

    An effective therapeutic outcome in the treatment of bladder cancer is largely defined by its early detection. In this context, big expectations have been placed on the fluorescence-guided diagnosis of bladder cancer. This paper reviews the applications of endo- and exogenous fluorescence for early diagnosis of in situ carcinoma of the bladder. Despite certain advantages of autofluorescence, exogenous fluorescence, based on the intravesical instillation of fluorophores with the following visible light excitation, has been shown to be more effective in terms of sensitivity and specificity for detecting carcinoma in situ. The equipment consists of a slightly modified light source in order to choose between white (conventional endoscopy) or blue light (fluorescence endoscopy) excitation, and specific lenses, in order to enhance maximally the contrast between normal (blue) autofluorescence and red fluorescence from malignancies. Among exogenous fluorophores, a particular emphasis will be put on the 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), its ester derivative (h-ALA) and hypericin. These dyes demonstrated an excellent sensitivity above 90% and specificity ranging from 70% to 90%.

  9. Bladder Cancer Screening in Aluminum Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Oyebode A.; Slade, Martin D.; Cantley, Linda F.; Tessier-Sherman, Baylah; Galusha, Deron; Kirsche, Sharon R.; Donoghue, A. Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present results of a bladder cancer screening program conducted in 18 aluminum smelters in the United States from January 2000 to December 2010. Methods: Data were collected on a cohort of workers with a history of working in coal tar pitch volatile exposed areas including urine analysis for conventional cytology and ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ assay. Results: ImmunoCyt/uCyt+ and cytology in combination showed a sensitivity of 62.30%, a specificity of 92.60%, a negative predictive value of 99.90%, and a positive predictive value of 2.96%. Fourteen cases of bladder cancer were detected, and the standardized incidence ratio of bladder cancer was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.99). Individuals who tested positive on either test who were later determined to be cancer free had undergone expensive and invasive tests. Conclusions: Evidence to support continued surveillance of this cohort has not been demonstrated. PMID:25525927

  10. Genetics of human congenital urinary bladder disease.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Adrian S; Stuart, Helen M; Newman, William G

    2014-03-01

    Lower urinary tract and/or kidney malformations are collectively the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in children, and they are also likely to account for a major subset of young adults requiring renal replacement therapy. Advances have been made regarding the discovery of the genetic causes of human kidney malformations. Indeed, testing for mutations of key nephrogenesis genes is now feasible for patients seen in nephrology clinics. Unfortunately, less is known about defined genetic bases of human lower urinary tract anomalies. The focus of this review is the genetic bases of congenital structural and functional disorders of the urinary bladder. Three are highlighted. First, prune belly syndrome, where mutations of CHRM3, encoding an acetylcholine receptor, HNF1B, encoding a transcription factor, and ACTA2, encoding a cytoskeletal protein, have been reported. Second, the urofacial syndrome, where mutations of LRIG2 and HPSE2, encoding proteins localised in nerves invading the fetal bladder, have been defined. Finally, we review emerging evidence that bladder exstrophy may have genetic bases, including variants in the TP63 promoter. These genetic discoveries provide a new perspective on a group of otherwise poorly understood diseases.

  11. Chemoimmunotherapy of implanted murine bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Akaza, H; Crabtree, W N; Matheny, R B; Soloway, M S

    1983-03-01

    The unaltered incidence of recurrence of superficial bladder tumor after discontinuation of intravesical chemotherapy has prompted a search for effective adjuvant therapy. The technique of cauterization and implantation of tumor cells was performed in C3H/He mice to simulate the early stage of bladder cancer to evaluate a regimen of intravesical mitomycin C followed by the systemic immunopotentiator, levamisole. Mice received either normal saline (control), mitomycin C (MMC), levamisole (Leva), or MMC plus Leva. Chemotherapy was given intravesically on days 6 and 13. Immunotherapy was given intraperitoneally on days 7 and 14. All mice were sacrificed on day 21. In the treatment groups, the incidences of bladder tumor varied from 50 to 63 per cent whereas that of the control group was 91 per cent. An increase in spleen weight was observed in the treatment groups of Leva and MMC plus Leva as well as the control group but not observed in the group receiving MMC. Our study suggests that although Leva did not reduce the tumor incidence, an immunostimulator might be of benefit when used in conjunction with MMC.

  12. Diagnostics techniques in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Soubra, Ayman; Risk, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is the most common presentation of bladder cancer and is often treatable with endoscopic resection and intravesical therapies. Cystoscopy and urine cytology are the gold standard in diagnosis and surveillance but are limited by their sensitivity in some situations. We seek to provide an overview of recent additions to the diagnostic armamentarium for urologists treating this disease. Methods: Articles were identified through a literature review of articles obtained through PubMed searches including the terms “bladder cancer” and various diagnostic techniques described in the article. Results: A variety of urinary biomarkers are available to assist the diagnosis and management of patients with NMIBC. Many have improved sensitivity over urine cytology, but less specificity. There are certain situations in which this has proved valuable, but as yet these are not part of the standard guidelines for NMIBC. Fluorescence cystoscopy has level 1 evidence demonstrating increased rates of tumor detection and prolonged recurrence-free survival when utilized for transurethral resection. Other technologies seeking to enhance cystoscopy, such as narrow band imaging, confocal laser endomicroscopy, and optical coherence tomography are still under evaluation. Conclusions: A variety of urine biomarker and adjunctive endoscopic technologies have been developed to assist the management of NMIBC. While some, such as fluorescence cystoscopy, have demonstrated a definite benefit in this disease, others are still finding their place in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Future studies should shed light on how these can be incorporated to improve outcomes in NMIBC. PMID:26604438

  13. Inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type A on the NANC system in rat respiratory models of neurogenic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chien, Chiang-Ting; Lee, Hsin-Min; Wu, Chia-Ching Josh; Li, Ping-Chia

