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Sample records for diagnoses sexual dysfunction

  1. Determinants of sexual dysfunction among clinically diagnosed diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that can result in various medical, psychological and sexual dysfunctions (SD) if not properly managed. SD in men is a common under-appreciated complication of diabetes. This study assessed the prevalence and determinants of SD among diabetic patients in Tema, Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Method Sexual functioning was determined in 300 consecutive diabetic men (age range: 18-82 years) visiting the diabetic clinic of Tema General Hospital with the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) questionnaire, between November, 2010 and March, 2011. In addition to the socio-demographic characteristics of the participants, the level of glycosylated haemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS) and serum testosterone were assessed. All the men had a steady heterosexual relationship for at least 2 years before enrolment in the study. Results Out the 300 participants contacted, the response rate was 91.3% after 20 declined participation and 6 incomplete data were excluded All the respondents had at least basic education, 97.4% were married, 65.3% were known hypertensive, 3.3% smoked cigarettes, 27% took alcoholic beverages and 32.8% did some form of exercise. The 69.3% SD rate observed in this study appears to be related to infrequency (79.2%), non-sensuality (74.5%), dissatisfaction with sexual acts (71.9%), non-communication (70.8%) and impotence (67.9%). Other areas of sexual function, including premature ejaculation (56.6%) and avoidance (42.7%) were also substantially affected. However, severe SD was seen in only 4.7% of the studied population. The perceived "adequate", "desirable", "too short" and "too long intra-vaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT) are 5-10, 5-10, 1-2 and 15-30 minutes respectively. Testosterone correlates negatively with glycated haemoglobin (HBA1c), FBS, perceived desirable, too short IELT, and weight as well as waist circumference. Conclusion SD rate from this study is high but similar to

  2. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Morrell, M J

    1991-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction may arise more frequently in men and women with epilepsy than with other chronic illnesses, manifesting primarily as diminished sexual desire and potency. Studies using retrospective self-report of sexual attitude and behavior find an incidence of sexual dysfunction ranging from 14-66%. Sexual dysfunction may be more common in partial than in generalized epilepsies. Sexual dysfunction in epilepsy may result from a disturbance in social or psychological factors affecting sexual responsiveness. Alternatively, epileptiform discharges may disrupt the function of structures mediating sexual behavior, particularly the limbic cortex, or alter the release of hypothalamic or pituitary hormones. Antiepileptic drugs modulate hormone release from the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and may have direct inhibitory effects on sexual behavior. Evidence both supports and refutes each of these etiologies in the sexual dysfunction seen with epilepsy. Specific evaluation and treatment protocols for patients with sexual dysfunction are available.

  3. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  4. [Sexual dysfunctions in selected endocrinopathies].

    PubMed

    Skrzypulec, Violetta; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Drosdzol, Agnieszka; Kowalaczyk, Robert

    2005-01-01

    According to the socio-sexological reports approximately 40-45% of women and up to 30% of males may suffer from different sexual dysfunctions. The prevalence of those disorders is gradually increasing with age. Multiply numbers of endocrinopathies may influence the human sexual life. In diabetic patients all phases of the sexual responses cycle, especially orgasm, might be affected. Women diagnosed with PCOS have decreased adaptation to the sexual life, low self-esteem and perception of self sexual attractiveness. The intimacy of infertile couples has not been well described and the characteristic of particular dysfunction in sex life has not been established yet. Interdisciplinary approach, understood as treatment of the endocrinopathy accompanied with psychological and sexological counseling, seems to be the fundamental issue in the therapy of sexual dysfunctions in patients with endocrinological disorders. PMID:16821220

  5. Female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdogan; Fynes, Michelle

    2008-02-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is a common problem with detrimental effects on woman's quality of life. It also has an economical and societal impact. It is defined as disorders of sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and sexual pain, which lead to personal distress. The etiology of sexual dysfunction is frequently multifactorial as it relates to general physical and mental well-being, quality of relationship, past sexual functioning, social class, education, employment, life stressors, personality factors, the presence of a sexual partner, and partner's age and health. It is very important to adopt the most efficient approach to gather information, and this may be achieved via standardized questionnaires or open-ended questions. Therapy should be tailored according to the patient's needs and may involve a multidisciplinary team approach including psychosexual counselor/sexologist/therapist and the physician. There is still more work needed to optimize the care of women with this problem. Priority should be given to international standardization and training of health care professionals.

  6. Sexual dysfunction in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Várkonyi; Kempler, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to summarize the etiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and possible treatment options of sexual dysfunction in diabetic patients of both sexes. Details of dysfunction in diabetic women are less conclusive than in men due to the lack of standardized evaluation of sexual function in women. Male sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes, including abnormalities of orgasmic/ejaculatory function and desire/libido in addition to penile erection. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) among diabetic men varies from 35% to 75%. Diabetes-induced ED has a multifactorial etiology including metabolic, neurologic, vascular, hormonal, and psychological components. ED should be regarded as the first sign of cardiovascular disease because it can be present before development of symptomatic coronary artery disease, as larger coronary vessels better tolerate the same amount of plaque compared to smaller penile arteries. The diagnosis of ED is based on validated questionnaires and determination of functional and organic abnormalities. First-, second- and third-line therapy may be applied. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitor treatment from the first-line options leads to smooth muscle relaxation in the corpus cavernosum and enhancement in blood flow, resulting in erection during sexual stimulus. The use of PDE-5 inhibitors in the presence of oral nitrates is strictly contraindicated in diabetic men, as in nondiabetic subjects. All PDE-5 inhibitors have been evaluated for ED in diabetic patients with convincing efficacy data. Second-line therapy includes intracavernosal, trans- or intraurethral administration of vasoactive drugs or application of a vacuum device. Third-line therapies are the implantation of penile prosthesis and penile revascularization. PMID:25410225

  7. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure.

  8. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  9. Sexual dysfunction following radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Benson, Cooper R; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. A favored treatment option for organ-confined prostate cancer in a middle-aged healthy man is radical prostatectomy (RP). Despite advances in techniques for RP, there remain concerns among physicians and patients alike on its adverse effects on sexual function. Although post-RP erectile dysfunction has been extensively studied, little attention has been focused on the other domains of sexual function, namely loss of libido, ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, penile shortening, and Peyronie disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the most recent literature regarding post-RP sexual dysfunctions. PMID:22744864

  10. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  11. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  12. Hypnotic metaphor and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, L G

    1987-01-01

    Although hypnosis can be very effective in alleviating sexual problems, few sex therapists use hypnotic methods. This paper seeks to encourage a greater use of hypnosis among clinicians by presenting: a description of the new hypnosis exemplified in the work of Milton H. Erickson; an explanation of one of Erickson's most important and innovative methods, the use of multiple embedded metaphors; and case histories illustrating the application of hypnotic approaches to sexual dysfunction.

  13. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orgasmic disorders - When you can't have an orgasm or you have pain during orgasm. Sexual pain disorders - When you have pain during ... cream. If you have a problem having an orgasm, you may not be getting enough foreplay or ...

  14. Flibanserin for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reviriego, C

    2014-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most commonly described form of female sexual dysfunction. There is currently no pharmacological therapy approved to treat HSDD, and therefore, there is an unmet medical need for the development of efficacious treatment alternatives. Flibanserin is a novel, non-hormonal drug for the treatment of HSDD in pre- and postmenopausal women, although the application submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by Sprout Pharmaceuticals is only for premenopausal women. Flibanserin works by correcting an imbalance of the levels of the neurotransmitters that affect sexual desire. More specifically, flibanserin increases dopamine and norepinephrine, both responsible for sexual excitement, and decreases serotonin, responsible for sexual inhibition. Clinically, flibanserin has exhibited some encouraging results in terms of its ability to increase the frequency of satisfying sexual events, and the intensity of sexual desire. However, adverse events such as dizziness, nausea, fatigue and somnolence, typical of a centrally acting drug, are also frequently related to flibanserin treatment. PMID:25187905

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  16. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  17. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient.

  18. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  19. [Sexual dysfunctions, psychiatric diseases and quality of life: a review].

    PubMed

    Bossini, Letizia; Fortini, Valentina; Casolaro, Ilaria; Caterini, Claudia; Koukouna, Despoina; Cecchini, Federica; Benbow, Jim; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions may have a significant effect on the quality of life, but are unreported and under-diagnosed. A review of recent literature highlights the correlation between dysfunction and a decreased quality of life in people with psychiatric comorbidity, and explores several aspects impacting care, from following the patient to pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. Sexual dysfunctions (SD) have been shown to be prevalent, but under-diagnosed and un-dertreated because of communication barriers between patients and physicians. Pharmacogenic and morbogenic causes of sexual problems are often difficult to differentiate. Psychiatric diseases may increase the risk of SD, and SD may further exacerbate psychiatric problems, suggesting a bi-directional relationship. Their effective treatment frequently involves combination of elements from psychotherapy, and behavioral along with pharmacotherapeutic intervention, if needed. The persistence of sexual problems has significant negative impact on patient's satisfaction and adherence with the treatment, quality of life and partnership. Routine assessment of sexual functioning needs to be integrated into ongoing care to identify and address problems early. If sexual dysfunction is ignored it may maintain the psychiatric disorder, compromise treatment outcome and lead to non-adherence and compromise treatment outcome. PMID:25314799

  20. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. PMID:27594188

  1. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298

  2. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  3. AB028. New drugs for sexual dysfunction complementary medicine for sexual dysfunction in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Australia both oriental and western products are available as complementary medicines. Our aim was to review the current available over-the-counter (OTC) medications for sexual dysfunction and report on this market. Methods Following an earlier published review in 2010, 37 products were reviewed that were listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) and registered with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). These products were manufactured in Australia and laid claim to provide treatment for sexual dysfunction. A review of these products and newer products was undertaken to establish the extent of complementary medicines in Australia for sexual dysfunction and the reported clinical experience. Results As at July 2015 there were 31 Australian manufactured OTC products registered with the TGA on the ARTG for sexual dysfunction. Twenty-four were for male sexual dysfunction, 3 for female sexual dysfunction and 4 for unisex sexual dysfunction. The main herbs used in sexual health products in Australia are tribulus terrestris, panax ginseng and horny goat weed. However, complementary medicine practitioners also promote the use of gingko Bilbo, avena sativa and damiana. Many of the ingredients found in men’s products are also in the women’s products. Although review articles for complementary medicine, sexual dysfunction and libido have been written in Australia, as far as can be investigated there are no published randomized clinical trials in the area of complementary medicine and sexual function. Conclusions Complementary medicine has reached a high degree of development in Australia. But, due to the lack of properly conducted placebo-controlled clinical trials there is not a body of supporting evidence of efficacy, certification of purity, guarantee of safety, or well-documented side effects. Even though most OTC medications for sexual health have mild side effects and some also promote general health, the lack of such evidence

  4. Sexual dysfunction in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Fridlund, Bengt; Mårtensson, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure has a severe impact on different aspects of a patient's life, including sexual function. Sexual problems are common in heart failure (HF) patients, both in men and women, and are not always adequately addressed and treated in the current health care system. Several factors have been described to be related to sexual problems, such as activity intolerance, psychological factors, physiological factors, cardiac medications, recreational habits and co-morbidity. The current review summarizes knowledge that can help clinicians treat sexual dysfunction in HF patients. After a good assessment, several steps are advised, including improving HF and co-morbid conditions, discussing psychosocial problems, worries and misunderstandings, managing risk factors and considering PDE-5 inhibitors or other libido enhancing agents. PMID:24800993

  5. The Study of Gonadal Hormonal Abnormalities and Sexual Dysfunction in HIV Positive Females: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Kallikadavil, Abithraj; Shivaswamy, Rajendraprasad; Menon, Vineetha Bharathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Every endocrine gland has been reported to be affected at varying rates in HIV. HIV is a highly stigmatized chronic disease with a substantial co-occurrence of mental and sexual health problems; however the sexual health problems in women have not been extensively studied. Aim To study the gonadal hormonal abnormalities and sexual dysfunction in HIV positive female patients and its possible association. Materials and Methods This descriptive/exploratory study was conducted in the Department of General Medicine at a tertiary care hospital from September 2013 to August 2015. The study group included 50 diagnosed HIV-positive patients. They were also subjected to specific questions regarding sexual dysfunction by female counselors using female sexual function index. Visits of the subjects were scheduled independent of the menstrual cycle. Hormonal levels (free testosterone, FSH, LH) were measured. Results Out of 50 patients, 26 patients in our study had sexual dysfunction (52%). Patients with age group between 30-39 years had the maximum sexual dysfunction compared to the other groups (<0.001). Patients with a CD4 count between 200 and 499 had the maximum sexual dysfunction (<0.02). Mean duration of HIV in the study was 30 months in sexual dysfunction group which was significant (p<0.005). Hormonal levels were found to be in normal range. All the study patients reported desire, arousal and lubrication problems whereas orgasm and satisfaction problems were noted in 60% patients with pain reported in 52%. Conclusion We identified that although the hormonal levels were in the normal range, they were comparatively in the lower range in the dysfunction group than the non-dysfunctional group. Both free testosterone and FSH levels were low indicating involvement of the pituitary rather than the gonads. We also conclude that duration of HIV and also level of CD4 count is related to sexual dysfunction. PMID:27190860

  6. [Female sexual dysfunction: a systematic overview of classification, pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Marthol, H; Hilz, M J

    2004-03-01

    and laboratory studies. Physiologic monitoring of parameters of arousal potentially allows to diagnose organic diseases. Recordings at baseline and following sexual stimulation are recommended to determine pathologic changes that occur with arousal. Duplex Doppler sonography, photoplethysmography or the measurement of vaginal and minor labial oxygen tension may help to evaluate genital blood flow. Moreover, measurements of vaginal pH and compliance should be performed. Neurophysiological examination, e.g. measurement of the bulbocavernosus reflex and pudendal evoked potentials, genital sympathetic skin response (SSR), warm, cold and vibratory perception thresholds as well as testing of the pressure and touch sensitivity of the external genitalia, should be performed to evaluate neurogenic etiologies. Medical management of female sexual dysfunction so far is primarily based on hormone replacement therapy. Application of estrogen results in decreased pain and burning during intercourse. The efficacy of various other medications, e.g. sildenafil, L-arginine, yohimbine, phentolamine, apomorphine and prostaglandin E1, in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction is still under investigation. PMID:14999592

  7. Pharmacogenetics of SSRIs and Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Osis, Liana; Bishop, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common and disconcerting side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) that often influences a patient’s desire to continue long-term antidepressant treatment. Studies specifically assessing changes in sexual well-being over time illustrate that the incidence of sexual side effects from SSRIs ranges from 20% to 70%, depending on the characteristics of the study sample assessed. Developing strategies to predict who may be at the highest risk for adverse changes in their sexual well-being is an important step in improving the quality of life and treatment of patients who require antidepressant therapy. Pharmacogenetic studies of SSRI-associated SD have identified associations between serotonin and glutamate system genes with aspects of SD. The results of studies investigating genetic variations in drug metabolism enzymes and their relationships to antidepressant-associated adverse effects have been mixed. Continued efforts to characterize the relationships between genetic markers and antidepressant outcomes, and to translate this knowledge to patient care, have the potential to significantly improve the empiric selection of antidepressant agents and to minimize the risk for intolerable side effects.

  8. Treating sexual dysfunction in sex offenders: a case example.

    PubMed

    Metz, Michael E; Sawyer, Steven P

    2004-01-01

    Sex offender treatment as a specialized procedure is maturing, and more comprehensive approaches that treat co-morbid patient problems (e.g., mood and anxiety disorders, relationship conflicts, social skills deficits) have emerged. However, little attention has been given to the role of sexual dysfunction in the assessment and treatment of sex offenders. We propose that: (a) sexual dysfunction is a prevalent co-occurring sexual disorder in sex offenders; (b) sexual dysfunction is, by definition, a lack of sexual health, which diminishes overall life satisfaction; and (c) sexual dysfunction can be a contributing factor for some in maintaining offense-related arousal patterns and therefore is a potential contributor to sex-offense risk. This article describes the importance of treating sex dysfunction in selected cases when it is present among men in sex offender treatment, in order to improve the men's quality of life and to deter sex offense recidivism. A brief case example illustrates this benefit. PMID:15205074

  9. Pelvic floor and sexual male dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pischedda, Antonella; Fusco, Ferdinando; Curreli, Andrea; Grimaldi, Giovanni; Pirozzi Farina, Furio

    2013-04-19

    The pelvic floor is a complex multifunctional structure that corresponds to the genito-urinary-anal area and consists of muscle and connective tissue. It supports the urinary, fecal, sexual and reproductive functions and pelvic statics. The symptoms caused by pelvic floor dysfunction often affect the quality of life of those who are afflicted, worsening significantly more aspects of daily life. In fact, in addition to providing support to the pelvic organs, the deep floor muscles support urinary continence and intestinal emptying whereas the superficial floor muscles are involved in the mechanism of erection and ejaculation. So, conditions of muscle hypotonia or hypertonicity may affect the efficiency of the pelvic floor, altering both the functionality of the deep and superficial floor muscles. In this evolution of knowledge it is possible imagine how the rehabilitation techniques of pelvic floor muscles, if altered and able to support a voiding or evacuative or sexual dysfunction, may have a role in improving the health and the quality of life.

