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Sample records for diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis

  1. Frequency of hypovitaminosis D and its associated risk factors in newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Fahad; Shaheen, Abida; Arshad, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To find out the frequency of hypovitaminosis D and its associated risk factors in newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to administration of standard anti tuberculosis therapy. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in Ojha Institute of Chest Diseases-DUHS. After approval from BASR and following written informed consent eighty newly diagnosed, as per WHO criteria, tuberculosis patients were enrolled. Prior to the initiation of anti tuberculosis therapy, the serum vitamin D level was determined by 25-OH Vitamin D kit using the chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA) method. A cut off value of >30 ng/mL of serum vitamin D was taken as normal whereas a range between 10-30 ng/mL and <10 ng/mL were considered insufficient and deficient respectively. Frequency of socio-demographic associated risk factors of hypovitaminosis D was also determined. Results: Out of eighty newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients 33 (41.25%) were males and 47(58.75%) were females with their ages ranging from 18-50 years. 54 patients (26 male and 28 female patients) were smokers. BMI of all the patients was found to be less than the normal ranges. Hypovitaminosis was present in all the cases. Vitamin D insufficiency was found in 49 participants (20 male and 29 female) whereas 31 patients (13 male and 18 female) were found to be vitamin D deficient. Conclusion: Prevalence of serum vitamin D level derangement is very high in newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in our local setting which necessitates administration of adjuvant vitamin D along with standard anti tuberculosis therapy. PMID:27182266

  2. Prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Oguche, Stephen; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Shehu, Nathan Y.; Abah, Isaac O.; Sagay, Atiene S.; Ugoagwu, Placid O.; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Idoko, John A.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce and in Nigeria there is paucity of reported data. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary TB (PTB) in newly diagnosed (treatment-naïve) HIV-1 infected children at the pediatric HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in Nigeria. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 876 children, aged 2 months – 13 years, diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between July 2005 and December 2012, of which 286 were diagnosed with PTB at presentation after TB screening. The study site was the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN)-supported Pediatric HIV clinic at JUTH, Jos. A multivariate forward logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection. Results The prevalence of PTB-HIV co-infection was 32% (286/876). Severe immunosuppression (SI) and World Health Organization (WHO) HIV clinical stage 3/4 were identified as independent risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection in HIV infected children. The odds of PTB-HIV co-infection was increased two-fold in HIV-infected children with WHO clinical stage 3/4 compared to those with stage 1/2 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 [1.31-2.37], p<0.001) and 1.5-fold in children with SI compared to those without SI (AOR 1.52 [1.12-2.06], p=0.007). Conclusion In our setting, the burden of PTB was high among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, and late WHO HIV clinical stage and severe immunosuppression were associated with PTB-HIV co-infection. Therefore there is a clear need to improve strategies for early diagnosis of both HIV and PTB to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27019829

  3. A Comparative Study of Induced Sputum and Bronchial Washings in Diagnosing Sputum Smear Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mandava, Venu; Namballa, Usha Rani; Makala, Sravani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is one of the most important public health problem worldwide. Detecting patients with active pulmonary Koch’s disease is an important component of tuberculosis control programs. However, at times in patients even with a compatible clinical picture, sputum smears do not reveal acid-fast bacilli and smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis remains a common problem. Aim The present study is aimed to compare the results of induced sputum and bronchial washings smear in patients suspected to have sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis. Materials and Methods A prospective study conducted from August 2014 to July 2015, comprising 120 patients fulfilling study criteria. Patients with respiratory symptoms and chest roentgenogram suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis with no previous history of anti-tuberculosis treatment and two spontaneous sputum smear samples negative for acid fast bacilli were included. Patients with active haemoptysis and sputum positive were excluded from the study. Sputum induction was done by using 5-10 ml of 3% hypertonic saline through ultrasonic nebulizer taking safety precautions. All the patient underwent fibreoptic bronchoscopy after six hours fasting on the same day. About 20 ml of normal saline instilled into the suspected pathology area and washings were taken with gentle suction. The sample processing and fluorescent staining for acid fast bacilli was done in a designated microscopy lab. Results Out of 120 sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients, induced sputum smear examination detected acid fast bacilli in 76 patients (63.3%) and acid fast bacilli detected from bronchial washings in 94 patients (78.3%). Smear positivity was higher in cavitary and infiltrative lesions as compared to consolidation and infrahilar pattern disease. Conclusion Even though both induced sputum and bronchial washings procedures were valuable for the diagnosis of sputum smear negative, sputum induction with hypertonic

  4. The role of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis in post-mortem tissues

    PubMed Central

    García-Basteiro, Alberto L.; Ismail, Mamudo R.; Carrilho, Carla; Ussene, Esperança; Castillo, Paola; Chitsungo, Dércio; Rodríguez, Cristina; Lovane, Lucília; Vergara, Andrea; López-Varela, Elisa; Mandomando, Inacio; Lorenzoni, Cesaltina; Ordi, Jaume; Menéndez, Clara; Bassat, Quique; Martínez, Miguel J.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which the Xpert MTB/RIF (Gene Xpert) contributes to tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in samples other than sputum and cerebrospinal fluid remains uncertain. We aimed to assess the role of Xpert MTB/RIF for detecting M. tuberculosis in post-mortem tissues. We conducted a study among 30 complete diagnostic autopsies (CDA) performed at the Maputo Central Hospital (Mozambique). Lung tissues were screened for TB in all cases. In addition other tissues were tested when compatible lesions were identified in the histological exam. We used in-house real time PCR and LAMP assays to confirm the presence of M. tuberculosis DNA. The diagnosis of tuberculosis at death was established based on microbiological and histopathological results. Eight out of 30 cases (26.7%) were diagnosed of tuberculosis. Xpert had a sensitivity to detect TB in lung tissue of 87.5% (95% CI 47.3–99.7) and a specificity of 95.7% (95% CI: 78.1–99.9). In-house DNA amplification methods and Xpert showed 93.6% concordance for lung tissue and 100% concordance for brain and liver tissues. The final cause of death was attributable to tuberculosis in four cases. Xpert MTB/RIF may represent a valuable, easy-to perform technique for post-mortem TB diagnosis. PMID:26860394

  5. Use of conventional PCR and smear microscopy to diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis in the Amazonian rainforest area.

    PubMed

    Carniel, F; Dalla Costa, E R; Lima-Bello, G; Martins, C; Scherer, L C; Rossetti, M L

    2014-12-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN)-stained sputum smears combined with conventional polymerase chain reaction (ZN/PCR) to amplify IS6110 region DNA extracted from ZN slides was evaluated. The objective was to verify if this association could improve tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in patients at remote sites. The study was carried out in 89 patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB as defined by the Brazilian Manual for TB Treatment. The participants were recruited in a reference unit for TB treatment in Rondônia, a state in the Amazonian area in northern Brazil. ZN, PCR, and culture performed in the sputum samples from these patients were analyzed in different combinations (i.e., ZN plus PCR and ZN plus culture). The prevalence rates of pulmonary TB in these patients were 32.6 and 28.1% considering culture and ZN/PCR, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of ZN/PCR were 86 and 93%, respectively. ZN/PCR was able to detect more TB cases than ZN alone. This method could offer a new approach for accurate tuberculosis diagnosis, especially in remote regions of the world where culture is not available.

  6. Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Lepromatous Leprosy Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Sendrasoa, F. A.; Ranaivo, I. M.; Raharolahy, O.; Andrianarison, M.; Ramarozatovo, L. S.; Rapelanoro Rabenja, F.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous occurrence of leprosy and pulmonary tuberculosis is reported infrequently in the modern era. We report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in patient being treated with glucocorticoids for complications of leprosy (type II reaction). Physicians should recognize that the leprosy patients treated with glucocorticoid may develop tuberculosis. PMID:26504603

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in Fecal Specimens From Adults Diagnosed With Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using the Xpert MTB/Rifampicin Test

    PubMed Central

    Kokuto, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yuka; Yoshimatsu, Shoji; Mizuno, Kazue; Yi, Lina; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Xpert Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)/rifampicin (RIF) is a fully automated diagnostic test that allows for the detection of MTB including its RIF resistance. Although the test is used for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in sputum samples worldwide, studies using fecal specimens are scarce. We therefore evaluated the efficacy of the Xpert MTB/RIF test for detection of MTB in fecal specimens obtained from adult pulmonary TB patients, confirmed by culture and/or molecular diagnostic methods. Methods. We conducted a retrospective case-control study to provide proof-of-concept regarding the efficacy of the Xpert MTB/RIF test using fecal samples for diagnosing pulmonary TB via detection of MTB in adult patients (≥20 years) at the Fukujuji Hospital in Tokyo, Japan. Results. Fecal specimens were obtained from 56 active pulmonary TB patients (including 48 sputum smear-positive and 8 sputum smear-negative patients), 10 non-TB patients (including 4 Myocobacterium avium complex infections), and 27 healthy individuals who were exposed to active pulmonary TB patients. The sensitivity of the fecal Xpert MTB/RIF was 100% (81.7%–100%) for detection of MTB in specimens from sputum smear-positive (1+ to 3+) patients, 81.0% (58.1%–94.6%) in specimens from sputum smear scanty positive patients, and 50.0% (15.7%–84.3%) in specimens from sputum smear-negative patients. Meanwhile, each of the fecal specimens from the non-TB group was negative for MTB (specificity 100%; 95% confidence interval, 86.2–100). Conclusions. The fecal Xpert MTB/RIF test could detect MTB in a large proportion of smear-positive pulmonary TB patients, without frequent false-positive results at a TB referral hospital in Japan. PMID:26125035

  8. Pulmonary Paragonimiasis Mimicking Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kj; Basu, Arup; Khana, Shilpi; Wattal, Chand

    2015-08-01

    Paragonimiasis is a disease which is frequently misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. In the areas where people eat crab/crayfish this disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis to avoid antituberculosis treatment for a non-tubercular condition. We are reporting a case of pulmonary paragonimiasis who had been treated for tuberculosis. PMID:27604443

  9. [Effects of different factors on work capacity status of patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Khudushina, T A; Maslakova, M G

    1994-01-01

    As shown by medical disability expert commission which followed up 142 tuberculous patients throughout chemotherapy, the disability in new-onset tuberculosis cases is related both to medical and social factors. The jobs of 1/2 of the examinees were not fit for such patients. More than half of them had concomitant visceral lesions. The duration of temporary disability was consequent to many factors, the principal of which were dissemination and destruction: subjects with local infection without destruction were incapable 192 days, on the average, while those with tuberculosis dissemination and destruction 266 days. 14.1% became invalids. Only a small group of the patients were not in need of social support. PMID:7870714

  10. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  11. Xpert(®) MTB/RIF under routine conditions in diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis: a study in two hospitals in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shah, S K; Kumar, A M V; Dogar, O F; Khan, M A; Qadeer, E; Tahseen, S; Masood, F; Chandio, A K; Edginton, M E

    2013-03-21

    Xpert(®) MTB/RIF testing was offered to consecutive patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) attending two hospitals in Pakistan during April-May 2012, in addition to routine diagnostic protocol (smear microscopy, chest radiography and clinical judgement). We assessed the relative contribution of each tool in detecting pulmonary TB under routine conditions. Of 606 participants, 121 (20%) were detected as pulmonary TB: 46 (38%) by microscopy, 38 (31%) by Xpert alone and 37 (31%) on clinical and radiological grounds; 41 (65%) were detected by both Xpert and microscopy. One patient had rifampicin resistance. Although Xpert detected approximately twice as many TB cases as microscopy (n = 79, 65%), clinical judgement remained favoured by clinicians even when smear and Xpert were negative.

  12. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective testing for pulmonary embolism is necessary, because clinical assessment alone is unreliable and the consequences of misdiagnosis are serious. No single test has ideal properties (100% sensitivity and specificity, no risk, low cost). Pulmonary angiography is regarded as the final arbiter but is ill suited for diagnosing a disease present in only a third of patients in whom it is suspected. Some tests are good for confirmation and some for exclusion of embolism; others are able to do both but are often non-diagnostic. For optimal efficiency, choice of the initial test should be guided by clinical assessment of the likelihood of embolism and by patient characteristics that may influence test accuracy. Standardised clinical estimates can be used to give a pre-test probability to assess, after appropriate objective testing, the post-test probability of embolism. Multidetector computed tomography can replace both scintigraphy and angiography for the exclusion and diagnosis of this disease and should now be considered the central imaging investigation in suspected pulmonary embolism. PMID:15192162

  13. Diagnostics for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cudahy, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of human suffering and mortality despite decades of effective treatment being available. Accurate and timely diagnosis remains an unmet goal. The HIV epidemic has also led to new challenges in the diagnosis of TB. Several new developments in TB diagnostics have the potential to positively influence the global campaign against TB. We aim to review the performance of both established as well as new diagnostics for pulmonary TB in adults, and discuss the ongoing challenges. PMID:27005271

  14. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  15. An approach to the problems of diagnosing and treating adult smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis in high-HIV-prevalence settings in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Maher, D.; Nunn, P.

    1998-01-01

    The overlap between the populations in sub-Saharan Africa infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to an upsurge in tuberculosis cases over the last 10 years. The relative increase in the proportion of notified sputum-smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases is greater than that of sputum-smear-positive PTB cases. This is a consequence of the following: the association between decreased host immunity and reduced sputum smear positivity; the difficulty in excluding other HIV-related diseases when making the diagnosis of smear-negative PTB; and an increase in false-negative sputum smears because of overstretched resources. This article examines problems in the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB in high-HIV-prevalence areas in sub-Saharan Africa. The main issues in diagnosis include: the criteria used to diagnose smear-negative PTB; the degree to which clinicians actually follow these criteria in practice; and the problem of how to exclude other respiratory diseases that can resemble, and be misdiagnosed as, smear-negative PTB. The most important aspect of the treatment of smear-negative PTB patients is abandoning 12-month "standard" treatment regimens in favour of short-course chemotherapy. Operational research is necessary to determine the most cost-effective approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative PTB. Nevertheless, substantial improvement could be obtained by implementing the effective measures already available, such as improved adherence to diagnostic and treatment guidelines. PMID:10191561

  16. Novel approaches in diagnosing tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Gibson, Tim; Anthony, Richard; Claassens, Mareli M.; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2011-06-01

    The WHO declared tuberculosis (TB) a global emergency. An estimated 8-9 million new cases occur each year with 2-3 million deaths. Currently, TB is diagnosed mostly by chest-X ray and staining of the mycobacteria in sputum with a detection limit of 1x104 bacteria /ml. There is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools for TB especially for developing countries. We have validated the electronic nose from TD Technology for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by headspace analysis of 284 sputum samples from TB patients. We used linear discriminant function analysis resulting in a sensitivity of 75% a specificity of 67% and an accuracy of 69%. Further research is still required to improve the results by choosing more selective sensors and sampling techniques. We used a fast gas chromatography- mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). The automated procedure is based on the injection of sputum samples which are methylated inside the GC injector using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). Hexacosanoic acid in combination with tuberculostearic acid was found to be specific for the presence of M. tuberculosis. The detection limit was similar to microscopy. We found no false positives, all microscopy and culture positive samples were also found positive with the THM-GC-MS method. The detection of ribosomal RNA from the infecting organism offers great potential since rRNA molecules outnumber chromosomal DNA by a factor 1000. It thus may possible to detect the organism without amplification of the nucleic acids (NA). We used a capture and a tagged detector probe for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum. So far the detection limit is 1x106 bacteria / ml. Currently we are testing a Lab-On-A-Chip Interferometer detection system.

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with oral aphthae

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Kevser; Gürer, Gülcan

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium. Tuberculosis primarily affects the lungs. Patients mainly complain of cough, sputum, night sweating, weight loss, and fever. However, there may be cases of atypical presentations. Although aphthous mouth ulcers are mostly present in the oral cavity in primary tuberculosis patients, our literature search showed only one case report of pulmonary tuberculosis with oral aphthae. Here we report a case of a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis admitted to the hospital with the complaint of oral aphthae.

  18. Knowledge, care-seeking behavior, and factors associated with patient delay among newly-diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Biya, Oladayo; Gidado, Saheed; Abraham, Ajibola; Waziri, Ndadilnasiya; Nguku, Patrick; Nsubuga, Peter; Suleman, Idris; Oyemakinde, Akin; Nasidi, Abdulsalami; Sabitu, Kabir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Early treatment of Tuberculosis (TB) cases is important for reducing transmission, morbidity and mortality associated with TB. In 2007, Federal Capital Territory (FCT), Nigeria recorded low TB case detection rate (CDR) of 9% which implied that many TB cases were undetected. We assessed the knowledge, care-seeking behavior, and factors associated with patient delay among pulmonary TB patients in FCT. Methods We enrolled 160 newly-diagnosed pulmonary TB patients in six directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) hospitals in FCT in a cross-sectional study. We used a structured questionnaire to collect data on socio-demographic variables, knowledge of TB, and care-seeking behavior. Patient delay was defined as > 4 weeks between onset of cough and first hospital contact. Results Mean age was 32.8 years (± 9 years). Sixty two percent were males. Forty seven percent first sought care in a government hospital, 26% with a patent medicine vendor and 22% in a private hospital. Forty one percent had unsatisfactory knowledge of TB. Forty two percent had patient delay. Having unsatisfactory knowledge of TB (p = 0.046) and multiple care-seeking (p = 0.02) were significantly associated with patient delay. After controlling for travel time and age, multiple care-seeking was independently associated with patient delay (Adjusted Odds Ratio = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.09-4.35). Conclusion Failure to immediately seek care in DOTS centers and having unsatisfactory knowledge of TB are factors contributing to patient delay. Strategies that promote early care-seeking in DOTS centers and sustained awareness on TB should be implemented in FCT. PMID:25328625

  19. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil. PMID:26785963

  20. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil. PMID:26785963

  1. Cost analysis of nucleic acid amplification for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis, within the context of the Brazilian Unified Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Márcia; Entringer, Aline Piovezan; Steffen, Ricardo; Trajman, Anete

    2015-01-01

    We estimated the costs of a molecular test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and resistance to rifampin (Xpert MTB/RIF) and of smear microscopy, within the Brazilian Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS, Unified Health Care System). In SUS laboratories in the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Manaus, we performed activity-based costing and micro-costing. The mean unit costs for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were R$35.57 and R$14.16, respectively. The major cost drivers for Xpert MTB/RIF and smear microscopy were consumables/reagents and staff, respectively. These results might facilitate future cost-effectiveness studies and inform the decision-making process regarding the expansion of Xpert MTB/RIF use in Brazil.

  2. Hyperferritinemia in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Benedicta; Sinha, Sulekha; Manjrekar, Poornima; D'Souza, Vivian

    2013-07-01

    High ferritin levels have been found to be associated with non infectious as well as infectious causes including tuberculosis. This is one case report of 41 year old male who presented with cough with expectoration. The patient had Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The laboratory findings showed Iron 280 μg/dl, Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) 61 μg/dl, and ferritin 92,945 ng/ml which indicates that iron is an essential nutrient for the survival of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  3. Dynamics of the T cell response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR and Rpf antigens in a Colombian population of household contacts of recently diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Leonar; Rojas, Mauricio; Ortíz, Blanca L; Franken, Kees L M C; García, Luis F; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Barrera, Luis F

    2016-03-01

    Immune response to DosR and Rpf antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) seems to be important for latency maintenance. Little is known about the dynamics of the immune response to these antigens in an endemic community. Thus, the IFNγ response and cytokine production in response to PPD, Esat6-Cfp10 (E6-C10), DosR and Rpf antigens in healthy HHC of tuberculosis (TB) patients over a 12 (T12) months period (short-term, stLTBI) was investigated. This response was compared with a group of LTBI, who have remained healthy for 5-7 years (long-term, ltLTBI). According to the IFNγ response, two groups of HHCs were identified in stLTBI in response to E6-C10. At T12, E6-C10(+) HHCs displayed a decrease in the IFNγ levels and a generalized decrease in cytokines production. The E6-C10(-) HHC showed an increase in the IFNγ response and cytokine levels. In stLTBI, the responses to E6-C10, DosR, and Rpf may be interpreted as a protective immune response controlling Mtb infection and may be leading to a state of latent infection. Comparing the response of stLTBI and ltLTBI, we observed significant changes in the proportions of CD45RO(+)CD27(+) T cells to specific DosR and Rpf, which may indicate a persistent immune response to Mtb antigens in ltLTBI.

  4. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...

  5. Pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer: simultaneous and sequential occurrence*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; Valentini, Dirceu Felipe; Müller, Alice Mânica; de Almeida, Carlos Podalirio Borges; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Lung cancer (LC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death and represents a major public health problem worldwide. Another major cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in developing countries, is tuberculosis. The simultaneous or sequential occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis and LC in the same patient has been reported in various case series and case-control studies. The objective of this study was to describe the characteristics of patients developing tuberculosis and LC, either simultaneously or sequentially. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study based on the review of medical charts. RESULTS: The study involved 24 patients diagnosed with tuberculosis and LC between 2009 and 2012. The diagnoses of tuberculosis and LC occurred simultaneously in 10 patients, whereas tuberculosis was diagnosed prior to LC in 14. The median time between the two diagnoses was 5 years (interquartile range: 1-30 years). Fourteen patients (58.3%) were male, 20 (83.3%) were White, and 22 (91.7%) were smokers or former smokers. The most common histological type was adenocarcinoma, identified in 14 cases (58.3%), followed by epidermoid carcinoma, identified in 6 (25.0%). Seven patients (29.2%) presented with distant metastases at diagnosis; of those 7 patients, 5 (71%) were diagnosed with LC and tuberculosis simultaneously. CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, most of the patients with tuberculosis and LC were smokers or former smokers, and tuberculosis was diagnosed either before or simultaneously with LC. Non-small cell lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, was the most common histological type. PMID:24068271

  6. A rare case of pulmonary tuberculosis with simultaneous pulmonary and skin sarcoidosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis are chronic diseases that rarely occur concomitantly. Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder characterized pathologically by the presence of non-caseating granulomas in involved tissues. Tuberculosis is infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis characterized by granulomas with caseous necrosis. Case presentation We present a case of 43-year-old female refugee from Kosovo with microbiological confirmation of pulmonary tuberculosis and pulmonary and skin sarcoidosis at the same time. Three weeks after corticosteroid therapy for pulmonary sarcoidosis was introduced, positive finding of mycobacterium culture of bronchial aspirate was observed. Based on these results, corticosteroid therapy was excluded and antituberculous therapy was introduced for six months. In the meantime, new nodes on face and nose appeared and skin sarcoidosis was diagnosed. The patient was given corticosteroids and colchicine according to the skin and pulmonary sarcoidosis therapy recommendation. Conclusion The authors of this study suggest that in cases when there is a dilemma in diagnosis between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis we should advance with corticosteroid therapy until we have microbiological confirmation of mycobacterium culture. This case is remarkable because this is a third described case of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis together (the first reported in Asia, the second in South Africa), and to authors knowledge, this is a first case report in Europe. PMID:20205764

  7. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease. PMID:18257992

  8. Clinical value of the measurement of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific antibody in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bothamley, G H; Rudd, R; Festenstein, F; Ivanyi, J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A serological test that could help to diagnose tuberculosis, especially smear negative disease, would contribute to patient management. METHODS: Levels of antibody to distinct antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were assessed for their value in the diagnosis and management of pulmonary tuberculosis. Serum was taken from 52 patients who were smear positive, from 27 patients who were smear negative but with evidence of active tuberculosis (sputum culture positive in 16, response to antituberculosis chemotherapy in 11), from 11 patients with old healed tuberculosis (pre-antibiotic era), and from 39 healthy subjects vaccinated with BCG. RESULTS: In smear positive tuberculosis an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using a single 38 kDa antigen gave a diagnostic sensitivity of 80% with a 100% specificity. In smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis, however, combination of the 19 kDa antigen, lipoarabinomannan (ML 34 epitope), and hsp 65 (TB 78 epitope) was needed to achieve a sensitivity of 64% with a specificity of 95%. Recurrent and extensive radiographic disease with a poor prognosis was associated with high anti-38 kDa and low anti-14 kDa antibody levels in patients with active disease. Patients with less pulmonary cavitation had high anti-19 kDa titres. Bacteriological relapse during treatment was indicated by a rise in anti-14 kDa (TB68 epitope) antibodies. Four patients with non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection showed no anti-38 kDa antibody. CONCLUSION: Antigen or epitope specific serology may help in the diagnosis, assessment of prognosis, and monitoring of chemotherapy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:1585290

  9. Prevalence of nutritional deficiency in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Silvana Gomes Nunes; Costa, Maria da Conceição Nascimento; Barreto, Florisneide Rodrigues; Pereira, Susan Martins

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nutritional deficiency among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using data obtained from the Brazilian Case Registry Database and from the medical records of patients diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (15-59 years of age) residing in one of the municipalities that make up the 16th Regional Health District of the state of Bahia. We calculated the incidence, lethality, and mortality rates, as well as the prevalence of nutritional deficiency, as evaluated by body mass index. Demographic, social, clinical, and epidemiological data were collected. RESULTS: Of the 72 confirmed cases of tuberculosis, 59 (81.9%) were in males, and 21 (29.2%) of the patients were in the 40-49 year age bracket. The majority (85.3%) described themselves as Mulatto or Black; 55.2% reported using alcohol; and approximately 90% were treated as outpatients. In the district and age bracket studied, the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 30.6/100,000 population. Among the 72 patients, data regarding nutritional status was available for 34. Of those, 50% and 25%, respectively, presented nutritional deficiency at the beginning and at the end of treatment. No statistically significant differences were found between normal-weight and malnourished patients regarding the characteristics studied. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of nutritional deficiency was high among our sample of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. This underscores the importance of nutritional follow-up for the assessment of tuberculosis treatment in the decision-making process regarding therapeutic interventions. PMID:24068270

  10. [Treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. In developed countries there is an increased number of cases due to different reasons. The most likely determinant cause is from immigrants coming from high endemic areas. This phenomenon is a direct cause of the increase in extrapulmonary and complicated pulmonary forms of tuberculosis. There are only a few controlled clinical trials evaluating therapies for extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Consequently, documented evidence is scarce, particularly in paediatrics. The majority of therapeutic recommendations are based on series of cases or expert opinions, with a lack of uniformity provided by the different consensus of the main scientific societies. The main objective of this fourth consensus by the Tuberculosis Study Group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, SEIP) is to perform a thorough revision of the data obtained from scientific literature, in order to establish recommendations for the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis, adapted to the characteristics and drugs available in Spain.

  11. [Hemophagocytic syndrome secondary to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Rakotoson, J L; Rakotonirainy, O H; Moroyandsa, F; Rakotoharivelo, H; Rakotomizao, J R; Andrianarisoa, A C F

    2012-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome is due to the activation and nonmalignant proliferation of macrophages and T lymphocytes. The purpose of this report is to describe a 25-year-old man who presented with fever, coughing, and weight loss over the past month. Laboratory findings demonstrated pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia, and cytolysis. The myelogram showed a hemophagocytic syndrome, and tuberculosis bacilli were found in the sputum. Chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography depicted a cavitary lesion suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis. Treatment of tuberculosis alone, without an immunosuppressant agent, was effective and led to improvement. In a country where tuberculosis is highly endemic, hemophagocytic syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with active tuberculosis complicated by pancytopenia.

  12. [Pulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis in children].

    PubMed

    Olivier, C

    1997-12-01

    The occurrence of tuberculosis in children is dependent on a contagious bacillus carrying adult. Among 500 cases notified annually, perhaps 5 or 6% of the total infectious reservoir in France, 75% have parenchymal pulmonary disease and/or lymph nodes. These tuberculous diseases only represent 10% of the pulmonary disorders: 90% remain primary infections (PI active) or latent infections. These are most often asymptomatic (PI Latent) or of low grade activity (PI active). The CT scanner and fibreoptic bronchoscopy are indispensable complementary investigations in tuberculous disease. Whatever the clinical picture the diagnosis rests on bacteriological confirmation (but only 30% of cultures are positive) and most often rests on a body of evidence: for example a contagious adult living in proximity or a contagious family, or other risk factors are present. The evidence of a child with whatever form of pulmonary tuberculosis, even a latent primary infection, requires treatment which is adapted in such a way to enable a cure and to protect against subsequent endogenous re-activation. A coherent system of co-operation between the hospital and community service and between paediatricians and adult physicians is indispensable to find the index adult case to break the chain of contagion. There are two specific aspects in children, first congenital tuberculosis when a diagnosis is difficult and secondly tuberculosis in a child who is HIV positive when the management can be delicate. PMID:9496592

  13. Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarmiento, José Mauricio Hernández; Restrepo, Natalia Builes; Mejía, Gloria Isabel; Zapata, Elsa; Restrepo, Mary Alejandra; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization had estimated 9.4 million tuberculosis cases on 2009, with 1.7 million of deaths as consequence of treatment and diagnosis failures. Improving diagnostic methods for the rapid and timely detection of tuberculosis patients is critical to control the disease. The aim of this study was evaluating the accuracy of the cord factor detection on the solid medium Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar compared to the Lowenstein Jensen medium for the rapid tuberculosis diagnosis. Methods Patients with suspected tuberculosis were enrolled and their sputum samples were processed for direct smear and culture on Lowenstein Jensen and BACTEC MGIT 960, from which positive tubes were subcultured on Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar. Statistical analysis was performed comparing culture results from Lowenstein Jensen and the thin layer agar, and their corresponding average times for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The performance of cord factor detection was evaluated determining its sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value. Results 111 out of 260 patients were positive for M. tuberculosis by Lowenstein Jensen medium with an average time ± standard deviation for its detection of 22.3 ± 8.5 days. 115 patients were positive by the MGIT system identifying the cord factor by the Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar which average time ± standard deviation was 5.5 ± 2.6 days. Conclusion The cord factor detection by Middlebrook 7H11 thin layer agar allows early and accurate tuberculosis diagnosis during an average time of 5 days, making this rapid diagnosis particularly important in patients with negative sputum smear. PMID:25419279

  14. Laryngeal Leishmaniasis with Extra-pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Swati; Khatiwada, Saurav; Sehrawat, Priyanka; Nischal, Neeraj; Jorwal, Pankaj; Soneja, Manish; Sharma, M C; Sharma, S K; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Anup

    2015-09-01

    Clinical presentations of Leishmania infection include visceral (most common form), cutaneous, mucocutaneous, mucosal and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. Mucosal form of leishmaniasis mostly involves oral and nasal mucosa. Rarely, laryngeal and pharyngeal mucosa may also be involved. Its concomitant presence with tuberculosis (TB), a disease rampant in India, is uncommon. Here we are reporting a case of isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis associated with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB), with approach to diagnosis and treatment in a tropical resource-limited setting. PMID:27608871

  15. [Lupus vulgaris as a complication of pulmonary tuberculosis--case report].

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Witold; Targowski, Tomasz; Kozera-Zywczyk, Anna; Paluchowska, Elwira; Patera, Janusz

    2009-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease induced by Mycobacterium species, acid-fast bacilli. These are mostly human type--Mycobacterium tuberculosis, less often cattle type--mycobacterium bovis or other: mycobacterium avium, kansasii, marinom, scrofulaceum, heamophilium, gordonae. The infection can affect all organs, but pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common form. The importance of tuberculosis is definitely rising in the context of massive population migrations in regions affected by its higher incidence, increased HIV infections and AIDS development. Cutaneous tuberculosis is a particular tuberculosis form with differentiated clinical picture. Non-typicalness of skin changes and oligobacilleous course of extrapulmonary tuberculosis forms are repeatedly causing difficulties in adequate diagnosis and early treatment. In differential diagnostics of cutaneous tuberculosis one must take leishmaniasis, actinomycosis, leprosy, syphilis and deep mycosis (among others) into consideration. The study is presenting a case of lupus vulgaris as a complication of past pulmonary tuberculosis. In bacteriological diagnostics of skin changes bioptates, no tuberculosis mycobacteria were found. The disease was diagnosed based on specific granulation presence in histopathology test, tuberculin hypersensivity, bacilli DNA presence in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test and skin changes regression after anti-mycobacterium treatment. According to authors of the study, the described case confirms the usefulness of PCR nucleonic acids amplification test in cutaneous tuberculosis diagnosis.

  16. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis masquerading as tuberculosis in an infant.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, M P; Mettananda, S; De Silva, M V C

    2011-01-01

    A 4-month-old infant presented with continued fever, unresolving bronchopneumonia and household contact with sputum-smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) and showed marginal improvement on anti-TB chemotherapy. Recurrent pneumothorax prompted the clinical diagnosis of TB to be revised. High-resolution CT scan of the chest and open lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Treatment with prednisolone and vinblastin resulted in settling of fever and resolution of respiratory symptoms and signs. In communities where the prevalence of TB is high, unusual presentations should prompt consideration of alternative diagnoses. PMID:22041471

  17. Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF with Other Nucleic Acid Technologies for Diagnosing Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a High HIV Prevalence Setting: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Lesley E.; McCarthy, Kerrigan; Gous, Natasha; Nduna, Matilda; Van Rie, Annelies; Sanne, Ian; Venter, Willem F.; Duse, Adrian; Stevens, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Background The Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid) non-laboratory-based molecular assay has potential to improve the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), especially in HIV-infected populations, through increased sensitivity, reduced turnaround time (2 h), and immediate identification of rifampicin (RIF) resistance. In a prospective clinical validation study we compared the performance of Xpert MTB/RIF, MTBDRplus (Hain Lifescience), LightCycler Mycobacterium Detection (LCTB) (Roche), with acid fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy and liquid culture on a single sputum specimen. Methods and Findings Consecutive adults with suspected TB attending a primary health care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa, were prospectively enrolled and evaluated for TB according to the guidelines of the National TB Control Programme, including assessment for smear-negative TB by chest X-ray, clinical evaluation, and HIV testing. A single sputum sample underwent routine decontamination, AFB smear microscopy, liquid culture, and phenotypic drug susceptibility testing. Residual sample was batched for molecular testing. For the 311 participants, the HIV prevalence was 70% (n = 215), with 120 (38.5%) culture-positive TB cases. Compared to liquid culture, the sensitivities of all the test methodologies, determined with a limited and potentially underpowered sample size (n = 177), were 59% (47%–71%) for smear microscopy, 76% (64%–85%) for MTBDRplus, 76% (64%–85%) for LCTB, and 86% (76%–93%) for Xpert MTB/RIF, with specificities all >97%. Among HIV+ individuals, the sensitivity of the Xpert MTB/RIF test was 84% (69%–93%), while the other molecular tests had sensitivities reduced by 6%. TB detection among smear-negative, culture-positive samples was 28% (5/18) for MTBDRplus, 22% (4/18) for LCTB, and 61% (11/18) for Xpert MTB/RIF. A few (n = 5) RIF-resistant cases were detected using the phenotypic drug susceptibility testing methodology. Xpert MTB/RIF detected four of these five cases

  18. Collapsing glomerulopathy associated with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasaprasad, N. D.; Chandramohan, G.; Praveen, V.; Fernando, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) usually presents with reduced glomerular filtration rate, heavy proteinuria and has unfavorable prognosis. Numerous associations with CG are found. We encountered a case of CG associated with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with proteinuria and dialysis-requiring severe renal failure. Our patient made partial recovery of his renal function and became dialysis-independent after antituberculous therapy and oral steroids. Long-term follow-up is needed to assess the progression of the disease. PMID:27795635

  19. Pulmonary tuberculosis: clinical features and patient management.

    PubMed

    Gough, Andrea; Kaufman, Gerri

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a common infectious disease and a major cause of illness and death throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. This article explores the difference between latent TB infection and active TB disease, and discusses the pharmacological management of TB and issues around adherence to medication. Although TB is usually managed by specialist teams it is essential that all practitioners have an understanding of the signs and symptoms of the disease to ensure early referral and accurate diagnosis. PMID:21888103

  20. Prevalence of Multidrug Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis in North Bihar

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Surya Deo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is caused by Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis which is resistant to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF), with or without any other anti tubercular drug. It is caused by resistant mutant strains due to inadequate treatment and poor compliance. Due to time taking conventional diagnostic methods, drug resistant strains continue to spread. Therefore rapid diagnosis and treatment of MDR-TB strains are prerequisites for the worldwide fight against TB. Objective To determine the prevalence of MDR TB in North Bihar by molecular diagnostic method and to facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Also, to find out the number of those diagnosed cases who were successfully initiated the treatment in MDR TB Centre of DMCH. Materials and Methods This six month observational study was carried out in IRL Darbhanga, Damien TB research Centre of the Darbhanga Medical College and Hospital, Bihar, India. During the period of February-July 2014, 256 sputum samples were collected from suspected cases of multidrug resistant tuberculosis, from 6 districts of North Bihar around Darbhanga. These samples were subjected to routine microscopy and culture to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Positive cases were subjected to drug sensitivity test by a molecular diagnostic method, Using Genotype MTBDR plus kit. Result Out of 256 sputum samples from suspected cases of MDR TB, 122 cases were microscopy positive for tuberculosis. Among these 122 cases, tuberculosis was confirmed by PCR in 114 cases. Finally with the help of Line Probe Assay (LPA), 39(15%) samples were found to have resistance to both INH and Rifampicin. Male female ratio was 4:1. Conclusion The Prevalence of Multi drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in North Bihar is 15%. It needs early diagnosis by molecular diagnostic method and prompt treatment to reduce the spread of MDR TB cases. PMID:26674711

  1. [Immune complex glomerulonephritis associated with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Villar, I; Hernández, E; Cozzi, J; Paletta, C; Mathurín, S

    1994-01-01

    A 32 year old man was admitted for dyspnea, hemoptysis, macroscopic hematuria, hypertension (140/100), peripheral edema and hemodynamic decompensation. Lung Xrays revealed pulmonary edema and a cavity in the left apex. Laboratory determinations revealed an altered renal function with increased creatinine and urea levels and nephrotic syndrome. There was leucocyturia, hematuria and cylindruria. The sputum showed a large number of acid-fast bacilli. The patient began anti-tuberculosis treatment with three drugs (isoniacid, rifampicin, pirazinamide). On ultrasonography, both kidneys revealed ecogenic lesions with size, shape and cortico-medular relationship preserved. The patient persisted with altered renal function, steady levels of urea nitrogen, creatinine and potassium, preserved diuresis and hypertension. Bidimensional echocardiogram: LVDD 55 mm, hypoquinetic septum, pericardic effusion, thickened pericardium, pleural effusion, shortening fraction decreased. He received treatment for this congestive cardiac failure and hypertension with enalapril, nifedipine and fursemide. A percutaneous renal biopsy was performed with anatomopathologic diagnosis of diffuse encocapillar proliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents (15%) and total glomerular sclerosis (33%). Immunofluorescence: positive, immune-complexes with IgM and C3. The patient gradually recovered his normal renal function, improved his pleural effusions and normalized his cardiac function. He was discharged in good clinical condition on the 69th day of anti-tuberculosis treatment. An association between pulmonary tuberculosis and glomerulonephritis is discussed. It is proposed that renal lesions might be the consequence of the tuberculosis due to the sedimentation of circulating immune-complexes. PMID:7854090

  2. Pulmonary gas transfer 20 years after pneumonectomy for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, F; Kraan, J K; Orie, N G; Peset, R

    1977-01-01

    The changes in pulmonary function after pneumonectomy in 13 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis have been studied. The data at the time of two follow-up studies are compared with those obtained before the pneumonectomy. The first follow-up was carried out between 5 and 30 months postoperatively and the second between 20 and 24 years later. The results of this second follow-up show a relatively normal arterial oxygen saturation and gas transfer factor but an increased residual volume which cannot be explained by increasing age alone. PMID:841538

  3. [The satisfaction of personal needs in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sukhova, E V

    2005-01-01

    The founder of humanistic psychology A. Maslow divided the needs of a personality into several levels--from the lowest to the highest ones. Higher-leveled needs rise when the lower-leveled needs are satisfied. A great deal of factors affect the origination and satisfaction of needs, but they are always interrelated with social values. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis has not been studied. A special questionnaire has been drawn up to study the extent to which personality needs are met. Its suitability has been determined, by using a group of patients with bronchial asthma. The extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis was studied in 178 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and 253 patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis. The results have shown that the extent to which personality needs are satisfied in patients with tuberculosis is lower than that in apparently healthy individuals of the same social status. In females with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the needs for safety are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, and self-realization needs is decreased. In males with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis, the physiological, noetic, and self-realization needs are satisfied to a lesser extent. In those with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis, the extent to which the physiological, safety, group decision-making, noetic and self-realization needs is decreased. PMID:15801639

  4. [Diagnosis delay of pleural and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ladhar, A; Toujani, S; Mokadem, S; Louzir, B; Mehiri, N; Béji, M

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still being endemic in our country. Time until management determines both evolution and prognosis of this condition. The aim of this work is to evaluate the delay in diagnosis of TB in a respiratory unit from a university hospital series. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study including patients with pulmonary TBC and/or pleural. An evaluation of time management was conducted from the beginning of symptoms and various consultations with reference to the date of hospitalization and treatment set up. One hundred patients were included (pulmonary TB: 68 cases, pleural TB 23 cases, miliary pulmonary TB: 4 cases, pulmonary TB associated with other extrathoracic locations: 5 cases). The mean time of patient delay and total delay institution were respectively 43.6, 25.7 and 69.3 days. Variables responsible for long delays were: number of consultations more than 3 before hospitalization, empirical antibiotic therapy, of a regional hospital first consultation and the presence of extra-respiratory impairment. The patient delay was considered long. A reorganization of the TB control program, in particular by partial decentralization of care and health education is imperative in order to improve the quality of tuberculosis management in our country.

  5. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blankley, Simon; Graham, Christine M.; Turner, Jacob; Berry, Matthew P. R.; Bloom, Chloe I.; Xu, Zhaohui; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Breen, Ronan; Santis, George; Blankenship, Derek M.; Lipman, Marc; O’Garra, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB) patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis. Methods A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB. Results The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease. Conclusions The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics. PMID:27706152

  6. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  7. Assessment of Hematological Parameters in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Rohini, K; Surekha Bhat, M; Srikumar, P S; Mahesh Kumar, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was the assessment of hematological parameters in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Forty patients diagnosed with tuberculosis were recruited from the Institute of Thoracic Medicine on the basis of history, clinical examination, chest radiography, sputum examination and related laboratory parameters and were compared with age and sex matched healthy volunteers (n = 40). Hematological parameters and CRP in tuberculosis patients were determined. The mean values for serum hemoglobin level, RBC count and platelet count in PTB was found to be less (p < 0.001). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), plasma C-reactive protein, WBC count in PTB subjects was increased (p < 0.001 for ESR & CRP, p < 0.05 for WBCs) and all were statistically significant. This study demonstrated that serum hemoglobin level, RBC count and platelet count was decreased in tuberculosis patients whereas ESR, CRP and WBC count was increased when compared with healthy controls. PMID:27382206

  8. Incidentally diagnosed pulmonary nodule: a diagnostic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Robert; Rzyman, Witold

    2014-12-01

    Asymptomatic solitary pulmonary nodules incidentally revealed by computed tomography has become a serious medical problem. Depending on their diameter, solid, part-solid, or pure ground-glass pulmonary nodules may be observed, diagnosed radiologically/invasively, or resected in accordance with international guidelines. Pure ground-glass nodules, semi-solid lesions, or solid lesions smaller than 8 mm should be monitored by serial low-dose computed tomography. In the case of solid nodules greater than 8 mm, the assessment of the risk of malignancy is recommended. Patients at high risk of lung cancer with pulmonary lesions should undergo diagnostic investigation, or the nodule should be resected. If the risk of lung cancer is low, the patients may be monitored. Needle aspiration biopsy is the most important invasive method of tumor diagnosis. Cytological or histopathological diagnosis is helpful in appropriate clinical decision making that reduces the risk of unnecessary surgery, decreasing the rate of benign nodule resections and thus reducing the costs of medical treatment.

  9. Pulmonary Disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a Horse: Zoonotic Concerns and Limitations of Antemortem Testing.

    PubMed

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Lecu, Alexis; Waters, W Ray; Posthaus, Horst; Bodmer, Thomas; Janssens, Jean-Paul; Aloisio, Fabio; Graubner, Claudia; Grosclaude, Eléonore; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Schiller, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of mycobacteriosis. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid granulomas communicating with the bronchiolar lumen, pleural effusion, and a granulomatous lymphadenitis involving mediastinal and tracheobronchial lymph nodes were found. Serologic response to M. tuberculosis antigens was detected in the infected horse, but not in the group of 42 potentially exposed animals (18 horses, 14 alpacas, 6 donkeys, and 4 dogs) which showed no signs of disease. Diagnosis of tuberculosis in live horses remains extremely difficult. Four of 20 animal handlers at the farm were positive for tuberculous infection upon follow-up testing by interferon-gamma release assay, indicating a possibility of interspecies transmission of M. tuberculosis. PMID:22567544

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by nested polymerase chain reaction in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Adriana Antônia da Cruz; Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Rodrigues, Jean Francisco; Montenegro, Lilian Maria Lapa; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Franco, Célia; Schindler, Haiana Charifker; Batista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Rossit, Andrea Regina Baptista

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) with that of cultures in the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens. METHODS: We analyzed 20 and 78 pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, respectively, of 67 hospitalized patients suspected of having tuberculosis. An automated microbial system was used for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. cultures, and M. tuberculosis IS6110 was used as the target sequence in the NPCR. The kappa statistic was used in order to assess the level of agreement among the results. RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, 6 and 5, respectively, were diagnosed with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the NPCR was positive in all of the cases. Among the 98 clinical specimens, smear microscopy, culture, and NPCR were positive in 6.00%, 8.16%, and 13.26%, respectively. Comparing the results of NPCR with those of cultures (the gold standard), we found that NPCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83%, respectively, in pulmonary specimens, compared with 83% and 96%, respectively, in extrapulmonary specimens, with good concordance between the tests (kappa, 0.50 and 0.6867, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Although NPCR proved to be a very useful tool for the detection of M. tuberculosis complex, clinical, epidemiological, and other laboratory data should also be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24473765

  11. Natural History of Tuberculosis: Duration and Fatality of Untreated Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Negative Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tiemersma, Edine W.; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Borgdorff, Martien W.; Williams, Brian G.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis, specifically the case fatality and duration, of untreated tuberculosis is important as many patients are not correctly diagnosed and therefore receive inadequate or no treatment. Furthermore, duration and case fatality of tuberculosis are key parameters in interpreting epidemiological data. Methodology and Principal Findings To estimate the duration and case fatality of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis in HIV negative patients we reviewed studies from the pre-chemotherapy era. Untreated smear-positive tuberculosis among HIV negative individuals has a 10-year case fatality variously reported between 53% and 86%, with a weighted mean of 70%. Ten-year case fatality of culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis was nowhere reported directly but can be indirectly estimated to be approximately 20%. The duration of tuberculosis from onset to cure or death is approximately 3 years and appears to be similar for smear-positive and smear-negative tuberculosis. Conclusions Current models of untreated tuberculosis that assume a total duration of 2 years until self-cure or death underestimate the duration of disease by about one year, but their case fatality estimates of 70% for smear-positive and 20% for culture-positive smear-negative tuberculosis appear to be satisfactory. PMID:21483732

  12. [Clinical diagnosis of HIV infection in patients with acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Nguen, V Kh; Stroganov, P V; Geshelin, S A

    2011-09-01

    The results of treatment of 81 patients, suffering tuberculosis and operated in emergency for an acute surgical diseases of the abdominal cavity organs, are adduced, in 29 of them--nonspecific diseases of nontuberculosis genesis were diagnosed. In 52 patients the indication for emergency operation performance were complications of abdominal tuberculosis (perforation of the tuberculosis ulcers of small intestine--in 37, the tuberculosis mesadenitis--in 15), of them in 34--pulmonary tuberculosis was in inactive phase, that's why the HIV presence was supposed. In 26 patients the diagnosis was confirmed, basing on serologic analysis data. The presence of intraabdominal catastrophe, caused by abdominal tuberculosis complications on inactive pulmonary tuberculosis background witnesses with 85.3% probability the HIV-infectioning of the patient.

  13. CT-Guided Transthoracic Core Biopsy for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Diagnostic Value of the Histopathological Findings in the Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Hozumi Ibukuro, Kenji; Tsukiyama, Toshitaka; Ishii, Rei

    2004-09-15

    We evaluated the value of CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy for the diagnosis of mycobacterial pulmonary nodules. The 30 subjects in this study had pulmonary nodules that had been either diagnosed histopathologically as tuberculosis or were suspected as tuberculosis based on a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy. The histopathological findings, the existence of acid-fast bacilli in the biopsy specimens, and the clinical course of the patients after the biopsy were reviewed retrospectively. Two of the three histological findings for tuberculosis that included epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells and caseous necrosis were observed in 21 of the nodules which were therefore diagnosed as histological tuberculosis. Six of these 21 nodules were positive for acid-fast bacilli, confirming the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Thirteen of the 21 nodules did not contain acid-fast bacilli but decreased in size in response to antituberculous treatment and were therefore diagnosed as clinical tuberculosis. Seven nodules with only caseous necrosis were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis, with a final diagnosis of tuberculosis being made in 4 of the nodules and a diagnosis of old tuberculosis in 2 nodules. Two nodules with only multinucleated giant cells were diagnosed as suspected tuberculosis with 1 of these nodules being diagnosed finally as tuberculosis and the other nodule as a nonspecific granuloma. When any two of the three following histopathological findings - epithelioid cells, multinucleated giant cells or caseous necrosis - are observed in a specimen obtained by CT-guided transthoracic core biopsy, the diagnosis of tuberculosis can be established without the detection of acid-fast bacilli or Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  14. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications. PMID:26074301

  15. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  16. CT Pulmonary Angiography: Increasingly Diagnosing Less Severe Pulmonary Emboli

    PubMed Central

    Schissler, Andrew J.; Rozenshtein, Anna; Kulon, Michal E.; Pearson, Gregory D. N.; Green, Robert A.; Stetson, Peter D.; Brenner, David J.; D'Souza, Belinda; Tsai, Wei-Yann; Schluger, Neil W.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether the observed increase in computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) utilization has resulted in increased detection of pulmonary emboli (PEs) with a less severe disease spectrum. Methods Trends in utilization, diagnostic yield, and disease severity were evaluated for 4,048 consecutive initial CTPAs performed in adult patients in the emergency department of a large urban academic medical center between 1/1/2004 and 10/31/2009. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) findings and peak serum troponin levels were evaluated to assess for the presence of PE-associated right ventricular (RV) abnormalities (dysfunction or dilatation) and myocardial injury, respectively. Statistical analyses were performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results 268 CTPAs (6.6%) were positive for acute PE, and 3,780 (93.4%) demonstrated either no PE or chronic PE. There was a significant increase in the likelihood of undergoing CTPA per year during the study period (odds ratio [OR] 1.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04–1.07, P<0.01). There was no significant change in the likelihood of having a CTPA diagnostic of an acute PE per year (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.95–1.11, P = 0.49). The likelihood of diagnosing a less severe PE on CTPA with no associated RV abnormalities or myocardial injury increased per year during the study period (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.10–1.75, P = 0.01). Conclusions CTPA utilization has risen with no corresponding change in diagnostic yield, resulting in an increase in PE detection. There is a concurrent rise in the likelihood of diagnosing a less clinically severe spectrum of PEs. PMID:23776522

  17. Diabetes mellitus with pulmonary tuberculosis--a double trouble.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Lata, Hem; Natu, S M; Mishra, Arvind Kumar; Verma, N S

    2013-03-01

    Diabetic patients are often at a higher risk for developing several types of infections and infection does alter the handling of glucose by tissues. Pulmonary infections in diabetics are characterised by alteration in host defence, in entire body and in the lung locally as well as in the function of respiratory epithelium and ciliary motility. Association between diabetes mellitus and pulmonary tuberculosis is well established, while the prevalence of tuberculosis is increased 4-5 times more among diabetics. Impairment of host defence plays an important role for changing the clinical, radiological and bacteriological presentation in diabetic patients. It is also reported by the various studies that hyperglycaemia favours the growth of tuberculosis bacilli. So the severity of tuberculosis appears more cirtical with the degree of hyperglycaemia and host defence activity. This overlap between the diabetic and tuberculosis epidemics could adversely affect global tuberculosis control efforts. PMID:24592761

  18. Plasma metabolomics in human pulmonary tuberculosis disease: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frediani, Jennifer K; Jones, Dean P; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I; Kempker, Russell R; Kurani, Shaheen S; Colas, Romain A; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N; Blumberg, Henry M; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  19. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Cavitation, and Matrix Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Catherine W. M.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease of global importance, is facing the emergence of drug-resistant strains with few new drugs to treat the infection. Pulmonary cavitation, the hallmark of established disease, is associated with very high bacillary burden. Cavitation may lead to delayed sputum culture conversion, emergence of drug resistance, and transmission of the infection. The host immunological reaction to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is implicated in driving the development of TB cavities. TB is characterized by a matrix-degrading phenotype in which the activity of proteolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is relatively unopposed by the specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Proteases, in particular MMPs, secreted from monocyte-derived cells, neutrophils, and stromal cells, are involved in both cell recruitment and tissue damage and may cause cavitation. MMP activity is augmented by proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, is tightly regulated by complex signaling paths, and causes matrix destruction. MMP concentrations are elevated in human TB and are closely associated with clinical and radiological markers of lung tissue destruction. Immunomodulatory therapies targeting MMPs in preclinical and clinical trials are potential adjuncts to TB treatment. Strategies targeting patients with cavitary TB have the potential to improve cure rates and reduce disease transmission. PMID:24713029

  20. Tuberculosis, pulmonary cavitation, and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Ong, Catherine W M; Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease of global importance, is facing the emergence of drug-resistant strains with few new drugs to treat the infection. Pulmonary cavitation, the hallmark of established disease, is associated with very high bacillary burden. Cavitation may lead to delayed sputum culture conversion, emergence of drug resistance, and transmission of the infection. The host immunological reaction to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is implicated in driving the development of TB cavities. TB is characterized by a matrix-degrading phenotype in which the activity of proteolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is relatively unopposed by the specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Proteases, in particular MMPs, secreted from monocyte-derived cells, neutrophils, and stromal cells, are involved in both cell recruitment and tissue damage and may cause cavitation. MMP activity is augmented by proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, is tightly regulated by complex signaling paths, and causes matrix destruction. MMP concentrations are elevated in human TB and are closely associated with clinical and radiological markers of lung tissue destruction. Immunomodulatory therapies targeting MMPs in preclinical and clinical trials are potential adjuncts to TB treatment. Strategies targeting patients with cavitary TB have the potential to improve cure rates and reduce disease transmission.

  1. DIAGNOSTIC TEST OF SPUTUM GENEXPERT MTB/RIF FOR SMEAR NEGATIVE PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS.

    PubMed

    Reechaipichitkul, Wipa; Phetsuriyawong, Attawoot; Chaimanee, Prajuab; Ananta, Pimjai

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of the Gene-Xpert MTB/RIF sputum test for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among patients sputum acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear negative results in Thailand, a country with a high prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis. We studied 151 patients who presented to Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand with a 2 week or more history of fever and/or cough and an abnormal chest radiograph between 2010 and 2014; these patients had at least 2 negative sputum AFB smear results. Of these, 76 were diagnosed as having either confirmed or probable pulmonary TB: the 32 confirmed cases were those with a positive sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and the 44 probable case were those with clinical and radiographic findings consistent with TB and who had a response to anti-TB therapy. Seventy-five cases were diagnosed as not having pulmonary TB. Of the 32 patients with a positive sputum culture for MTB, 26 had a positive GeneXpert MTB/RIF sputum test. Compared to sputum culture for MTB the GeneXpert MTB/ RIF test gave a sensitivity of 83.9% (95% CI: 66.3-94.5) and a specificity of 92.1% (95% CI: 83.6-97), a positive predictive value (PPV) of 81.3% (95% CI: 63.6-92.8) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 93.3% (95% CI: 85.1-97.8). The GeneXpert MTB/RIF test had a fair sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing smear negative pulmonary TB. It may be useful for diagnosing pulmonary TB in patients with a negative sputum AFB smear. The assay is faster than culture and can detect rifampicin resistant strains of MTB. PMID:27405129

  2. Tuberculosis incidence among contacts of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cailleaux-Cezar, M.; de A. Melo, D.; Xavier, G. M.; de Salles, C. L. G.; de Mello, F. C. Q.; Ruffino-Netto, A.; Golub, J. E.; Efron, A.; Chaisson, R. E.; Conde, M. B.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND Treatment of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI) in Brazil is recommended only in the case of contacts of pulmonary smear-positive TB patients aged ≤15 years with a tuberculin skin test (TST) ≥10 mm and no previous bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination or with a TST ≥15 mm regardless of previous BCG vaccination. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the 2-year incidence and predictors of TB among contacts who did not meet the Brazilian criteria for LTBI treatment. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. Contacts aged between 12 and 15 years and those aged >15 years who did not meet the Brazilian criteria for LTBI treatment were enrolled in the study. RESULTS TB incidence was 3.2% (22/667), with an estimated TB rate of 1649 per 100 000 population. Risk of TB was greater among the 349 contacts with TST ≥5 mm (5.4%) compared to the 318 contacts with TST < 5 mm (0.9%; RR 6.04, 95%CI 1.7–20.6). CONCLUSION The high incidence of TB among contacts who did not meet the Brazilian criteria for LTBI treatment strongly suggests that these criteria should be reviewed. Furthermore, even among BCG-vaccinated contacts, TST induration ≥5 mm was the only variable that predicted the development of TB disease within 2 years. PMID:19146746

  3. [Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis among deep-sea fishermen].

    PubMed

    Ono, Hidemaro; Murakami, Reiko; Tsuruwaka, Mia; Suzuki, Yoshihiko

    2003-06-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis among deep-sea fishermen was reported. Four pulmonary tuberculosis cases among fishing boat members engaged in deep-sea fishing were registered at the Kesennuma Health Center during three years period from 2000 to 2002. Crew engaging in deep-sea fishing live together in a narrow cabin with inadequate airconditioning for a long period of time, about 1 year. It is difficult to consult with a medical institution in an open sea. If a tuberculosis patient breaks out in a boat, the risk of transmission of tuberculosis to other members is high. In boats of all four cases in this report, about 30 to 70 percent of crew were Indonesian. Indonesia is one of the high burden countries of tuberculosis in the world. The Japanese fishing boat members have received the medical checkup every year. Indonesians have also received the pre-employment medical checkup, however, the improvement in the quality of this medical checkup is required.

  4. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras.

    PubMed Central

    Pineda-Garcia, L; Ferrera, A; Hoffner, S E

    1997-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 84 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Honduras were characterized by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Seventy-three different IS6110 patterns were found; 63 of these were unique and 10 were shared by two to three strains each. Thus, no ongoing spread of any specific clone of bacteria could be demonstrated. PMID:9276422

  5. [Delays in diagnosing and treating tuberculosis in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Jurčev-Savičević, Anamarija; Popović-Grle, Sanja; Mulić, Rosanda; Smoljanović, Mladen; Miše, Kornelija

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine factors causing delay in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment in Croatia. It included 240 adults with pulmonary tuberculosis, who were interviewed for demographics, socioeconomic, lifestyle, and personal health data. Total delay was defined as a number of days from the onset of symptoms to the initiation of therapy. The median and the 75th percentile of the total delay were 68 and 120 days, respectively: 16.7 % of the patients initiated treatment within the first month, 23.8 % within the second month, 23.3 % within the third month, 12.9 % within the fourth month, and 23.3 % more than four months after the symptoms appeared. Long delay (exceeding median delay) was strongly associated with drug abuse (p=0.021). Extreme delay (75th percentile of delay) was significantly associated with the lowest level of education (p=0.021), below minimal income (p=0.039), minimal to average income (p=0.020), current smoking (p=0.050), and co-morbidity (p=0.048). In the multivariate model, long delay remained associated with drug abuse, while extreme delay was associated with the lowest level of education (p=0.033) and current (p=0.017) and ex-smoking (p=0.045).In a setting with decreasing TB incidence, the reported delay can be reduced by increasing health education, not only about tuberculosis per se, but about health in general and attitudes towards prevention and early care. It is also important to increase tuberculosis knowledge among healthcare workers as well as their diagnostic skills.

  6. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%).

  7. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%). PMID:17338353

  8. Breath tests in diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cheepsattayakorn, Attapon; Cheepsattayakorn, Ruangrong

    2014-01-01

    Since the time of Hippocrates, physicians have known that the odour of human breath can provide clues to diagnosis. In the past, hydrogen peroxide which is a marker of inflammatory diseases and oxidative stress was the most studied substance in the exhaled breath which was detectable in the liquid that obtained by condensing or cooling. The advantages of breath analysis are that it is convenient, non-invasive, and could be performed with children as well as mechanically ventilated patients. Today, exhaled nitric oxide has been studied extensively, especially in relation to asthma. More than a thousand different volatile organic compounds have been observed in low concentrations in normal human breath. Alkanes and methylalkanes have been increasingly used by physicians as a novel method to diagnose many diseases without discomforts of invasive procedures. Although the limitations of measurement of exhaled nitric oxide in direct diagnosis of infectious pulmonary TB, it may have potential development as a cost-effective replacement of chest radiological examination in screening algorithms. None of the individual exhaled volatile organic compound alone is specific for disease. Exhaled breath analysis techniques may be available to diagnose and monitor the diseases in home setting when their sensitivity and specificity are expected to improve in the future. Here, we also discussed some patents related to the topic. PMID:25185981

  9. [Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma diagnosed by thoracoscopy].

    PubMed

    Kadoyama, C; Yokosuka, T; Otsuji, M; Suzuki, M

    1999-06-01

    A 36-year-old woman was examined by our hospital for pulmonary coin shadows in both lungs, as disclosed on chest X-ray films. She had no subjective complaints other than allergic rhinitis, but exhibited hypergam-maglobulinemia, particularly in IgE. Inhalative allergen tests were positive for three types of allergens, but no autoimmune disease was detected. Although transbronchial and percutaneous fine needle biopsies failed to obtain enough specimens because of the wandering shadow a thoracoscopic biopsy was effective because of the subpleural location of the target lesions. The histologic findings were consistent with pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma, with extensive, hyalinized lamellar collagen bundles arranged haphazardly in the central area. Infiltration by lymphocytes and plasma cells, together with the destruction of bronchiolar and vessel walls, were observed in the marginal areas. No amyloid deposits or lymphocytic monoclonality were observed in the lesion. Twenty-five months after the biopsy, the patient's clinical and radiographic data had not changed. PMID:10434548

  10. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Background: The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. Objective: We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. Case Description: A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Clinical findings and diagnosis: Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Treatment and Outcome: Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Clinical relevance: Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients. PMID:27546933

  11. Pulmonary Angiography and Embolization for Severe Hemoptysis Due to Cavitary Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyika, Charles; Corr, Peter; Royston, Duncan; Blyth, David F.