    2012-08-15

    This study investigated whether botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) inhibits respiratory neurogenic inflammation in the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) transmitter system in rats. Neurogenic inflammation models were induced in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats through bilateral cerebral artery occlusion (BCAO) for different times (0, 30 and 60 min) or by stimulation with capsaicin at different doses (5 or 15 g/kg). Pre-Bötzinger Complex-Spikes and the expression of substance P, synaptosomal-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected with or without pretreatment of rats with BTX-A (15 or 30 U/kg). BCAO reduced pre-Bot C spike activity (spike/s) and increased the breath rate (breaths/s) in an unstable pattern in comparison to controls, while pretreatment with BTX-A slightly reduced this phenomenon. Pretreatment with BTX-A inhibited BCAO- or capsaicin-induced increases in expression of SNAP-25, substance P, and ROS in a dose-dependent manner in brainstem and lung tissue. BTX-A exerts a suppressive effect on neurogenic inflammation via non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic transmitters. These results add to the body of evidence elucidating the non-cholinergic effects of BTX-A in the context of neurogenic inflammation.

  14. Neurogenic Stuttering

    MedlinePlus

    ... even depression about the difficulty they encounter in speaking. This may be accompanied by other behaviors, which ... speech production; movements of head or limbs while speaking; reduced eye contact; Postponement or delay in attempting ...

  15. FOREIGN BODY IN URINARY BLADDER: AN UNUSUAL PRESENTATION.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Saadat-Hassan; Khan, Ikramullah

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder functions for the storage and expulsion of urine. Foreign bodies in male urinary bladder are rare due to lengthy urethra, especially when they are rounded in shape and difficult to be introduced into urinary bladder. This is a case report of a middle age male with thin body habitus and slightly disturbed psychiatric status. He presented with both irritative and obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). He was investigated and found to have an intact bangle in the urinary bladder. The patient was planned for surgery, and the foreign body was removed endoscopically with the help of cystoscope. Later on the patient was referred to a psychiatrist for psychological management.

  16. Paediatric Post-Traumatic Bladder Neck Distraction Injury: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit S.; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin S.

    2017-01-01

    The bladder neck distraction is a rare posterior urethral injury in paediatric age group. It mostly occurs secondary to road traffic accidents. We report three cases of paediatric bladder neck distraction injury. Three paediatric patients aged between 4 to 7 years (mean 5 year), who presented with post traumatic bladder neck distraction injury but no other major injury, they were treated with early urethro-vesical anastomosis. Postoperatively all patients were continent and with good urine flow rates. In paediatric bladder neck distraction injury, immediate urethro-vesical anastomosis gives good results. PMID:28384935

  17. Primary bladder neck obstruction may be determined by postural imbalances.

    PubMed

    Camerota, Tommaso Ciro; Zago, Matteo; Pisu, Stefano; Ciprandi, Daniela; Sforza, Chiarella

    2016-12-01

    Primary bladder neck obstruction (PBNO) is a frequent under-investigated urological condition in which the bladder neck fails to open adequately during voiding. In the majority of cases no known etiological factor can be found. In this study we propose a new hypothesis to explain the origin of the disease in young male patients with no neurological disorders. We suggest a possible role of an unbalanced biomechanics of the pelvis on urethral sphincters activity and on functional bladder capacity. To support the proposed hypothesis, we present pilot gait analysis data of young male patients with primary bladder neck obstruction.

  18. [Capsaicin and lidocaine usage in functional disorders of urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Kajetan; Thor, Piotr J

    2011-01-01

    Most of the drugs in the treatment of functional disorders of the urinary bladder has a peripheral effect. Their work consists mainly in reducing detrusor contractility of the bladder, or effects on the afferent innervation. Anticholinergics are the first drugs of choice. An alternative pharmacological treatment is to eliminate the overactivity by acting on the bladder afferent innervation, while not inhibiting its contractility. One option is to modulate the pharmacological activity of sensory mechanisms governing the functioning of the bladder via the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and ancyrin (TRPA1). Intravesical treatment with capsaicin or lidocaine only partially reduces bladder sensation. Furthermore, clinical use of lidocaine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is reduced to intravesical supply before capsaicin instillation to reduce the symptoms associated with initial phase of C-fibres sensitization. This paper presents the current state of knowledge regarding the use of capsaicin and lidocaine in functional disorders of the urinary bladder, as well as discusses the impact of these substances on afferent C-fibres and the activity of the urinary bladder. Based on previous studies intravesical capsaicin and lidocaine therapy is one of the alternative treatment options in selected patients with functional disorders of the urinary bladder (in particular OAB) in addition to standard anticholinergics therapy or the newer generation of therapies using botulinum toxin.

  19. Hair dye use and risk of bladder cancer in the New England bladder cancer study.

    PubMed

    Koutros, Stella; Silverman, Debra T; Baris, Dalsu; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Morton, Lindsay M; Colt, Joanne S; Hein, David W; Moore, Lee E; Johnson, Alison; Schwenn, Molly; Cherala, Sai; Schned, Alan; Doll, Mark A; Rothman, Nathaniel; Karagas, Margaret R

    2011-12-15

    Aromatic amine components in hair dyes and polymorphisms in genes that encode enzymes responsible for hair dye metabolism may be related to bladder cancer risk. We evaluated the association between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk and effect modification by N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1), NAT2, glutathione S-transferase Mu-1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase theta-1 (GSTT1) genotypes in a population-based case-control study of 1193 incident cases and 1418 controls from Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire enrolled between 2001 and 2004. Individuals were interviewed in person using a computer-assisted personal interview to assess hair dye use and information on potential confounders and effect modifiers. No overall association between age at first use, year of first use, type of product, color, duration or number of applications of hair dyes and bladder cancer among women or men was apparent, but increased risks were observed in certain subgroups. Women who used permanent dyes and had a college degree, a marker of socioeconomic status, had an increased risk of bladder cancer [odds ratio (OR) = 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-8.9]. Among these women, we found an increased risk of bladder cancer among exclusive users of permanent hair dyes who had NAT2 slow acetylation phenotype (OR = 7.3, 95% CI: 1.6-32.6) compared to never users of dye with NAT2 rapid/intermediate acetylation phenotype. Although we found no relation between hair dye use and bladder cancer risk in women overall, we detected evidence of associations and gene-environment interaction with permanent hair dye use; however, this was limited to educated women. These results need confirmation with larger numbers, requiring pooling data from multiple studies.