  10. Female sexual dysfunction: focus on low desire.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Woodard, Terri

    2015-02-01

    Low or absent sexual desire is the most common sexual dysfunction in women, and its prevalence peaks during midlife. Its etiology is complex and may include biologic, psychologic, and social elements. Major risk factors for its development include poor health status, depression, certain medications, dissatisfaction with partner relationship, and history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or both. Diagnosis is based on criteria set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th Edition) and requires that a woman experience personal distress. Clinical evaluation should include medical history, sexual history, and, sometimes, a physical examination. Laboratory data are of limited value, except when warranted by history or physical examination. Treatment options include nonpharmacologic interventions such as education, office-based counseling, and psychotherapy. Although there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for low desire, pharmacologic agents have been used off-label for this purpose. Bupropion is an antidepressant that has been shown to improve desire in some women with and without depression. Systemic estrogen therapy is not recommended in the absence of vasomotor symptoms and is not directly associated with desire. However, vaginal estrogen is useful in patients presenting with concomitant vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia. Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can be used as an alternative to vaginal estrogen. Exogenous testosterone has demonstrated efficacy in treating loss of desire in postmenopausal women. However, patients should be counseled that it is not FDA-approved for this purpose and there are limited published long-term safety data. Several agents for the treatment of low desire are currently in development. Gynecologists are in a unique position to address concerns about sexual desire in women.

  11. Evaluation of sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid; Raei, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Parham, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes that adversely affects their quality of life. Its prevalence is known to be higher in diabetic men with and it is estimated to affect 20-85% of patients but the problem is probably less common in diabetic women. This study investigated the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its risk factors among women with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was performed during May 2012 to Feb 2013 at Diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for evaluation of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: In this study, 59 (53.6%) women had sexual dysfunction. The mean age of patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy people was 48.22 ± 6.61 and 48.14 ± 5.37 years respectively and it was not statistically different in both groups (P = 0.94). Also, there was no significant difference between two groups in average duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, insulin resistance, abdominal circumference and body mass index BMI. Although the history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and exercise levels were not significantly associated with sexual dysfunction, but there was a significant association between albuminuria and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001). Retinopathy and sexual dysfunction had statistically significant relationship (P = 0.007) while no association was found between diabetic neuropathy and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.79). Results: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication in diabetic patients which accompanies with some complications of diabetes and should be considered especially in patients with nephropathy or retinopathy. PMID:24741512

  12. The Newell Test Should Commit to Diagnosing Dysfunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.

    2003-01-01

    "Conceptual coordination" analysis bridges connectionism and symbolic approaches by posting a "process memory" by which categories are physically coordinated (as neural networks) in time. Focusing on dysfunctions and odd behaviors like slips reveals the function of consciousness, especially taken-for-granted constructive processes, different from conventional programming constructs. Newell strongly endorsed identifying architectural limits; the heuristic of "diagnose unusual behaviors" will provide targets of opportunity that greatly strengthens the Newell Test.

  13. Relationship factors and sexual dysfunction. Implications for assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hartman, L M

    1980-11-01

    Conceptual issues pertaining to behavioural treatment of sexual dysfunctions are examined. A study is described in which twenty couples referred to an outpatient family therapy unit were assigned one of four group classifications based on their combined scores for specific measures of marital happiness and sexual functioning. The groups included asymptomatic-control, sexual dysfunction, marital conflict, and combined classifications. Results clearly indicate that sexual dysfunction and marital distress may operate independent of one another. Implications for assessment, treatment, and future research are discussed.

  14. Antidepressant-associated sexual dysfunction: impact, effects, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Agnes; Nash, Michael; Lynch, Aileen M

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of antidepressants and can have significant impact on the person's quality of life, relationships, mental health, and recovery. The reported incidence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant medication varies considerably between studies, making it difficult to estimate the exact incidence or prevalence. The sexual problems reported range from decreased sexual desire, decreased sexual excitement, diminished or delayed orgasm, to erection or delayed ejaculation problems. There are a number of case reports of sexual side effects, such as priapism, painful ejaculation, penile anesthesia, loss of sensation in the vagina and nipples, persistent genital arousal and nonpuerperal lactation in women. The focus of this article is to explore the incidence, pathophysiology, and treatment of antidepressant iatrogenic sexual dysfunction. PMID:21701626

  15. Self-help therapies for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    van Lankveld, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Self-help approaches can be relevant for individuals with sexual difficulties who cannot visit a therapist yet have sufficient coping skills and motivation to adhere to the advice and prescriptions included in the self-help method. Self-help can facilitate the transfer of treatment gains to the unassisted situation at home and thus reduce generalization difficulties from therapist setting to the home setting. They may prevent the development of client's codependency on therapist support and can help boost the client's sense of self-efficacy. Several self-help approaches were found to be efficacious, both statistically and clinically, in the treatment of several types of sexual dysfunction. The outcome is qualified by problem type, client characteristics, and delivery format of the self-help. The methods that are offered vary from cookbook-like protocols, which need to be followed in a stepwise and strict fashion, to strategies requiring the user to self-adapt a general problem-solving method to his or her personal situation, thereby enabling the individual to become his or her own therapist.

  16. Factors influencing fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in female rats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sarah; Heckard, Danyeal; Hassell, James; Uphouse, Lynda

    2012-11-01

    Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as fluoxetine, produces sexual side effects with low sexual desire being the most prevalent effect in females. In few studies have preclinical models for such antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction been fruitful. In the current manuscript, the effects of fluoxetine on multiple measures of female sexual motivation and sexual receptivity were examined. Ovariectomized, Fischer rats were primed with 10 μg estradiol benzoate and 500 μg progesterone. Partner preference, active investigation of the male, and measures of sexual behavior were examined after injection with 15 mg/kg fluoxetine. Factors (pretesting for sexual behavior, size of the test arena, non-contact time with a male) that differ among experiments designed to study antidepressant-induced female rat sexual dysfunction were studied. The male preference ratio was not affected by fluoxetine treatment but active investigation of the male was reduced; lordosis behavior was inhibited and pretesting for sexual receptivity amplified fluoxetine's inhibition; size of the testing arena or non-contact experience with the male had no effect. Regardless of test condition, when given the opportunity to escape from the male, fluoxetine-treated females displayed escape behavior. Measures of male preference and active investigation, but not lordosis behavior, appeared to be affected by fluoxetine's impact on activity. The collective data provided a behavioral profile of fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. These findings reinforce the value of multiple measures when attempting to model antidepressant-induced female sexual dysfunction.

  17. Survivorship: Sexual Dysfunction (Female), Version 1.2013

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B.; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; McCabe, Mary S.; McVary, Kevin T.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O’Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment, especially hormonal therapy and therapy directed toward the pelvis, can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. Thus, sexual dysfunction is common in survivors and can cause increased distress and have a significant negative impact on quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for female sexual problems, including those related to sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain. PMID:24586080

  18. Female sexual dysfunction in female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Elneil, Sohier

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM), otherwise known as female genital cutting (FGC), is currently very topical and has become a significant global political issue. The impact of FGM on the lives of women and girls is enormous, as it often affects both their psychology and physical being. Among the complications that are often under-reported and not always acknowledged is female sexual dysfunction (FSD). FSD presents with a complex of symptoms including lack of libido, arousability and orgasm. This often occurs in tandem with chronic urogenital pain and anatomical disruption due to perineal scarring.To treat FSD in FGM each woman needs specifically directed holistic care, geared to her individual case. This may include psychological support, physiotherapy and, on occasion, reconstructive surgery. In many cases the situation is complicated by symptoms of chronic pelvic pain, which can make treatment increasingly difficult as this issue needs a defined multidisciplinary approach for its effective management in its own right. The problems suffered by women with FGM are wholly preventable, as the practice need not happen. The current global momentum to address the social, cultural, economic and medical issues of FGM is being supported by communities, governments, non-governmental agencies (NGOs) and healthcare providers. It is only by working together that the practice can be abolished and women and girls may be free from this practice and its associated consequences. PMID:26759415

  19. Female sexual dysfunction in female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Elneil, Sohier

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM), otherwise known as female genital cutting (FGC), is currently very topical and has become a significant global political issue. The impact of FGM on the lives of women and girls is enormous, as it often affects both their psychology and physical being. Among the complications that are often under-reported and not always acknowledged is female sexual dysfunction (FSD). FSD presents with a complex of symptoms including lack of libido, arousability and orgasm. This often occurs in tandem with chronic urogenital pain and anatomical disruption due to perineal scarring.To treat FSD in FGM each woman needs specifically directed holistic care, geared to her individual case. This may include psychological support, physiotherapy and, on occasion, reconstructive surgery. In many cases the situation is complicated by symptoms of chronic pelvic pain, which can make treatment increasingly difficult as this issue needs a defined multidisciplinary approach for its effective management in its own right. The problems suffered by women with FGM are wholly preventable, as the practice need not happen. The current global momentum to address the social, cultural, economic and medical issues of FGM is being supported by communities, governments, non-governmental agencies (NGOs) and healthcare providers. It is only by working together that the practice can be abolished and women and girls may be free from this practice and its associated consequences.

  20. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in newly diagnosed untreated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Fici, Francesco; Ural, Dilek; Tayfun, Sahin; Kozdag, Guliz; Facchetti, Rita; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Dell'oro, Raffaella; Grassi, Guido; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Essential hypertension is characterized by a left ventricular dysfunction. However, the majority of the studies performed so far investigated patients under drug treatment and/or with concomitant diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or coronary heart disease, which per se may affect diastolic function independently on the blood pressure elevation. The present study aimed at investigating left ventricular diastolic function in untreated, uncomplicated and newly diagnosed hypertensive patients by employing both routine echo-Doppler and pulse tissue-Doppler technique. Data were collected in 86 middle-aged essential hypertensive patients and in 18 sex-matched normotensive controls. At the echo-Doppler approach, about half of the hypertensive patients displayed a diastolic dysfunction (n = 44, E/A: 0.79 ± 0.02). They showed body mass index values slightly greater than hypertensive patients without diastolic dysfunction but superimposable blood pressure values and metabolic variables. When assessed via the pulse tissue-Doppler approach, patients with a reduced E/A displayed an Em/Am ratio significantly lower than patients without diastolic dysfunction and control subjects. This was the case when the data were related to the lateral and septal mitral annulus or averaged together. Furthermore, whereas myocardial systolic peak velocity (Sm) was lower in hypertensive patients than in control subjects, no significant between-groups difference in E/Em ratio was observed. Differently from the data obtained via the echo-Doppler approach, the tissue-Doppler method in patients without diastolic dysfunction showed a significant higher deceleration and isovolumetric relaxation times, with a lower Em velocity compared with the normotensive subjects. At the stepwise multiple regression analysis E/A ratio and E'/A' values were related with left ventricular mass index and body mass index after correction for age. These data provide evidence that diastolic

  1. The clinical relevance of sexual dysfunction in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruni, C; Raja, J; Denton, C P; Matucci-Cerinic, M

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a chronic multi-organ autoimmune disease, leading to important clinical and psychological implications. Among organ complications, sexual dysfunction is a major issue for both male and female gender, with high prevalence and great impact on quality of life, although frequently not addressed by both clinicians and patients. While erectile dysfunction is the most common cause of sexual problems in males, genital tract and general physical changes are major contributors to sexual impairment in females. This review presents current state of the art on this topic, discussing published data on presentation, evaluation and therapeutic options.

  2. Executive Dysfunction Predicts Delinquency But Not Characteristics of Sexual Aggression Among Adolescent Sexual Offenders.

    PubMed

    Burton, David; Demuynck, Sophia; Yoder, Jamie R

    2014-11-25

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate executive function and its relationship to delinquency and sexual crime in adolescents incarcerated for sexual crimes. Based on self-report data, 196 male adolescent sexual offenders from a Midwest state reported high rates of executive dysfunction. Although such deficits did not relate to the number of victims of sexual abuse, severity, or degree of force used in commission of the sexual crimes, poor executive function was significantly predictive of both general delinquency and felony theft. In both measures of delinquent conduct, behavioral regulation dysfunction was predictive of the frequency of commission of the crimes, whereas metacognition was not. Research and treatment implications are offered.

  3. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Dysfunction in Jamaican Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaby, Antoneal N.; Morgan, Kai A. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the associations between early traumatic sexualization and later sexual dysfunction in a sample of 100 Jamaican adults while identifying the linkages between age, frequency of abuse, and gender on sexual functioning. Participants were selected via purposive and convenience sampling and divided equally into comparison and…

  4. Management of sexual dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vodušek, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Nonmotor symptoms, among them sexual dysfunction, are common and underrecognized in patients with Parkinson disease; they play a major role in the deterioration of quality of life of patients and their partners. Loss of desire and dissatisfaction with their sexual life is encountered in both genders. Hypersexuality (HS), erectile dysfunction and problems with ejaculation are found in male patients, and loss of lubrication and involuntary urination during sex are found in female patients. Tremor, hypomimia, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, ‘clumsiness’ in fine motor control, dyskinesias, hypersalivation and sweating may interfere with sexual function. Optimal dopaminergic treatment should facilitate sexual encounters of the couple. Appropriate counselling diminishes some of the problems (reluctance to engage in sex, problems with ejaculation, lubrication and urinary incontinence). Treatment of erectile dysfunction with sildenafil and apomorphine is evidence based. HS or compulsive sexual behaviour are side effects of dopaminergic therapy, particularly by dopaminergic agonists, and should be treated primarily by diminishing their dose. Neurologists should actively investigate sexual dysfunction in their Parkinsonian patients and offer treatment, optimally within a multidisciplinary team, where a dedicated professional would deal with sexual counselling. PMID:22164191

  5. Late-stage clinical development in lower urogenital targets: sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Usman

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, late-stage clinical drug development that primarily focuses on urogenital targets has centered around four areas of medical need (both unmet need and aiming to improve on existing therapies). These include male sexual dysfunction (MSD), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), prostatic pathology (neoplastic, pre-neoplasitic, and non-neoplastic), and improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite the regulatory approval of compounds to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), benign prostatic hyperplasia, a number of treatments for overactive bladder, and stress urinary incontinence, there remains a deficiency in addressing a number of conditions that arise out of pathophysiological dysfunction resulting in lower urogenital tract sexual conditions. In terms of late-stage clinical development, significant progress has most recently been made in MSD development, especially in understanding further a common and complex sexual dysfunction – that of premature ejaculation. The search also continues for compounds that improve ED in terms of better efficacy and superior safety profile compared to the currently marketed phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Whilst there are no approved medications to treat the subtypes of FSD, there has been significant progress in attempting to better understand how to appropriately assess treatment benefit in clinical trial settings for this difficult to diagnose and treat condition. This review will focus on late-stage human clinical development pertaining to MSD and FSD. PMID:16465180

  6. Prevalence and determinants of male sexual dysfunctions during first intercourse.

    PubMed

    Santtila, Pekka; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Jern, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We explored the balance of genetic and environmental factors on sexual dysfunctions during first intercourse experience in young men. Gender role conflict theory predicts that young males should show high levels of such dysfunctions coupled with mixed affective reactions. Three thousand one hundred eighty six male twins and their siblings (M = 26.17 years, SD = 4.77) completed items on erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE), contextual factors, and affective reactions during first intercourse, as well as parental attitudes towards nudity and sexuality. Twin modeling revealed a significant genetic effects for PE, but not for ED. Experiences of sexual dysfunction and both negative and positive affects during first intercourse were common among the participants. More positive parental attitudes were associated with less dysfunction and more positive affect during first intercourse. Having the first sexual intercourse with an unknown partner and while strongly intoxicated were, together with group pressure and reluctance to engage in intercourse, related to more negative and less positive affects. Erectile dysfunction during the first intercourse was related to more negative and less positive affects. PMID:19266379