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To identify the role of pulmonary angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of severe hemoptysis due to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods: Selective pulmonary angiography was performed on eight patients with severe hemoptysis uncontrolled by previous bronchial and systemic arterial embolization. Results: Three (38%) patients had Rasmussen aneurysms, which were successfully embolized with steel coils. Five patients demonstrated pulmonary arterial hypoperfusion in the diseased lung. Conclusions: We recommend pulmonary angiography in cavitary tuberculous patients with severe hemoptysis who do not respond to systemic arterial embolization. Rasmussen aneurysms are effectively treated by steel coil occlusion.

  12. Is tuberculosis a lymphatic disease with a pulmonary portal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) is commonly viewed as a pulmonary disease, in which infection, persistence, induction of pathology and bacterial expulsion all occur in the lungs. In this model, enlarged lymph nodes represent reactive adenitis and spread of organisms to extrapulmonary sites results in a non-transm...

  13. Opportunistic microorganisms in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Querido, Silvia Maria Rodrigues; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Leão, Mariella Vieira Pereira; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial therapy may cause changes in the resident oral microbiota, with the increase of opportunistic pathogens. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of Candida, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae in the oral cavity of fifty patients undergoing antibiotic therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and systemically healthy controls. Oral rinsing and subgingival samples were obtained, plated in Sabouraud dextrose agar with chloramphenicol, mannitol agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 48 h at 37°C. Candida spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci were identified by phenotypic tests, C. dubliniensis, by multiplex PCR, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas spp., by the API systems. The number of Candida spp. was significantly higher in tuberculosis patients, and C. albicans was the most prevalent specie. No significant differences in the prevalence of other microorganisms were observed. In conclusion, the antimicrobial therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis induced significant increase only in the amounts of Candida spp. PMID:24031759

  14. Tip of nose tuberculosis: A rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Darshan K.; Verma, Ajay K.; Jaiswal, Riddhi; Kant, Surya; Patel, Anand; Asnani, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis is notorious that it affects various sites of the human body and presents in different ways. One of the uncommon or rather rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis is nasal tuberculosis. The nose apart from its physiological functions also contributes to facial aesthetics and gives a defined appearance and its deformity imparts cosmetic disfigurement and unsightly appearance. Both primary and secondary forms of nasal tuberculosis are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative or crusting lesions of the nose. Here we report such a case of nasal tuberculosis, which presented as an ulcerative and crusting lesion over the tip of the nose in a female child. The patient was given antituberculous chemotherapy after establishing the diagnosis and responded well to treatment. PMID:27195200

  15. 78 FR 66744 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Pulmonary Tuberculosis... industry entitled ``Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Developing Drugs for Treatment.'' The purpose of the draft... tuberculosis. This guidance applies to the development of a single investigational drug as well as...

  16. The imaging spectrum of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Luciano; Parlatano, Daniela; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Onoscuri, Maurizio; Volpicelli, Giovanni; Veltri, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis has still an important impact on public health because it is an important cause of death, particularly in developing countries. On the other hand recent studies have shown that tuberculosis is again becoming concentrated in big cities of Western Europe, especially among immigrants, drug addicts, poor people, and the homeless, despite progress in reducing national rates of the disease. Diagnostic imaging is challenging for radiologists because signs of tuberculosis may easily mimic other diseases such as neoplasms or sarcoidosis. Clinical signs and symptoms in affected adults can be non-specific and a high level of pre-test clinical suspicion based on history is fundamental in the diagnostic work-up. Impact of tuberculosis in the world is extremely important considering the high incidence estimated during 2011 that was 8.7 million cases. This article gives a review of imaging patterns of chest tuberculosis as may be detected on conventional radiography and computerized tomography (CT). The main aim is to improve radiologist's familiarity with the spectrum of imaging features of this disease and facilitate timely diagnosis. Furthermore, we consider the emerging role of alternative methods of imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that can be helpful and highly accurate for a better definition of some signs of tuberculosis. PMID:24833643

  17. [Postoperatively Diagnosed Pulmonary Actinomycosis;Report of Three Cases].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hisao; Murasawa, Masaki; Yoshizawa, Masatoshi; Hoshino, Taiki; Hanawa, Takeshi; Kuwabara, Masayoshi

    2015-09-01

    Three cases of pulmonary actinomycosis have been postoperatively diagnosed in our hospital in the past 3 years. All the cases were preoperatively difficult to differentiate from lung cancer, and all were diagnosed in men. One of the patients was diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms, while the other 2 patients were diagnosed during the treatment and follow-up of other diseases. On radiological examination, 2 patients showed mass-like shadows, and the 3rd showed a cavitary lesion; fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) -positron emission tomography showed high FDG accumulation in all the patients. One of the patients was pathologically suspected with lung cancer on transbronchial lung biopsy. Right upper lobectomy was performed in 2 patients, and right lower lobectomy in 1. One of the patients who underwent right upper lobectomy, also received chest wall resection because of the perioperative finding of chest wall invasion of lung cancer. Clinically, all the cases were preoperatively diagnosed as lung cancer. PMID:26329633

  18. Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Flexible Bronchoscopy in Patients with Unexpected Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hae Jung; Eom, Jung Seop; Lee, Geewon; Mok, Jeong Ha; Kim, Mi Hyun; Lee, Kwangha; Kim, Ki Uk; Lee, Min Ki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent guidelines recommend the use by healthcare personnel of a fit-tested N95 particulate respirator or higher-grade respiratory precaution in a patient undergoing bronchoscopy when pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is suspected. However, PTB may be unexpectedly diagnosed in this setting and therefore not evaluated, resulting in the unexpected exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) of healthcare workers in the bronchoscopy suite. Here, we examined the incidence of unexpected exposure to MTB during flexible bronchoscopy and determined the exposure-related factors. Methods Between 2011 and 2013, a retrospective study was conducted to evaluate unexpected diagnoses of PTB in the bronchoscopy suite. During the study period, 1650 consecutive patients for whom previous CT scans were available and who underwent bronchoscopy for respiratory disease other than PTB were included. The results of bronchial washing, bronchoalveolar lavage, and post-bronchoscopic sputum were reviewed. Results PTB was unexpectedly diagnosed in 76 patients (4.6%). The presence of anthracofibrosis [odds ratio (OR), 3.878; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.291–11.650; P = 0.016), bronchiectasis (OR, 1.974; 95% CI, 1.095–3.557; P = 0.024), or atelectasis (OR, 1.740; 95% CI, 1.010–2.903; P = 0.046) as seen on chest CT scan was independently associated with unexpected PTB. Patients with both anthracofibrosis and atelectasis were at much higher risk of unexpected PTB (OR, 4.606; 95% CI, 1.383–15.342; P = 0.013). Conclusions The risk of MTB exposure by healthcare personnel in the bronchoscopy suite due to patients with undiagnosed PTB has been underestimated. Therefore, in geographic regions with an intermediate PTB prevalence, such as South Korea (97/100,000 persons per year), higher-grade respiratory precaution, such as a fit-tested N95 particulate respirator, should be considered to prevent occupational exposure to MTB during routine bronchoscopy, especially in patients with CT

  19. Experience with pulmonary resection for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yuji; Katsuragi, Naoya; Kita, Hidefumi; Toishi, Masayuki; Onda, Takahito

    2008-12-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis is becoming a global threat. It is a relatively new phenomenon, and its optimal management remains undetermined. We report our experience in using pulmonary resection for treating patients with this disease. Records were reviewed of 54 consecutive patients undergoing a pulmonary resection for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis at Fukujuji Hospital between 2000 and 2006. These patients were identified using the definition approved by the World Health Organization Global Task Force on extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in October 2006. Five (9%) patients (3 men and 2 women) aged 31-60 years met the definition. None of the patients was HIV-positive. Although the best available multidrug regimens were initiated, no patient could achieve sputum conversion. Adjuvant resectional surgery was considered because the patients had localized disease. Procedures performed included pneumonectomy (2) and upper lobectomy (3). There was no operative mortality or morbidity. All patients attained sputum-negative status after the operation, and they were maintained on multidrug regimens for 12-25 months postoperatively. All patients remained free from disease at the time of follow-up. Pulmonary resection under cover of state-of-the-art chemotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  20. The clinical significance of CA-125 in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Sun; Park, Kyoung Un; Song, JungHan; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Cho, Young-Jae; Yoon, Hoil; Lee, JaeHo; Lee, Choon-Taek; Park, Jong Sun

    2013-03-01

    Cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) is usually elevated in ovarian cancer. However, there are several reports that serum CA-125 is elevated in tuberculosis. This study investigated the clinical significance of serum CA-125 measurements in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Between September 2008 and March 2011, Serum CA-125 was measured in patients with active pulmonary TB before treatment (baseline), and 6 and 12 months after initiation of anti-TB treatment. Patients with pulmonary TB confirmed by culture or polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB-PCR) were included. The study enrolled 100 patients. The mean serum CA-125 was 38.9 ± 41.4 U/ml (reference value, <35 U/ml). Thirty-eight patients showed elevated CA-125. Significantly more of those with elevated CA-125 were female (p < 0.001), and had a positive sputum smear for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) (p = 0.030). They also significantly more showed extensive pulmonary lesions on chest X-ray (p = 0.004). Elevated CA-125 was independently associated with female gender (OR = 12.5, 95% CI: 3.4-45.2), positive acid-fast staining of sputum (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 1.8-19.7), cavitary lung lesion (OR = 4.0, 95% CI: 1.2-12.9), and involvement of more than one lung on chest X-ray (OR = 9.4, 95% CI: 2.2-40.1). The CA-125 level decreased with anti-TB treatment (p = 0.001). Serum CA-125 was related to the activity and severity of pulmonary TB, and it may be useful in the monitoring of therapeutic responses in certain cases of active pulmonary TB, especially in female patients of active pulmonary TB. PMID:23414674

  1. [Alcohol sales and pulmonary tuberculosis mortality in the Republic of Belarus in 1981 to 2001].

    PubMed

    Razvodovskiĭ, Iu E

    2006-01-01

    The fact that there is an association of alcohol abuse with pulmonary tuberculosis is well documented. The effect of alcohol sales per capita on tuberculosis mortality rates is considerably less known. The aim of the study was to evaluate the beverage-specific effect of alcohol on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. Trends in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in Belarus from 1981 to 2001 were analyzed in relation to those in the level of sales of various alcoholic beverages per capita, by applying the time series analysis. The analysis demonstrated a positive and statistically significant effect of changes in per capita alcohol sale levels on pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates. It suggests that a 1% increase in alcohol sales per capita might cause 0.49 and 0.36% increases in pulmonary tuberculosis mortality rates in males and females, respectively. This study also indicates that tuberculosis prevention programs should place more emphasis on alcohol problems.

  2. Immunophenotypical characterization of the lymphocyte infiltrate in caprine pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Seva, J; Hernández, D; Bernabé, A; Pallarés, F J; Navarro, J A

    2000-01-01

    A study was made of the immunophenotype of the lymphocytes associated with natural caprine pulmonary tuberculosis at four stages of the disease. Regardless of the stage, CD4(+)and CD8(+)T lymphocytes predominated in lung and mediastinal lymph node lesions, but gamma/delta T and B (IgM(+)) cells were seen only rarely. At the primary complex stage, CD4(+)cells outnumbered CD8(+)cells. At the stage of generalized tuberculosis, however, and still more at the post-primary stage, CD8(+)cells outnumbered CD4(+)cells. At the final stage (tuberculous pneumonia), CD4(+)and CD8(+)cells were present in low but approximately equal numbers.

  3. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs.

  4. Prevalence and characterization of opportunistic candidal infections among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Bhatiya, Priyanka Sharma; Sowmya, GV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although Candida albicans remains the most common cause of human candidiasis, the frequency of infection attributed to other members of the genus is also increasing. Hence, the present study was carried out to know the prevalence of opportunistic candidal infection in tuberculosis, and if positive, the species of Candida that is most commonly associated. Materials and Methods: The present study comprised sixty pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were divided into (1) fresh or untreated group, (2A) chronic or treated group having no complications and (2B) having complications, comprising twenty patients each, respectively. The collected sputum samples were initially stained with Ziehl–Neelsen stain for confirmation of presence of tubercle Bacilli. Primary isolation was done on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA). The candidal colonies were confirmed microscopically for the presence of pseudohyphae. Further speciation of the positive candidal samples was carried out using ChromAgar. Result: The total fungal prevalence among 60 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis on SDA was 33 (55%) Candida and 3 (5%) Aspergillus. The prevalence of different candidal species on ChromAgar showed C. albicans as the predominant one, followed by Candida tropicalis and Candida krusei. Freshly diagnosed or untreated group was less commonly associated with pulmonary mycoses than chronic or treated group. The prevalence of Candida had increased with treatment, duration and age, and it was more in males than females. Conclusion: The present study confirms the phenomenon of opportunistic candidal infections in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Rapid and reliable identification of Candida species is essential as they differ in their virulence and sensitivity to antifungal drugs. PMID:27601806

  5. Immunological aspects of pulmonary tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Lagrange, P H; Wargnier, A

    1995-01-01

    In recent years new information has been collected about the immunological responses to pathogenic mycobacteria. More information on cellular and molecular responses of cells in murine and human tuberculosis has been produced and T cells' role in the production of selected cytokines has been clarified. Studies in mice have provided insight into the phases of the T cell response to virulent M. tuberculosis, the role of various T cell subsets, and the repertoire of antigens recognized by these cells. However, despite this new information, some of which has been confirmed in humans, large gaps remain in our knowledge about the immune response to this infection, particularly concerning cellular or molecular mechanisms involved in acquired protection. Even if some extrapolations from adult data can be made, large gaps in our knowledge exist on the potential immune defects in young infants who are prone to develop tuberculosis soon after infection.

  6. Outbreak of pulmonary tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Bosley, A R; George, G; George, M

    1986-05-17

    A case of miliary tuberculosis in a 4-year-old child led to contact tracing, revealing 32 children with evidence of tuberculous infection. 3 adult cases were also identified. The source case was a mother who passed on the infection at two Christmas parties. Limited exposure to the organism caused infection, suggesting a virulent strain and a susceptible subgroup. A range of complications of primary tuberculosis in children was seen. Minor side-effects of the chemotherapeutic agents occurred in most children but only 3 suffered substantial toxic effects. The limited range of agents marketed in a presentation suitable for young children was a serious difficulty.

  7. Incidental intraoperative diagnosis of retained foreign body lung misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ramchandani, Radhakrishna; Dewan, Ravindra Kumar; Ramchandani, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a very common and lethal problem among children. It can easily be diagnosed with a typical history of choking crisis. Clinical examination and radiology play a secondary role in diagnosis. Acute choking episode may lead to death or else to serious sequels such as bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and recurrent pneumonia. Here, we report an interesting case of bronchiectasis in a young female initially thought to be a consequence of pulmonary tuberculosis, who was subsequently found to have retained foreign body in the left lower lobe lung which was the actual cause of her symptoms. PMID:27578942

  8. Incidental intraoperative diagnosis of retained foreign body lung misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Radhakrishna; Dewan, Ravindra Kumar; Ramchandani, Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign body aspiration (FBA) is a very common and lethal problem among children. It can easily be diagnosed with a typical history of choking crisis. Clinical examination and radiology play a secondary role in diagnosis. Acute choking episode may lead to death or else to serious sequels such as bronchiectasis, atelectasis, and recurrent pneumonia. Here, we report an interesting case of bronchiectasis in a young female initially thought to be a consequence of pulmonary tuberculosis, who was subsequently found to have retained foreign body in the left lower lobe lung which was the actual cause of her symptoms. PMID:27578942

  9. A Case of Good's Syndrome Presenting with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Arunabha Datta; Tapadar, Sumit Roy; Dhua, Aparup; Dhara, Palash Nandan; Nandi, Saumen; Choudhury, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    Adult onset immunodeficiency associated with thymoma is a rare condition. The combination of hypogammaglobulinemia, reduced number of peripheral B and CD4+ T cells, along with thymoma constitutes Good's syndrome (GS). This immunodeficiency condition is often complicated with opportunistic infection with organisms, like bacteria (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumonia etc), viruses (Cytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex etc), fungi and protozoa. We present an unusual case of Good's syndrome with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). A 40-year-old man presented with sputum-positive PTB and was started on anti-tuberculosis treatment. Subsequently, he developed symptoms and findings consistent with thymoma and other components of Good's syndrome. Although patients of Good's syndrome are susceptible to various opportunistic infections, infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. Evidence of recurrent infections or some opportunistic infection in a thymoma patient should trigger a suspicion of Good's syndrome. PMID:27164735

  10. Pulmonary mucormycosis mimicking as pulmonary tuberculosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajiv; Marak, Rungmei Sk; Verma, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Jagdeep; Sanjay; Prasad, Rajendra

    2008-07-01

    Pulmonary Mucormycosis is an uncommon disease caused by fungi of class Zygomycetes. It occurs predminantly in an immunodeficient host most common risk factor being diabetes mellitus. The lesions are localized in the lungs or the mediastinum. We are reporting a case of 70 years old male, having cough, haemoptysis, fever and chest pain. He was on antituberculosis treatment (RHEZ) for last 10 days and was later found to have Pulmonary Mucormycosis on further evaluation.

  11. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Where We Are?

    PubMed Central

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, in spite of medical advancement, tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem. Although many laboratory methods have been developed to expedite the diagnosis of TB, delays in diagnosis remain a major problem in the clinical practice. Because of the slow growth rate of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of this organism and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks or longer. During the past several years, many methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of TB. A good understanding of the effectiveness and practical limitations of these methods is important to improve diagnosis. This review summarizes the currently-used advances in nonmolecular and molecular diagnostics. PMID:27433173

  12. Serum PCT and its Relation to Body Weight Gain in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rohini, K; Bhat, Surekha; Srikumar, P S; Mahesh Kumar, A

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at assessing alterations in serum PCT in terms of its relation to body weight gain in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients undergoing treatment. Among patients (25-75 years) diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis, those that were new smear positive, showed sputum conversion at the end of 2 months and were declared clinically cured at the end of 6 months, were included in the study (n = 40). Serum procalcitonin was determined by BRAHMS PCT-Q kit. Patients were divided into two study groups-Group 1 (n = 21; serum PCT > 2 ng/ml at diagnosis), Group 2 (n = 19; serum PCT > 10 ng/ml at diagnosis). Body weights of all patients were obtained at three different time points, PTB-0 (at diagnosis), PTB-2 (after 2 months of intensive treatment) and PTB-6 (after 6 months of treatment). In both groups, mean body weights at PTB-2 and PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-0 and at PTB-6 were significantly higher than those at PTB-2. However, percentage body weight gain following 2 months of intensive treatment was higher in group 1 (4.05 % gain, p < 0.01) than in group 2 (2.75 % body weight gain, p < 0.05). Thus, the percentage gain in group 1 was tending more towards the desirable minimum gain of 5 % during intensive phase. Increase in serum PCT levels in pulmonary tuberculosis is inversely associated with body weight gain during treatment. Thus, PCT could play a role in regulation of body weight gain in anorectic conditions like tuberculosis.

  13. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guanglu; Wang, Guirong; Chen, Suting; Yu, Xia; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhao, Liping; Ma, Yifeng; Dong, Lingling; Huang, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in humans in China is unknown. In this study, pulmonary tuberculosis caused by M. bovis in China was studied. A total of 4069 clinical strains isolated from sputa during the 2007–2009 nationwide surveillance of drug-resistant tuberculosis in China were analyzed. M. bovis was identified by para-nitrobenzoic acid and thiophen-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide growth tests, spoligotyping and multiplex PCR amplification. In addition, a total of 1828 clinical specimens were recruited from Beijing Chest Hospital (Beijing, China) for Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) culture, both on standard LJ medium and LJ medium containing 4.5 mg/ml(W/V) sodium pyruvate, the latter being the preferred medium for M. bovis growth. The isolates which demonstrated more vigorous on pyruvate containing medium than on standard LJ medium were then identified by multiplex PCR amplification. Only 1 isolate from the nationwide surveillance was confirmed as M. bovis-BCG. The isolate belonged to a predominant spoligotype SB0120 (ST482). In addition, no M. bovis isolate was acquired by the continuous screening step in Beijing Chest Hospital. M. bovis has a negligible contribution to pulmonary tuberculosis in China, so neither laboratory identification nor clinical treatment of M. bovis infection need be considered in routine work. PMID:25736338

  14. Fixed-dose combinations of drugs versus single-drug formulations for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Rigau Comas, David; Valderrama Rodríguez, Angélica; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Parker, Lucy Anne; Caylà, Joan; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are newly diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) typically receive a standard first-line treatment regimen that consists of two months of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol followed by four months of isoniazid and rifampicin. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of these drugs are widely recommended. Objectives To compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of anti-tuberculosis regimens given as fixed-dose combinations compared to single-drug formulations for treating people with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 11 2015); MEDLINE (1966 to 20 November 2015); EMBASE (1980 to 20 November 2015); LILACS (1982 to 20 November 2015); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials; and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), without language restrictions, up to 20 November 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared the use of FDCs with single-drug formulations in adults (aged 15 years or more) newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We attempted to assess the effect of treatment for time-to-event measures with hazard ratios and their 95% CIs. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool to determine the risk of bias in included trials. We used the fixed-effect model when there was little heterogeneity and the random-effects model with moderate heterogeneity. We used an I² statistic value of 75% or greater to denote significant heterogeneity, in which case we did not perform a

  15. Genetic diversity and dynamic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates causing pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies.

  16. [The chest CT findings and pathologic findings of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hideo

    2009-08-01

    The past research of the radiologic manifestations of pulmonary tuberculosis in Japan was based on morphological pathology of the untreated patient autopsy. I would like to show the chest CT scan of tuberculosis diseases with caseous granuloma at its exudative reaction, proliferative reaction, productive reaction, cirrhotic reaction until self cure. This progress reflects the normal cell mediated immunological responses. Also I would like to show the cavitation of granuloma, which results from liquefaction of caseous materials during the course and results in the formation of the source of infection. And finally I would like to show the morphological differences of acinous lesion, acino-nodular lesion and caseous lobular pneumonia. These differences reflect the amount of bacilli disseminated in the peripheral parts under the lobules. In this study, I do not show old age cases and HIV positive cases, who do not form typical granuloma due to the decreased cell mediated immnunity and whose X ray findings are atypical.

  17. [Factors affecting the treatment results with pulmonary tuberculosis patients].

    PubMed

    Berezovskiĭ, B A; Salobaĭ, R Iu; Marchak, V V; Popova, I I; Zakopaĭlo, G G; Kucher, V A; Vasylyk, V U; Mikheĭ, L V

    1991-12-01

    A study is presented of the effect of social factors on the outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with freshly detected disease mainly in rural localities in 1985-1989. The outcomes of treatment depended mainly on the form and extension of the pathological process and terms of treatment. It was also established that the outcomes of tuberculosis are also influenced by unfavourable social factors which are more pronounced in persons with an extensive process. Treatment results were better in women with higher education than in similarly educator men. Among agricultural workers treatment efficacy was worse than among office workers and housewives. Life in the family effects more favourably treatment results than single life. Treatment results were worse in those living in unsatisfactory conditions, engaged in hard physical work, suffering of concomitant diseases and bad habits.

  18. Nearest patch matching for color image segmentation supporting neural network classification in pulmonary tuberculosis identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulaningtyas, Riries; Suksmono, Andriyan B.; Mengko, Tati L. R.; Saptawati, Putri

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is a deadly infectious disease which occurs in many countries in Asia and Africa. In Indonesia, many people with tuberculosis disease are examined in the community health center. Examination of pulmonary tuberculosis is done through sputum smear with Ziehl - Neelsen staining using conventional light microscope. The results of Ziehl - Neelsen staining will give effect to the appearance of tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in red color and sputum background in blue color. The first examination is to detect the presence of TB bacteria from its color, then from the morphology of the TB bacteria itself. The results of Ziehl - Neelsen staining in sputum smear give the complex color images, so that the clinicians have difficulty when doing slide examination manually because it is time consuming and needs highly training to detect the presence of TB bacteria accurately. The clinicians have heavy workload to examine many sputum smear slides from the patients. To assist the clinicians when reading the sputum smear slide, this research built computer aided diagnose with color image segmentation, feature extraction, and classification method. This research used K-means clustering with patch technique to segment digital sputum smear images which separated the TB bacteria images from the background images. This segmentation method gave the good accuracy 97.68%. Then, feature extraction based on geometrical shape of TB bacteria was applied to this research. The last step, this research used neural network with back propagation method to classify TB bacteria and non TB bacteria images in sputum slides. The classification result of neural network back propagation are learning time (42.69±0.02) second, the number of epoch 5000, error rate of learning 15%, learning accuracy (98.58±0.01)%, and test accuracy (96.54±0.02)%.

  19. Inflammatory and immunogenetic markers in correlation with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Beatriz Lima Alezio; Ramalho, Daniela Maria de Paula; dos Santos, Paula Fernanda Gonçalves; Mesquita, Eliene Denites Duarte; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe serum levels of the cytokines IL-10, TNF-α, and IFN-γ, as well as polymorphisms in the genes involved in their transcription, and their association with markers of the acute inflammatory response in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving 81 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated at two referral hospitals. We collected data on sociodemographic variables and evaluated bacteriological conversion at the eighth week of antituberculosis treatment, gene polymorphisms related to the cytokines studied, and serum levels of those cytokines, as well as those of C-reactive protein (CRP). We also determined the ESR and CD4+ counts. RESULTS: The median age of the patients was 43 years; 67 patients (82.7%) were male; and 8 patients (9.9%) were infected with HIV. The ESR was highest in the patients with high IFN-γ levels and low IL-10 levels. IFN-γ and TNF-α gene polymorphisms at positions +874 and −238, respectively, showed no correlations with the corresponding cytokine serum levels. Low IL-10 levels were associated with IL-10 gene polymorphisms at positions −592 and −819 (but not −1082). There was a negative association between bacteriological conversion at the eighth week of treatment and CRP levels. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that genetic markers and markers of acute inflammatory response are useful in predicting the response to antituberculosis treatment. PMID:24473766

  20. Impairments of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sakhno, Ludmila V; Shevela, Ekaterina Ya; Tikhonova, Marina A; Nikonov, Sergey D; Ostanin, Alexandr A; Chernykh, Elena R

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype and functional properties of antigen-presenting cells (APC), that is, circulating monocytes and generated in vitro macrophages and dendritic cells, were investigated in the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) differing in lymphocyte reactivity to M. tuberculosis antigens (PPD-reactive versus PPD-anergic patients). We revealed the distinct impairments in patient APC functions. For example, the monocyte dysfunctions were displayed by low CD86 and HLA-DR expression, 2-fold increase in CD14(+)CD16(+) expression, the high numbers of IL-10-producing cells, and enhanced IL-10 and IL-6 production upon LPS-stimulation. The macrophages which were in vitro generated from peripheral blood monocytes under GM-CSF were characterized by Th1/Th2-balance shifting (downproduction of IFN-γ coupled with upproduction of IL-10) and by reducing of allostimulatory activity in mixed lymphocyte culture. The dendritic cells (generated in vitro from peripheral blood monocytes upon GM-CSF + IFN-α) were characterized by impaired maturation/activation, a lower level of IFN-γ production in conjunction with an enhanced capacity to produce IL-10 and IL-6, and a profound reduction of allostimulatory activity. The APC dysfunctions were found to be most prominent in PPD-anergic patients. The possible role of APC impairments in reducing the antigen-specific T-cell response to M. tuberculosis was discussed. PMID:26339660

  1. Case-finding for pulmonary tuberculosis in Penang.

    PubMed

    Hooi, L N

    1994-09-01

    The process of case-finding was studied in 100 consecutive patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated by the Chest Clinic, Penang Hospital. The median time from the onset of the illness until the initial medical consultation was two weeks (patient's delay). This delay was longer in males, patients with lower than secondary education and drug abusers. Only 47% of patients were put on treatment with a correct diagnosis within one month of the first consultation (doctor's delay). Almost all patients had at least one symptom suggestive of tuberculosis at presentation and the mean number of consultations before diagnosis was three. Patients who first visited government medical facilities had shorter doctor's delay than those who first saw private practitioners, and patients who first consulted a private practitioner were the least likely to be appropriately investigated by sputum examination and chest radiography. The median total delay was three months and at the time of diagnosis, 95% of patients had moderate or far advanced disease radiologically. In order to shorten doctor's delay, all medical practitioners, especially those in the private sector, should be made aware of the importance of early diagnosis and the proper management of tuberculosis. Health education campaigns for the public should also be undertaken to shorten patient's delay.

  2. TB-SA antibody test for diagnosis and monitoring treatment outcome of sputum smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxu; Xu, Hancheng; Jiang, Shiwen; Jing, Kuanhe; Wang, Li; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Li, Weibin; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Lixia

    2011-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the suitability of the TB-SA antibody test to diagnose tuberculosis in sputum smear negative (SS-) pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients and its applicability for monitoring treatment outcomes in these patients. This study was conducted in three counties/districts in Chongqing Municipality, Liaoning Province, China between June 2005 and June 2007. A total of 432 SS suspected pulmonary TB patients were recruited and their blood was collected prior to treatment, at the end of 1 month of treatment, 2 months of treatment and 6 months of treatment (E6MT). The serum samples were analyzed with a TB-SA antibody test kit. Of the 432 SS suspected pulmonary TB patients, serum samples were obtained at all time points in 316 patients and analyzed. The 316 patients were divided into three groups according to sputum smear and sputum culture results and the chest X-ray results before treatment and at E6MT. Ten point four percent were SS-/culture positive (C+), 73.1% were SS-/culture negative (C-) with X-rays abnormalities, and 16.5% were SS-/C- without X-rays abnormalities. The positive rates for TB-SA antibody in the three groups were 57.6, 44.6 and 44.2%, respectively, before treatment, and 18.2, 19.1 and 26.9%, respectively, at E6MT. There was a significant decrease in TB-SA antibody positivity with treatment for all 3 groups. The TB-SA antibody test may be a useful adjunct to diagnose tuberculosis in SS- pulmonary TB patients, and may be useful for monitoring treatment outcomes of SS- pulmonary TB patients. PMID:22299440

  3. Incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis in garments workers of Dhaka City, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M R; Bennoor, K S; Rahman, M F; Mahmud, A M; Hossain, M A; Habib, G M M; Kabir, M H; Kamaluddin, A F M; Ali, T; Shamsul Huq, A K M

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to find out the incidence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PT) in garments workers of Dhaka city and to find-out the relationship between the incidence of PT and socio-demographic factors of the respondents. From all garments factories of Dhaka city, 30 factories were included by stratified random sampling method. Then workers were selected by simple random sampling technique. Following selection, detailed history was taken and recorded in a pre-tested questionnaire. Chest X-ray, Sputum for AFB, M.T and ESR were done in the suspected cases. PT was diagnosed when any patient fulfilled predefined inclusion criteria. Out of 2400 selected workers, 2281 workers were studied finally. A total of 22 (9.6 per 1000) definite PT cases were identified. Sputum positive were 4/2281 (1.75 per 1000) cases. All were diagnosed as new cases; none had received any treatment of tuberculosis in the past. The study concludes that PT among the garments workers is a more alarming health issue than among the general population of Bangladesh. Improved and regular health check-up system and 'directly observed treatment shortcourse' (DOTS) should be implemented in the working places particularly where clusters of workers are working together.

  4. Acute Hypercalcaemia and Hypervitaminosis D in an Infant with Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Devi; Didel, Siya Ram; Agarwal, Sikha; Sachdeva, Naresh; Singh, Meenu

    2015-10-01

    In patients with tuberculosis, abnormal extrarenal production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 by activated macrophages in granulomatous tissues may result in hypercalcaemia. More commonly reported in adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis, this complication may rarely occur in extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and children. The hypercalcaemia may be precipitated by usually recommended vitamin D and calcium supplementation in patients with tuberculosis. We report here an infant with tubercular meningitis who developed hypercalcaemia 12 days after starting routine vitamin D and calcium supplementation. This communication highlights the importance of close monitoring of calcium levels in patients with tuberculosis, especially if started on vitamin D and calcium replacement before anti-tubercular therapy. PMID:26557587

  5. Surgical treatment of complications of pulmonary tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madansein, Rajhmun; Parida, Shreemanta; Padayatchi, Nesri; Singh, Nalini; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Surgery for drug-resistant tuberculosis has been shown to be safe and effective, with similar level of mortalities associated with surgical intervention observed with that for lung cancer. While surgery has been an option to treat TB in the pre-antibiotic era, it is now increasingly used to treat complications of pulmonary TB, particularly in patients with drug-resistant TB who do not respond to medical treatment. The two most frequent indications for lung resection in drug- resistant TB, are i) failed medical treatment with persistent sputum positivity or ii) patients who have had medical treatment and are sputum negative, but with persistent localized cavitary disease or bronchiectasis. Massive hemoptysis is a potentially life-threatening complication of TB. Lung resection is potentially curative in patients with massive hemoptysis and cavitary or bronchiectatic disease. Bronchial artery embolization in these patients has a high success rate but bears also the risk of recurrence. Lung resection can be safely undertaken in selected patients with HIV co-infection and pulmonary complications of TB. Ambulatory drainage is a novel, safe, affordable and effective method of draining a chronic TB associated empyema thoracis. We review here the current surgical treatment of the complications of pulmonary TB and discuss the experience from the Durban Cardiothoracic Surgery Unit for the surgical treatment of patients with complicated pulmonary TB. PMID:25809758

  6. An extremely rare case of prenatally diagnosed absent both aortic and pulmonary valves

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Hyeon Kyeong; Yoon, Sun-Young; Jung, Hee Jung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Jae-Yoon; Won, Hye-Sung; Lee, Pil-Ryang; Kim, Ahm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of absent aortic and pulmonary valves, diagnosed at 16.4 weeks of gestation. Fetal echocardiography showed cardiomegaly with dilated both ventricles. No valve leaflets were observed in the aorta and pulmonary artery, and a typical to-and-fro flow pattern was noted in both great arteries on color Doppler imaging. Fetal hydrops was also detected. Follow-up ultrasonographic evaluation at 19 weeks demonstrated intrauterine fetal death. Postmortem autopsy revealed the absence of both aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the earliest diagnosed case of absent both aortic and pulmonary valves and only the second case to be diagnosed prenatally.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Elicits Tuberculosis-Specific Humoral Immune Response Independent of Mycobacterial Load in Pulmonary and Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Ganji, Rakesh; Sivangala, Ramya; Jakkala, Kiran; Gaddam, Sumanlatha; Penmetsa, Sitaramaraju; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Conventionally, facultative intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacilli in human is cleared by cell-mediated immunity (CMI) with CD4+ T cells playing instrumental role in protective immunity, while antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) is considered non-protective. This longstanding convention has been challenged with recent evidences of increased susceptibility of hosts with compromised AMI and monoclonal antibodies conferring passive protection against TB and other intracellular pathogens. Therefore, novel approaches toward vaccine development include strategies aiming at induction of humoral response along with CMI. This necessitates the identification of mycobacterial proteins with properties of immunomodulation and strong immunogenicity. In this study, we determined the immunogenic potential of M. tuberculosis Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1), a secretory protein essential for intracellular survival and pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We observed that Zmp1 was secreted by in vitro grown M. tuberculosis under granuloma-like stress conditions (acidic, oxidative, iron deficiency, and nutrient deprivation) and generated Th2 cytokine microenvironment upon exogenous treatment of peripheral blood mononulear cells PBMCs with recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1). This was supported by recording specific and robust humoral response in TB patients in a cohort of 295. The anti-Zmp1 titers were significantly higher in TB patients (n = 121) as against healthy control (n = 62), household contacts (n = 89) and non-specific infection controls (n = 23). A significant observation of the study is the presence of equally high titers of anti-Zmp1 antibodies in a range of patients with high bacilli load (sputum bacilli load of 300+ per mL) to paucibacillary smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) cases. This clearly indicated the potential of Zmp1 to evoke an effective humoral response independent of mycobacterial load. Such mycobacterial proteins can

  8. Initial Presentations Predict Mortality in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients - A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jia-Yih; Su, Wei-Juin; Chiu, Yu-Chi; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Lin, Yung-Yang; Huang, Ruay-Ming; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Yu, Ming-Chih; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Lee, Yu-Chin

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite effective anti-TB treatments, tuberculosis remains a serious threat to public health and is associated with high mortality. Old age and multiple co-morbidities are known risk factors for death. The association of clinical presentations with mortality in pulmonary tuberculosis patients remains an issue of controversy. Methods This prospective observational study enrolled newly diagnosed, culture-proven pulmonary tuberculosis patients from five medical centers and one regional hospital, which were referral hospitals of TB patients. Radiographic findings and clinical symptoms were determined at the time of diagnosis. Patients who died for any reason during the course of anti-TB treatment were defined as mortality cases and death that occurred within 30 days of initiating treatment was defined as early mortality. Clinical factors associated with overall mortality and early mortality were investigated. Results A total of 992 patients were enrolled and 195 (19.7%) died. Nearly one-third (62/195, 31.8%) of the deaths occurred before or within 30 days of treatment initiation. Older age (RR = 1.04, 95%CI: 1.03–1.05), malignancy (RR = 2.42, 95%CI: 1.77–3.31), renal insufficiency (RR = 1.77, 95%CI: 1.12–2.80), presence of chronic cough (RR = 0.63, 95%CI: 0.47–0.84), fever (RR = 1.45, 95%CI: 1.09–1.94), and anorexia (RR = 1.49, 95%CI: 1.07–2.06) were independently associated with overall mortality. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated significantly higher mortality in patients present with fever (p<0.001), anorexia (p = 0.005), and without chronic cough (p<0.001). Among patients of mortality, those with respiratory symptoms of chronic cough (RR = 0.56, 95%CI: 0.33–0.98) and dyspnea (HR = 0.51, 95%CI: 0.27–0.98) were less likely to experience early mortality. The radiological features were comparable between survivors and non-survivors. Conclusions In addition to demographic characteristics, clinical

  9. Blood transcriptomic diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Jennifer K; Thomas, Niclas; Gil, Eliza; Best, Katharine; Tsaliki, Evdokia; Morris‑Jones, Stephen; Stafford, Sian; Simpson, Nandi; Witt, Karolina D; Chain, Benjamin; Miller, Robert F; Martineau, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Novel rapid diagnostics for active tuberculosis (TB) are required to overcome the time delays and inadequate sensitivity of current microbiological tests that are critically dependent on sampling the site of disease. Multiparametric blood transcriptomic signatures of TB have been described as potential diagnostic tests. We sought to identify the best transcript candidates as host biomarkers for active TB, extend the evaluation of their specificity by comparison with other infectious diseases, and to test their performance in both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB. METHODS. Support vector machine learning, combined with feature selection, was applied to new and previously published blood transcriptional profiles in order to identify the minimal TB‑specific transcriptional signature shared by multiple patient cohorts including pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB, and individuals with and without HIV-1 coinfection. RESULTS. We identified and validated elevated blood basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BATF2) transcript levels as a single sensitive biomarker that discriminated active pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB from healthy individuals, with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) scores of 0.93 to 0.99 in multiple cohorts of HIV-1–negative individuals, and 0.85 in HIV-1–infected individuals. In addition, we identified and validated a potentially novel 4-gene signature comprising CD177, haptoglobin, immunoglobin J chain, and galectin 10 that discriminated active pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB from other febrile infections, giving ROC AUCs of 0.94 to 1. CONCLUSIONS. Elevated blood BATF2 transcript levels provide a sensitive biomarker that discriminates active TB from healthy individuals, and a potentially novel 4-gene transcriptional signature differentiates between active TB and other infectious diseases in individuals presenting with fever. FUNDING. MRC, Wellcome Trust, Rosetrees Trust, British Lung Foundation, NIHR

  10. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  11. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  12. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  13. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  14. 38 CFR 3.378 - Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Changes from activity in pulmonary tuberculosis pension cases. 3.378 Section 3.378 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... tuberculosis pension cases. A permanent and total disability rating in effect during hospitalization will...

  15. T Cell Functional Disturbances in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ostanin, Alexander A.; Khonina, Nataliya A.; Norkin, Maxim N.; Leplina, Olga Yu.; Nikonov, Sergey D.; Ogirenko, Anatoly P.; Chernykh, Helen R.

    2000-04-01

    The investigations of 38 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) revealed combined T cell and monocyte functional disturbances. Indeed, the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, proliferative response and IL-2 production, as well as the percentages of HLA DR(+) monocytes and IL-1beta production were significantly decreased in PT patients as compared with normal individuals. Herewith the absolute T lymphocyte number did not undergo the pronounced changes. The decrease of T cell proliferative response was not mediated through immunosuppressive action of monocytes or T lymphocytes since removing of "adherent" cells from patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pretreatment of PBMC with indomethacin and cyclophosphan failed to recover mitogenic reactivity in vitro. The patient's sera also did not significantly influence on PBMC proliferation. The decrease of IL-2 production and the stimulation of T cell proliferative response via TcR-CD3 complex, i.e. through the classic pathway of activation, indicated the anergy of T lymphocyte in tuberculosis patients. Furthermore, T lymphocytes were characterized by enhanced apoptosis. It should be noted, that patient's sera (especially in the patients with an initially high apoptosis) promoted significant anti-apoptotic activity. It is likely that this mechanism may be an explanation, why absolute T lymphopenia is absent during tuberculosis infection. Our findings suggest, that T lymphocyte dysfunctions in patients with PT are caused by impairments of T cell activation process, which lead to predominance of "negative" response (induction anergy, apoptosis) and to a lesser degree connected with direct suppressive mechanisms mediated by monocytes, T lymphocytes or serum factors.

  16. Applying cybernetic technology to diagnose human pulmonary sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Chou, Cheng-Han

    2014-06-01

    Chest auscultation is a crucial and efficient method for diagnosing lung disease; however, it is a subjective process that relies on physician experience and the ability to differentiate between various sound patterns. Because the physiological signals composed of heart sounds and pulmonary sounds (PSs) are greater than 120 Hz and the human ear is not sensitive to low frequencies, successfully making diagnostic classifications is difficult. To solve this problem, we constructed various PS recognition systems for classifying six PS classes: vesicular breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, tracheal breath sounds, crackles, wheezes, and stridor sounds. First, we used a piezoelectric microphone and data acquisition card to acquire PS signals and perform signal preprocessing. A wavelet transform was used for feature extraction, and the PS signals were decomposed into frequency subbands. Using a statistical method, we extracted 17 features that were used as the input vectors of a neural network. We proposed a 2-stage classifier combined with a back-propagation (BP) neural network and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which improves classification accuracy by using a haploid neural network. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve verifies the high performance level of the neural network. To expand traditional auscultation methods, we constructed various PS diagnostic systems that can correctly classify the six common PSs. The proposed device overcomes the lack of human sensitivity to low-frequency sounds and various PS waves, characteristic values, and a spectral analysis charts are provided to elucidate the design of the human-machine interface.

  17. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  18. Plasma melatonin and urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin levels in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Esin; Yaman, Halil; Cakir, Erdinc; Deniz, Omer; Oztosun, Muzaffer; Gumus, Seyfettin; Akgul, Emin Ozgur; Agilli, Mehmet; Cayci, Tuncer; Kurt, Yasemin Gulcan; Aydin, Ibrahim; Arslan, Yakup; Ilhan, Nevin; Ilhan, Necip; Erbil, Mehmet Kemal

    2012-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the second most frequent cause of death in the world, after AIDS. Delay in diagnosing TB is an important worldwide problem. It seriously threatens public health. Cell-mediated immune responses play an important role in the pathogenesis of TB infection. The course of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) infection is regulated by two distinct T cell cytokine patterns. Melatonin is a biomolecule (mainly secreted by the pineal gland) with free radical scavenging, antioxidant and immunoregulatory properties. Melatonin has both its direct and indirect immunomodulatory effects on the immune system. In this study, we measured plasma melatonin and urine 6-hydroxy melatonin sulphate (6-HMS) concentrations in patients with newly diagnosed TB for the purpose of investigating whether there was a relationship between their levels and MTb infection. Thirty-one newly diagnosed patients presenting with active TB and 31 healthy subjects as the control group were included in this study. Blood and 24-h urine samples were collected from all individuals. Plasma melatonin levels and urine 6-HMS were measured. Our results show that in patients with TB, mean melatonin and 6-HMS concentrations were significantly lower than in the control subjects (p = 0.037, p < 0.001, respectively). We believe that the treatment of TB patients with melatonin might result in a wide range of health benefits including improved quality of life and reduced severity of infection in these patients. Supplementation with melatonin may be considered as an adjunctive therapy to classic treatment of pulmonary TB, especially during the acute phase of infection.

  19. Microscopic examination and smear negative pulmonary tuberculosis in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Keflie, Tibebe Seyoum; Ameni, Gobena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis causes illness among millions of people each year and ranks as the second leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the detection rate of microscopic examination and estimate risk of transmission of TB by smear negative pulmonary TB patients. Methods A cross-sectional study and retrospective data analysis on TB were undertaken in Northwest Shewa, Ethiopia. Microscopic examination, bacterial culture and PCR were performed. The statistical analysis was made by using STATA software version 10. Results A total of 92 suspected TB cases was included in the study. Of these, 27.17% (25/92) were positive for microscopic examination and 51% (47/92) for culture. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopic examination with 95% CI were 48.94% (34.08% to 63.93%) and 95.56% (84.82 to 99.33%), respectively. The positive and negative predictive values were 92% (73.93% to 98.78%) and 64.18% (51.53% to 75.53%), respectively. Of 8150 pulmonary TB cases in the retrospective study, 58.9% was smear negative. The proportion of TB-HIV co-infection was 28.66% (96/335). Conclusion The sensitivity of microscopic examination was 48.94% which was very low. The poor sensitivity of this test together with the advent of HIV/AIDS elevated the prevalence of smear negative pulmonary TB. This in turn increased the risk of TB transmission. PMID:25810798

  20. Effects of Fluroquinolones in Newly Diagnosed, Sputum-Positive Tuberculosis Therapy: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Wang, Tiansheng; Shen, Su; Cheng, Sheng; Yu, Junxian; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Chao; Tang, Huilin

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a major public health problem especially in developing countries, the comparative efficacy and safety of fluroquinolones (FQs) for adult patients with newly diagnosed, sputum-positive tuberculosis remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the benefits and risks of FQs-containing (addition/substitution) regimens in this population. Methods A network meta-analysis was performed to compare FQs (C: ciprofloxacin; O: ofloxacin; Lo: levofloxacin; M: moxifloxacin; G: gatifloxacin) addition/substitution regimen with standard HRZE regimen (ie isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol) in newly diagnosed, sputum-positive tuberculosis. Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were systematically searched, randomized trials with duration longer than 8 weeks were included. The primary outcome was week-8 sputum negativity, and secondary outcomes included treatment failure, serious adverse events and death from all cause. Results Twelve studies comprising 6465 participants were included in the network meta-analysis. Löwenstein-Jensen culture method showed that HRZEM (OR 4.96, 95% CI 2.83–8.67), MRZE (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.19–1.84) and HRZM (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.08–1.62) had more sputum conversion than HRZE by the eighth week, whereas HRC (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.77) and HRZO (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.24–0.92) were worse than HRZE. Moxifloxacin-containing regimens showed more conversion than HRZE by liquid method at the end of two months. But by the end of treatment, FQs-containing regimens didn’t show superiority than HRZE on treatment failure. There were no significant differences between any regimens on other outcomes like serious adverse events and all-cause death. Conclusion This comprehensive network meta-analysis showed that compared with HRZE, moxifloxacin-containing regimens could significantly increase sputum conversion by the eighth week for patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis while HRC

  1. Posterior mediastinal mass diagnosed as schwanomma with concomittant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Surya Kant; Mishra, Ashwini Kumar; Verma, Ajay Kumar; Prakash, Ved

    2014-01-01

    A 21-year-old non-smoker, non-hypertensive male without diabetes was referred to our pulmonary medicine department with suspected malignant intrathoracic mass. The clinicoradiological evaluation revealed that it could be a posterior mediastinal mass. The same diagnosis was confirmed on performing CT and MRI. Benign posterior mediastinal schwanomma was suspected as it is the most common posterior mediastinal mass. It was completely resected. Histopathological examination confirmed the same. The mass was also sent for culture for mycobacterium which came out to be positive. The patient recovered from the surgery and postoperative X-ray showed complete clearance. He was treated with antitubercular treatment and responded very well. PMID:25246469

  2. A case of multifocal lupus vulgaris that preceded pulmonary tuberculosis in an immune compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Manabu; Urabe, Kazunori; Moroi, Yoichi; Koga, Tetsuya; Takeishi, Masaaki; Fujita, Masaki; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Furue, Masutaka

    2004-02-01

    We describe the rare case of a Japanese male with multifocal lupus vulgaris that preceded asymptomatic pulmonary tuberculosis and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). He visited our hospital with multiple reddish plaques and erythema of 4-12 months duration. A skin biopsy revealed non-caseating epithelioid granulomas. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-hybridization from a skin biopsy specimen and was also isolated from a culture of the skin biopsy sample. The result of chest roentogenography was compatible with pulmonary tuberculosis. In addition, the diagnosis of ATL was based upon the presence of atypical lymphocytes with convoluted nuclei in his peripheral blood and a positive anti-ATL antibody reaction. Cases of cutaneous tuberculosis presenting with unusual clinical features may be on the increase, accompanying the spread of tuberculosis in immunosuppressed patients, including those with ATL and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  3. The Effect of Garcin® in Preventing AntiTB-Induced Hepatitis in Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tabarsi, Payam; Fahimi, Fanak; Heidarzadeh, Nader; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Kazempour, Mehdi; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects of antituberculosis agents such as hepatotoxicity may reduce treatment effectiveness, because they significantly contribute to nonadherence and eventually result in treatment failure, relapse or the emergence of drug resistance. Garlic is an ancient herbal substance, which its effectiveness on isoniazid and rifampicin-induced hepatic injury in animal models has been demonstrated (1). In the present study a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group clinical trial was designed to assess the effect(s) of garlic tablets (1000 mg daily) administered for two weeks orally. Fifty eight newly diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, with age ranges between 18-65 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups. Each patient received either garlic or placebo tablets for the first two weeks of tuberculosis treatment. Of total 58 patients, 31 received garlic tablets while 27 received placebo. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding age, sex, nationality, smoking, underlying diseases and opium usage. During 8 weeks of anti-TB (antituberculosis) treatment, 8 (13.0%) patients developed drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH). Of them, 6 (75%) occurred in the first two weeks of treatment. Fifty percent of the patients who developed DIH were in garlic group. Results indicated no significant difference between groups in developing DIH (p=1.000). We could not show a significant role in preventing DIH by 1000 mg daily garlic administration. PMID:24711843

  4. The Effect of Garcin® in Preventing AntiTB-Induced Hepatitis in Newly Diagnosed Tuberculosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Fahimi, Fanak; Heidarzadeh, Nader; Haghgoo, Roodabeh; Kazempour, Mehdi; Masjedi, Mohammadreza; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects of antituberculosis agents such as hepatotoxicity may reduce treatment effectiveness, because they significantly contribute to nonadherence and eventually result in treatment failure, relapse or the emergence of drug resistance. Garlic is an ancient herbal substance, which its effectiveness on isoniazid and rifampicin-induced hepatic injury in animal models has been demonstrated (1). In the present study a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group clinical trial was designed to assess the effect(s) of garlic tablets (1000 mg daily) administered for two weeks orally. Fifty eight newly diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients, with age ranges between 18-65 years old, were randomly allocated into two groups. Each patient received either garlic or placebo tablets for the first two weeks of tuberculosis treatment. Of total 58 patients, 31 received garlic tablets while 27 received placebo. No significant difference was found between the two groups regarding age, sex, nationality, smoking, underlying diseases and opium usage. During 8 weeks of anti-TB (antituberculosis) treatment, 8 (13.0%) patients developed drug-induced hepatotoxicity (DIH). Of them, 6 (75%) occurred in the first two weeks of treatment. Fifty percent of the patients who developed DIH were in garlic group. Results indicated no significant difference between groups in developing DIH (p=1.000). We could not show a significant role in preventing DIH by 1000 mg daily garlic administration. PMID:24711843

  5. [Therapy and Rehabilitation of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Different Treatment Adherence].

    PubMed

    Rubleva, N V; Kolomiets, V M; Kochetkova, E Ya

    2016-01-01

    The pulmonary tuberculosis process as dependent on the disease form and the therapy efficacy with the use of Cycloferon in the treatment scheme were investigated. The study had two stages. At the first stage the data concerning 358 patients with primary pulmonary tuberculosis and infiltration (93 patients) or degradation (89 patients) and 176 patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis were analysed. At the second stage the efficacy of the treatment schemes applied to the patients with pulmonary fibrocavernous tuberculosis was compared. The etiotropic therapy intensive phase was applied to all the patients. Moreover, 56 patients (group 1) under the therapy and rehabilitatinon were treated with Cycloferon in a dose of 0.25 administered intramuscularly twice a week (not less than 16 injections for the course), 60 patients (group 2) were treated with Omega 3, 30 patients (group 3) were given the standard complex (vitamins and tonics), 30 patients (group 4) were under the etiotropic therapy alone. The following additional factors promoting progression and aggravation of the tuberculosis process were confirmed: degradation at the time of the disease diagnosis, high resistance of the pathogen to antituberculosis drugs, low adherence to the treatment, social desadaptation and especially psychofunctional state of the patients. The use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the intensive phase treatment of the primary fibrocavernous tuberculosis resulted in reduction of the intoxication signs, bacteria isolation, positive dynamics of the cavity healing, lower lung infiltration and consequently high frequency of the treatment positive outcomes (94.1 ± 3.33%). PMID:27337863

  6. Use of PCR in routine diagnosis of treated and untreated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, K Y; Chan, K S; Chan, C M; Ho, B S; Dai, L K; Chau, P Y; Ng, M H

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To assess the routine use of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in expectorated sputum specimens. METHODS--A pair of primers (20-mer) were designed to amplify the 38 kilodalton protein of M tuberculosis. The specificity of the assay was evaluated in 31 M tuberculosis strains, 15 atypical mycobacterium species, and several commensal bacteria of the upper respiratory tract. The assay was subsequently applied to 519 sputum specimens from 85 inpatients of a chest hospital in Hong Kong. RESULTS--An amplified product of 239 base pairs was found in all M tuberculosis strains, standard strains of M bovis, and M africanum but not in the other bacterial strains tested. For the 51 patients with pulmonary radiographic lesions, the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was subsequently confirmed by both culture and PCR in 41 of them. Five patients who were treated before admission were positive by PCR alone. All but one patient in the control group (patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive airway diseases) or those with atypical mycobacterial diseases were PCR negative. The PCR remained positive after four weeks of anti-tuberculosis treatment in 29 patients, 16 of whom had become culture negative. CONCLUSION--This PCR assay is a useful technique for the diagnosis of untreated and recently treated cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. Images PMID:8496388

  7. Hyponatremia Due to Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Review of 200 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Jonaidi Jafari, Nematollah; Izadi, Morteza; Sarrafzadeh, Farhad; Heidari, Amir; Ranjbar, Reza; Saburi, Amin

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary Tuberculosis (PTB) is one of the common diseases with high prevalence of mortality and morbidity in developing countries. Various complications have been reported along with PTB. The subclinical electrolyte imbalances are customary in cases with PTB. Objectives The aim of this study was the evaluation of patients with PTB and hyponatremia. Patients and Methods We evaluated patients with diagnosis of secondary PTB who have been admitted to Baqiyatallah hospital, Tehran, Iran from 2005 till 2010. The diagnosis of PTB was based on the appearance of acid fast bacilli in sputum smears or sputum cultures, without any evidence of miliary TB. Demographic and laboratory characteristics relative to electrolytes were recorded according inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results The mean age was 59.22 ± 20.57 years and 91 (45.5%) patients were male. The mean serum sodium concentration was 134.54 ± 4.95 mmol/L and more than half of subjects (51%) have shown hyponatremia. The mean age difference between hyponatremic and eunatremic groups was statistically significant (61.95 versus 56.02 years) (P = 0.047). No significant relationship was found between hyponatremia and gender, anti-TB medications and co-morbidity conditions. Conclusions In this study, an older age was suggested as an important predisposing factor for hyponatremia in patients with PTB which had been observed as less of a determinant. We recommend further evaluations for hyponatremia in patients presenting with PTB, particularly for those who are older. PMID:23577332

  8. Immunophenotyping of macrophages in human pulmonary tuberculosis and sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Lee-Anne; Fenhalls, Gael; Lucas, Andrew; Gough, Peter; Greaves, David R; Mahoney, James A; Helden, Paul Van; Gordon, Siamon

    2003-01-01

    Classic studies of tuberculosis (TB) revealed morphologic evidence of considerable heterogeneity of macrophages (MØs), but the functional significance of this heterogeneity remains unknown. We have used newly available specific antibodies for selected membrane and secretory molecules to examine the phenotype of MØs in situ in a range of South African patients with TB, compared with sarcoidosis. Patients were human immunodeficiency virus-negative adults and children, and the examined biopsy specimens included lung and lymph nodes. Mature pulmonary MØs (alveolar, interstitial, epithelioid and multinucleated giant cells) selectively expressed scavenger receptor type A and a novel carboxypeptidase-like antigen called carboxypeptidase-related vitellogenin-like MØ molecule (CPVL). CPVL did not display enhanced expression in sarcoidosis, vs. TB patients, as observed with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), a related molecule. Immunocytochemical studies with surfactant proteins (SP)-A and -D showed that type II alveolar cells expressed these collectins, as did MØs, possibly after binding of secreted proteins. Studies with an antibody specific for the C-terminus of fractalkine, a tethered CX3C chemokine, confirmed synthesis of this molecule by bronchiolar epithelial cells and occasional endothelial cells. These studies provide new marker antigens and extend previous studies on MØ differentiation, activation and local interactions in chronic human granulomatous inflammation in the lung. PMID:14748748

  9. Drug Resistance among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Calabar, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Otu, Akaninyene; Umoh, Victor; Habib, Abdulrazak; Ameh, Soter; Lawson, Lovett

    2013-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to determine the pattern of drug susceptibility to first-line drugs among pulmonary TB patients in two hospitals in Calabar, Nigeria. Methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study carried out between February 2011 and April 2012. Sputum samples from consecutive TB patients in Calabar were subjected to culture on Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) slopes followed by drug susceptibility testing (DST). The DST was performed on LJ medium by the proportion method. Results. Forty-two of the 100 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains were found to be resistant to at least one drug. Resistance to only one drug (monoresistance) was found in 17 patients. No strains with monoresistance to rifampicin were found. Resistance to two drugs was found in 22 patients, while one patient was resistant to both three and four drugs. MDR TB was seen in 4% (4/100). The independent variables of HIV serology and sex were not significantly associated with resistance (P > 0.05). Conclusion. There was a high prevalence of anti-TB drug resistance in Calabar. PMID:24078872

  10. Preventing Infectious Pulmonary Tuberculosis Among Foreign-Born Residents of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Dolly; Ghosh, Smita; Blumberg, Henry; Tamhane, Ashutosh; Sevilla, Anna; Reves, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We described risk factors associated with infectious tuberculosis (TB) and missed TB-prevention opportunities in foreign-born US residents, who account for almost two thirds of the nation’s TB patients. Methods. In a cross-sectional study at 20 US sites of foreign-born persons diagnosed with TB in 2005 through 2006, we collected results of sputum smear microscopy for acid-fast bacilli (a marker for infectiousness) and data on visa status, sociodemographics, TB-related care seeking, and latent TB infection (LTBI) diagnosis opportunities. Results. Among 980 persons with pulmonary TB who reported their visa status, 601 (61%) were legal permanent residents, 131 (13.4%) had temporary visas, and 248 (25.3%) were undocumented. Undocumented persons were more likely than permanent residents to have acid-fast bacilli–positive smears at diagnosis (risk ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.2, 1.4). Of those diagnosed 1 year or more after arrival, 57.3% reported LTBI screening opportunities; fewer than 25% actually were. Undocumented persons reported fewer LTBI screening opportunities and were less likely to be tested. Conclusions. Progress toward TB elimination in the United States depends upon expanding opportunities for regular medical care and promotion of LTBI screening and treatment among foreign-born persons. PMID:26180947

  11. Fixed-dose combinations of drugs versus single-drug formulations for treating pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Rigau Comas, David; Valderrama Rodríguez, Angélica; Roqué i Figuls, Marta; Parker, Lucy Anne; Caylà, Joan; Bonfill Cosp, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background People who are newly diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) typically receive a standard first-line treatment regimen that consists of two months of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol followed by four months of isoniazid and rifampicin. Fixed-dose combinations (FDCs) of these drugs are widely recommended. Objectives To compare the efficacy, safety, and acceptability of anti-tuberculosis regimens given as fixed-dose combinations compared to single-drug formulations for treating people with newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, published in the Cochrane Library, Issue 11 2015); MEDLINE (1966 to 20 November 2015); EMBASE (1980 to 20 November 2015); LILACS (1982 to 20 November 2015); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials; and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), without language restrictions, up to 20 November 2015. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared the use of FDCs with single-drug formulations in adults (aged 15 years or more) newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous data and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We attempted to assess the effect of treatment for time-to-event measures with hazard ratios and their 95% CIs. We used the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' assessment tool to determine the risk of bias in included trials. We used the fixed-effect model when there was little heterogeneity and the random-effects model with moderate heterogeneity. We used an I² statistic value of 75% or greater to denote significant heterogeneity, in which case we did not perform a

  12. Imaging Features of Pulmonary CT in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbo; Ren, Yanwei; Lu, Xiwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Until now, radiographic manifestations of multidrug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDR- TB) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) have not been reported. We conducted a study to investigate the imaging features of pulmonary computed tomography (CT) for type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients with MDR-TB. Methods The clinical data and pulmonary CT findings of 39 type 2 diabetic patients with MDR-TB, 46 type 2 diabetic patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis (DS-TB), and 72 pure drug-susceptible TB cases (without T2DM and MDR) treated at Dalian Tuberculosis Hospital from 2012 to 2015 were collected, and the clinical features and imaging differences of the three groups were compared. Results The clinical characteristics of the three groups of patients were not significantly different except with respect to age and previous treatment history. However, on imaging, the patients with MDR-TB showed consolidation in and above the pulmonary segments was significantly more extensive than that seen in the DS-TB group with or without T2DM. Conclusion Consolidation in or above multiple pulmonary segments with multiple mouth-eaten cavities and bronchial damage on pulmonary CT images in type 2 diabetic patients with tuberculosis suggests the possibility of multi-drug resistance. PMID:27022735

  13. Non-diagnosed pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) as a cause of sudden unexpected death.

    PubMed

    Preuss, J; Woenckhaus, C; Thierauf, A; Strehler, M; Madea, B

    2008-08-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG), a very rare benign tumour of the lungs, was first reported in 1977. We present a PHG of a 32-year-old woman from Yemen who collapsed 1 day after her arrival in Germany. Tuberculosis was suspected and the health authorities nearly closed part of one of the major international airports in Europe. However, this drastic measure was avoided by autopsy and a correct interpretation of the solid-elastic and well-circumscribed lung tumour as not characteristic for tuberculosis. Although the final diagnosis of PHG was only achieved after histology, this case strongly illustrates the necessity of a profound morphological training of forensic physicians. PMID:18621495

  14. Tuberculosis in otorhinolaryngology: clinical presentation and diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Michael, Rajiv C; Michael, Joy S

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis affects all tissues of the body, although some more commonly than the others. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common type of tuberculosis accounting for approximately 80% of the tuberculosis cases. Tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region is one of the rarer forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis but still poses a significant clinical and diagnostic challenge. Over three years, only five out of 121 patients suspected to have tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region (cervical adenitis excluded) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-proven disease. Additional 7 had histology-proven tuberculosis. Only one patient had concomitant sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis. We look at the various clinical and laboratory aspects of tuberculosis of the otorhinolaryngeal region that would help to diagnose this uncommon but important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  15. Transmission dynamics of pulmonary tuberculosis between autochthonous and immigrant sub-populations

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The overall incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in Western Europe has been declining since the 19th Century. However, immigrant sub-groups from high-prevalence countries are slowing down this trend. The aim of this study was to describe how immigration influences TB transmission in Germany. For that we prospectively investigated the dynamics of TB transmission between TB high-prevalence immigrant and TB low-prevalence local populations with molecular epidemiological methods and conventional contact investigations. Besides, we assessed transmission in relation to social mixing using an innovative tool that measures the integration of immigrants into the local social environment. Methods A prospective study of confirmed culture positive cases of pulmonary TB and their contacts was carried out in a German federal state from 2003 to 2005. Data for the study included: 1) case data routinely collected by the local public health staff and transmitted to the state health office and the national surveillance centre, 2) a study questionnaire designed to capture social interactions of relevance for TB transmission and 3) molecular genotyping data (IS6110 DNA fingerprint and spoligotyping). The proportion of German cases caused by foreign-born cases, and vice versa, was estimated and an integration index was computed using a selected set of questions from the study questionnaire. Results A total of 749 cases of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis voluntarily enrolled in the study, representing 57.8% of all registered cases diagnosed over the study period. Data that included study questionnaire and DNA fingerprinting were available for 41% (n = 308) of the study participants. Forty-seven clusters, defined as a least two cases infected by the same TB strains, were identified by molecular methods and included 132 (17%) of the study participants. Epidemiological links were identified for 28% of the clusters by conventional epidemiological data. In mixed clusters, defined

  16. An extremely rare case of prenatally diagnosed absent both aortic and pulmonary valves.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Hyeon Kyeong; Lee, Mi-Young; Yoon, Sun-Young; Jung, Hee Jung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Jae-Yoon; Won, Hye-Sung; Lee, Pil-Ryang; Kim, Ahm

    2016-09-01

    We describe a case of absent aortic and pulmonary valves, diagnosed at 16.4 weeks of gestation. Fetal echocardiography showed cardiomegaly with dilated both ventricles. No valve leaflets were observed in the aorta and pulmonary artery, and a typical to-and-fro flow pattern was noted in both great arteries on color Doppler imaging. Fetal hydrops was also detected. Follow-up ultrasonographic evaluation at 19 weeks demonstrated intrauterine fetal death. Postmortem autopsy revealed the absence of both aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the earliest diagnosed case of absent both aortic and pulmonary valves and only the second case to be diagnosed prenatally. PMID:27668203

  17. An extremely rare case of prenatally diagnosed absent both aortic and pulmonary valves

    PubMed Central

    Yeon, Hyeon Kyeong; Yoon, Sun-Young; Jung, Hee Jung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Jae-Yoon; Won, Hye-Sung; Lee, Pil-Ryang; Kim, Ahm

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of absent aortic and pulmonary valves, diagnosed at 16.4 weeks of gestation. Fetal echocardiography showed cardiomegaly with dilated both ventricles. No valve leaflets were observed in the aorta and pulmonary artery, and a typical to-and-fro flow pattern was noted in both great arteries on color Doppler imaging. Fetal hydrops was also detected. Follow-up ultrasonographic evaluation at 19 weeks demonstrated intrauterine fetal death. Postmortem autopsy revealed the absence of both aortic and pulmonary valve leaflets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the earliest diagnosed case of absent both aortic and pulmonary valves and only the second case to be diagnosed prenatally. PMID:27668203

  18. [Role of computerized tomography in the diagnosis of cirrhotic pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Lazareva, Ia V

    1999-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) revealed cirrhotic tuberculosis in 52 patients. In most patients, cirrhosis resulted from infiltrative and fibrocavernous tuberculosis, less frequently from tuberculous bronchoadenitis, disseminated and focal tuberculosis, caseous pneumonia. Segmental cirrhosis was present in 15 patients, multisegmental and lobar cirrhosis in 19, and bilateral lung cirrhosis in 2. In 8 patients, pulmonary cirrhosis was accompanied by tuberculous empyema; in 8 more patients lobar cirrhosis was the metatuberculous syndrome of fibrocavernous tuberculosis. Evaluation of the diagnostic potentialities of CT in cirrhotic pulmonary tuberculosis revealed that the major CT semiotics of this clinical type was identical to the basic skialogic signs of routine X-ray study. However, unlike the latter that assesses mainly indirect X-ray signs of the cirrhotic transformation of lung tissue, such as reduced lung volumes, chest deformity, CT objectively detects morphological changes in cirrhosis, the presence and magnitude of specific and metatuberculous changes, interprets clinical and X-ray variants of this form of tuberculosis and its related pulmonary vascular alterations.