  20. Diabetic autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vinik, Aaron I; Maser, Raelene E; Mitchell, Braxton D; Freeman, Roy

    2003-05-01

    associated with genitourinary tract disturbances including bladder and/or sexual dysfunction. Evaluation of bladder dysfunction should be performed for individuals with diabetes who have recurrent urinary tract infections, pyelonephritis, incontinence, or a palpable bladder. Specialized assessment of bladder dysfunction will typically be performed by a urologist. In men, DAN may cause loss of penile erection and/or retrograde ejaculation. A complete workup for erectile dysfunction in men should include history (medical and sexual); psychological evaluation; hormone levels; measurement of nocturnal penile tumescence; tests to assess penile, pelvic, and spinal nerve function; cardiovascular autonomic function tests; and measurement of penile and brachial blood pressure. Neurovascular dysfunction resulting from DAN contributes to a wide spectrum of clinical disorders including erectile dysfunction, loss of skin integrity, and abnormal vascular reflexes. Disruption of microvascular skin blood flow and sudomotor function may be among the earliest manifestations of DAN and lead to dry skin, loss of sweating, and the development of fissures and cracks that allow microorganisms to enter. These changes ultimately contribute to the development of ulcers, gangrene, and limb loss. Various aspects of neurovascular function can be evaluated with specialized tests, but generally these have not been well standardized and have limited clinical utility. Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is the most studied and clinically important form of DAN. Meta-analyses of published data demonstrate that reduced cardiovascular autonomic function as measured by heart rate variability (HRV) is strongly (i.e., relative risk is doubled) associated with an increased risk of silent myocardial ischemia and mortality. The determination of the presence of CAN is usually based on a battery of autonomic function tests rather than just on one test. Proceedings from a consensus conference in 1992 recommended

  1. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei; Guzzo, Thomas; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  2. Development of a short form and scoring algorithm from the validated actionable bladder symptom screening tool

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The majority of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients develop some form of lower urinary tract dysfunction, usually as a result of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO). Patients identify urinary incontinence as one of the worst aspects of this disease. Despite the high prevalence of NDO, urological evaluation and treatment are significantly under-accessed in this population. The objectives of this study were: 1) to adapt the previously validated Actionable Bladder Symptom Screening Tool (ABSST) to a short form for ease and brevity of application in a clinical setting that is clinically meaningful; and 2) to develop a scoring algorithm that would be interpretable in terms of referring/considering precise diagnosis and treatment. Methods A US-based, non-randomized, multi-center, stand-alone observational study was conducted to assess the psychometric properties of the ABSST among patients who have MS with and without NDO. Mixed psychometric methods (e.g., classical statistics (Psychometric theory (3rd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill; 1994) and item response methods (Applying the Rasch Model: Fundamental Measurement in the Human Sciences. New Jersey: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates; 2001)) were used to evaluate the predictive and clinical validity of the shortened form. The latter included clinicians flagging clinically meaningful items and associated response options which would indicate the need for further evaluation or treatment. Results A total of 151 patients, all with MS and with and without NDO, were recruited by 28 clinicians in various US geographical locations. Approximately 41% of patients reported a history of or currently having urinary incontinence and/or urinary urgency. The prediction model across the entire range of classification thresholds was evaluated, plotting the true positive identification rate against the false positive rate (1-Specificity) for various cut scores. In this study, the cut-point or total score of greater than or equal to 6 had

  3. Dynamic multi-planar EPI of the urinary bladder during voiding with simultaneous detrusor pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Simmons, A; Williams, S C; Craggs, M; Andrew, C; Gregory, L; Allin, M; Mundy, A; Leaker, B

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging gives high quality images of the urinary bladder with excellent contrast. We report here the first application of dynamic, multi-slice, echo planar imaging to a study of urinary bladder emptying. Changes in urinary bladder volumes and rates of urine expulsion from the bladder have been measured simultaneously with bladder pressure. The method shows promise for clinical applications involving compromised bladder function, for reappraising bladder contraction strength-volume relationships, and for investigating the rate of change of length, three-dimensional shape, and wall tension in different parts of the bladder during micturition.

  4. The selective PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan inhibits neurogenic vasodilation and edema formation in the mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Banki, E; Hajna, Zs; Kemeny, A; Botz, B; Nagy, P; Bolcskei, K; Toth, G; Reglodi, D; Helyes, Zs

    2014-10-01

    We have earlier shown that PACAP-38 decreases neurogenic inflammation. However, there were no data on its receptorial mechanism and the involvement of its PAC1 and VPAC1/2 receptors (PAC1R, VPAC1/2R) in this inhibitory effect. Neurogenic inflammation in the mouse ear was induced by topical application of the Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptor activator mustard oil (MO). Consequent neurogenic edema, vasodilation and plasma leakage were assessed by measuring ear thickness with engineer's micrometer, detecting tissue perfusion by laser Doppler scanning and Evans blue or indocyanine green extravasation by intravital videomicroscopy or fluorescence imaging, respectively. Myeloperoxidase activity, an indicator of neutrophil infiltration, was measured from the ear homogenates with spectrophotometry. The selective PAC1R agonist maxadilan, the VPAC1/2R agonist vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or the vehicle were administered i.p. 15 min before MO. Substance P (SP) concentration of the ear was assessed by radioimmunoassay. Maxadilan significantly diminished MO-induced neurogenic edema, increase of vascular permeability and vasodilation. These inhibitory effects of maxadilan may be partially due to the decreased substance P (SP) levels. In contrast, inhibitory effect of VIP on ear swelling was moderate, without any effect on MO-induced plasma leakage or SP release, however, activation of VPAC1/2R inhibited the increased microcirculation caused by the early arteriolar vasodilation. Neither the PAC1R, nor the VPAC1/2R agonist influenced the MO-evoked increase in tissue myeloperoxidase activity. These results clearly show that PAC1R activation inhibits acute neurogenic arterial vasodilation and plasma protein leakage from the venules, while VPAC1/2R stimulation is only involved in the attenuation of vasodilation.