  7. Erectile dysfunction as an initial presentation of diabetes discovered by taking sexual history

    PubMed Central

    Hirooka, Nobutaka; Lapp, Daniel P

    2012-01-01

    This case, as an important clinical reminder, will illustrate improvement of a patient’s quality of life and care in chronic diseases through sexual history taking in the primary care setting. The case report also includes recommended investigation for erectile dysfunction (ED). Family physicians need to maintain awareness of sexual dysfunction as part of the history taking during a general medical investigation to avoid leaving sexual issues untreated including ED. If left untreated, ED can lead to psychological trauma, frustration and lower self-esteem. Additionally, ED is associated with major comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, psychological conditions and diabetes mellitus. Thus, appropriately identifying this medical condition may lead prompt diagnoses and treatment of other major diseases. PMID:22605862

  8. Heart Rate Variability: A Risk Factor for Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Amelia M; Lorenz, Tierney A; Pulverman, Carey S; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of autonomic nervous system activity, which reflects an individual's ability to adapt to physiological and environmental changes. Low resting HRV has been linked to several mental health conditions, including depression, anxiety, and alcohol dependence (Kemp et al. in Biological Psychiatry 67(11):1067-1074, 2010. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.012; Kemp et al. in PloS One, 7(2):e30777, 2012; Quintana et al. in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 132(1-2):395-398, 2013. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.02.025). HRV has also been used as a method for indexing the relative balance of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity to parasympathetic nervous system activity. This balance--in particular, moderately dominant SNS activity--has been shown to play a significant role in women's genital sexual arousal in the laboratory; however, the role of SNS activity in clinically relevant sexual arousal function is unknown. The present study assessed the feasibility of using HRV as an index of women's self-reported sexual arousal function outside the laboratory. Sexual arousal function, overall sexual function, and resting HRV were assessed in 72 women, aged 18-39. Women with below average HRV were significantly more likely to report sexual arousal dysfunction (p < .001) and overall sexual dysfunction (p < .001) than both women with average HRV and women with above average HRV. In conclusion, low HRV may be a risk factor for female sexual arousal dysfunction and overall sexual dysfunction. PMID:26081002

  9. Survivorship: Sexual Dysfunction (Male), Version 1.2013

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B.; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; McCabe, Mary S.; McVary, Kevin T.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O’Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Various anticancer treatments, especially those directed toward the pelvis, can damage blood vessels and reduce circulation of blood to the penis and/or damage the autonomic nervous system, resulting in higher rates of erectile dysfunction in survivors than in the general population. In addition, hormonal therapy can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for male sexual problems, namely erectile dysfunction. PMID:24616541

  10. Sexual Dysfunction in an Internet Sample of U.S. Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Chiasson, Mary Ann; Wagmiller, Robert L.; Remien, Robert H.; Humberstone, Mike; Scheinmann, Roberta; Grov, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Relatively little is known about sexual dysfunction (SD) in men who have sex with men (MSM). Aim In order to better understand SD symptoms in MSM, we assessed self-reported SD symptoms, individually and by latent class analysis (LCA). Methods In 2004–2005 an Internet sample of U.S. MSM was recruited from gay-oriented sexual networking, chat and news websites. The analytic sample comprised 7,001 men aged 18 or older who reported lifetime male sex partners and oral or anal sex with a male partner in their most recent encounter within the past year. Main Outcome Measures Seven questions on SD symptoms that occurred during the past 12 months inquired about low sexual desire, erection problems, inability to achieve an orgasm, performance anxiety, premature ejaculation, pain during sex, and sex not being pleasurable. Results Self-reported symptoms of SD were high. Overall, 79% of men reported one or more SD symptoms in the past year, with low sexual desire, erection problems, and performance anxiety being the most prevalent. Four distinct underlying patterns of sexual functioning were identified by LCA: no/low SD, erection problems/performance anxiety, low desire/pleasure, and high SD/sexual pain. High SD/sexual pain was distinguished from the other patterns by club drug use and use of prescription and non-prescription erectile dysfunction medication before sex in the past year. Additionally, men associated with the high SD/sexual pain group were younger, single, more likely to have poor mental and physical health, and more likely to have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection in the past year compared to men in the no/low SD group. Conclusions LCA enabled us to identify underlying patterns of sexual functioning among this sample of MSM recruited online. Future research should investigate these distinct subgroups with SD symptoms in order to develop tailored treatments and counseling for SD. PMID:19968773

  11. The role of the sexual partner in managing erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjun; Gao, Tiejun; Wang, Run

    2016-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has detrimental social and psychological effects on the quality of life of affected individuals and their sexual partners. When medical intervention is introduced to treat ED, physicians, nurses, and clinical educators should consider this disorder as a shared health problem for the men with ED and their sexual partners. New therapeutics such as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors improve erectile function in affected men, and the ultimate goal of medical intervention for ED should be achievement of a satisfactory sex life for couples engaged sexual relationships. Sexual partners of men with ED have an important role in its management and improvement in quality of sex life; therefore, they should be involved in assessment of, diagnosis, education, counselling, and choice of therapy. This sexual- partner-engaged approach might assist treatment and rehabilitation, helping the couples affected by ED to achieve a high-quality sex life. PMID:26832165

  12. Sexual Enhancement Groups for Dysfunctional Women: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, Sandra R.; Ersner-Hershfield, Robin

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of women with sexual dysfunction were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment. Two groups did not involve partner participation, while the third group included partners on two occasions. Results for all groups were similar. The question of whether orgasm through coitus alone is a reasonable goal is raised and challenged. (Author)

  13. Insecure Attachment Style and Dysfunctional Sexual Beliefs Predict Sexual Coercion Proclivity in University Men

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Silvain S; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Past studies have shown an association between low sexual functioning and engaging in sexually coercive behaviors among men. The mechanism of this relationship is not well understood. Moreover, most studies in this area have been done in incarcerated sex offenders. Aims The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of potential distal predictors of sexual coercion, including insecure attachment style and dysfunctional sexual beliefs, in mediating the relationship between sexual functioning and sexual coercion. The study also seeks to extend past findings to a novel non-forensic population. Methods Male university students (N = 367) anonymously completed online questionnaires. Main Outcome Measures Participants completed the Sexual Experiences Survey, Improved Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale, Hostility Towards Women Scale, Likelihood of Rape Item, Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, Dysfunctional Sexual Beliefs Scale, and Brief Sexual Functioning Questionnaire. Results Sexual functioning was not significantly associated with sexually coercive behaviors in our sample (r = 0.08, P = 0.247), though a significant correlation between sexual functioning and rape myth acceptance was found (r = 0.18, P = 0.007). Path analysis of all variables showed that the likelihood of rape item was the strongest correlate of sexually coercive behaviors (β = 0.34, P < 0.001), while dysfunctional sexual beliefs appeared to mediate the association between anxious attachment and likelihood of rape item score. Anxious (r = −0.27, P = 0.001) and avoidant (r = −0.19, P = 0.004) attachment also correlated significantly with lower sexual functioning. Conclusions These findings suggest the relationship between sexual functioning and sexual coercion may be less robust than previously reported, and may be due to a shared association with other factors. The results elaborate on the interrelation between attachment

  14. Reproductive and sexual dysfunction in men with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Montouris, Georgia; Morris, George L

    2005-12-01

    Disturbances of reproductive and sexual health are common in people with epilepsy. Their etiology is not well understood but appears to be multifactorial, and both epilepsy itself and drugs used to treat it are implicated. Physiologically, sex steroid hormone levels, the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, and testicular function can be affected in men with epilepsy. Psychosocial complications associated with epilepsy can also affect reproductive health and sexuality. Clinicians need to investigate such problems carefully, both because of their multifactorial nature and because patients and physicians alike may often fail to recognize or be reluctant to acknowledge them; in particular, patients whose epilepsy had its onset before puberty may lack subjective awareness of impairments of sexual response and function. Treatments for reproductive and sexual dysfunction in men with epilepsy have been inadequately studied. Modalities such as medications for erectile dysfunction and surgery may be useful. Therapy with exogenous testosterone and an aromatase inhibitor may be helpful for men with epilepsy and sexual dysfunction due to testosterone deficiency.

  15. Sexual (Dys)function after Urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the andrological consequences of urethral repair. Until recently authors have focused mainly on technical aspects and objective results. Reported outcomes of urethral reconstruction surgery have traditionally focused only on urodynamic parameters such as flow rates. Patient reported outcome measures have largely been neglected and there is a scarcity of well conducted systematic studies on the subject. For these reasons whether the different components of sexual life are more or less affected by different types of urethral reconstruction remains largely unknown. In an attempt to clarify the available scientific evidence, the authors make a critical review of available literature, systematizing it by sexual domain and study type. Brief pathophysiological correlations are discussed. PMID:27051420

  16. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  17. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  18. Executive Dysfunction Predicts Delinquency But Not Characteristics of Sexual Aggression Among Adolescent Sexual Offenders.

    PubMed

    Burton, David; Demuynck, Sophia; Yoder, Jamie R

    2014-11-25

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate executive function and its relationship to delinquency and sexual crime in adolescents incarcerated for sexual crimes. Based on self-report data, 196 male adolescent sexual offenders from a Midwest state reported high rates of executive dysfunction. Although such deficits did not relate to the number of victims of sexual abuse, severity, or degree of force used in commission of the sexual crimes, poor executive function was significantly predictive of both general delinquency and felony theft. In both measures of delinquent conduct, behavioral regulation dysfunction was predictive of the frequency of commission of the crimes, whereas metacognition was not. Research and treatment implications are offered. PMID:25428928

  19. Sexual dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: a hot but sensitive issue.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has considerable personal impact for sufferers and their families. Those with RA suffer from pain, restricted joint movements, and fatigue, and can have problems with self-esteem and body image. It is also possible that medication causes sexual problems. Research on the subject is limited, and shows a divergent picture. Assessment for sexual dysfunction in clinical practice might be another hurdle, as patients and health professionals are reluctant to discuss this issue face to face. The aim of the work carried out and described in this article was to study the possibility of implementing sexual dysfunction assessment into standard rheumatology clinical practice. Results revealed that the multidimensional patient-reported outcome measures questionnaire offered the opportunity to assess the disease activity parameters, functional disability, quality of life, sexual dysfunction, and self-helplessness in one format. The patients appeared willing to complete questionnaires and this may be an acceptable tool for assessment. Improving patient education, as well as nurse-patient communication, through discussions about available options may minimize patients' feelings of isolation in addressing the problem and could help compensate for negative effects resulting from the disease. PMID:22067584

  20. Sexuality in eating disorders patients: etiological factors, sexual dysfunction and identity issues. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lelli, Lorenzo; Ricca, Valdo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community appears to be less interested in sexuality of eating disorders (EDs) as compared to other psychiatric or medical comorbidities. However, a clear association between sexual problems and ED psychopathology was reported from different perspectives. The overarching goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the general approach of the scientific literature toward the topic of sexuality and EDs. In particular, four different categories of research have been individuated, encompassing the role of puberty, and sexual abuse in the pathogenesis of the disorders, sexual dysfunctions, and the association between sexual orientation and EDs psychopathology. Timing of puberty with its hormonal consequences and the changes in the way persons perceive their own body represent a crucial period of life for the onset of the disorder. Sexual abuse, and especially childhood sexual abuse are well-recognized risk factors for the development of ED, determining a worse long-term outcome. Recent research overcome the approach that considers sexual activity of EDs patients, in terms of hypersexuality and dangerous sexual behaviors, considering the sexuality of EDs persons in terms of sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm and pain. Results from this line of research are promising, and describe a clear relationship between sexual dysfunction and the core psychopathological features of EDs, such as body image disturbances. Finally, the analysis of the literature showed an association between sexual orientation and gender dysphoria with EDs psychopathology and pathological eating behaviors, confirming the validity of research developing new models of maintaining factors of EDs related to the topic of self-identity. PMID:26812878

  1. Sexuality in eating disorders patients: etiological factors, sexual dysfunction and identity issues. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lelli, Lorenzo; Ricca, Valdo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community appears to be less interested in sexuality of eating disorders (EDs) as compared to other psychiatric or medical comorbidities. However, a clear association between sexual problems and ED psychopathology was reported from different perspectives. The overarching goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the general approach of the scientific literature toward the topic of sexuality and EDs. In particular, four different categories of research have been individuated, encompassing the role of puberty, and sexual abuse in the pathogenesis of the disorders, sexual dysfunctions, and the association between sexual orientation and EDs psychopathology. Timing of puberty with its hormonal consequences and the changes in the way persons perceive their own body represent a crucial period of life for the onset of the disorder. Sexual abuse, and especially childhood sexual abuse are well-recognized risk factors for the development of ED, determining a worse long-term outcome. Recent research overcome the approach that considers sexual activity of EDs patients, in terms of hypersexuality and dangerous sexual behaviors, considering the sexuality of EDs persons in terms of sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm and pain. Results from this line of research are promising, and describe a clear relationship between sexual dysfunction and the core psychopathological features of EDs, such as body image disturbances. Finally, the analysis of the literature showed an association between sexual orientation and gender dysphoria with EDs psychopathology and pathological eating behaviors, confirming the validity of research developing new models of maintaining factors of EDs related to the topic of self-identity.

  2. Avoiding experiences: sexual dysfunction in women with a history of sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Staples, Jennifer; Rellini, Alessandra H; Roberts, Sarah P

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of sexual abuse during childhood/adolescence experience a high rate of sexual dysfunction. Evidence also suggests that they often use avoidant coping strategies, such as substance abuse, dissociation, and emotional suppression, which are likely factors implicated with their psychopathology. There is a dearth of information on potential psychological mechanisms affecting the sexuality of these women. Therefore, it is relevant to investigate whether avoidance, an important cognitive mechanism associated with anxiety disorders, relates to sexual functioning in this population. In this study, participants with (N = 34) and without (N = 22) a history of sexual abuse prior to age 16 years completed questionnaires on severity of sexual abuse, sexual functioning, and a tendency to avoid experiences. A three-step hierarchical regression investigated the effects of childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies on different aspects of sexual functioning. A significant interaction between childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies was found for orgasm function, with the combination of sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies explaining lower orgasm function. These findings suggest that, for women with a history of early sexual abuse, the tendency to avoid interpersonal closeness and avoid emotional involvement predicts orgasm functioning. PMID:21667232

  3. Avoiding experiences: sexual dysfunction in women with a history of sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Staples, Jennifer; Rellini, Alessandra H; Roberts, Sarah P

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of sexual abuse during childhood/adolescence experience a high rate of sexual dysfunction. Evidence also suggests that they often use avoidant coping strategies, such as substance abuse, dissociation, and emotional suppression, which are likely factors implicated with their psychopathology. There is a dearth of information on potential psychological mechanisms affecting the sexuality of these women. Therefore, it is relevant to investigate whether avoidance, an important cognitive mechanism associated with anxiety disorders, relates to sexual functioning in this population. In this study, participants with (N = 34) and without (N = 22) a history of sexual abuse prior to age 16 years completed questionnaires on severity of sexual abuse, sexual functioning, and a tendency to avoid experiences. A three-step hierarchical regression investigated the effects of childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies on different aspects of sexual functioning. A significant interaction between childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies was found for orgasm function, with the combination of sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies explaining lower orgasm function. These findings suggest that, for women with a history of early sexual abuse, the tendency to avoid interpersonal closeness and avoid emotional involvement predicts orgasm functioning.

  4. [Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in adrenal disorders].

    PubMed

    Horiba, N

    1997-11-01

    Among various diseases of the adrenals, major disorders that cause sexual and gonadal disturbances are congenital adrenal hyperplasia(CAH) and Cushing's syndrome, and the others include virilizing or feminizing adrenocortical tumors. CAH was reviewed based on the recent advances in molecular genetics. The most striking discovery was steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, mutations of which produce lipoid adrenal hyperplasia that was previously attributed to P-450scc deficiency. Reversible amenorrhea or impotence is found in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Low plasma estrogen and testosterone levels are associated with female and male patients, respectively. Elevated adrenal androgen accounts for mild virilization in female patients with ACTH-dependent subtypes. The sites of action at which hypercortisolemia suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were discussed.