  19. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children: Assessment of the 2012 National Institutes of Health Expert Consensus Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Zar, Heather J.; Workman, Lesley J.; Little, Francesca; Nicol, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) consensus criteria for standardized diagnostic categories of pulmonary tuberculosis in children have not been validated. We aimed to assess the NIH diagnostic criteria in children with culture-confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis and those in whom tuberculosis has been excluded. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive children hospitalized with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis in Cape Town, South Africa, who were enrolled in a diagnostic study. Children were categorized as definite tuberculosis (culture positive), probable tuberculosis (chest radiograph consistent), possible tuberculosis (chest radiograph inconsistent), or not tuberculosis (improved without tuberculosis treatment). We applied the NIH diagnostic categories to the cohort and evaluated their performance specifically in children with definite tuberculosis and not tuberculosis. Results. Four hundred sixty-four children (median age, 25.1 months [interquartile range, 13.5–61.5 months]) were included; 96 (20.7%) were HIV infected. Of these, 165 (35.6%) were definite tuberculosis, and 299 (64.4%) were not tuberculosis. If strict NIH symptom criteria were applied, 100 (21.6%) were unclassifiable including 21 (21.0%) with definite pulmonary tuberculosis, as they did not meet the NIH criteria due to short duration of symptoms; 71 (71%) had cough <14 days, 48 (48%) had recent weight loss, and 39 (39%) had fever <7 days. Of 364 classifiable children, there was moderate agreement (κ = 0.48) with 100% agreement for definite tuberculosis and moderate agreement for not tuberculosis (220 [60.4%] vs 89 [24.5%]). Conclusions. Entry criteria for diagnostic studies should not be restrictive. Data from this analysis have informed revision of the NIH definitions. PMID:26409280

  20. Comparison of bronchial brushing and sputum in detection of pediatric pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiao-Pei; Ren, Shi-Feng; Wang, Xin-Feng; Wang, Mao-Shui

    2016-01-27

    The retrospective study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of bronchial brushing and sputum using acid fast bacilli smear, mycobacterial culture and real-time PCR in detection of pediatric pulmonary tuberculosis, sensitivity and specificity of bronchial brushing and sputum examined by the three methods were calculated and compared to each other. Data showed there were no significant difference in sensitivity between bronchial brushing and matched sputum using each method. But the specificity of real-time PCR on bronchial brushing was lower than on sputum. Compared with bronchial brushing, sputum was better specimen in detection of pediatric pulmonary tuberculosis.

  1. [Real-time polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Salina, T Iu; Morozova, T I

    2008-01-01

    To enhance the efficiency of diagnosis of oligo- and abacillar pulmonary tuberculosis and its differential diagnosis with other lung diseases, the authors studied the informative value of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) used in 62 patients with different clinical forms of tuberculosis and 108 differentially diagnostic patients. Real-time PCR has been ascertained to be a significantly more sensitive and highly specific tool in tuberculosis diagnosis, which considerably improves the specific recognition of the etiology of a pathogenetic process in oligo- and abacillar patients. Particularly encouraging results have been obtained when examining differentially diagnostic patients with the rounded shadows being formed in the lung. PMID:18710048

  2. Systematic review: Comparison of Xpert MTB/RIF, LAMP and SAT methods for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Xiao, Heping; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances in nucleic acid amplification have led to breakthroughs in the early detection of PTB compared to traditional sputum smear tests. The sensitivity and specificity of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), simultaneous amplification testing (SAT), and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated. A critical review of previous studies of LAMP, SAT, and Xpert MTB/RIF for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis that used laboratory culturing as the reference method was carried out together with a meta-analysis. In 25 previous studies, the pooled sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of tuberculosis were 93% and 94% for LAMP, 96% and 88% for SAT, and 89% and 98% for Xpert MTB/RIF. The I(2) values for the pooled data were >80%, indicating significant heterogeneity. In the smear-positive subgroup analysis of LAMP, the sensitivity increased from 93% to 98% (I(2) = 2.6%), and specificity was 68% (I(2) = 38.4%). In the HIV-infected subgroup analysis of Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 79% (I(2) = 72.9%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.4%). In the HIV-negative subgroup analysis for Xpert MTB/RIF, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 72% (I(2) = 49.6%) and 99% (I(2) = 64.5%). LAMP, SAT and Xpert MTB/RIF had comparably high levels of sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of tuberculosis. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of three methods were similar, with LAMP being highly sensitive for the diagnosis of smear-positive PTB. The cost effectiveness of LAMP and SAT make them particularly suitable tests for diagnosing PTB in developing countries. PMID:26786658

  3. Association of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Diabetes in Mexico: Analysis of the National Tuberculosis Registry 2000–2012

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; García-García, Lourdes; Castellanos-Joya, Martín; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Hernández, Andrés; Ortega-Baeza, Victor Manuel; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Sulca, José Antonio; Martínez-Olivares, Ma. de Lourdes; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Baez-Saldaña, Renata; González-Roldán, Jesús Felipe; López-Gatell, Hugo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Jiménez-Corona, María Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health problem in Mexico while the incidence of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) has increased rapidly in recent years. Objective To describe the trends of incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated with DM and not associated with DM and to compare the results of treatment outcomes in patients with and without DM. Materials and Methods We analysed the National Tuberculosis Registry from 2000 to 2012 including patients with pulmonary TB among individuals older than 20 years of age. The association between DM and treatment failure was analysed using logistic regression, accounting for clustering due to regional distribution. Results In Mexico from 2000 to 2012, the incidence rates of pulmonary TB associated to DM increased by 82.64%, (p <0.001) in contrast to rates of pulmonary TB rate without DM, which decreased by 26.77%, (p <0.001). Patients with a prior diagnosis of DM had a greater likelihood of failing treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.34 (1.11–1.61) p <0.002) compared with patients who did not have DM. There was statistical evidence of interaction between DM and sex. The odds of treatment failure were increased in both sexes. Conclusion Our data suggest that the growing DM epidemic has an impact on the rates of pulmonary TB. In addition, patients who suffer from both diseases have a greater probability of treatment failure. PMID:26075393

  4. The association of some genetic factors with pulmonary tuberculosis in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups.

    PubMed

    Khukhunaishvili, R; Tskvitinidze, S; Nagervadze, M; Akhvlediani, L; Koridze, M

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) is still one of the major public health problems. Over the last half decade the significant problem is an increased ratio of drug-resistant TB cases. TB is as well the most significant infectious disease in the country of Georgia. Pulmonary tuberculosis is assessed as a complex infectious disease affected by both, environmental and genetic factors. Present study was undertaken to find out the correlation between pulmonary tuberculosis and erythrocyte blood groups antigens determinant alleles (ABO - r, p, q; Rh D+, Rh D- and MN - p, q) in two different, Georgian and Azeri, ethno groups. Immune-serological methods, direct reaction of universal monoclonal antibodies were used. Materials processed by biostatistician methods. The study had shown different correlation of pulmonary tuberculosis to erythrocyte blood groups determinant alleles in Georgian and Azeri ethno groups. In Georgian ethno group pulmonary TB correlates with ABO-r and p, Rh-D,+' and MN-p alleles, whether ABO-q, Rh-D,-' and MN-p in Azeri ethno group. PMID:25020171

  5. Safety and effectiveness of CT-guided percutaneous pulmonary paracentesis and tuberculoma perfusing chemotherapy for the treatment of pleural tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Shujun; Li, Lijuan; Liu, Jianling; Song, Tao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the mid- and long-term effects of different treatments such as CT-guided percutaneous pulmonary paracentesis, tuberculoma perfusing chemotherapy and whole-body standard chemotherapy or extended chemotherapy on safety and effectiveness for pleural chemotherapy. A total of 60 subjects diagnosed to have pleural tuberculosis between February 2010 and February 2014 were prospectively selected for this study and were considered as the experimental group. Seventy pleural tuberculosis patients who underwent treatment between February 2006 and February 2010 were considered as the control group. The patients in the experimental group were treated with CT-guided percutaneous pulmonary paracentesis and tuberculoma perfusing chemotherapy of not more than three courses with each course consisting of administration of 0.1 g isoniazid, n 0.5 gkanamyci, 0.2 g levofloxacin, and 1 ml lidocaine once a week for four times. The patients in the control group were treated with whole-body standard or extended chemotherapy regimen 3~6HRZE(S)/6~12HR. The patients were followed up for 18 months and the treatment effects were compared. The diameter of tuberculoma in patients of the experimental group during 6, 12 and 18 months was shorter than that of the control group (P<0.05). The total effective rate of treatment and the duration of treatment in experimental group during 18 months were higher than that of control group (P<0.05). The frequency of drug-related complications were lower in comparison with the control group (P<0.05). No surgically acquired complications were observed in the experimental group. Thus, treatments such as CT-guided percutaneous pulmonary paracentesis and tuberculoma perfusing chemotherapy for pleural tuberculosis are safe and effective, which has greater value and can be promoted for use in the clinical setting. PMID:27446302

  6. Protocol for studying cough frequency in people with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bravard, Marjory A; Tracey, Brian H; López, José W; Comina, German; Zimic, Mirko; Coronel, Jorge; O'Neill Lee, Gwenyth; Caviedes, Luz; Luis Cabrera, Jose; Salas, Antonio; Ticona, Eduardo; Kirwan, Daniela E; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A; Moore, David A; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cough is a key symptom of tuberculosis (TB) as well as the main cause of transmission. However, a recent literature review found that cough frequency (number of coughs per hour) in patients with TB has only been studied once, in 1969. The main aim of this study is to describe cough frequency patterns before and after the start of TB treatment and to determine baseline factors that affect cough frequency in these patients. Secondarily, we will evaluate the correlation between cough frequency and TB microbiological resolution. Methods This study will select participants with culture confirmed TB from 2 tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. We estimated that a sample size of 107 patients was sufficient to detect clinically significant changes in cough frequency. Participants will initially be evaluated through questionnaires, radiology, microscopic observation drug susceptibility broth TB-culture, auramine smear microscopy and cough recordings. This cohort will be followed for the initial 60 days of anti-TB treatment, and throughout the study several microbiological samples as well as 24 h recordings will be collected. We will describe the variability of cough episodes and determine its association with baseline laboratory parameters of pulmonary TB. In addition, we will analyse the reduction of cough frequency in predicting TB cure, adjusted for potential confounders. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the ethics committees at each participating hospital in Lima, Peru, Asociación Benéfica PRISMA in Lima, Peru, the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Lima, Peru and Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA. We aim to publish and disseminate our findings in peer-reviewed journals. We also expect to create and maintain an online repository for TB cough sounds as well as the statistical analysis employed. PMID:27105713

  7. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism: time to rewrite the textbooks.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, U Joseph

    2005-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is rapidly becoming the first line modality for imaging pulmonary embolism (PE). However, limitations for the accurate diagnosis of small peripheral emboli have prevented the unanimous acceptance of CT as the new standard of reference for imaging PE although the actual significance of the detection and treatment of isolated peripheral emboli is uncertain. At the same time the high negative predictive value of CT pulmonary angiography for excluding clinically significant PE has been established in retrospective and prospective studies. The introduction of multidetector-row spiral CT has greatly improved visualization of peripheral pulmonary arteries and detection of small emboli. Previous concerns regarding the accuracy of spiral CT for the accurate diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary emboli should thus be overcome. Multidetector-row spiral CT has become a widely available and cost-effective modality, which has surpassed other imaging modalities for PE diagnosis to a point where over-utilization may become of concern. Our most immediate goal must be to educate our referring colleagues about these important transitions so that the diagnostic algorithm in patients with suspected acute PE is updated to accurately reflect our current diagnostic prowess in medical imaging. PMID:15915948

  8. High-Dose Rifapentine with Moxifloxacin for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jindani, Amina; Harrison, Thomas S.; Nunn, Andrew J.; Phillips, Patrick P.J.; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Charalambous, Salome; Hatherill, Mark; Geldenhuys, Hennie; McIlleron, Helen M.; Zvada, Simbarashe P.; Mungofa, Stanley; Shah, Nasir A.; Zizhou, Simukai; Magweta, Lloyd; Shepherd, James; Nyirenda, Sambayawo; van Dijk, Janneke H.; Clouting, Heather E.; Coleman, David; Bateson, Anna L.E.; McHugh, Timothy D.; Butcher, Philip D.; Mitchison, Denny A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tuberculosis regimens that are shorter and simpler than the current 6-month daily regimen are needed. METHODS We randomly assigned patients with newly diagnosed, smear-positive, drug-sensitive tuberculosis to one of three regimens: a control regimen that included 2 months of ethambutol, isoniazid, rifampicin, and pyrazinamide administered daily followed by 4 months of daily isoniazid and rifampicin; a 4-month regimen in which the isoniazid in the control regimen was replaced by moxifloxacin administered daily for 2 months followed by moxifloxacin and 900 mg of rifapentine administered twice weekly for 2 months; or a 6-month regimen in which isoniazid was replaced by daily moxifloxacin for 2 months followed by one weekly dose of both moxifloxacin and 1200 mg of rifapentine for 4 months. Sputum specimens were examined on microscopy and after culture at regular intervals. The primary end point was a composite treatment failure and relapse, with noninferiority based on a margin of 6 percentage points and 90% confidence intervals. RESULTS We enrolled a total of 827 patients from South Africa, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Zambia; 28% of patients were coinfected with the human immunodefiency virus. In the per-protocol analysis, the proportion of patients with an unfavorable response was 4.9% in the control group, 3.2% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, −1.8 percentage points; 90% confidence interval [CI], −6.1 to 2.4), and 18.2% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.6 percentage points; 90% CI, 8.1 to 19.1). In the modified intention-to-treat analysis these proportions were 14.4% in the control group, 13.7% in the 6-month group (adjusted difference from control, 0.4 percentage points; 90% CI, −4.7 to 5.6), and 26.9% in the 4-month group (adjusted difference from control, 13.1 percentage points; 90% CI, 6.8 to 19.4). CONCLUSIONS The 6-month regimen that included weekly administration of high-dose rifapentine and

  9. Diagnostic value of sputum adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Jalali, Hadi; Zare, Mohammad Reza; Behravan, Farhad; Tafti, Arefeh Dehghani; Behnaz, Fatemah; Tabatabaee, Mohammad; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis is still a considerable health problem in many countries. Rapid diagnosis of this disease is important, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) has been used as a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of ADA in the sputum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The current study included 40 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (culture positive, smear ±) and 42 patients with non tuberculosis pulmonary diseases (culture negative). ADA was measured on all of the samples. Results The median value of ADA in non-tuberculosis patients was 2.94 (4.2) U/L and 4.01 (6.54) U/L in tuberculosis patients, but this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.100). The cut-off point of 3.1 U/L had a sensitivity of 61% and a specificity of 53%, the cut-off point of 2.81 U/L had a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 50% and the cut-off point of 2.78 U/L had a sensitivity of 65% and a specificity of 48%. The positive predictive values for cut-off points of 3.1, 2.81 and 2.78 U/L were 55.7%, 57.44% and 69.23%, respectively. The negative predictive values for the abovementioned cut-off points were 56.75%, 57.14% and 55.88%, respectively. Conclusion Our results showed that sputum ADA test is neither specific nor sensitive. Because of its low sensitivity and specificity, determination of sputum ADA for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is not recommended. PMID:27482515

  10. Splenic tuberculosis in a patient with newly diagnosed advanced HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tiri, B; Saraca, L M; Luciano, E; Burkert, F R; Cappanera, S; Cenci, E; Francisci, D

    2016-01-01

    The extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) constitutes to about 20% of all TB cases. Among extra-pulmonary form, splenic TB is very rare clinical condition especially as initial manifestation in a developed country. Diagnosis of splenic TB is challenging because it presents no specific symptoms or typical imaging findings and microbiological confirmation is not straight forward. We describe the case of a 55 year old Italian female with advanced HIV infection whose first AIDS clinical manifestation was a TB splenic abscess.On CT, the lesion was multilocular, hypovascular, 34 mm large, and presented contrast enhancement and a spoke wheel pattern; it was initially considered a cystic formation of parasitic nature. In this patient clinical manifestations were nonspecific (nightly fever, weight loss, and fatigue); as diagnostic imaging could not pinpoint the underlying etiology, microbiological and molecular examinations of spleen abscess drainage proved pivotal for the diagnosis. The patient improved clinically with antitubercular therapy. The rarityof splenic tuberculosis in an European patient coupled with the involvement of the spleen in isolation and outside the "miliary" setting prompted us to report this case. PMID:27635384

  11. Clinical and Radiographic Manifestations of Sputum Culture-Negative Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh-Vu H.; Jenny-Avital, Elizabeth R.; Burger, Susanne; Leibert, Eric M.; Achkar, Jacqueline M.

    2015-01-01

    Intervention at the earliest possible stage of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) reduces morbidity for the individual and transmission for the community. We characterize the clinical and radiographic manifestations of sputum culture-negative (Cx-) PTB in order to facilitate awareness of this under recognized and likely early disease state. In this cross-sectional sub-study, we reviewed the medical records of HIV-uninfected PTB patients enrolled from 2006–2014 within the context of a TB biomarker study in New York City. Cx- PTB was defined as clinical and/or radiographic presentation consistent with PTB, three initial mycobacterial sputum cultures negative, and no evidence of other respiratory disease. Diagnosis was confirmed by clinical and radiographic improvement on antituberculous treatment and/or culture, nucleic acid, or histological confirmation from a specimen other than the initial three sputa. Cx+ PTB was defined as above but with M. tuberculosis growth in at least one of the first three sputum cultures. Demographics, symptoms, and radiographic findings on initial presentation were compared between the two groups. Of 99 subjects diagnosed with PTB, 21 met the criteria of Cx- PTB. Cx- compared to Cx+ subjects presented with a significantly lower frequency of cough (70% vs. 91%, P = 0.02), sputum production (30% vs. 64%, P < 0.01), weight loss (25% vs. 54%, P = 0.02), and frequency of cavitation on chest CT (12% vs. 68%, P < 0.01). Our findings should raise awareness that neither a positive culture nor the hallmark symptoms are invariably associated with early TB disease. PMID:26448182

  12. Follow up of an immunocompromised contact group of a case of open pulmonary tuberculosis on a renal unit.

    PubMed Central

    Drobniewski, F. A.; Ferguson, J.; Barritt, K.; Higgins, R. M.; Higgon, M.; Neave, D.; Uttley, A. H.; O'Sullivan, D.; Hay, A.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--The organisation, management, outcome and cost of follow up of a large group of mainly immunocompromised patients and healthcare workers who were exposed to a staff member of a London renal unit with smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis are described. METHODS--Following British Thoracic Society (BTS) guidelines, 576 close contacts were identified and divided into three groups: (1) 303 renal patients including 61 with renal transplants; (2) 90 surgical patients; and (3) 183 staff members. Screened contacts were interviewed, completed a symptoms questionnaire, and were offered a chest radiograph and Heaf or Mantoux test if appropriate with referral to a chest physician if required. RESULTS--Overall, 524 (85%) living contacts have been screened: 243 (97%) renal (first screening), 63 (70%) surgical, and 135 (74%) staff contacts. Thirty one transplant patients were prescribed isoniazid chemoprophylaxis. Fifty two renal patients had died before screening and 11 deaths occurred after first interview. One case of tuberculosis epidemiologically related to the index case was diagnosed on clinical criteria. A review of the case records and/or death certificates and entries on to tuberculosis registers indicated no further cases. The cost of the investigation was estimated to be approximately franc25 000, or franc44 per contact screened, with staff costs comprising 79% of the total. CONCLUSIONS--Undiagnosed tuberculosis in healthcare workers working with immunosuppressed patients can lead to large and expensive follow up studies. The applicability of the 1990 and 1994 BTS guidelines to the investigation of tuberculosis in an immunocompromised nosocomial group, and the role of the infection control doctor and the consultant in Communicable Disease Control in overlapping nosocomial and community incidents, are discussed. PMID:7570438

  13. Resolution of hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury after treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis without the use of corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Constance A A; Araujo, Nicole A A; Daher, Elizabeth F; Oliveira, José Daniel B; Kubrusly, Marcos; Duarte, Pastora M A; Silva, Sonia L; Araujo, Sonia M H A

    2013-03-01

    Abstract. Hypercalcemia caused by tuberculosis is rare and it is usually asymptomatic. Tuberculosis (TB) -related hypercalcemia associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) is rarely reported. We report a case of a 22-year-old immunocompetent man with 1-month history of daily fever, asthenia and weight loss. Laboratory findings on admission included serum calcium 14.9 mg/dL, urinary Ca(2+) 569.6 mg/24 hours, low level of parathyroid hormone, serum creatinine = 2.2 mg/dL and sodium fractional excretion (FeNa) 2.73%. The result of the tuberculin skin test was 17 mm. A chest X-ray revealed micronodular pulmonary infiltrate in the apex of the right lung, which was confirmed by computed tomography scan. The patient was diagnosed with hypercalcemia associated with pulmonary TB and AKI. A general improvement of the hypercalcemia and renal function was observed in the first 2 weeks after effective hydration and treatment of TB without corticosteroids. The patient was discharged with normal calcium levels and renal function.

  14. The Poor Survival among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Chiapas, Mexico: The Case of Los Altos Region.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Ortiz, J C; Sánchez-Pérez, H J; Ochoa-Díaz-López, H; Leal-Fernández, G; Navarro-Giné, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse survival in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and factors associated with such survival. Design. Study of a cohort of patients aged over 14 years diagnosed with PTB from January 1, 1998 to July 31, 2005. During 2004-2006 a home visit was made to each patient and, during 2008-2009, they were visited again. During these visits a follow-up interview was administered; when the patient had died, a verbal autopsy was conducted with family members. Statistical analysis consisted of survival tests, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression. Results. Of 305 studied patients, 68 had died due to PTB by the time of the first evaluation, 237 were followed-up for a second evaluation, and 10 of them had died of PTB. According to the Cox regression, age (over 45 years) and treatment duration (under six months) were associated with a poorer survival. When treatment duration was excluded, the association between poorer survival with age persisted, whereas with having been treated via DOTS strategy, was barely significant. Conclusions. In the studied area it is necessary that patients receive a complete treatment scheme, and to give priority to patients aged over 45 years.

  15. The Poor Survival among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Chiapas, Mexico: The Case of Los Altos Region

    PubMed Central

    Nájera-Ortiz, J. C.; Sánchez-Pérez, H. J.; Ochoa-Díaz-López, H.; Leal-Fernández, G.; Navarro-Giné, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To analyse survival in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and factors associated with such survival. Design. Study of a cohort of patients aged over 14 years diagnosed with PTB from January 1, 1998 to July 31, 2005. During 2004–2006 a home visit was made to each patient and, during 2008-2009, they were visited again. During these visits a follow-up interview was administered; when the patient had died, a verbal autopsy was conducted with family members. Statistical analysis consisted of survival tests, Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression. Results. Of 305 studied patients, 68 had died due to PTB by the time of the first evaluation, 237 were followed-up for a second evaluation, and 10 of them had died of PTB. According to the Cox regression, age (over 45 years) and treatment duration (under six months) were associated with a poorer survival. When treatment duration was excluded, the association between poorer survival with age persisted, whereas with having been treated via DOTS strategy, was barely significant. Conclusions. In the studied area it is necessary that patients receive a complete treatment scheme, and to give priority to patients aged over 45 years. PMID:22701170

  16. [The effect of thymogen on the state of immunity in destructive pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Medus, A I; Pisarevskaia, L I; Nikishina, E V

    1999-10-01

    The article shows that the immunocorrector timoguen stimulates T-cell link in patients with destructive forms of pulmonary tuberculosis, increases tolerance for ethiotropics, makes intoxication syndromes disappear and heals decomposition cavities and stops the bacteria discharge. It recommends 2 courses of timoguen immunostimulation (1% solution by 1 ml injection N 10 in 2 days for 2 and 4 mouths' treatment course).

  17. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  18. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  19. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  20. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  1. 38 CFR 3.370 - Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shown by X-ray in active service. 3.370 Section 3.370 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Rating Considerations Relative to Specific Diseases § 3.370 Pulmonary tuberculosis shown by X-ray in active service. (a) Active disease. X-ray evidence alone may be adequate for grant of direct...

  2. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  3. [Use of essential oil of peppermint (Mentha piperita) in the complex treatment of patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Shkurupiĭ, V A; Odintsova, O A; Kazarinova, N V; Tkrachenko, K G

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the effects of peppermint (Mentha piperita) essential oil inhaled by patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the penitentiary system. This procedure is shown to be most effective in infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis in the phase of resorption of infiltrates and/or closure of decay cavities. The efficiency is determined by the rapid positive changes in a tuberculous process, which appear as a rapider regression of tuberculous inflammation, causing small residual changes. This procedure may be used to prevent recurrences and exacerbations of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  4. Quality of outcome reporting in phase II studies in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, Laura Jayne; Davies, Geraint Rhys

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major killer amongst the infectious diseases. Current treatment involves a four-drug regimen for at least 6 months. New drugs and regimens are required to shorten treatment duration, reduce toxicity and combat drug resistance, but the optimal methodology to define the critical path for novel regimens is not well defined. We undertook a systematic review to summarise outcomes reported in Phase II trials of patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB to assess the need for a core outcome set. A systematic search of databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACs) was conducted on 1 May 2015 to retrieve relevant peer-reviewed articles. Reference lists of included studies were also searched. This systematic review considered all reported outcomes. Risk of bias was considered via sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, reasons for exclusions, and selective reporting. Of 55 included studies, 20 were Phase IIB studies based on culture conversion, 32 were Phase IIA studies based on quantitative bacteriology, and three considered alternative outcomes. Large variation in reported outcomes and trial characteristics was observed across the included studies. Bacteriological results were as often expressed in terms of positivity as negativity, with varying definitions of culture conversion. Variation in reporting was particularly marked for Phase IIA studies, where multiple time intervals were typically selected for analysis and sometimes resulted in differing interpretations of the efficacy of drugs or regimens. Within both Phase IIA and IIB studies, there was variation in the time points at which the study participants were sampled, as well as in the bacteriological media and methods used. For successful future meta-analysis of early-phase studies, the findings of this review suggest that development of a core outcome set would be desirable. This would enable trial results to be more easily compared and combined, potentially leading to

  5. Treatment outcome of new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Penang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background According to the World Health Organization’s recent report, in Malaysia, tuberculosis (TB) treatment success rate for new smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients is still below the global success target of 85%. In this study, we evaluated TB treatment outcome among new smear positive PTB patients, and identified the predictors of unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer duration of treatment (i.e., > 6 months). Methods The population in this study consisted of all new smear positive PTB patients who were diagnosed at the chest clinic of Penang General Hospital between March 2010 and February 2011. During the study period, a standardized data collection form was used to obtain socio-demographic, clinical and treatment related data of the patients from their medical charts and TB notification forms (Tuberculosis Information System; TBIS). These data sources were reviewed at the time of the diagnosis of the patients and then at the subsequent follow-up visits until their final treatment outcomes were available. The treatment outcomes of the patients were reported in line with six outcome categories recommended by World Health Organization. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find the independent risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome and longer treatment duration. Data were analyzed using the PASW (Predictive Analysis SoftWare, version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results Among the 336 PTB patients (236 male and 100 female) notified during the study period, the treatment success rate was 67.26% (n = 226). Out of 110 patients in unsuccessful outcome category, 30 defaulted from the treatment, 59 died and 21 were transferred to other health care facilities. The mean duration of TB treatment was 8.19 (SD 1.65) months. In multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for unsuccessful treatment outcome were foreign nationality, male gender and being illiterate. Similarly, risk factors for mortality due to TB

  6. Relationship between human LTA4H polymorphisms and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in an ethnic Han Chinese population in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Jin; Yue, Jun; Liu, Lirong; Han, Min; Wang, Hongxiu

    2014-12-01

    Two single nucleotide polymorphisms in Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) gene were reported to be associated with protection from pulmonary tuberculosis in Vietnamese population. But these associations were not found in the Russians. To investigate the association of LTA4H polymorphisms with tuberculosis in a Han Chinese population in Eastern China, we genotyped 5 SNPs of LTA4H gene in 743 of pulmonary tuberculosis patients, 372 of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 888 of healthy controls individuals. The CC and TT homozygotes of rs1978331 and rs2540474 were identified to have higher rates (P < 0.01) and be risk factors in the patients with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (OR = 1.412; 95% CI = 1.104-1.804 and(OR = 1.380; 95% CI = 1.080-1.764). However, no significant association was found between any of the SNPs and pulmonary tuberculosis. In the extra-pulmonary tuberculosis subgroups. LTA4H gene were significantly associated with tuberculous meningitis, lymph node tuberculosis, bone tuberculosis and other extra-pulmonary tuberculosis except for pleural tuberculosis. The present findings suggest that polymorphisms in the LTA4H gene may affect susceptibility to extra-pulmonary tuberculosis and change the risk of developing the disease in the Han nationality in the East China.

  7. Accuracy of the Bronchoalveolar Lavage Enzyme-Linked Immunospot Assay for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Caishuang; Wu, Yanqiu; Wan, Chun; Shen, Konglong; Hu, Yuzhu; Yang, Ting; Shen, Yongchun; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Assessing of local immune response may improve the accuracy of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosis. Many studies have investigated diagnosing PTB based on enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, but the results have been inconclusive. We meta-analyzed the available evidences on overall diagnostic performance of ELISPOT assay of BAL fluid for diagnosing PTB. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, Wangfang, Weipu, and CNKI. Data were pooled on sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR). Overall test performance was summarized using summary receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve (AUC). Deeks test was used to test for potential publication bias. Seven publications with 814 subjects met our inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. The following pooled estimates for diagnostic parameters were obtained: sensitivity, 0.90 (95% CI: 0.85–0.94); specificity, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.77–0.84); PLR, 5.08 (95% CI: 2.70–9.57); NLR, 0.13 (95% CI: 0.06–0.28); DOR, 49.12 (95% CI: 12.97–186.00); and AUC, 0.96. No publication bias was identified. The available evidence suggests that ELISPOT assay of BAL fluid is a useful rapid diagnostic test for PTB. The results of this assay should be interpreted in parallel with clinical findings and the results of conventional tests. PMID:27015211

  8. Vitamin D deficiency in Malawian adults with pulmonary tuberculosis: risk factors and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mwandumba, H. C.; Kamdolozi, M.; Shani, D.; Chisale, B.; Dutton, J.; Khoo, S. H.; Allain, T. J.; Davies, G. R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY SETTING: Vitamin D deficiency is common in African adults with tuberculosis (TB), and may be exacerbated by the metabolic effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs and antiretroviral therapy (ART). It is unclear whether vitamin D deficiency influences response to anti-tuberculosis treatment. OBJECTIVES: To describe risk factors for baseline vitamin D deficiency in Malawian adults with pulmonary TB, assess the relationship between serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration and treatment response, and evaluate whether the administration of anti-tuberculosis drugs and ART is deleterious to vitamin D status during treatment. DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal cohort study. RESULTS: The median baseline 25(OH)D concentration of the 169 patients (58% human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] infected) recruited was 57 nmol/l; 47 (28%) had vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/l). Baseline 25(OH)D concentrations were lower during the cold season (P < 0.001), with food insecurity (P = 0.034) or in patients who consumed alcohol (P = 0.019). No relationship between vitamin D status and anti-tuberculosis treatment response was found. 25(OH)D concentrations increased during anti-tuberculosis treatment, irrespective of HIV status or use of ART. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is common among TB patients in Malawi, but this does not influence treatment response. Adverse metabolic effects of drug treatment may be compensated by the positive impact of clinical recovery preventing exacerbation of vitamin D deficiency during anti-tuberculosis treatment. PMID:26162355

  9. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae. PMID:27583077

  10. The effectiveness of sputum pH analysis in the prediction of response to therapy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Makoto; Sato, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Kudo, Makoto; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The predictive factor of response to antituberculous therapy has not been fully elucidated. Airway acidity has been thought to be a potential indicator of the bactericidal activity. Therefore, we hypothesized that monitoring airway acidity by measuring sputum pH could predict response to therapy. Methods. A total of 47 patients having newly diagnosed, smear-positive, active pulmonary tuberculosis were enrolled between October 2011 and March 2014. Sputum samples were serially analyzed before and after treatment. Eligible patients who initiated a standard 6-month treatment were monitored for the length of time to sputum smear and culture conversion. Results. There were 39 patients who completed a 2-month intensive phase of isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol therapy followed by a 4-month continuation phase of isoniazid and rifampicin. Although factors including age, cavitation, sputum grade, and use of an acid-suppressant were associated with initial low sputum pH in univariate analysis, multivariate analysis revealed that only age ≥61 years was a statistically important factor predicting low pH value (p = 0.005). Further outcome analysis showed that initial low sputum pH before treatment was the only factor significantly associated with shorter length of time to both sputum smear and culture conversion (p = 0.034 and 0.019, respectively) independent of the effects of age, sputum bacterial load, extent of lung lesion, and cavitation. Thus, initial low sputum pH indicated favorable response to anti-tuberculosis therapy. Conclusions. Measuring sputum pH is an easy and inexpensive way of predicting response to standard combination therapy in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26644982

  11. TLR2-targeted secreted proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis are protective as powdered pulmonary vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tyne, Anneliese S; Chan, John Gar Yan; Shanahan, Erin R; Atmosukarto, Ines; Chan, Hak-Kim; Britton, Warwick J; West, Nicholas P

    2013-09-13

    Despite considerable research efforts towards effective treatments, tuberculosis (TB) remains a staggering burden on global health. Suitably formulated sub-unit vaccines offer potential as safe and effective generators of protective immunity. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens, cutinase-like proteins (Culp) 1 and 6 and MPT83, were conjugated directly to the novel adjuvant Lipokel (Lipotek Pty Ltd), a TLR2 ligand that delivers antigen to immune cells in a self-adjuvanting context. Protein-Lipokel complexes were formulated as dry powders for pulmonary delivery directly to the lungs of mice by intra-tracheal insufflation, leading to recruitment of neutrophils and antigen presenting cell populations to the lungs at 72 h, that persisted at 7 days post immunisation. Significant increases in the frequency of activated dendritic cells were observed in the mediastinal lymph node (MLN) at 1 and 4 weeks after homologous boosting with protein-Lipokel vaccine. This was associated with the increased recruitment of effector CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-lymphocytes to the MLN and systemic antigen-specific, IFN-γ producing T-lymphocyte and IgG responses. Notably, pulmonary immunisation with either Culp1-6-Lipokel or MPT83-Lipokel powder vaccines generated protective responses in the lungs against aerosol M. tuberculosis challenge. The successful combination of TLR2-targeting and dry powder vaccine formulation, together with important practical benefits, offers potential for pulmonary vaccination against M. tuberculosis. PMID:23880366

  12. Childhood pulmonary tuberculosis: old wisdom and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Marais, Ben J; Gie, Robert P; Schaaf, H Simon; Beyers, Nulda; Donald, Peter R; Starke, Jeff R

    2006-05-15

    Childhood tuberculosis is neglected in endemic areas with resource constraints, as children are considered to develop mild forms of disease and to contribute little to the maintenance of the tuberculosis epidemic. However, children contribute a significant proportion of the disease burden and suffer severe tuberculosis-related morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas. This review provides an overview of well-documented concepts and principles, and demonstrates how this "old wisdom" applies to current and future challenges in the field of childhood tuberculosis; the aim was to articulate some of the most pressing issues, to provide a rational framework for discussion, and to stimulate thought and further scientific study. The prechemotherapy literature that described the natural history of disease in children identified three central concepts: (1) the need for accurate case definitions, (2) the importance of risk stratification, and (3) the diverse spectrum of disease pathology, which necessitates accurate disease classification. The relevance of these concepts and their application to pertinent issues such as the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis are discussed. The concepts are also linked to the basic principles of antituberculosis treatment, providing a simplified approach to the diagnosis and treatment of childhood tuberculosis that is independent of resource constraints. The main challenges for future research are highlighted and in conclusion it is emphasized that the infrastructure provided by the directly observed therapy, short-course strategy, combined with well-targeted interventions, slightly improved resources, and greatly improved political commitment, may lead to a dramatic reduction in tuberculosis-related morbidity and mortality among children. PMID:16484674

  13. Evaluation of a Quantitative Serological Assay for Diagnosing Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuka; Suzuki, Hokuto; Doushita, Kazushi; Kuroda, Hikaru; Takahashi, Masaaki; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Tadakatsu; Fujikane, Toshiaki; Osanai, Shinobu; Sasaki, Takaaki; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of a quantitative Aspergillus IgG assay for diagnosing chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. We examined Aspergillus-specific IgG levels in patients who met the following criteria: (i) chronic (duration of >3 months) pulmonary or systemic symptoms, (ii) radiological evidence of a progressive (over months or years) pulmonary lesion with surrounding inflammation, and (iii) no major discernible immunocompromising factors. Anti-Aspergillus IgG serum levels were retrospectively analyzed according to defined classifications. Mean Aspergillus IgG levels were significantly higher in the proven group than those in the possible and control groups (P < 0.01). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the Aspergillus IgG cutoff value for diagnosing proven cases was 50 mg of antigen-specific antibodies/liter (area under the curve, 0.94; sensitivity, 0.98; specificity, 0.84). The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing proven cases using this cutoff were 0.77 and 0.78, respectively. The positive rates of Aspergillus IgG in the proven and possible groups were 97.9% and 39.2%, respectively, whereas that of the control group was 6.6%. The quantitative Aspergillus IgG assay offers reliable sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing chronic pulmonary aspergillosis and may be an alternative to the conventional precipitin test. PMID:27008878

  14. Three plasma metabolite signatures for diagnosing high altitude pulmonary edema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Tan, Guangguo; Liu, Ping; Li, Huijie; Tang, Lulu; Huang, Lan; Ren, Qian

    2015-10-01

    High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a potentially fatal condition, occurring at altitudes greater than 3,000 m and affecting rapidly ascending, non-acclimatized healthy individuals. However, the lack of biomarkers for this disease still constitutes a bottleneck in the clinical diagnosis. Here, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with Q-TOF mass spectrometry was applied to study plasma metabolite profiling from 57 HAPE and 57 control subjects. 14 differential plasma metabolites responsible for the discrimination between the two groups from discovery set (35 HAPE subjects and 35 healthy controls) were identified. Furthermore, 3 of the 14 metabolites (C8-ceramide, sphingosine and glutamine) were selected as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for HAPE using metabolic pathway impact analysis. The feasibility of using the combination of these three biomarkers for HAPE was evaluated, where the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.981 and 0.942 in the discovery set and the validation set (22 HAPE subjects and 22 healthy controls), respectively. Taken together, these results suggested that this composite plasma metabolite signature may be used in HAPE diagnosis, especially after further investigation and verification with larger samples.

  15. [Use of alpha-tocopherol acetate in the treatment of hemodynamic disorders in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ditiatkov, A E; Tikhonov, V A; Radzevich, A E; Zholnin, P A

    2005-01-01

    Examination of 101 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis established the impact of specific intoxication on central hemodynamics in 51 patients. Specific treatment was found to have a certain positive effect on impaired hemodynamics. However, there were no significant changes in patients with severe tuberculosis. Hemodynamics substantially improved when alpha-tocopherol acetate was supplemented to antibacterial therapy.

  16. Air Pollution and Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Nested Case–Control Study among Members of a Northern California Health Plan

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Geneé S.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Garcia, Cynthia; Shan, Jun; Baxter, Roger; Herring, Amy H.; Richardson, David B.; Van Rie, Annelies; Emch, Michael; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ecologic analyses, case–case comparisons, and animal experiments suggest positive associations between air pollution and tuberculosis. Objectives: We evaluated this hypothesis in a large sample, which yielded results that are applicable to the general population. Methods: We conducted a case–control study nested within a cohort of Kaiser Permanente of Northern California members. All active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) cases newly diagnosed between 1996 and 2010 (n = 2,309) were matched to two controls (n = 4,604) by age, sex, and race/ethnicity on the index date corresponding with the case diagnosis date. Average individual-level concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and 10 μm (PM10) for 2 years before diagnosis/entry into the study were estimated using measurements from the California Air Resources Board monitor closest to the participant’s residence. Results: In single-pollutant adjusted conditional logistic regression models, the pulmonary TB odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest quintile (vs. lowest) were 1.50 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.95) for CO and 1.42 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.84) for NO2. Corresponding estimates were higher among never [1.68 (95% CI: 1.26, 2.24)] than ever [1.19 (95% CI: 0.74, 1.92)] smokers for CO. In contrast, for NO2, estimates were higher among ever [1.81 (95% CI: 1.13, 2.91)] than never [1.29 (95% CI: 0.97, 1.71)] smokers. O3 was inversely associated for smokers [0.66 (95% CI: 0.43, 1.02)] and never smokers [0.65 (95% CI: 0.52, 0.81)]. No other consistent patterns were observed. Conclusions: In this first, to our knowledge, U.S. nested case–control study on air pollution and pulmonary TB, we observed positive associations with ambient CO and NO2, which require confirmation. Citation: Smith GS, Van Den Eeden SK, Garcia C, Shan J, Baxter R, Herring AH, Richardson DB, Van Rie A, Emch M

  17. [Immunomodulator Intensification of Etioropic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kolomiets, V M; Abramov, A V; Rachina, N V; Rubleva, N V

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed at possible increase of the therapy efficacy in patients with advanced tuberculosis by including immunomodulators to the treatment schemes. The data concerning 6034 patients with advanced tuberculosis, mainly fibrocavernous tuberculosis of the lungs, were analysed. Four groups of the patients were randomized. In group 1 the management of the patients included etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures with the use of Cycloferon. The group 2 patients in addition to the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures were given Omega-3. In group 3 the management included the etiotropic therapy and some treatment and rehabilitation measures. In group 4 the etioropic therapy was used alone. The analysis showed that 3419 patients had primary pulmonary tuberculosis, 340 patients had relapsing tuberculosis and 2275 patients had long-term process. The etiotropic therapy efficacy was estimated after an intensive phase of not more than 3 months. In the cases with Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance and some other unfavourable factors it was estimated after a 5-month intensive phase. The results confirmed that inclusion of immunomodulators to the treatment schemes allowed to increase the therapy efficacy and the patients' adherence to the treatment, as well as to shorten the period of the bacteria carriage. Thus, the use of Cycloferon in the schemes of the treatment of the patients with fibrocavernous pulmonary tuberculosis allowed to shorten the period of the pathogen carriage (as well as the drug resistant forms) in 94.1 ± 3.33% of the patients in spite of concomitant diseases. The effect of Cycloferon in such cases was likely due to both its direct immunoprotective action and the improvement of the general state of the patients and their higher adherence to the treatment.

  18. Evaluation of a whole-blood chemiluminescent immunoassay of IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 for diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Li, Hang; Yang, Yourong; Liu, Jianyang; Yu, Ting; Wu, Xueqiong

    2016-10-01

    The study explored the use of IP-10, MCP-1, and IFN-γ as biomarkers to improve the diagnoses of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy. We enrolled 267 individuals, including 134 TB patients, 93 patients with non-tuberculous pulmonary diseases, and 40 healthy controls. Whole bloods were stimulated in vitro with rCFP-10/ESAT-6 protein antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The levels of IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 in cultured supernatants of whole bloods were detected by a chemiluminescence immunoassay. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn to determine the cutoff value for diagnosing TB and to evaluate the diagnostic efficacies of the IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 for TB. The antigen-specific release of each cytokine, IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1, was significantly higher in the TB groups than in either the non-tuberculous pulmonary disease group (p < 0.001) or the healthy control group (p < 0.001). The ROC curves indicated cutoff values for IFN-γ, IP-10, and MCP-1 at 147.8, 160.4, and 496.4 pg/mL, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and diagnostic efficiency for IFN-γ were 85.8%, 70.7%, 74.7%, 83.2%, and 78.3%, respectively; for IP-10 were 72.4%, 75.9%, 75.2%, 73.2%, and 74.2%, respectively; and for MCP-1 were 90.3%, 97.0%, 96.8%, 90.8%, and 93.6%, respectively. IFN-γ combined MCP-1 improved the sensitivity to 97.8% compared with IFN-γ (p < 0.001). Our findings indicate high sensitivity and specificity of MCP-1 as novel biomarkers for the diagnosis of active pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous pleurisy.

  19. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen. PMID:27635298

  20. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-09-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen. PMID:27635298

  1. Comparison of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens between a group of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis and healthy household contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M; Mendez-Sampeiro, P; Jimenez-Zamudio, L; Teran, L; Camarena, A; Quezada, R; Ramos, E; Sada, E

    1994-01-01

    The mycobacterial antigens and the factors related to protection for the development of active tuberculosis are not known. In a natural model of tuberculosis, we studied 10 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (non-protective immune response) and 38 healthy household contacts (protective immune response). We tested the lymphocyte proliferative response by T cell Western blotting to eight different antigen fractions and to two purified mycobacterial antigens of 30 and 64 kD. Patients with active tuberculosis recognized fractions with molecular weights of 80-114, 60-80, 28-41 and 14-19 kD. Household contacts recognized the same fractions except the 14-19 kD. The response to the 64-kD antigen was not significantly different between groups. In contrast, 10% of the patients with active tuberculosis and 73% of the household contacts responded to the 30-kD antigen. The humoral response against the 30-kD antigen by ELISA showed a significantly higher production of antibodies in tuberculosis patients compared with household contacts. We conclude that patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis develop an immune response characterized by poor proliferative response to the 30-kD antigen with a strong humoral response, whereas the opposite occurs in healthy subjects infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:8149670

  2. Rapid and effective diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis with novel and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay in clinical samples: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Le-yong; Li, Yan; Wang, Ming; Ke, Zun-qiong; Xu, Wan-zhou

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay has been introduced for the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We performed the meta-analysis to establish the overall accuracy of LAMP assay for diagnosing pulmonary TB. Based on comprehensive searches of the pubmed, embase and cochrane databases, we identified outcome datas from all articles estimating diagnostic accuracy with LAMP assay until 1 October 2012. A summary estimation for sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR) and the area under the summary ROC curve (AUC) was calculated by using the bivariate random-effects approach. The meta-analysis included 10 studies (1920 suspected specimens). The summary estimate was 80.0% (95%CI, 78.0%-83.0%) for sensitivity, 96.0% (95%CI, 95.0%-97.0%) for specificity and 119.85/0.9633 for DOR/AUC in pulmonary TB. The findings in subgroup analysis were as follows: the accuracy of LAMP assay is higher in high quality level studies than moderate and low quality level studies. The pooled sensitivity for the diagnosis of pulmonary TB was 90.0% (95%CI, 86.0-93.0%) and 75.0% (95%CI, 71.0-78.0%) for high quality level studies and moderate combined low quality level studies, respectively, while the specificity was 99.0% (95%CI, 98.0-100.0%) and 91.0% (95%CI, 88.0-94.0%). Pulmonary TB can be rapidly and accurately diagnosed with LAMP assay.

  3. Pulmonary symptoms and diagnoses are associated with HIV in the MACS and WIHS cohorts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lung diseases are increasingly recognized as comorbidities with HIV; however, few data exist related to the spectrum of respiratory symptoms, diagnostic testing, and diagnoses in the current HIV era. The objective of the study is to determine the impact of HIV on prevalence and incidence of respiratory disease in the current era of effective antiretroviral treatment. Methods A pulmonary-specific questionnaire was administered yearly for three years to participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and Women’s Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Adjusted prevalence ratios for respiratory symptoms, testing, or diagnoses and adjusted incidence rate ratios for diagnoses in HIV-infected compared to HIV-uninfected participants were determined. Risk factors for outcomes in HIV-infected individuals were modeled. Results Baseline pulmonary questionnaires were completed by 907 HIV-infected and 989 HIV-uninfected participants in the MACS cohort and by 1405 HIV-infected and 571 HIV-uninfected participants in the WIHS cohort. In MACS, dyspnea, cough, wheezing, sleep apnea, and incident chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were more common in HIV-infected participants. In WIHS, wheezing and sleep apnea were more common in HIV-infected participants. Smoking (MACS and WIHS) and greater body mass index (WIHS) were associated with more respiratory symptoms and diagnoses. While sputum studies, bronchoscopies, and chest computed tomography scans were more likely to be performed in HIV-infected participants, pulmonary function tests were no more common in HIV-infected individuals. Respiratory symptoms in HIV-infected individuals were associated with history of pneumonia, cardiovascular disease, or use of HAART. A diagnosis of asthma or COPD was associated with previous pneumonia. Conclusions In these two cohorts, HIV is an independent risk factor for several respiratory symptoms and pulmonary diseases including COPD and sleep apnea. Despite a higher

  4. Rapid Screening of MDR-TB in Cases of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis Using Geno Type MTBDRplus

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Richa; Tripathi, Rajneesh; Pandey, Alok Prakash; Banerjee, Tuhina; Sinha, Pallavi; Anupurba, Shampa

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistance in tuberculosis is a major public health challenge in developing countries. The limited data available on drug resistance in extra pulmonary tuberculosis stimulated us to design our study on anti-tuberculosis drug resistance pattern in cases of extra pulmonary tuberculosis in a tertiary referral hospital of North India. We performed Geno Type MTBDRplus assay in comparison with conventional drug susceptibility testing by proportion method to study the mutation patterns in rpoB, katG and inhA genes. Methods A total of 510 extra pulmonary samples were included in this study. After the smear microscopy, all the specimens were subjected for culture on Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) media. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) was performed on LJ media for all the MTB isolates and compared with the results of Geno Type MTBDRplus assay which was performed with the DNA isolated from the culture by conventional method. Results Of 510 specimens cultured, the total culture positivity obtained was 11.8% (60) encompassing 54 (10.6%) Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 6 (1.2%) non-tubercular mycobacteria (NTM). DST results by Geno Type MTBDRplus assay and solid culture methods were compared in 51 MTB isolates excluding the two Rif indeterminate and one invalid test. Geno Type MTBDRplus accurately identified 13 of 14 rifampicin-resistant strains, 14 of 15 isoniazid-resistant strains and 13 of 14 as multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in comparison with conventional method. Sensitivity and specificity were 92.86% and 97.30% respectively for detection of RIF resistance, 93.33% and 94.44% respectively for detection of INH resistance, 92.86% and 97.30% respectively for detection of MDR-TB, while the overall concordance of Geno Type MTBDRplus assay with conventional DST was 94.11%. The turn-around time for performing Geno Type MTBDRplus assay test was 48 hours. Conclusion The problem of MDR in extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) cannot be overlooked and

  5. Intracellular levels and extracellular release of lysosomal enzymes from peripheral blood monocytes in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Jaswal, S; Dhand, R; Sethi, A K; Kohli, K K; Ganguly, N K

    1993-01-01

    The intracellular activity and extracellular release (basal and latex-stimulated) of B-glucuronidase (BG) and N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), measured fluorimetrically, were observed to be significantly (P < 0.05) higher in blood monocytes (BM) of untreated pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients compared to those of age- and sex-matched controls and Mantoux-positive subjects without any evidence of active disease. After completion of antituberculous therapy, BG and NAG activities declined appreciably (P < 0.05) and their levels became comparable to those in control subjects. The present results suggest the potentiation of the oxygen-independent defense mechanism of BM in pulmonary TB. PMID:8457326

  6. CD14 contributes to pulmonary inflammation and mortality during murine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Catharina W; van der Windt, Gerritje J W; Wiersinga, W Joost; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors play an essential role in the innate recognition of micro-organisms by the host. CD14 is one of the extracellular adaptor proteins required for recognition of Gram-negative bacteria and possibly also Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, we intranasally infected wild-type (WT) and CD14 knock-out (KO) mice with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv. We found no differences in bacterial load in the main target organ lung up to 32 weeks after infection. From 20 weeks onward 57% of WT mice succumbed, whereas all CD14 KO mice survived. The improved outcome of CD14 KO mice was accompanied by reduced pulmonary inflammation; lung cell counts and percentage of inflamed lung tissue were reduced in CD14 WT mice. These data suggest that during chronic infection CD14 KO mice are protected from lethality caused by lung tuberculosis because of a reduction of the inflammatory response. PMID:18393969

  7. [Pulmonary tuberculosis of occupational origin in a funeral director: a case report].

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Anna; Wiszniewska, Marta; Krakowiak, Anna; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    In Poland the incidence rate of tuberculosis is higher than the average for countries of the European Union, Norway or Iceland. On the other hand, occupational tuberculosis is still rarely recognized in our country. In this paper we present the first in Poland--to our best knowledge--case of pulmonary manifestation of this disease acquired at work in a funeral director. The recognition of the occupational etiology of the discussed illness gave rise to an array of diagnostic problems and became feasible after a thorough analysis of the patient's history and literature data, which allowed finding the relationship between infection and performed job. We speculated that the transfer of the dead body and handling of cadavers may expel residual air from the lungs of the deceased. Although tuberculosis occurs frequently in the general population, the recognition of work-related cases of this disease is still rare, especially among funeral directors.

  8. A case of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Das, Joyutpal; Layton, Benjamin; Lamb, Harriet; Sinnott, Nicola; Leahy, Bernard C

    2015-11-01

    Serratia marcescens is a saprophytic gram-negative bacillus capable of causing a wide range of infections. A 57-year-old female was admitted to our hospital for four weeks with community acquired pneumonia. A chest x-ray, six weeks after discharge, demonstrated multiple, bilateral 'cannon ball'-like opacities and mediastinal lymphadenopathy which were highly suspicious of disseminated malignancy or tuberculosis. The only symptom that this patient had was a productive cough. She had multiple commodities, but no specific immunodeficiency disorder. Interestingly, her sputum and bronchial washing samples grew S. marcescens. The computed tomography-guided lung biopsy demonstrated necrotic granulomatous changes. There was no pathological evidence of tuberculosis or fungal infection, malignancy or vasculitis. There are only a handful of reported cases of Serratia granulomas. Thus, we are reporting a rare instance of pulmonary Serratia marcescens granuloma radiologically mimicking metastatic malignancy and tuberculosis infection.

  9. Prospective cross-sectional evaluation of the small membrane filtration method for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jones-López, Edward; Manabe, Yukari C; Palaci, Moises; Kayiza, Carol; Armstrong, Derek; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ssengooba, Willy; Gaeddert, Mary; Kubiak, Rachel; Almeida Júnior, Pedro; Alland, David; Dietze, Reynaldo; Joloba, Moses; Ellner, Jerrold J; Dorman, Susan E

    2014-07-01

    Smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity, and there is a need to improve its performance since it is commonly used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the small membrane filtration (SMF) method, an approach that uses a vacuum manifold and is designed to concentrate bacilli onto a filter that can be examined microscopically. We enrolled hospitalized adults suspected to have pulmonary TB in Kampala, Uganda. We obtained a clinical history and three spontaneously expectorated sputum specimens for smear microscopy (direct, concentrated, and SMF), MGIT (mycobacterial growth indicator tube) 960 and Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) cultures, and Xpert MTB/RIF testing. We performed per-specimen (primary) and per-patient analyses. From October 2012 to June 2013, we enrolled 212 patients (579 sputum specimens). The participants were mostly female (63.2%), and 81.6% were HIV infected; their median CD4 cell count was 47 cells/μl. Overall, 19.0%, 20.4%, 27.1%, 25.2%, and 25.9% of specimens tested positive by direct smear, concentrated smear, MGIT culture, LJ culture, and Xpert test, respectively. In the per-specimen analysis, the sensitivity of the SMF method (48.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 37.4 to 59.6) was lower than those of direct smear (60.9%; 51.4 to 70.5 [P = 0.0001]) and concentrated smear (63.3%; 53.6 to 73.1 [P < 0.0001]). Subgroup analyses showed that SMF performed poorly in specimens having a low volume or low bacterial load. The SMF method performed poorly compared to standard smear techniques and was sensitive to sample preparation techniques. The optimal laboratory SMF protocol may require striking a fine balance between sample dilution and filtration failure rate.