  5. Are portable bladder scanning and real-time ultrasound accurate measures of bladder volume in postnatal women?

    PubMed

    Mathew, S; Horne, A W; Murray, L S; Tydeman, G; McKinley, C A

    2007-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound and portable bladder scanners are commonly used instead of catheterisation to determine bladder volumes in postnatal women but it is not known whether these are accurate. Change in bladder volumes measured by ultrasound and portable scanners were compared with actual voided volume (VV) in 100 postnatal women. The VV was on average 41 ml (CI 29 - 54 ml) higher than that measured by ultrasound, and 33 ml (CI 17 - 48 ml) higher than that measured by portable scanners. Portable scanner volumes were 9 ml (CI -8 - 26 ml) higher than those measured by ultrasound. Neither method is an accurate tool for detecting bladder volume in postnatal women.

  6. The influence of intravesical administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX) on the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Majewski, Mariusz; Bossowska, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is used as an experimental drug in therapy of neurogenic urinary bladder disorders. The present study investigated the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying porcine urinary bladder after intravesical RTX instillation. The SChG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH; marker of noradrenergic neurons), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), galanin, Leu(5)-enkephalin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It was found that in both the control (n = 5) and RTX-treated pigs (n = 5), the vast majority (90.4 ± 2.8 and 89.7 ± 2.3%, respectively) of FB-positive (FB+) nerve cells were DβH+. RTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (71.1 ± 12.1 vs 43.2 ± 6.7%), VIP (21.3 ± 10.7 vs 5.3 ± 4.3%) or SOM (16.5 ± 4.6 vs 2.3 ± 2.6%) and a distinct increase in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunoreactive to nNOS (0.8 ± 1 vs 5.3 ± 1.9 %). The present study for the first time has provided some information that therapeutic effects of RTX on the mammalian urinary bladder can be partly mediated by SChG neurons.

  7. Excitatory cholinergic and purinergic signaling in bladder are equally susceptible to botulinum neurotoxin a consistent with co-release of transmitters from efferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary W; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Mediators of neuromuscular transmission in rat bladder strips were dissected pharmacologically to examine their susceptibilities to inhibition by botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and elucidate a basis for the clinical effectiveness of BoNT/A in alleviating smooth muscle spasms associated with overactive bladder. BoNT/A, BoNT/C1, or BoNT/E reduced peak and average force of muscle contractions induced by electric field stimulation (EFS) in dose-dependent manners by acting only on neurogenic, tetrodotoxin-sensitive responses. BoNTs that cleaved vesicle-associated membrane protein proved to be much less effective. Acetylcholine (ACh) and ATP were found to provide virtually all excitatory input, because EFS-evoked contractions were abolished by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine, combined with either a desensitizing agonist of P2X(1) and P2X(3) or a nonselective ATP receptor antagonist. Both transmitters were released in the innervated muscle layer and, thus, persisted after removal of urothelium. Atropine or a desensitizer of the P2X(1) or P2X(3) receptors did not alter the rate at which muscle contractions were weakened by BoNT/A. Moreover, although cholinergic and purinergic signaling could be partially delineated by using high-frequency EFS (which intensified a transient, largely atropine-resistant spike in muscle contractions that was reduced after P2X receptor desensitization), they proved equally susceptible to BoNT/A. Thus, equi-potent blockade of ATP co-released with ACh from muscle efferents probably contributes to the effectiveness of BoNT/A in treating bladder overactivity, including nonresponders to anticholinergic drugs. Because purinergic receptors are known mediators of sensory afferent excitation, inhibition of efferent ATP release by BoNT/A could also help to ameliorate acute pain and urgency sensation reported by some recipients.

  8. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  9. Modulation of Purinergic Neuromuscular Transmission by Phorbol Dibutyrate is Independent of Protein Kinase C in Murine Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Silinsky, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Parasympathetic control of murine urinary bladder consists of contractile components mediated by both muscarinic and purinergic receptors. Using intracellular recording techniques, the purinergic component of transmission was measured as both evoked excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) in response to electrical field stimulation and spontaneous events [spontaneous EJPs (sEJPs)]. EJPs, but not sEJPs, were abolished by the application of the Na+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin and the Ca2+ channel blocker Cd2+. Both EJPs and sEJPs were abolished by the application of the P2X1 antagonist 8,8′-[carbonylbis(imino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino-4,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)]bis-1,3,5-naphthalenetrisulfonic acid hexasodium salt (NF279). Application of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) increased electrically evoked EJP amplitudes with no effect on mean sEJP amplitudes. Similar increases in EJP amplitudes were produced by PDBu in the presence of either the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine or the specific protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor 2-[1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)indol-3-yl]-3-(indol-3-yl) maleimide (GF109203X). These results suggest that PDBu increases the purinergic component of detrusor transmission through increasing neurogenic ATP release via a PKC-independent mechanism. PMID:22547572

  10. Spontaneous rupture of urinary bladder: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    Albino, Giuseppe; Bilardi, Francesco; Gattulli, Domenico; Maggi, Pietro; Corvasce, Antonio; Marucco, Ettore Cirillo