  5. High Rate of Sexual Dysfunction Following Surgery for Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Caglar; Tinay, Ilker; Yegen, Cumhur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although rectal cancer is a very common malignancy and has an improved cure rate in response to oncological treatment, research on rectal-cancer survivors' sexual function remains limited. Sexual dysfunction (SD) after rectal cancer treatment was measured, and possible predisposing factors that may have an impact on the development of this disorder were identified. Methods Patients undergoing curative rectal cancer surgery from January 2012 to September 2013 were surveyed using questionnaires. The female sexual function index or the International Index of Erectile Function was recorded. A multiple logistic regression was used to test associations of clinical factors with outcomes. Results Fifty-six men (56%) and 28 women (44%) who completed the questionnaire were included in the study. A total of 76 patients of the 86 patients (90.5%) with the diagnosis of rectal cancer who were included in this study reported different levels of SD after radical surgery. A total of 64 patients (76%) from the whole cohort reported moderate to severe SD after treatment of rectal cancer. Gender (P = 0.011) was independently associated with SD. Female patients reported significantly higher rates of moderate to severe SD than male patients. Patients were rarely treated for dysfunction. Conclusion Sexual problems after surgery for rectal cancer are common, but patients are rarely treated for SD. Female patients reported higher rates of SD than males. These results point out the importance of sexual (dys)function in survivors of rectal cancer. More attention should be drawn to this topic for clinical and research purposes. PMID:25360427

  6. FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION (FSD) IN WOMEN HEALTH CARE WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Margariti, Maria; Nousi, Eftichia; Mistrioti, Dimitra; Lacroix, Richard; Saridi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence and severity of FSD in women working in tertiary hospitals. Material and methods: The study sample was drawn from health care women between the ages of 20 and 65 years, working in two hospitals in Greece. This descriptive study used a structured Greek questionnaire and sexual function screener and quality of life sectors were consisted of rated scale questions. Eighty eight questionnaires were returned properly completed. The statistical analysis used the SPSS statistical program. Results: Female sexual dysfunction is a highly prevalent health issue whose exact incidence is not well defined. Factors that can contribute to female sexual dysfunction may be psychogenic, physical, mixed or unknown. Each of these factors consists of individual components that influence the sexual response; however their precise impact in FSD development and progression is unknown. Moreover, the role of circadian rhythm disorders (especially that of shift work sleep disorder) to the development and progression of FSD has been poorly investigated. Conclusion: Working environment and patterns of work schedules may play a role in FSD however it has been difficult to specify in what extent they contribute to FSD development. PMID:27482157

  7. Vajikarana: Treatment of sexual dysfunctions based on Indian concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P. K.; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Vajikarana or Vrishya chikitsa is a one of eight major specialty of the Ashtanga Ayurveda. This subject is concerned with aphrodisiacs, virility and improving health of progeny. As per Charak Samhita, by proper use of these formulations, one becomes endowed with good physique, potency, strength, and complexion and sexually exhilarated and sexually potent. This in turn is helpful in many common sexual dysfunctions, including Infertility, Premature Ejaculation and Erectile dysfunction. The therapy is preceded by living in strict compliance with the directions mentioned in Ayurvedic classics, various methods of body cleansing and other non-medicinal strategies like sexual health promoting conduct, behavior and diet. Certain individualized herbal and herbo-mineral combinations are administered as per the nature of a person according to the Ayurveda. Many limitations need to be considered before considering the use of theses therapy like lack of scientific studies, possibilities of adulteration in the herbal and herbo-mineral combinations available in market and possibilities of unexpected side-effects etc., The article calls upon initiating research in this area so that claims of ancient Ayurvedic texts could be substantiated and vajikaran therapy may be utilized by modern medicine. PMID:23858267

  8. Ginkgo biloba for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A J; Bartlik, B

    1998-01-01

    In an open trial ginkgo biloba, an extract derived from the leaf of the Chinese ginkgo tree and noted for its cerebral enhancing effects, was found to be 84% effective in treating antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction predominately caused by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, N = 63). Women (n = 33) were more responsive to the sexually enhancing effects of ginkgo biloba than men (N = 30), with relative success rates of 91% versus 76%. Ginkgo biloba generally had a positive effect on all 4 phases of the sexual response cycle: desire, excitement (erection and lubrication), orgasm, and resolution (afterglow). This study originated from the observation that a geriatric patient on ginkgo biloba for memory enhancement noted improved erections. Patients exhibited sexual dysfunction secondary to a variety of antidepressant medications including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs), serotonin and nonrepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOIs), and tricyclics. Dosages of ginkgo biloba extract ranged from 60 mg qd to 120 mg bid (average = 209mg/d). The common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances, headache, and general central nervous system activation. The article includes a discussion of presumed pharmacologic mechanisms, including effects on platelet activating factor, prostaglandins, peripheral vasodilatation, and central serotonin and norepinephrine receptor factor modulation.

  9. Vajikarana: Treatment of sexual dysfunctions based on Indian concepts.

    PubMed

    Dalal, P K; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gupta, S K

    2013-01-01

    Vajikarana or Vrishya chikitsa is a one of eight major specialty of the Ashtanga Ayurveda. This subject is concerned with aphrodisiacs, virility and improving health of progeny. As per Charak Samhita, by proper use of these formulations, one becomes endowed with good physique, potency, strength, and complexion and sexually exhilarated and sexually potent. This in turn is helpful in many common sexual dysfunctions, including Infertility, Premature Ejaculation and Erectile dysfunction. The therapy is preceded by living in strict compliance with the directions mentioned in Ayurvedic classics, various methods of body cleansing and other non-medicinal strategies like sexual health promoting conduct, behavior and diet. Certain individualized herbal and herbo-mineral combinations are administered as per the nature of a person according to the Ayurveda. Many limitations need to be considered before considering the use of theses therapy like lack of scientific studies, possibilities of adulteration in the herbal and herbo-mineral combinations available in market and possibilities of unexpected side-effects etc., The article calls upon initiating research in this area so that claims of ancient Ayurvedic texts could be substantiated and vajikaran therapy may be utilized by modern medicine. PMID:23858267

  10. Pharmacologic and surgical therapies for sexual dysfunction in male cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Ortaç, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    The recent recognition that many men experience sexual dysfunction following their diagnosis and treatment of genitourinary cancers, has led to the development multiple varied strategies that attempt to restore or preserve that function. In this manuscript we review the understanding of why it happens, highlight novel management strategies and discuss the concept of penile rehabilitation (PR) following prostate cancer (PCa) treatment, glans preserving strategies among men diagnosed with penile cancer and address the controversial issue of testosterone therapy in men with PCa. PMID:26816821

  11. Prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction among Turkish pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Küçükdurmaz, Faruk; Efe, Erkan; Malkoç, Önder; Kolus, Eyüp; Amasyalı, Akın Soner; Resim, Sefa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of female sexual dysfunction together with the concerns of women about sexuality during pregnancy. Material and methods A total of 207 healthy, sexually active pregnant women were enrolled in the study. Demographic data of all participants were noted and sexual functions were evaluated by Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Each FSFI domain score was calculated and mean scores were noted. Concerns of women about sexuality were also investigated. Results Mean age of participant women was 27.0±5.9 (range 15–44) years. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction was found to be 87% in study population. Mean FSFI score was 18.6±1.21. The rate of sexual dysfunction was higher in the first (87%) and third (92.6%) trimesters when compared to the second (80.6%) trimester (p=0.243). Among demographic variables, education levels of partners and preconceptional sexual dysfunction were found to be significantly related to FSD. The most common concerns of women about sexual relationship have been reported as the fear of having pain (35%), risk of abortion (21.3%) and religious factors (10%). Conclusion Prevalence of sexual dysfunction is relatively high among pregnant women. Educational levels and preconceptional sexual functions were found to have an impact on this high rate. Accurate counseling of partners about sexuality during pregnancy may help to reduce misbeliefs, concerns and, thereby, decrease this high rate of female sexual dysfunction.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction among Turkish pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Küçükdurmaz, Faruk; Efe, Erkan; Malkoç, Önder; Kolus, Eyüp; Amasyalı, Akın Soner; Resim, Sefa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of female sexual dysfunction together with the concerns of women about sexuality during pregnancy. Material and methods A total of 207 healthy, sexually active pregnant women were enrolled in the study. Demographic data of all participants were noted and sexual functions were evaluated by Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Each FSFI domain score was calculated and mean scores were noted. Concerns of women about sexuality were also investigated. Results Mean age of participant women was 27.0±5.9 (range 15–44) years. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction was found to be 87% in study population. Mean FSFI score was 18.6±1.21. The rate of sexual dysfunction was higher in the first (87%) and third (92.6%) trimesters when compared to the second (80.6%) trimester (p=0.243). Among demographic variables, education levels of partners and preconceptional sexual dysfunction were found to be significantly related to FSD. The most common concerns of women about sexual relationship have been reported as the fear of having pain (35%), risk of abortion (21.3%) and religious factors (10%). Conclusion Prevalence of sexual dysfunction is relatively high among pregnant women. Educational levels and preconceptional sexual functions were found to have an impact on this high rate. Accurate counseling of partners about sexuality during pregnancy may help to reduce misbeliefs, concerns and, thereby, decrease this high rate of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:27635293

  13. Sexual Dysfunction in Patients with Alcohol and Opioid Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Mattoo, Surendra K.; Pendharkar, Shreyas; Kandappan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    There are limited numbers of studies which have evaluated the sexual dysfunction (SD) in patients with alcohol and opioids dependence. This article reviews the existing literature. Electronic searches were carried out using the PubMed, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect to locate the relevant literature. Subjects addicted to heroin or on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) or buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) show higher rates of SD in comparison to the general population. SD rates have ranged 34-85% for heroin addicts, 14-81% for MMT, 36-83% for BMT, and 90% for naltrexone maintenance. The rates of SD in alcohol-dependent population have ranged 40-95.2%, with rates being consistently much higher in alcohol-dependent population than in the healthy controls or social drinkers. The common SDs reported have been erectile dysfunction followed by premature ejaculation, retarded ejaculation and decreased sexual desire among men, and dyspareunia and vaginal dryness among women. This review suggests that long-term use of alcohol and opioids are associated with SD in almost all domains of sexual functioning. There is a need to increase the awareness of clinicians about this association as many times SD in patients with substance abuse lead to poor treatment compliance and relapse. Further, there is a need to carry out more number of studies to understand the relationship in a better way. PMID:25336765

  14. Prevalence and Predictive Factors of Sexual Dysfunction in Iranian Women: Univariate and Multivariate Logistic Regression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Suhrabi, Zainab; Akbari, Malihe

    2016-01-01

    Background Female sexual dysfunction, which can occur during any stage of a normal sexual activity, is a serious condition for individuals and couples. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictive factors of female sexual dysfunction in women referred to health centers in Ilam, the Western Iran, in 2014. Methods In the present cross-sectional study, 444 women who attended health centers in Ilam were enrolled from May to September 2014. Participants were selected according to the simple random sampling method. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to predict the risk factors of female sexual dysfunction. Diffe rences with an alpha error of 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Results Overall, 75.9% of the study population exhibited sexual dysfunction. Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that there was a significant association between female sexual dysfunction and age, menarche age, gravidity, parity, and education (P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that, menarche age (odds ratio, 1.26), education level (odds ratio, 1.71), and gravida (odds ratio, 1.59) were independent predictive variables for female sexual dysfunction. Conclusion The majority of Iranian women suffer from sexual dysfunction. A lack of awareness of Iranian women's sexual pleasure and formal training on sexual function and its influencing factors, such as menarche age, gravida, and level of education, may lead to a high prevalence of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:27688863

  15. Prevalence and Predictive Factors of Sexual Dysfunction in Iranian Women: Univariate and Multivariate Logistic Regression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Suhrabi, Zainab; Akbari, Malihe

    2016-01-01

    Background Female sexual dysfunction, which can occur during any stage of a normal sexual activity, is a serious condition for individuals and couples. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and predictive factors of female sexual dysfunction in women referred to health centers in Ilam, the Western Iran, in 2014. Methods In the present cross-sectional study, 444 women who attended health centers in Ilam were enrolled from May to September 2014. Participants were selected according to the simple random sampling method. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to predict the risk factors of female sexual dysfunction. Diffe rences with an alpha error of 0.05 were regarded as statistically significant. Results Overall, 75.9% of the study population exhibited sexual dysfunction. Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that there was a significant association between female sexual dysfunction and age, menarche age, gravidity, parity, and education (P<0.05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that, menarche age (odds ratio, 1.26), education level (odds ratio, 1.71), and gravida (odds ratio, 1.59) were independent predictive variables for female sexual dysfunction. Conclusion The majority of Iranian women suffer from sexual dysfunction. A lack of awareness of Iranian women's sexual pleasure and formal training on sexual function and its influencing factors, such as menarche age, gravida, and level of education, may lead to a high prevalence of female sexual dysfunction.

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Male Subjects Receiving Trifluoperazine, Risperidone, or Olanzapine: Rates Vary With Assessment Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Nebhinani, Naresh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the rate and typology of sexual dysfunction in male subjects receiving trifluoperazine, risperidone, or olanzapine using the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), the Psychotropic Related Sexual Dysfunction Questionnaire (PRSexDQ), and the sexual function section of the modified Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale (UKU). Method: The sample included 100 men with psychotic disorders (F2 category of the ICD-10) and receiving trifluoperazine (n = 20), risperidone (n = 30), or olanzapine (n = 50) for at least 3 months’ duration. Subjects with a history of sexual dysfunction prior to antipsychotic intake or chronic medical illness were excluded. A cross-sectional design was employed, and data were collected over a 1½-year period from March 2009 to August 2010. Results: The rate of sexual dysfunction varied from scale to scale among the 100 subjects. The rate of sexual dysfunction was 25% on the ASEX, 37% on the PRSexDQ, and 40% on the UKU. Sexual dysfunction in the trifluoperazine, risperidone, and olanzapine groups was 20%, 43%, and 16%, respectively, on the ASEX; 35%, 50%, and 30%, respectively, on the PRSexDQ; and 40%, 50%, and 34%, respectively, on the UKU. The most common sexual dysfunction as assessed on all scales was decreased libido, except for the risperidone group on the ASEX. Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction is quite prevalent in subjects receiving antipsychotic medications. In our study, rate of sexual dysfunction was highest for risperidone, followed by trifluoperazine and olanzapine. However, the rate of sexual dysfunction varied from scale to scale. Hence, there is a need for a comprehensive instrument to assess sexual dysfunction in patients receiving antipsychotics. PMID:22943029

  17. Male sexual dysfunctions and multimedia immersion therapy (follow-up).

    PubMed

    Optale, Gabriele; Marin, Silvia; Pastore, Massimiliano; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2003-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency, after 1 year, of combined use of psychodynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual reality (VR) for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature ejaculation (PE) in 160 heterosexual males who had neither any prior sexual therapy nor had made use (either before, during or after therapy) of any specific pharmaceuticals for the treatment of primary sexual dysfunction. All subjects had given their informed consent. After a clinical diagnosis in an andrologic center, 50 presumably psychological ED (average age 43.7 years), 60 mixed ED (53.9 years) and 50 primary PE (39 years) who suffered these problems over 6 months were undergoing a cycle of 12 sessions, over a 25-week period, of psychotherapy, integrating an audio CD and helmet with miniature television screens that projected specially designed CD-ROM program on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity. The clinical follow up was done after 6 and 12 months after the cycle. After one year, the overall partial (two times out of three) and complete positive response rate for psychological ED was 75%, for mixed ED was 47% and for PE was 54%. We considered drop-out cases as only before the 7th session of the treatment cycle, the drop-outs after session 7 and the patients that did not show up for follow-up are counted as negative results. Two patients reported nausea and one, vertigo during the first 15-min virtual reality experience. Considering the particular way that full-immersion virtual reality involves the subject who experiences it, we hypothesized that this methodological approach could speed up the therapeutic process. The evidence that positive results persist over time allows us to hypothesize that certain changes in cerebral function can be possible and that these changes are correlated to favorable sexual performance in the male.