  10. Retrospective cohort evaluation on risk of pneumonia in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsui-Ming; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Shen, Te-Chun; Yang, Chien-Lung; Yang, Min-Hui; Wu, Fang-Yang; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTb) and pneumonia are diseases that may exist concomitantly. Population study investigating the subsequent pneumonia development in PTb patients is limited. This study compares the risk of pneumonia between cohorts with and without PTb.We used the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance to identify a cohort with PTb (N = 3417) newly diagnosed in 2000-2006 without pneumonia history, and a randomly selected comparison cohort (N = 6834) free of PTb and pneumonia, frequency matched by propensity score. Incidence rates and hazard ratios of pneumonia were calculated by sex, age, and comorbidity starting in the 7th month after the cohorts being established until the end of 2011.We found the incidence of pneumonia to be 1.9-fold higher in the PTb cohort than in the PTb free cohort (51.6 vs 27.0 per 1000 person-years). The PTb cohort had a Cox method estimated adjusted hazard ratio of 2.14 (95% confidence interval = 1.96-2.32). We also found that the risk was greater for men than for women, but lower for young adults aged 20-39 years. Comorbidity interacted with PTb by aggravating the pneumonia risk, particularly for those with asthma. For PTb patients comorbid with asthma, the pneumonia incidence was 2.5-fold higher than for PTb patients free of comorbidities (75.9 vs 29.3 per 1000 person-years).Our results display that PTb patients have an elevated risk of developing pneumonia. Adequate follow-up should be provided to the PTb patients, especially those with comorbidity. PMID:27368009

  11. Retrospective cohort evaluation on risk of pneumonia in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsui-Ming; Mou, Chih-Hsin; Shen, Te-Chun; Yang, Chien-Lung; Yang, Min-Hui; Wu, Fang-Yang; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTb) and pneumonia are diseases that may exist concomitantly. Population study investigating the subsequent pneumonia development in PTb patients is limited. This study compares the risk of pneumonia between cohorts with and without PTb. We used the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance to identify a cohort with PTb (N = 3417) newly diagnosed in 2000–2006 without pneumonia history, and a randomly selected comparison cohort (N = 6834) free of PTb and pneumonia, frequency matched by propensity score. Incidence rates and hazard ratios of pneumonia were calculated by sex, age, and comorbidity starting in the 7th month after the cohorts being established until the end of 2011. We found the incidence of pneumonia to be 1.9-fold higher in the PTb cohort than in the PTb free cohort (51.6 vs 27.0 per 1000 person-years). The PTb cohort had a Cox method estimated adjusted hazard ratio of 2.14 (95% confidence interval = 1.96–2.32). We also found that the risk was greater for men than for women, but lower for young adults aged 20–39 years. Comorbidity interacted with PTb by aggravating the pneumonia risk, particularly for those with asthma. For PTb patients comorbid with asthma, the pneumonia incidence was 2.5-fold higher than for PTb patients free of comorbidities (75.9 vs 29.3 per 1000 person-years). Our results display that PTb patients have an elevated risk of developing pneumonia. Adequate follow-up should be provided to the PTb patients, especially those with comorbidity. PMID:27368009

  12. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma detected in a family member after confirmation of tuberculosis in his father.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Katsunari; Imanishi, Naoko; Matsuoka, Takahisa; Nagai, Shinjiro; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is an uncommon lung disease that usually presents as bilateral multiple nodules, and more rarely as a solitary nodule. An exaggerated immune response to antigenic stimuli resulting from infection or an autoimmune process has been suggested as the cause of PHG. Here, we describe a rare case of solitary PHG that was detected in a family member after tuberculosis had been confirmed in his father, without any background of infectious disease or autoimmune abnormality. PMID:23903707

  13. Evidence From Chile That Arsenic in Drinking Water May Increase Mortality From Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Allan H.; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic in drinking water causes increased mortality from several cancers, ischemic heart disease, bronchiectasis, and other diseases. This paper presents the first evidence relating arsenic exposure to pulmonary tuberculosis, by estimating mortality rate ratios for Region II of Chile compared with Region V for the years 1958–2000. The authors compared mortality rate ratios with time patterns of arsenic exposure, which increased abruptly in 1958 in Region II and then declined starting in 1971. Tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men started increasing in 1968, 10 years after high arsenic exposure commenced. The peak male 5-year mortality rate ratio occurred during 1982–1986 (rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 2.6; P < 0.001) and subsequently declined. Mortality rates in women were also elevated but with fewer excess pulmonary tuberculosis deaths (359 among men and 95 among women). The clear rise and fall of tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men following high arsenic exposure are consistent with a causal relation. The findings are biologically plausible in view of evidence that arsenic is an immunosuppressant and also a cause of chronic lung disease. Finding weaker associations in women is unsurprising, because this is true of most arsenic-caused health effects. Confirmatory evidence is needed from other arsenic-exposed populations. PMID:21190988

  14. Rapid culture-based diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in developed and developing countries.

    PubMed

    Asmar, Shady; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, with 9 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths mainly in developing countries. Reviewing data reported over 20 years yields a state-of-the-art procedure for the routine culture of M. tuberculosis in both developed and developing countries. Useful specimens include sputum, induced sputum, and stools collected in quaternary ammonium preservative-containing sterile cans. The usefulness of other non-invasive specimens remains to be evaluated. Specimens can be collected in a diagnosis kit also containing sampling materials, instructions, laboratory requests, and informed consent. Automated direct LED fluorescence microscopy after auramine staining precedes inoculation of an egg-lecithin-containing culture solid medium under microaerophilic atmosphere, inverted microscope reading or scanning video-imaging detection of colonies and colonies identification by recent molecular methods. This procedure should result in a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis as fast as 5 days. It may be implemented in both developed and developing countries with automated steps replaceable by manual steps depending on local resources. PMID:26579092

  15. Antimycobacterial drugs modulate immunopathogenic matrix metalloproteinases in a cellular model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shivani; Kubler, Andre; Singh, Utpal K; Singh, Ajay; Gardiner, Harriet; Prasad, Rajniti; Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis is characterized by extensive destruction and remodelling of the pulmonary extracellular matrix. Stromal cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in this process and may be a target for adjunctive immunotherapy. We hypothesized that MMPs are elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of tuberculosis patients and that antimycobacterial agents may have a modulatory effect on MMP secretion. Concentrations of MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, and -9 were elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from tuberculosis patients compared to those in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with other pulmonary conditions. There was a positive correlation between MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8 and a chest radiological score of cavitation and parenchymal damage. Respiratory epithelial cell-derived MMP-3 was suppressed by moxifloxacin, rifampicin, and azithromycin in a dose-dependent manner. Respiratory epithelial cell-derived MMP-1 was suppressed by moxifloxacin and azithromycin, whereas MMP-9 secretion was only decreased by moxifloxacin. In contrast, moxifloxacin and azithromycin both increased MMP-1 and -3 secretion from MRC-5 fibroblasts, demonstrating that the effects of these drugs are cell specific. Isoniazid did not affect MMP secretion. In conclusion, MMPs are elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from tuberculosis patients and correlate with parameters of tissue destruction. Antimycobacterial agents have a hitherto-undescribed immunomodulatory effect on MMP release by stromal cells.

  16. Rapid culture-based diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in developed and developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Asmar, Shady; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, with 9 million new cases and 1.5 million deaths mainly in developing countries. Reviewing data reported over 20 years yields a state-of-the-art procedure for the routine culture of M. tuberculosis in both developed and developing countries. Useful specimens include sputum, induced sputum, and stools collected in quaternary ammonium preservative-containing sterile cans. The usefulness of other non-invasive specimens remains to be evaluated. Specimens can be collected in a diagnosis kit also containing sampling materials, instructions, laboratory requests, and informed consent. Automated direct LED fluorescence microscopy after auramine staining precedes inoculation of an egg-lecithin-containing culture solid medium under microaerophilic atmosphere, inverted microscope reading or scanning video-imaging detection of colonies and colonies identification by recent molecular methods. This procedure should result in a diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis as fast as 5 days. It may be implemented in both developed and developing countries with automated steps replaceable by manual steps depending on local resources. PMID:26579092

  17. Evidence from Chile that arsenic in drinking water may increase mortality from pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Allan H; Marshall, Guillermo; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane; Ferreccio, Catterina; Steinmaus, Craig

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic in drinking water causes increased mortality from several cancers, ischemic heart disease, bronchiectasis, and other diseases. This paper presents the first evidence relating arsenic exposure to pulmonary tuberculosis, by estimating mortality rate ratios for Region II of Chile compared with Region V for the years 1958-2000. The authors compared mortality rate ratios with time patterns of arsenic exposure, which increased abruptly in 1958 in Region II and then declined starting in 1971. Tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men started increasing in 1968, 10 years after high arsenic exposure commenced. The peak male 5-year mortality rate ratio occurred during 1982-1986 (rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 2.6; P < 0.001) and subsequently declined. Mortality rates in women were also elevated but with fewer excess pulmonary tuberculosis deaths (359 among men and 95 among women). The clear rise and fall of tuberculosis mortality rate ratios in men following high arsenic exposure are consistent with a causal relation. The findings are biologically plausible in view of evidence that arsenic is an immunosuppressant and also a cause of chronic lung disease. Finding weaker associations in women is unsurprising, because this is true of most arsenic-caused health effects. Confirmatory evidence is needed from other arsenic-exposed populations.

  18. Correlates of Delayed Diagnosis among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in a Rural HIV Clinic, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Respicious; Moshabela, Mosa; Zulliger, Rose; Macpherson, Peter; Nyasulu, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background. Delay in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) diagnosis is one of the major factors that affect outcome and threatens continued spread of tuberculosis. This study aimed at determining factors associated with delayed PTB diagnosis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals. Methods. A retrospective observational study was done using clinic records of HIV-infected PTB suspects attending an HIV/AIDS clinic at Tintswalo rural hospital in South Africa (SA) between January 2006 and December 2007. Using routine clinic registers, 480 records were identified. Results. PTB diagnosis delay was found among 77/176 (43.8%) of the patients diagnosed with PTB. The mean delay of PTB diagnosis was 170.6 days; diagnosis delay ranged 1-30 days in 27 (35.1%) patients, 31-180 days in 24 (33.8%) patients; 24 (31.2%) patients remained undiagnosed for ≥180 days. Independent factors associated with delayed diagnosis were: older age >40 years (Odds Ratio (OR) 3.43, 95% CI 1.45-8.08) and virological failure (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.09-6.74). Conclusion. There is a considerable delayed PTB diagnosis among HIV-infected patients in rural SA. Older patients as well as patients with high viral load are at a higher risk of PTB diagnosis delay. Therefore efforts to reduce PTB diagnosis delay need to emphasised.

  19. Radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients in Dourados, MS, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Lachi, Tatiana; Nakayama, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the radiological findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous patients from the city of Dourados, MS, Brazil, according to age and sex. Materials and Methods Chest radiographic images of 81 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, acquired in the period from 2007 to 2010, were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists in consensus for the presence or absence of changes. The findings in abnormal radiographs were classified according to the changes observed and they were correlated to age and sex. The data were submitted to statistical analysis. Results The individuals’ ages ranged from 1 to 97 years (mean: 36 years). Heterogeneous consolidations, nodules, pleural involvement and cavities were the most frequent imaging findings. Most patients (55/81 or 67.9%) were male, and upper lung and right lung were the most affected regions. Fibrosis, heterogeneous consolidations and involvement of the left lung apex were significantly more frequent in males (p < 0.05). Presence of a single type of finding at radiography was most frequent in children (p < 0.05). Conclusion Based on the hypothesis that indigenous patients represent a population without genetically determined resistance to tuberculosis, the present study may enhance the knowledge about how the pulmonary form of this disease manifests in susceptible individuals. PMID:26543277

  20. [The clinical and morphological features of pulmonary tuberculosis under the conditions of the Far North].

    PubMed

    Vinokurov, I I; Argunov, V A; Nikolaev, Iu Ia; Plotnikova, N V

    2006-01-01

    The clinical and morphological features of pulmonary tuberculomas were studied in 205 patients among the naives and newcomers of the Far North. It was established that the lymphohematogenous spread of tuberculosis involving mainly the lymphatic system into the inflammatory process predominates in the genesis of tuberculomas under the conditions of the Far North. At the same time the lymphatic genesis of tuberculosis was found to affect the development of pulmonary tuberculomas in 60% of cases among the native patients. In most patients, the afflicted intrathoracic lymph nodes became a source of retrograde dissemination of tuberculosis in the lung. Tuberculomas were chiefly unilateral and in 56.7% of cases they were located in the lower portions of the lung in the presence of significant fibrosis. The lymphohematogenous spread of tuberculous infection was a cause of pulmonary tuberculomas in most (72.9%) newcomers on adapting to the conditions of the Far North. In most cases, tuberculomas were formed from a newly appeared tuberculous focus in the presence of intact lung tissue and located in the upper portions of both lungs. The formed tuberculomas had no extensive focal dissemination and were present within the anatomic structure of one or two segments of the lung.

  1. Missed Opportunities to Diagnose Tuberculosis Are Common Among Hospitalized Patients and Patients Seen in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron C.; Polgreen, Linnea A.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hornick, Douglas B.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) may lead to worse outcomes and additional TB exposures. Methods. To estimate the potential number of misdiagnosed TB cases, we linked all hospital and emergency department (ED) visits in California′s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) databases (2005–2011). We defined a potential misdiagnosis as a visit with a new, primary diagnosis of TB preceded by a recent respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Next, we calculated the prevalence of potential missed TB diagnoses for different time windows. We also computed odds ratios (OR) comparing the likelihood of a previous respiratory diagnosis in patients with and without a TB diagnosis, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Finally, we determined the correlation between a hospital′s TB volume and the prevalence of potential TB misdiagnoses. Results. Within 30 days before an initial TB diagnosis, 15.9% of patients (25.7% for 90 days) had a respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Also, within 30 days, prior respiratory-related visits were more common in patients with TB than other patients (OR = 3.83; P < .01), controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Respiratory diagnosis-related visits were increasingly common until approximately 90 days before the TB diagnosis. Finally, potential misdiagnoses were more common in hospitals with fewer TB cases (ρ = −0.845; P < .01). Conclusions. Missed opportunities to diagnose TB are common and correlate inversely with the number of TB cases diagnosed at a hospital. Thus, as TB becomes infrequent, delayed diagnoses may increase, initiating outbreaks in communities and hospitals. PMID:26705537

  2. Determinants of consultation, diagnosis and treatment delays among new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Morocco: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Akrim, M; Bennani, K; Essolbi, A; Sghiar, M; Likos, A; Benmamoun, A; Menzhi, O El; Maaroufi, A

    2014-12-17

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2012 in 12 selected provinces and prefectures in Morocco to determine consultation delay (patient delay), diagnosis delay and treatment delay (health system delays), and factors relating to these delays. The sample included 250 eligible and consenting newly diagnosed smearpositive pulmonary tuberculosis patients who were interviewed at the time of their registration within Diagnosis of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Reference Centers (CDTMR) or Integrated Health Centers (CSI) using a pretested and structured questionnaire. The median total delay was 46 days [inter-quartile interval (IQI) = 29-84 days]. Patient delay (median = 20; IQI = 8-47 days) was higher than health system delay (median=15; IIQ = 7-35 days). Being illiterate, thinking symptoms will disappear by themselves; having financial constraints and feeling fear of diagnosis or social isolation were associated with patient delay. Consulting first in the private sector or having 3 or more consultations before diagnosis was associated with health system delay.

  3. The ABO and rhesus blood groups in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Viskum, K

    1975-12-01

    During the 3 year period 1970-1972 a total of 554 patients were notified for the first time as having bacillary or abacillary pulmonary tuberculosis in the Municipality of Copenhagen; 99 per cent of these patients were typed according to the ABO and rhesus system. The bacillary patients showed an excess of group O and AB and a deficit of A and B as compared to the general population. The deviations were statistically highly significant for group O and A. The distribution according to the rhesus system did not deviate from the expected pattern. The ABO and rhesus distribution of the abacillary patients did not differ significantly from the expected pattern. During a follow-up period of 2-5 years after the initial diagnosis 104 bacillary patients died; the ABO pattern among the survivors was now closer to the normal; this resulted from a high number of deaths from tuberculosis among patients of group O and a low number among those belonging to group A. More rhesus negative patients died from tuberculosis than rhesus positive. It is concluded that a study of the ABO and rhesus pattern among the tuberculosis patients becomes biased if a break-down by bacteriological findings and history is not made. It is also important that the study covers all patients who contract tuberculosis within a certain period, as the longevity of the patients is apparently to some extent dependent on their blood group.

  4. Knowledge about HIV prevention and transmission among recently diagnosed tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with Tuberculosis (TB) are a vulnerable group for acquiring HIV infection. Therefore, countries with a concentrated HIV epidemic and high prevalence of TB should provide adequate information about HIV prevention to TB patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to evaluate the level of knowledge on HIV prevention and transmission among newly diagnosed TB patients in Lima, Peru. The survey evaluated knowledge about HIV infection and prevention and was administered before HIV counseling and blood sampling for HIV testing were performed. Results A total of 171 TB patients were enrolled; mean age was 31.1 years, 101 (59%) were male. The overall mean level of knowledge of HIV was 59%; but the specific mean level of knowledge on HIV transmission and prevention was only 33.3% and 41.5%, respectively. Age and level of education correlated with overall level of knowledge in the multivariate model (P-value: 0.02 and <0.001 respectively). Conclusions The study shows inadequate levels of knowledge about HIV transmission and prevention among newly-diagnosed TB patients in this setting, and underscores the need for implementing educational interventions in this population. PMID:24373517

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies. PMID:27497873

  6. Problems in defining a “case” of pulmonary tuberculosis in prevalence surveys*

    PubMed Central

    Narain, Raj; Nair, S. S.; Naganna, K.; Chandrasekhar, P.; Rao, G. Ramanatha; Lal, Pyare

    1968-01-01

    An analysis of data from two successive tuberculosis prevalence surveys (conducted at an interval of 18 months) in a random sample of villages in Bangalore District, South India, has shown that the term “a case of pulmonary tuberculosis” does not represent a single uniform entity, but rather embraces cases of several types, differing considerably in their mortality experience, tuberculin sensitivity, results of X-ray and sputum examinations, and in the reliability of their diagnosis. The status at the first survey of the cases found at the resurvey and that at resurvey of those found at the initial survey give an indication of changes with time. Such changes show considerable differences for the various types of cases and provide another dimension to study the differences among them. The authors consider that, in spite of the great need and importance of a single straightforward definition of a case, no such definition is suitable for all situations; there is no other option but to continue to use more than one definition. Although, theoretically, finding a single bacillus in the sputum should be adequate proof of pulmonary tuberculosis, it is shown that finding of a few bacilli, 3 or less, is probably far too often due to artefacts and should not be the basis for a diagnosis. The findings also well bear out the notion that positive radiological findings, in the absence of bacteriological confirmation, indicate, not pulmonary tuberculosis, but only a high risk of the disease. Direct microscopy appears to be a consistent index of disease but, in community surveys, has the limitations of missing a substantial proportion of cases and of adding some false cases. The extent of these limitations, so far as symptomatic patients in a community tuberculosis control programme are concerned, remains to be investigated. PMID:5306123

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies.

  8. Influence of M. tuberculosis Lineage Variability within a Clinical Trial for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E.; Kim, Elizabeth Y.; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Stout, Jason E.; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C.; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status. PMID:20505778

  9. Influence of M. tuberculosis lineage variability within a clinical trial for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E; Kim, Elizabeth Y; Mac Kenzie, William R; Stout, Jason E; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-05-20

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status.

  10. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. NK cell in pulmonary tuberculosis from basic and clinical point of view].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, T

    1996-11-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells, which lyse certain tumors in vitro, have been shown to provide early defense mechanism against cancer growth and viral infection, possible role in the host defense against pulmonary tuberculosis remains undefined. A series of my studies have recently provided several evidence supporting the involvement of NK cells in the immunopathology of pulmonary tuberculosis. NK cell activity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly augmented compared with that in age-, sex- matched healthy controls, which suggests NK cells are activated in vivo in pulmonary tuberculosis. Lung NK cells from BCG-infected mice also are shown to be activated. Asialo GM 1 was demonstrated to be a novel surface marker of mice NK cells, which inhibited activation of NK cells by interferon. Chronic intractable tuberculosis was classified with a combination of NK cell activity and delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to 2, 4-dinitrochrolbenzene. Subgroup defined with high NK cell activity and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity was characterized with moderate radiographical lesions and stable clinical course, suggesting the immune-spectrum classification was associated with clinical manifestations. Malnutrition has been suggested to be a risk factor associated with the development and reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. NK cell activity was significantly correlated with visceral proteins. IL-2 producing capability was significantly decreased in patients with serum albumin less than 3.5 g/dl. More recently, I established an in vitro system evaluating quantitative capability for intracellular killing by human monocytes, in which monocyte phagocytize Mycobacterium tuberculosis and subsequently inhibit intracellular replication of the organisms by adding some cytokines or cells. Purified NK cells by using discontinuous gradient centrifugation and magnetic separation technique were added to M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes monolayer

  11. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. NK cell in pulmonary tuberculosis from basic and clinical point of view].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, T

    1996-11-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells, which lyse certain tumors in vitro, have been shown to provide early defense mechanism against cancer growth and viral infection, possible role in the host defense against pulmonary tuberculosis remains undefined. A series of my studies have recently provided several evidence supporting the involvement of NK cells in the immunopathology of pulmonary tuberculosis. NK cell activity in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis was significantly augmented compared with that in age-, sex- matched healthy controls, which suggests NK cells are activated in vivo in pulmonary tuberculosis. Lung NK cells from BCG-infected mice also are shown to be activated. Asialo GM 1 was demonstrated to be a novel surface marker of mice NK cells, which inhibited activation of NK cells by interferon. Chronic intractable tuberculosis was classified with a combination of NK cell activity and delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to 2, 4-dinitrochrolbenzene. Subgroup defined with high NK cell activity and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity was characterized with moderate radiographical lesions and stable clinical course, suggesting the immune-spectrum classification was associated with clinical manifestations. Malnutrition has been suggested to be a risk factor associated with the development and reactivation of pulmonary tuberculosis. NK cell activity was significantly correlated with visceral proteins. IL-2 producing capability was significantly decreased in patients with serum albumin less than 3.5 g/dl. More recently, I established an in vitro system evaluating quantitative capability for intracellular killing by human monocytes, in which monocyte phagocytize Mycobacterium tuberculosis and subsequently inhibit intracellular replication of the organisms by adding some cytokines or cells. Purified NK cells by using discontinuous gradient centrifugation and magnetic separation technique were added to M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes monolayer

  12. [Pulmonary actinomycosis and tuberculosis. A comorbidity pediatric case].

    PubMed

    Bisero, Elsa D; Luque, Graciela F; Rizzo, Cristina N; Zapata, Alejandra E; Cuello, María S

    2016-08-01

    La actinomicosis es una infección supurativa crónica, producida por bacterias Gram-positivas anaeróbicas o especies Actinomyces microaerófilas. Es rara en niños y adolescentes; es más común en inmunodeprimidos. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis colabora en el desarrollo de la enfermedad. La afectación pulmonar aparece como un cuadro de condensación crónica que no mejora con el tratamiento antibiótico convencional. Las complicaciones clásicas de afectación de la pared torácica con fistulización y supuración en «granulo de azufre» son descritas con menor frecuencia en la actualidad. El diagnóstico es un verdadero desafío y se establece mediante el aislamiento de las especies de Actinomyces. El tratamiento de elección para todas las formas clínicas de la enfermedad es el uso prolongado de antibióticos. Objetivo. Presentar un caso pediátrico de comorbilidad entre tuberculosis y actinomicosis. Resaltar la importancia de la sospecha diagnóstica de actinomicosis frente a todo proceso supurado crónico.

  13. Risk Factors for Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis among Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis at the Central Chest Institute of Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chuchottaworn, Charoen; Thanachartwet, Vipa; Sangsayunh, Piamlarp; Than, Thu Zar Myint; Sahassananda, Duangjai; Surabotsophon, Manoon; Desakorn, Varunee

    2015-01-01

    There are limited data available on the risk factors for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Therefore, we here conducted a retrospective matched case−control study among adults with pulmonary TB who received treatment at the Central Chest Institute of Thailand (CCIT) between January 2007 and December 2013, in order to determine the risk factors associated with MDR-TB among patients with pulmonary TB. We identified 145 patients with pulmonary MDR-TB (cases) and 145 patients with drug-sensitive pulmonary TB (controls). Multivariate analysis identified the independent risk factors for MDR-TB as follows: (1) ≥ 2 episodes of prior pulmonary TB (odds ratio [OR] 39.72, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 7.86−200.66), (2) duration of illness > 60 days (OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.52−6.22), (3) sputum acid fast bacilli smear 3+ (OR 13.09, 95% CI 4.64−36.91), (4) presence of lung cavities (OR 3.82, 95% CI 1.89−7.73), and (5) presence of pleural effusion (OR 2.75, 95% CI 1.06−7.16). Prior pulmonary TB management with a non-category I regimen (P = 0.012) and having treatment failure or default as treatment outcomes (P = 0.036) were observed in a higher proportion among patients with MDR-TB. Particular characteristics of lung cavities, including the maximum diameter ≥ 30 mm (P < 0.001), the number of cavities ≥ 3 (P = 0.001), bilateral involvement (P < 0.001), and ≥ 2 lung zones involved (P = 0.001) were more commonly observed in patients with MDR-TB. In conclusion, these clinical factors and chest radiographic findings associated with MDR-TB among patients with pulmonary TB may help physicians to provide proper management of cases for prevention of the development and spread of MDR-TB in future. PMID:26444421

  14. Rifampin-containing chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis associated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, F.L. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    The outcomes of 20 anthracite miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis and culture-proved pulmonary tuberculosis treated with rifampin-containing chemotherapeutic regimens were determined by a retrospective review. Their mean age was 65 yr, and the duration of underground dust exposure averaged 27 yr. Nine miners had simple pneumoconiosis, 11 had progressive massive fibrosis, and 13 had cavitary disease; 3 also had extrapulmonary disease. All patients were given rifampin (mean, 12 months in survivors) plus one or more other effective agents; the mean duration of treatment with 2 or more drugs was 17 months. Follow-up averaged 46 months in those surviving more than 1 yr. Sputum cultures became negative and remained so within 3 months in 17 patients and within 5 months in the remainder. Eighteen patients survived more than 1 yr after completing chemotherapy. No clinical, radiologic, or bacteriologic relapses were observed during follow-up, but 5 patients died of nontuberculous causes. These results are superior to those reported previously in patients with coal workers' pneumoconiosis treated for pulmonary tuberculosis with regimens not containing rifampin. They suggest that treatment of tuberculosis in coal workers, even in the presence of progressive massive fibrosis and cavitary disease, can yield results as favorable as in nonpneumoconiotic patients provided the initial treatment regimen includes rifampin plus one or more other effective agents.

  15. Delay for First Consultation and Its Associated Factors among New Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients of Central Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Mahato, Roshan Kumar; Koju, Rajendra; Vaeteewootacharn, Kriangsak

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health challenge in Nepal and worldwide. Most transmissions occur between the onset of symptoms and the consultation with formal health care centers. This study aimed to determine the duration of delay for the first consultation and its associated factors with unacceptable delay among the new sputum pulmonary tuberculosis cases in the central development region of Nepal. An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in the central development region of Nepal between January and May 2015. New pulmonary sputum positive tuberculosis patients were interviewed by using a structured questionnaire and their medical records were reviewed. Among a total of 374 patients, the magnitude of patient delay was 53.21% (95% CI: 48.12–58.28%) with a median delay of 32 days and an interquartile range of 11–70 days. The factors associated with unacceptable patient delay (duration ≥ 30 days) were residence in the rural area (adj. OR = 3.10, 95% CI: 1.10–8.72; p value = 0.032) and DOTS center located more than 5 km away from their residences (adj. OR = 5.53, 95% CI: 2.18–13.99; p value < 0.001). Unemployed patients were more likely to have patient delay (adj. OR = 7.79, 95% CI: 1.64–37.00; p value = 0.010) when controlled for other variables. PMID:27144020

  16. [Chronic renal failure: unexpected late sequela of pulmonary tuberculosis after 30 years].

    PubMed

    Zümrütdal, Ayşegül; Yıldız, Ismail; Ozelsancak, Rüya; Canpolat, Tuba

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis-related chronic granulomatous tubulointerstitial nephritis (GTN) and chronic renal dysfunction as a consequence of GTN is a rarely seen clinical condition, with a few case reports in the literature. In this report, a case with end stage renal failure as an unexpected late extrapulmonary sequela of tuberculosis has been presented. A 60 years old female patient was admitted to hospital with the complaints of fever, malaise and nausea. Her history revealed that she had pulmonary tuberculosis 30 years ago and received antituberculosis therapy for nine months. The laboratory results on admission were as follows: blood urea nitrogen 90 mg/dl, serum creatinine 9 mg/dl, sodium 116 mEq/L, potassium 6.6 mEq/L, albumine 2.9 g/dl, hemoglobin, 8.4 g/dl, white blood cell count 10.800/mm3, C-reactive protein 187 mg/L and erythrocyte sedimentation rate 110 mm/hour. Urinalysis showed 8.1 g/L protein, 10-12 leukocytes, 1-2 erythrocytes, while 24-hours urinalysis yielded proteinuria with 8 ml/minutes creatinine clearance value. Urine and blood cultures of the patient revealed neither bacteria or mycobacteria. PPD skin test was negative. Acid-resistant bacilli (ARB) were not detected in sequential urine samples obtained on three consecutive days. Since sputum samples could not be obtained, diagnostic procedures for sputum were not performed. Abdomen ultrasonography yielded bilateral edema and grade II echogenity in kidneys. Computed tomography of the chest showed bilateral pulmonary nodules, chronic sequela lesions, pleural scarring and calcifications, as well as minimal interstitial infiltrate. Transthoracic lung biopsy showed chronic inflammation and fibrosis, while amyloid was negative. Renal biopsy showed GTN with central caseified necrosis and granulomas, multinuclear giant cells, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis. Amyloid was negative and ARB were not detected in renal biopsy sample. Definitive diagnosis was achieved by the demonstration of Mycobacterium

  17. Application of the Multistate Tuberculosis Pharmacometric Model in Patients With Rifampicin‐Treated Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson, USH

    2016-01-01

    This is the first clinical implementation of the Multistate Tuberculosis Pharmacometric (MTP) model describing fast‐, slow‐, and nonmultiplying bacterial states of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Colony forming unit data from 19 patients treated with rifampicin were analyzed. A previously developed rifampicin population pharmacokinetic (PK) model was linked to the MTP model previously developed using in vitro data. Drug effect was implemented as exposure‐response relationships tested at several effect sites, both alone and in combination. All MTP model parameters were fixed to in vitro estimates except Bmax. Drug effect was described by an on/off effect inhibiting growth of fast‐multiplying bacteria in addition to linear increase of the stimulation of the death rate of slow‐ and nonmultiplying bacteria with increasing drug exposure. Clinical trial simulations predicted well three retrospective clinical trials using the final model that confirmed the potential utility of the MTP model in antitubercular drug development. PMID:27299939

  18. Protective effect of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination in children with extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, but not the pulmonary disease. A case-control study in Rosario, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bonifachich, Elena; Chort, Monica; Astigarraga, Ana; Diaz, Nora; Brunet, Beatriz; Pezzotto, Stella Maris; Bottasso, Oscar

    2006-04-01

    A hospital-based case-control study was carried out at the Vilela Children's Hospital in Rosario, Argentina, to measure the protection conferred by BCG vaccination against tuberculosis (TB). The study included 148 newly diagnosed cases of TB (75 males and 73 females, mean age 3.34+/-2.97 years, S.D.), 134 of them with pulmonary TB and 14 cases with extra-pulmonary disease. Controls (425 males and 357 females, 3.39+/-2.98 years) were selected randomly among children who attended to the Hospital showing, neither respiratory diseases nor any other infectious illnesses. Information on BCG vaccination history was assessed from scars or immunisation records. All participants were negative to human immunodeficiency virus and belonged to the lower and upper-lower socioeconomic status, being similar in place of residence and ethnic characteristics. Rate of vaccinated children was 92.6% of cases and 94.5% of controls (3.4 and 3.9% of them without scars, respectively). Regarding the total cases, the protective association between BCG and TB was statistically insignificant, as was for the pulmonary form. Among cases with extra-pulmonary disease, vaccine effectiveness attained significance [79% (95% CI=26-94)], no matter their age, sex or nutritional status. BCG vaccination exerted a beneficial role in extra-pulmonary TB, even in children not seriously undernourished.

  19. A concurrent comparison of home and sanatorium treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis in South India

    PubMed Central

    1959-01-01

    In India, as in most under-development countries, the tuberculosis problem is aggravated by an acute shortage of sanatorium beds. The number of active cases of tuberculosis in the country has been estimated at 2 ½ million, but only 23 000 tuberculosis beds are available. In these circumstances great importance attaches to the possibility of applying mass domiciliary chemotherapy as a substitute for sanatorium treatment in cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. The findings of the present study, based on a comparison of the two types of treatment over a period of 12 months, show that despite the manifest advantages of sanatorium care—rest, adequate diet, nursing and supervised medicine-taking—the merits of domiciliary chemotherapy are comparable to those of sanatorium treatment, and that it would therefore be appropriate to treat the majority of patients at home, provided an adequate service were established. Imagesp135-ap136-ap137-ap138-ap139-ap140-ap141-ap142-ap143-ap144-a PMID:20604054

  20. Drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in the Baja California-San Diego County border population.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, C R; Schultz, E; Moser, K; Cox, M; Freeman, R; Ramirez-Zetina, M; Lomeli, M R

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the frequency of, and risk factors for, drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among Baja California (BC) and San Diego County (SDC) residents. Another purpose was to document the amount of contact between pulmonary TB patients and residents of the opposite side of the the border. During the period from February 1995 to May 1996, pulmonary TB patients from BC (n = 427) and SDC (n = 331) were evaluated with cultures, drug susceptibility tests, and questionnaires. Drug resistance was found in 41% of the BC Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) isolates and 20% of the SDC isolates. Resistance to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) varied from 1% of isolates from SDC patients to 17% of isolates from BC patients. Patients with a history of previous treatment had increased odds of drug-resistant disease. Older BC patients were more likely to have INH- or RIF-resistant TB. Although 42% of Tijuana TB patients reported recent contact with residents from SDC, travel to Mexico and contact with residents from Mexico were not significant risk factors for drug-resistant TB among SDC residents. However, the demonstrated contact between TB patients and residents on opposite sides of the border indicates the importance of coordinating efforts internationally to control TB. PMID:9795580

  1. [CORRECTION OF METABOLIC DISTURBANCES IN PATIENTS WITH PULMONARY TUBERCULOSIS AND CONCOMITANT DISEASES].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances were corrected using the oral specialized formula Nutrien-phthisio (ZAO "Company Nutritec", Russia) in 53 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and concomitant diseases. In the whole group, tuberculosis was first detected in 21 patients; 32 had a chronic process. Chemotherapy was discontinued in all the patients due to the intolerance phenomena caused by comorbidity (erosive gastritis, gastroduodenal peptic ulcer, hepatitis B and C, chronic pyelonephritis) in 24 patients, by adverse reactions in 19, and by a combination of both factors in 10. The criteria for objectively monitoring the efficiency of nutritional support (in combination with specific treatment) were body mass index, general blood analysis, by taking into account the percentage and absolute count of lymphocytes and the protein metabolism from the serum levels of total protein, albumin, and transferrin. The study determined clinical and laboratory indications for the use of Nutrien-phthisio and the favorable impact of nutritional support on the course of a tuberculous process and concomitant diseases.

  2. Nanocarriers as pulmonary drug delivery systems to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Smola, Malgorzata; Vandamme, Thierry; Sokolowski, Adam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of nanocarriers administered by pulmonary route to treat and to diagnose respiratory and non respiratory diseases. Indeed, during the past 10 years, the removal of chlorofluorocarbon propellants from industrial and household products intended for the pulmonary route has lead to the developments of new alternative products. Amongst these ones, on one hand, a lot of attention has been focused to improve the bioavailability of marketed drugs intended for respiratory diseases and to develop new concepts for pulmonary administration of drugs and, on the other hand, to use the pulmonary route to administer drugs for systemic diseases. This has led to some marketed products through the last decade. Although the introduction of nanotechnology permitted to step over numerous problems and to improve the bioavailability of drugs, there are, however, unresolved delivery problems to be still addressed. These scientific and industrial innovations and challenges are discussed along this review together with an analysis of the current situation concerning the industrial developments. PMID:18488412

  3. A registry-based cohort study of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Babalik, Aylin; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Caner, S Sevkan; Gungor, Gokay; Ortakoylu, M Gonenc; Gencer, Serap; McCurdy, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the treatment outcomes and identify factors associated with adverse tuberculosis treatment outcomes for bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis. Treatment outcomes of pulmonary tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively among 11,186 smear- and/or culture-positive patients treated between 2006 and 2009 in Istanbul, Turkey. Adverse treatment outcomes were identified in 1,010 (9.0%) patients including death (1.8%), treatment default (6.1%), and treatment failure (1.1%). Factors associated with adverse treatment outcomes included being born abroad (odds ratios [OR], 5.38; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 3.67-7.91), history of tuberculosis treatment (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 3.26-4.36), age > 65 years (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 2.21-3.53), and male gender (OR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.59-2.27). Death was most strongly associated with age > 65 years (OR, 45.1; 95% CI, 27.0-75.6), followed by treatment default with history of interrupted treatment (OR, 11.6; 95% CI, 8.94-15.1), and treatment failure with prior history of treatment failure (OR, 17.1; 95% CI, 6.97-41.6). Multidrug resistance was strongly associated with adverse treatment outcomes (OR, 10.8; 95% CI, 8.02-14.6). Age > 65 years, male sex, being born abroad, and history of treatment failure were found to be risk factors for adverse treatment outcomes. Hence, patients with any of these characteristics should be carefully monitored and treated aggressively.

  4. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management.

  5. Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed using endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Caraway, Nancy P; Salina, Davide; Deavers, Michael T; Morice, Rodolfo; Landon, Gene

    2015-01-01

    Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery is a rare intraluminal malignant neoplasm that has an aggressive biological behavior, and early diagnosis may improve patient outcome. We describe a case of pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma diagnosed on cytologic material obtained by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) biopsy with rapid on-site evaluation (ROSE). The aspirate showed loosely cohesive clusters of pleomorphic malignant spindled and epithelioid cells. An immunostain panel did not demonstrate any definitive mesenchymal or epithelial differentiation. The tumor's intraluminal origin was supported by radiographic imaging studies. Subsequently, the patient received preoperative chemotherapy and underwent tumor resection with reconstruction. This report describes the cytomorphologic features of this rare intravascular tumor and demonstrates how EBUS-TBNA with ROSE was instrumental in obtaining optimal cytologic sampling for ancillary studies, thus expediting the management. PMID:25745502

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostic delays in Chad: a multicenter, hospital-based survey in Ndjamena and Moundou

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in low-resource countries. One contagious patient can infect 10 to 20 contacts in these settings. Delays in diagnosing TB therefore contribute to the spread of the disease and sustain the epidemic. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess delays in diagnosing tuberculosis and the factors associated with these delays in the public hospitals in Moundou and Ndjamena, Chad. Methods A structured questionnaire was administered to 286 new tuberculosis patients to evaluate patient delay (time from the onset of symptoms to the first formal or informal care), health-care system delay (time from the first health care to tuberculosis treatment) and total delay (sum of the patient and system delays). Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with long diagnostic delays (defined as greater than the median). Results and discussion The median [interquartile range] patient delay, system delay and total delay were 15 [7–30], 36 [19–65] and 57.5 [33–95] days, respectively. Low economic status (aOR [adjusted odds ratio] =2.38 [1.08-5.25]), not being referred to a health service (aOR = 1.75 [1.02- 3.02]) and a secondary level education (aOR = 0.33 [0.12-0.92]) were associated with a long patient delay. Risk factors for a long system delay were a low level of education (aOR = 4.71 [1.34-16.51]) and the belief that traditional medicine and informal care can cure TB (aOR = 5.46 [2.37-12.60]). Conclusion Targeted strengthening of the health-care system, including improving patient access, addressing deficiencies in health-related human resources, and improving laboratory networks and linkages as well as community mobilization will make for better outcomes in tuberculosis diagnosis. PMID:22776241

  7. Surgery and pleuro-pulmonary tuberculosis: a scientific literature review

    PubMed Central

    Subotic, Dragan; Yablonskiy, Piotr; Sulis, Giorgia; Cordos, Ioan; Petrov, Danail; Centis, Rosella; D’Ambrosio, Lia; Sotgiu, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health concern, mostly affecting resource-constrained settings and marginalized populations. The fight against the disease is hindered by the growing emergence of drug-resistant forms whose management can be rather challenging. Surgery may play an important role to support diagnosis and treatment of the most complex cases and improve their therapeutic outcome. We conducted a non-systematic review of the literature based on relevant keywords through PubMed database. Papers in English and Russian were included. The search was focused on five main areas of intervention as follows: (I) diagnosis of complicated cases; (II) elimination of contagious persisting cavities, despite appropriate chemotherapy; (III) treatment of destroyed lung; (V) resection of tuberculomas; (VI) treatment of tuberculous pleural empyema. Although specific practical guidelines concerning surgical indications and approaches are currently unavailable, a summary of the evidence emerged from the scientific literature was elaborated to help the clinician in the management of severely compromised TB patients. The decision to proceed to surgery is usually individualized and a careful assessment of the patient’s risk profile is always recommended before performing any procedure in addition to appropriate chemotherapy. PMID:27499980

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of a point-of-care urine test for tuberculosis screening among newly-diagnosed hiv-infected adults: a prospective, clinic-based study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A rapid diagnostic test for active tuberculosis (TB) at the clinical point-of-care could expedite case detection and accelerate TB treatment initiation. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a rapid urine lipoarabinomannan (LAM) test for TB screening among HIV-infected adults in a TB-endemic setting. Methods We prospectively enrolled newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) at 4 outpatient clinics in Durban from Oct 2011-May 2012, excluding those on TB therapy. A physician evaluated all participants and offered CD4 cell count testing. Trained study nurses collected a sputum sample for acid-fast bacilli smear microscopy (AFB) and mycobacterial culture, and performed urine LAM testing using Determine™ TB LAM in the clinic. The presence of a band regardless of intensity on the urine LAM test was considered positive. We defined as the gold standard for active pulmonary TB a positive sputum culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diagnostic accuracy of urine LAM was assessed, alone and in combination with smear microscopy, and stratified by CD4 cell count. Results Among 342 newly-diagnosed HIV-infected participants, 190 (56%) were male, mean age was 35.6 years, and median CD4 was 182/mm3. Sixty participants had culture-positive pulmonary TB, resulting in an estimated prevalence of 17.5% (95% CI 13.7-22.0%). Forty-five (13.2%) participants were urine LAM positive. Mean time from urine specimen collection to LAM test result was 40 minutes (95% CI 34–46 minutes). Urine LAM test sensitivity was 28.3% (95% CI 17.5-41.4) overall, and 37.5% (95% CI 21.1-56.3) for those with CD4 count <100/mm3, while specificity was 90.1% (95% CI 86.0-93.3) overall, and 86.9% (95% CI 75.8-94.2) for those with CD4 < 100/mm3. When combined with sputum AFB (either test positive), sensitivity increased to 38.3% (95% CI 26.0-51.8), but specificity decreased to 85.8% (95% CI 81.1-89.7). Conclusions In this prospective, clinic-based study with trained nurses, a rapid

  9. Control measures to trace ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; Melo, Angelita Cristine de; Oliveira, Lílian Ruth Silva de; Froede, Emerson Lopes; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This was descriptive study carried out in a medium-sized Brazilian city. In ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, we assessed compliance with the Brazilian national guidelines for tuberculosis control. We interviewed 43 contacts and their legal guardians. Approximately 80% of the contacts were not assessed by the municipal public health care system, and only 21% underwent tuberculin skin testing. The results obtained with the Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector method suggest that health care teams have a biased attitude toward assessing such contacts and underscore the need for training health professionals regarding tuberculosis control programs.

  10. Control measures to trace ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia Di Lorenzo; de Melo, Angelita Cristine; de Oliveira, Lílian Ruth Silva; Froede, Emerson Lopes; Camargos, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    This was descriptive study carried out in a medium-sized Brazilian city. In ≤ 15-year-old contacts of index cases of active pulmonary tuberculosis, we assessed compliance with the Brazilian national guidelines for tuberculosis control. We interviewed 43 contacts and their legal guardians. Approximately 80% of the contacts were not assessed by the municipal public health care system, and only 21% underwent tuberculin skin testing. The results obtained with the Chi-square Automatic Interaction Detector method suggest that health care teams have a biased attitude toward assessing such contacts and underscore the need for training health professionals regarding tuberculosis control programs. PMID:26578137

  11. Mapping the epidemiology and trends of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Bright; Al-Hajoj, Sahal

    2015-12-01

    An extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) infection rate of 30% in Saudi Arabia remains above the global rate. A variable rate of infection in each province has been reported and the involvement of most organs has been cited. Nationwide collective data on the current trends of infection are scarce and the factors behind the increased rate of EPTB are perplexing. This review endeavors to shed light into the epidemiology of EPTB, various types of infections sites, geographical differences in the infection rate, known risk factors, and challenges in the diagnosis and management of EPTB in Saudi Arabia.

  12. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  13. The contribution of the sympathetic nervous system to the immunopathology of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Payán, Jorge; Revuelta, Alberto; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; Marquina-Castillo, Brenda; Villanueva, Enrique Becerril; Gutiérrez, María Eugenia Hernández; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Pavón, Lenin; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio

    2016-09-15

    The role of norepinephrine (NE) in the immunopathology of experimental tuberculosis (TB) was studied by measuring pulmonary NE and determining its cellular sources and targets. Functional studies were performed administrating adrenergic and anti-adrenergic drugs at different TB phases. Results showed high production of NE during early infection by adrenergic nerve terminals and lymphocytes located in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes, these cells highly expressed β2 adreno-receptors (β2AR) which by an autocrine mechanism promote Th-1 cell differentiation favoring protection. During advanced infection, the production of NE and β2AR sharply decreased, suggesting that adrenergic activity is less important during late TB. PMID:27609282

  14. Evaluation of methods for detection and identification of Mycobacterium species in patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Marchi, A M; Juttel, I D; Kawacubo, E M; Dalmarco, E M; Blatt, S L; Cordova, C M M

    2008-10-01

    Tuberculosis control is a priority for the Ministry of Health policies in Brazil. In the present work, the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was standardized, and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis was evaluated comparing baciloscopy, culture and PCR tests. The study was carried out with 117 sputum samples from different patients suspected of having pulmonary tuberculosis, for whom physicians had ordered a baciloscopy test. Baciloscopy was performed using the Ziehl-Neelsen method, and culture was performed by incubation of treated samples in Lowenstein-Jensen's medium at 37°C for eight weeks. For PCR, DNA was amplified with a specific pair of primers to the M. tuberculosis complex, with a resulting product of 123 bp from the insertion element IS6110. Three (2.56%) samples presented a positive baciloscopy result and a positive PCR result (100% agreement), and nine (7.69%) presented Mycobacterium sp. growth in culture (P= 0.1384). Among six samples with positive results in culture, one was identified by PCR-RFLP as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex and one was identified as a non-tuberculosis mycobacteria. Sensitivity and specificity of PCR compared to culture were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. PMID:24031276

  15. [A case of pulmonary tuberculosis with diminished lung function whose paradoxical reaction led to death].

    PubMed

    Omura, Harutaka; Kajiki, Akira; Nagata, Nobuhiko; Kitahara, Yoshinari; Wakamatsu, Kentarou; Minami, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazuhito; Katahira, Katsuyuki

    2011-05-01

    Paradoxical reaction in tuberculosis treatment is not generally fatal. On rare occasion it can lead a patient with diminished lung function and poor general condition to death. A 60-year-old man with history of left upper lobe resection from tuberculosis was referred to our hospital due to the recurrence of tuberculosis. Sputum examination showed a positive smear with a Gaffky score of 10, and the chest X-ray and CT revealed pulmonary infiltrate with many cavities (bII2) on the whole left lung field. Anti-tuberculosis drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide) were administered, but his high fever persisted, and the infiltrate on the chest X-ray deteriorated. While the positive sputum smear persisted, the culture became negative after one month. The tuberculous bacilli were susceptible to all anti-tuberculosis drugs in vitro. Though we performed examinations and trial treatments for non-tuberculous conditions such as pneumonia and drug-induced pneumonia, the patient died after 6 months. A necropsy specimen taken from the worsening lesion (the right upper lobe) as shown on the chest X-ray revealed many epithelioid granulomas. The patient had malnutrition, diabetes, alcoholic hepatic disorder, and insanity. It is supposed that although antituberculosis drugs were effective, a large quantity of killed organisms was continuously excreted from many cavities in the left lung toward the right lung. Lesions in the right lung thus newly produced in this paradoxical reaction seemed to reduce the remaining lung function. In addition, poorly controlled diabetes caused deteriorated heart function. These multiple factors contributed to the poor prognosis of the patient and his ultimate death.

  16. High Prevelance of Rifampin-Monoresistant Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Analysis among Iranian Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Velayati, Ali Akbar; Farnia, Parissa; Mozafari, Mohadese; Sheikholeslami, Maryam Fatemeh; Karahrudi, Mona Afraei; Tabarsi, Payam; Hoffner, Sven

    2014-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of rifampin-monoresistant tuberculosis (RMR-TB) in Iran. Because development of RMR-TB is not common, we also identified the major risk factors associated with RMR-TB reported from different provinces of Iran. Data for 3,020 TB patients who remained or became smear positive after two, four, six, and nine months of standard first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Of 3,020 patients, 1,242 patients (41.1%) were culture and DNA positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Of these patients, 73 (7.4%) patients had monoresistant isolates to rifampin, which was significantly higher than that for multidrug-resistant TB (5.8%). The average rate of RMR-TB in the studied population ranged from 5% to 10%. Classical investigation showed that 33.6% of patients had either a previous or family history of TB. Molecular epidemiology methods (i.e., spoligotyping and Mycobacterium intespersed repetitive unit–variable number tandem repeat), defined transmission link in three clusters (13%). These results outline the urgent need for a comprehensive plan for detection and treatment of RMR-TB cases. PMID:24189362

  17. [Bronchopleurocutaneous Fistula: A Rare Complication of Pulmonary Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montez, Ana Sofia José; Coutinho, Daniel; Velez, Jorge; Freitas, Filomena; Oliveira, Célia

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A tuberculose pulmonar pode cursar com diversas complicações. As fístulas bronco-pleuro-cutâneas consistem em comunicações anormais entre o brônquio, o espaço pleural e a pele.Caso Clínico: Apresentamos o caso de um homem, 47 anos, esquizofrénico, enviado ao Serviço de Urgência por toracalgia esquerda, tosse produtiva e emagrecimento. Apresentava-se caquético, sendo evidente um orifício cutâneo torácico latero-anterior esquerdo com drenagem purulenta, na qual o exame direto revelou bacilos ácido-álcool resistentes. A radiografia torácica evidenciava infiltrado heterogéneo bilateral. Foi internado com o diagnóstico de tuberculose pulmonar fistulizada. Na expetoração, a pesquisa de bacilos ácido-álcool resistentes foi igualmente positiva, sendo evidenciado Mycobacterium tuberculosis por reação de polimerase em cadeia e exame cultural. Iniciou terapêutica antituberculosa quádrupla apresentando evolução clínica favorável.Conclusões: A formação de fístulas bronco-pleuro-cutâneas é atualmente e em países desenvolvidos, uma complicação rara de tuberculose pulmonar. Assim, apesar da tuberculose ser frequente em Portugal, a raridade deste tipo de complicações torna pertinente a apresentação deste caso clínico.

  18. Deregulated tyrosine-phenylalanine metabolism in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinal Kumar; Bishwal, Subasa Chandra; Das, Aleena; Dabral, Deepti; Badireddy, Vinod Kumar; Pandit, Bhaswati; Varghese, George M; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic profiling of biofluids from tuberculosis (TB) patients would help us in understanding the disease pathophysiology and may also be useful for the development of novel diagnostics and host-directed therapy. In this pilot study we have compared the urine metabolic profiles of two groups of subjects having similar TB symptoms and categorized as active TB (ATB, n = 21) and non-TB (NTB, n = 21) based on GeneXpert test results. Silylation, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and standard chemometric methods were employed to identify the important molecules and deregulated metabolic pathways. Eleven active TB patients were followed up on longitudinally for comparative urine metabolic profiling with healthy controls (n = 11). A set of 42 features qualified to have a variable importance parameter score of > 1.5 of a partial least-squares discriminate analysis model and fold change of > 1.5 at p value < 0.05 between ATB and NTB. Using these variables, a receiver operating characteristics curve was plotted and the area under the curve was calculated to be 0.85 (95% CI: 0.72-0.96). Several of these variables that represent norepinephrine, gentisic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, hydroquinone, and 4-hydroxyhippuric acid are part of the tyrosine-phenylalanine metabolic pathway. In the longitudinal study we observed a treatment-dependent trend in the urine metabolome of follow-up samples, and subjects declared as clinically cured showed similar metabolic profile as those of asymptomatic healthy subjects. The deregulated tyrosine-phenylalanine axis reveals a potential target for diagnostics and intervention in TB. PMID:25693719

  19. Ayurvedic management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health crisis. 25% of world’s TB cases are found in India. Ayurveda, an ancient medical science may offer some solution to this problem. Hence, a systematic review was carried out to assess the role of Ayurveda for the management of TB. Methodology: A systematic review was carried out using published literature obtained through “PubMed” until April 2015. The key words used for literature search include “Ayurveda, role and TB.” Results and Discussion: It was observed that a couple of single and compound drugs have been used for the management of TB. However, none of the studies could reflect the true anti-TB activities of any drug, both single and compound. Two of the studies revealed in vitro anti-TB properties of some herbs which can potentially be brought into the realm of a clinical trial to test their efficacy in a human subject. Most of these Ayurvedic therapeutic preparations studied in different clinical settings primarily reflected their adjunct properties for the management of TB. These studies revealed that Ayurvedic therapeutics was able to reduce associated symptoms and the adverse drug effects of ATDs (anti-TB drugs). Furthermore, some of the preparations showed potential hepato-protective properties that can be simultaneously administered with ATDs. Conclusion: Distressingly research on the role of Ayurveda in the management of TB is very scanty and mostly limited to adjunct or supportive therapy. Being a global public health crisis, it is highly recommended to carry out clinical trials on TB patients using Ayurvedic drugs and therapeutic regimens. PMID:27069721

  20. Deregulated tyrosine-phenylalanine metabolism in pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Das, Mrinal Kumar; Bishwal, Subasa Chandra; Das, Aleena; Dabral, Deepti; Badireddy, Vinod Kumar; Pandit, Bhaswati; Varghese, George M; Nanda, Ranjan Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic profiling of biofluids from tuberculosis (TB) patients would help us in understanding the disease pathophysiology and may also be useful for the development of novel diagnostics and host-directed therapy. In this pilot study we have compared the urine metabolic profiles of two groups of subjects having similar TB symptoms and categorized as active TB (ATB, n = 21) and non-TB (NTB, n = 21) based on GeneXpert test results. Silylation, gas chromatography mass spectrometry, and standard chemometric methods were employed to identify the important molecules and deregulated metabolic pathways. Eleven active TB patients were followed up on longitudinally for comparative urine metabolic profiling with healthy controls (n = 11). A set of 42 features qualified to have a variable importance parameter score of > 1.5 of a partial least-squares discriminate analysis model and fold change of > 1.5 at p value < 0.05 between ATB and NTB. Using these variables, a receiver operating characteristics curve was plotted and the area under the curve was calculated to be 0.85 (95% CI: 0.72-0.96). Several of these variables that represent norepinephrine, gentisic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, hydroquinone, and 4-hydroxyhippuric acid are part of the tyrosine-phenylalanine metabolic pathway. In the longitudinal study we observed a treatment-dependent trend in the urine metabolome of follow-up samples, and subjects declared as clinically cured showed similar metabolic profile as those of asymptomatic healthy subjects. The deregulated tyrosine-phenylalanine axis reveals a potential target for diagnostics and intervention in TB.

  1. Inflammasome genetics contributes to the development and control of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Souza de Lima, D; Ogusku, M M; Sadahiro, A; Pontillo, A

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health problem. An estimated one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but remains asymptomatic (latent TB) and only 5% to 10% of these latent individuals will develop active pulmonary TB. Factors affecting the balance between latent and active TB are mostly unknown, even if host genome has been shown to contribute to the outcome of Mtb response. Acute inflammation and Th1 response are important in the early clearance of the bacteria as it was emphasized by the association between immune genes (i.e.: HLA, IFNG, TNF, NRPAM1, IL10) variants and the development of active pulmonary TB. Recently, the role of the inflammasome in experimental TB has been demonstrated, however, to our knowledge, no data still exist about the contribution of inflammasome genetics to Mtb susceptibility and/or to the development of active TB. For this reason, selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes were analysed in a case/control cohort of individuals with active pulmonary TB from an endemic area of Brazil Amazon. Our data evidence the novel association between polymorphisms in NLRP3-inflammasome encoding genes and active pulmonary TB, and replicated the association between P2X7 and TB observed in other populations. These results emphasize the role of NLRP3-inflammasome also in human TB, and contribute to our knowledge about pathways involved in the development of active TB, even if deeper investigation are needed to fully elucidate the role of the complex in Mtb infection.

  2. Immunization with extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P G; Horwitz, M A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the capacity of a selected fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracellular proteins (EP) released into broth culture by mid-logarithmic-growth-phase organisms to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis by aerosol but not uninfected control guinea pigs exhibit strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized subcutaneously with EP but not sham-immunized control guinea pigs also develop strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. EP is nonlethal and nontoxic to guinea pigs upon subcutaneous immunization. Guinea pigs immunized with EP and then challenged with aerosolized M. tuberculosis exhibit protective immunity. In five independent experiments, EP-immunized guinea pigs were consistently protected against clinical illness, including weight loss. Compared with EP-immunized guinea pigs, sham-immunized control guinea pigs lost 12.9 +/- 2.0% (mean +/- SE) of their total weight. EP-immunized guinea pigs also had a 10-fold reduction in viable M. tuberculosis bacilli in their lungs and spleens (P = 0.004 and 0.001, respectively) compared with sham-immunized control animals. In the two experiments in which some guinea pigs died after aerosol challenge, EP-immunized animals were protected from death. Whereas all 12 (100%) EP-immunized guinea pigs survived challenge with aerosolized M. tuberculosis, only 6 of 12 (50%) sham-immunized control guinea pigs survived challenge (P = 0.007, Fisher exact test). This study demonstrates that actively growing M. tuberculosis cells release immunoprotective molecules extracellularly, that a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis is feasible, and that extracellular molecules of M

  3. Knowledge, Perceptions, and Practice of Nurses toward HIV+/AIDS Patients Diagnosed with Tuberculosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Patricia R.; Jones, Sande; Moore, Jackie; Taggart, Bonnie; Parchment, Yvonne; Holloman, Faye; Quintero, Lisa Mitchell

    1998-01-01

    Nurses (n=35) participating in an experimental education program on HIV-associated tuberculosis were compared with 15 controls. The experimental group had greater knowledge of tuberculosis and more adherence to universal precaution protocols. However, there was no tangible increase in their AIDS knowledge, attitudes, or concerns. (SK)

  4. Performance of the Roche LightCycler real-time PCR assay for diagnosing extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gous, N; Scott, L E; Wong, E; Omar, T; Venter, W D F; Stevens, W

    2012-06-01

    The Roche LightCycler mycobacterium detection molecular assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. avium, and M. kansasii, was applied to tissue specimens. It performed well on lymph node and cerebrospinal fluid specimens and less well on lung, liver, and bone marrow core biopsy specimens, but used in conjunction with a clinical suspicion of tuberculosis, it could augment patient management.

  5. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A Text Size What's in ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  6. Pulmonary but Not Subcutaneous Delivery of BCG Vaccine Confers Protection to Tuberculosis-Susceptible Mice by an Interleukin 17-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Nacho; Alvarez-Arguedas, Samuel; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzón, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising novel tuberculosis vaccine strategies currently under development are based on respiratory vaccination, mimicking the natural route of infection. In this work, we have compared pulmonary and subcutaneous delivery of BCG vaccine in the tuberculosis-susceptible DBA/2 mouse strain, a model in which parenterally administered BCG vaccine does not protect against tuberculosis. Our data show that intranasally but not subcutaneously administered BCG confers robust protection against pulmonary tuberculosis challenge. In addition, our results indicate that pulmonary vaccination triggers a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific mucosal immune response orchestrated by interleukin 17A (IL-17A). Thus, IL-17A neutralization in vivo reduces protection and abrogates M. tuberculosis-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion to respiratory airways and lung expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor induced following intranasal vaccination. Together, our results demonstrate that pulmonary delivery of BCG can overcome the lack of protection observed when BCG is given parenterally, suggesting that respiratory tuberculosis vaccines could have an advantage in tuberculosis-endemic countries, where intradermally administered BCG has inefficient effectiveness against pulmonary tuberculosis.