    2012-12-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the bladder is a rare event. The clinical presentation shows the signs and symptoms of peritonitis, but the diagnosis is made at the operating table. This event is burdened with a high mortality rate. We present a case report of a 73-year-old man who came to our observation. He was a chronic carrier of urinary catheter, at least 7 times removed traumatically by himself. At the time of admission he showed drastic reduction in urine output, absence of hydronephrosis, normal functioning of the catheter, a tense and widely meteoric abdomen, the presence of air-fluid levels, normal kidneys, absence of free fluid in the abdomen. The CT showed a fluid collection of about 7 cm diameter between the bladder and rectum. The explorative laparotomy found a small fissuration of the posterior wall of the bladder. For his severe conditions, the patient died a few hours after surgery, in intensive care unit. Although it is a rare event, since 1980, 177 cases of spontaneous rupture of the bladder are reported in the literature. Their causes may be essentially divided into two groups: for increase of intravesical pressure; or for weakening of the bladder wall. In most cases, the spontaneous rupture of the bladder takes place in presence of a urothelial neoplasm or after radiation therapy of the pelvic organs. The etiology of spontaneous rupture of the bladder in our case does not relate to a bladder tumor or radiotherapy. It may have been caused by repeated episodes of acute retention of urine with extreme bladder distension up to 3 liters. It is not easy to think of a bladder perforation in patients presenting signs of peritonitis without a history of bladder cancer or pelvic radiotherapy. A CT with intravesical contrast medium could help the diagnostic orientation.

  11. Overactive bladder – 18 years – Part II

    PubMed Central

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A.; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G.; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell’Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, José Antonio; Castaño, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; López, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics – pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy – started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning – as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder – 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  12. Neurogenic pulmonary edema combined with febrile seizures in early childhood-A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Keiji; Matsubara, Kousaku; Hori, Masayuki; Nigami, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Aya; Isome, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Yu; Nagai, Sadayuki

    2016-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a clinical entity that can occur following central nervous system disorders. However, NPE occurs quite rarely in early childhood, and there has only been one report about pediatric NPE associated with febrile seizures. Two cases are reported here. One case involved a 2-year-old girl who presented with febrile seizures, which rapidly progressed to severe NPE. Since the NPE occurred in the emergency department room, the patient was able to be resuscitated via immediate endotracheal intubation. The other case involved an 11-month-old boy who developed respiratory distress following a 50-min episode of febrile status epilepticus. Both patients required respiratory management in the intensive care unit. However their conditions were dramatically improved within several days and fully recovered without any sequelae.

  13. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  14. Vertebrate neurogenic placode development: historical highlights that have shaped our current understanding.

    PubMed

    Stark, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    With the flood of published research encountered today, it is important to occasionally reflect upon how we arrived at our current understanding in a particular scientific discipline, thereby positioning new discoveries into proper context with long-established models. This historical review highlights some of the important scientific contributions in the field of neurogenic placode development. By viewing cumulatively the rich historical data, we can more fully appreciate and apply what has been accomplished. Early descriptive work in fish and experimental approaches in amphibians and chick yielded important conceptual models of placode induction and cellular differentiation. Current efforts to discover genes and their molecular functions continue to expand our understanding of the placodes. Carefully considering the body of work may improve current models and help focus modern experimental design.

  15. TRPA1 channels mediate acute neurogenic inflammation and pain produced by bacterial endotoxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meseguer, Victor; Alpizar, Yeranddy A.; Luis, Enoch; Tajada, Sendoa; Denlinger, Bristol; Fajardo, Otto; Manenschijn, Jan-Albert; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Talavera, Arturo; Kichko, Tatiana; Navia, Belén; Sánchez, Alicia; Señarís, Rosa; Reeh, Peter; Pérez-García, María Teresa; López-López, José Ramón; Voets, Thomas; Belmonte, Carlos; Talavera, Karel; Viana, Félix

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial infections are accompanied by inflammation and somatic or visceral pain. These symptoms are generally attributed to sensitization of nociceptors by inflammatory mediators released by immune cells. Nociceptor sensitization during inflammation occurs through activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signalling pathway by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a toxic by-product of bacterial lysis. Here we show that LPS exerts fast, membrane delimited, excitatory actions via TRPA1, a transient receptor potential cation channel that is critical for transducing environmental irritant stimuli into nociceptor activity. Moreover, we find that pain and acute vascular reactions, including neurogenic inflammation (CGRP release) caused by LPS are primarily dependent on TRPA1 channel activation in nociceptive sensory neurons, and develop independently of TLR4 activation. The identification of TRPA1 as a molecular determinant of direct LPS effects on nociceptors offers new insights into the pathogenesis of pain and neurovascular responses during bacterial infections and opens novel avenues for their treatment.

  16. Brain Ischemia Suppresses Immunity in the Periphery and Brain via Different Neurogenic Innervations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Jin, Wei-Na; Liu, Yaou; Shi, Kaibin; Sun, Haoran; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Chao; Gonzales, Rayna J; Sheth, Kevin N; La Cava, Antonio; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-03-21

    Brain ischemia inhibits immune function systemically, with resulting infectious complications. Whether in stroke different immune alterations occur in brain and periphery and whether analogous mechanisms operate in these compartments remains unclear. Here we show that in patients with ischemic stroke and in mice subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion, natural killer (NK) cells display remarkably distinct temporal and transcriptome profiles in the brain as compared to the periphery. The activation of catecholaminergic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis leads to splenic atrophy and contraction of NK cell numbers in the periphery through a modulated expression of SOCS3, whereas cholinergic innervation-mediated suppression of NK cell responses in the brain involves RUNX3. Importantly, pharmacological or genetic ablation of innervation preserved NK cell function and restrained post-stroke infection. Thus, brain ischemia compromises NK cell-mediated immune defenses through mechanisms that differ in the brain versus the periphery, and targeted inhibition of neurogenic innervation limits post-stroke infection.