  18. Sexual dysfunction in the older woman: an overview of the current understanding and management.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Berman, Jennifer R

    2004-01-01

    Sexuality is one of the most important quality of life issues for both men and women. Sexual dysfunction is a highly prevalent, age-related and progressive problem. The various physiological and psychological changes that occur with aging can have a significant impact on sexual function. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction remains distinct from that of a man. Thus, we cannot approach female patients or their sexual function problems in a similar fashion to that of male patients. A woman's motivation and ability to find and respond to sexual stimuli is largely influenced by her emotional intimacy with her partner. Frequently, the emotional and relationship well-being a woman experiences contributes more to her sexual enjoyment than does her physiological response. However, it is imperative to assess for possible physiological barriers a woman may have which impede a healthy and satisfying sexual life. Therefore, a comprehensive approach, addressing both the physiological and psychological factors is instrumental to the evaluation of female patients with sexual complaints. After years of ardent research and recent therapeutic advances in male sexual dysfunction, researchers have begun addressing the intricacy of female sexual complaints. Studies involving both pre- and postmenopausal women have reported that most women do experience some type of sexual dysfunction during their lifetime. The sexual complaints women experience in their younger years may follow them into older adulthood, but often times change considerably because of various age-related changes. In an effort to assist researchers and clinicians in designing studies and implementing appropriate evaluation and treatment options for women with sexual complaints, a classification system for female sexual dysfunction has been designed. The four categories of female dysfunction include: hypoactive sexual desire disorder, sexual arousal disorder, orgasmic disorder and sexual pain disorders. Evaluation

  19. Male sexual dysfunctions: immersive virtual reality and multimedia therapy.

    PubMed

    Optale, Gabriele; Pastore, Massimiliano; Marin, Silvia; Bordin, Diego; Nasta, Alberto; Pianon, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    The study describes a therapeutic approach using psycho-dynamic psychotherapy integrating virtual environment (VE) for resolving impotence or better erectile dysfunction (ED) of presumably psychological or mixed origin and premature ejaculation (PE). The plan for therapy consists of 12 sessions (15 if a sexual partner was involved) over a 25-week period on the ontogenetic development of male sexual identity, and the methods involved the use of a laptop PC, joystick, Virtual Reality (VR) helmet with miniature television screen showing a new specially-designed CD-ROM programs using Virtools with Windows 2000 and an audio CD. This study was composed of 30 patients, 15 (10 suffering from ED and 5 PE) plus 15 control patients (10 ED and 5 PE), that underwent the same therapeutic protocol but used an old VR helmet to interact with the old VE using a PC Pentium 133 16 Mb RAM. We also compared this study with another study we carried out on 160 men affected by sexual disorders, underwent the same therapeutic protocol, but treated using a VE created (in Superscape VRT 5.6) using always Windows 2000 with portable tools. Comparing the groups of patients affected by ED and PE, there emerged a significant positive results value without any important differences among the different VE used. However, we had a % increase of undesirable physical reactions during the more realistic 15-minute VR experience using Virtools development kit. Psychotherapy alone normally requires long periods of treatment in order to resolve sexual dysfunctions. Considering the particular way in which full-immersion VR involves the subject who experiences it (he is totally unobserved and in complete privacy), we hypothesise that this methodological approach might speed up the therapeutic psycho-dynamic process, which eludes cognitive defences and directly stimulates the subconscious, and that better results could be obtained in the treatment of these sexual disorders. This method can be used by any

  20. The assessment of sexual dysfunction in Egyptian women with lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    El Atrash, Gamal; Ali, Mohamed H.; Abdelwahab, Hassan A.; Abdelreheem, Lobna A.; Shamaa, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) has been reported in 46% of women with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). FSD is a common health problem that remains under-investigated, especially in Eastern communities, where discussion of the issue is considered a taboo. In this study we determined the prevalence of various subtypes of FSD in relation to LUTS in women in Ismailia, Egypt. Patients and methods This was a case-control study to assess FSD in women with LUTS in comparison to normal women. In all, 101 women patients attending the Urology clinic at our institution were divided into two groups, a study group of 52 with LUTS and a control group of 49 with no LUTS. Validated Arabic versions of the FSD index and the Bristol questionnaire were used to assess the participants, and the data analysed statistically. Results FSD was diagnosed in 75 of the 101 patients (74%); 87 (86%) reported hypoactive sexual desire, 61 (60%) reported sexual arousal disorder, 56 (55%) had lubrication disorders, 65 (64%) complained of orgasmic deficiency, 36 (36%) had satisfaction disorder, and 59 (58%) had sexual pain disorder (e.g., dyspareunia or non-coital genital pain). Arousal, satisfaction, orgasmic and lubrication disorders were more common in the women with LUTS. There was no statistically significant difference in desire disorders between the groups. Conclusions FSD and its subtypes are more prevalent in women with LUTS in this sample of Egyptian women. PMID:26019956

  1. The effects of state and trait self-focused attention on sexual arousal in sexually functional and dysfunctional women

    PubMed Central

    Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of state self-focused attention on sexual arousal and trait self-consciousness on sexual arousal and function in sexually functional (n = 16) and dysfunctional (n = 16) women. Self-focused attention was induced using a 50% reflectant television screen in one of two counterbalanced sessions during which self-report and physiological sexual responses to erotic films were measured. Self-focused attention significantly decreased vaginal pulse amplitude (VPA) responses among sexually functional but not dysfunctional women, and substantially decreased correlations between self-report and VPA measures of sexual arousal. Self-focused attention did not significantly impact subjective sexual arousal in sexually functional or dysfunctional women. Trait private self-consciousness was positively related to sexual desire, orgasm, compatibility, contentment and sexual satisfaction. Public self-consciousness was correlated with sexual pain. The findings are discussed in terms of Masters and Johnson’s [Masters, W. H. & Johnson, V. E. (1970). Human sexual inadequacy. Boston: Little, Brown) concepts of “spectatoring” and “sensate focus.” PMID:15927143

  2. Sexual dysfunction and neuroendocrine correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder in combat veterans: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Lehrner, Amy; Flory, Janine D; Bierer, Linda M; Makotkine, Iouri; Marmar, Charles R; Yehuda, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is not a symptom of PTSD but is a common clinical complaint in trauma survivors with this disorder. In that there are biological parallels in the neuroendocrine processes underlying both PTSD and sexual behavior, we conducted an exploratory investigation of the relationship of PTSD and related neuroendocrine indicators with sexual dysfunction in armed service veterans. Major Depressive Disorder, highly comorbid with PTSD and sexual dysfunction, was also assessed. In veterans with PTSD, sexual problems were associated with plasma DHEA and cortisol, urinary catecholamines, and glucocorticoid sensitivity, even when controlling for the effects of comorbid depression. In a subsample analysis, testosterone levels did not distinguish PTSD or sexual dysfunction, suggesting that sexual problems reported by veterans in this sample were not the result of organic disorder. PTSD did predict higher dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels, which were associated with sexual problems. More detailed assessment of sexual dysfunction in biologically informed studies of PTSD is warranted to clarify the relationships of PTSD symptomatology and related neurobiology with sexual dysfunction.

  3. The effect of fatigue and fibromyalgia on sexual dysfunction in women with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Blazquez, Alicia; Ruiz, Eva; Aliste, Luisa; García-Quintana, Ana; Alegre, José

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome is attracting growing interest but, to date, few studies have analyzed it. For this reason, the authors evaluated sexual dysfunction in women with chronic fatigue syndrome (using the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction) and explore correlations with fatigue and other symptoms. Sexual dysfunction was greater in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (n = 615) with a higher number of cognitive, neurological, and neurovegetative symptoms, concomitant fibromyalgia, Sjögren's syndrome, or myofascial pain syndrome, and more intense fatigue (p <.05).

  4. Animal models in urological disease and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, Gordon; Casey, James H; Naylor, Alasdair M

    2006-01-01

    There are several conditions associated with dysfunction of the lower urinary tract or which result in a reduction in the ability to engage in satisfactory sexual function and result in significant bother to sufferers, partners and/or carers. This review describes some of the animal models that may be used to discover safe and effective medicines with which to treat them. While alpha adrenoceptor antagonists and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors deliver improvement in symptom relief in benign prostatic hyperplasia sufferers, the availability of efficacious and well-tolerated medicines to treat incontinence is less well served. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) has no approved medical therapy in the United States and overactive bladder (OAB) therapy is limited to treatment with muscarinic antagonists (anti-muscarinics). SUI and OAB are characterised by high prevalence, a growing ageing population and a strong desire from sufferers and physicians for more effective treatment options. High patient numbers with low presentation rates characterizes sexual dysfunction in men and women. The introduction of Viagra™ in 1998 for treating male erectile dysfunction and the success of the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor class (PDE5 inhibitor) have indicated the willingness of sufferers to seek treatment when an effective alternative to injections and devices is available. The main value of preclinical models in discovering new medicines is to predict clinical outcomes. This translation can be established relatively easily in areas of medicine where there are a large number of drugs with different underlying pharmacological mechanisms in clinical usage. However, apart from, for example, the use of PDE5 inhibitors to treat male erectile dysfunction and the use of anti-muscarinics to treat OAB, this clinical information is limited. Therefore, current confidence in existing preclinical models is based on our understanding of the biochemical, physiological, pathophysiological and

  5. Female Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Non-Malignant Cervical Diseases: A Study from an Urban Chinese Sample

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aixia; Lei, Yu; Yang, Bin; Li, Ping; Pan, Lianjun

    2015-01-01

    Non-malignant cervical diseases are common causes of disease among women worldwide. Although many studies have focused on sexual function in women with cervical cancer, little is known about the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and its risk factors in women with non-malignant cervical diseases. The present study aims to assess sexual function in Chinese women with non-malignant cervical diseases and to identify potential risk factors for these diseases. A cross-sectional hospital-based survey was conducted in Nanjing, China. The Chinese version of the Female Sexual Function Index (CVFSFI) was used to evaluate sexual function. Three hundred three women who had been diagnosed with at least one non-malignant cervical disease and 293 healthy women were recruited from Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. We found that women with non-malignant cervical diseases had a significantly higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) (51.8% vs. 34.8%), low desire (43.2% vs. 26.3%), arousal disorder (41.6% vs. 28.3%), and lubrication disorder (51.2% vs. 36.9%) compared with the control group. Cervicitis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were found to be independent risk factors for FSD. Our study indicates that women with cervicitis and CIN are at a high risk for FSD and deserve focused initial and follow-up management. PMID:26473480

  6. Sexual self-schemas, sexual dysfunction, and the sexual responses of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Rellini, Alessandra H; Meston, Cindy M

    2011-04-01

    Accumulating evidence points to the mediating effects of sexual self-schemas on the sexual difficulties of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). The following study adds to the extant literature by investigating (1) sexual function and (2) sexual satisfaction utilizing validated measures, and reporting on the relationship between sexual self-schemas and physiological (vaginal photoplethysmography), subjective, and affective responses during laboratory exposure to sexual stimuli. In a community sample of women with (N = 48) and without (N = 48) a history of CSA, we tested (1) the mediation of negative affect on the relation between sexual self-schemas and sexual function/satisfaction, (2) the mediation of negative affect in the relation between CSA and sexual function/satisfaction, and (3) the mediation of sexual self-schemas in the relation between a history of CSA and negative affect prior to sexual stimuli. We found that more Embarrassed/Conservative and less Romantic/Passionate sexual self-schemas predicted negative affect prior to exposure to sexual stimuli which, in turn, predicted levels of sexual satisfaction. The lower sexual satisfaction of CSA survivors was partially mediated by higher reports of negative affect prior to sexual stimuli. However, negative affect prior to sexual stimuli was not mediated by the sexual self-schemas of CSA survivors. Thus, although sexual self-schemas predicted sexual satisfaction, they did not predict variance in negative affect prior to sexual videos experienced by women with a history of CSA. PMID:21140286

  7. Sexual dysfunction in multiple myeloma: survivorship care plan of the International Myeloma Foundation Nurse Leadership Board.

    PubMed

    Richards, Tiffany A; Bertolotti, Page A; Doss, Deborah; McCullagh, Emily J

    2011-08-01

    The World Health Organization describes sexuality as a "central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is influenced by the interaction of biological, psychological, social, economic, political, cultural, ethical, legal, historical, religious, and spiritual factors." Currently, no research has been conducted regarding sexual dysfunction in patients with multiple myeloma; therefore, information related to the assessment and evaluation of sexual dysfunction is gleaned from other malignancies and diseases. In this article, members of the International Myeloma Foundation's Nurse Leadership Board discuss the definition, presentation, and causes of sexual dysfunction; provide recommendations for sexual assessment practices; and promote discussion among patients with multiple myeloma, their healthcare providers, and their partners.

  8. Recommendations for the management of premature ejaculation: BASHH Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Daniel; Goldmeier, David; Green, John; Lamba, Harpal; Harris, J R W

    2006-01-01

    We present the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH), Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction updated recommendations for the management of premature ejaculation. The recommendations outline the physiology, prevalence, definitions, aetiological factors and patient assessment for this common sexual problem. Behavioural, local and systemic pharmacological treatments are discussed along with general recommendations and auditable outcomes. PMID:16409670

  9. Recommendations for the management of retarded ejaculation: BASHH Special Interest Group for Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Daniel; Goldmeier, David

    2006-01-01

    We present the British Association of Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH) special interest group in sexual dysfunction recommendations for the management of retarded ejaculation. The recommendations outline the physiology, prevalence, definitions, aetiological factors and patient assessment for this sexual problem. We suggest treatment strategies, recommendations for management and an auditable outcome. PMID:16409671

  10. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Fatih; Küçük, Adem; Satan, Yılmaz; İlgün, Erdem; Arslan, Şevket; İlik, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD), mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods This case–control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders. Results Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1%) suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5%) and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%). Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9%) had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5%) had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%), and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%). Conclusion SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM. PMID:26937190

  11. Can Sex Partner Therapy Treat Sexual Distress and Dysfunction in Transgender Patients After Gender Confirmation Surgery?

    PubMed

    Tarsha, Amir Adam; Xantus, Aruditi; Arana, Rebecca

    2016-10-01

    Sex surrogacy, or sex partner therapy (SPT), is a form of therapy that aims to increase patients' comfort and confidence in sexual activity through a supportive, often sexually (though not necessarily) intimate connection with a trained surrogate partner/sex therapist. The therapy has been used to treat various disabilities, sexual dysfunctions, and anxieties related to sexual activity. Recently, there has been discussion about using SPT as a treatment for sexual distress and dysfunction in transgender patients who have undergone gender confirmation surgery (GCS). The use of SPT in this patient population has not been studied. The purpose of this letter to the editor is to call attention to and encourage discussion about the potential benefits and risks of using SPT as a treatment modality for sexual distress and dysfunction in post-GCS patients. PMID:27028584

  12. Aspects of Sexuality in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Lucrecia Cabral; Gillberg, Carina I.; Cederlund, Mats; Hagberg, Bibbi; Gillberg, Christopher; Billstedt, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The literature concerning sexuality in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited regarding inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias and its relation to age, verbal ability, symptom severity, intellectual ability, or adaptive functioning. A cohort of 184 adolescents and young adults (ages 15-39 years) with ASD diagnosed in childhood,…

  13. The Facts About Sexual (Dys)function in Schizophrenia: An Overview of Clinically Relevant Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Marrit K.; Castelein, Stynke; Wiersma, Durk; Schoevers, Robert A.; Knegtering, Henderikus

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have evaluated sexual functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Most patients show an interest in sex that differs little from the general population. By contrast, psychiatric symptoms, institutionalization, and psychotropic medication contribute to frequently occurring impairments in sexual functioning. Women with schizophrenia have a better social outcome, longer lasting (sexual) relationships, and more offspring than men with schizophrenia. Still, in both sexes social and interpersonal impairments limit the development of stable sexual relationships. Although patients consider sexual problems to be highly relevant, patients and clinicians not easily discuss these spontaneously, leading to an underestimation of their prevalence and contributing to decreased adherence to treatment. Studies using structured interviews or questionnaires result in many more patients reporting sexual dysfunctions. Although sexual functioning can be impaired by different factors, the use of antipsychotic medication seems to be an important factor. A comparison of different antipsychotics showed high frequencies of sexual dysfunction for risperidone and classical antipsychotics, and lower frequencies for clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, and aripiprazole. Postsynaptic dopamine antagonism, prolactin elevation, and α1-receptor blockade may be the most relevant factors in the pathogenesis of antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction. Psychosocial strategies to treat antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction include psychoeducation and relationship counseling. Pharmacological strategies include lowering the dose or switching to a prolactin sparing antipsychotic. Also, the addition of a dopamine agonist, aripiprazole, or a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor has shown some promising results, but evidence is currently scarce. PMID:25721311

  14. Sexual dysfunction among female patients of reproductive age in a hospital setting in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fajewonyomi, Benjamin A; Orji, Ernest O; Adeyemo, Adenike O

    2007-03-01

    Although sexual dysfunction is an important public-health problem in Nigeria, little research has been conducted on this topic in Nigeria. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and their correlates among female patients of reproductive age using a questionnaire. Respondents were recruited from the out-patients clinics of a teaching hospital setting in Ile-Ife/ Ijesa administrative health zone, Osun State, Nigeria. Of 384 female patients interviewed, 242 (63%) were sexually dysfunctional. Types of sexual dysfunction included disorder of desire (n=20; 8.3%), disorder of arousal (n=l 3; 5.4%), disorder of orgasm (n=154; 63.6%), and painful coitus (dyspareunia) (n=55; 22.7%). The peak age of sexual dysfunction was observed among the age-group of 26-30 years. Women with higher educational status were mostly affected. The reasons for unsatisfactory sexual life mainly included psychosexual factors and medical illnesses, among which included uncaring partners, present illness, excessive domestic duties, lack of adequate foreplay, present medication, competition among wives in a polygamous family setting, previous sexual abuse, and guilt-feeling of previous pregnancy termination among infertile women. The culture of male dominance in the local environment which makes women afraid of rejection and threats of divorce if they ever complain about sexually-related matters might perpetrate sexual dysfunction among the affected individuals. Sexual dysfunction is a real social and psychological problem in the local environment demanding urgent attention. It is imperative to carry out further research in society at large so that the health and lifestyles of affected women and their partners could be improved.