  7. Pulmonary but Not Subcutaneous Delivery of BCG Vaccine Confers Protection to Tuberculosis-Susceptible Mice by an Interleukin 17-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Nacho; Alvarez-Arguedas, Samuel; Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Monzón, Marta; Badiola, Juan; Martin, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Some of the most promising novel tuberculosis vaccine strategies currently under development are based on respiratory vaccination, mimicking the natural route of infection. In this work, we have compared pulmonary and subcutaneous delivery of BCG vaccine in the tuberculosis-susceptible DBA/2 mouse strain, a model in which parenterally administered BCG vaccine does not protect against tuberculosis. Our data show that intranasally but not subcutaneously administered BCG confers robust protection against pulmonary tuberculosis challenge. In addition, our results indicate that pulmonary vaccination triggers a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific mucosal immune response orchestrated by interleukin 17A (IL-17A). Thus, IL-17A neutralization in vivo reduces protection and abrogates M. tuberculosis-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion to respiratory airways and lung expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor induced following intranasal vaccination. Together, our results demonstrate that pulmonary delivery of BCG can overcome the lack of protection observed when BCG is given parenterally, suggesting that respiratory tuberculosis vaccines could have an advantage in tuberculosis-endemic countries, where intradermally administered BCG has inefficient effectiveness against pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:26494773

  8. Validity of Antibodies in Lymphocyte Supernatant in Diagnosing Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Raqib, Rubhana; Banu, Sayera; Shahid, Abu ASMSB; Shahunja, KM; Sharmin, Lazina; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) in young children can be challenging, especially in severely malnourished children. There is a critical need for improved diagnostics for children. Thus, we sought to evaluate the performance of a technique that measures antibodies in lymphocyte supernatant (ALS) for the diagnosis of TB in severely malnourished children presenting with suspected pneumonia. Methods Children less than 5 years with severe acute malnutrition and radiological features of pneumonia admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, were enrolled consecutively following informed written consent. In addition to clinical and radiological assessment, samples taken for TB diagnosis included gastric lavage fluid and induced sputum for microbiological confirmation. ALS was measured from venous blood, and results were evaluated in children classified as “confirmed”, “non-confirmed TB” or “not TB”. Results Among 224 children who had ALS analysis, 12 (5.4%) children had microbiologically “confirmed TB”, a further 41 (18%) had clinically diagnosed “non-confirmed TB” and the remaining 168 (75%) were considered not to have TB. ALS was positive in 89 (40%) and negative in 85 (39%) of children, with a large number (47 or 21%) reported as “borderline”. These proportions were similar between the three diagnostic groups. The sensitivity and specificity of ALS when comparing “Confirmed TB” to “Not TB” was only 67% (95% CI: 31–91%) and 51% (95% CI: 42–60%), respectively. Conclusions and Significance Our data suggest that ALS is not sufficiently accurate to improve the diagnosis of TB in children with severe malnutrition. PMID:26020966

  9. Treatment Outcomes with Fluoroquinolone-Containing Regimens for Isoniazid-Resistant Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Huh, Hee Jae; Lee, Nam Yong

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid (INH) is the most common form of drug resistance in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are recommended to strengthen treatment regimens for INH-resistant pulmonary TB, few studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy of FQ-containing regimens in patients with INH-resistant pulmonary TB. A retrospective cohort study of 140 patients with INH-resistant pulmonary TB was performed between 2005 and 2012. We evaluated whether FQ-containing regimens yielded improved treatment outcomes for patients with INH-resistant pulmonary TB. Overall, favorable outcomes were achieved in 128 (91.4%) patients. Unfavorable outcomes occurred in 12 patients (8.6%), including 7 with treatment failure (5.0%) and 5 with relapse after initial treatment completion (3.6%). FQs, such as levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, were given to 75 (53.6%) patients. Favorable treatment outcomes were more frequent for patients who received FQs (97.3% [73/75 patients]) than for those who did not receive FQs (84.6% [55/65 patients]) (P = 0.007). Patients who did not receive FQs were more likely to develop treatment failure (9.2% [6/65 patients] versus 1.3% [1/75 patients]) (P = 0.049) than patients who received FQs. The adjusted proportion of unfavorable outcomes was significantly higher among patients who did not receive FQs (8.8%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.3 to 21.5%) than among those who did receive FQs (1.5%; 95% CI, 0.3 to 7.7%) (P = 0.037). These results suggest that the addition of FQs can improve treatment outcomes for patients with INH-resistant pulmonary TB. PMID:26525801

  10. Comparisons of Prognosis between Surgically and Clinically Diagnosed Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Using Gap Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Dong Soon; Kim, Young Whan; Chung, Man Pyo; Uh, Soo Taek; Park, Choon Sik; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Hong Lyeol; Shin, Jong Wook; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jin Hwa; Jegal, Yangin; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Song, Jin Woo; Park, Moo Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a multidisciplinary approach has become an important criterion for an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) diagnosis, lung biopsies remain crucial. However, the prognosis of patients with surgically diagnosed IPF (sIPF) is uncertain. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of patients with clinically diagnosed IPF (cIPF) and sIPF. In this retrospective observational study, the Korean Interstitial Lung Disease Study Group conducted a national survey to evaluate the clinical, physiological, radiological, and survival characteristics of patients with IPF from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. Patients were recruited from 54 universities and teaching hospitals across the Republic of Korea. IPF diagnoses were established according to the 2002 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society criteria (ERS) guideline. A total of 1685 patients with IPF (1027 cIPF and 658 sIPF) were enrolled. Patients with sIPF were significantly younger, predominantly female, and nonsmokers (all P < 0.001). sIPF group had significantly better initial pulmonary function. The proportion of computed tomography-based honeycomb findings of patients with cIPF was higher than in those with sIPF (P < 0.001). A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the sIPF group had a better prognosis (P = 0.001). A survival analysis showed that age, pulmonary function parameters, pulmonary oxygen tension, honeycombing change, and combined lung cancer had a significant influence on patient prognosis. However, there was no significant difference in prognosis between the cIPF and sIPF groups after adjusting for GAP (gender, age, physiology) stage. The patients with sIPF had better clinical features than those with cIPF. However, after adjusting for GAP stage, the sIPF group showed similar prognoses as the cIPF group. This study showed that after adjusting for GAP stage, the prognosis of patients with IPF is the same regardless of the diagnostic method used. PMID:26986154

  11. Applying patient centered approach in management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A case report from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Atif, M; Sulaiman, Sas; Shafi, Aa; Muttalif, Ar; Ali, I; Saleem, F

    2011-06-01

    A 24 year university student with history of productive cough was registered as sputum smear confirmed case of pulmonary tuberculosis. During treatment, patient suffered from itchiness associated with anti tuberculosis drugs and was treated with chlorpheniramine (4mg) tablet. Patient missed twenty eight doses of anti tuberculosis drugs in continuation phase claiming that he was very busy in his studies and assignments. Upon questioning he further explained that he was quite healthy after five months and unable to concentrate on his studies after taking prescribed medicines. His treatment was stopped based on clinical improvement, although he did not complete six months therapy. Two major reasons; false perception of being completely cured and side effects associated with anti TB drugs might be responsible for non adherence. Non sedative anti histamines like fexofenadine, citrizine or loratidine should be preferred over first generation anti histamines (chlorpheniramine) in patients with such lifestyle. Patient had not completed full course of chemotherapy, which is preliminary requirement for a case to be classified as "cure" and "treatment completed". Moreover, patient had not defaulted for two consecutive months. Therefore, according to WHO treatment outcome categories, this patient can neither be classified as "cure" or "treatment completed" nor as "defaulter". Further elaboration of WHO treatment outcome categories is required for adequate classification of patients with similar characteristics. Likelihood of non adherence can be significantly reduced by applying the WHO recommended "Patient Centered Approach" strategy. Close friend, class mate or family member can be selected as treatment supporter to ensure adherence to treatment. PMID:24826012

  12. Applying patient centered approach in management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A case report from Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Atif, M; Sulaiman, Sas; Shafi, Aa; Muttalif, Ar; Ali, I; Saleem, F

    2011-06-01

    A 24 year university student with history of productive cough was registered as sputum smear confirmed case of pulmonary tuberculosis. During treatment, patient suffered from itchiness associated with anti tuberculosis drugs and was treated with chlorpheniramine (4mg) tablet. Patient missed twenty eight doses of anti tuberculosis drugs in continuation phase claiming that he was very busy in his studies and assignments. Upon questioning he further explained that he was quite healthy after five months and unable to concentrate on his studies after taking prescribed medicines. His treatment was stopped based on clinical improvement, although he did not complete six months therapy. Two major reasons; false perception of being completely cured and side effects associated with anti TB drugs might be responsible for non adherence. Non sedative anti histamines like fexofenadine, citrizine or loratidine should be preferred over first generation anti histamines (chlorpheniramine) in patients with such lifestyle. Patient had not completed full course of chemotherapy, which is preliminary requirement for a case to be classified as "cure" and "treatment completed". Moreover, patient had not defaulted for two consecutive months. Therefore, according to WHO treatment outcome categories, this patient can neither be classified as "cure" or "treatment completed" nor as "defaulter". Further elaboration of WHO treatment outcome categories is required for adequate classification of patients with similar characteristics. Likelihood of non adherence can be significantly reduced by applying the WHO recommended "Patient Centered Approach" strategy. Close friend, class mate or family member can be selected as treatment supporter to ensure adherence to treatment.

  13. Correlation between Either Cupriavidus or Porphyromonas and Primary Pulmonary Tuberculosis Found by Analysing the Microbiota in Patients’ Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuhua; Lin, Feishen; Cui, Zelin; Zhang, Xiangrong; Hu, Chunmei; Shen, Tian; Chen, Chunyan; Zhang, Xia; Guo, Xiaokui

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has gained attention in recent decades because of its rising incidence trend; simultaneously, increasing numbers of studies have identified the relationship between microbiota and chronic infectious diseases. In our work, we enrolled 32 patients with primary TB characterised by unilateral TB lesion formation diagnosed by chest radiographic exam. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was taken from both lungs. Twenty-four healthy people were chosen as controls. Pyrosequencing was performed on the V3 hypervariable region of 16S rDNA in all bacterial samples and used as a culture-independent method to describe the phylogenetic composition of the microbiota. Through pyrosequencing, 271,764 amplicons were detected in samples and analysed using tools in the Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) and bioinformatics. These analyses revealed significant differences in the microbiota in the lower respiratory tract (LRT) of TB patients compared with healthy controls; in contrast, the microbiota of intra/extra-TB lesions were similar. These results showed that the dominant bacterial genus in the LRT of TB patients was Cupriavidus and not Streptococcus, which resulted in a significant change in the microbiota in TB patients. The abundance of Mycobacteria and Porphyromonas significantly increased inside TB lesions when compared with non-lesion-containing contralateral lungs. From these data, it can be concluded that Cupriavidus plays an important role in TB’s secondary infection and that in addition to Mycobacteria, Porphyromonas may also be a co-factor in lesion formation. The mechanisms underlying this connection warrant further research. PMID:26000957

  14. Sociodemographic, Epidemiological, and Clinical Risk Factors for Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely Malnourished Children Presenting With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu Syeed Golam; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in children presenting with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and pneumonia. Children aged 0 to 59 months with SAM and radiologic pneumonia from April 2011 to July 2012 were studied in Bangladesh. Children with confirmed PTB (by culture and/or X-pert MTB/RIF) (cases = 27) and without PTB (controls = 81; randomly selected from 378 children) were compared. The cases more often had the history of contact with active PTB patient (P < .01) and exposure to cigarette smoke (P = .04) compared with the controls. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with working mother (P = .05) and positive tuberculin skin test (TST; P = .02). Thus, pneumonia in SAM children is a common presentation of PTB and further highlights the importance of the use of simple TST and/or history of contact with active TB patients in diagnosing PTB in such children, especially in resource-limited settings. PMID:27335971

  15. Summary of follow-up results from potential tuberculosis exposures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    There were two isolated episodes of LeRC workers who were diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) during the fall of 1990. The specifics surrounding each case were very different, and it is clear that the two episodes were completely unrelated. The fact that the final diagnoses of pulmonary tuberculosis came within three weeks of each other was purely coincidental. The Occupational Medicine Service (OMS) conducted separate informational sessions and offered free PPD skin testing to all employees, both NASA and contractors, who felt that they were at risk of having been exposed to tuberculosis from either individual. The procedures and results of these are briefly discussed.

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Small Membrane Filtration Method for Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a High-HIV-Prevalence Setting.

    PubMed

    Boum, Yap; Kim, Soyeon; Orikiriza, Patrick; Acuña-Villaorduña, Carlos; Vinhas, Solange; Bonnet, Maryline; Nyehangane, Dan; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Fennelly, Kevin P; Jones-López, Edward C

    2016-06-01

    Sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity but remains the most commonly used laboratory test to diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the small membrane filtration (SMF) method that concentrates AFB in a smaller area to facilitate detection to improve the diagnostic performance of microscopy. We enrolled adults with suspicion of pulmonary TB from health facilities in southwestern Uganda. Clinical history, physical examination, and 3 sputum samples were obtained for direct fluorescent AFB smear, SMF, Xpert MTB/RIF, and MGIT culture media. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated for SMF, AFB smear, and Xpert MTB/RIF, using MGIT as the reference standard. The analysis was stratified according to HIV status. From September 2012 to April 2014, 737 participants were included in the HIV-infected stratum (146 [20.5%] were culture positive) and 313 were in the HIV-uninfected stratum (85 [28%] were culture positive). In HIV-infected patients, the sensitivity of a single SMF was 67.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59.9% to 74.1%); for AFB, 68.0% (95% CI, 60.6% to 74.6%); and for Xpert MTB/RIF, 91.0% (95% CI, 85.0% to 94.8%). In HIV-uninfected patients, the corresponding sensitivities were 72.5% (95% CI, 62.1% to 80.9%), 80.3% (95% CI, 70.8% to 87.2%), and 93.5% (95% CI, 85.7% to 97.2%). The specificity for all 3 tests in both HIV groups was ≥96%. In this setting, the SMF method did not improve the diagnostic accuracy of sputum AFB. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay performed well in both HIV-infected and -uninfected groups.

  17. Value of Urine Lipoarabinomannan Grade and Second Test for Optimizing Clinic-based Screening for HIV-associated Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Paul K.; Losina, Elena; Coleman, Sharon M.; Giddy, Janet; Ross, Douglas; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Bassett, Ingrid V.

    2014-01-01

    Background We assessed the role of urine LAM (lipoarabinomannan) grade and a second LAM test for HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) screening in outpatient clinics in South Africa. Methods We enrolled newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults (≥18 years) at 4 clinics, excluding those on TB therapy. Participants provided sputum for AFB microscopy and culture. Nurses conducted two rapid urine LAM tests at the point-of-care, and graded positive results from low (“faint”) to high (5+). Culture-confirmed pulmonary TB was the gold standard. We used area under receiver operating curves (AUROC) to compare screening strategies. Results Among 320 HIV-infected adults, median CD4 was 248/mm3 (IQR 107–379/mm3); 54 (17%) were TB culture-positive. 52 (16%) of all participants were LAM-positive by either test; correlation between LAM tests was high. Among 10 “faint” positive results, 2 (20%) had culture-positive TB. Using ≥1+ LAM grade as positive, one LAM test had sensitivity of 41% (95% CI 28–55%) and specificity of 92% (95% CI 88–95%). A 2 LAM test strategy had a sensitivity of 43% (95% CI 29–57%). One LAM test ≥1+ grade (AUROC=0.66; 95% CI 0.60–0.73) was significantly better than sputum AFB alone. The optimal strategy was sequentially performing one LAM test followed by sputum AFB if LAM grade <1+ (AUROC=0.70; 95% CI 0.63–0.77), which had sensitivity of 48% (95% CI 34–62%) and specificity of 91% (95% CI 87–94%). Conclusions In this clinic-based study, “faint” line was a false-positive, second urine LAM test added no value, and an optimal screening strategy was one LAM test followed by sputum AFB microscopy for urine LAM-negative people. PMID:25415288

  18. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline.

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of the Small Membrane Filtration Method for Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a High-HIV-Prevalence Setting.

    PubMed

    Boum, Yap; Kim, Soyeon; Orikiriza, Patrick; Acuña-Villaorduña, Carlos; Vinhas, Solange; Bonnet, Maryline; Nyehangane, Dan; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Fennelly, Kevin P; Jones-López, Edward C

    2016-06-01

    Sputum acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear microscopy has suboptimal sensitivity but remains the most commonly used laboratory test to diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We prospectively evaluated the small membrane filtration (SMF) method that concentrates AFB in a smaller area to facilitate detection to improve the diagnostic performance of microscopy. We enrolled adults with suspicion of pulmonary TB from health facilities in southwestern Uganda. Clinical history, physical examination, and 3 sputum samples were obtained for direct fluorescent AFB smear, SMF, Xpert MTB/RIF, and MGIT culture media. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated for SMF, AFB smear, and Xpert MTB/RIF, using MGIT as the reference standard. The analysis was stratified according to HIV status. From September 2012 to April 2014, 737 participants were included in the HIV-infected stratum (146 [20.5%] were culture positive) and 313 were in the HIV-uninfected stratum (85 [28%] were culture positive). In HIV-infected patients, the sensitivity of a single SMF was 67.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 59.9% to 74.1%); for AFB, 68.0% (95% CI, 60.6% to 74.6%); and for Xpert MTB/RIF, 91.0% (95% CI, 85.0% to 94.8%). In HIV-uninfected patients, the corresponding sensitivities were 72.5% (95% CI, 62.1% to 80.9%), 80.3% (95% CI, 70.8% to 87.2%), and 93.5% (95% CI, 85.7% to 97.2%). The specificity for all 3 tests in both HIV groups was ≥96%. In this setting, the SMF method did not improve the diagnostic accuracy of sputum AFB. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay performed well in both HIV-infected and -uninfected groups. PMID:27030493

  20. Clinical Correlates and Drug Resistance in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in South India

    PubMed Central

    Sara, Chandy; Elsa, Heylen; Baijayanti, Mishra; Lennartsdotter, Ekstrand Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine demographics, clinical correlates, sputum AFB (acid fast bacilli) smear grading DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy Short Course) uptake, and drug resistance in a cohort of newly-diagnosed, smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients with respect to HIV status at baseline, and compare smear conversion rates, side effects and mortality after two months. Design A prospective study among 54 HIV positive and 41 HIV negative pulmonary TB patients. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews, review of medical records, and lab tests. Results HIVTB co-infected patients, though more symptomatic at baseline, showed more improvement in their symptoms compared to HIV-uninfected TB patients at follow-up. The HIV co-infected group had more prevalent perceived side effects, and sputum smear positivity was marginally higher compared to the HIV negative group at follow-up. Mortality was higher among the HIV-infected group. Both groups had high rates of resistance to first-line anti-tubercular drugs, particularly isoniazid. There was no significant difference in the drug resistance patterns between the groups. Conclusions Prompt initiation and provision of daily regimens of ATT (Anti-Tubercular treatment) along with ART (Anti-Retroviral treatment) via ART centers is urgently needed in India. As resistance to ART and/or ATT is directly linked to medication non-adherence, the use of counseling, regular reinforcement, early detection and appropriate intervention strategies to tackle this complex issue could help prevent premature mortality and development of resistance in HIV-TB co-infected patients. The high rate of isoniazid resistance might preclude its use in India as prophylaxis for latent TB in HIV infected persons as per the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. PMID:27708985

  1. Ocular tuberculosis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Shakarchi, Faiz I

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization currently estimates that nearly two billion people, or one-third of the world’s population, are infected by tuberculosis, and that roughly 10% of the infected people are symptomatic. Tuberculosis affects the lungs in 80% of patients, while in the remaining 20% the disease may affect other organs, including the eye. Uveitis can be seen concurrently with tuberculosis, but a direct association is difficult to prove. Ocular tuberculosis is usually not associated with clinical evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis, as up to 60% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis patients may not have pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of tuberculous uveitis is often problematic and in nearly all reported cases, the diagnosis was only presumptive. Tuberculous uveitis is a great mimicker of various uveitis entities and it can be considered in the differential diagnosis of any type of intraocular inflammation. It is still unknown if ocular manifestations result from a direct mycobacterium infection or hypersensitivity reaction and this is reflected on the management of tuberculous uveitis. Prevalence of tuberculosis as an etiology of uveitis may reach up to 10% in endemic areas. Tuberculous uveitis is a vision-threatening disease that inevitably leads to blindness if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to illustrate the various clinical features and management of presumed tuberculous uveitis. The current review focuses on the diagnostic criteria, significance of tuberculin skin test, and use of systemic corticosteroids in the management of tuberculous uveitis as recommended in recent publications. PMID:26648690

  2. Alternative diagnoses based on CT angiography of the chest in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Eleci Vaz; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Sarmento, Muriel Bossle; Guazzelli, Pedro Arends; Hoffmeister, Mariana Costa; Guerra, Vinicius André; Seligman, Renato; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To determine the prevalence of alternative diagnoses based on chest CT angiography (CTA) in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) who tested negative for PTE, as well as whether those alternative diagnoses had been considered prior to the CTA. Methods : This was a cross-sectional, retrospective study involving 191 adult patients undergoing CTA for suspected PTE between September of 2009 and May of 2012. Chest X-rays and CTAs were reviewed to determine whether the findings suggested an alternative diagnosis in the cases not diagnosed as PTE. Data on symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, length of hospital stay, and mortality were collected. Results : On the basis of the CTA findings, PTE was diagnosed in 47 cases (24.6%). Among the 144 patients not diagnosed with PTE via CTA, the findings were abnormal in 120 (83.3%). Such findings were consistent with an alternative diagnosis that explained the symptoms in 75 patients (39.3%). Among those 75 cases, there were only 39 (20.4%) in which the same alterations had not been previously detected on chest X-rays. The most common alternative diagnosis, made solely on the basis of the CTA findings, was pneumonia (identified in 20 cases). Symptoms, risk factors, comorbidities, and the in-hospital mortality rate did not differ significantly between the patients with and without PTE. However, the median hospital stay was significantly longer in the patients with PTE than in those without (18.0 and 9.5 days, respectively; p = 0.001). Conclusions : Our results indicate that chest CTA is useful in cases of suspected PTE, because it can confirm the diagnosis and reveal findings consistent with an alternative diagnosis in a significant number of patients. PMID:26982039

  3. Mycobacterial Etiology of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Association with HIV Infection and Multidrug Resistance in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    El-Kamary, Samer S.; Abimiku, Alash'le; Ezati, Nicholas; Mosunmola, Iwakun; Brown, Clayton; Tracy, Kathleen J.; Obasanya, Joshua; Blattner, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Data on pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) complex in Nigeria are limited. We investigated species of MTB complex in TB cases from northern Nigeria. Methods. New TB suspects were enrolled, screened for HIV and their sputum samples were cultured after routine microscopy. Genotypes MTBC and MTBDRplus were used to characterize the MTB complex species and their resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin. Results. Of the 1,603 patients enrolled, 375 (23%) had MTB complex infection: 354 (94.4%) had Mycobacterium tuberculosis; 20 (5.3%) had Mycobacterium africanum; and one had Mycobacterium bovis (0.3%). Cases were more likely to be male (AOR = 1.87, 95% CI : 1.42–2.46; P ≤ 0.001), young (AOR = 2.03, 95% CI : 1.56–2.65; P ≤ 0.001) and have HIV (AOR = 1.43, 95% CI : 1.06–1.92; P = 0.032). In 23 patients (6.1%), the mycobacterium was resistant to at least one drug, and these cases were more likely to have HIV and prior TB treatment (AOR = 3.62, 95% CI : 1.51–8.84; P = 0.004; AOR : 4.43; 95% CI : 1.71–11.45 P = 0.002 resp.), compared to cases without any resistance. Conclusion. Mycobacterium tuberculosis remained the predominant specie in TB in this setting followed by Mycobacterium africanum while Mycobacterium bovis was rare. The association of TB drug resistance with HIV has implications for TB treatment. PMID:23970967

  4. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Departments & Divisions Home Conditions Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Our Specialists Charles L. Daley, ...

  5. Adjunctive Phosphodiesterase-4 Inhibitor Therapy Improves Antibiotic Response to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; O'Brien, Paul; Dartois, Véronique; Khetani, Vikram; Zeldis, Jerome B.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Adjunctive host-directed therapy is emerging as a new potential approach to improve the outcome of conventional antimicrobial treatment for tuberculosis (TB). We tested the ability of a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (PDE4i) CC-11050, co-administered with the first-line anti-TB drug isoniazid (INH), to accelerate bacillary killing and reduce chronic inflammation in the lungs of rabbits with experimental Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. Methods A rabbit model of pulmonary TB that recapitulates the pathologic manifestations seen in humans was used. Rabbits were infected with virulent Mtb by aerosol exposure and treated for eight weeks with INH with or without CC-11050, starting at four weeks post infection. The effect of CC-11050 treatment on disease severity, pathology, bacillary load, T cell proliferation and global lung transcriptome profiles were analyzed. Results Significant improvement in bacillary clearance and reduced lung pathology and fibrosis were noted in the rabbits treated for eight weeks with INH + CC-11050, compared to those treated with INH or CC-11050 only. In addition, expression of host genes associated with tissue remodeling, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) regulation, macrophage activation and lung inflammation networks was dampened in CC-11050-treated, compared to the untreated rabbits. Conclusions Adjunctive CC-11050 therapy significantly improves the response of rabbits with experimental pulmonary TB to INH treatment. We propose that CC-11050 may be a promising candidate for host directed therapy of patients with pulmonary TB, reducing the duration and improving clinical outcome of antibiotic treatment. PMID:26981575

  6. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment.

  7. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis – limitations for the underlying COPD detection

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Background During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. Purpose The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Patients and methods Prospective, nest case–control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. Results From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (P<0.01). Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (%) during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%–20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041) and working environments (3.928%–20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005), initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%–0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047), leukocyte count (0.020%–1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043), and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%–0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003) compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01–1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02–1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. Conclusion AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel

  8. Management of pulmonary tuberculosis in health clinics in the Gombak district: How are we doing so far?

    PubMed

    Ariffin, F; Ahmad Zubaidi, A Z; Md Yasin, M; Ishak, R

    2015-01-01

    This audit report assessed the structure, processes and outcome of the pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) management in adults conducted at eight government health clinics within the high TB burden Gombak district. All newly diagnosed PTB patients from November 2012 to November 2013 were identified from the tuberculosis registry. Patients less than 18 years old, were transferred out or extrapulmonary tuberculosis was excluded from the study. The assessment criteria for PTB were defined according to the latest Malaysian TB clinical practice guidelines (TB CPG) 2012. A total of 117 patients were included in this report and data were extracted and analysed using SPSS version 20.0. The mean age of patients was 40.4 ± 14.4 SD. Majority was men (63.2%). Out of 117 patients, 82.1% were Malaysian citizens and 17.9% were foreigners. Malays were the majority (65%) followed by 7.7% Chinese, 10.3% Indian and 17.1% others. The most common clinical feature was cough (88.0%) followed by loss of weight (58.1%), loss of appetite (57.3%), fever (56.4%), night sweat (30.8%) and haemoptysis (32.5%). Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear was positive in 94% of cases. Chest X-ray and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening results were available for 89.1 and 82.1% cases respectively. The results for the sputum culture were available in 27.4% of patients and 54.7% were documented as done but pending results. The clinics have a successful directly observed therapy (DOT) program with 94.0% patients documented under DOT. Out of 53 patients on maintenance phase, 47.2% were identified as cured. Cure rate for those completed treatment was 100%. The defaulter rate was 17.1%. This audit demonstrated the attempt made by the clinics to adhere to the recommended guidelines. However, improvements are to be made in the documentation of medical records, tracing of investigation results and reduction of the number of defaulters. PMID:26425292

  9. Spatial analysis of deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis in the city of São Luís, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Neto, Marcelino; Yamamura, Mellina; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Silveira, Tatiane Ramos dos Santos; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis, according to sociodemographic and operational variables, in the city of São Luís, Brazil, and to describe their spatial distribution. METHODS: This was an exploratory ecological study based on secondary data from death certificates, obtained from the Brazilian Mortality Database, related to deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis. We included all deaths attributed to pulmonary tuberculosis that occurred in the urban area of São Luís between 2008 and 2012. We performed univariate and bivariate analyses of the sociodemographic and operational variables of the deaths investigated, as well as evaluating the spatial distribution of the events by kernel density estimation. RESULTS: During the study period, there were 193 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis in São Luís. The median age of the affected individuals was 52 years. Of the 193 individuals who died, 142 (73.60%) were male, 133 (68.91%) were Mulatto, 102 (53.13%) were single, and 64 (33.16%) had completed middle school. There was a significant positive association between not having received medical care prior to death and an autopsy having been performed (p = 0.001). A thematic map by density of points showed that the spatial distribution of those deaths was heterogeneous and that the density was as high as 8.12 deaths/km2. CONCLUSIONS: The sociodemographic and operational characteristics of the deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis evaluated in this study, as well as the identification of priority areas for control and surveillance of the disease, could promote public health policies aimed at reducing health inequities, allowing the optimization of resources, as well as informing decisions regarding the selection of strategies and specific interventions targeting the most vulnerable populations. PMID:25410843

  10. P2X7 and NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 gene polymorphisms in Mexican mestizo patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Niño-Moreno, P; Portales-Pérez, D; Hernández-Castro, B; Portales-Cervantes, L; Flores-Meraz, V; Baranda, L; Gómez-Gómez, A; Acuña-Alonzo, V; Granados, J; González-Amaro, R

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. Several studies have suggested that genetic factors may affect susceptibility to tuberculosis, but the specific genes involved have not yet been fully characterized. NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 and P2X7 genes have been linked to increased risk for tuberculosis in some African and Asiatic populations. To explore the potential role of these genes in the susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in a Mexican mestizo population, we evaluated the association of D543N and 3′-UTR polymorphisms in NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 and − 762 and A1513C polymorphisms in P2X7 genes with the risk for tuberculosis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genomic DNA followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and allelic-specific PCR was employed. We found no significant differences in allelic frequency in NRAMP1/SLC11 A1 gene polymorphisms in 94 patients with tuberculosis compared to 100 healthy contacts. Similarly, no significant association of the P2X7−762 gene polymorphism with tuberculosis was detected. In contrast, the P2X7 A1513C polymorphism was associated significantly with tuberculosis (P= 0·02, odds ratio = 5·28, 95% CI, 0·99–37·69), an association that had not been reported previously. However, when the function of P2X7 was assessed by an l-selectin loss assay, we did not find significant differences in patients compared to healthy contacts or between PPD+ and PPD– control individuals. This study further supports the complex role of P2X7 gene in host regulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and demonstrates that different associations of gene polymorphisms and tuberculosis are found in distinct racial populations. PMID:17493019

  11. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable. PMID:22858774

  12. Pulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculous arthritis of knee joint associated with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha medication: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nalbant, Selim; Özyurt, Mustafa; Yıldırım, Murat; Kuskucu, Mesih

    2012-09-01

    Tuberculosis infection (TB) is one of the most important problems for the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with anti-TNF agents. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common clinic form of the TB in these patients. However, tuberculosis arthritis is very rare. We present here a 72-year-old Caucasian woman with seropositive RA, treated with etanercept/adalimumab for the last 2 years, who presented with resistant knee pain and joint effusion. We believe that this treatment caused the tuberculosis in this patient, which is the most worried complication. Interestingly, tuberculosis was in the knee joint at this time.

  13. Prevalence, Risk Factors and Social Context of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Tajikistan

    PubMed Central

    Winetsky, Daniel E.; Almukhamedov, Olga; Pulatov, Dilshod; Vezhnina, Natalia; Dooronbekova, Aizhan; Zhussupov, Baurzhan

    2014-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is highly prevalent in prisons of the former Soviet Union. Objective To understand the behavioral, demographic and biological factors placing inmates in Tajikistan at risk for active TB. Design We administered a behavioral and demographic survey to 1317 inmates in two prison facilities in Sughd province, Tajikistan along with radiographic screening for pulmonary TB. Suspected cases were confirmed bacteriologically. Inmates undergoing TB treatment were also surveyed. In-depth interviews were conducted with former prisoners to elicit relevant social and behavioral characteristics. Results We identified 59 cases of active pulmonary TB (prevalence 4.5%). Factors independently associated with increased prevalence of active TB were: HIV-infection by self-report (PR 7.88; 95%CI 3.40–18.28), history of previous TB (PR 10.21; 95%CI 6.27–16.63) and infrequent supplemental nutrition beyond scheduled meals (PR 3.00; 95%CI 1.67–5.62). Access to supplemental nutrition was associated with frequency of visits from friends and family and ability to rely on other inmates for help. Conclusion In prison facilities of Tajikistan, HIV-infection, injection drug use and low access to supplemental nutrition were associated with prevalent cases of active pulmonary TB. Policies that reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users and improve the nutritional status of socially isolated inmates may alleviate the TB burden in Tajikistan’s prisons. PMID:24465861

  14. Isoniazid Induced Cutaneous Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (Pott’s Spine): A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    V, Dharma Rao; Rampure, Dilip; S, Rama Rao

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tuberculosis drugs frequently result in cutaneous adverse reactions but Isoniazid is known to have least toxic potential for cutaneous reactions. We report a rare case of Isoniazid induced cutaneous leucocytoclastic vasculitis. A 64-year-old male was diagnosed to have Pott’s spine with multiple vertebral body involvement (D8-12 vertebrae). Subsequently, he was treated with first line anti-TB drugs i.e., Isoniazid, Rifampicin, Pyrazinamide and Ethambutol. On the fourth day of treatment with Anti Tuberculosis Treatment (ATT), the patient developed an erythematosus rash over right upper limb not associated with itching or pain, non-blanchable macules and papules over bilateral shins on lower limbs, petechiae on both forearms and hyper pigmented, scaly rash over right axilla and buttocks. The skin biopsy report was consistent with cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Although rare, Isoniazid among anti-tuberculosis drugs should be considered as potential cause of drug-induced cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the differential diagnosis of erythematosus rash with petechiae. PMID:25302231

  15. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with ...

  16. A Novel Scoring System to Measure Radiographic Abnormalities and Related Spirometric Values in Cured Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; López-Arteaga, Yesenia; Bizarrón-Muro, Alma; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Cruz-Hervert, Luis Pablo; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; García-García, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite chemotherapy, patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis may result in lung functional impairment. Objective To evaluate a novel scoring system based on the degree of radiographic abnormalities and related spirometric values in patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods One hundred and twenty seven patients with cured pulmonary tuberculosis were prospectively enrolled in a referral hospital specializing in respiratory diseases. Spirometry was performed and the extent of radiographic abnormalities was evaluated twice by each of two readers to generate a novel quantitative score. Scoring reproducibility was analyzed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and the Bland-Altman method. Multiple linear regression models were performed to assess the association of the extent of radiographic abnormalities with spirometric values. Results The intra-observer agreement for scoring of radiographic abnormalities (SRA) showed an ICC of 0.81 (CI:95%, 0.67–0.95) and 0.78 (CI:95%, 0.65–0.92), for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-observer reproducibility for the first measurement was 0.83 (CI:95%, 0.71–0.95), and for the second measurement was 0.74 (CI:95%, 0.58–0.90). The Bland-Altman analysis of the intra-observer agreement showed a mean bias of 0.87% and -0.55% and an inter-observer agreement of -0.35% and -1.78%, indicating a minor average systematic variability. After adjustment for age, gender, height, smoking status, pack-years of smoking, and degree of dyspnea, the scoring degree of radiographic abnormalities was significantly and negatively associated with absolute and percent predicted values of FVC: -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.01 to -0.04); -2.48 (CI:95%, -3.45 to -1.50); and FEV1 -0.07 (CI:95%, -0.10 to -0.05); -2.92 (CI:95%, -3.87 to -1.97) respectively, in the patients studied. Conclusion The extent of radiographic abnormalities, as evaluated through our novel scoring system, was inversely associated with spirometric values, and

  17. Alleles of HLA-DRB1*04 Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Amazon Brazilian Population

    PubMed Central

    Porto dos Santos, Maisa; de Melo Silva, Cláudia Maria; Alves de Almeida, Vanessa; Assumpção Antunes, Irineide

    2016-01-01

    Immunogenetic host factors are associated with susceptibility or protection to tuberculosis (TB). Strong associations of HLA class II genes with TB are reported. We analyzed the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles to identify subtypes associated with pulmonary TB and their interaction with risk factors such as alcohol, smoking, and gender in 316 pulmonary TB patients and 306 healthy individuals from the Brazilian Amazon. The HLA-DRB1*04 was prevalent in patients with pulmonary TB (p<0.0001; OR = 2.94; 95% CI = 2.12 to 4.08). Direct nucleotide sequencing of DRB1 exon 2 identified nine subtypes of HLA-DRB1*04. The subtype HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0019; OR = 2.23; 95% CI = 1.34 to 3.70) was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary TB while DRB1*04:07:01 (p<0.0001; OR = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.001 to 0.33) to protection. Notably, the interaction between alcohol and HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 increased the risk for developing pulmonary TB (p = 0.0001; OR = 51.3; 95% CI = 6.81 to 386). Multibacillary pulmonary TB, the clinical presentation of disease transmission, was strongly associated with interaction to alcohol (p = 0.0026; OR = 11.1; 95% CI = 3.99 to 30.9), HLA-DRB1*04:11:01 (p = 0.0442; OR = 2.01; 95% CI = 1.03 to 3.93) and DRB1*04:92 (p = 0.0112; OR = 8.62; 95% CI = 1.63 to 45.5). These results show that HLA-DRB1*04 are associated with pulmonary TB. Interestingly, three subtypes, DRB1*04:07:01, DRB1*04:11:01 and DRB1*04:92 of the HLA-DRB1*04 could be potential immunogenetic markers that may help to explain mechanisms involved in disease development. PMID:26901036

  18. The impact of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment on the prevalence of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Carren Teh Sui; Gopala, Krishnan; Manuel, Anura Michelle

    2013-08-01

    Atopy is a syndrome characterized by immediate hypersensitivity reactions to common environmental antigens. The "hygiene hypothesis" stipulates that childhood infections are associated with a lower risk of allergies. Not much has been published about the effects that the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has on allergies, specifically allergic rhinitis. We conducted a study to investigate the prevalence of allergic rhinitis in patients with pulmonary TB before and after treatment of their TB. Our initial study group was made up of 121 patients with confirmed pulmonary TB who were followed up by questionnaire. In addition to demographic data, they provided information about their personal and family history of atopy and their current status with regard to allergic rhinitis. After providing informed consent, all patients underwent skin-prick testing with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and Blomia tropicalis allergens before and after TB treatment. Stool samples were obtained to identify patients with worm infestation, and they were excluded from the study. In all, 94 patients completed treatment and follow-up, and their data were included in the final analysis. Of this group, 31 patients (33.0%) exhibited symptoms of allergic rhinitis prior to TB treatment, and 26 (27.7%) had a positive skin-prick test. Following treatment, only 12 patients (12.8%) reported allergic rhinitis symptoms (p = 0.004), but there was no significant reduction in the number of patients with a positive skin-prick test (n = 20 [21.3%]; p = 0.555). We conclude that the treatment of pulmonary TB results in significant relief of atopy, particularly allergic rhinitis symptoms.

  19. [Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling pulmonary abscess with a so-called niveau-like shadow in a medical school hospital: discussion concerning the formation mechanism of niveau-like shadows].

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Y; Niki, Y; Kawane, H; Matsushima, T

    1996-04-01

    Four cases of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling pulmonary abscess radiographically were reviewed from their clinical features, chest X-ray and chest CT, and the mechanism of formation of so-called niveau-like shadows was discussed. Only one case showed a newly formed tuberculous cavity with air fluid level on chest X-ray, however, even in this case, the possibility of the infection with tubercle bacilli of an emphysematous bulla of the lung could not be completely excluded as several bulla were found on chest CT. The remaining three cases showed a slightly different mechanism of the formation of niveau-like shadows. Namely, mycobacterium tuberculosis spread into an existed bulla and a tubercle bacilli infected bulla was formed. Regarding the clinical features, no remarkable findings were detected and we could find no differences with common tuberculosis. Based on these experiences, the presence of pulmonary tuberculosis resembling the shadow of pulmonary abscess should be emphasized. PMID:8683908

  20. Calcified Pulmonary Nodules Identified in a 350-Year-Old-Joseon Mummy: the First Report on Ancient Pulmonary Tuberculosis from Archaeologically Obtained Pre-modern Korean Samples

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We found calcified pulmonary nodules in a middle-aged female mummy discovered from 350-yr-old Joseon tomb of Korea. In the CT scan, we found six radiopaque nodules in right lung, through the levels of thoracic vertebrae 1 to 6. We also found presumptive pleural adhesions in right thoracic cavity of CT images. We re-confirmed radiological findings by our post-factum dissection on the same mummy. By the differential diagnosis, we speculate that the radiopaque calcification nodules and associated pleural adhesion could have been caused by tuberculosis. This is the first-ever report on the pulmonary tuberculosis identified in archaeologically obtained, pre-modern Korean samples. PMID:26770051

  1. Prevalence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis among prisoners in Malawi: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Banda, H T; Gausi, F; Harries, A D; Salaniponi, F M

    2009-12-01

    A cross-sectional cell-to-cell survey was conducted in 18 of 22 prisons in Malawi to determine the period prevalence of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). In each prison, prisoners were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Prisoners with cough of >1 week's duration were investigated by sputum smear examination. Of 7661 prisoners, 3887 had cough of > or =1 week, of whom 3794 submitted three sputum specimens: 54 (0.7%) had smear-positive PTB. The prevalence of PTB was higher in large urban prisons (1.1%) than in district prisons (0.3%, P < 0.001). More needs to be done to improve TB control in urban prisons.

  2. Profiling the erythrocyte membrane proteome isolated from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Bruno M; Charro, Nuno; Blonder, Josip; Lopes, Carlos; Azevedo, Pilar; Bugalho de Almeida, António; Chan, King C; Prieto, DaRue A; Issaq, Haleem; Veenstra, Timothy D; Penque, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Structural and metabolic alterations in erythrocytes play an important role in the pathophysiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whether these dysfunctions are related to the modulation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in patients diagnosed with COPD remains to be determined. Herein, a comparative proteomic profiling of the erythrocyte membrane fraction isolated from peripheral blood of smokers diagnosed with COPD and smokers with no COPD was performed using differential (16)O/(18)O stable isotope labeling. A total of 219 proteins were quantified as being significantly differentially expressed within the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of smokers with COPD and healthy smokers. Functional pathway analysis showed that the most enriched biofunctions were related to cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development, immune response, oxidative stress and cytoskeleton. Chorein (VPS13A), a cytoskeleton related protein whose defects had been associated with the presence of cell membrane deformation of circulating erythrocytes was found to be down-regulated in the membrane fraction of erythrocytes obtained from COPD patients. Methemoglobin reductase (CYB5R3) was also found to be underexpressed in these cells, suggesting that COPD patients may be at higher risk for developing methemoglobinemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  3. Profiling the erythrocyte membrane proteome isolated from patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Bruno M; Charro, Nuno; Blonder, Josip; Lopes, Carlos; Azevedo, Pilar; Bugalho de Almeida, António; Chan, King C; Prieto, DaRue A; Issaq, Haleem; Veenstra, Timothy D; Penque, Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Structural and metabolic alterations in erythrocytes play an important role in the pathophysiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Whether these dysfunctions are related to the modulation of erythrocyte membrane proteins in patients diagnosed with COPD remains to be determined. Herein, a comparative proteomic profiling of the erythrocyte membrane fraction isolated from peripheral blood of smokers diagnosed with COPD and smokers with no COPD was performed using differential (16)O/(18)O stable isotope labeling. A total of 219 proteins were quantified as being significantly differentially expressed within the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of smokers with COPD and healthy smokers. Functional pathway analysis showed that the most enriched biofunctions were related to cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, hematological system development, immune response, oxidative stress and cytoskeleton. Chorein (VPS13A), a cytoskeleton related protein whose defects had been associated with the presence of cell membrane deformation of circulating erythrocytes was found to be down-regulated in the membrane fraction of erythrocytes obtained from COPD patients. Methemoglobin reductase (CYB5R3) was also found to be underexpressed in these cells, suggesting that COPD patients may be at higher risk for developing methemoglobinemia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22538302

  4. Isolated perianal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Akgun, E; Tekin, F; Ersin, S; Osmanoglu, H

    2005-03-01

    Perianal tuberculosis, without the presence of any previous or active pulmonary infection, is extremely rare. A case of isolated perianal tuberculosis without gastrointestinal or pulmonary spread will be discussed here with an evaluation of the clinical features. PMID:15813425

  5. Increased specific T cell cytokine responses in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis from Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Stefan; Necek, Magdalena; Winkler, Heidi; Adegnika, Ayola A; Perkmann, Thomas; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G

    2005-07-01

    An understanding of T cell responses that are crucial for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has major implications for the development of immune-based interventions. We studied the frequency of purified protein derivative (PPD)-specific CD3) cells expressing interleukin-2 (IL)-2, gamma interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-10 in HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients (TB, n=30) as well as in healthy individuals (controls, n=21) from Central Africa. Increased frequencies of PPD-stimulated CD3+ cells expressing IL-2, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha in TB were seen when compared with frequencies of controls. The presence of type 1 cytokine biased responses in TB patients was supported by a shift in the distribution pattern of cytokine expression from exclusively IL-2 or TNF-alpha expression seen in controls towards an increased frequency of IFN-gamma/IL-2 or IFN-gamma/TNF-alpha co-expression in TB. Higher levels of PPD-induced IFN-gamma in the supernatants from TB patients than from controls were found, which correlated with its intracellular expression. PPD was a weak inducer of IL-10 in T cells and insufficient in promoting cytokine production in TCRgammadelta+CD3+ cells. Non-specific stimulation with PMA and ionomycin revealed increased frequencies of CD4+ cells expressing IFN-gamma in controls, while expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, and TNF-alpha was not different. Non-specific cytokine responses of TCRgammadelta+CD3+ cells were similar in all groups. Pulmonary TB in Central Africa is associated with enhanced expression and secretion of specifically induced cytokines that are frequently implicated in host defense against MTB.

  6. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J; Klunk, Mariah H; Mollura, Daniel J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  7. True status of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis defaulters in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, M. L.; Kruyt, N. D.; Boeree, M. J.; Harries, A. D.; Salaniponi, F. M.; van Noord, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    The article reports the results of a study to determine the true outcome of 8 months of treatment received by smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and Mlambe Mission Hospital (MMH), Blantyre, Malawi. The treatment outcomes were documented from the tuberculosis registers of all patients registered between 1 October 1994 and 30 September 1995. The true treatment outcome for patients who had been registered as defaulters was determined by making personal inquiries at the treatment units and the residences of patients or relatives and, in a few cases, by writing to the appropriate postal address. Interviews were carried out with patients who had defaulted and were still alive and with matched, fully compliant PTB patients who had successfully completed the treatment to determine the factors associated with defaulter status. Of the 1099 patients, 126 (11.5%) had been registered as defaulters, and the true treatment outcome was determined for 101 (80%) of the latter; only 22 were true defaulters, 31 had completed the treatment, 31 had died during the treatment period, and 17 had left the area. A total of 8 of the 22 true defaulters were still alive and were compared with the compliant patients. Two significant characteristics were associated with the defaulters; they were unmarried; and they did not know the correct duration of antituberculosis treatment. Many of the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Blantyre district were found to have different treatment outcomes, without defaulting. The quality of reporting in the health facilities must therefore be improved in order to exclude individuals who are not true defaulters. PMID:10361755

  8. True status of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis defaulters in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, M L; Kruyt, N D; Boeree, M J; Harries, A D; Salaniponi, F M; van Noord, P A

    1999-01-01

    The article reports the results of a study to determine the true outcome of 8 months of treatment received by smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH) and Mlambe Mission Hospital (MMH), Blantyre, Malawi. The treatment outcomes were documented from the tuberculosis registers of all patients registered between 1 October 1994 and 30 September 1995. The true treatment outcome for patients who had been registered as defaulters was determined by making personal inquiries at the treatment units and the residences of patients or relatives and, in a few cases, by writing to the appropriate postal address. Interviews were carried out with patients who had defaulted and were still alive and with matched, fully compliant PTB patients who had successfully completed the treatment to determine the factors associated with defaulter status. Of the 1099 patients, 126 (11.5%) had been registered as defaulters, and the true treatment outcome was determined for 101 (80%) of the latter; only 22 were true defaulters, 31 had completed the treatment, 31 had died during the treatment period, and 17 had left the area. A total of 8 of the 22 true defaulters were still alive and were compared with the compliant patients. Two significant characteristics were associated with the defaulters; they were unmarried; and they did not know the correct duration of antituberculosis treatment. Many of the smear-positive tuberculosis patients who had been registered as defaulters in the Blantyre district were found to have different treatment outcomes, without defaulting. The quality of reporting in the health facilities must therefore be improved in order to exclude individuals who are not true defaulters.

  9. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Nuno S.; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8–7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7–4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity—HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease–(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3–3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1–3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3–5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  10. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J; Klunk, Mariah H; Mollura, Daniel J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments.

  11. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J.; Klunk, Mariah H.; Mollura, Daniel J.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ. A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  12. A Prediction Rule to Stratify Mortality Risk of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Helder Novais; Osório, Nuno S; Castro, António Gil; Ramos, Angélica; Carvalho, Teresa; Meira, Leonor; Araújo, David; Almeida, Leonor; Boaventura, Rita; Fragata, Patrícia; Chaves, Catarina; Costa, Patrício; Portela, Miguel; Ferreira, Ivo; Magalhães, Sara Pinto; Rodrigues, Fernando; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Duarte, Raquel; Guimarães, João Tiago; Saraiva, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis imposes high human and economic tolls, including in Europe. This study was conducted to develop a severity assessment tool for stratifying mortality risk in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients. A derivation cohort of 681 PTB cases was retrospectively reviewed to generate a model based on multiple logistic regression analysis of prognostic variables with 6-month mortality as the outcome measure. A clinical scoring system was developed and tested against a validation cohort of 103 patients. Five risk features were selected for the prediction model: hypoxemic respiratory failure (OR 4.7, 95% CI 2.8-7.9), age ≥50 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8), bilateral lung involvement (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4-4.4), ≥1 significant comorbidity-HIV infection, diabetes mellitus, liver failure or cirrhosis, congestive heart failure and chronic respiratory disease-(OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.3-3.8), and hemoglobin <12 g/dL (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.1). A tuberculosis risk assessment tool (TReAT) was developed, stratifying patients with low (score ≤2), moderate (score 3-5) and high (score ≥6) mortality risk. The mortality associated with each group was 2.9%, 22.9% and 53.9%, respectively. The model performed equally well in the validation cohort. We provide a new, easy-to-use clinical scoring system to identify PTB patients with high-mortality risk in settings with good healthcare access, helping clinicians to decide which patients are in need of closer medical care during treatment. PMID:27636095

  13. Prolonged survival of scavenger receptor class A-deficient mice from pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Tvinnereim, Amy; Hunter, Robert L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study tested the hypothesis that the scavenger receptor SR-A modulates granuloma formation in response to pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To test this hypothesis, we monitored survival and histopathology in WT and SR-A-deficient mice following aerosol infection with MTB Rv. SR-A-deficient (SR-A−/−) mice infected with MTB survived significantly longer than WT mice; the mean survival of SR-A−/− mice exceeded 430 days compared to 230 days for WT mice. Early granuloma formation was not impaired in SR-A−/− mice. The extended survival of SR-A−/− mice was associated with 13- and 3-fold higher number of CD4+ lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells in SR-A−/− lungs compared to WT mice 280 after infection. The histopathology of chronically infected SR-A−/− lungs, however, was marked by abundant cholesterol clefts in parenchymal lesions containing infection in multinucleated giant cells. The present study indicates SR-A as a candidate gene of the innate immune system influencing the chronic phase of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22088322

  14. Surgical interventions for pulmonary tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, S.; Anande, L.; Dalal, A.; Desai, C.; Corrêa, G.; Laxmeshwar, C.; Mansoor, H.; Remartinez, D.; Trelles, M.; Isaakidis, P.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: While surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is considered an important adjunct for specific cases, including drug-resistant tuberculosis, operational evidence on its feasibility and effectiveness is limited. Objective: To describe surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges of providing surgery for PTB in Mumbai, India. Design: A descriptive study of routinely collected data of surgical interventions for PTB from 2010 to 2014 in two Mumbai hospitals, one public, one private. Results: Of 85 patients, 5 (6%) died and 17 (20%) had complications, with wound infection being the most frequent. Repeat operation was required in 12 (14%) patients. Most procedures were performed on an emergency basis, and eligibility was established late in the course of treatment. Median time from admission to surgery was 51 days. Drug susceptibility test (DST) patterns and final treatment outcomes were not systematically collected. Conclusion: In a high-burden setting such as Mumbai, important data on surgery for PTB were surprisingly limited in both the private and public sectors. Eligibility for surgery was established late, culture and DST were not systematically offered, the interval between admission and surgery was long and TB outcomes were not known. Systematic data collection would allow for proper evaluation of surgery as adjunctive therapy for all forms of TB under programmatic conditions. PMID:27695683

  15. Surgical interventions for pulmonary tuberculosis in Mumbai, India: surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, S.; Anande, L.; Dalal, A.; Desai, C.; Corrêa, G.; Laxmeshwar, C.; Mansoor, H.; Remartinez, D.; Trelles, M.; Isaakidis, P.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: While surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is considered an important adjunct for specific cases, including drug-resistant tuberculosis, operational evidence on its feasibility and effectiveness is limited. Objective: To describe surgical outcomes and programmatic challenges of providing surgery for PTB in Mumbai, India. Design: A descriptive study of routinely collected data of surgical interventions for PTB from 2010 to 2014 in two Mumbai hospitals, one public, one private. Results: Of 85 patients, 5 (6%) died and 17 (20%) had complications, with wound infection being the most frequent. Repeat operation was required in 12 (14%) patients. Most procedures were performed on an emergency basis, and eligibility was established late in the course of treatment. Median time from admission to surgery was 51 days. Drug susceptibility test (DST) patterns and final treatment outcomes were not systematically collected. Conclusion: In a high-burden setting such as Mumbai, important data on surgery for PTB were surprisingly limited in both the private and public sectors. Eligibility for surgery was established late, culture and DST were not systematically offered, the interval between admission and surgery was long and TB outcomes were not known. Systematic data collection would allow for proper evaluation of surgery as adjunctive therapy for all forms of TB under programmatic conditions.

  16. A genome-wide association study of pulmonary tuberculosis in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Grant, A V; Sabri, A; Abid, A; Abderrahmani Rhorfi, I; Benkirane, M; Souhi, H; Naji Amrani, H; Alaoui-Tahiri, K; Gharbaoui, Y; Lazrak, F; Sentissi, I; Manessouri, M; Belkheiri, S; Zaid, S; Bouraqadi, A; El Amraoui, N; Hakam, M; Belkadi, A; Orlova, M; Boland, A; Deswarte, C; Amar, L; Bustamante, J; Boisson-Dupuis, S; Casanova, J L; Schurr, E; El Baghdadi, J; Abel, L

    2016-03-01

    Although epidemiological evidence suggests a human genetic basis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) susceptibility, the identification of specific genes and alleles influencing PTB risk has proven to be difficult. Previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified only three novel loci with modest effect sizes in sub-Saharan African and Russian populations. We performed a GWA study of 550,352 autosomal SNPs in a family-based discovery Moroccan sample (on the full population and on the subset with PTB diagnosis at <25 years), which identified 143 SNPs with p < 1 × 10(-4). The replication study in an independent case/control sample identified four SNPs displaying a p < 0.01 implicating the same risk allele. In the combined sample including 556 PTB subjects and 650 controls these four SNPs showed suggestive association (2 × 10(-6) < p < 4 × 10(-5)): rs358793 and rs17590261 were intergenic, while rs6786408 and rs916943 were located in introns of FOXP1 and AGMO, respectively. Both genes are involved in the function of macrophages, which are the site of latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The most significant finding (p = 2 × 10(-6)) was obtained for the AGMO SNP in an early (<25 years) age-at-onset subset, confirming the importance of considering age-at-onset to decipher the genetic basis of PTB. Although only suggestive, these findings highlight several avenues for future research in the human genetics of PTB. PMID:26767831

  17. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  18. Rate of tuberculosis infection in children and adolescents with household contact with adults with active pulmonary tuberculosis as assessed by tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrarini, M A G; Spina, F G; Weckx, L Y; Lederman, H M; De Moraes-Pinto, M I

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection was evaluated in Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents exposed and unexposed (control group) to adults with active pulmonary TB. Both groups were analysed by clinical and radiological assessment, TST, QFT-IT and T-SPOT.TB. The three tests were repeated after 8 weeks in the TB-exposed group if results were initially negative. Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) were treated and tests were repeated after treatment. Fifty-nine TB-exposed and 42 controls were evaluated. Rate of infection was 69·5% and 9·5% for the exposed and control groups, respectively. The exposed group infection rate was 61% assessed by TST, 57·6% by T-SPOT.TB, and 59·3%, by QFT-IT. No active TB was diagnosed. Agreement between the three tests was 83·1% and 92·8% in the exposed and control groups, respectively. In the exposed group, T-SPOT.TB added four TB diagnoses [16%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·6-30·4] and QFT-IT added three TB diagnoses (12%, 95% CI 0-24·7) in 25 individuals with negative tuberculin skin test (TST). Risk factors associated to TB infection were contact with an adult with active TB [0-60 days: odds ratio (OR) 6·9; >60 days: OR 27·0] and sleeping in the same room as an adult with active TB (OR 5·2). In Brazilian immunocompetent children and adolescents, TST had a similar performance to interferon-gamma release assays and detected a high rate of LTBI.

  19. The role of prostaglandin E2 in the immunopathogenesis of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier Rangel; García, Iris Estrada; de la Luz García Hernández, María; Leon, Diana Aguilar; Marquez, Ricardo; Pando, Rogelio Hernández

    2002-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are potent mediators of intercellular communication, and PGE2 at high concentration is immunosuppressive for T-cell-mediated immunity. We studied the kinetics of PGE2 production and the expression of the enzymes related to its synthesis during the course of experimental pulmonary tuberculosis. Secondly, we analysed the pathological and immunological changes produced by the pharmacological suppression of PG production. In BALB/c mice infected via the trachea with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv there is an initial phase of partial resistance, dominated by type 1 cytokines plus tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and expression of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), followed by a phase of progressive disease. During the early phase of the infection some activated macrophages located in the alveolar-capillary interstitium and in granulomas showed strong PGE2 immunostaining. However, PGE2 concentrations were relatively low and stable. Animals in this early phase of infection were treated with niflumic acid, a potent and specific blocker of cyclo-oxygenase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme of PG production. In comparison with control animals, the suppression of PG synthesis produced higher inflammation and expression of TNF-α, interleukin-1α and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), but almost complete disappearance of iNOS expression, which coexisted with a significant increment of bacterial load. The late progressive phase in this experimental model is characterized by progressive pneumonia, small granulomas and diminished expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α and iNOS in coexistence with high expression of IL-4. Strong PGE2 immunostaining was seen in foamy macrophages localized in the pneumonic areas, and the PGE2 concentration was four-fold higher in this late phase of infection than during the early phase. When PG production was suppressed in animals suffering advanced phase infection, a significant reduction of pneumonia and bacillus load with striking

  20. Pulmonary tuberculosis among tribals in India: A systematic review & meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Beena E.; Adinarayanan, Srividya; Manogaran, C.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: There has been limited investigation on the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in tribal communities in India, a vulnerable section of Indian society. The lack of a population-based estimate prompted us to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to provide a single, population-based estimate of the TB prevalence for tribals. Methods: Literature search was conducted in PubMed using the keywords - “tuberculosis”, “tribals”, “India”, “prevalence”, and “survey”. References cited in the articles retrieved were also reviewed, and those found relevant were selected. TB prevalence rates estimated by the studies were used for our calculation of a pooled-estimate. Results: The pooled estimate, based on the random effects model, was 703 per 100,000 population with a 95 % CI of 386-1011. The associated heterogeneity measures in terms of Cochran's Q was significant (P=0 0.08 <0.1) and I2 was moderate at 48 per cent. Interpretation & conclusions: The meta-analysis demonstrated a large variability in pulmonary TB prevalence estimates among the different studies with poor representation of the various tribal groups. The moderate level of heterogeneity found across the studies suggests that the pooled-estimate needs to be treated with caution. Our findings also highlight the need to assess the pulmonary TB burden in India. PMID:26139779

  1. [AIDS and tuberculosis in central Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Jemni, L; Bahri, S; Saadi, M; Letaif, A; Dhidah, M; Lahdhiri, H; Bouchoucha, S

    1991-05-01

    7 men and 2 women seropositive for HIV were carefully screened for tuberculosis in the internal medicine service of a hospital in Sousse, central Tunisia, and all tuberculosis patients aged 20-50 years registered at the tuberculosis treatment center in Sousse between May 1987-December 1988 were screened for HIV infections using the ELISA test. The HIV seropositive patients ranged in age from 21-42 years and averaged 28 at the time of diagnosis. Marriage to an HIV-positive man was the only risk factor for the 2 seropositive women. 1 of the men had hemophilia and the rest had travelled abroad and used drugs or had homosexual or heterosexual relations while outside Tunisia. 4 of the 9 HIV positive patients were diagnoses with tuberculosis, 2 with isolated pulmonary tuberculosis, 1 with pulmonary and hepatoslenic tuberculosis, and 1 with a cervical ganglionary tuberculosis. 3 of the 4 with tuberculosis had apparently normal thoracic X-rays. The 4 were treated with the normal course of antitubercular drugs for a year or more. Screening for HIV in the 104 tuberculosis patients aged 20-50 years revealed no cases of HIV infection. Tuberculosis appears to be 1 of the most frequent opportunistic infections among patients seropositive for HIV, but it is not an indicator or predictor of HIV infection in central Tunisia as it reportedly is in some African countries.

  2. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not.