  17. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  18. Self-maintenance of neurogenic inflammation contributes to a vicious cycle in skin.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Olivier; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; L'Herondelle, Killian; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Buhé, Virginie; Plée-Gautier, Emmanuelle; Carré, Jean-Luc; Lefeuvre, Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2015-10-01

    Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation (CNI) is frequently associated with skin disorders. CNI is not limited to the retrograde signalling of nociceptive sensory nerve endings but can instead be regarded as a multicellular phenomenon. Thus, soluble mediators participating in communication among sensory nerves, skin and immune cells are key components of CNI. These interactions induce the self-maintenance of CNI, promoting a vicious cycle. Certain G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a prominent role in these cell interactions and contribute to self-maintenance. Protease-activated receptors 2 and 4 (PAR-2 and PAR-4, respectively) and Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs) are implicated in the synthesis and release of neuropeptides, proteases and soluble mediators from most cutaneous cells. Regulation of the expression and release of these mediators contributes to the vicious cycle of CNI. The authors propose certain hypothetical therapeutic options to interrupt this cycle, which might reduce skin symptoms and improve patient quality of life.

  19. Endocannabinoids via CB1 receptors act as neurogenic niche cues during cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Guzmán, Manuel; Galve-Roperh, Ismael

    2012-01-01

    During brain development, neurogenesis is precisely regulated by the concerted action of intrinsic factors and extracellular signalling systems that provide the necessary niche information to proliferating and differentiating cells. A number of recent studies have revealed a previously unknown role for the endocannabinoid (ECB) system in the control of embryonic neuronal development and maturation. Thus, the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in concert with locally produced ECBs regulates neural progenitor (NP) proliferation, pyramidal specification and axonal navigation. In addition, subcellularly restricted ECB production acts as an axonal growth cone signal to regulate interneuron morphogenesis. These findings provide the rationale for understanding better the consequences of prenatal cannabinoid exposure, and emphasize a novel role of ECBs as neurogenic instructive cues involved in cortical development. In this review the implications of altered CB1-receptor-mediated signalling in developmental disorders and particularly in epileptogenesis are briefly discussed. PMID:23108542

  20. Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome: current diagnostic criteria and advances in MRI diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Magill, Stephen T; Brus-Ramer, Marcel; Weinstein, Philip R; Chin, Cynthia T; Jacques, Line

    2015-09-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (nTOS) is caused by compression of the brachial plexus as it traverses from the thoracic outlet to the axilla. Diagnosing nTOS can be difficult because of overlap with other complex pain and entrapment syndromes. An nTOS diagnosis is made based on patient history, physical exam, electrodiagnostic studies, and, more recently, interpretation of MR neurograms with tractography. Advances in high-resolution MRI and tractography can confirm an nTOS diagnosis and identify the location of nerve compression, allowing tailored surgical decompression. In this report, the authors review the current diagnostic criteria, present an update on advances in MRI, and provide case examples demonstrating how MR neurography (MRN) can aid in diagnosing nTOS. The authors conclude that improved high-resolution MRN and tractography are valuable tools for identifying the source of nerve compression in patients with nTOS and can augment current diagnostic modalities for this syndrome.

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury Activation of the Adult Subventricular Zone Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Hyuk; Adorjan, Istvan; Mundim, Mayara V.; Sun, Bin; Dizon, Maria L. V.; Szele, Francis G.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common in both civilian and military life, placing a large burden on survivors and society. However, with the recognition of neural stem cells in adult mammals, including humans, came the possibility to harness these cells for repair of damaged brain, whereas previously this was thought to be impossible. In this review, we focus on the rodent adult subventricular zone (SVZ), an important neurogenic niche within the mature brain in which neural stem cells continue to reside. We review how the SVZ is perturbed following various animal TBI models with regards to cell proliferation, emigration, survival, and differentiation, and we review specific molecules involved in these processes. Together, this information suggests next steps in attempting to translate knowledge from TBI animal models into human therapies for TBI. PMID:27531972

  2. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  3. Hippocampal transcriptional and neurogenic changes evoked by combination yohimbine and imipramine treatment.

    PubMed

    Husain, Basma Fatima Anwar; Nanavaty, Ishira N; Marathe, Swananda V; Rajendran, Rajeev; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2015-08-03

    Adjunct α2-adrenoceptor antagonism is a potential strategy to accelerate the behavioral effects of antidepressants. Co-administration of the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine hastens the behavioral and neurogenic effects of the antidepressant imipramine. We examined the transcriptional targets of short duration (7days), combination treatment of yohimbine and imipramine (Y+I) within the adult rat hippocampus. Using microarray and qPCR analysis we observed functional enrichment of genes involved in intracellular signaling cascades, plasma membrane, cellular metal ion homeostasis, multicellular stress responses and neuropeptide signaling pathways in the Y+I transcriptome. We noted reduced expression of the α2A-adrenoceptor (Adra2a), serotonin 5HT2C receptor (Htr2c) and the somatostatin receptor 1 (Sstr1), which modulate antidepressant action. Further, we noted a regulation of signaling pathway genes like inositol monophosphatase 2 (Impa2), iodothyronine deiodinase 3 (Dio3), regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (Rgs4), alkaline ceramidase 2 (Acer2), doublecortin-like kinase 2 (Dclk2), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (Nfkbia) and serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase 1 (Sgk1), several of which are implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Comparative analysis revealed an overlap in the hippocampal regulation of Acer2, Nfkbia, Sgk1 and Impa2 between Y+I treatment, the fast-acting electroconvulsive seizure (ECS) paradigm, and the slow-onset chronic (21days) imipramine treatment. Further, Y+I treatment enhanced the quiescent neural progenitor pool in the hippocampal neurogenic niche similar to ECS, and distinct from chronic imipramine treatment. Taken together, our results provide insight into the molecular and cellular targets of short duration Y+I treatment, and identify potential leads for the development of rapid-action antidepressants.