  15. Sexual Dysfunction and Help Seeking Behaviors in Newly Married Men in Sari City: a Descriptive

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi, Sakineh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Khaki-Rostami, Zeynab; Malakouti, Jamileh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ghanbari-Homayi, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for people's general health. The aim of this study was to determine the status of sexual function and help-seeking behaviors in newly married men. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 363 newly married men. Simple random sampling was used according to premarital counseling offices in the health center of Sari city. Data collection instruments included personal and social characteristics, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), and help-seeking behaviors questionnaires. In order to determine the relationship between characteristics and sexual function, general linear model and also between socio-demographic characteristics and receiving or lack of receiving help, multivariate logistic regression test were used. Results: The mean of sexual function score was 21.3 (2.7) out of possible 5-30, and 26% of men suffered sexual dysfunction. The highest prevalence (27.2%) of dysfunction was in the dimension of sexual stimulation, and the lowest (15.7%) in maintaining erection. For the treatment of sexual dysfunction, only 32% men had sought help, and 40% of them had visited specialists. The most frequent reasons for not seeking help were feeling uncomfortable with doctor, and their belief that doctor is not able to do much. 65% of men desired to be treated. Conclusion: The results demonstrated relatively high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among men, and unfortunately, most of them did not seek help for their sexual problem. Since Sexual dysfunction can leave damaging effects on the quality of life and marital relationship, interventions to deal with these challenges and screening to identify such problems appear necessary. PMID:26161368

  16. Manufacturing desire: the commodification of female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jennifer R

    2004-04-01

    The process of bringing new drugs to market interweaves commercialism, science, clinical medicine, and governmental regulation. Through their authority and public persona as medical experts, academic clinical trial researchers studying these pharmaceuticals are integral to this process, serving as mediators between producers (the pharmaceutical companies) and consumers (clinicians and patients) of new drugs through a complex set of exchange networks. Using examples from my ethnographic research on the search for pharmaceuticals to treat what has become known as female sexual dysfunction, this paper explores the links academic researchers make with drug manufacturers and consumer markets. Academic researchers have become an integral aspect of drug development, not only by conducting clinical trial research, but also by participating in a number of other activities that assist pharmaceutical companies in identifying and creating new markets. In this paper, i examine how researchers attend professional meetings where they present clinical trial data, lecture at continuing medical education conferences, and offer themselves as ' experts' to raise awareness about disorders and their treatments. Modifying a sociology of technology approach, this paper focuses on the actors in the social network who mediate the junctions between technological producers and consumers. This extends work in this area through theorizing the linkages between exchange networks, commodification techniques, and technoscientific developments. PMID:15295831

  17. Laser irradiation of penile blood as treatment of sexual dysfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.; Khomyakov, Victor T.

    2001-05-01

    40-60% of the men of average age suffer from the violations of sexual functions. Impotence doesn't make direct threat to life; nevertheless this disease essentially reduces quality of life, and consequently deserves the most steadfast attention. There are many methods of treatment of erectile dysfunction. However they are connected with a reception of medicines, which is expensive and has a number of contraindications, or with invasive procedures, or with surgical intervention, that also not always is desirable. We have developed the original device permitting to cause passive erection by creation of a local decompression. The second stage is the effect by an infrared laser radiation (denseness of a potency 4.2 mWt/sm2, continuous radiation with length of a wave 0.89 microns, exposition 5 minutes) on erection glans penis. We observed 24 patients with the complaints on insufficient erection (18), premature ejaculation (6); 2 patients in addition presented the complaint on small sizes of the penis. Age of the patients was 24-46 years, on the average 34.3 years. All have received treatment from 15 sessions in day.

  18. Vaginal Dryness and Beyond: The Sexual Health Needs of Women Diagnosed With Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Sara I; Holland, Kathryn J; Griggs, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    While research on the sexual health of women with early stage cancer has grown extensively over the past decade, markedly less information is available to support the sexual health needs of women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (ages 35 to 77) about questions they had concerning their sexual health and intimate relationships. All participants were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center at a large Midwestern university. Three themes were examined: the role of sexual activity and intimate touch in participants' lives, unmet information needs about sexual health, and communication with medical providers about sexual concerns. Findings indicated that sexual activities with partners were important; however, participants worried about their own physical limitations and reported frequent physical (e.g., bone pains) and vaginal pain associated with intercourse. When women raised concerns about these issues in clinical settings, medical providers often focused exclusively on vaginal lubricants, which did not address the entirety of women's problems or concerns. In addition, women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer reported needing additional resources about specialized vaginal lubricants, nonpenetrative and nongenitally focused sex, and sexual positions that did not compromise their physical health yet still provided pleasure.

  19. Racial Disparities in Sexual Dysfunction Outcomes After Prostate Cancer Treatment: Myth or Reality?

    PubMed

    Burnett, Arthur L

    2016-03-01

    Among diverse subject areas in the field of prostate cancer management, treatment-related sexual dysfunction complications persist today as a significant potential problem for all men receiving treatment for this disease. The conjecture that African-American men are disproportionately affected by this problem among ethnic groups is not trivial and warrants attention in view of the possibility that its risk profile, whether real or perceived, may influence clinical management decisions impacting survival outcomes in this high-prostate cancer-risk population. A literature review was performed to define the occurrence and significance of sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment in African-American men, with an emphasis on clinically localized treatment. Data retrieved from population-based as well as single-center investigations are conflicting with regard to the extent and quality of life relevance of sexual dysfunction following prostate cancer treatments in African-American men, relative to that of ethnically different counterparts. Some reports suggest a relatively greater trend in African-American men than other ethnic groups toward obtaining clinical management for sexual dysfunction and experiencing psychosocial effects from it, lending additional support for the possibly greater effect of this problem in African-American men. Although further studies are needed to define sexual dysfunction after prostate cancer treatment and ascertain its bother and impact on quality of life in African-American men, survivorship care that encompasses sexual dysfunction management should proceed with appropriate attention given to cultural, educational, and psychosocial variables.

  20. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that

  1. Bupropion in the depression-related sexual dysfunction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Valeska M; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio E; Silva, Adriana C

    2014-01-01

    Depression is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder (16.6%) and is frequently associated with impairments in several areas. Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a prevalent problem with rates ranging from 40-45% in adult women and 20- 30% in adult men. A relationship between depression and sexual dysfunction has been shown in the literature although the mechanisms of this association are not yet clear. Many antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), list sexual dysfunction as a side effect. New drug alternatives with fewer side effects have been proposed, and bupropion is one of them. This study aims to review the literature on bupropion and its impact in sexual function on depressed subjects. Most of the studies have noted that bupropion is not only as effective as other antidepressants but has the advantage of a lower impact on sexual functioning. Some other studies have found that bupropion can even enhance sexual function in certain individuals. Bupropion is also effective, when combined with other antidepressants, in treating emergent sexual dysfunction. Bupropion may be an alternative treatment for depression that does not include the sexual side effects associated with most of the prescribed antidepressants available; however, additional research is required.

  2. Predictors of the Sexual Well-being of Individuals Diagnosed with Herpes and Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lyndsay R; Byers, E Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests that having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as genital herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV) can negatively affect sexual well-being. However, there is little research examining factors associated with poorer sexual well-being among individuals with a STI. This study investigated the extent to which stigma experiences, individual characteristics, and STI characteristics were associated with multiple aspects of sexual well-being among individuals diagnosed with herpes and/or HPV. Participants were an average of 36 years old (SD = 11.58) and included 188 individuals with herpes and/or HPV who completed measures of sexual activity, sexual problems, and sexual cognitive-affective factors. The results showed that experiences of stigmatization were the most important predictors of sexual well-being. Participants who perceived were stigmatized by others as well as those who internalized negative social attitudes to a greater extent reported poorer sexual well-being across all dimensions, over and above individual and STI characteristics. The implications of these findings for sexual health professionals are discussed. PMID:25408498

  3. A comparative study of sexual dysfunction involving risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.; Pai, Nagesh B.; Rao, Satheesh

    2009-01-01

    Background: With the advent of newer antipsychotic drugs, side effects such as sexual dysfunction have been a major contributor toward treatment compliance. There are only a few studies that have compared different atypical antipsychotic agents regarding sexual dysfunction. We have not come across any data in this area on Indian population. Aims: To determine and compare the frequency of sexual dysfunction associated with risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine, among patients with clinically stable schizophrenia. Settings and Design: It is a cross-sectional hospital-based study. The subjects were recruited for the study by the purposive sampling technique. Materials and Methods: The total sample size was 102, consisting of 25 each in the quetiapine and risperidone groups, 22 in the olanzapine group, and 30 healthy volunteers. A Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ) were administered. The Kruskal Wallis test was used to compare the variables in the demographic data and the mean chlorpromazine equivalent doses of the study groups. To analyze the sexual dysfunction, the mean scores on all the domains of sexual functioning in SFQ were compared across the study groups using the Chi square test, for proportions. Results and Conclusion: Twenty-three percent of the healthy volunteers had some impairment in one or more domains of sexual functioning. For the medication groups this was 96, 88, and 90%, respectively for risperidone, quetiapine, and olanzapine. However, there was statistically no significant difference across the study groups although it was relatively less with quetiapine. PMID:20048451

  4. Sexual dysfunction in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kurizky, Patricia Shu; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da

    2012-12-01

    Psoriasis is a cutaneous-articular disease, whose incidence ranges from 1% to 3%. Stress tends to be a triggering or aggravating factor in psoriasis. In addition, the disease itself can generate emotional stress because of its lesions. Several psychological disorders can be associated with psoriasis, and feelings such as rage, depression, shame, and anxiety have been commonly reported, which can culminate in social isolation and sexual dysfunction. Despite being a common complaint among patients with psoriasis, sexual dysfunction has been rarely reported in the literature. This study aimed at performing a systematic review of the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, assessing the role played by factors such as depression and severity of disease in this relation. This systematic review showed that data on the sexual difficulties of patients with psoriasis are scarce. The hypotheses to explain sexual dysfunction in that group of patients include the severity of skin findings, the psychological effects of the condition on the patient, concerns of the sexual partner, and side effects of the medical treatments for psoriasis. Those data emphasize that this type of symptomatology is frequently neglected in medical practice, and stress the importance of assessing the impact of psoriasis regarding not only cutaneous and joint involvements, but also psychosocial and sexual impairments. Considering the sociocultural diversities of each population, a specific study of the Brazilian population to provide more information about our patients is required.

  5. Efficacy of ellagic acid and sildenafil in diabetes-induced sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Vishwanath, Manikanta; Gangadarappa, Suma Kallahalli; Razdan, Rema; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes induced sexual dysfunction is a leading cause of male sexual disorder and an early indicator of cardiovascular complication. Reactive oxygen species generated in body during diabetes is a main causative factor for erectile dysfunction, a sexual dysfunction. Adjuvant antioxidant therapy along with phosphodiesterases type 5 enzyme inhibitor (PDE5i) is more effective than PDE5i alone. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate efficacy of ellagic acid a known antioxidant and sildenafil in diabetes induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced in male rats and rats were treated with ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and a combination of ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and sildenafil (5 mg/kg, p.o.), a PDE5i for 28 days. Sexual function was observed in diabetic rat and compared with those of treatment group and normal rats. Effect of ellagic acid was studied on advanced glycation end products (AGE) and isolated rat corpus cavernosum in vitro. Results: Sexual function of diabetic rats was found to be reduced and ellegic acid treatment could preserve sexual function of diabetic rats to some extent. Ellagic acid + sildenafil treatment was more efficient in management of diabetes induced sexual dysfunction. Ellagic acid inhibited (AGE) in vitro implying its role in reducing oxidative stress in diabetes. The polyphenol could not increase sexual function in normal rats and relax isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle significantly. Conclusion: The study proves usefulness of adjuvant antioxidant therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25298678

  6. Aspects of Sexuality in Adolescents and Adults Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Lucrecia Cabral; Gillberg, Carina I; Cederlund, Mats; Hagberg, Bibbi; Gillberg, Christopher; Billstedt, Eva

    2016-09-01

    The literature concerning sexuality in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is limited regarding inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias and its relation to age, verbal ability, symptom severity, intellectual ability, or adaptive functioning. A cohort of 184 adolescents and young adults (ages 15-39 years) with ASD diagnosed in childhood, including both low and high functioning individuals, was examined. The large majority were found to have a sexual interest and showed interest towards the opposite sex. Inappropriate sexual behaviours and paraphilias were reported for about a fourth of the individuals. No relationships were found between inappropriate sexual behaviours and any of the background variables listed above. However, associations were found between paraphilias and ASD symptom severity, intellectual ability, and adaptive functioning. PMID:27401993

  7. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sexual Dysfunction in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foley, Sallie; Wittmann, Daniela; Balon, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Addressing sexual health concerns in medical practice has been an emerging concept for the past two decades. However, there have been very few educational opportunities in medical training that would prepare future physicians for such a responsibility. Since assessing and treating sexual problems requires knowledge that encompasses many…

  8. Exploring gay couples' experience with sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Mary-Ellen; Irvine, Jane; Currie, Kristen L; Ritvo, Paul; Trachtenberg, Lianne; Louis, Alyssa; Trachtenberg, John; Jamnicky, Leah; Matthew, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the experience of three gay couples managing sexual dysfunction as a result of undergoing a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a larger study at an urban hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors clustered 18 subordinate themes under 3 superordinate themes: (a) acknowledging change in sexual experience (libido, erectile function, sexual activity, orgasmic function); (b) accommodating change in sexual experience (strategies: emphasizing intimacy, embracing plan B, focus on the other; barriers: side-effect concerns, loss of naturalness, communication breakdown, failure to initiate, trial and failure, partner confounds); and (c) accepting change in sexual experience (indicators: emphasizing health, age attributions, finding a new normal; barriers: uncertain outcomes, treatment regrets). Although gay couples and heterosexual couples share many similar challenges, we discovered that gay men have particular sexual roles and can engage in novel accommodation practices, such as open relationships, that have not been noted in heterosexual couples. All couples, regardless of their level of sexual functioning, highlighted the need for more extensive programming related to sexual rehabilitation. Equitable rehabilitative support is critical to assist homosexual couples manage distress associated with prostatectomy-related sexual dysfunction. PMID:23899045

  9. Sexual Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes at Diagnosis: Progression over Time and Drug and Non-Drug Correlated Factors