  3. Pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexistence with pulmonary tuberculosis and right pneumothorax: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Limin; Li, Huifang; Li, Gandi; Liu, Weiping; Li, Jinnan; Zhang, Wenyan

    2015-01-01

    We report an uncommon 22-year-old male Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH) case which co-existed with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Unlike the common PLCH cases, this PLCH case has cervical lymph node involvement and right pneumothorax. The diagnosis was established by the imaging of lung and the biopsies of the lung and left neck lymph node. Imaging of the chest showed characteristic small nodules and thin-walled cysts and right pneumothorax. The LCH cells in the lung and left neck lymph node were characterized by large convoluted nuclei with cerebriform indentations of the nuclear envelope and longitudinal grooves. The nuclei contained small eosinophilic nucleoli and moderate amount cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were positive for Langerin, CD1a and S-100. Acid-fast bacilli were found in sputum and lung biopsy tissue. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PLCH with cervical lymph node involvement, and coexisted with pulmonary tuberculosis, right pneumothorax. A contribution of this case and review three of the five cases of PLCH with extrapulmonary involvement to lymph nodes resolved spontaneously after smoking cessation constitute a novel addition that it is inappropriate to regard pulmonary/nodal LCH as multi-organ or disseminated disease, and the treatment methods are the same whether the PLCH patient with lymph node involvement or not. PMID:25973117

  4. Treatment delay among pulmonary tuberculosis patients in pastoralist communities in Bale Zone, Southeast Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem in Africa with Ethiopia being the most affected. Treatment delay is an important indicator of access to TB diagnosis and treatment. However, little is known about factors associated with treatment delay of pulmonary TB among pastoralists. Health facility based cross sectional study was conducted on 129 pulmonary TB patients in pastoralist community. The study was conducted in three health centers and a hospital. Time between onset of TB symptoms and first visit to a professional health care provider (patient delay), and the time between first visits to the professional health care provider to the date of diagnosis (provider's delay) were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software. Findings A total of 129 new smear positive pulmonary TB patients participated in the study. The median total delay was 97 days. The median patient and health provider delays were 63 and 34 days, respectively. Ninety six percent of the patients were delayed for more than the twenty one days cutoff point. Patient delay was positively associated with first visit to traditional healer/private clinic/drug shop, rural residence, being illiterate, living in more than 10 kilometers from health facility; severity of illness at first presentation to health facility. Provider delay was positively associated with rural residence, being illiterate, patient with good functional status, patients in contact with more than two health providers, and place of first visit being traditional healer/private clinic/drug shop. Conclusions This study showed that majority of smear positive patients delayed either for diagnosis or treatment, thus continue to serve as reservoirs of infection. This indicates that there is a need for intervention to decrease patient and provider delays. Effort to reduce delays in pastoralist communities should focus on improving access to services in rural communities, engaging traditional and private health providers and

  5. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Dominique N.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Lino, Christopher A.; McBride, Amber A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0–80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  6. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical.

  7. Oral Tolerance to Environmental Mycobacteria Interferes with Intradermal, but Not Pulmonary, Immunization against Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Dominique N; Kusewitt, Donna F; Lino, Christopher A; McBride, Amber A; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-05-01

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is currently the only approved vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and is administered in over 150 countries worldwide. Despite its widespread use, the vaccine has a variable protective efficacy of 0-80%, with the lowest efficacy rates in tropical regions where TB is most prevalent. This variability is partially due to ubiquitous environmental mycobacteria (EM) found in soil and water sources, with high EM prevalence coinciding with areas of poor vaccine efficacy. In an effort to elucidate the mechanisms underlying EM interference with BCG vaccine efficacy, we exposed mice chronically to Mycobacterium avium (M. avium), a specific EM, by two different routes, the oral and intradermal route, to mimic human exposure. After intradermal BCG immunization in mice exposed to oral M. avium, we saw a significant decrease in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-γ, and an increase in T regulatory cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10 compared to naïve BCG-vaccinated animals. To circumvent the immunosuppressive effect of oral M. avium exposure, we vaccinated mice by the pulmonary route with BCG. Inhaled BCG immunization rescued IFN-γ levels and increased CD4 and CD8 T cell recruitment into airways in M. avium-presensitized mice. In contrast, intradermal BCG vaccination was ineffective at T cell recruitment into the airway. Pulmonary BCG vaccination proved protective against Mtb infection regardless of previous oral M. avium exposure, compared to intradermal BCG immunization. In conclusion, our data indicate that vaccination against TB by the pulmonary route increases BCG vaccine efficacy by avoiding the immunosuppressive interference generated by chronic oral exposure to EM. This has implications in TB-burdened countries where drug resistance is on the rise and health care options are limited due to economic considerations. A successful vaccine against TB is necessary in these areas as it is both effective and economical. PMID:27153120

  8. The Influence of Smoking on Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Kuan-Jen; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chien, Shun-Tien; Suk, Chi-Won; Chiang, Chen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Both smoking and diabetes can increase the risk and influence the manifestations and outcomes of tuberculosis (TB). It is not clear whether the influence of smoking on pulmonary TB differs between non-diabetic and diabetic patients. Herein, we assessed the manifestations and outcomes of TB in relation to smoking in both diabetic and non-diabetic TB patients. Methodology/Principal Findings All diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients notified from 2005–2010 at three teaching hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. A culture-positive pulmonary TB patient without DM who was notified to the health authority immediately prior to each diabetic TB patient was selected for comparison. The 972 patients in this study cohort included 365 (37.6%) non-diabetic non-smokers, 149 (15.3%) non-diabetic smokers, 284 (29.2%) diabetic non-smokers, and 174 (17.9%) diabetic smokers. The adjusted relative risk of a pretreatment positive smear for a smoker compared with a non-smoker was 2.19 (95% CI 1.38–3.47) in non-diabetic patients and 2.23 (95% CI 1.29–3.87) in diabetic culture-positive pulmonary TB patients. The adjusted relative risk for a positive smear among diabetic smokers was 5.61 (95% CI 3.35–9.41) compared with non-diabetic non-smokers. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased frequency of bilateral lung parenchyma involvement (AdjOR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16–2.93), far-advanced pulmonary TB (AdjOR 1.91, 95% CI 1.04–3.50), cavitary lesions (AdjOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29–3.20), and unfavorable outcomes of TB (AdjOR 2.35, 95% CI 1.02–5.41) in non-diabetic patients. However, smoking was not associated with cavitary lung parenchyma lesions regarding the location, number or size of the cavity in diabetic TB patients. Conclusions/Significance Smoking and diabetes have joint effects on a pretreatment positive smear. Diabetic smokers had more than a 5-fold increased risk of a pretreatment positive smear than did non-diabetic non-smokers, indicating

  9. Seasonal Variation of Newly Notified Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases from 2004 to 2013 in Wuhan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaobing; Duan, Qionghong; Wang, Jianjie; Zhang, Zhengbin; Jiang, Gaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there was a report about the seasonal variation in Wuhan city, it only analyzed the prevalence data of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) cases, and just studied the seasonality by subgroup of smear positive and negative from 2006 to 2010 by spectral analysis. In this study, we investigated the seasonality of the total newly notified pulmonary TB cases by subgroups such as time period, sex, age, occupation, district, and sputum smear result from 2004 to 2013 in Wuhan by a popular seasonal adjustment model (TRAMO-SEATS). Methods Monthly pulmonary TB cases from 2004 to 2013 in Wuhan were analyzed by the TRAMO-SEATS seasonal adjustment program. Seasonal amplitude was calculated and compared within the subgroups. Results From 2004 to 2013, there were 77.76 thousand newly notified pulmonary TB cases in Wuhan, China. There was a dominant peak spring peak (March) with seasonal amplitude of 56.81% and a second summer peak (September) of 43.40%, compared with the trough month (December). The spring seasonal amplitude in 2004–2008 was higher than that of 2009–2013(P<0.05). There were no statistical differences for spring seasonal amplitude within subgroups of gender, age, district, and sputum smear result (P>0.05). However, there were significant differences in spring seasonal amplitude by occupation, with amplitude ranging from 59.37% to 113.22% (P<0.05). The summer seasonal amplitude in 2004–2008 was higher than that of 2009–2013(P<0.05). There were no statistical differences in summer seasonal amplitude within subgroups of gender, district, sputum smear result(P>0.05). There were significant differences in summer seasonal amplitude by age, with amplitude ranging from 36.05% to 100.09% (P<0.05). Also, there were significant differences in summer seasonal amplitude by occupation, with amplitude ranging from 43.40% to 109.88% (P<0.05). Conclusions There was an apparent seasonal variation in pulmonary TB cases in Wuhan. We speculated that spring peak in

  10. Particulate air pollution and susceptibility to the development of pulmonary tuberculosis disease in North Carolina: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Schoenbach, Victor J.; Richardson, David B.; Gammon, Marilie D.

    2015-01-01

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), environmental factors may influence disease progression. Ecologic studies conducted in countries outside the USA with high levels of air pollution and PTB have suggested a link between active disease and ambient air pollution. The present investigation is the first to examine the ambient air pollution/PTB association in a country, where air pollution levels are comparatively lower. We used Poisson regression models to examine the association of outdoor air pollutants, PM10 and PM2.5 with rates of PTB in North Carolina residents during 1993–2007. Results suggest a potential association between long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and PTB disease. In view of the high levels of air pollution and high rates of PTB worldwide, a potential association between ambient air pollution and tuberculosis warrants further study. PMID:24387197

  11. Particulate air pollution and susceptibility to the development of pulmonary tuberculosis disease in North Carolina: an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Genee S; Schoenbach, Victor J; Richardson, David B; Gammon, Marilie D

    2014-04-01

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), environmental factors may influence disease progression. Ecologic studies conducted in countries outside the USA with high levels of air pollution and PTB have suggested a link between active disease and ambient air pollution. The present investigation is the first to examine the ambient air pollution-PTB association in a country, where air pollution levels are comparatively lower. We used Poisson regression models to examine the association of outdoor air pollutants, PM10 and PM2.5 with rates of PTB in North Carolina residents during 1993-2007. Results suggest a potential association between long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) and PTB disease. In view of the high levels of air pollution and high rates of PTB worldwide, a potential association between ambient air pollution and tuberculosis warrants further study.

  12. Asthma–Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases Overlap Syndrome Increases the Risk of Incident Tuberculosis: A National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jun-Jun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The association between asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) and tuberculosis (TB) has yet to be studied. Methods The newly diagnosed TB patients (age > 20 y) treated from January 2000 to December 2008 were included (ACOS cohort, n = 10 751; non-ACOS cohort, n = 42 966). The non-ACOS cohort involved patients with confirmed absence of ACOS. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for TB in the ACOS and non-ACOS cohorts by using poisson regression analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to determine the adjusted HR (aHR) for TB in the ACOS cohort compared with the non-ACOS cohort. Results The aHR for TB was 2.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.19–2.66) in the ACOS cohort. The TB risk was significantly higher in the ACOS cohort than in the non-ACOS cohort when stratified by age, sex, comorbidities, and atopy. Within the ACOS cohort, the aHR was higher among patients receiving SABAs+SAMAs, LABAs+LAMAs, and ICSs (aHR [95% CI]: 3.06 [2.75–3.41], 3.68 [2.93–4.61], and 2.79 [1.25–6.22], respectively; all P < .05). Furthermore, patients with more than 15 outpatient visits and hospitalizations per year demonstrated the highest aHR (8.09; 95% CI, 6.85–9.56). Conclusions ACOS cohort potentially develop incident TB, regardless of the age,sex, comorbidities and atopy; even without receiving the inhalers.This risk is higher, especially in the ACOS cohort have a high frequency of medical services or receiving the inhalers such as SABAs+SAMAs, LABAs+LAMAs and ICSs. PMID:27448309

  13. The Role of Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Therapeutic Resection for Medically Failed Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yau-Lin; Chang, Jia-Ming; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Cheng, Lili; Chen, Ying-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ho; Lu, Chung-Lan; Yen, Yi-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There are few reports regarding video-assisted thoracoscopic therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). We reviewed our surgical results of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) therapeutic resection for pulmonary TB with medical failure, and its correlation with image characteristics on chest computed tomography (CT) scan. Between January 2007 and December 2012, among the 203 patients who had surgery for TB, the medical records of 89 patients undergoing therapeutic resection for medically failed pulmonary TB were reviewed. Clinical information and the image characteristics of CT scan were investigated and analyzed. Forty-six of the 89 patients undergoing successful VATS therapeutic resection had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P < 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P < 0.001), tuberculoma (P = 0.015), cavity (P = 0.006), and aspergilloma (P = 0.038); they had less operative blood loss (171.0 ± 218.7 vs 542.8 ± 622.8 mL; P < 0.001) and shorter hospital stay (5.2 ± 2.2 vs 15.6 ± 15.6 days; P < 0.001). They also had a lower percentage of anatomic resection (73.9% vs 93.0%; P = 0.016), a higher percentage of sublobar resection (56.5% vs 32.6%; P = 0.023), and a lower disease relapse rate (4.3% vs 23.3%; P = 0.009). Eighteen of the 38 patients with multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (MDRTB) who successfully underwent VATS had significantly lower grading in pleural thickening (P = 0.001), peribronchial lymph node calcification (P = 0.019), and cavity (P = 0.017). They were preoperatively medicated for a shorter period of time (221.6 ± 90.8 vs 596.1 ± 432.5 days; P = 0.001), and had more sublobar resection (44.4% vs 10%), less blood loss (165.3 ± 148.3 vs 468.0 ± 439.9 mL; P = 0.009), and shorter hospital stay (5.4 ± 2.6 vs 11.8 ± 6.9 days; P = 0.001). Without multiple

  14. Pulmonary Actinomyces graevenitzii infection presenting as organizing pneumonia diagnosed by PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yu; Iikura, Motoyasu; Horio, Yuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki

    2012-08-01

    We report what is believed to be the first case of pulmonary Actinomyces graevenitzii infection presenting as organizing pneumonia. Fever and night sweats developed in a 69-year-old male. The only abnormal laboratory data were an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level. On chest images, multiple consolidations with air bronchograms were seen in the bilateral lungs. Histological examination from lung biopsy revealed a pattern of organizing pneumonia with microabscesses, but definitive diagnosis was not obtained because culture from lung specimen was negative. A. graevenitzii was eventually identified in the lung biopsy specimen by detection of an Actinomyces-specific PCR product followed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The patient was treated with high-dose ampicillin intravenously for 1 month, followed by oral amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 6 months, and recovered. We suggest that actinomycosis can present as organizing pneumonia, and identification of infection by PCR analysis and rRNA gene sequencing is a useful strategy in cases that are difficult to diagnose.

  15. A Case of Primary Pulmonary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Diagnosed by Transbronchial Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Tomomi; Takeuchi, Chie; Usuda, Jitsuo; Hosone, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old man took a chest X-ray for his medical checkup and an abnormal shadow was detected in the right lower lung field. For more detailed examination, he was referred to our hospital. Chest computed tomography showed a 20-mm nodule with relatively regular margins in the right lower lobe. A compact proliferation of circular to polygonal cells with a high nucleus-cytoplasm ratio was evident in a transbronchial lung biopsy. Based on pathological findings, a mature large B-cell lymphoma was diagnosed. Thoracoscopic right lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymphadenectomy were performed. The post-surgical pathological examination showed that the tumor consisted of diffuse to compact proliferation of medium to large atypical lymphocyte-like cells. Immunohistochemical staining yielded positive results for B-cell lineage markers. Five months after surgical resection, neither local recurrence nor accumulation in remote organs was observed on gallium scintigraphy. The diagnosis of primary pulmonary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was established. PMID:25912218

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11-1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13-1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G-rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34-5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  17. Genetic polymorphisms of IL-17A, IL-17F, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Xu, Guisheng; Lü, Lingshuang; Xu, Kun; Chen, Yongzhong; Pan, Hongqiu; Burstrom, Bo; Burstrom, Kristina; Wang, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors affect host susceptibility to pathogens. In this population-based case control study, we explored the genetic polymorphisms of IL-17, TLR4 and miR-146a in association with pulmonary tuberculosis in a Chinese Han population. We recruited 1601 pulmonary tuberculosis patients matched with 1526 healthy controls and genotyped twelve functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). After the correction for multiple comparisons, two SNPs (rs10759932 and rs2737190) in the TLR4 gene remained significant. Individuals carrying the rs2737190-AG genotype (vs. AA) had a significantly increased risk of either clinical tuberculosis (OR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11–1.53) or sputum smear-positive tuberculosis (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.13–1.61). Stratification analysis revealed that the effects of genetic variations on tuberculosis were more evident among non-smokers. People with haplotype TLR4 rs10983755G–rs10759932C had a significantly increased risk of tuberculosis (OR: 3.43, 95% CI: 2.34–5.05). Moreover, we found that SNPs of rs3819024 in IL-17A and rs763780 in IL-17F were weakly related to a prognosis of tuberculosis. Our results suggest that genetic polymorphisms of IL-17 and TLR4 may play a role in host susceptibility to tuberculosis in the Chinese Han population. More work is necessary to identify specific causative variants of tuberculosis underlying the observed associations. PMID:27339100

  18. Glucose Metabolism Disorder Is Associated with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Individuals with Respiratory Symptoms from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Simone; Cafezeiro, Aparecida S.; Daltro, Carla; Netto, Eduardo M.; Kornfeld, Hardy; Andrade, Bruno B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus (DM) has been associated with increased risk for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in endemic settings but it is unknown whether PTB risk is also increased by pre-DM. Here, we prospectively examined the association between glucose metabolism disorder (GMD) and PTB in patients with respiratory symptoms at a tuberculosis primary care reference center in Brazil. Methods Oral glucose tolerance test was performed and levels of fasting plasma glucose and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured in a cohort of 892 individuals presenting with respiratory symptoms of more than two weeks duration. Patients were also tested for PTB with sputum cultures. Prevalence of pre-DM and DM (based on HbA1c) was estimated and tested for association with incident PTB. Other TB risk factors including smoking history were analyzed. Results The majority of the study population (63.1%) exhibited GMD based on HbA1c ≥5.7%. Patients with GMD had higher prevalence of PTB compared to normoglycemic patients. Individuals with DM exhibited increased frequency of TB-related symptoms and detection of acid-fast bacilli in sputum smears. Among patients with previous DM diagnosis, sustained hyperglycemia (HbA1c ≥7.0%) was associated with increased TB prevalence. Smoking history alone was not significantly associated with TB in our study population but the combination of smoking and HbA1c ≥7.0% was associated with 6 times higher odds for PTB. Conclusions Sustained hyperglycemia and pre-DM are independently associated with active PTB. This evidence raises the question whether improving glycemic control in diabetic TB patients would reduce the risk of TB transmission and simultaneously reduce the clinical burden of disease. A better understanding of mechanisms underlying these associations, especially those suggesting that pre-DM may be a factor driving susceptibility to TB is warranted. PMID:27078026

  19. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis. PMID:24579533

  20. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  1. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes. PMID:26377143

  2. Incubation time of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex sputum cultures in BACTEC MGIT 960: 4weeks of negative culture is enough for physicians to consider alternative diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Ogwang, Sam; Mubiri, Paul; Bark, Charles M; Joloba, Moses L; Boom, W Henry; Johnson, John L

    2015-10-01

    We retrospectively analyzed time to detection of 3747 positive MGIT sputum cultures at a laboratory in a country with heavy burden of tuberculosis. Ninety-nine percent of diagnostic cultures turned positive within 28days, suggesting that physicians may consider alternative diagnoses if sputum cultures remain negative after 4weeks of incubation.

  3. Variability of Infectious Aerosols Produced during Coughing by Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jones-López, Edward C.; Ayakaka, Irene; Kim, Soyeon; Menyha, Harriet; Kirenga, Bruce; Muchwa, Christopher; Joloba, Moses; Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Reilly, Nancy; Okwera, Alphonse; Elliott, Alison M.; Smith, Peter G.; Mugerwa, Roy D.; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Ellner, Jerrold J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is transmitted by infectious aerosols, but assessing infectiousness currently relies on sputum microscopy that does not accurately predict the variability in transmission. Objectives: To evaluate the feasibility of collecting cough aerosols and the risk factors for infectious aerosol production from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a resource-limited setting. Methods: We enrolled subjects with suspected TB in Kampala, Uganda and collected clinical, radiographic, and microbiological data in addition to cough aerosol cultures. A subset of 38 subjects was studied on 2 or 3 consecutive days to assess reproducibility. Measurements and Main Results: M. tuberculosis was cultured from cough aerosols of 28 of 101 (27.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 19.9–37.1%) subjects with culture-confirmed TB, with a median 16 aerosol cfu (range, 1–701) in 10 minutes of coughing. Nearly all (96.4%) cultivable particles were 0.65 to 4.7 μm in size. Positive aerosol cultures were associated with higher Karnofsky performance scores (P = 0.016), higher sputum acid-fast bacilli smear microscopy grades (P = 0.007), lower days to positive in liquid culture (P = 0.004), stronger cough (P = 0.016), and fewer days on TB treatment (P = 0.047). In multivariable analyses, cough aerosol cultures were associated with a salivary/mucosalivary (compared with purulent/mucopurulent) appearance of sputum (odds ratio, 4.42; 95% CI, 1.23–21.43) and low days to positive (per 1-d decrease; odds ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.07–1.33). The within-test (kappa, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68–0.94) and interday test (kappa, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43–0.82) reproducibility were high. Conclusions: A minority of patients with TB (28%) produced culturable cough aerosols. Collection of cough aerosol cultures is feasible and reproducible in a resource-limited setting. PMID:22798319

  4. An unusual case of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Khakural, Prabhat; Shrestha, Kajan R; Sapkota, Ranjan; Shrestha, Uttam K

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Metastatic choriocarcinoma presenting as pulmonary embolism is a rare event. Here, we report a case of a 25-year-lady with a history of worsening shortness of breath for 4 months who was treated as a case of pneumonia and tuberculosis. Owing to the worsening condition, she had a contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) chest done and was diagnosed to have pulmonary embolism. She underwent pulmonary embolectomy. The histopathological examination of the embolus revealed it to be metastatic choriocarcinoma. She showed a good response to chemotherapy. Metastatic choriocarcinoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in females presenting with pulmonary embolism. PMID:25687445

  5. Quantification of Pulmonary Inflammatory Processes Using Chest Radiography: Tuberculosis as the Motivating Application

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Miranda, José R.A.; Pavan, Ana Luiza M.; Duarte, Sérgio B.; Ribeiro, Sérgio M.; Pereira, Paulo C.M.; Alves, Allan F.F.; de Oliveira, Marcela; Pina, Diana R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this work was to develop a quantitative method for evaluating the pulmonary inflammatory process (PIP) through the computational analysis of chest radiography exams in posteroanterior (PA) and lateral views. The quantification procedure was applied to patients with tuberculosis (TB) as the motivating application. A study of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) examinations of patients with TB was developed to establish a relation between the inflammatory process and the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) measured in the PA projection. A phantom essay was used to validate this relation, which was implemented using an algorithm that is able to estimate the volume of the inflammatory region based solely on SDNR values in the chest radiographs of patients. The PIP volumes that were quantified for 30 patients with TB were used for comparisons with direct HRCT analysis for the same patient. The Bland–Altman statistical analyses showed no significant differences between the 2 quantification methods. The linear regression line had a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.97 and P < 0.001, showing a strong association between the volume that was determined by our evaluation method and the results obtained by direct HRCT scan analysis. Since the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with TB is commonly performed using X-rays exams, the method developed herein can be considered an adequate tool for quantifying the PIP with a lower patient radiation dose and lower institutional cost. Although we used patients with TB for the application of the method, this method may be used for other pulmonary diseases characterized by a PIP. PMID:26131814

  6. Assessment of treatment interruption among pulmonary tuberculosis patients: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gorityala, Satya Bhgath; Mateti, Uday Venkat; Konuru, Venkateswarlu; Martha, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a rising peril of the TB control in India caused mostly by incomplete treatment. Aim: The aim was to assess the treatment interruption among pulmonary TB (PTB) patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out for a period of 9 months among PTB patients. Patients admitted with active pulmonary Koch's and history of anti-TB treatment (ATT) for 1-month or more from any source and who returns to treatment after not taking ATT consecutively for 2 months or more were included in the study. The data were collected from the patients or their caretakers to obtain the source of treatment given previously before default, number of treatment interruptions, phase and reasons for treatment interruption treatment. Results: A total of 107 defaulters were identified during the study period. In the present study, 62.6% of the patients interrupted treatment only once, 55.34% of the patient's early continuation (3–4 months) treatment, and 47.66% of the patient's only one reason for the treatment interruptions during the course of the treatment. The most common reason for the treatment interruptions were felt well with TB treatment (29.53%) followed by side effects (16.06%), lack of money (8.29%), and other reasons. Conclusion: The study revealed that most of the defaulters were in the age group between 35 and 60 years, male gender, illiterates, daily wage labor, and married. The treatment interruptions were minimized by putting the efforts to improve direct supervision; pretreatment counseling and retrieve treatment interrupters were recommended. PMID:26229358

  7. Prevalence of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with tuberculosis from Iran.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, M T; Azimi, Y; Droudinia, A; Mousavi, B; Khalilian, A; Hedayati, N; Denning, D W

    2015-09-01

    In patients with preexisting lung disease, especially a cavity, Aspergillus can infect the surface of the cavity, causing chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA), and may form an aspergilloma, collectively called chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA). In the present study, we assessed tuberculosis (TB) patients for CPA based on culture and serological methods. During a period of 1 year (from March 2013 to March 2014), we studied 124 patients with TB (94 with current TB and 30 with previous TB) at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, Iran. Sputum specimens were analyzed by direct microscopic examination (DME) and fungal culture. The clinical and radiological features of all patients were recorded, to categorize the patients into CCPA and aspergilloma. All patients were screened for serum-specific IgG against A. fumigatus, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Out of 124 patients with TB (66 male, age range: 10-91 years), 48 patients (38.7 %) exhibited residual cavities. Eighteen (14.5 %) patients had cavities with pleural thickening. A round-shaped mass lesion was detected in six patients (6.8 %). DME was positive in ten patients for septate fungal hyphae. A. fumigatus was grown from 14 samples. Fifty-five (44.3 %) cases were positive for serum-specific IgG against A. fumigatus. Of 124 patients with TB, 3 (2.4 %) met criteria for aspergilloma and 14 (11.3 %) for CCPA. CPA is a common clinical presentation in individuals with healed TB in Iran, as reported by previous studies from other countries. PMID:26003310

  8. Post-Inhaled Corticosteroid Pulmonary Tuberculosis Increases Lung Cancer in Patients with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Jhang, Kai-Ming; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Ho, Chien-Chang; Lung, Chia-Chi; Pan, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Min-Chen; Wu, Ming-Fang; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the association between post-inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), pneumonia and lung cancer in patients with asthma. Methods The study samples were collected from the National Health Insurance Database. Asthmatic patients who were first-time users of ICS between 2003 and 2005 were identified as cases. For each case, 4 control individuals were randomly matched for sex, age and date of ICS use. Cases and matched controls were followed up until the end of 2010. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to determine the hazard ratio for pulmonary infections and lung cancer risk in the ICS users and non-users. Results A total of 10,904 first-time users of ICS were matched with 43,616 controls. The hazard ratios for lung cancer were: 2.52 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22–5.22; p = 0.012) for individuals with post-ICS TB, 1.28 (95%CI, 0.73–2.26; p = 0.389) for post-ICS pneumonia, 2.31(95%CI, 0.84–6.38; p = 0.105) for post-ICS pneumonia+TB, 1.08 (95%CI, 0.57–2.03; p = 0.815) for TB, 0.99 (95%CI, 0.63–1.55; p = 0.970) for pneumonia, and 0.32 (95%CI, 0.05–2.32; p = 0.261) for pneumonia+ TB, respectively. Conclusions Post-ICS TB increased lung cancer risk in patients with asthma. Because of the high mortality associated with lung cancer, screening tests are recommended for patients with post-ICS TB. PMID:27448321

  9. Longitudinal Lung Function Decrease in Subjects with Spontaneous Healed Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Heon; Kwon, Amy M.; Yang, Hae-Chung; Lee, Seung Ku; Kim, Young; Choi, Jong Hyun; Kim, Je Hyeong; Shin, Chol

    2016-01-01

    Objective We compared the longitudinal course of post-bronchodilator Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (pFEV1) over a 10-year period in subjects with spontaneous healed pulmonary tuberculosis (SHPTB) with that in normal subjects. Methods We prospectively investigated 339 subjects with SHPTB and 3211 normal subjects. pFEV1 values measured biannually over 10 years were analyzed using mixed effects model. Results At baseline, there were no differences in gender, smoking amount, and mean height, except mean age (50.0 ± 8.1 VS. 48.1 ± 7.3, P< 0.001) between the SHPTB and normal group. 52% of the 339 participants with SHPTB and 56% of the 3211 normal participants participated till the end of study. According to the final model, the SHPTB group showed significantly larger decrease in the average pFEV1 over the time than the normal group (P< 0.001) adjusted for gender, age, height, smoking pack years, and time effects. Especially, the interaction effect between time and group was statistically significant (P = 0.036). Conclusion The average lung function in terms of pFEV1 decreases faster in subjects with SHPTB than in normal individuals over time. PMID:27706203

  10. High social anxiety and poor quality of life in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kibrisli, Erkan; Bez, Yasin; Yilmaz, Ahmet; Aslanhan, Hamza; Taylan, Mahsuk; Kaya, Halide; Tanrikulu, Abdullah Cetin; Abakay, Ozlem

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PT) has been previously related with various psychosocial adverse consequences including stigmatization and social isolation.Social anxiety is a psychiatric condition that may be associated with social isolation and fear of social exclusion.To date no study has investigated social anxiety and its impact on quality of life (QoL) among patients with PT. Therefore, we aimed to determine the severity of social anxiety in a group of patients with PT.Among patients who were recently discharged from hospital with the diagnosis of PT 94 patients and 99 healthy control subjects who had similar demographical features have been included in the study. A psychiatrist interviewed all participants and a semistructured interview form, which was prepared by the authors, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS), and Short Form-36 were administered to them.Patients with PT showed higher levels of performance avoidance and social avoidance than healthy control subjects. They reported lower QoL scores across all dimensions. Among patients women showed higher levels of LSAS subscale scores and total score. Fear of social exclusion was predicted by perceived illness severity and emotional role difficulty. On the other hand, perceived illness severity was predicted by fear of exclusion and sedimentation level.PT patients seem to experience higher levels of social anxiety and associated fear of social exclusion that add to their worse QoL during the earlier months of their disease. Among them fear of social exclusion is related with perceived illness severity.

  11. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for direct diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Moussa, Husseiny Sh.; Bayoumi, Faten S.; Ali, Ahmed M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the performance of GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for direct diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted between October 2013 and February 2016 at Abbassaia Chest Hospital and Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. Inclusion criteria were adults between 18 and 60 years with suspected PTB and classified into 5 clinical categories based on their clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings: confirmed TB, probable TB, possible TB, unlikely TB, and not TB. Two sputum samples from each participant were analyzed by GX and the results were compared by conventional culture. Results: In total, 218 participants were enrolled: 71 had confirmed TB; 112, highly probable TB; 20, probable TB; 10, unlikely TB; and 5, no TB. The sensitivity and specificity of the GX assay were 93% and 98.3% respectively. GeneXpert was positive in 93% of confirmed TB and 2.2% of probable TB cases. Conclusions: GeneXpert is a rapid and promising technique with good sensitivity (93%) and specificity (98.3%), but it cannot be used as a standalone PTB diagnostic tool. There is a need for more GX evaluation studies in countries with low TB incidence. PMID:27652357

  12. Validation of an Automated Cough Detection Algorithm for Tracking Recovery of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Sandra; Comina, Germán; Gilman, Robert H.; Tracey, Brian H.; Bravard, Marjory; López, José W.

    2012-01-01

    Background A laboratory-free test for assessing recovery from pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) would be extremely beneficial in regions of the world where laboratory facilities are lacking. Our hypothesis is that analysis of cough sound recordings may provide such a test. In the current paper, we present validation of a cough analysis tool. Methodology/Principal Findings Cough data was collected from a cohort of TB patients in Lima, Peru and 25.5 hours of recordings were manually annotated by clinical staff. Analysis software was developed and validated by comparison to manual scoring. Because many patients cough in bursts, coughing was characterized in terms of cough epochs. Our software correctly detects 75.5% of cough episodes with a specificity of 99.6% (comparable to past results using the same definition) and a median false positive rate of 4 false positives/hour, due to the noisy, real-world nature of our dataset. We then manually review detected coughs to eliminate false positives, in effect using the algorithm as a pre-screening tool that reduces reviewing time to roughly 5% of the recording length. This cough analysis approach provides a foundation to support larger-scale studies of coughing rates over time for TB patients undergoing treatment. PMID:23071550

  13. A real-time PCR signature to discriminate between tuberculosis and other pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Laux da Costa, Lucas; Delcroix, Melaine; Dalla Costa, Elis R; Prestes, Isaías V; Milano, Mariana; Francis, Steve S; Unis, Gisela; Silva, Denise R; Riley, Lee W; Rossetti, Maria L R

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a host gene signature that can distinguish tuberculosis (TB) from other pulmonary diseases (OPD). We conducted real-time PCR on whole blood samples from patients in Brazil. TB and OPD patients (asthma and non-TB pneumonia) differentially expressed granzyme A (GZMA), guanylate binding protein 5 (GBP5) and Fc gamma receptor 1A (CD64). Receiver operating characteristic, tree classification and random forest analyses were applied to evaluate the discriminatory power of the three genes and find the gene panel most predictive of patients' disease classification. Tree classification produced a model based on GBP5 and CD64 expression. In random forest analysis, the combination of the three genes provided a robust biosignature to distinguish TB from OPD with 95% specificity and 93% sensitivity. Our results suggest that GBP5 and CD64 in tandem may be the most predictive combination. However, GZMA contribution to the prediction model requires further investigation. Regardless, these three genes show promise as a rapid diagnostic marker separating TB from OPD. PMID:26025597

  14. Multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae: sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis in retroviral infection

    PubMed Central

    Low, Soo Fin; Ngiu, Chai Soon; Hing, Erica Yee; Abu Bakar, Norzailin

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a common infectious disease worldwide. However, mediastinal tuberculous lymphadenitis complicated by oesophageal involvement and oesophago-respiratory fistula is now uncommon due to improved anti-tuberculous regimes and better general awareness. The overall incidence of acquired oesophago-respiratory fistula due to infection is low, and therefore, the lesion is not often a frontrunner in differential diagnosis. Still, tuberculous oesophago-respiratory fistulae can potentially occur in patients with retroviral disease, as they tend to have atypical and more virulent manifestations. In this study, we report the case of multiple oesophago-respiratory fistulae in a patient with PTB and retroviral disease, and highlight the computed tomography features of these lesions as an atypical presentation of PTB in retroviral disease. Clinicians should suspect oesophago-respiratory fistulae if patients present with Ono’s sign, and remain particularly vigilant for patients with underlying PTB and retroviral disease, as early diagnosis and treatment could help to reduce mortality. PMID:24347038

  15. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Severely-malnourished or HIV-infected Children with Pneumonia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tahmeed; Pietroni, Mark A.C.; Faruque, Abu S.G.; Ashraf, Hasan; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Hossain, Md. Iqbal; Das, Sumon Kumar; Salam, Mohammed Abdus

    2013-01-01

    Presentation of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) as acute pneumonia in severely-malnourished and HIV-positive children has received very little attention, although this is very important in the management of pneumonia in children living in communities where TB is highly endemic. Our aim was to identify confirmed TB in children with acute pneumonia and HIV infection and/or severe acute malnutrition (SAM) (weight-for-length/height or weight-for-age z score <-3 of the WHO median, or presence of nutritional oedema). We conducted a literature search, using PubMed and Web of Science in April 2013 for the period from January 1974 through April 2013. We included only those studies that reported confirmed TB identified by acid fast bacilli (AFB) through smear microscopy, or by culture-positive specimens from children with acute pneumonia and SAM and/or HIV infection. The specimens were collected either from induced sputum (IS), or gastric lavage (GL), or broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), or percutaneous lung aspirates (LA). Pneumonia was defined as the radiological evidence of lobar or patchy consolidation and/or clinical evidence of severe/very severe pneumonia according to the WHO criteria of acute respiratory infection. A total of 17 studies met our search criteria but 6 were relevant for our review. Eleven studies were excluded as those did not assess the HIV status of the children or specify the nutritional status of the children with acute pneumonia and TB. We identified only 747 under-five children from the six relevant studies that determined a tubercular aetiology of acute pneumonia in children with SAM and/or positive HIV status. Three studies were reported from South Africa and one each from the Gambia, Ethiopia, and Thailand where 610, 90, 35, and 12 children were enrolled and 64 (10%), 23 (26%), 5 (14%), and 1 (8%) children were identified with active TB respectively, with a total of 93 (12%) children with active TB. Among 610 HIV-infected children in three studies

  16. Impact of a training course on the quality of chest radiography to diagnose pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ohkado, A; Luna, P; Querri, A; Mercader, M; Yoshimatsu, S; Coprada, L; Bañares, R; Garfin, A M C; Date, T

    2015-03-21

    Contexte : Zones urbaines de bas niveau socio-économique aux Philippines.Objectif : Evaluer la performance des manipulateurs radio (RT) dans les 3 années suivant leur participation à un cours de formation destiné à améliorer la qualité des radiographies pulmonaires (CXR) ainsi que l’effet d’une visite de suivi après le cours.Schéma : Etude transversale et d’observation incluant le suivi sur place des structures de radiographie à Manille et Quezon et l’évaluation des clichés de CXR pris par 23 RT qui avaient assisté au cours de formation en 2009 ou 2010. Les sommes des scores d’évaluation de chacun des six facteurs d’évaluation à quatre moments, c’est-à-dire avant et après le cours de formation qui avaient été évalués précédemment et avant et après les visites de suivi qui étaient en cours d’analyse, ont été comparées.Résultats : Deux sommes de scores d’évaluation—identification du cliché ou positionnement du patient—n’ont pas mis en évidence de différence significative. Cependant, en ce qui concerne la densité, le contraste, la définition et les artefacts, une amélioration significative a été constatée après le cours de formation et avant et après la visite de suivi, par comparaison avec les résultats préalables à la formation. Par contre, il n’y a eu de différence significative dans aucun des facteurs d’évaluation avant et après les visites de suivi.Conclusion : Le cours de formation a démontré un effet à long terme en termes de maintien de la qualité des RP. Par contre, la visite de suivi après la formation n’a pas significativement amélioré la qualité des RP.

  17. Real-time fluorescence Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) for rapid and reliable diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Donglin; Hu, Liangshan; Lin, Maorui; Li, Mingyou; Ye, Zebing; Sun, Hongtao; Huang, Jiwei; Yang, Huawen; Tian, Junzhang

    2015-02-01

    A reliable, simple and rapid diagnostic method that can be helpful in pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis is urgently needed. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) allows DNA to be amplified rapidly at a constant temperature. In this study, real-time fluorescence LAMP was evaluated to rapidly detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum and was compared to the performance of real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). All the standard MTB strains were successfully detected and limit of detection (LOD) was 10(2)CFU/mL by real-time fluorescence LAMP within 20min. In light of MTB in sputum, the real-time fluorescence LAMP method yielded a sensitivity of 98.0% and a specificity of 78.3%, compared to Q-PCR assay, which yielded a sensitivity of 96.0% and a specificity of 82.6% for PTB diagnosis. There was an excellent overall agreement between LAMP and Q-PCR for PTB (κ=0.315) and non-PTB (κ=0.862). Therefore, the real-time fluorescence LAMP assay is a rapid, sensitive, and specific method to detect pulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. Potential yield of pulmonary tuberculosis cases by direct microscopy of sputum in a district of South India*

    PubMed Central

    Baily, G. V. J.; Savič, D.; Gothi, G. D.; Naidu, V. B.; Nair, S. S.

    1967-01-01

    In the District Tuberculosis Programme in India, which is part of a national programme, case-finding and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis are integrated into the general health services. With such an integration, it is desirable, in order to forecast possible achievements, to understand the additional work-load that the programme will impose upon the existing health institutions and to assess the potential of these institutions for case-finding and treatment. The operational study described in this paper was made under programme conditions in a district in South India and is an examination of the case-finding potential of rural health institutions, using direct microscopy of sputum for diagnosis, and of the additional work-load involved by such case-finding. Under the conditions found in the course of the study, it is clear that a substantial proportion (at least 65%) of pulmonary tuberculosis cases prevalent in the district can be detected by the existing staffs with an easily manageable work-load. PMID:5301646

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Childhood Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross-Sectional Study of Practices among Paediatricians in Private Sector, Mumbai

    PubMed Central

    Tauro, Carolyn Kavita; Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant

    2015-01-01

    Majority of children with tuberculosis are treated in private sector in India with no available data on management practices. The study assessed diagnostic and treatment practices related to childhood pulmonary tuberculosis among paediatricians in Mumbai's private sector in comparison with International Standards for Tuberculosis Care (ISTC) 2009. In this cross-sectional study, 64 paediatricians from private sector filled self-administered questionnaires. Cough was reported as a symptom of childhood TB by 77.8% of respondents. 38.1% request sputum smear or culture for diagnosis and fewer (32.8%) use it for patients positive on chest radiographs and 32.8% induce sputum for those unable to produce it. Sputum negative TB suspect is always tested with X-ray or tuberculin skin test. 61.4% prescribe regimen as recommended in ISTC and all monitor progress to treatment clinically. Drug-resistance at beginning of treatment is suspected for child in contact with a drug-resistant patient (67.7%) and with prior history of antitubercular treatment (12.9%). About half of them (48%) request drug-resistance test for rifampicin in case of nonresponse after two to three months of therapy and regimen prescribed by 41.7% for multidrug-resistant TB was as per ISTC. The study highlights inappropriate diagnostic and treatment practices for managing childhood pulmonary TB among paediatricians in private sector. PMID:26379705

  20. [Cecal tuberculosis: the importance of a high diagnostic suspicion].

    PubMed

    Valdivielso Cortázar, E; Bolado Concejo, F; Jiménez Pérez, F J; Couto Wörner, I; Alonso Aguirre, P A

    Intestinal tuberculosis is less common than pulmonary tuberculosis. Its clinical and endoscopic features are nonspe-cific, so diagnostic suspicion must be high in order to make an early diagnosis and prevent iatrogenia. Pharmacotherapy is often effective, with an excellent clinical and endoscopic evolution. Surgical treatment is reserved for complications. We present the case of cecal tuberculosis diagnosed endoscopically; this is the second case diagnosed in a few months in our center. In this case there were no risk factors, such as recent travel, risk of contacts or inmunosupression. PMID:27599955

  1. Tuberculous liver abscess in an immunocompetent child with pulmonary tuberculosis as a cause of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Bahar; Somer, Ayper; Hatipoğlu, Nevin; Keser, Melike; Yekeler, Ensar; Gün, Feryal; Güllüoğlu, Mine; Salman, Tansu; Salman, Nuran

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are the leading cause of FUO. A case of prolonged fever with hepatic and pulmonary tuberculosis as a final diagnosis is herein presented. A 4-year-old, otherwise healthy boy presented with an axillary temperature of up to 39.5ºC for the previous 3 weeks. His medical history revealed an occasional increase in body temperature up to 38.5ºC for the last 6 months. Physical examination revealed coarse breath sounds on the basal lung area. Chest X-ray showed mediastinal lymphadenomegaly and computed tomography revealed paratracheal conglomerated lymph nodes and a groundglass appearance on the right lung. There were multiple contrast-enhanced, hypoechoic nodules with central necrosis in the liver parenchyma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging. Open liver biopsy yielded chronic granulomatous inflammation compatible with pathological findings of tuberculosis infection. The culture specimen was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient improved rapidly after antituberculous therapy was initiated. Tuberculosis, especially in its disseminated form, poses a distinct diagnostic challenge in cases of prolonged fever with unproven etiology, and thus persistence should be exercised in disclosing the cause of such fevers. PMID:26613227

  2. Impact of Educational Intervention on Patients Behavior with Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Study Using the Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    Jadgal, Khair Mohammad; Nakhaei-Moghadam, Tayebeh; Alizadeh-Seiouki, Hadi; Zareban, Iraj; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis is a single-agent infectious disease, which is the major cause of death around the world. Approximately one third of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacilli and at risk of developing active TB. The purpose of this study was determined the impact of education based on health belief model in promoting behavior of smear-positive pulmonary TB among patients in Chabahar city, Iran. Material and methods: Of the 80 smear-positive pulmonary TB who referred to health centers in Chabahar voluntarily participated in this interventional study. The data collected using questionnaire based on health belief model. The data were analyzed by using paired t-test, independent t-test, pearson correlation and chi-square test with SPSS 16. Results: The cognitive skills were increased significantly from 6.10 to 6.88 after intervention. All behavioral skills were increased significantly from 2.08 to 2.88 after implementing the intervention. Perceived severity was increased from11.08to12.19 significantly. Percepted benefits were enhanced significantly from 11.48 to 12.23. Mean percepted barrier was decreased significantly from 17.52 to 16.68. Conclusion: Findings demonstrated that implementing educational intervention programs can increase the level of knowledge and behavior of patients regarding smear- positive pulmonary TB initiatives. PMID:26543411

  3. Non-Pulmonary Tuberculosis--A Case Report: Importance and Pitfalls of Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pepper, Hannah; Davies, Rebecca; Hughes, Ceri; Thomas, Steve; Pring, Miranda; Hetzel, Martin

    2016-06-01

    A case of tuberculosis presenting as a neck lump is highlighted. Tuberculosis is on the increase. There are national and international strategies to improve the management of tuberculosis in the United Kingdom, and raising clinical awareness of tuberculosis is an important part of that strategy. Neck lumps can present in the dental setting and the differential diagnosis should include tuberculosis, with referral to an appropriate multidisciplinary team. Special tests to aid diagnosis are helpful but not completely discriminating. Tuberculosis is a notifiable disease and it must be treated by a designated specialist medical team. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Tuberculosis is a differential diagnosis for a persistent neck lump and clinicians should understand the problems of diagnosis and the importance of appropriate referral for treatment in the national and international strategy to reduce this disease. PMID:27529917

  4. Successful use of blood pleurodesis to resolve an iatrogenic persistent pneumothorax in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, Masooma; Hyams, Catherine; Macavei, Vladimir M; O'Shaughnessy, Terence C

    2014-01-01

    A Somali patient with previous tuberculosis presented clinically unwell with features consistent with a right-sided pleural effusion. Subsequent investigations confirmed a community-acquired pneumonia and relapse of pulmonary tuberculosis, with a drug resistant strain isolated. The patient developed a large left-sided iatrogenic pneumothorax, which recurred and failed to resolve despite the successful insertion of both Seldinger and surgical chest drains, and the patient remained clinically unstable on the intensive care unit. A blood pleurodesis was successfully used to provide resolution of this patient's previously persistent pneumothorax, which has resulted in stabilisation of the patient and no further pneumothoraces have occurred subsequently. The authors therefore highlight the use of a blood pleurodesis as a little used technique that may provide a valuable tool to other clinicians in similar cases. PMID:25240008

  5. Granulocytic Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells Expansion during Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis Is Associated with High Nitric Oxide Plasma Level

    PubMed Central

    El Daker, Sary; Sacchi, Alessandra; Tempestilli, Massimo; Carducci, Claudia; Goletti, Delia; Vanini, Valentina; Colizzi, Vittorio; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Martini, Federico; Martino, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still the principal cause of death caused by a single infectious agent, and the balance between the bacillus and host defense mechanisms reflects the different manifestations of the pathology. The aim of this work was to study the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during active pulmonary tuberculosis at the site of infection. We observed an expansion of MDSCs in the lung and blood of patients with active TB, which are correlated with an enhanced amount of nitric oxide in the plasma. We also found that these cells have the remarkable ability to suppress T-cell response, suggesting an important role in the modulation of the immune response against TB. Interestingly, a trend in the diminution of MDSCs was found after an efficacious anti-TB therapy, suggesting that these cells may be used as a potential biomarker for monitoring anti-TB therapy efficacy. PMID:25879532

  6. Cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    de Jonghe, E; Murray, C J; Chum, H J; Nyangulu, D S; Salomao, A; Styblo, K

    1994-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of chemotherapy for pulmonary sputum smear-positive tuberculosis was examined in the national tuberculosis control programmes of Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. In these three programmes, routine cure rates have exceeded 80 per cent. Average, average incremental and marginal unit costs for standard, short-course and retreatment regimens with and without hospitalization have been measured. The average incremental cost per year of life saved through chemotherapy ranged from US $0.90-3.10. In all conditions, short-course chemotherapy is preferable to standard 12-month chemotherapy. When hospitalization during the intensive phase of chemotherapy increases the cure rate by 10-15 percentage points, it can be relatively cost-effective. Analysing the cost-effectiveness of short-course and standard chemotherapy, where the depth of the margin of benefit is different, illustrates some of the dangers of simplistic use of cost-effectiveness ratios.

  7. LED fluorescence microscopy increases the detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in medical colleges of India.

    PubMed

    Reza, L W; Satyanarayana, S; Pandey, A; Kumar, S; Devendrappa, N M; Anand, L; Singh, G; Kumar, A M V; Chadha, S S; Wilson, N; Sachdeva, K S; Nair, S A

    2013-09-21

    In July 2012, light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM) replaced conventional light microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the detection of sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 190 microscopy centres of medical colleges operating under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We compared the performance of LED-FM (July-December 2012) to that of conventional microscopy (July-December 2011) across 190 sites. Of 222 658 patients examined using conventional microscopy, 28 042 (12.6%) were smear-positive, while of 224 714 examined using LED-FM, 33 552 (14.9%) were smear-positive, an additional yield of 5251 cases after adjusting for the increase in patients examined. We recommend replacing conventional microscopy with LED-FM in high workload microscopy centres in India.

  8. Quantitative computed tomography measurements of emphysema for diagnosing asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mengshuang; Wang, Wei; Dou, Shuang; Cui, Liwei; Xiao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background The diagnostic criteria of asthma–COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) are controversial. Emphysema is characteristic of COPD and usually does not exist in typical asthma patients. Emphysema in patients with asthma suggests the coexistence of COPD. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) allows repeated evaluation of emphysema noninvasively. We investigated the value of quantitative CT measurements of emphysema in the diagnosis of ACOS. Methods This study included 404 participants; 151 asthma patients, 125 COPD patients, and 128 normal control subjects. All the participants underwent pulmonary function tests and a high-resolution CT scan. Emphysema measurements were taken with an Airway Inspector software. The asthma patients were divided into high and low emphysema index (EI) groups based on the percentage of low attenuation areas less than −950 Hounsfield units. The characteristics of asthma patients with high EI were compared with those having low EI or COPD. Results The normal value of percentage of low attenuation areas less than −950 Hounsfield units in Chinese aged >40 years was 2.79%±2.37%. COPD patients indicated more severe emphysema and more upper-zone-predominant distribution of emphysema than asthma patients or controls. Thirty-two (21.2%) of the 151 asthma patients had high EI. Compared with asthma patients with low EI, those with high EI were significantly older, more likely to be male, had more pack-years of smoking, had more upper-zone-predominant distribution of emphysema, and had greater airflow limitation. There were no significant differences in sex ratios, pack-years of smoking, airflow limitation, or emphysema distribution between asthma patients with high EI and COPD patients. A greater number of acute exacerbations were seen in asthma patients with high EI compared with those with low EI or COPD. Conclusion Asthma patients with high EI fulfill the features of ACOS, as described in the Global Initiative for Asthma and Global

  9. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  10. HMGB1/RAGE Signaling and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Responses in Non-HIV Adults with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ip, Margaret; Chu, Yi Jun; Yung, Irene M. H.; Cheung, Catherine S. K.; Zheng, Lin; Lam, Judy S. Y.; Wong, Ka Tak; Sin, Winnie W. Y.; Choi, Kin Wing; Lee, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to study the pathogenic roles of High-Mobility Group Box 1 (HMGB1) / Receptor-for-Advanced-Glycation-End-products (RAGE) signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Methods A prospective study was conducted among non-HIV adults newly-diagnosed with active PTB at two acute-care hospitals (n = 80); age-and-sex matched asymptomatic individuals (tested for latent TB) were used for comparison (n = 45). Plasma concentrations of 8 cytokines/chemokines, HMGB1, soluble-RAGE, and transmembrane-RAGE expressed on monocytes/dendritic cells, were measured. Gene expression (mRNA) of HMGB1, RAGE, and inflammasome-NALP3 was quantified. Patients’ PBMCs were stimulated with recombinant-HMGB1 and MTB-antigen (lipoarabinomannan) for cytokine induction ex vivo. Results In active PTB, plasma IL-8/CXCL8 [median(IQR), 6.0(3.6–15.1) vs 3.6(3.6–3.6) pg/ml, P<0.001] and IL-6 were elevated, which significantly correlated with mycobacterial load, extent of lung consolidation (rs +0.509, P<0.001), severity-score (rs +0.317, P = 0.004), and fever and hospitalization durations (rs +0.407, P<0.001). IL-18 and sTNFR1 also increased. Plasma IL-8/CXCL8 (adjusted OR 1.12, 95%CI 1.02–1.23 per unit increase, P = 0.021) and HMGB1 (adjusted OR 1.42 per unit increase, 95%CI 1.08–1.87, P = 0.012) concentrations were independent predictors for respiratory failure, as well as for ICU admission/death. Gene expression of HMGB1, RAGE, and inflammasome-NALP3 were upregulated (1.2−2.8 fold). Transmembrane-RAGE was increased, whereas the decoy soluble-RAGE was significantly depleted. RAGE and HMGB1 gene expressions positively correlated with cytokine levels (IL-8/CXCL8, IL-6, sTNFR1) and clinico-/radiographical severity (e.g. extent of consolidation rs +0.240, P = 0.034). Ex vivo, recombinant-HMGB1 potentiated cytokine release (e.g. TNF-α) when combined with lipoarabinomannan. Conclusion In patients with active PTB, HMGB1/RAGE

  11. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to address TB and HIV coinfection around the world? The President’s U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS ... of those suffering from HIV/AIDS around the world. PEPFAR’s Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and ...

  12. Use of sodium chromate Cr/sub 51/ in diagnosing childhood idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzweil, P.R.; Miller, D.R.; Freeman, J.E.; Reiman, R.E.; Mayer, K.

    1984-08-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) may be elusive. A 6-year-old boy had microcytic hypochromic anemia and a hemolytic component. Hemosiderin-laden macrophages were not found in the gastric aspirate. He had no pulmonary signs or symptoms. Extensive hematologic and roentgenologic investigations failed to reveal the cause of the anemia. Quantitative serial scintigraphic scanning showed significant (35%) pulmonary sequestration of autologous erythrocytes labeled with sodium chromate Cr51. The half-life of the RBCs was moderately decreased (half-life, 15 days; normal, 25 to 35 days). An open-lung biopsy spece Cr51. The half-life of the RBCs was moderately decreased (half-life, 15 days; normal, 25 to 35 days). An open-lung biopsy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of IPH. A diagnosis of IPH should be considered when children have iron deficiency anemia and pulmonary signs or symptoms. Organ sequestration studies may be helpful in equivocal cases.

  13. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  14. Cytokine and Antibody Based Diagnostic Algorithms for Sputum Culture-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Joy; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yunxia; Li, Haicheng; Guo, Huixin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xunxun; Chen, Yuhui; Liao, Qinghua; Shu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Yu, Meiling; Li, Guozhou; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Qiu; Bi, Lijun; Guo, Lina; Zhao, Meigui

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious infectious diseases globally and has high mortality rates. A variety of diagnostic tests are available, yet none are wholly reliable. Serum cytokines, although significantly and frequently induced by different diseases and thus good biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis, are not sufficiently disease-specific. TB-specific antibody detection, on the other hand, has been reported to be highly specific but not sufficiently sensitive. In this study, our aim was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of TB diagnosis by combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies in peripheral blood samples. Methods TB-related serum cytokines were screened using a human cytokine array. TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies were detected in parallel with microarray technology. The diagnostic performance of the new protocol for active TB was systematically compared with other traditional methods. Results Here, we show that cytokines I-309, IL-8 and MIG are capable of distinguishing patients with active TB from healthy controls, patients with latent TB infection, and those with a range of other pulmonary diseases, and that these cytokines, and their presence alongside antibodies for TB-specific antigens Ag14-16kDa, Ag32kDa, Ag38kDa and Ag85B, are specific markers for active TB. The diagnostic protocol for active TB developed here, which combines the detection of three TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies, is highly sensitive (91.03%), specific (90.77%) and accurate (90.87%). Conclusions Our results show that combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies significantly enhances diagnostic accuracy for active TB, providing greater accuracy than conventional diagnostic methods such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), TB antibody Colloidal Gold Assays and microbiological culture, and suggest that this diagnostic protocol has potential for clinical

  15. Co-endemicity of Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Intestinal Helminth Infection in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Ren, Zhou-Peng; Wang, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Shi-Wen; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Jin-Feng; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2016-03-01

    Both pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and intestinal helminth infection (IHI) affect millions of individuals every year in China. However, the national-scale estimation of prevalence predictors and prevalence maps for these diseases, as well as co-endemic relative risk (RR) maps of both diseases' prevalence are not well developed. There are co-endemic, high prevalence areas of both diseases, whose delimitation is essential for devising effective control strategies. Bayesian geostatistical logistic regression models including socio-economic, climatic, geographical and environmental predictors were fitted separately for active PTB and IHI based on data from the national surveys for PTB and major human parasitic diseases that were completed in 2010 and 2004, respectively. Prevalence maps and co-endemic RR maps were constructed for both diseases by means of Bayesian Kriging model and Bayesian shared component model capable of appraising the fraction of variance of spatial RRs shared by both diseases, and those specific for each one, under an assumption that there are unobserved covariates common to both diseases. Our results indicate that gross domestic product (GDP) per capita had a negative association, while rural regions, the arid and polar zones and elevation had positive association with active PTB prevalence; for the IHI prevalence, GDP per capita and distance to water bodies had a negative association, the equatorial and warm zones and the normalized difference vegetation index had a positive association. Moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in western regions, low to moderate prevalence of active PTB and low prevalence of IHI were predicted in north-central regions and the southeast coastal regions, and moderate to high prevalence of active PTB and high prevalence of IHI were predicted in the south-western regions. Thus, co-endemic areas of active PTB and IHI were located in the south-western regions of China, which

  16. Mean platelet volume as an inflammation marker in active pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mean platelet volume (MPV) reflects the size of platelets. It has been shown to be inversely correlated with level of the inflammation in some chronic inflammatory diseases. This prospective study aims to show the usability of MPV as an inflammation marker in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) by comparison with healthy controls. In addition, its relationships with other inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as well as with the radiological extent of disease were examined. Methods This study included 82 patients with active PTB and 95 healthy subjects (control group). Whole blood counts, CRP level, and ESR were compared between the two groups. In the PTB group, the relationships between the radiological extent of disease and the MPV and other inflammation markers were investigated. Results The MPV was 7.74 ± 1.33/μL in the PTB group and 8.20 ± 1.13/μL in the control group (p = 0.005). The blood platelet count, CRP level, and ESR were significantly higher in the active PTB group than in the control group (p < 0.0001). In the PTB group, CRP levels (r = 0.26, p = 0.003) and ESR (r = 0.39, p = 0.003), but not MPV (p = 0.80), were significantly correlated with the radiologic extent of the disease. Conclusions The MPV was lower in patients with PTB than in healthy controls, however, the difference was limited. The MPV does not reflect the severity of the disease. The use of MPV as an inflammation marker and a negative acute-phase reactant in PTB does not seem to be reliable. PMID:24581084

  17. Diabetes Is a Risk Factor for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study from Mwanza, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Range, Nyagosya; PrayGod, George; Jeremiah, Kidola; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Aabye, Martine Grosos; Changalucha, John; Christensen, Dirk Lund; Pipper, Christian Bressen; Krarup, Henrik; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Friis, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes and TB are associated, and diabetes is increasingly common in low-income countries where tuberculosis (TB) is highly endemic. However, the role of diabetes for TB has not been assessed in populations where HIV is prevalent. Methods A case-control study was conducted in an urban population in Tanzania among culture-confirmed pulmonary TB patients and non-TB neighbourhood controls. Participants were tested for diabetes according to WHO guidelines and serum concentrations of acute phase reactants were measured. The association between diabetes and TB, and the role of HIV as an effect modifier, were examined using logistic regression. Since blood glucose levels increase during the acute phase response, we adjusted for elevated serum acute phase reactants. Results Among 803 cases and 350 controls the mean (SD) age was 34.8 (11.9) and 33.8 (12.0) years, and the prevalence of diabetes was 16.7% (95% CI: 14.2; 19.4) and 9.4% (6.6; 13.0), respectively. Diabetes was associated with TB (OR 2.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 3.4, p<0.001). However, the association depended on HIV status (interaction, p = 0.01) due to a stronger association among HIV uninfected (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.5; 11.6, p = 0.01) compared to HIV infected (OR 0.1, 95% CI: 0.01; 1.8, p = 0.13) after adjusting for age, sex, demographic factors and elevated serum acute phase reactants. Conclusion Diabetes is a risk factor for TB in HIV uninfected, whereas the association in HIV infected patients needs further study. The increasing diabetes prevalence may be a threat to TB control. PMID:21912626

  18. Intermittent Versus Daily Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treatment Regimens: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kasozi, Samuel; Clark, Justin; Doi, Suhail A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several systematic reviews suggest that intermittent pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) chemotherapy is effective, but intensity (daily versus intermittent) and duration of rifampicin use (intensive phase only versus both phases) have not been distinguished. In addition, the various outcomes (success, failure, relapse, and default) have only selectively been evaluated. Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of proportions using all four outcomes as multi-category proportions to examine the effectiveness of WHO category 1 TB treatment regimens. Database searches of studies reporting treatment outcomes of HIV negative subjects were included and stratified by intensity of therapy and duration of rifampicin therapy. Using a bias-adjusted statistical model, we pooled proportions of the four treatment outcome categories using a method that handles multi-category proportions. Results A total of 27 studies comprising of 48 data sets with 10,624 participants were studied. Overall, treatment success was similar among patients treated with intermittent (I/I) (88%) (95% CI, 81–92) and daily (D/D) (90%) (95% CI, 84–95) regimens. Default was significantly less with I/I (0%) (95% CI, 0–2) compared to D/D regimens (5%) (95% CI, 1–9). Nevertheless, I/I relapse rates (7%) (95% CI, 3–11) were higher than D/D relapse rates (1%) (95% CI, 0–3). Conclusion Treatment regimens that are offered completely intermittently versus completely daily are associated with a trade-off between treatment relapse and treatment default. There is a possibility that I/I regimens can be improved by increasing treatment duration, and this needs to be urgently addressed by future studies. PMID:26056374

  19. Special computer-aided computed tomography (CT) volume measurement and comparison method for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingming; Sun, Zhaogang; Xie, Ruming; Gao, Mengqiu; Li, Chuanyou

    2015-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) manifestations in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients are complex and could not be quantitatively evaluated. We aimed to establish a new method to objectively measure the lung injury level in PTB by thoracic CT and make quantitative comparisons. In the retrospective study, a total of 360 adults were selected and divided into four groups according to their CT manifestations and medical history: Normal group, PTB group, PTB with diabetes mellitus (DM) group and Death caused by PTB group. Five additional patients who had continuous CT scans were chosen for preliminary longitudinal analysis. We established a new computer-aided CT volume measurement and comparison method for PTB patients (CACTV-PTB) which measured lung volume (LV) and thoracic volume (TV). RLT was calculated as the ratio of LV to TV and comparisons were performed among different groups. Standardized RLT (SRLT) was used in the longitudinal analysis among different patients. In the Normal group, LV and TV were positively correlated in linear regression (Ŷ=-0.5+0.46X, R2=0.796, P<0.01). RLT values were significantly different among four groups (Normal: 0.40±0.05, PTB: 0.37±0.08, PTB+DM: 0.34±0.06, Death: 0.23±0.04). The curves of SRLT value from different patients shared a same start point and could be compared directly. Utilizing the novel objective method CACTV-PTB makes it possible to compare the severity and dynamic change among different PTB patients. Our early experience also suggested that the lung injury is severer in the PTB+DM group than in the PTB group. PMID:26628995

  20. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, P. K.; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S. K.; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as ‘Yakshma’. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as ‘Rajayakshma’. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. Objectives: To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. Materials and Methods: In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. Results: The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. Conclusion: This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB. PMID:23125511

  1. RAIRS2 a new expert system for diagnosing tuberculosis with real-world tournament selection mechanism inside artificial immune recognition system.