  4. Stroke Increases Neural Stem Cells and Angiogenesis in the Neurogenic Niche of the Adult Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui Lan; Chopp, Michael; Roberts, Cynthia; Liu, Xianshuang; Wei, Min; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Wang, Xinli; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2014-01-01

    The unique cellular and vascular architecture of the adult ventricular-subventricular zone (V/SVZ) neurogenic niche plays an important role in regulating neural stem cell function. However, the in vivo identification of neural stem cells and their relationship to blood vessels within this niche in response to stroke remain largely unknown. Using whole-mount preparation of the lateral ventricle wall, we examined the architecture of neural stem cells and blood vessels in the V/SVZ of adult mouse over the course of 3 months after onset of focal cerebral ischemia. Stroke substantially increased the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive neural stem cells that are in contact with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) via their apical processes at the center of pinwheel structures formed by ependymal cells residing in the lateral ventricle. Long basal processes of these cells extended to blood vessels beneath the ependymal layer. Moreover, stroke increased V/SVZ endothelial cell proliferation from 2% in non-ischemic mice to 12 and 15% at 7 and 14 days after stroke, respectively. Vascular volume in the V/SVZ was augmented from 3% of the total volume prior to stroke to 6% at 90 days after stroke. Stroke-increased angiogenesis was closely associated with neuroblasts that expanded to nearly encompass the entire lateral ventricular wall in the V/SVZ. These data indicate that stroke induces long-term alterations of the neural stem cell and vascular architecture of the adult V/SVZ neurogenic niche. These post-stroke structural changes may provide insight into neural stem cell mediation of stroke-induced neurogenesis through the interaction of neural stem cells with proteins in the CSF and their sub-ependymal neurovascular interaction. PMID:25437857

  5. Cancer stem cells from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis posits that deregulated neural stem cells (NSCs) form the basis of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). GBM, however, usually forms in the cerebral white matter while normal NSCs reside in subventricular and hippocampal regions. We attempted to characterize CSCs from a rare form of glioblastoma multiforme involving the neurogenic ventricular wall. Methods We described isolating CSCs from a GBM involving the lateral ventricles and characterized these cells with in vitro molecular biomarker profiling, cellular behavior, ex vivo and in vivo techniques. Results The patient’s MRI revealed a heterogeneous mass with associated edema, involving the left subventricular zone. Histological examination of the tumor established it as being a high-grade glial neoplasm, characterized by polygonal and fusiform cells with marked nuclear atypia, amphophilic cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, frequent mitotic figures, irregular zones of necrosis and vascular hyperplasia. Recurrence of the tumor occurred shortly after the surgical resection. CD133-positive cells, isolated from the tumor, expressed stem cell markers including nestin, CD133, Ki67, Sox2, EFNB1, EFNB2, EFNB3, Cav-1, Musashi, Nucleostemin, Notch 2, Notch 4, and Pax6. Biomarkers expressed in differentiated cells included Cathepsin L, Cathepsin B, Mucin18, Mucin24, c-Myc, NSE, and TIMP1. Expression of unique cancer-related transcripts in these CD133-positive cells, such as caveolin-1 and −2, do not appear to have been previously reported in the literature. Ex vivo organotypic brain slice co-culture showed that the CD133+ cells behaved like tumor cells. The CD133-positive cells also induced tumor formation when they were stereotactically transplanted into the brains of the immune-deficient NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions This brain tumor involving the neurogenic lateral ventricular wall was comprised of tumor-forming, CD133-positive cancer stem cells, which are likely

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells secretome as a modulator of the neurogenic niche: basic insights and therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Antonio J.; Sousa, Joao C.; Costa, Bruno M.; Pires, Ana O.; Mateus-Pinheiro, António; Teixeira, F. G.; Pinto, Luisa; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) share few characteristics apart from self-renewal and multipotency. In fact, the neurogenic and osteogenic stem cell niches derive from two distinct embryonary structures; while the later originates from the mesoderm, as all the connective tissues do, the first derives from the ectoderm. Therefore, it is highly unlikely that stem cells isolated from one niche could form terminally differentiated cells from the other. Additionally, these two niches are associated to tissues/systems (e.g., bone and central nervous system) that have markedly different needs and display diverse functions within the human body. Nevertheless they do share common features. For instance, the differentiation of both NSCs and MSCs is intimately associated with the bone morphogenetic protein family. Moreover, both NSCs and MSCs secrete a panel of common growth factors, such as nerve growth factor (NGF), glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), among others. But it is not the features they share but the interaction between them that seem most important, and worth exploring; namely, it has already been shown that there are mutually beneficially effects when these cell types are co-cultured in vitro. In fact the use of MSCs, and their secretome, become a strong candidate to be used as a therapeutic tool for CNS applications, namely by triggering the endogenous proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitors, among other mechanisms. Quite interestingly it was recently revealed that MSCs could be found in the human brain, in the vicinity of capillaries. In the present review we highlight how MSCs and NSCs in the neurogenic niches interact. Furthermore, we propose directions on this field and explore the future therapeutic possibilities that may arise from the combination/interaction of MSCs and NSCs. PMID:26217178

  7. NSI-189, a Small Molecule with Neurogenic Properties, Exerts Behavioral and Neurostructural Benefits in Stroke Rats.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Quach, David M; Kaneko, Yuji; Wu, Stephanie; Lee, David; Lam, Tina; Hayama, Ken L; Hazel, Thomas G; Johe, Karl; Wu, Michael C; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2017-02-09