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Giorda, Carlo B.; Cucinotta, Domenico; Guida, Piero; Nada, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Aims To present the longitudinal data of the SUBITO-DE study, a prospective survey involving male patients with new or recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (<24 months). Materials and Methods Sexual function was assessed in male patients with T2DM at baseline (phase 1) and after a mean follow-up of 18 months (phase 2). Standard metabolic parameters and sexual and depressive symptoms were evaluated. Results Six of the 499 enrolled patients died of different causes during phase 1. Of the 493 surviving men invited to participate in phase 2, 450 (mean age 59.0±9.0 years) (90.2%) accepted and 43 (8.2%) were lost to follow-up. As compared to baseline, the proportion of the men who reported improvement in erectile dysfunction (ED) at follow-up was nearly double that of the men who reported worsening of ED (22.6% vs. 12.8%). The increase in frequency of sexual activity the men reported at follow-up assessment indicates that many never treated before baseline were taking an ED drug during the study period (106 subjects). Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5i) were the ED drugs most commonly taken at both baseline and follow-up. An overall improvement over baseline values was observed in metabolic targets for T2DM and depressive symptoms. Conversely, no change in lifestyle behaviors was recorded during the study. Conclusions Sexual dysfunction is a major concern in men with T2DM. The SUBITO-DE study demonstrates that, when combined with adequate counseling and tailored PDE5i therapy, an integrated approach to achieving metabolic targets in men with T2DM can improve sexual function as well as depressive symptoms. PMID:27706160

  10. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Anne; Danaee, Mahmoud; Loh, Huai Seng; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Ng, Chong Guan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients. Methods Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15), and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders. Results The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8%) on MMT and 67 (28.2%) on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043) domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008) compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039) were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables. Conclusions Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus

  11. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Results: Majority of our respondents were in the 18–30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11–13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Discussion: Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents. PMID:25657457

  12. Prevalence of childhood physical and sexual abuse in veterans with psychiatric diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Koola, Maju Mathew; Qualls, Clifford; Kelly, Deanna L; Skelton, Kelly; Bradley, Bekh; Amar, Richard; Duncan, Erica J

    2013-04-01

    We examined the prevalence of childhood (≤ 18 years) physical and sexual abuse reported among patients admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service and the differential rates of this abuse associated with psychiatric diagnoses. This study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 603 patients admitted to a psychiatric ward during a period of 1 year at Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center who had data on childhood physical and sexual abuse. The prevalence of reported childhood physical or sexual abuse in this inpatient clinical population was 19.4% (117/603). The prevalence of reported physical abuse was 22.6% (19/84) in the women and 12.0% (62/519) in the men (p = 0.008); the prevalence of sexual abuse was 33.3% (28/84) in the women and 7.7% (40/519) in the men (p < 0.0001). More patients with depressive disorders reported sexual abuse than did those without these disorders. More patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) reported physical and sexual abuse than did those without these disorders. Stratifying by race, sex, and diagnoses, multivariate analyses showed that the women with PTSD had a greater likelihood to report physical abuse (p = 0.03) and sexual abuse histories (p = 0.008) than did the women without PTSD. The men with substance-induced mood disorder (p = 0.01) were more likely to report physical abuse compared with the men without substance-induced mood disorder. Screening for abuse in patients with depressive disorders and PTSD is warranted to tailor individualized treatments for these patients. More research is needed to better understand the potential implications of childhood abuse on psychiatric diagnoses.

  13. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  14. Sexual dysfunction in chronic liver disease: is liver transplantation an effective cure?

    PubMed

    Burra, Patrizia; Germani, Giacomo; Masier, Annalisa; De Martin, Eleonora; Gambato, Martina; Salonia, Andrea; Bo, Patrizio; Vitale, Alessandro; Cillo, Umberto; Russo, Francesco Paolo; Senzolo, Marco

    2010-06-27

    The goal of liver transplantation is not only to ensure patient long-term survival but also to offer the opportunity to achieve psychologic and physical integrity. Quality of life after liver transplantation may be affected by unsatisfactory sexual function. Before liver transplantation, sexual dysfunction and sex hormone disturbances are reported in men and women mainly due to abnormality of physiology of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and, in some cases, origin of liver disease. Successful liver transplantation should theoretically restore hormonal balance and improve sexual function both in men and women, thus improving the reproductive performance. However, after transplantation, up to 25% of patients report persistent sexual dysfunction, and approximately one third of patients describe the appearance of de novo sexual dysfunction. Despite the described high prevalence of this condition, epidemiologic data are relatively scant. Further studies on pathophysiology and risk factors in the field of sexual function after liver transplantation along with new strategies to support and inform patients on the waiting list and after surgery are needed.

  15. Efficacy of Cinnamomum cassia Blume. in age induced sexual dysfunction of rats

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Jamwal, Rohitash; Dethe, Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cinnamomum cassia has been suggested in Ayurveda for the management of sexual dysfunction. This research work was conducted to shed some light on the mechanism of action of the extract, and evaluate the efficacy of its methanol extract in age induced sexual dysfunction in male Wistar rats. Secondary objective of the project was to study the effect of treatment on sperm parameters and smooth muscle:collagen level in rat penile tissue. Methods Young and aged male rats were treated with methanol extract of Cinnamomum cassia at a dose of 100 mg/kg and sexual behavior was observed on 28th day in presence of female rats in estrous phase. Sildenafil was used as standard medicine. Effect of treatment was studied on epididymal sperm parameters, and Massons trichrome staining of rat penile tissues was performed to know the level of smooth muscle:collagen. Results The treatment significantly increased sexual function in aged rats that had decreased in comparison to young rats, but did not have any significant effect on sperm count, live and defective sperm percentage. However, treatment induced an increase in smooth muscle level and a decrease in collagen level in the aged rat penile tissue in comparison to that of age matched control. Conclusion Based on our studies, we found that Cinnamomum cassia extract was effective in management of sexual dysfunction in aged rats and hence we propose a possible mechanism of action for Cinnamomum cassia which could be responsible for restoring sexual activity in aged rat. PMID:24563594

  16. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-08-05

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth.

  17. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports

    PubMed Central

    Park, Brian Y.; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P.; Doan, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men’s sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography’s unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  18. A clinical guide to the diagnosis and treatment of heroin-related sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Smith, D E; Moser, C; Wesson, D R; Apter, M; Buxton, M E; Davison, J V; Orgel, M; Buffum, J

    1982-01-01

    It is apparent that a significant degree of sexual concern exists in male and female heroin addicts in the predrug, drug and postdrug periods. The Sexual Concerns and Substance Abuse Project recommends that each opiate abuser entering in to treatment has a brief sex history taken and, if a primary or secondary sexual dysfunction is discovered, then additional evaluation is indicated. Furthermore, the Project stresses the importance of educating the patient to the physiological, as well as psychological, relationship between heroin-related sexual dysfunction and concomitant side effects. For example, in women chronically abusing high doses of heroin, one may not only see a reduction of sexual desire and performance, but also irregular menstrual cycles, and occasionally, amenorrhea, as a result of the depressive effects of the opiate on pituitary hormones. The woman may misinterpret this physiological effect and believe that such changes in her menstrual cycle are irreversible, and that she is sterile. Following the evaluation and patient education phase, the findings obtained from the evaluation of the drug cycle, as it relates to the sociosexual response cycle, should be incorporated into the overall treatment approach for counseling the opiate abuser. When a specific sexual dysfunction exists, particularly if it predates the heroin involvement, referral to a qualified sex therapist is often indicated, to work in co-therapy with the drug counselor and the referring physician. Greater awareness of heroin-related sexual dysfunction may help reduce the relapse rate back to heroin as well as improve the quality of the individual's life during the recovery period. PMID:7119946

  19. A Comparative Study of Sexual Dysfunction due to Typical and Atypical Antipsychotics in Remitted Bipolar-I Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.; Nizamie, Haque S.; Akhtar, Sayeed; Sinha, Baxi Neeraj P.; Goyal, Nishant

    2004-01-01

    In the remitted phase of bipolar I disorder, sexual dysfunction is commonly due to drugs used in the treatment rather than the disease itself. There are very few studies, especially in the Indian population, addressing the frequency of sexual dysfunction due to antipsychotics in bipolar I disorder. Hence this study was done to determine the sexual dysfunction due to antipsychotics and to compare the same among typical and atypical antipsychotics. A cross sectional study with 108 male patients of remitted bipolar I disorder (DSM-IV), chosen by purposive sampling technique was done. Psychopathology was assessed using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. Sexual side effects due to antipsychotics were assessed using the Udvalg for Kliniske ndersogelser (UKU) side effect rating scale. The total sample size was divided into two groups of those on typical antipsychotics (n = 53) and atypical antipsychotics (n = 55). The two groups were compared for sexual dysfunction using Chi-square test. Results showed dysfunction in at least one phase of the sexual response cycle, comprising of desire, arousal and orgasm, was present in 66% of the sample population. Erectile dysfunction was present in 42% of the sample population and it was the most common type of sexual dysfunction reported. It was also significantly different across the two groups (p = 0.025). There was no significant difference in other aspects of sexual dysfunction across the two groups. In conclusion patients of Bipolar I disorder experience sexual side effects of antipsychotics frequently. Erectile dysfunction is the most common sexual dysfunction among men and this is significantly higher with typical than atypical antipsychotics. PMID:21224908

  20. A Qualitative Study of the Relationship Between Methamphetamine Abuse and Sexual Dysfunction in Male Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshahi, Behrouz; Farhoudian, Ali; Falahatdoost, Mozhgan; Tavakoli, Mahmoud; Rezaie Dogahe, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background Increased prevalent use of methamphetamine is a global public challenge. Information on drug use can be helpful in preventing high-risk behavior related to drug abuse. Objectives This study aims to investigate the sexual function changes related to methamphetamine use in the male clients of public and private addiction treatment centers. Patients and Methods In this qualitative study, 45 men (35 methamphetamine users, 5 family members of the users, and 5 psychiatrists or physicians who were famous for treating or researching addiction) are involved. An in-depth interview was done with therapists and key individuals. Results The results show that the effects of methamphetamine on sexual function are not identical. The first usage is concomitant with the increased duration of sex, an increase in the quality and quantity of sexual pleasure, a delighted orgasm, and feeling more control of the sex act. These effects gradually decrease. A decreased libido and various sexual dysfunctions such as erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and losing control during the sex act will appear over time. Conclusions There are differences in the libido and sexual functions of methamphetamine users. Personal perceptions of one’s sexual function may be affected by cognitive changes resultant from the drug. Drug-use prevention, addiction treatments, appropriate sexual behavior education, and harm reduction are priorities. PMID:27803891

  1. Recent studies on aphrodisiac herbs for the management of male sexual dysfunction--a review.

    PubMed

    Malviya, Neelesh; Jain, Sanjay; Gupta, Vipin Bihari; Vyas, Savita

    2011-01-01

    An aphrodisiac is a type of food or drink that has the effect of making those who eat or drink it more aroused in a sexual way. Aphrodisiacs can be categorized according to their mode of action into three groups: substances that increase libido (i.e., sexual desire, arousal), substances that increase sexual potency (i.e., effectiveness of erection) and substances that increase sexual pleasure. Some well-known aphrodisiacs are Tribulus terrestrins, Withania somnifera, Eurycoma longifolia, Avena sativa, Ginko biloba, and Psoralea coryifolia. Ethnobotanical surveys have indicated a large number of plants as aphrodisiacs. The paper reviews the recent scientific validation on traditionally used herbal plants as aphrodisiac herbs for the management of sexual disorder erectile dysfunction. PMID:21485695

  2. The effects of psychiatric treatment on depression, anxiety, quality of life, and sexual dysfunction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Yanartas, O; Kani, HT; Bicakci, E; Kilic, I; Banzragch, M; Acikel, C; Atug, O; Kuscu, K; Imeryuz, N; Akin, H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression and anxiety are common disorders in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim is to prospectively determine the effect of psychiatric treatment on scores for depression, anxiety, quality of life (QoL), and sexual dysfunction in an outpatient population diagnosed with IBD and also anxiety and/or depression disorder. Patients and methods Patients who scored higher than the cutoff point on the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale were referred for further structured psychiatric evaluation and determination of the need for psychiatric drug treatment. Patients who underwent drug therapy completed Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. Results Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the most common diagnoses. After 6 months, 47 patients had completely adhered to drug treatment (group A), whereas 20 were nonadherent (group B). In group A, all domains of SF-36, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, depression/anxiety scores, and Crohn’s disease activity index were statistically improved after treatment when compared with the baseline. In group B, the three domains of SF-36, platelet count, and mean corpuscular volume were worse between baseline and at 6 months. Conclusion In IBD patients having any psychiatric disorder, 6 months of antidepressant drug treatment is associated with an improvement in depression, anxiety, QoL, and sexual functioning scores, as well as an improvement in Crohn’s disease activity index. On the other hand, insufficient psychiatric treatment seems to be related to a poor QoL. PMID:27069364

  3. A survey of commonalities relevant to function and dysfunction in pelvic and sexual organs.

    PubMed

    Brading, A F; Heaton, J P W; Hashitani, H

    2008-01-01

    Micturition, defecation and sexual function are all programmed through spinal reflexes that are under descending control from higher centres. Interaction between these reflexes can clearly be perceived, and evidence is accumulating the dysfunction in one reflex is often associated with dysfunction in another. In this article, we describe some of the basic properties and neural control of the smooth muscles mediating the reflexes, reviewing the common features that underlie these reflex functions, and what changes may be responsible for dysfunction. We propose that autonomic control within the pelvis predisposes pelvic and sexual organs to crosstalk, with the consequence that diseases and conditions of the pelvis are subject to convergence on a functional level. It should be expected that disturbance of the function of one system will inevitably impact adjacent systems.

  4. Recognising female sexual dysfunction as an essential aspect of effective diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Anne; Phillips, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    The following literature review will focus on sexual dysfunction in women living with diabetes, drawing on international studies in this specialist field. The key aim of this paper is generate a greater understanding and recognition of the issues facing these women and to determine a more proactive approach to identification, consultation and potential treatment options. The main findings highlight the unique role practitioners have with women with diabetes and how to facilitate partnership working. Nurses have the most frequent contact with people living with diabetes in any healthcare system. Nurses' knowledge about sexuality in relation to diabetes should improve patient education, recognition and could signal undiagnosed or increased risk of sexual dysfunction to enable treatment so care can be optimised accordingly (Sivrikaya et al., 2014).

  5. Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics of sexual dysfunction: current status, gaps and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Ibrahim A; Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2009-10-01

    Although treatment of different types of sexual dysfunction has improved in the past decade with the introduction of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, response rates to these targeted therapies are variable. There are a number of studies in the published literature that provide proof-of-concept that genetic variation contributes to the variable response. Pharmacogenomics will most likely be one part of our therapeutic armamentarium in the future and will provide a stronger scientific basis for optimizing drug therapy on the basis of each patient's genetic constitution. This article will review English language medical literature on the state-of-the-art genetic polymorphisms of drug targets, transporters and signaling molecules as well as pharmacogenetic studies of sexual dysfunction and suggested possible applications. Collectively, the data demonstrate that pharmacogenomics in the field of sexual medicine is still in its infancy. More research will provide further intriguing new discoveries in years to come.