    PubMed

    Saybani, Mahmoud Reza; Shamshirband, Shahaboddin; Golzari, Shahram; Wah, Teh Ying; Saeed, Aghabozorgi; Mat Kiah, Miss Laiha; Balas, Valentina Emilia

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major global health problem that has been ranked as the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide, after the human immunodeficiency virus. Diagnosis based on cultured specimens is the reference standard; however, results take weeks to obtain. Slow and insensitive diagnostic methods hampered the global control of tuberculosis, and scientists are looking for early detection strategies, which remain the foundation of tuberculosis control. Consequently, there is a need to develop an expert system that helps medical professionals to accurately diagnose the disease. The objective of this study is to diagnose tuberculosis using a machine learning method. Artificial immune recognition system (AIRS) has been used successfully for diagnosing various diseases. However, little effort has been undertaken to improve its classification accuracy. In order to increase the classification accuracy, this study introduces a new hybrid system that incorporates real tournament selection mechanism into the AIRS. This mechanism is used to control the population size of the model and to overcome the existing selection pressure. Patient epacris reports obtained from the Pasteur laboratory in northern Iran were used as the benchmark data set. The sample consisted of 175 records, from which 114 (65 %) were positive for TB, and the remaining 61 (35 %) were negative. The classification performance was measured through tenfold cross-validation, root-mean-square error, sensitivity, and specificity. With an accuracy of 100 %, RMSE of 0, sensitivity of 100 %, and specificity of 100 %, the proposed method was able to successfully classify tuberculosis cases. In addition, the proposed method is comparable with top classifiers used in this research.

  2. Patient and health system delay among patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Beira city, Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background TB control is based on the rapid identification of cases and their effective treatment. However, many studies have shown that there are important delays in diagnosis and treatment of patients with TB. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of and identify risk factors associated with patient delay and health system delay among newly diagnosed patients with pulmonary TB. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out in Beira city, Mozambique between September 2009 and February 2010. Patients in the first month of treatment were consecutively selected to this study if they had a diagnosis of pulmonary TB, had no history of previous TB treatment, and were 18 years or older and provided informed consent. Data was obtained through a questionnaire administered to the patients and from patients’ files. Results Among the 622 patients included in the study the median age was 32 years (interquartile range, 26–40) and 272 (43.7%) were females. The median total delay, patient delay and health system delay was 150 days (interquartile range, 91–240), 61 days (28–113) and 62 days (37–120), respectively. The contribution of patient delay and health system delay to total delay was similar. Farming, visiting first a traditional healer, low TB knowledge and coexistence of a chronic disease were associated with increased patient delay. More than two visits to a health facility, farming and coexistence of a chronic disease were associated with increased health system delay. Conclusions This study revealed a long total delay with a similar contribution of patient delay and health system delay. To reduce the total delay in this setting we need a combination of interventions to encourage patients to seek appropriate health care earlier and to expedite TB diagnosis within the health care system. PMID:24499197

  3. Circulating Interferon-Gamma Levels Are Associated with Low Body Weight in Newly Diagnosed Kenyan Non-Substance Using Tuberculosis Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Shaviya, Nathan; Budambula, Valentine; Webale, Mark K.; Were, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin are key immunopathogenesis mediators of tuberculosis, their association with clinical manifestations of early stage disease is inconclusive. We determined interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and adiponectin levels in clinically and phenotypically well-characterised non-substance using new pulmonary tuberculosis patients (n = 13) and controls (n = 14) from Kenya. Interferon-gamma levels (P < 0.0001) and interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 (P < 0.001) and interferon-gamma to adiponectin (P = 0.027) ratios were elevated in tuberculosis cases. Correlation analyses in tuberculosis cases showed associations of interferon-gamma levels with body weight (ρ = −0.849; P < 0.0001), body mass index (ρ = 0.664; P = 0.013), hip girth (ρ = −0.579; P = 0.038), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.605; P = 0.028); interferon-gamma to interleukin-10 ratio with diastolic pressure (ρ = −0.729; P = 0.005); and interferon-gamma to adiponectin ratio with body weight (ρ = −0.560; P = 0.047), body mass index (ρ = −0.604; P = 0.029), and plateletcrit (ρ = 0.793; P = 0.001). Taken together, our results suggest mild-inflammation in early stage infection characterised by upregulation of circulating interferon-gamma production in newly infected TB patients. PMID:26880909

  4. Application of cetylpyridinium chloride and sodium chloride decontamination method for recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinically suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shinu, Pottathil; Singh, Varsha; Nair, Anroop; Mehrishi, Priya; Mehta, Sonia; Joshi, Ekta

    2013-10-01

    The study was designed to compare the efficacy of cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and sodium chloride (NaCl) decontamination method with N-acetyl L-Cystine (NALC) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) decontamination (the reference method) method for the recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) from clinically suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis. To evaluate CPC-NaCl and NALC-NaOH decontamination methods, sputum specimens (n = 796) were studied (culturing on Löwenstein-Jensen medium), and the performances were compared. The CPC-NaCl decontamination method demonstrated a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value of 97.99%, 87.53%, 70.19%, and 99.32%, respectively, when compared to NALC-NaOH decontamination method. In summary, CPC-NaCl decontamination method effectively detected significantly higher number of MTB cases (n = 208) than NALC-NaOH decontamination method (n = 149) particularly in sputum with scanty bacilli and smear-negative cases, indicating the potential of CPC-NaCl decontamination method to preserve paucibacillary cases more efficient than NALC-NaOH decontamination method.

  5. The Effect of Low CD4+ Lymphocyte Count on the Radiographic Patterns of HIV Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Affusim, Christopher; Abah, Vivien; Kesieme, Emeka B; Anyanwu, Kester; Salami, Taofik A T; Eifediyi, Reuben

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the radiographic features in patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), and the association with CD4 lymphocyte count and sputum smear. Method. A prospective study was carried out on 89 HIV positive patients with PTB. The demographics, smoking history, sputum smear result, chest radiographic findings and CD4 lymphocyte count were documented. Results. Out of the 89 patients recruited in the study, 41 were males and 48 were females. Eighteen (18) patients had typical radiographic features, 60 patients had atypical radiographic features while only 11 of them had normal radiographic films. Sixty eight (68) patients had CD4 count <200 cells/mm(3), 19 patients had CD4 count between 200-499 cells/mm(3), while only 2 patients had CD4 count from 500 cells/mm(3) upwards. The association between low CD4 count and radiographic finding was statistically significant, (P value <0.05). Sixty (60) patients had negative sputum smear for Acid and Alcohol Fast Bacilli (AAFB), while the remaining 29 patients had positive smear. The association between low CD4 count and negative smear was statistically significant (P value <0.05). Conclusion. The radiographic pattern and the result of the sputum smear for AAFB has a significant relationship and association with the immune status of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis.

  6. Plasma Adenosine Deaminase Enzyme Reduces with Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Nigerian Patients: Indication for Diagnosis and Treatment Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ige, O; Edem, V F; Arinola, O G

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis(TB)-specific host biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment response have been identified as priorities for TB research. Macrophage and T cell lymphocytes play vital roles in Mycobacterium tuberculosis immune response and their associated biomarkers could form good candidates for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) is produced mainly by monocytes and macrophages and increase in biological fluids in the course of infection with microorganisms infecting macrophages. This study comprised sixty-eight (68) participants; twenty-four (24) multi-drug-resistant TB(MDR-TB) patients, twenty-four (24) drug-sensitive TB patients(DS-TB) and twenty (20) non-TB apparently healthy individuals. Five (5) milliliters of blood was drawn before commencement of chemotherapy and 6 anti-TB therapy. In DSTB and MDR-TB patients before commencement of chemotherapy and 6 months of anti-TB treatment, the mean plasma levels of ADA were significantly increased compared with control. At 6 months of anti-TB chemotherapy of DSTB or MDR TB patients, ADA level was significantly decreased compared with before chemotherapy. Plasma ADA in DSTB patients before and 6 months of chemotherapy were not significantly different compared MDR TB patients. Plasma ADA level is a promising biomarker for the screening and treatment monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis but not to differentiate MDR TB from DSTB patients. PMID:27574764

  7. A Phase 2 Randomized Trial of a Rifapentine plus Moxifloxacin-Based Regimen for Treatment of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Conde, Marcus B.; Mello, Fernanda C. Q.; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Cavalcante, Solange C.; Rolla, Valeria; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Loredo, Carla; Durovni, Betina; Armstrong, Derek T.; Efron, Anne; Barnes, Grace L.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Savic, Radojka M.; Dooley, Kelly E.; Cohn, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Chaisson, Richard E.; Dorman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The combination of rifapentine and moxifloxacin administered daily with other anti-tuberculosis drugs is highly active in mouse models of tuberculosis chemotherapy. The objective of this phase 2 clinical trial was to determine the bactericidal activity, safety, and tolerability of a regimen comprised of rifapentine, moxifloxacin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide administered daily during the first 8 weeks of pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. Methods Adults with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were randomized to receive either rifapentine (approximately 7.5 mg/kg) plus moxifloxacin (investigational arm), or rifampin (approximately 10 mg/kg) plus ethambutol (control) daily for 8 weeks, along with isoniazid and pyrazinamide. The primary endpoint was sputum culture status at completion of 8 weeks of treatment. Results 121 participants (56% of accrual target) were enrolled. At completion of 8 weeks of treatment, negative cultures using Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) medium occurred in 47/60 (78%) participants in the investigational arm vs. 43/51 (84%, p = 0.47) in the control arm; negative cultures using liquid medium occurred in 37/47 (79%) in the investigational arm vs. 27/41 (66%, p = 0.23) in the control arm. Time to stable culture conversion was shorter for the investigational arm vs. the control arm using liquid culture medium (p = 0.03), but there was no difference using LJ medium. Median rifapentine area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-24) was 313 mcg*h/mL, similar to recent studies of rifapentine dosed at 450–600 mg daily. Median moxifloxacin AUC0-24 was 28.0 mcg*h/mL, much lower than in trials where rifapentine was given only intermittently with moxifloxacin. The proportion of participants discontinuing assigned treatment for reasons other than microbiological ineligibility was higher in the investigational arm vs. the control arm (11/62 [18%] vs. 3/59 [5%], p = 0.04) although the proportions of grade 3 or higher adverse events were

  8. [Progress in management of severe tuberculosis or tuberculosis with severe complication].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    early in patient with persistent pulmonary shadows from pulmonary tuberculosis is difficult. Serum microbiological tests such as Aspergillus precipitans (principally for Aspergillus IgG antibodies) are useful but sensitivity and specificity of this test are not high. Even treated, CPA has a case mortality rate of 50% over a span of 5 years. Morbidity is marked by both systemic and respiratory symptom and hemoptysis. Loss of lung function and life-threatening hemoptysis are common. As invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, early diagnosis and treatment of CPA might improve the outcome. Regarding the treatment, concomitant use of some anti-tubercular agents and antifungals is contradicted. Treatment and management for pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with COPD and interstitial pneumonia: Shinji TAMAKI, Takashi KUGE, Midori TAMURA, Sayuri TANAKA, Eiko YOSHINO, Mouka TAMURA (National Hospital Organization Nara Medical Center), Hiroshi KIMURA (Second Department of Internal Medicine and Respiratory Medicine, Nara Medical University) Recently, patients of pulmonary tuberculosis have many complications especially in the elderly population. It is recognized that patients with COPD and interstitial pneumonia (IP) have an increased risk for developing active tuberculosis. The aim of this report is to describe the clinical findings of pulmonary tuberculosis complicated with COPD and IP. We reviewed 327 patients who were diagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-six cases were complicated with COPD. All patients were male, and had smoking history. Cavitary lesions were observed only in 5 cases. Acute exacerbation of COPD occurred in one fatal case. Ten cases were complicated with IP. Cavitary lesions were observed in 3 cases. Acute exacerbation of IP were observed in 7 cases, and 4 patients died during the anti-tuberculosis treatment. Careful evaluation and treatment are necessary for tuberculosis patients complicated with COPD and IP. PMID:24979949

  9. Malignant pleural mesothelioma treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and Tuberculosis "Podhrastovi" in ten-year period (from 1998 to 2007).

    PubMed

    Cukić, Vesna; Ustamujić, Aida; Lovre, Vladimir; Zutić, Hasan; Genjac, Sadika; Masić-Zecević, Mina

    2008-11-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is the most common primary malign tumour of pleura. The aim of this study was to evaluate cases of MPM diagnosed and treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and Tuberculosis "Podhrastovi" during ten-year period (1998-2007). Study is retrospective. The patients were analysed according to age, sex, histopathologic type of the tumour, cantonal distribution in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and regimen of treatment. MPM presented 0,72% (0-1,56% per year) of all hospitalised malignant patients, and the greatest number of registered cases was in the year of 2007. The series included 16 male (57,14%) and 12 female (42,86%). Cases over 64 years old were the most frequent (14-50%) than 45-54 years (7- not 25%). Histopathology types of hospitalised cases of MPM: epitheloid form (8- 28,57%); sarcomatoid form (2- 7,14 %); other forms (18-64,29%). The most patients came from Canton Sarajevo (12-42,86%); ZE-DO canton (8-28,57%) and the UNA-SANA canton (5-17,86%). The therapy applied: chemotherapy (11-39,29%); radiotherapy (3-10,71%); chemotherapy + radiotherapy (4-14,29%); symptomatic therapy (10-35,71 %).

  10. Comparisons of Prognosis between Surgically and Clinically Diagnosed Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Using Gap Model: A Korean National Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Song Yee; Kim, Dong Soon; Kim, Young Whan; Chung, Man Pyo; Uh, Soo Taek; Park, Choon Sik; Jeong, Sung Hwan; Park, Yong Bum; Lee, Hong Lyeol; Shin, Jong Wook; Lee, Eun Joo; Lee, Jin Hwa; Jegal, Yangin; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Yong Hyun; Song, Jin Woo; Park, Moo Suk

    2016-03-01

    Although a multidisciplinary approach has become an important criterion for an idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) diagnosis, lung biopsies remain crucial. However, the prognosis of patients with surgically diagnosed IPF (sIPF) is uncertain. We aimed to investigate the prognosis of patients with clinically diagnosed IPF (cIPF) and sIPF. In this retrospective observational study, the Korean Interstitial Lung Disease Study Group conducted a national survey to evaluate the clinical, physiological, radiological, and survival characteristics of patients with IPF from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007. Patients were recruited from 54 universities and teaching hospitals across the Republic of Korea. IPF diagnoses were established according to the 2002 American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society criteria (ERS) guideline. A total of 1685 patients with IPF (1027 cIPF and 658 sIPF) were enrolled. Patients with sIPF were significantly younger, predominantly female, and nonsmokers (all P < 0.001). sIPF group had significantly better initial pulmonary function. The proportion of computed tomography-based honeycomb findings of patients with cIPF was higher than in those with sIPF (P < 0.001). A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the sIPF group had a better prognosis (P = 0.001). A survival analysis showed that age, pulmonary function parameters, pulmonary oxygen tension, honeycombing change, and combined lung cancer had a significant influence on patient prognosis. However, there was no significant difference in prognosis between the cIPF and sIPF groups after adjusting for GAP (gender, age, physiology) stage. The patients with sIPF had better clinical features than those with cIPF. However, after adjusting for GAP stage, the sIPF group showed similar prognoses as the cIPF group. This study showed that after adjusting for GAP stage, the prognosis of patients with IPF is the same regardless of the diagnostic method used. PMID:26986154

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Isoniazid, Pyrazinamide, and Ethambutol in Newly Diagnosed Pulmonary TB Patients in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Chigutsa, Emmanuel; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; PrayGod, George; Range, Nyagosya; Castel, Sandra; Wiesner, Lubbe; Hagen, Christian Munch; Christiansen, Michael; Changalucha, John; McIlleron, Helen; Friis, Henrik; Andersen, Aase Bengaard

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to lower-than-therapeutic levels of anti-tuberculosis drugs is likely to cause selection of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and treatment failure. The first-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) regimen consists of rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, and correct management reduces risk of TB relapse and development of drug resistance. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of standard of care plus nutritional supplementation versus standard care on the pharmacokinetics of isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol among sputum smear positive TB patients with and without HIV. In a clinical trial in 100 Tanzanian TB patients, with or without HIV infection, drug concentrations were determined at 1 week and 2 months post initiation of anti-TB medication. Data was analysed using population pharmacokinetic modelling. The effect of body size was described using allometric scaling, and the effects of nutritional supplementation, HIV, age, sex, CD4+ count, weight-adjusted dose, NAT2 genotype, and time on TB treatment were investigated. The kinetics of all drugs was well characterised using first-order elimination and transit compartment absorption, with isoniazid and ethambutol described by two-compartment disposition models, and pyrazinamide by a one-compartment model. Patients with a slow NAT2 genotype had higher isoniazid exposure and a lower estimate of oral clearance (15.5 L/h) than rapid/intermediate NAT2 genotype (26.1 L/h). Pyrazinamide clearance had an estimated typical value of 3.32 L/h, and it was found to increase with time on treatment, with a 16.3% increase after the first 2 months of anti-TB treatment. The typical clearance of ethambutol was estimated to be 40.7 L/h, and was found to decrease with age, at a rate of 1.41% per year. Neither HIV status nor nutritional supplementations were found to affect the pharmacokinetics of these drugs in our cohort of patients. PMID:26501782

  12. Evaluation of Giant African Pouched Rats for Detection of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Patients from a High-Endemic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Reither, Klaus; Jugheli, Levan; Glass, Tracy R.; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Mhimbira, Francis A.; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Edwards, Timothy L.; Mulder, Christiaan; Beyene, Negussie W.; Mahoney, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background This study established evidence about the diagnostic performance of trained giant African pouched rats for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum of well-characterised patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) in a high-burden setting. Methods The TB detection rats were evaluated using sputum samples of patients with presumptive TB enrolled in two prospective cohort studies in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. The patients were characterised by sputum smear microscopy and culture, including subsequent antigen or molecular confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and by clinical data at enrolment and for at least 5-months of follow-up to determine the reference standard. Seven trained giant African pouched rats were used for the detection of TB in the sputum samples after shipment to the APOPO project in Morogoro, Tanzania. Results Of 469 eligible patients, 109 (23.2%) were culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 128 (27.3%) were non-TB controls with sustained recovery after 5 months without anti-TB treatment. The HIV prevalence was 46%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the seven rats for the detection of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 0.72 (95% CI 0.66–0.78). An optimal threshold could be defined at ≥2 indications by rats in either sample with a corresponding sensitivity of 56.9% (95% CI 47.0–66.3), specificity of 80.5% (95% CI 72.5–86.9), positive and negative predictive value of 71.3% (95% CI 60.6–80.5) and 68.7% (95% CI 60.6–76.0), and an accuracy for TB diagnosis of 69.6%. The diagnostic performance was negatively influenced by low burden of bacilli, and independent of the HIV status. Conclusion Giant African pouched rats have potential for detection of tuberculosis in sputum samples. However, the diagnostic performance characteristics of TB detection rats do not currently meet the requirements for high-priority, rapid sputum-based TB diagnostics as defined by the World Health

  13. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Adults in a Rural Sub-District of South India

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Vineet K.; Kumar, Prahlad; Anjinappa, Sharada M.; Singh, Sanjay; Narasimhaiah, Somashekar; Joshi, Malathi V.; Gupta, Joydev; Lakshminarayana; Ramchandra, Jitendra; Velu, Magesh; Papkianathan, Suganthi; Babu, Suseendra; Krishna, Hemalatha

    2012-01-01

    Background We conducted a survey to estimate point prevalence of bacteriologically positive pulmonary TB (PTB) in a rural area in South India, implementing TB program DOTS strategy since 2002. Methods Survey was conducted among persons ≥15 years of age in fifteen clusters selected by simple random sampling; each consisting of 5–12 villages. Persons having symptoms suggestive of PTB or history of anti-TB treatment (ATT) were eligible for sputum examination by smear microscopy for Acid Fast Bacilli and culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis; two sputum samples were collected from each eligible person. Persons with one or both sputum specimen positive on microscopy and/or culture were labeled suffering from PTB. Prevalence was estimated after imputing missing values to correct for bias introduced by incompleteness of data. In six clusters, registered persons were also screened by X-ray chest. Persons with any abnormal shadow on X-ray were eligible for sputum examination in addition to those with symptoms and ATT. Multiplication factor calculated as ratio of prevalence while using both screening tools to prevalence using symptoms screening alone was applied to entire study population to estimate prevalence corrected for non-screening by X-ray. Results Of 71,874 residents ≥15 years of age, 63,362 (88.2%) were screened for symptoms and ATT. Of them, 5120 (8.1%) - 4681 (7.4%) with symptoms and an additional 439 (0.7%) with ATT were eligible for sputum examination. Spot specimen were collected from 4850 (94.7%) and early morning sputum specimens from 4719 (92.2%). Using symptom screening alone, prevalence of smear, culture and bacteriologically positive PTB in persons ≥15 years of age was 83 (CI: 57–109), 152 (CI: 108–197) and 196 (CI :145–246) per 100,000 population respectively. Prevalence corrected for non-screening by X-ray was 108 (CI: 82–134), 198 (CI: 153–243) and 254 (CI: 204–301) respectively. Conclusion Observed prevalence suggests further

  14. Adjuvant Efficacy of Nutrition Support During Pulmonary Tuberculosis Treating Course: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Si, Zhuang-Li; Kang, Ling-Ling; Shen, Xu-Bo; Zhou, Yuan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malnutrition and tuberculosis (TB) tend to interact with each other. TB may lead to nutrition deficiencies that will conversely delay recovery by depressing immune functions. Nutrition support can promote recovery in the subject being treated for TB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nutrition support on promoting the recovery of adult pulmonary TB patients with anti-TB drug therapy. Methods: English database of the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, PubMed, EMBASE, and Chinese database of CBM, CNKI, VIP, and WANFANG were searched. Randomized controlled trials comparing nutrition support (given for more than 2 weeks) with no nutrition intervention, nutrition advice only, or placebo-control for TB patients being anti-TB treated were included. Two reviewers conducted data extraction, assessed the quality of the studies independently, and any discrepancies were solved by the third reviewer. Data were entered and analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software, and meta-analysis was done using risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous variables and mean differences (MDs) for continuous variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 19 studies (3681 participants) were included. In nutritional support for TB patients, pooled RR and its 95% CI of sputum smears- or culture-negative conversion rate and chest X-ray (CXR) absorption rate were 1.10 (1.04, 1.17) and 1.22 (1.08, 1.39), respectively, the pooled MD and its 95% CI of body mass index (BMI) and time of sputum smears or culture negativity were 0.59 (0.16, 1.2) and − 5.42 (−7.93, −2.92), respectively, compared with the control group. The differences in outcomes of CXR zone affected, TB score, serum albumin, and hemoglobin were not statistically significant (P = 0.76, 0.24, 0.28, and 0.20, respectively) between the intervention group and the control group. No systemic adverse events were recorded. Conclusions: During anti-TB course, nutrition support may be helpful in treatment

  15. Evaluation of public awareness and attitude to pulmonary tuberculosis in a Nigerian rural community

    PubMed Central

    Anochie, Philip Ifesinachi; Onyeneke, Edwina Chinwe; Onyeozirila, Anthony Chidiebere; Igbolekwu, Leonard Chibuzo; Onyeneke, Bestman Chukwuemeka; Ogu, Angelina Chinyere

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Community based interventions have long been linked to tuberculosis control efforts. Effectively treated and cured patients living within their home communities are often the best advocates and may become the drivers of social mobilization to support control of tuberculosis. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional knowledge, attitude, behavioral and practice (KABP) survey on tuberculosis was carried out in a rural Nigerian community. We used the multi-stage sampling method for subject selection. We administered an interview schedule consisting of a pre-tested structured interviewer-administered questionnaire, together with in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. Results We applied the questionnaire to 1186 people in designated rural households. Most of the participants, (1154, 97.3%) had prior knowledge and awareness about tuberculosis as a disease, 612 (51.6%) considered tuberculosis a result of HIV/AIDS epidemics or malnutrition, and 451 (38%) believed that it can be cured by Western medicine. The unwillingness of respondents to relate with TB patients was generally high (97%, 1150), even where levels of awareness and knowledge were high. Conclusion These results should be used to orient tuberculosis control programs, especially those aimed at mobilizing people for tuberculosis control and eradication. PMID:24432287

  16. Epidemiology, Diagnosis and Management of Extra-Pulmonary Tuberculosis in a Low-Prevalence Country: A Four Year Retrospective Study in an Australian Tertiary Infectious Diseases Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pollett, Simon; Banner, Pamela; O’Sullivan, Matthew V. N.; Ralph, Anna P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is relatively neglected and increasing in incidence, in comparison to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in low-burden settings. It poses particular diagnostic and management challenges. We aimed to determine the characteristics of EPTB in Western Sydney, Australia, and to conduct a quality assurance investigation of adherence to guidelines among Infectious Diseases (ID) practitioners managing EPTB cases. Methods All adult EPTB cases managed by a large ID service during 01/01/2008–31/12/2011 were eligible for inclusion in the retrospective review. Data were extracted from patient medical records on demographic, diagnostic, clinical and management details, and on clinician adherence to local and international TB guidelines. Results 129 cases managed by the ID service were identified, with files available for 117. 98 cases were managed by the Respiratory service and were excluded. 98.2%(112/114) had been born in a country other than Australia. HIV status was tested or previously known in 97 people, and positive in 4 (4%). Microbiological confirmation was obtained in 68/117 (58.1%), an additional 24 had histopathological findings considered confirmatory (92/117, 78.6%), with the remainder diagnosed on clinical and/or radiological grounds. Median time to diagnosis post-migration from a high TB-burden country was 5 years (range 0–41). 95 cases were successfully treated, 11 cases defaulted, refused therapy or transferred, 2 cases relapsed and outcomes unknown or pending in 9 cases. No deaths occurred in the sample analysed. Clinician adherence to guidelines was high, but with scope for improvement in offering testing for co-infections, performing eye checks, monitoring blood glucose in patients receiving adjunctive corticosteroids, and considering drug interactions. Conclusions Despite excellent TB outcomes in this setting, the low proportion of cases with susceptibility data is worrying in this era of increasing drug

  17. Incidence and outcome of newly-diagnosed tuberculosis in schizophrenics: a 12-year, nationwide, retrospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To control tuberculosis (TB), it is critical to identify at risk populations. Schizophrenia is recognized as an important risk factor for TB. However, previous studies have been confounded by comorbidities, and reports of TB infection outcomes are rare. Therefore, the current nation-wide study aimed to compare the adjusted incidence and outcome of TB diseases in schizophrenics and the general population. Method Using the National Health Insurance Research Database from 1998 to 2009, this retrospective longitudinal study included 60,409 schizophrenics and general population matched for age, Charlson’s score, and comorbidities. Diagnosis of TB was based on the international classification of disease, ninth revision and use of anti-TB drugs. Unfavorable outcome for TB was defined as death, loss to follow-up, or use of anti-TB treatment for more than 9 months. Results The adjusted incidence of TB in schizophrenics was significantly higher than in the general population [hazard ratio, 1.52; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.29-1.79; p < 0.001; Kaplan-Meier log-rank test, p < 0.001]. Cox regression revealed age and male gender as risk factors for newly-diagnosed TB. The outcome of TB was comparable in schizophrenics and the general population [odds ratio (OR), 0.78; 95% CI, 0.55-1.09; p =0.144]. Logistic regression revealed a statistical trend for diabetes mellitus to predict poor outcome in schizophrenics with TB (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 0.96-5.74; p = 0.062). Conclusions Schizophrenics are at increased risk for TB, and screening may be warranted for those living in areas with high prevalence of TB. PMID:23895638

  18. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  19. Estimation of Ten-Year Survival of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis Based on the Competing Risks Model in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kazempour-Dizaji, Mehdi; Tabarsi, Payam; Zayeri, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic bacterial disease, which despite the presence of effective drug strategies, still remains a serious health problem worldwide. Estimation of survival rate is an appropriate indicator for prognosis in patients with pulmonary TB. Therefore, this research was designed with the aim of accurate estimation of the survival of patients by taking both the death event and relapse into consideration. Materials and Methods: Based on a retrospective cohort study, information of 2,299 patients with pulmonary TB that had been referred to and treated in Masih Daneshvari Hospital from 2005 to 2015 was reviewed. To estimate the survival of patients with pulmonary TB, the competing risks model, which considered death and relapse as competing events, was used. In addition, the effect of factors affecting the cumulative incidence function (CIF) of death event and relapse was also examined. Results: The effect of risk factors on the CIF of death events and relapse showed that patients’ age, marital status, contact with TB patients, adverse effect of drugs, imprisonment and HIV positivity were factors that affected the CIF of death. Meanwhile, sex, marital status, imprisonment and HIV positivity were factors affecting the CIF of relapse (P <0.05). Considering death and relapse as competing events, survival estimation in pulmonary TB patients showed that survival in this group of patients in the first, third, fifth and tenth year after treatment was 39%, 14%, 7% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: The use of competing risks model in survival analysis of patients with pulmonary TB with consideration of competing events, enables more accurate estimation of survival. PMID:27403177

  20. Total Delay Is Associated with Unfavorable Treatment Outcome among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gebreegziabher, Senedu Bekele; Bjune, Gunnar Aksel; Yimer, Solomon Abebe

    2016-01-01

    Background delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) may worsen the disease, increase mortality and enhance transmission in the community. This study aimed at assessing the association between total delay and unfavorable treatment outcome among newly diagnosed pulmonary TB (PTB) patients. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region of Ethiopia from October 2013 to May 2015. Newly diagnosed PTB patients who were ≥15 years of age were consecutively enrolled in the study from 30 randomly selected public health facilities. Total delay (the time period from onset of TB symptoms to first start of anti-TB treatment) was measured. Median total delay was calculated. Mixed effect logistics regression was used to analyze factors associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. Results Seven hundred six patients were enrolled in the study. The median total delay was 60 days. Patients with total delay of > 60 days were more likely to have unfavorable TB treatment outcome than patients with total delay of ≤ 60 days (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–5.26). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive TB patients were 8.46 times more likely to experience unfavorable treatment outcome than HIV negative TB patients (AOR, 8.46; 95% CI, 3.14–22.79). Conclusions Long total delay and TB/HIV coinfection were associated with unfavorable treatment outcome. Targeted interventions that can reduce delay in diagnosis and treatment of TB, and early comprehensive management of TB/HIV coinfection are needed to reduce increased risk of unfavorable treatment outcome. PMID:27442529

  1. Pulmonary tuberculosis in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): histologic lesions with correlation to local immune responses.

    PubMed

    Landolfi, J A; Terio, K A; Miller, M; Junecko, B F; Reinhart, T

    2015-05-01

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an important health concern for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), no studies have evaluated the associated local immune responses or histologic lesions. In primates including humans, latent tuberculosis is distinguished by well-organized granulomas with TH1 cytokine expression, whereas active disease is characterized by poorly organized inflammation and local imbalance in TH1/TH2 cytokines. This study examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung samples from 5 tuberculosis-negative and 9 tuberculosis-positive Asian elephants. Lesions were assessed by light microscopy, and lymphoid infiltrates were characterized by CD3 and CD20 immunolabeling. Expression of TH1 (interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) and TH2 (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) cytokines was determined using in situ hybridization. In 6 of 9 samples, inflammation was similar to the pattern of primate active disease with low to moderate numbers of lymphocytes, most of which were CD20 positive. In 1 sample, inflammation was most similar to latent tuberculosis in primates with numerous CD3-positive lymphocytes. Expression of IFN-γ was detected in 3 of 8 tuberculosis-positive samples. Expression of TNF-α was detected in 3 of 8 positive samples, including the one with latent morphology. Low-level expression of IL-4 was present in 4 of 8 positive samples. Only single positive samples displayed expression of IL-10 and TGF-β. Tuberculosis-negative samples generally lacked cytokine expression. Results showed heterogeneity in lesions of elephant tuberculosis similar to those of latent and active disease in primates, with variable expression of both TH1 and TH2 cytokines.

  2. Pulmonary tuberculosis in Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): histologic lesions with correlation to local immune responses.

    PubMed

    Landolfi, J A; Terio, K A; Miller, M; Junecko, B F; Reinhart, T

    2015-05-01

    Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is an important health concern for Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), no studies have evaluated the associated local immune responses or histologic lesions. In primates including humans, latent tuberculosis is distinguished by well-organized granulomas with TH1 cytokine expression, whereas active disease is characterized by poorly organized inflammation and local imbalance in TH1/TH2 cytokines. This study examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung samples from 5 tuberculosis-negative and 9 tuberculosis-positive Asian elephants. Lesions were assessed by light microscopy, and lymphoid infiltrates were characterized by CD3 and CD20 immunolabeling. Expression of TH1 (interferon [IFN]-γ, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) and TH2 (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor [TGF]-β) cytokines was determined using in situ hybridization. In 6 of 9 samples, inflammation was similar to the pattern of primate active disease with low to moderate numbers of lymphocytes, most of which were CD20 positive. In 1 sample, inflammation was most similar to latent tuberculosis in primates with numerous CD3-positive lymphocytes. Expression of IFN-γ was detected in 3 of 8 tuberculosis-positive samples. Expression of TNF-α was detected in 3 of 8 positive samples, including the one with latent morphology. Low-level expression of IL-4 was present in 4 of 8 positive samples. Only single positive samples displayed expression of IL-10 and TGF-β. Tuberculosis-negative samples generally lacked cytokine expression. Results showed heterogeneity in lesions of elephant tuberculosis similar to those of latent and active disease in primates, with variable expression of both TH1 and TH2 cytokines. PMID:25228055

  3. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Jaideep; Venugopal, Shwetha; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  4. Tuberculosis as an Etiological Factor in Liver Abscess in Adults.

    PubMed

    Dey, Jaideep; Gautam, Hitender; Venugopal, Shwetha; Porwal, Chhavi; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Gupta, Naresh; Singh, Urvashi B

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tuberculosis of the liver without active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis is considered as an uncommon diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the etiological role of tuberculosis in adult patients presenting with features of liver abscess. Methods. A total of 40 patients with liver abscess were included in the study. The liver abscess aspirate was subjected to microscopy, culture, and polymerase chain reaction to determine the role of tuberculosis as an etiological factor in liver abscess. Results. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 25% (10/40) were diagnosed with having tubercular liver abscess. In a total of 40 specimens, 2.5% (1/40) were positive for acid fast bacilli by Ziehl-Neelsen method, while 10% (4/40) were positive for M. tuberculosis by culture using BACTEC 460 and the yield increased to 25% (10/40) by polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis. Conclusion. 25% of the patients presenting with liver abscess had tubercular etiology without features of active pulmonary or miliary tuberculosis. Liver can act as the primary site of involvement in the absence of activity elsewhere in the body. Tuberculosis should be considered as an important differential diagnosis of liver abscess irrespective of evidence of active tuberculosis elsewhere in the body. PMID:27595021

  5. Cytokine Profiles for Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from Patients with Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Healthy Household Contacts in Response to the 30-Kilodalton Antigen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Martha; Herrera, Teresa; Villareal, Hector; Rich, Elizabeth A.; Sada, Eduardo

    1998-01-01

    Patients with active tuberculosis (TB) have a stronger humoral but a poorer cellular immune response to the secreted 30-kDa antigen (Ag) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis than do healthy household contacts (HHC), who presumably are more protected against disease. The basis for this observation was studied by examining the Th1 (interleukin 2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ])- and Th2 (IL-10 and IL-4)-type cytokines produced in response to the 30-kDa Ag by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with active pulmonary TB (n = 7) and from HHC who were tuberculin (purified protein derivative) skin test positive (n = 12). Thirty-kilodalton-Ag-stimulated PBMC from TB patients produced significantly lower levels of IFN-γ (none detectable) than did those from HHC (212 ± 73 pg/ml, mean ± standard error) (P < 0.001). Likewise, 30-kDa-Ag-stimulated PBMC from TB patients failed to express IFN-γ mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, whereas cells from HHC expressed the IFN-γ gene. In contrast, 30-kDa-Ag-stimulated PBMC from TB patients produced significantly higher levels of IL-10 (403 ± 80 pg/ml) than did those from HHC (187 ± 66 pg/ml) (P < 0.013), although cells from both groups expressed the IL-10 gene. IL-2 and IL-4 were not consistently produced, and their genes were not expressed by 30-kDa-Ag-stimulated cells from either TB patients or HHC. After treatment with antituberculous drugs, lymphocytes from four of the seven TB patients proliferated and three of them expressed IFN-γ mRNA in response to the 30-kDa Ag and produced decreased levels of IL-10. PMID:9423855

  6. Hepatic Tuberculosis Mimicking Biliary Cystadenoma: A Radiological Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajaram; Dey, Amit Kumar; Mittal, Kartik; Udmale, Prasad; Singh, Udai; Mitkar, Sumit; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Primary involvement of liver in tuberculosis is a rare entity. It is difficult to diagnose in absence of previous history of tuberculosis or concurrent pulmonary involvement. It is usually misdiagnosed as neoplastic liver lesion, which misdirects the treatment protocol and delays proper treatment. Here we are presenting a case of 36-year-old male patient with vague right upper quadrant abdominal pain. All the laboratory values were within normal limits. Radiological investigations were in favor of biliary cystadenoma but final diagnosis was primary focal involvement of liver in tuberculosis which was histopathologically proven to be tuberculous granulomas on biopsy of the resected mass. PMID:26504607

  7. A Multifaceted Analysis of Immune-Endocrine-Metabolic Alterations in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Natalia; D'Attilio, Luciano; Kovalevski, Leandro; Bozza, Verónica; Besedovsky, Hugo; del Rey, Adriana; Bay, María Luisa; Bottasso, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Our study investigated the circulating levels of factors involved in immune-inflammatory-endocrine-metabolic responses in patients with tuberculosis with the aim of uncovering a relation between certain immune and hormonal patterns, their clinical status and in vitro immune response. The concentration of leptin, adiponectin, IL-6, IL-1β, ghrelin, C-reactive protein (CRP), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and the in vitro immune response (lymphoproliferation and IFN-γ production) was evaluated in 53 patients with active untreated tuberculosis, 27 household contacts and 25 healthy controls, without significant age- or sex-related differences. Patients had a lower body mass index (BMI), reduced levels of leptin and DHEA, and increased concentrations of CRP, IL-6, cortisol, IL-1β and nearly significant adiponectin values than household contacts and controls. Within tuberculosis patients the BMI and leptin levels were positively correlated and decreased with increasing disease severity, whereas higher concentrations of IL-6, CRP, IL-1β, cortisol, and ghrelin were seen in cases with moderate to severe tuberculosis. Household contacts had lower DHEA and higher IL-6 levels than controls. Group classification by means of discriminant analysis and the k-nearest neighbor method showed that tuberculosis patients were clearly different from the other groups, having higher levels of CRP and lower DHEA concentration and BMI. Furthermore, plasma leptin levels were positively associated with the basal in vitro IFN-γ production and the ConA-driven proliferation of cells from tuberculosis patients. Present alterations in the communication between the neuro-endocrine and immune systems in tuberculosis may contribute to disease worsening. PMID:22022605

  8. Infection Rate and Tissue Localization of Murine IL-12p40-Producing Monocyte-Derived CD103+ Lung Dendritic Cells during Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Leepiyasakulchai, Chaniya; Taher, Chato; Chuquimia, Olga D.; Mazurek, Jolanta; Söderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Fernández, Carmen; Sköld, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Non-hematopoietic cells, including lung epithelial cells, influence host immune responses. By co-culturing primary alveolar epithelial cells and monocytes from naïve donor mice, we show that alveolar epithelial cells support monocyte survival and differentiation in vitro, suggesting a role for non-hematopoietic cells in monocyte differentiation during the steady state in vivo. CD103+ dendritic cells (αE-DC) are present at mucosal surfaces. Using a murine primary monocyte adoptive transfer model, we demonstrate that αE-DC in the lungs and pulmonary lymph nodes are monocyte-derived during pulmonary tuberculosis. The tissue localization may influence the functional potential of αE-DC that accumulate in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected lungs. Here, we confirm the localization of αE-DC in uninfected mice beneath the bronchial epithelial cell layer and near the vascular wall, and show that αE-DC have a similar distribution in the lungs during pulmonary tuberculosis and are detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from infected mice. Lung DC can be targeted by M. tuberculosis in vivo and play a role in bacterial dissemination to the draining lymph node. In contrast to other DC subsets, only a fraction of lung αE-DC are infected with the bacterium. We also show that virulent M. tuberculosis does not significantly alter cell surface expression levels of MHC class II on infected cells in vivo and that αE-DC contain the highest frequency of IL-12p40+ cells among the myeloid cell subsets in infected lungs. Our results support a model in which inflammatory monocytes are recruited into the M. tuberculosis-infected lung tissue and, depending on which non-hematopoietic cells they interact with, differentiate along different paths to give rise to multiple monocyte-derived cells, including DC with a distinctive αE-DC phenotype. PMID:23861965

  9. Can chest high-resolution computed tomography findings diagnose pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis?*

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Flávia Angélica Ferreira; Rodrigues, Rosana Souza; Barreto, Miriam Menna; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Silva, Claudio S.; Hochhegger, Bruno; Souza Jr., Arthur Soares; Zanetti, Gláucia; Marchiori, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study was aimed at retrospectively reviewing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in patients with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis in order to evaluate the frequency of tomographic findings and their distribution in the lung parenchyma. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients (9 females and 4 males; age, 9 to 59 years; mean age, 34.5 years) were included in the present study. The HRCT images were independently evaluated by two observers whose decisions were made by consensus. The inclusion criterion was the presence of abnormalities typical of pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis at HRCT, which precludes lung biopsy. However, in 6 cases lung biopsy was performed. Results Ground-glass opacities and small parenchymal nodules were the predominant tomographic findings, present in 100% of cases, followed by small subpleural nodules (92.3%), subpleural cysts (84.6%), subpleural linear calcifications (69.2%), crazy-paving pattern (69.2%), fissure nodularity (53.8%), calcification along interlobular septa (46.2%) and dense consolidation (46.2%). Conclusion As regards distribution of the lesions, there was preferential involvement of the lower third of the lungs. No predominance of distribution in axial and anteroposterior directions was observed. PMID:26379317

  10. Comparison of the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination regimen and separate formulations for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiun-Ting; Chiu, Chien-Tung; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lai, Yung-Fa

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Fixed-dose combination formulations, which simplify the administration of drugs and prevent the development of drug resistance, have been recommended as a standard anti-tuberculosis treatment regimen. However, the composition and dosage recommendations for fixed-dose combination formulations differ from those for separate formulations. Thus, questions about the effectiveness and side effects of combination formulations remain. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of these two types of anti-tuberculosis regimens for pulmonary tuberculosis treatment. METHOD: A prospective, randomized controlled study was conducted using the directly observed treatment short-course strategy. Patients were randomly allocated to one of two short-course regimens. One year after completing the treatment, these patients' outcomes were analyzed. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00979290. RESULTS: A total of 161 patients were enrolled, 142 of whom were evaluable for safety assessment. The two regimens had a similar incidence of adverse effects. In the per-protocol population, serum bilirubin concentrations at the peak level, at week 4, and at week 8 were significantly higher for the fixed-dose combination formulation than for the separate formulations. All patients had negative sputum cultures at the end of the treatment, and no relapse occurred after one year of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized study, transient higher serum bilirubin levels were noted for the fixed-dose combination regimen compared with the separate formulations during treatment. However, no significant difference in safety or efficacy was found between the groups when the directly observed treatment short-course strategy was used. PMID:26106962

  11. Association between Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL1RN) Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) Polymorphism and Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Naderi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Mahboubeh; Amininia, Shadi; Bahari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Mohsen; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Ghavami, Saeid

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages and T-lymphocytes are involved in immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Macrophage produces interleukin (IL)-1 as an inflammatory mediator. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1-Ra) is a natural antagonist of IL-1 receptors. In this study we aimed to examine the possible association between the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) gene and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a sample of Iranian population. Our study is a case-control study and we examined the VNTR of the IL1RN gene in 265 PTB and 250 healthy subjects by PCR. Neither the overall chi-square comparison of PTB and control subjects nor the logistic regression analysis indicated any association between VNTR IL1RN polymorphism and PTB. Our data suggest that VNTR IL1RN polymorphism may not be associated with the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. Larger studies with different ethnicities are needed to find out the impact of IL1RN VNTR polymorphism on risk of developing TB.

  12. Regulatory role of Cdx-2 and Taq I polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene on chemokine expression in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Harishankar, M; Selvaraj, P

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene variants have been shown to be regulating the immune response in tuberculosis. We studied the regulatory role of VDR promoter Cdx-2 and 3'UTR TaqI gene variants on chemokine levels from culture filtrate antigen (CFA) stimulated with or without 1,25(OH)2D3 treated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients (PTB) and 51 normal healthy controls (HCs). In CFA with 1,25(OH)2D3 treated cultures, the MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES levels were significantly decreased in Cdx-2 AA genotype compared to GG genotype, while a significantly increased MIG level was observed in Cdx-2 AA genotype (p<0.05). In TaqI polymorphism, tt genotype significantly decreased MIP-1β and RANTES levels compared to TT genotype. Moreover, a significantly increased level of IP-10 and MIG was observed in TaqI tt genotype compared with TT genotype (p<0.05). The results suggests that the 1,25(OH)2D3 may alter the chemokine response through the VDR polymorphic variants during infection. PMID:27067904

  13. High resolution computed tomography findings in smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis patients according to their culture status

    PubMed Central

    Caliskan, Tayfun; Ozkisa, Tuncer; Aribal, Serkan; Kaya, Hatice; Incedayi, Mehmet; Ulcay, Asim; Ciftci, Faruk

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the clinical features and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings in smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and to evaluate the correlation between these parameters and the culture results. Methods We retrospectively studied 78 active smear-negative PTB patients. They were divided into two groups according to their culture results. The HRCT findings and clinical features at the beginning of the antituberculosis treatment were reviewed. Results The mean age was 22.48±3.18 years. Micronodules (87%), large nodules (63%) and centrilobular nodules (62%) were the most common HRCT findings. HRCT findings were observed in the right upper (72%), left upper (56%), right lower (32%), and left lower lobes (29%). Cough (37%) and chest pain (32%) were the most frequent symptoms at presentation. Conclusions There were no significant differences in the HRCT findings and clinical features between the two groups. Thus, in cases of smear-negative and culture-negative PTB, the patient with compatible clinical and radiological features should be considered for tuberculosis treatment. PMID:24976993

  14. Trend of Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Iran during 1995–2012: A Segmented Regression Model

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Salman; Soheilyzad, Mokhtar; Molaeipoor, Leila; Khazaei, Zaher; Rezaeian, Shahab; Khazaei, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Describing trend in tuberculosis (TB) over time can play an important role to assess the disease control strategies and predict the future morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the incidence trend of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (SPPT) in sub-age and sex groups during the years of 1995–2012. Methods: This retrospective cohort study was performed in 2015 by using the dataset regarding National Statistics of SPPT reported by World Health Organization during 1995–2012. Annual percent changes (APCs) and average annual percent changes (AAPCs) were estimated to determine the summery statistics of trend using segmented regression model. Results: During 1995–2012, there were 96,579 SPPT case notifications in Iran (male to female ratio: 0.99). There was only one change point in 1997 for SPPT incidence in subgroups of age and sex during 1995–2012. The AAPCs for both genders and also all three age groups had a significant descending trend during the time period (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results showed a downward trend in the SPPT incidence. It seems that to achieve the set goals and high successful in TB control program especially reduction in SPPT, pay more attention to old age and males should be considered. In addition, improvement of clinical and medical care services and notification processes would be imperative. PMID:27413517

  15. Prevalence of extended treatment in pulmonary tuberculosis patients receiving first-line therapy and its association with recurrent tuberculosis in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, YinYin; Goel, Sonu; Harries, Anthony D.; Zhang, ZhiGuo; Gao, TieJie; Wang, LiXia; Cheng, ShiMing; Lin, Yan; Du, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Background In China, it is known that extended treatment is given to patients with pulmonary TB after they have successfully completed 6 months of first-line treatment. This practice is not officially reported to the National Tuberculosis Control Programme, so there are no data on its prevalence, its possible benefits in terms of preventing recurrent disease or the costs. This study aimed to provide information, from a single TB dispensary in Beijing, China, on the prevalence of extended anti-TB treatment and its relationship with recurrent TB. Methods Retrospective cohort study using the electronic national TB information system and dispensary medical records. Results Of 935 patients with pulmonary TB who completed 6–7 months of first-line drug treatment, 399 (43%) were given extended treatment. This was more common in patients with smear-positive disease, and those with lung cavities and more extensive radiographic lobar involvement at the time of diagnosis. Over 3–4 years' follow-up, recurrent disease was not significantly different in patients who received extended treatment (2.8%, 11/399) as compared to those who received the standard 6-month treatment (3.7%, 20/534). The median length of extended treatment was 89 days at a median cost of US$111 for drugs and US$32 for laboratory examinations. Conclusions This study shows that extended treatment is common in one TB dispensary in Beijing. Further studies are needed to determine the countrywide prevalence of this practice and ascertain more conclusively the apparent lack of benefit. PMID:24864048

  16. First insight into the genetic population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Diab, Hassan Mahmoud; Nakajima, Chie; Kotb, Saber A; Mokhtar, Alaa; Khder, Nagwa F M; Abdelaal, Ahmed S A; Hegazy, Azza; Poudel, Ajay; Shah, Yogendra; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to assess the population structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates from Egypt. A total of 230 MTB isolates were analysed using spoligotyping, large sequence polymorphism (LSPs), mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The majority of isolates (93.0%) belonged to lineage 4, including 44.3, 13.4 and 10.8% of the ill-defined T clade, LAM and Haarlem families, respectively, and lineage 3 was identified in 7.0% of the isolates. MIRU-VNTRs typing allowed efficient discrimination of the spoligotype-defined clusters, including spoligo-international types (SIT) 53, 34, and 4, into 56 patterns, including 13 clusters and 43 unique patterns. A new SNP at position 311614 was identified in all six isolates to form the biggest MIRU-VNTR cluster, which suggested a recent clonal expansion. This SNP could possibly be used as a genetic marker for robust discriminations of Egyptian MTB isolates belonging to SIT53. The combination of spoligotyping, 12 MIRU-VNTRs loci and MLST provided insight into the genetic diversity and transmission dynamics of the Egyptian MTB genotypes and could be a key to implementation of effective control measures by public health authorities.

  17. [The case of a solitary pulmonary tumor which could be diagnosed as early gastric cancer recurrence by detailed pathological examinations].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shigeya; Sato, Tsutomu; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Ito, Hiroyuki; Nakayama, Haruhiko; Segami, Kenki; Kawabe, Taichi; Aoyama, Toru; Makuuchi, Yousuke; Oshima, Takashi; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Yoshikawa, Takaki

    2014-11-01

    We report the case of a solitary pulmonary tumor, which was diagnosed as recurrent early gastric cancer by detailed pathological examinations. A 59-year old man initially underwent total gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma located at the esophago-gastric junction. A pathological examination indicated a papillary adenocarcinoma (pap ) that had invaded the submucosal layer (sm²), but had not metastasized to the regional lymph nodes (n0). The final diagnosis was P0H0M0T1bN0, Stage IA. Chest computed tomography (CT) 30 months after primary surgery indicated a solitary tumor with a diameter of 9 mm at S3 of the left lung. A positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scan showed an accumulation of ¹⁸F-fluordeoxy-glucose (FDG18) at the same location. Lung cancer was suspected and the patient was given a left upper lobectomy. The resected tumor was diagnosed as gastric cancer metastatic adenocarcinoma by permanent pathological examination. The tumors showed similar histology and immuno histochemical findings for CK7, CK20, TTF-1, SP-A, CDX-2, and HER2 . Early gastric cancer is an almost curable disease and recurrence is very rare. We report the details of this case and review the literature. PMID:25731547

  18. [Pulmonary tuberculosis among residents of municipalities in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, bordering on Paraguay and Bolivia].

    PubMed

    Marques, Marli; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Marques, Ana Maria Campos; Andrade, Sonia Maria Oliveira de; Silva, Baldomero Antonio Kato da; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzed the epidemiological profile of pulmonary tuberculosis from 2007 to 2010 in municipalities (counties) in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil, that border on Paraguay and Bolivia. In the border region, the incidence rate (49.1/100,000 inhabitants), mortality rate (4.0/100,000 inhabitants), and treatment dropout rate (11.3%) were 1.6, 1.8, and 1.5 times higher than in the non-border region. Among indigenous individuals in the border region, the rates for incidence (253.4/100,000 inhabitants), mortality (11.6/100,000 inhabitants), and HIV/TB co-infection (1.9/100,000 inhabitants) were 6.4, 3.2, and 1.9 times higher than in non-indigenous individuals in this region. Living in the border regions was inversely associated with HIV/TB co-infection. Indigenous ethnicity was associated statistically with not abandoning TB treatment. The study concludes that the population residing in these municipalities along the border is exposed to high risk of pulmonary TB and TB mortality and treatment dropout, thus requiring special health surveillance interventions.

  19. Genitourinary and pulmonary multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus).

    PubMed

    Dumonceaux, Genevieve A; St Leger, Judy; Olsen, John H; Burton, Michael S; Ashkin, David; Maslow, Joel N

    2011-12-01

    A female Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) developed vaginal and trunk discharge. Cultures were positive for pan-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Isoniazid and pyrazinamide were given rectally and monitored by serum levels. After being trained at 10 mo to accept oral dosing, treatment was changed and rifampin was added. Oral medications were administered for another 10 mo. A year after completion of therapy, the vaginal discharge increased and cultures yielded M. tuberculosis, resistant to isoniazid and rifampin. Treatment with oral ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and enrofloxacin and intramuscular amikacin was initiated. Although followup cultures became negative, adverse reactions to medications precluded treatment completion. Due to public health concerns related to multidrug resistant M. tuberculosis (MDR-TB), the elephant was euthanized. Postmortem smears from the lung, peribronchial, and abdominal lymph nodes yielded acid-fast bacteria, although cultures were negative. This case highlights important considerations in the treatment of M. tuberculosis in animals and the need for a consistent approach to diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. PMID:22204067

  20. Psychiatric Morbidity and Other Factors Affecting Treatment Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pachi, Argiro; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients. PMID:23691305

  1. Half of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases Were Left Undiagnosed in Prisons of the Tigray Region of Ethiopia: Implications for Tuberculosis Control

    PubMed Central

    Adane, Kelemework; Spigt, Mark; Ferede, Semaw; Asmelash, Tsehaye; Abebe, Markos; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prison settings have been often identified as important but neglected reservoirs for TB. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed pulmonary TB and assess the potential risk factors for such TB cases in prisons of the Tigray region. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2013 and February 2014 in nine prisons. A standardized symptom-based questionnaire was initially used to identify presumptive TB cases. From each, three consecutive sputum samples were collected for acid-fast bacilli (AFB) microscopy and culture. Blood samples were collected from consented participants for HIV testing. Result Out of 809 presumptive TB cases with culture result, 4.0% (95% CI: 2.65–5.35) were confirmed to have undiagnosed TB. The overall estimated point prevalence of undiagnosed TB was found to be 505/100,000 prisoners (95% CI: 360–640). Together with the 27 patients who were already on treatment, the overall estimated point prevalence of TB would be 793/100,000 prisoners (95% CI: 610–970), about four times higher than in the general population. The ratio of active to passive case detection was 1.18:1. The prevalence of HIV was 4.4% (36/809) among presumptive TB cases and 6.3% (2/32) among undiagnosed TB cases. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, chewing Khat (adjusted OR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.02–7.75) and having had a close contact with a TB patient (adjusted OR = 2.18; 95% CI: 1.05–4.51) were found to be predictors of undiagnosed TB among presumptive TB cases. Conclusions This study revealed that at least half of symptomatic pulmonary TB cases in Northern Ethiopian prisons remain undiagnosed and hence untreated. The prevalence of undiagnosed TB in the study prisons was more than two folds higher than in the general population of Tigray. This may indicate the need for more investment and commitment to improving TB case detection in the study prisons. PMID:26914770

  2. [Tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Y

    2000-11-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis in Japan is the highest among developed countries, with approximately 42,000 new cases reported in 1997, marking the first increase in 38 years. The growing incidence among the elderly and group infections among young adults may be responsible for this increase. Infection with tubercle bacilli(TB) occurs via airborne transmission, which involves dissemination of either airborne droplet nuclei on evaporated droplets that may remain suspended in the air for long periods of time. Microorganisms carried in this manner can be dispersed widely by air currents, therefore, special air handling and ventilation are required to prevent airborne transmission. Patients with infectious TB must be placed in a single room with negative pressure and a ventilation rate of 6 or more air changes per hour. Health care workers must wear an N95 mask when entering the room, and if an incident involving possible TB infection occurs in the hospital, the concerned people should be examined for Tuberculin reaction. Two to 12 weeks after the TB infection has occurred, the tuberculin reaction converts to positive. However, most Japanese people have been vaccinated with BCG, so assessment of the results is difficult. A comparison of the diameter of erythema before and after the potential infection may be the most confirmatory. If latent TB infection is suspected, preventive therapy with isoniazid must be considered. Special biohazard systems in the clinical laboratory and autopsy room have also been proposed to prevent TB dispersal. DOTS(Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course) is useful to prevent the emergence of multi-drug-resistant TB. In some areas of Japan that have low levels of compliance with TB therapy, trials of DOTS have been started. PMID:11132556

  3. [Efficiency of the use of peppermint (Mentha piperita L) essential oil inhalations in the combined multi-drug therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Shkurupiĭ, V A; Kazarinova, N V; Ogirenko, A P; Nikonov, S D; Tkachev, A V; Tkachenko, K G

    2002-01-01

    The essential oil of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) has been found to have an in vitro pronounced and equal antimycobacterial effect in doses of 300 and 600 micrograms/ml, respectively. The use of its inhalations (upon 20-min heat evaporation into the room atmosphere for 2 months) as a supplement to combined multidrug therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis has indicated their significantly high positive effect in terms of abacillation (by 26.8 and 58.5% with doses of 0.01 and 0.005 ml/m3, respectively). This was followed by earlier positive X-ray changes in the lung and by attenuation of the intoxication syndrome. The findings suggest that peppermint essential oil may be used in combined multidrug therapy in patients with disseminated and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis.

  4. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8+ T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4+ T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8+ T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8+ T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8+ T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8+ T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8+ T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology. PMID:25363329

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with altered CD8(+) T and natural killer cell function in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella P; Sridhar, Rathinam; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with expanded frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4(+) T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 cells in individuals with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). No data are available on the role of CD8(+) T and natural killer (NK) cells in TB with coincident DM. To identify the role of CD8(+) T and NK cells in pulmonary TB with diabetes, we examined mycobacteria-specific immune responses in the whole blood of individuals with TB and DM (TB-DM) and compared them with those without DM (TB-NDM). We found that TB-DM is characterized by elevated frequencies of mycobacterial antigen-stimulated CD8(+) T cells expressing type 1 [interferon-γ and interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and type 17 (IL-17F) cytokines. We also found that TB-DM is characterized by expanded frequencies of TB antigen-stimulated NK cells expressing type 1 (tumour necrosis factor-α) and type 17 (IL-17A and IL-17F) cytokines. In contrast, CD8(+) T cells were associated with significantly diminished expression of the cytotoxic markers perforin, granzyme B and CD107a both at baseline and following antigen or anti-CD3 stimulation, while NK cells were associated with significantly decreased antigen-stimulated expression of CD107a only. This was not associated with alterations in CD8(+) T-cell or NK cell numbers or subset distribution. Therefore, our data suggest that pulmonary TB complicated with type 2 DM is associated with an altered repertoire of cytokine-producing and cytotoxic molecule-expressing CD8(+) T and NK cells, possibly contributing to increased pathology.

  6. The effect of HIV and antiretroviral therapy on characteristics of pulmonary tuberculosis in northern Malawi: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection reduces the likelihood that individuals with pulmonary tuberculosis are smear positive and that they have cavitatory disease. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) may shift the pattern of disease to be more similar to that of HIV negative patients. This would aid diagnosis- which often depends on sputum smears – but would also increase infectiousness. We assessed the effect of HIV and ART on smear positivity and cavitatory disease in laboratory-confirmed pulmonary TB patients. Methods Three sputum samples were collected per pulmonary TB suspect and were examined using microscopy and culture. Chest radiographs were available for a subset of patients as part of another study. The effect of HIV and ART status on sputum smear positivity and lung cavitation were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Results Of 1024 laboratory-confirmed pulmonary TB patients who were identified between January 2005 and December 2011, 766 had HIV and ART status available. Positive sputum smears were significantly more common among HIV negative individuals than HIV positive individuals (adjusted OR = 2.91, 95% CI 1.53 – 5.55). Compared to those HIV positive but not on ART, patients on ART were more likely to be smear positive (adjusted OR = 2.33, 95% CI 1.01 – 5.39) if they had been on ART ≤ 6 months, but only slightly more likely to be smear positive (adjusted OR = 1.43, 95% CI 0.68 – 2.99) if they were on ART > 6 months. HIV negative patients were more likely than HIV positive patients to have cavitatory disease (adjusted OR = 1.97, 95% CI 1.20 – 3.23). Patients on ART > 6 months had a slight increase in cavitatory disease compared to HIV positive patients not on ART (adjusted OR = 1.68, CI 0.78 – 3.63). Conclusions HIV infection is associated with less smear positivity and cavitation in pulmonary TB patients. Among HIV positive patients, the use of ART shifts the presentation of disease towards that seen in HIV

  7. The mechanism by which the phenothiazine thioridazine contributes to cure problematic drug-resistant forms of pulmonary tuberculosis: recent patents for "new use".