    Enhancing neurogenesis may be a powerful stroke therapy. Here, we tested in a rat model of ischemic stroke the beneficial effects of NSI-189, an orally active, new molecular entity (mol. wt. 366) with enhanced neurogenic activity, and indicated as an anti-depressant drug in a clinical trial (Fava et al., 2015) and being tested in a Phase 2 efficacy trial (ClinicalTrials.gov, 2016) for treatment of major depression. Oral administration of NSI-189 in adult Sprague-Dawley rats starting at 6 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion, and daily thereafter over the next 12 weeks resulted in significant amelioration of stroke-induced motor and neurological deficits, which was maintained up to 24 weeks post-stroke. Histopathological assessment of stroke brains from NSI-189-treated animals revealed significant increments in neurite outgrowth as evidenced by MAP2 immunoreactivity that was prominently detected in the hippocampus and partially in the cortex. These results suggest NSI-189 actively stimulated remodeling of the stroke brain. Parallel in vitro studies further probed this remodeling process and demonstrated that oxygen glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R) initiated typical cell death processes, which were reversed by NSI-189 treatment characterized by significant attenuation of OGD/R-mediated hippocampal cell death and increased Ki67 and MAP2 expression, coupled with upregulation of neurogenic factors such as BDNF and SCF. These findings support the use of oral NSI-189 as a therapeutic agent well beyond the initial 6-hour time window to accelerate and enhance the overall functional improvement in the initial 6 months post stroke. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Diabetes and Foot Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infographic (English) Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies) Diabetic Kidney Disease Diabetes and Foot Problems Diabetic ... time, diabetes may cause nerve damage, also called diabetic neuropathy , that can cause tingling and pain, and can ...

  9. [Comparative assessment of combined therapy of neurogenic hyperactivity of detrusor in patients with Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Fedorova, N V; Mazurenko, D A; Khitarishvili, E V

    2006-01-01

    We studied clinical characteristics of voiding disorders to improve treatment results in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in 64 PD patients (28 women and 36 men aged 45 to 76 years, mean age 62.5 +/- 9.4 years). Duration of PD was 8.0 +/- 3.4 years, history of voiding disorders--2.1 +/- 0.8 years. Hyperactive urinary bladder was the cause of voiding disorders in all the patients. The examinees have undergone physical examination, microscopic and cultural examination of the urine, ultrasound investigation of the kidneys, urinary bladder and prostate with determination of residual urine, urodynamic examination of the lower urinary tracts. All the patients were divided into four groups. Group 1 of 10 patients received antiparkinsonian therapy which corrected voiding disorders. Group 2 (n = 26) received tolterodin in a dose 4 mg/day, group 3 (n = 14) received oxibutinin in a dose 5 mg/day, group 4 (n = 14) were treated with trospium chloride in a dose 30 mg/day. Thus, initial correction of antiparkinsonian therapy was made in 64 patients, after this correction voiding disorders reduced in 10 patients and no further treatment was needed. Voiding disorders reduced in all 3 groups of patients given the drugs. Cystometric capacity of the bladder increased in all 4 groups from 155 (86-450) ml to 220 (105-530) ml, on the average, and unstable contractions of the urinary bladder decreased from 3.1 (1-8) to 1.6 (0-5). Quality of life in the examinees improved considerably. The data obtained evidence for M-cholino-blockers efficacy in PD patients with unstable detrusor after correction of antiparkinsonean therapy. Two-month course of tolterodin, oxibutinin and trospium chloride significantly reduced symptoms of urination disorders.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Xu, Zhipeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiang; Sun, Chengwen; Guo, Jia; Xue, Peng; Guan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia), KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC), and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer) have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC) progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO) term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer. PMID:26230496

  11. Bladder Neck Urothelial Carcinoma: A Urinary Bladder Subsite Carcinoma With Distinct Clinicopathology.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Rashid, Hani

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the clinicopathology of carcinomas originating in the urinary bladder neck, 316 cystectomies for urinary bladder carcinoma performed between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2013, were analyzed. Clinicopathological parameters were compared between bladder neck carcinomas (BNCs) and non-BNCs. Among the 316 cystectomies were 19 BNCs and 297 non-BNCs. BNCs accounted for 19/316 (6%) of all the cases, with a male-to-female ratio 18:1. Bladder neck location was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage. Ninety percent and 58% BNCs presented at stage ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively, versus 62% and 38% non-BNCs at ≥T2 and ≥T3, respectively. Significantly higher percentage of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were also seen in BNCs (68% and 47%, respectively) than in non-BNCs (29% and 17%, respectively). In conclusion, BNCs present with a significantly higher frequency of muscle invasion and advanced tumor stage, lymphovascular invasion, as well as local and distant metastasis at diagnosis compared with the non-BNCs group. Recognition of these unique clinicopathologic features with early detection and possibly more aggressive management of BNC can potentially have a significant impact on the patient's outcome.

  12. Gestational diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... you are pregnant and you have symptoms of diabetes . Prevention Getting prenatal care early and having regular checkups helps improve your health and the health of your baby. Having prenatal ... gestational diabetes early. If you are overweight, getting your weight ...

  13. Diabetes Complications

    MedlinePlus

    If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body ... as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk ...

  14. Diabetes Insipidus

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) causes frequent urination. You become extremely thirsty, so you drink. Then you urinate. This ... is almost all water. DI is different from diabetes mellitus (DM), which involves insulin problems and high ...

  15. Diabetes Myths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  16. Diabetes Superfoods

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  17. Radiation Dose–Volume Effects Of The Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Yorke, Ellen D.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Shipley, William U.

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth overview of the normal-tissue radiation tolerance of the urinary bladder is presented. The most informative studies consider whole-organ irradiation. The data on partial-organ/nonuniform irradiation are suspect because the bladder motion is not accounted for, and many studies lack long enough follow-up data. Future studies are needed. PMID:20171505

  18. [Metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma to the urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, S; Komatsu, H; Doi, N; Wakumoto, Y; Tominaga, T; Nishimura, Y

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of metastasis of a hepatocellular carcinoma to the bladder. Clinically the tumor was suspected to be a primary bladder tumor with subsequent metastasis to the liver. However, the pathological diagnosis yielded different results. The tumor cells resembled liver cells and sometimes bile production was even observed. No therapy was available and the patient died of cachexia 6 months later.

  19. Unusual location of a urinary bladder cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Forte, Serafino; Kos, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Adrienne

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy among men in the Western world. Bone metastasis occurs in 27 % of the cases. Usually, the location is the spine. The present report describes the first case of a proven distant bone metastasis to the acromion from a urinary bladder carcinoma in a patient with shoulder pain.

  20. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.