    PubMed

    Amaral, Leonard; Martins, Ana; Spengler, Gabriella; Hunyadi, Attila; Molnar, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    At this moment, over half million patients suffer from multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) according to the data from the WHO. A large majority is terminally ill with essentially incurable pulmonary tuberculosis. This herein mini-review provides the experimental and observational evidence that a specific phenothiazine, thioridazine, will contribute to cure any form of drug-resistant tuberculosis. This antipsychotic agent is no longer under patent protection for its initial use. The reader is informed on the recent developments in patenting this compound for "new use" with a special emphasis on the aspects of drug-resistance. Given that economic motivation can stimulate the use of this drug as an antitubercular agent, future prospects are also discussed. PMID:24320229

  8. Dietary Vitamin D3 Suppresses Pulmonary Immunopathology Associated with Late-Stage Tuberculosis in C3HeB/FeJ Mice.

    PubMed

    Reeme, Allison E; Robinson, Richard T

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a significant human disease caused by inhalation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Left untreated, TB mortality is associated with a failure to resolve pulmonary immunopathology. There is currently widespread interest in using vitamin D3 (VitD3) as an adjunct therapy for TB because numerous in vitro studies have shown that VitD3 has direct and indirect mycobactericidal activities. However, to date, there have been no in vivo studies addressing whether VitD3 affects experimental TB outcome. In this study, we used C3HeB/FeJ mice to determine whether dietary VitD3 influences the outcome of experimental TB. We observed that although M. tuberculosis burdens did not differ between mice on a VitD3-replete diet (VitD(HI) mice) and mice on a VitD3-deficient diet (VitD(LO) mice), the inflammatory response in VitD(HI) mice was significantly attenuated relative to VitD(LO) controls. Specifically, the expression of multiple inflammatory pathways was reduced in the lungs at later disease stages as were splenocyte IL12/23p40 and IFN-γ levels following ex vivo restimulation. Dietary VitD3 also suppressed the accumulation of T cells in the mediastinal lymph nodes and lung granulomatous regions while concomitantly accelerating the accumulation of F4/80(+) and Ly6C/Ly6G(+) lineages. The altered inflammatory profile of VitD(HI) mice also associated with reductions in pulmonary immunopathology. VitD receptor-deficient (vdr(-/-)) radiation bone marrow chimeras demonstrate that reductions in pulmonary TB immunopathology are dependent on hematopoietic VitD responsiveness. Collectively, our data support a model wherein the in vivo role of VitD3 during TB is not to promote M. tuberculosis killing but rather to function through hematopoietic cells to reduce M. tuberculosis-elicited immunopathology. PMID:26729807

  9. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Vallada, Marcelo Genofre; Okay, Thelma Suely; Del Negro, Gilda Maria B.; Antonio, Claudio Amaral; Yamamoto, Lidia; Ramos, Sonia Regina T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube) for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6%) were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months). In this group, 177 children (96.2%) had negative test results, six (3.2%) had indeterminate results, and one (0.5%) had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18%) had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001), disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4). The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2) and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8). Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population. PMID:24676183

  10. S100A12 is up-regulated in pulmonary tuberculosis and predicts the extent of alveolar infiltration on chest radiography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal-Almanza, Luis C.; Goyal, Surabhi; Hussain, Abid; Klassert, Tilman E.; Driesch, Dominik; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Sumanlatha, Gadamm; Ahmed, Niyaz; Valluri, Vijayalakshmi; Conrad, Melanie L.; Dittrich, Nickel; Schumann, Ralf R.; Lala, Birgit; Slevogt, Hortense

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) results in lung functional impairment and there are no surrogate markers to monitor the extent of lung involvement. We investigated the clinical significance of S100A12 and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) for predicting the extent of lung involvement. We performed an observational study in India with 119 newly diagnosed, treatment naïve, sputum smear positive, HIV-negative PTB patients and 163 healthy controls. All patients were followed-up for six months. Sociodemographic variables and the serum levels of S100A12, sRAGE, esRAGE, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and CRP were measured. Lung involvement in PTB patients was assessed by chest radiography. Compared with healthy controls, PTB patients had increased serum concentrations of S100A12 while sRAGE was decreased. S100A12 was an independent predictor of disease occurrence (OR 1.873, 95%CI 1.212–2.891, p = 0.004). Under DOTS therapy, S100A12 decreased significantly after 4 months whereas CRP significantly decreased after 2 months (p < 0.0001). Importantly, although CRP was also an independent predictor of disease occurrence, only S100A12 was a significant predictor of lung alveolar infiltration (OR 2.60, 95%CI 1.35–5.00, p = 0.004). These results suggest that S100A12 has the potential to assess the extent of alveolar infiltration in PTB. PMID:27539060

  11. S100A12 is up-regulated in pulmonary tuberculosis and predicts the extent of alveolar infiltration on chest radiography: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Berrocal-Almanza, Luis C; Goyal, Surabhi; Hussain, Abid; Klassert, Tilman E; Driesch, Dominik; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Sumanlatha, Gadamm; Ahmed, Niyaz; Valluri, Vijayalakshmi; Conrad, Melanie L; Dittrich, Nickel; Schumann, Ralf R; Lala, Birgit; Slevogt, Hortense

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) results in lung functional impairment and there are no surrogate markers to monitor the extent of lung involvement. We investigated the clinical significance of S100A12 and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (sRAGE) for predicting the extent of lung involvement. We performed an observational study in India with 119 newly diagnosed, treatment naïve, sputum smear positive, HIV-negative PTB patients and 163 healthy controls. All patients were followed-up for six months. Sociodemographic variables and the serum levels of S100A12, sRAGE, esRAGE, HMGB-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and CRP were measured. Lung involvement in PTB patients was assessed by chest radiography. Compared with healthy controls, PTB patients had increased serum concentrations of S100A12 while sRAGE was decreased. S100A12 was an independent predictor of disease occurrence (OR 1.873, 95%CI 1.212-2.891, p = 0.004). Under DOTS therapy, S100A12 decreased significantly after 4 months whereas CRP significantly decreased after 2 months (p < 0.0001). Importantly, although CRP was also an independent predictor of disease occurrence, only S100A12 was a significant predictor of lung alveolar infiltration (OR 2.60, 95%CI 1.35-5.00, p = 0.004). These results suggest that S100A12 has the potential to assess the extent of alveolar infiltration in PTB. PMID:27539060

  12. Evaluation of the semiautomated Abbott LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis assay for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausina, V; Gamboa, F; Gazapo, E; Manterola, J M; Lonca, J; Matas, L; Manzano, J R; Rodrigo, C; Cardona, P J; Padilla, E

    1997-01-01

    Five hundred twenty processed respiratory specimens from 326 patients received for the diagnosis of tuberculosis or other mycobacterial infections were tested by means of the LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay from Abbott Laboratories, which uses ligase chain reaction technology for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. The results of the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were compared with the results of culture and staining techniques. After a combination of culture results and the patient's clinical data, a total of 195 specimens were collected from 110 patients who were positively diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-three of these 195 specimens which corresponded to 10 patients with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and anti-TB treatment ranging from 1 to 6 months were culture negative. The other 172 specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis. With an overall positivity rate of 37.5% (195 of 520 specimens), the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 90.8, 100, 100, and 94.7%, respectively, for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay; 88.2, 100, 100, and 93.4%, respectively, for culture; and 82.6, 92, 72.9, and 97.6%, respectively, for acid-fast staining. For 161 specimens (82.6%) from patients smear positive for the disease and 34 specimens (17.4%) from patients smear negative for the disease, the sensitivity values for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were 98.8 and 53%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivities and specificities between the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay and culture (P > 0.05). Conclusively, the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay has proved to have an acceptable sensitivity and a high specificity in detecting M. tuberculosis and has the potential of reducing the diagnosis time to an 8-h working day. PMID:9230369

  13. The Effectiveness and Safety of Fluoroquinolone-Containing Regimen as a First-Line Treatment for Drug-Sensitive Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jung Kyu; Kim, Eunyoung; Yim, Jae-Joon; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolone is recommended as a pivotal antituberculous agent for treating multi-drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis. However, its effectiveness as first-line treatment remains controversial. The present study was conducted to validate the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen for drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials until June 5, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared antituberculous regimens containing fluoroquinolone with the standard regimen were included. Results Eleven RCTs that included 6,334 patients were selected. Fluoroquinolone-containing regimens had a higher rate of sputum culture conversion at 2 months of treatment (M-H fixed odds ratio [OR], 1.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.54). However, the outcomes were less favorable (M-H fixed OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.59–0.82) and the associated total adverse events were more frequent (M-H fixed OR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.46–2.31) in the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen group, without a significant heterogeneity according to treatment duration. Treatment with the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen for 4 months showed a higher relapse rate. Conclusions Despite a higher culture conversion rate at 2 months of treatment, the fluoroquinolone-containing regimen had limitations, including less favorable outcomes and more adverse events, as the first-line therapy for drug-sensitive pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:27455053

  14. Characteristics of the Vδ2 CDR3 Sequence of Peripheral γδ T Cells in Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Identification of a New Tuberculosis-Related Antigen Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Ma, Fei; Wang, Zhaohua

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific γδ T cells may play an important role in the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, little is known about the characteristics of the length distribution of the δ2-chain complementarity determining region 3 (δ2 CDR3) of the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR) in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) on a large scale. In addition, M. tuberculosis-activated γδ T cells potentially inhibit intracellular mycobacterial growth, but phosphoantigen-activated γδ T cells do not. Only a few M. tuberculosis-related antigen peptides or proteins that are recognized by γδ TCR have been identified. Twenty-four healthy donors (HDs) and 27 TB patients were included in the present study. The gene-scanning technique found that the δ2 CDR3 length distribution patterns of γδ TCR in TB patients were perturbed, and each pattern included different predominant CDR3 sequences. The predominant δ2 CDR3 sequences of γδ TCRs, which originated from TB patients and HD γδ T cells that were stimulated by M. tuberculosis heat resistance antigen (Mtb-HAg), were used as probes to screen peptides recognized by γδ TCR using a phage display library. We identified four peptides that bound to the predominant δ2 CDR3 fragments and showed homology to M. tuberculosis genes in a BLAST search. Notably, one peptide was related to M. tuberculosis H37Rv (QHIPKPP), and this fragment was confirmed as a ligand for the γδ TCR. Two fragments, Ag1 and Ag2, activated γδ T cells from HD or TB patients. In summary, the δ2 CDR3 lineage of TB patients apparently drifts, and the predominant δ2 CDR3 sequence that recognizes M. tuberculosis may exhibit specificity. The identified M. tuberculosis-related antigen peptides may be used as vaccines or adjuvants for protective immunity against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25947144

  15. Neutrophils from pulmonary tuberculosis patients show augmented levels of chemokines MIP-1α, IL-8 and MCP-1 which further increase upon in vitro infection with mycobacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Hilda, J Nancy; Narasimhan, Meenakshi; Das, Sulochana D

    2014-08-01

    Neutrophils being innate cells initiate the immune defence against mycobacteria by sending signals to other immune cells. Chemokines being the vital link in signaling processes, it is of interest to study their secretion by neutrophils as a response to tuberculosis infection. The levels of various chemokines (MIP-1α, MCP-1, IL-8 and IP-10) and chemokine receptors (CXCR1, CXCR2 and CCR1) in neutrophils from healthy individuals and pulmonary tuberculosis patients were studied following infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains (clinical--S7 and S10 and laboratory--H37Rv). The release of MIP-1α, IL-8 and MCP-1 is found to be greatly increased in patient neutrophils. Mycobacterial strains differentially influenced neutrophils affecting the release of chemokines to different extent. H37Rv significantly increased the release of MIP-1α and IL-8 in both normals and tuberculosis patients, while S10 up regulated only the release of MIP-1α in patients. Thus, during tuberculosis, neutrophils undergo functional alteration to combat infection. While H37Rv is greatly recognized by neutrophils and triggers the release of chemokines, clinical strains by some means try to suppress immune activation of neutrophils in their favor.

  16. Serum complement C4b, fibronectin, and prolidase are associated with the pathological changes of pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection can activate the immune system, leading to characteristic pathological changes such as inflammatory granuloma, caseous necrosis, and cavity formation. Methods Clinical data of 187 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) were analyzed using statistical methods, while serum levels of complement C4b (C4b), fibronectin (FN), and prolidase (PEPD) were detected using the ELISA method among the control, minimal PTB, moderate PTB, and advanced PTB groups. Results We found significantly higher levels of serum C4b and PEPD (P = 0.018, P = 0.003), and significantly lower levels of serum FN (P < 0.001) in PTB patients. Furthermore, the serum levels of 3 proteins were significantly different among 3 PTB groups. FN level was significantly higher in the moderate PTB group, compared with patients in the minimal and advanced PTB groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). PEPD level was significantly higher in the moderate PTB group, compared with the minimal PTB group (P < 0.05). Analysis of clinical data showed that serum albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), prealbumin, and C4 were significantly higher (P < 0.05), while serum globulin was significantly lower in patients with PTB (P < 0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between C4b and albumin, prealbumin. On the other hand, a significant positive correlation was found between C4b and globulin, CRP, PEPD, as well as between PEPD and CRP (P < 0.05). Conclusions Our study showed that C4b, FN, and PEPD are associated with tissue damage, granuloma formation, and cavity formation, respectively, in patients with PTB. The present study provides a new experimental basis to understand the pathogenesis and pathological changes of PTB. PMID:24484408

  17. Factors influencing development and mortality of acute respiratory failure in hospitalized patient with active pulmonary tuberculosis: a 10-year retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Maneenil, Kunlatida

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis with acute respiratory failure is fatal and is a burden in the intensive care units and leads to mortality. This retrospective study identifies the factors influencing the development of pulmonary tuberculosis requiring mechanical ventilation (TBMV) and mortality in the hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods The medical records of hospitalized adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were retrospectively reviewed. Demographic data, clinical presentations, radiographic findings, biochemical tests, and clinical outcomes were collected. Data were compared by Student’s t-test and Chi-square test between groups. Select variables that were statistically significant with P values <0.1 were introduced into a forward, stepwise, logistic regression model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) identified the independent influencing factors in the development of TBMV and mortality. Results Of 268 enrolled patients, 185 (69.0%) were male. The patients were equally divided between the TBMV and non-TBMV groups. The shorter duration of illness (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.98–0.99), underlying disease of AIDS (OR, 14.55; 95% CI, 1.71–123.91), presentation of fever (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.20–3.71) and dyspnea (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 2.02–6.11), large amount of acid fast bacilli on sputum smear (OR, 3.76; 95% CI, 1.90–7.47), lower serum albumin level (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.26–0.59), and delayed initiation of anti-tuberculosis agents (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.00–1.12) were independent factors to develop TBMV. Male gender (OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.01–4.61), consolidation pattern on chest X-ray (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.17–4.98), and lower serum albumin (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.21–0.71) were correlated to mortality. Conclusions The incidence and mortality rate of TBMV patients were high. Acute tuberculous pneumonia, underlying disease of AIDS, amount of acid fast bacilli, and delayed administration of anti-tuberculosis agents

  18. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis See also: Aspergillosis Symptoms You may not have ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Update Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin ...

  19. Intestinal parasite co-infection among pulmonary tuberculosis cases without human immunodeficiency virus infection in a rural county in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47-6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17-5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03-10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  20. Intestinal Parasite Co-infection among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Cases without Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in a Rural County in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of co-infection with tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites in humans have not been extensively investigated in China. A cross-section study was conducted in a rural county of Henan Province, China. Pulmonary TB (PTB) case-patients receiving treatment for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and healthy controls matched for geographic area, age, and sex were surveyed by using questionnaires. Fecal and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal parasites, routine blood examination, and infection with human immunodeficiency virus. The chi-square test was used for univariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. A total of 369 persons with PTB and 366 healthy controls were included; all participants were negative for human immunodeficiency virus. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in persons with PTB was 14.9%, including intestinal protozoa (7.9%) and helminthes (7.6%). The infection spectrum of intestinal parasites was Entamoeba spp. (1.4%), Blastocystis hominis (6.2%), Trichomonas hominis (0.3%), Clonorchis sinensis (0.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.5%), Trichuris trichiura (2.2%), and hookworm (4.6%). The prevalence of intestinal parasites showed no significant difference between persons with PTB and healthy controls after adjusting for potential confounding factors. There was no factor that affected infection rates for intestinal parasites between the two groups. Infection with intestinal parasites of persons with PTB was associated with female sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01–4.17), body mass index ≤ 19 (AOR = 3.02, 95% CI = 1.47–6.20), and anemia (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 1.17–5.03). Infection of healthy controls was only associated with an annual labor time in farmlands > 2 months (AOR = 4.50, 95% CI = 2.03–10.00). In addition, there was no significant trend between rates of infection with

  1. Pulmonary blood volume indexed to lung volume is reduced in newly diagnosed systemic sclerosis compared to normals – a prospective clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance study addressing pulmonary vascular changes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary involvement, manifested as pulmonary arterial hypertension or pulmonary fibrosis, is the most common cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). We aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting early pulmonary involvement in SSc using recently developed non-invasive quantitative measures of pulmonary physiology using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods Twenty-seven SSc patients (9 men, 57 ± 13 years) and 10 healthy controls (3 men, 54 ± 9 years) underwent CMR to determine the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and the PBV variation (PBVV) throughout the cardiac cycle. Patients underwent Doppler echocardiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), and pulmonary function testing by spirometry. Comparisons were performed using the unpaired t-test and linear regression analysis was performed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r). Results Compared to healthy controls, the PBV indexed to lung volume (PBVI) was lower in patients (16 ± 4 vs 20 ± 5%, p < 0.05). There was no difference in PBV (466 ± 87 vs 471 ± 122 mL, p = 0.91) or PBVV/stroke volume (45 ± 10 vs 40 ± 6%, p = 0.09). There were no significant correlations between PBVI and pulmonary artery pressure estimated by Doppler (p = 0.08) the lung’s diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) (p = 0.09), vital capacity (p = 0.45), or pulmonary fibrosis by HRCT (p = 0.74). Conclusions This study is the first to measure the PBV in humans using CMR. Compared to healthy controls, newly diagnosed SSc patients have a reduced amount of blood in the pulmonary vasculature (PBVI) but unchanged pulmonary vascular distensibility (PBVV/stroke volume). PBVI is unrelated to DLCO, pulmonary artery pressure, vital capacity, and the presence of pulmonary fibrosis. PBVI may be a novel parameter reflecting vascular lung involvement in early-stage SSc, and these findings may be consistent with pathophysiological changes of

  2. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  3. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as fever with massive splenomegaly and pancytopenia.

    PubMed

    Chandni R; Rajan G; Udayabhaskaran V

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated tuberculosis is an important differential diagnosis for fever of unknown origin (FUO) and it can present with hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy and may have meningitis and with hematological abnormalities including pancytopenia or a leukemoid reaction. We report the case of a 13-year old male who presented with fever, weight loss, pallor and massive splenomegaly with pancytopenia, in whom a bone marrow trephine biopsy showed caseating granulomata, who responded well to antituberculous treatment and has remained healthy on follow up after nine years. PMID:27051579

  4. Highest prevalence of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype isolates in patients newly diagnosed with tuberculosis in the Novosibirsk oblast, Russian Federation.

    PubMed

    Dymova, M A; Kinsht, V N; Cherednichenko, A G; Khrapov, E A; Svistelnik, A V; Filipenko, M L

    2011-07-01

    In order to assess the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Novosibirsk Region and determine profiles of resistance, 106 M. tuberculosis isolates were analysed. Fifty (47 %) isolates were identified using variable number tandem repeat typing as being in the Beijing family, of which eight (16 %) were type M2 isolates with the genetic profile 233325153533424 and eight (16 %) were type M11 isolates with the genetic profile 233325173533424, both of which are widespread in Russia. Mutations associated with resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin were identified. Of 48 isolates with resistance to isoniazid, 42 (87.5 %) contained a Ser(315)→Thr substitution in the katG gene and one contained a T→A substitution at position -34 of the promoter region of the ahpC gene. Of 31 isolates with resistance to rifampicin, 19 (61 %) each contained a mutation (TCG→TTG) at codon 531 of the rpoB gene. Two isolates each contained a mutation (GAC→GTC) at codon 516 of the rpoB gene and two others each contained a substitution at codon 526 of the rpoB gene, leading to a His→Asn substitution in one case and a His→Asp substitution in another case. One isolate contained a mutation (CTG→CCG) at codon 533 of the rpoB gene. An association between the Beijing genotype and multidrug resistance was demonstrated (R = 0.2, P = 0.032). However, it was interesting to note that a significant proportion (46 %) of isolates were sensitive to all drugs tested. PMID:21436372

  5. Nutritional status of adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in rural central India and its association with mortality.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Anurag; Chatterjee, Madhuri; Jain, Yogesh; Chatterjee, Biswaroop; Kataria, Anju; Bhargava, Madhavi; Kataria, Raman; D'Souza, Ravi; Jain, Rachna; Benedetti, Andrea; Pai, Madhukar; Menzies, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Under-nutrition is a known risk factor for TB and can adversely affect treatment outcomes. However, data from India are sparse, despite the high burden of TB as well as malnutrition in India. We assessed the nutritional status at the time of diagnosis and completion of therapy, and its association with deaths during TB treatment, in a consecutive cohort of 1695 adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in rural India during 2004 - 2009.Multivariable logistic regression was used to obtain adjusted estimates of the association of nutritional status with deaths during treatment. At the time of diagnosis, median BMI and body weights were 16.0 kg/m(2)and 42.1 kg in men, and 15.0 kg/m(2)and 34.1 kg in women, indicating that 80% of women and 67% of men had moderate to severe under-nutrition (BMI<17.0 kg/m(2)). Fifty two percent of the patients (57% of men and 48% of women) had stunting indicating chronic under-nutrition. Half of women and one third of men remained moderately to severely underweight at the end of treatment. 60 deaths occurred in 1179 patients (5%) in whom treatment was initiated. Severe under-nutrition at diagnosis was associated with a 2 fold higher risk of death. Overall, a majority of patients had evidence of chronic severe under-nutrition at diagnosis, which persisted even after successful treatment in a significant proportion of them. These findings suggest the need for nutritional support during treatment of pulmonary TB in this rural population.

  6. Comparative study of clinico-bacterio-radiological profile and treatment outcome of smokers and nonsmokers suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Deepti; Arora, Piyush; Meena, Manoj; Sarin, Rohit; Chakraborty, Pitambar; Jaiswal, Anand; Goyal, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death and disease worldwide. Tobacco smoking has been linked as a risk factor for TB. This study was aimed to affirm the strength of association between smoking and pulmonary TB. Materials and Methods: Pulmonary TB patients aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled and followed-up until treatment completion. Two consecutive sputum smears were examined from each patient for the presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) using Ziehl–Neelsen technique. Radiological severity of disease was assessed using guidelines of National TB Association of USA. Sputum smears for AFB were graded for positivity as per WHO Revised National TB Control Programme criteria. Response was determined in terms of sputum conversion at the end of intensive phase and final treatment outcomes. Results: Sputum smear grading of 3+ increased from 12.5% to 68.18% and 66.66% as smoking index increased from <100 to 100–299 and >300 (P < 0.05). In nonsmokers, 79.2% patients had minimal disease while only 4.2% had advanced disease as compared to smokers where 52.4% had moderate disease, 26.2% advanced disease, and 21.4% minimal disease (P < 0.01). Smokers had significantly lower treatment success rate (69%) as against nonsmokers and former smokers (93.8% and 90.9%, respectively, P = 0.001) owing to a higher default rate among smokers (28.5%) than nonsmokers (6.3%) and former smokers (9.1%). Conclusion: Smokers during initial presentation, as well as at end of the treatment demonstrate more radiological findings, cavitary disease, and worse sputum AFB smear grading. Smokers also have a poorer treatment success rate largely due to high percentage of default rate thus suggesting noncompliance as a main confounder to treatment success. Focus needs to be made to reduce defaulters which are more common among smokers.

  7. Comparative study of clinico-bacterio-radiological profile and treatment outcome of smokers and nonsmokers suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Deepti; Arora, Piyush; Meena, Manoj; Sarin, Rohit; Chakraborty, Pitambar; Jaiswal, Anand; Goyal, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the leading causes of death and disease worldwide. Tobacco smoking has been linked as a risk factor for TB. This study was aimed to affirm the strength of association between smoking and pulmonary TB. Materials and Methods: Pulmonary TB patients aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled and followed-up until treatment completion. Two consecutive sputum smears were examined from each patient for the presence of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) using Ziehl–Neelsen technique. Radiological severity of disease was assessed using guidelines of National TB Association of USA. Sputum smears for AFB were graded for positivity as per WHO Revised National TB Control Programme criteria. Response was determined in terms of sputum conversion at the end of intensive phase and final treatment outcomes. Results: Sputum smear grading of 3+ increased from 12.5% to 68.18% and 66.66% as smoking index increased from <100 to 100–299 and >300 (P < 0.05). In nonsmokers, 79.2% patients had minimal disease while only 4.2% had advanced disease as compared to smokers where 52.4% had moderate disease, 26.2% advanced disease, and 21.4% minimal disease (P < 0.01). Smokers had significantly lower treatment success rate (69%) as against nonsmokers and former smokers (93.8% and 90.9%, respectively, P = 0.001) owing to a higher default rate among smokers (28.5%) than nonsmokers (6.3%) and former smokers (9.1%). Conclusion: Smokers during initial presentation, as well as at end of the treatment demonstrate more radiological findings, cavitary disease, and worse sputum AFB smear grading. Smokers also have a poorer treatment success rate largely due to high percentage of default rate thus suggesting noncompliance as a main confounder to treatment success. Focus needs to be made to reduce defaulters which are more common among smokers. PMID:27625444

  8. Prevalence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Prison Inmates in Ethiopia, a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Solomon; Haileamlak, Abraham; Wieser, Andreas; Pritsch, Michael; Heinrich, Norbert; Loscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Rachow, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Setting Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the major health problems in prisons. Objective This study was done to assess the prevalence and determinants of active tuberculosis in Ethiopian prisons. Design A cross-sectional study was conducted from January 2013 to December 2013 in 13 zonal prisons. All incarcerated inmates underwent TB symptom screening according to WHO criteria. From identified TB-suspects two sputum samples were analyzed using smear microscopy and solid culture. A standardized questionnaire assessing TB risk factors was completed for each TB suspect. Results 765 (4.9%) TB suspects were identified among 15,495 inmates. 51 suspects were already on anti-TB treatment (6.67%) and 20 (2.8%) new culture-confirmed TB cases were identified in the study, resulting in an overall TB prevalence of 458.1/100,000 (95%CI: 350-560/100,000). Risk factors for active TB were alcohol consumption, contact with a TB case before incarceration and no window in prison cell. HIV prevalence was not different between TB suspects and active TB cases. Further, the TB burden in prisons increased with advancing distance from the capital Addis Ababa. Conclusions The overall TB prevalence in Ethiopian prisons was high and extremely variable among different prisons. TB risk factors related to conditions of prison facilities and the impact of implemented TB control measures need to be further studied in order to improve TB control among inmates. PMID:26641654

  9. Cerebral aspergillosis and pulmonary tuberculosis in a child with chronic granulomatous disease

    PubMed Central

    Waqas, Muhammed; Zafar, Sidra; Rehman, Tooba; Riyaz, Muhammed; Bari, Muhammed E.; Idrees, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an immune disorder that affects phagocytes. It is characterized by recurrent or persistent bacterial and fungal infections. Reports of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with CGD are rare. In developing countries, where TB is endemic, possibility of other chronic infections is often overlooked by physicians. Case Description: We report the case of a 4-year-old boy who had recurrent respiratory infections and episodes of headache. He was put on antituberculosis (ATT) drugs without microbiological or pathological evidence 2 months prior to presentation. The child did not improve and was brought to our hospital where a computed tomography scan revealed multiple cerebral abscesses. These abscesses were excised. The microbiological specimen was determined to be positive for Aspergillus fumigatus. His tracheal aspirate was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis polymerase chain reaction assay. Further work-up confirmed the diagnosis of CGD in the child. Conclusion: This report describes the course of the patient's illness in order to highlight the challenges associated with the management of these infections. We also aim to stress on the importance of pathological diagnosis before starting a therapy. PMID:27308089

  10. Microscopical and immunological features of tuberculoid granulomata and cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis in naturally infected goats.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Tomás, L; Ortega, N; Buendía, A J; del Rio, L; Salinas, J; Bezos, J; Caro, M R; Navarro, J A

    2011-01-01

    Caprine tuberculosis is caused by bacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae). Although typical tuberculoid granulomata are usually observed in the lungs and lymph nodes of infected goats, the presence of cavitary lesions with exuberant mycobacterial growth is also a common feature in this species. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunological mechanisms that lead to liquefaction and cavity formation by comparing granulomata and cavitary lesions. Samples from animals positive by skin testing were collected for microscopical and immunohistochemical examination. Samples were also collected for analysis of cytokine gene expression in the lesions by real time polymerase chain reaction. There were marked differences between granulomata and cavitary lesions. In cavitary lesions there was a substantial population of neutrophils and a significant decrease in the number of CD4(+) T cells, with concomitant increases in other T-cell populations (CD8(+) and cells expressing the γδ form of the T-cell receptor). The enzyme iNOS was strongly expressed by macrophages in the cavitary lesions. There was no difference in the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in the lesions. These findings suggest that cavitary lesions are reactivation sites, where conditions are optimal for Mycobacterium proliferation and that immunological mechanisms may underlie the severe destruction of lung tissue that characterizes the cavitary pathology.

  11. Lesion-Specific Immune Response in Granulomas of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Subbian, Selvakumar; Tsenova, Liana; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Wainwright, Helen C.; Visser, Annalie; Bandyopadhyay, Nirmalya; Bader, Joel S.; Karakousis, Petros C.; Murrmann, Gabriele B.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Russell, David G.; Kaplan, Gilla

    2015-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of granulomas is central to the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. It is widely accepted that the lungs of patients with tuberculosis (TB) usually contain multiple infection foci, and that the granulomas evolve and differentiate independently, resulting in considerable heterogeneity. Although gene expression profiles of human blood cells have been proposed as biomarkers of Mtb infection and/or active disease, the immune profiles of discrete lesion types has not been studied extensively. Using histology, immunopathology and genome-wide transcriptome analysis, we explored the immunological profile of human lung TB granulomas. We show that although the different granulomas share core similarities in their immunological/inflammatory characteristics, they also exhibit significant divergence. Despite similar numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the different lesions, the extent of immune reactivity, as determined by the density of CD3+ T cells in the macrophage rich areas, and the extent of fibrosis, shows considerable variation. Both quantitative and qualitative differences among significantly differentially expressed genes (SDEG) were noted in each of the lesion types studied. Further, network/pathway analysis of SDEG revealed differential regulation of inflammatory response, immune cell trafficking, and cell mediated immune response in the different lesions. Our data highlight the formidable challenges facing ongoing efforts to identify peripheral blood biomarkers due to the diversity of lesion types and complexity of local immune responses in the lung. PMID:26133981

  12. The relationship between perceived discrimination and psychological distress among Chinese pulmonary tuberculosis patients: the moderating role of self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Feng, Danjun; Xu, Lingzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study described the prevalence of psychological distress and examined the moderating effect of self-esteem in the relationship between perceived discrimination and psychological distress among Chinese pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) patients. Seven hundred and twenty patients with TB from three cities of Shandong Province in eastern China participated in a cross-sectional survey. Patients were measured with the Kessler 10 (K10), the Rosenberg self-esteem scale, and a self-developed perceived discrimination questionnaire. A total of 58.6% of patients with TB scored above 16 on the K10, indicating moderate and serious psychological distress. Chi-square test revealed that female patients reported higher psychological distress than male patients. The structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis among the whole sample indicated that perceived discrimination was significantly related with psychological distress (β = .28, p ≤ .01). The multiple group analysis of SEM showed that perceived discrimination had a significantly substantial (β = .50, p ≤ .001), significantly moderate (β = .15, p ≤ .01), and insignificant effect (β = .05, p ≥ .05) on psychological distress among low self-esteem, moderate self-esteem, and high self-esteem patients with TB, respectively, which verified the moderating effect of self-esteem in the relationship between perceived discrimination and psychological distress.

  13. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  14. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  15. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahidjo, Bintou A.; Maiga, Mariama C.; Ihms, Elizabeth A.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Cheung, Laurene S.; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B.; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone’s antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings. PMID:27699232

  16. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I. D.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Roldan, A.; Heldal, E.; Enarson, D. A.; Zhang, L-X.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low. PMID:27695680

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis space-time clustering and spatial variation in temporal trends in Portugal, 2000-2010: an updated analysis.

    PubMed

    Areias, C; Briz, T; Nunes, C

    2015-11-01

    Portugal, a medium- to low-level endemic country (21·6 cases/100 000 population in 2012), has one of the highest European Union tuberculosis (TB) incidences. Although incidence is declining progressively, the country's heterogeneity in both regional endemics and their evolution suggests the importance of a better understanding of subnational epidemiology to customize TB control efforts. We aimed to update knowledge on municipality-years pulmonary TB incidence clustering, identify areas with different time trends, and show the potential of combining complementary clustering methods in control of infectious diseases. We used national surveillance municipality-level data (mainland Portugal, 2000-2010). Space-time clustering and spatial variation in temporal trends methods were applied. Space-time critical clusters identified (P < 0·001) were still the Lisbon and Oporto regions. The global incidence declined at a 5·81% mean annual percentage change, with high space-time heterogeneity and distinct time trend clusters (P < 0·001). Municipalities with incidences declining more rapidly belonged to critical areas. In particular, the Oporto trend cluster had a consistent -8·98% mean annual percentage change. Large space-time heterogeneities were identified, with critical incidences in the greater Lisbon and Oporto regions, but declining more rapidly in these regions. Oporto showed a consistent, steeper decrease and could represent a good example of local control strategy. Combining results from these approaches gives promise for prospects for infectious disease control and the design of more effective, focused interventions.

  18. A review of Vitamin D effects on common respiratory diseases: Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Mohammad Esmaeil; Modarresi-Ghazani, Faezeh; Entezari-Maleki, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Despite the classic role of Vitamin D in skeletal health, new aspects of Vitamin D have been discovered in tissues and organs other than bones. Epidemiological and observational studies demonstrate a link between Vitamin D deficiency and risk of developing respiratory diseases including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and tuberculosis (TB). To review the literature, we searched the terms "Vitamin D" (using the set operator) and "asthma," "COPD" and "TB" in electronic databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar until July 2015. Non-English articles or articles with unavailable full text were excluded. Both in vivo and in vitro studies were included. All the reviewed articles state that Vitamin D deficiency is very common among patients with respiratory diseases. The present data regarding Vitamin D and asthma is still controversial, but data about COPD and TB are more encouraging. The relevant studies have been conducted in different populations therefore it is not particularly possible to compare the data due to genetic variations. In order to point out a role for Vitamin D, large clinical trials with Vitamin D deficient subjects and sufficient Vitamin D supplementation are needed.

  19. The antifibrotic drug pirfenidone promotes pulmonary cavitation and drug resistance in a mouse model of chronic tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahidjo, Bintou A.; Maiga, Mariama C.; Ihms, Elizabeth A.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Cheung, Laurene S.; Beck, Sarah; Andrade, Bruno B.; Jain, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Pirfenidone is a recently approved antifibrotic drug for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Because tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by granulomatous inflammation in conjunction with parenchymal destruction and replacement fibrosis, we sought to determine whether the addition of pirfenidone as an adjunctive, host-directed therapy provides a beneficial effect during antimicrobial treatment of TB. We hypothesized that pirfenidone’s antiinflammatory and antifibrotic properties would reduce inflammatory lung damage and increase antimicrobial drug penetration in granulomas to accelerate treatment response. The effectiveness of adjunctive pirfenidone during TB drug therapy was evaluated using a murine model of chronic TB. Mice treated with standard therapy 2HRZ/4HR (H, isoniazid; R, rifampin; and Z, pyrazinamide) were compared with 2 alternative regimens containing pirfenidone (Pf) (2HRZPf/4HRPf and 2HRZPf/4HR). Contrary to our hypothesis, adjunctive pirfenidone use leads to reduced bacterial clearance and increased relapse rates. This treatment failure is closely associated with the emergence of isoniazid monoresistant bacilli, increased cavitation, and significant lung pathology. While antifibrotic agents may eventually be used as part of adjunctive host-directed therapy of TB, this study clearly demonstrates that caution must be exercised. Moreover, as pirfenidone becomes more widely used in clinical practice, increased patient monitoring would be required in endemic TB settings.

  20. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I. D.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Roldan, A.; Heldal, E.; Enarson, D. A.; Zhang, L-X.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low.

  1. Association of DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR Repeat Regions with Susceptibility to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Zahedan, Southeastern Iran.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Mohammad; Hashemi, Mohammad; Soroush, Navid; Amininia, Shadi; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-05-01

    There are conflicting results concerning DC-SIGN and DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphisms. The present study aimed to evaluate the possible association between DC-SIGN as well as DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a sample of Iranian population. This case-control study was done on 171 PTB and 161 healthy subjects. The variants were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DC-SIGNR VNTR genotypes in cases were 12.7% for 5/5, 2.4% for 6/5, 32.7% for 7/7, 38.2% for 7/5, 5.5% for 7/6, 1.2% for /5, 0.6% for 9/6, 6.7% for 9/7 in PTB patients and 19.7% for 5/5, 2.0% for 6/5, 31.6% for 7/7, 37.5% for 7/5, 5.7% for 7/6, 0.0% for 9/5, 0.7% for 9/6, 2.6% for 9/7 in controls. The findings showed no significant association between DC-SIGNR VNTR polymorphism and PTB. All subjects in cases and controls were 7/7 genotype regarding DC-SIGN VNTR polymorphism. Our data propose that DC-SIGNR VNTR, as well as DC-SIGN VNTR, were not associated with the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. PMID:27309478

  2. New Diagnostics for Childhood Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Silvia S; Swanson, Douglas S; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2015-09-01

    The challenge of diagnosing childhood tuberculosis (TB) results from its paucibacillary nature and the difficulties of sputum collection in children. Mycobacterial culture, the diagnostic gold standard, provides microbiological confirmation in only 30% to 40% of childhood pulmonary TB cases and takes up to 6 weeks to result. Conventional drug susceptibility testing requires an additional 2 to 4 weeks after culture confirmation. In response to the low sensitivity and long wait time of the traditional diagnostic approach, many new assays have been developed. These new tools have shortened time to result; however, none of them offer greater sensitivity than culture.

  3. Association between Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Occurrence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Susceptible to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuze; Li, Dianzhong; Zhang, Jinfeng; Liu, Shurui; Chen, Haijun; Wu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore why type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients are susceptible to pulmonary tuberculosis through detection of serum Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important immune-related receptor, especially in terms of content and TLR4 gene polymorphism. Patients with T2DM complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis (T2DMTB) were selected as the case group and T2DM patients without tuberculosis were selected as the control group. Forty patients in each group were randomly selected and their serum TLR4 levels were detected and compared. Determination of six sites of TLR4 gene polymorphism was carried out in 238 T2DMTB patients and 310 patients with T2DM, and results showed that the serum TLR4 content of the T2DMTB group was significantly lower than that of the T2DM group (p < 0.05). The six sites of TLR4 gene polymorphism did not show significant associations with T2DMTB risk. No statistically significant differences in genotype distributions were observed between T2DMTB patients and patients with T2DM when studied using the recessive and dominant genetic models. How two diseases with contradictory nutritional statuses can occur in the same person is difficult to explain from environmental factors perspective alone. Future research should study the causes of T2DMTB from the perspective of genetics. PMID:27123010

  4. Evaluation of serum levels of essential trace elements in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis before and after treatment by age and gender.

    PubMed

    Pourfallah, F; Javadian, S; Zamani, Z; Saghiri, R; Sadeghi, S; Zarea, B; Mirkhani, F; Fatemi, N; Kordi, T

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels of Zinc, Copper, Iron and Copper/Zinc ratio in the serum of adult patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in Iran. Serum levels of Zinc and Copper were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer and scrum iron concentration was measured by using an Auto Analyzer. The study group consisted of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients before treatment and after 6 months of anti-tubercular therapy. Levels of scrum Zn (p < 0.001) and Fe (p < 0.001) in TB patients were significantly increased after 6 months of anti-tubercular therapy. However, serum Cu concentration (p < 0.01) and Cu/Zn ratio (p < 0.05) were decreased after 6 months of anti-tubercular therapy. Some studies indicated a strong association of Zn, Cu, Fe and the Cu/Zn ratio with TB. In this study, we found remarkable change in Cu/Zn ratio. Some researchers mentioned that serum Cu/Zn ratio could be used as an important laboratory marker for diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. They also mentioned that trace element levels must be closely monitored during the process of disease. PMID:22097095

  5. Association between Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Occurrence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Susceptible to Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore why type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients are susceptible to pulmonary tuberculosis through detection of serum Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an important immune-related receptor, especially in terms of content and TLR4 gene polymorphism. Patients with T2DM complicated by pulmonary tuberculosis (T2DMTB) were selected as the case group and T2DM patients without tuberculosis were selected as the control group. Forty patients in each group were randomly selected and their serum TLR4 levels were detected and compared. Determination of six sites of TLR4 gene polymorphism was carried out in 238 T2DMTB patients and 310 patients with T2DM, and results showed that the serum TLR4 content of the T2DMTB group was significantly lower than that of the T2DM group (p < 0.05). The six sites of TLR4 gene polymorphism did not show significant associations with T2DMTB risk. No statistically significant differences in genotype distributions were observed between T2DMTB patients and patients with T2DM when studied using the recessive and dominant genetic models. How two diseases with contradictory nutritional statuses can occur in the same person is difficult to explain from environmental factors perspective alone. Future research should study the causes of T2DMTB from the perspective of genetics. PMID:27123010

  6. Genetic polymorphisms of CCL1 rs2072069 G/A and TLR2 rs3804099 T/C in pulmonary or meningeal tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Bu, Hui; Hong, Kun; Yin, Hua; Zou, Yue-Li; Geng, Shu-Jun; Zheng, Ming-Ming; He, Jun-Ying

    2015-01-01

    CCL1, one of the members of the CC chemokine family, is an inflammatory mediator that stimulates the migration of human monocytes. CCL1 expression is induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and TLR ligands in macrophage. TLR2 plays critical role in host immune response against M. tuberculosis infection by regulating the macrophage activation and cytokine secretion. M. tuberculosis causes different clinical forms of tuberculosis (TB) disease. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCL1 gene and TLR2 gene may be associated with the development of different clinical forms of TB, depending on the different immune mechanisms. This study was to evaluate the possible association between CCL1 rs2072069 G/A or/and TLR2 rs3804099 T/C (T597C) polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) or/and tuberculous meningitis (TBM) in a sample of the Chinese adult population. A case-control study was designed to compare the allele frequency and genotype distribution between control (n=386) and TB (n=341) who had either PTB (n=230) or TBM (n=111). The genotype typing was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. TLR2 variant genotype 597CC was associated with susceptibility to PTB rather than to TBM. In the male PTB subgroup, 597CC genotype was identified in a higher rate, compared with male control subgroup. This study demonstrates that T597C polymorphism of TLR2 is a risk factor for susceptibility to PTB rather than to TBM in a sample of Chinese adult population. Patient gender may affect the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. TLR2 gene may influence the development of PTB and TBM by different immune mechanisms. PMID:26722451

  7. Socio-Demographic Predictors and Distribution of Pulmonary Tuberculosis (TB) in Xinjiang, China: A Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wubuli, Atikaimu; Xue, Feng; Jiang, Daobin; Yao, Xuemei; Upur, Halmurat; Wushouer, Qimanguli

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Xinjiang is one of the high TB burden provinces of China. A spatial analysis was conducted using geographical information system (GIS) technology to improve the understanding of geographic variation of the pulmonary TB occurrence in Xinjiang, its predictors, and to search for targeted interventions. Methods Numbers of reported pulmonary TB cases were collected at county/district level from TB surveillance system database. Population data were extracted from Xinjiang Statistical Yearbook (2006~2014). Spatial autocorrelation (or dependency) was assessed using global Moran’s I statistic. Anselin’s local Moran’s I and local Getis-Ord statistics were used to detect local spatial clusters. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, spatial lag model (SLM) and geographically-weighted regression (GWR) models were used to explore the socio-demographic predictors of pulmonary TB incidence from global and local perspectives. SPSS17.0, ArcGIS10.2.2, and GeoDA software were used for data analysis. Results Incidence of sputum smear positive (SS+) TB and new SS+TB showed a declining trend from 2005 to 2013. Pulmonary TB incidence showed a declining trend from 2005 to 2010 and a rising trend since 2011 mainly caused by the rising trend of sputum smear negative (SS-) TB incidence (p<0.0001). Spatial autocorrelation analysis showed the presence of positive spatial autocorrelation for pulmonary TB incidence, SS+TB incidence and SS-TB incidence from 2005 to 2013 (P <0.0001). The Anselin’s Local Moran’s I identified the “hotspots” which were consistently located in the southwest regions composed of 20 to 28 districts, and the “coldspots” which were consistently located in the north central regions consisting of 21 to 27 districts. Analysis with the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic expanded the scope of “hotspots” and “coldspots” with different intensity; 30 county/districts clustered as “hotspots”, while 47 county/districts clustered as

  8. Reporter Phage and Breath Tests: Emerging Phenotypic Assays for Diagnosing Active Tuberculosis, Antibiotic Resistance, and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S.; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S.; Bishai, William R.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.

    2011-01-01

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics. PMID:21996696

  9. TLR1 Variant H305L Associated with Protection from Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Christian G.; Reiling, Norbert; Ehmen, Christa; Ruge, Gerd; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Horstmann, Rolf D.; Thye, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLR) are key elements of the innate immune response and involved in the recognition of pathogens. To test common and rare TLR variants involved in susceptibility or resistance to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis we screened the exons of the genes encoding TLR 1, 2, 4, and the adaptor molecule TIRAP in more than 4500 tuberculosis (TB) cases and controls from Ghana. The analysis yielded 109 variants with possible functional impact, including 101 non-synonymous variants, three stop-variants, and five indels. Association analyses yielded a significant result for the TLR1 variant rs3923647, conferring strong protection against TB (Odds ratio [OR] 0.21, CI confidence interval [CI] 0.05–0.6, Pnominal 1 x 10−3) when applying a recessive model of inheritance. Replication analyses with an additional 3370 Ghanaian cases and control samples, and with data from a recent TB study of 533 African-Americans confirmed the protective effect and resulted in a combined OR of 0.19, with a nominal P value of 2.2 x 10−5, and a corrected P value of 4.1 x 10−4. The SNP is located near the binding pocket of TLR1 and causes an amino acid exchange from histidine to leucine at position 305. The observed effect may, therefore, be attributable to structural changes in the recognition site of the TLR1 molecule, allowing to bind those mycobacterial ligands which preferentially may induce a protective immune response. This is supported by the analysis of BCG-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, showing increased induction of the proinflammatory cytokine IFN-γ in carriers of the mutant TLR1 rs3923647 TT genotype, compared to the IFN-γ levels of individuals with the AT and AA genotypes. PMID:27214039

  10. Formulation and Characterization of Pyrazinamide Polymeric Nanoparticles for Pulmonary Tuberculosis: Efficiency for Alveolar Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Varma, J. N. Ravi; Kumar, T. Santosh; Prasanthi, B.; Ratna, J. Vijaya

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide, a highly specific agent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis is used as first-line drug to treat tuberculosis. The current work aims to formulate polymeric nanoparticles based drug delivery system to sustain the release profile and reduce the dosing frequency of pyrazinamide. Further aim was to target the macrophages within body fluid. These polymeric nanoparticles were prepared by simultaneous double-emulsion (W/O/W) solvent evaporation/diffusion technique. The prepared dispersions were characterized for various biopharmaceutical parameters such as particle size, zeta potential, polydispersity index, drug loading capacity, entrapment efficiency and targeting to alveolar macrophages. The formulated polymeric nanoparticles were in the particle size range of 45.51 to 300.4 nm with a maximum drug entrapment efficiency of 80.9%. The stability study of optimized batch conducted at 40±2°/75±5% relative humidity showed no significant changes up to 90 days. X-Ray Diffraction spectrum exhibits the transformation of crystalline form of drug to amorphous in the formulation. Scanning Electron Microscope image showed nanoparticles spherical in shape with smooth surface. In vitro release profiles were biphasic in nature with burst release followed by controlled release over a period of 24 h obeying diffusion mechanism. In vivo and ex vivo studies results of the study show significant uptake of the nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages through fluorescent micrograph. Polymeric nanoparticles formulation of pyrazinamide could encompass significant uptake by alveolar macrophages, the high first-pass metabolism, sustain the release of drug leading to reduction in dose, toxicity and improvement of patient compliance. PMID:26180270

  11. Health Seeking Behaviour and Associated Factors among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects in Lay Armachiho District, Northwest Ethiopia: A Community-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Dachew, Berihun Assefa; Kassa Woreta, Hiwot; Mekonnen Kelkay, Mengistu; Ashenafie, Tesfaye Demeke

    2016-01-01

    Studies in the northern part of Ethiopia showed high prevalence of undiagnosed cluster of tuberculosis cases within the community which demanded an investigation of the health care seeking behaviour of tuberculosis suspects. A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Lay Armachiho district, Northwest Ethiopia. Individuals who had cough for at least two weeks and aged greater than or equal to 15 years were included in the study. Data were collected by interview using pretested and structured questionnaire. Logistic regression was computed and adjusted odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was calculated. Out of the total population surveyed (29, 735), 663 (2.2%) individuals were found to be pulmonary tuberculosis suspects. Majority of the suspects reported that they had visited a modern health care facility. Those aged 15 to 34 and aged 35–54 had secondary educational level and above; those who were civil servants, those who were farmers, those who had previous history of tuberculosis treatment, and those who perceived that they were sick were more likely to visit a modern health care facility. The proportion of respondents who had taken traditional measures was found to be higher than some other districts. Improving the socioeconomic status of the community is recommended. PMID:27022483

  12. A cluster of tuberculosis among crack house contacts in San Mateo County, California.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, K K; Gentile, F; Gilbert, B P; Aiken, M

    1994-11-01

    In March 1992, a cluster of 89 persons with tuberculosis infection was identified in San Mateo County, California. Thirteen persons (15%), including 11 children, were diagnosed with active pulmonary tuberculosis. All contacts were African Americans who resided in or visited one of two houses used for crack cocaine smoking or dealing. The patient with the index case, a male infected with human immunodeficiency virus, contributed to the transmission of tuberculosis as a transient resident of several dwellings. Public health authorities applied unique intervention methods to control the outbreak, including the use of a mobile health van. Further innovative strategies will be necessary to meet the challenge of this reemerging disease.

  13. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiang-nan; Zhang, Xian-xin; He, Xiao-chun; Yang, Guo-ru; Zhang, Xiao-qi; Xin, Wen-gen; Li, Huai-chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the specific relationship and impact from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on multidrug-resistant tuberculsosis (MDR-TB). Methods We conducted a retrospective study included patients aged ≥40 years with a confirmed pulmonary TB at three tertiary hospitals (Shandong, China) between January 2011 and October 2014. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to identify the relationship of MDR-TB and COPD. Results A total of 2164 patients aged ≥ 40 years with available results of drug susceptibility test (DST) and medical records were screened for this study: 268 patients with discharge diagnosis of COPD and 1896 patients without COPD. Overall, 14.2% of patients with COPD and 8.5% patients without COPD were MDR-TB. The rate of MDR-TB were significantly higher in patients with COPD (P<0.05). Migrant (odds ratios (OR) 1.32, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02–1.72), previous anti-TB treatment (OR 4.58, 95% CI 1.69–12.42), cavity (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.14–4.75), and GOLD stage (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.01–2.93) were the independent predictors for MDR-TB among patients with COPD. Conclusions MDR-TB occurs more frequently in patients with underlying COPD, especially those with being migrant, previous anti-TB therapy, cavity and severe airway obstruction. PMID:26284920

  14. Perceptions of Research Bronchoscopy in Malawian Adults with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lora, Wezzie; Khoo, Saye H.; Sloan, Derek J.; Mwandumba, Henry C.; Desmond, Nicola; Davies, Geraint R.

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is an established research tool in Malawi, enabling collection of pulmonary samples for immunological, pharmacological, and microbiological studies. It is, however, an invasive clinical procedure that offers no direct benefit to volunteering participants when used in a research capacity alone, and thus informed consent is essential. This study aimed to explore TB patients’ understanding of research bronchoscopy, what would motivate them to participate in research bronchoscopy, and their concerns, in order to inform consenting processes for future clinical studies. We used a qualitative research design. Two focus group discussions were conducted with community members and TB patients to understand their perceptions of bronchoscopy. Transcripts were coded by multiple co-authors and thematic content analysis was used to analyse main findings. We found that Malawian patients with pulmonary TB were willing to participate in a study using research bronchoscopy for health assessment and access to improved healthcare. We identified information of value to potential participants when consenting to that may lessen some of the anxieties expressed by participants. Patient and public involvement is essential to improve informed consent and institutional trust. PMID:27792765

  15. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Salindri, Argita D; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R; Gandhi, Neel R; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M; Magee, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods.  From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results.  Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56-8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13-.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04-.61). Conclusions.  We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion.

  16. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Salindri, Argita D; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R; Gandhi, Neel R; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M; Magee, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods.  From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results.  Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56-8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13-.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04-.61). Conclusions.  We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion. PMID:27419188

  17. Diabetes Reduces the Rate of Sputum Culture Conversion in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Salindri, Argita D.; Kipiani, Maia; Kempker, Russell R.; Gandhi, Neel R.; Darchia, Lasha; Tukvadze, Nestani; Blumberg, Henry M.; Magee, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetes is a risk factor for active tuberculosis (TB), but little is known about the relationship between diabetes and multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB. We aimed to assess risk factors for primary MDR TB, including diabetes, and determine whether diabetes reduced the rate of sputum culture conversion among patients with MDR TB. Methods. From 2011 to 2014, we conducted a cohort study at the National Center for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in Tbilisi, Georgia. Adult (≥35 years) patients with primary TB were eligible. Multidrug-resistant TB was defined as resistance to at least rifampicin and isoniazid. Patients with capillary glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% or previous diagnosis were defined to have diabetes. Polytomous regression was used to estimate the association of patient characteristics with drug resistance. Cox regression was used to compare rates of sputum culture conversion in patients with and without diabetes. Results. Among 318 patients with TB, 268 had drug-susceptibility test (DST) results. Among patients with DST results, 19.4% (52 of 268) had primary MDR TB and 13.4% (36 of 268) had diabetes. In multivariable analyses, diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00–6.31) and lower socioeconomic status (aOR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.56–8.20) were associated with primary MDR TB. Among patients with primary MDR TB, 44 (84.6%) converted sputum cultures to negative. The rate of sputum culture conversion was lower among patients with diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.34; 95% CI, .13–.87) and among smokers (aHR, 0.16; 95% CI, .04–.61). Conclusions. We found diabetes was associated with an increased risk of primary MDR TB; both diabetes and smoking were associated with a longer time to sputum culture conversion. PMID:27419188

  18. Virulence-Dependent Alterations in the Kinetics of Immune Cells during Pulmonary Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jung; Kim, HongMin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Kim, So Jeong; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the kinetics of accumulated immune cells that are involved in pathophysiology during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection may help to facilitate the development of vaccines and immunological interventions. However, the kinetics of innate and adaptive cells that are associated with pathogenesis during Mtb infection and their relationship to Mtb virulence are not clearly understood. In this study, we used a mouse model to compare the bacterial burden, inflammation and kinetics of immune cells during aerogenic infection in the lung between laboratory-adapted strains (Mtb H37Rv and H37Ra) and Mtb K strain, a hyper-virulent W-Beijing lineage strain. The Mtb K strain multiplied more than 10- and 3.54-fold more rapidly than H37Ra and H37Rv, respectively, during the early stage of infection (at 28 days post-infection) and resulted in exacerbated lung pathology at 56 to 112 days post-infection. Similar numbers of innate immune cells had infiltrated, regardless of the strain, by 14 days post-infection. High, time-dependent frequencies of F4/80-CD11c+CD11b-Siglec-H+PDCA-1+ plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c-CD11b+Gr-1int cells were observed in the lungs of mice that were infected with the Mtb K strain. Regarding adaptive immunity, Th1 and Th17 T cells that express T-bet and RORγt, respectively, significantly increased in the lungs that were infected with the laboratory-adapted strains, and the population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was remarkably increased at 112 days post-infection in the lungs of mice that were infected with the K strain. Collectively, our findings indicate that the highly virulent Mtb K strain may trigger the accumulation of pDCs and Gr1intCD11b+ cells with the concomitant down-regulation of the Th1 response and the maintenance of an up-regulated Th2 response without inducing a Th17 response during chronic infection. These results will help to determine which immune system components must be considered for the development

  19. Influences of Cross-Border Mobility on Tuberculosis Diagnoses and Treatment Interruption Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Deiss, Robert; Garfein, Richard S.; Lozada, Remedios; Burgos, Jose Luis; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Moser, Kathleen S.; Zuniga, Maria Luisa; Rodwell, Timothy C.; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to identify correlates of reported lifetime diagnoses of TB among injection drug users in the border city of Tijuana, Mexico. Methods. Injection drug users in Tijuana were recruited into a prospective cohort study during 2006 and 2007. We used weighted multivariate logistic regression to identify correlates of TB diagnoses. Results. Of the 1056 participants, 103 (9.8%) reported a history of TB, among whom 93% received anti-TB medication and 80% were diagnosed in the United States. Treatment was prematurely halted among 8% of patients; deportation from the United States was the cause of half of these treatment interruptions. History of travel to (odds ratio [OR] = 6.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.53, 27.20) or deportation from (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.12) the United States and incarceration (OR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.06, 4.58) were independently associated with a reported lifetime diagnosis of TB. Conclusions. Mobility and migration are important factors in identifying and treating TB patients diagnosed in the US–Mexico border region. Strengthening capacity on both sides of the border to identify, monitor, and treat TB is a priority. PMID:19542040

  20. Pelvic tuberculosis: an uncommon gynaecological problem in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sivanesaratnam, V; Lim, B H; Sivanesan, S; Menon, A

    1986-08-01

    Tuberculosis of the genital tract was diagnosed in only 12 patients during the 17 year period from March 1968 to February 1985 at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, which serves as a major referral centre in Malaysia. The incidence was 0.31 per 1000 gynaecological admissions and the peak age incidence was in the age group 26 to 35 years. The surgical management was mainly conservative as infertility was the most frequent mode of presentation (50%). Evidence of previous pulmonary tuberculosis was present in only five cases. Adnexal adhesions were the commonest pelvic finding; the fallopian tubes and endometrium were affected with equal frequency. Positive cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were obtained in only five of the 12 patients. All patients received combination anti-tuberculosis drugs with satisfactory response.

  1. The microbiome at the pulmonary alveolar niche and its role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Adami, Alexander J; Cervantes, Jorge L

    2015-12-01

    Advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology have provided the tools to comprehensively and accurately characterize the microbial community in the respiratory tract in health and disease. The presence of commensal and pathogenic bacteria has been found to have important effects on the lung immune system. Until relatively recently, the lung has received less attention compared to other body sites in terms of microbiome characterization, and its study carries special technological difficulties related to obtaining reliable samples as compared to other body niches. Additionally, the complexity of the alveolar immune system, and its interactions with the lung microbiome, are only just beginning to be understood. Amidst this complexity sits Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), one of humanity's oldest nemeses and a significant public health concern, with millions of individuals infected with Mtb worldwide. The intricate interactions between Mtb, the lung microbiome, and the alveolar immune system are beginning to be understood, and it is increasingly apparent that improved treatment of Mtb will only come through deep understanding of the interplay between these three forces. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the lung microbiome, alveolar immunity, and the interaction of each with Mtb.

  2. Determinants of Pulmonary Tuberculosis among Inmates at Mangaung Maximum Correctional Facility in Bloemfontein, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Nyasulu, Peter; Mogoere, Serame; Umanah, Teye; Setswe, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Correctional facilities house large number of inmates who are at high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB); however factors associated with TB among inmates at Mangaung Correctional Centre have not been studied. Study Population and Methods. We undertook a case control study and reviewed a total of 1140 medical records of inmates treated for TB between 2009 and 2010. Cases were selected randomly from the medical records of inmates who were treated. Data collected were analysed using STATA version 12.0 and determinants of TB were evaluated using multiple logistic regression analyses. Factors with P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results. Prevalence of TB was 8.8% and 52% of inmates with TB were aged 31–40 years; 58% of the TB cases were HIV positive and 34% of them had CD4 cell count 350 cells/mm3. Factors associated with TB among inmates were HIV coinfection (OR: 4.2; 95% CI: 2.64–7.00); previous history of TB disease (OR: 3.58; 95% CI: 2.25–5.70); and smoking (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.16–3.81). Conclusion. Interventions to improve TB detection such as regular screening of inmates with such factors need to be reinforced to control transmission of TB among inmates and the community. PMID:25866677

  3. Tuberculosis Case Finding in Benin, 2000–2014 and Beyond: A Retrospective Cohort and Time Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Ade, Serge; Békou, Wilfried; Adjobimey, Mênonli; Adjibode, Omer; Ade, Gabriel; Harries, Anthony D.; Anagonou, Séverin

    201