  6. Female Sexual Dysfunction Among the Wives of Opioid-Dependent Males in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Anvar Abnavi, Marjan; Ahmadi, Jamshid; Hamidian, Sajedeh; Ghaffarpour, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Opiate abuse in males has significant effects on their sexual functions. In contrast, sexuality in females is a multidimensional issue that can strongly be affected by several factors in their partners. However, only a limited number of studies have assessed the role of males’ opioid dependency in their female partners’ sexual function. Objectives The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of males’ opioid dependency on their wives’ sexual function compared to the sexual function of the females whose husbands were not opioid dependent. Patients and Methods This study included 340 women who were selected through convenience sampling and divided into a control (females whose husbands were not opioid dependent) and a case group (women whose husbands were opioid dependent). The data were collected through an interview according to the DSM-IV-R criteria for female sexual dysfunctions by a senior female medical student who was one of the researchers. Finally, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 15) and analyzed using the t-test and chi-square test. Results According to the results, the frequency of hypoactive sexual desire disorder and sexual aversion disorder in the control group was significantly higher than that of the case group (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results showed that having an addicted husband could strongly affect some sexual domains in women. It could change the pattern of desire and motivation for sexual contact in females and alter their attitude toward the sexual relationship, thereby causing disturbances in the females’ normal sexual function. PMID:27218067

  7. Viewing Sexual Stimuli Associated with Greater Sexual Responsiveness, Not Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Prause, Nicole; Pfaus, James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time spent viewing visual sexual stimuli (VSS) has the potential to habituate the sexual response and generalize to the partner context. Aim The aim of this study was to examine whether the time spent viewing VSS is related to sexual responsiveness felt in the laboratory or with a sexual partner. Methods Nontreatment-seeking men (N = 280) reported their weekly average VSS viewing in hours. VSS hours were examined in relation to the sexual arousal experienced while viewing a standardized sexual film in the laboratory and erectile problems experienced with a sexual partner. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual arousal in response to sexual films and erectile problems on the International Index of Erectile Function were the main outcome measures. Results More hours viewing VSS was related to stronger experienced sexual responses to VSS in the laboratory, was unrelated to erectile functioning with a partner, and was related to stronger desire for sex with a partner. Conclusions VSS use within the range of hours tested is unlikely to negatively impact sexual functioning, given that responses actually were stronger in those who viewed more VSS. PMID:26185674

  8. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R.; Marson, Anthony G.; Baker, Gus A.; Quinn, John P.; Sills, Graeme J.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF–BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. PMID:26708060

  9. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R; Marson, Anthony G; Baker, Gus A; Quinn, John P; Sills, Graeme J

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF-BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. PMID:26708060

  10. NRSF and BDNF polymorphisms as biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Alix; Miyajima, Fabio; Shazadi, Kanvel; Crossley, Joanne; Johnson, Michael R; Marson, Anthony G; Baker, Gus A; Quinn, John P; Sills, Graeme J

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a common comorbidity in people with epilepsy, but its causes remain unclear. It may be related to the etiology of the disorder, the consequences of seizures, or the effects of antiepileptic drug treatment. Genetics may also play a contributory role. We investigated the influence of variants in the genes encoding neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins previously associated with cognition and epilepsy, on cognitive function in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A total of 82 patients who had previously undergone detailed neuropsychological assessment were genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the NRSF and BDNF genes. Putatively functional SNPs were included in a genetic association analysis with specific cognitive domains, including memory, psychomotor speed, and information processing. Cross-sectional and longitudinal designs were used to explore genetic influences on baseline cognition at diagnosis and change from baseline over the first year since diagnosis, respectively. We found a statistically significant association between genotypic variation and memory function at both baseline (NRSF: rs1105434, rs2227902 and BDNF: rs1491850, rs2030324, rs11030094) and in our longitudinal analysis (NRSF: rs2227902 and BDNF: rs12273363). Psychomotor speed was also associated with genotype (NRSF rs3796529) in the longitudinal assessment. In line with our previous work on general cognitive function in the healthy aging population, we observed an additive interaction between risk alleles for the NRSF rs2227902 (G) and BDNF rs6265 (A) polymorphisms which was again consistent with a significantly greater decline in delayed recall over the first year since diagnosis. These findings support a role for the NRSF-BDNF pathway in the modulation of cognitive function in patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy.

  11. Survivors of childhood sexual abuse diagnosed with cancer: managing the impact of early trauma on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Silver, Les; Weiner, Michael O

    2006-01-01

    The incidence of survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) diagnosed with cancer is unknown. It is estimated that one in three women and one in six men in the United States are survivors of CSA. Survivors of CSA diagnosed with cancer are presented with multiple and potentially accumulating traumas. The re-traumatizing nature of a cancer diagnosis and treatment affects all elements of the CSA survivor's care and may impede her/his treatment. To date, the impact of CSA on the medical treatment of people with cancer has been unexplored with the existing studies on female survivors of CSA with cancer focusing on the post-treatment experience and their higher incidence of sexual dysfunction. This article describes the impact of CSA on the cancer treatment of 18 survivors of CSA and the clinical interventions used to address the unique psychosocial needs of this population. Anecdotal information suggests that the survivors of CSA may find aspects of the cancer experience reminiscent of their history of abuse. All 18 survivors of CSA experienced distressing memories of their abuse during their cancer treatment. Fifteen CSA survivors presented traumatic memories that were inaccessible to conscious thought processes prior to their cancer diagnosis. Psychodynamic interventions address issues of disruption in the cancer treatment, non-adherence, and difficulties in relationships with the health care team. Containment of intense affect and distressing thoughts rather than exploration improved CSA survivors' adherence with cancer treatments. The acquisition of self-comforting skills helped CSA survivors feel less re-victimized by their cancer experience. The establishment of an environment of internal and external safety improved communication with the health care team. Health care/psychosocial clinicians' awareness and use of appropriate interventions can minimize the affects of re-traumatization and enhance the CSA survivor's treatment experience.

  12. A review of the potential of medicinal plants in the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Malviya, N; Malviya, S; Jain, S; Vyas, S

    2016-10-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is a common disorder that appears to be a consequence of a wide range of physical and psychological conditions. Due to mental stress, insufficient physical exercise and various aetiological factors, human being's life is becoming less pleasant, which leads to incapability to have sexual pleasure. The allopathic drugs used for sexual dysfunction are believed to produce a variety of side effects and affect other physiological processes and, ultimately, general health. Therefore, the search for natural supplement from medicinal plants is being intensified probably because of less side effects availability and affordability. Ethnobotanical surveys have indicated a large number of plants traditionally used as aphrodisiacs but only few of them are scientifically validated for the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction. This article has summarised the medicinal plants traditionally recommended and scientifically validated for the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction. PMID:27681645

  13. A review of the potential of medicinal plants in the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Malviya, N; Malviya, S; Jain, S; Vyas, S

    2016-10-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is a common disorder that appears to be a consequence of a wide range of physical and psychological conditions. Due to mental stress, insufficient physical exercise and various aetiological factors, human being's life is becoming less pleasant, which leads to incapability to have sexual pleasure. The allopathic drugs used for sexual dysfunction are believed to produce a variety of side effects and affect other physiological processes and, ultimately, general health. Therefore, the search for natural supplement from medicinal plants is being intensified probably because of less side effects availability and affordability. Ethnobotanical surveys have indicated a large number of plants traditionally used as aphrodisiacs but only few of them are scientifically validated for the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction. This article has summarised the medicinal plants traditionally recommended and scientifically validated for the management and treatment of male sexual dysfunction.

  14. Comparative study of sexual dysfunction and serum prolactin level associated with olanzapine, risperidone, and clozapine in patients with remitted schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sathish Kumar, S. V.; Sinha, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunctions have been a major side effect of the second generation anti-psychotic drugs which often affects treatment compliance in patients with schizophrenia. There is no/few systematic review or research addressing sexual dysfunction and their effect on serum prolactin level among different atypical antipsychotics in India. Aims: To determine and compare the frequency of sexual dysfunction associated with olanzapine, risperidone, and clozapine and their effect on serum prolactin level in remitted patients with schizophrenia. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional hospital-based study. Recruitment by purposive sampling. Estimation of serum prolactin was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Materials and Methods: The total sample size was 103, consisting of 31, 23, and 19 patients in olanzapine, risperidone, and clozapine groups, respectively and 30 controls. A Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Udvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser (UKU) Side Effect Rating Scale and Sexual Functioning Questionnaire were administered. Analysis of variance was used to compare clinical variables. Chi-square test was used to identify the frequency of sexual dysfunction. Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare UKU side effect, sexual dysfunction, and blood parameters across the study groups. Results and Conclusion: Eighty-six percentage reported sexual dysfunction in one or more domains of sexual functioning in risperidone group as compared to 48.3% in olanzapine and 31% in clozapine groups, respectively. Prolactin level elevation was statistically significant in risperidone group followed by clozapine and olanzapine groups, respectively. PMID:26816428

  15. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend

  16. Sexual dysfunction in diabetic women: prevalence and differences in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mazzilli, Rossella; Imbrogno, Norina; Elia, Jlenia; Delfino, Michele; Bitterman, Olimpia; Napoli, Angela; Mazzilli, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of diabetes on female sexuality and to highlight any differences between sexuality in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods The subjects selected were 49 women with type 1 DM, 24 women with type 2 DM, and 45 healthy women as controls. Each participant was given the nine-item Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire to complete. The metabolic profile was evaluated by body mass index and glycosylated hemoglobin assay. Results The prevalence of sexual dysfunction (total score ≤30) was significantly higher in the type 1 DM group (25/49, 51%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 18–31) than in the control group (4/45, 9%; 95% CI 3–5; P=0.00006); there were no significant variations in the type 2 DM group (4/24, 17%; 95% CI 3–4) versus the control group (P=0.630, not statistically significant). The mean total score was significantly lower in the type 1 DM group (30.2±6.9) versus the control group (36.5±4.9; P=0.0003), but there was no significant difference between the type 2 DM group and the control group (P=0.773). With regard to specific questionnaire items, the mean values for arousal, lubrication, dyspareunia, and orgasm were significantly lower only in the type 1 DM group versus the control group. The mean values for desire were reduced in type 1 and type 2 DM groups versus control group. Conclusion Type 1 DM is associated with sexual dysfunction. This may be due to classic neurovascular complications or to the negative impact of the disease on psychosocial factors. Larger and ideally longitudinal studies are necessary to better understand the relationship between DM and sexual dysfunction. PMID:25709482

  17. Sweet Bee Venom Pharmacopuncture May be Effective for Treating Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pavel; Yu, Junsang

    2014-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is a health problem which occurs during any phase of the sexual response cycle that keeps the individual or couple from experiencing satisfaction from the sexual activity. SD covers a wide variety of symptoms like in men, erectile dysfunction and premature or delayed ejaculation, in women, spasms of the vagina and pain with sexual intercourse, in both sexes, sexual desire and response. And pharmacopuncture, i.e. injection of subclinical doses of drugs, mostly herb medicine, in acupoints, has been adopted with successful results. This case report showed the effect of bee venom on SD. A 51-year-old male patient with SD, who had a past history of taking Western medication to treat his SD and who had previously undergone surgery on his lower back due to a herniated disc, received treatments using pharmacopuncture of sweet bee venom (SBV) at Gwanwon (CV4), Hoeeum (CV1), Sinsu (BL23), and Gihaesu (BL24) for 20 days. Objectively, the patient showed improvement on most items on the International Index for Erectile Dysfunction (IIEF) like 28 to 29 out of perfect score 30 for erectile function, 10 to 10 out of perfect score 10 for orgasmic function, 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for sexual desire, 10 to 13 out of perfect score 15 for satisfaction with intercourse, and 6 to 8 out of perfect score 10 for overall satisfaction; subjectively, his words, the tone of his voice and the look of confidence in his eyes all indicated improvement. Among the variety of effects of SBV pharmacopuncture, urogenital problems such as SD may be health problems that pharmacopuncture can treat effectively. PMID:25780712

  18. Three-year follow-up of couples evaluated for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    De Amicis, L A; Goldberg, D C; LoPiccolo, J; Friedman, J; Davies, L

    1984-01-01

    The present status of 49 couples who three years previously had been evaluated but not treated at a clinic for sexual dysfunction was determined by a self-report assessment battery. The battery consisted of the Sexual Interaction Inventory, the Locke-Wallace Marriage Inventory and the Sexual History Form completed at initial evaluation and follow-up. An additional Follow-up Questionnaire was completed at post only. Approximately 52% of the men and 54% of the women reported receiving therapy during the period between initial intake and follow-up. Analysis of male data revealed that with the exceptions of estimates of mate satisfaction and marital happiness, all other variables measuring sexual behaviors and attitudes did not show significant changes over time. Men who received subsequent therapy reported significantly more erectile difficulty at both intake and follow-up than their nontreated counterparts. In contrast, women showed significant improvement over time in sexual satisfaction, acceptance of mate, and ability to achieve orgasm through a wider variety of means. These improvements were reported by women who had therapy during the interim period as well as women who had not had therapy. Repeated measured ANOVAs and t-test analyses were performed examining the effects of male dysfunction on female functioning. Interpretations of the differences in change noted over time between women and men are offered as well as suggestions for future research.

  19. Sexual Dysfunction and Hyperprolactinemia in Male Psychotic Inpatients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnsen, Erik; Kroken, Rune; Løberg, Else-Marie; Kjelby, Eirik; Jørgensen, Hugo A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Sexual dysfunction (SD) and hyperprolactinemia are frequently reported in patients with psychotic disorders and have the potential for severe complications but investigations in males are particularly scarce. The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of SD and hyperprolactinemia in male patients and to investigate whether associations exist between SD and prolactin levels. Methods. Cross-sectional data were obtained at discharge from the hospital or 6 weeks after admittance for patients acutely admitted for psychosis and treated with a second-generation antipsychotic drug. Results. Half the patients reported diminished sexual desire and more than a third reported erectile and ejaculatory dysfunctions with no differences among the drugs. More than half the sample was hyperprolactinemic. No association was found between prolactin levels and SD. Conclusion. High rates of SD and hyperprolactinemia were found in male patients and should be a treatment target. SD and hyperprolactinemia were not correlated. PMID:22190916

  20. Effect of Intensive Lifestyle Intervention on Sexual Dysfunction in Women With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Rena R.; Bond, Dale S.; Gendrano, Isaias Noel; Wadden, Thomas; Bahnson, Judy; Lewis, Cora E.; Brancati, Frederick; Schneider, Stephen; Kitabchi, Abbas E.; Van Dorsten, Brent; Rosen, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sexual dysfunction is a prevalent problem in obese women with type 2 diabetes. This study examined the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) in these women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Look AHEAD is a 16-center, randomized, controlled trial evaluating the health effects of ILI compared with a control group (diabetes support and education [DSE]). The Look AHEAD Sexual Function Ancillary study included 375 female participants at five Look AHEAD sites. Participants completed the Female Sexual Function Inventory (FSFI) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and assessments of weight and cardiovascular risk factors at baseline and 1 year were made. RESULTS At baseline, 50% of the 229 participants who reported being sexually active met criteria for female sexual dysfunction (FSD); only BDI score was related to FSD. One-year weight losses were greater in the ILI group than in the DSE group (7.6 vs. 0.45 kg; P < 0.001). Among women with FSD at baseline, those in the ILI group (N = 60) compared with those in the DSE group (N = 53) were significantly more likely to remain sexually active (83 vs. 64%; P < 0.008), reported greater improvement in total FSFI scores and in most FSFI domains (P < 0.05), and were more likely to experience remission of FSD (28 vs. 11%; P < 0.04) at 1 year. No significant differences between ILI and DSE were seen in women who did not have FSD at baseline. CONCLUSIONS Participation in ILI appeared to have beneficial effects on sexual functioning among obese women with diabetes, particularly in those who had FSD at baseline. PMID:23757437

  1. Sexual dysfunction (Kṛcchra Vyavāya) in obesity (Sthaulya): Validation by an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, Parampalli; Aravind, B.S.; Pallavi, G.; Rajendra, V.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Akhtar, Naseema

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study intends to evaluate the relationship between Sthaulya (obesity) and Kṛcchra Vyavāya (sexual dysfunction) with respect to different phases of sexual intercourse through a single-centered, observational study in male patients of obesity. Materials and Methods: The study involved 33 obese males from the outpatient department of the Institution whose sexual functioning was assessed using an International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, which was meant to assess five specific areas of sexual functioning. Results: A varying degree of sexual dysfunction was observed in four out of five areas of sexual functioning viz. erectile function (P < 0.02), orgasmic function (P < 0.02), sexual desire (P < 0.08), and overall satisfaction (P < 0.000) in obese individuals. Statistically significant dysfunction was not observed in intercourse satisfaction. Conclusions: Varying degree of sexual dysfunction is present in obese males, suggesting that obesity has a possible role in reducing the quality of sexual functioning in males as indicated in the classical ayurvedic literature. PMID:24167331

  2. Which are the male factors associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD)?

    PubMed

    Maseroli, E; Fanni, E; Mannucci, E; Fambrini, M; Jannini, E A; Maggi, M; Vignozzi, L

    2016-09-01

    It has been generally assumed that partner's erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation play a significant role in determining female sexual dysfunction (FSD). This study aimed to evaluate the role of the male partner's sexual function, as perceived by women, in determining FSD. A consecutive series of 156 heterosexual women consulting our clinic for FSD was retrospectively studied. All patients underwent a structured interview and completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). FSFI total score decreased as a function of partner's age, conflicts within the couple, relationship without cohabitation and the habit of engaging in intercourse to please the partner; FSFI total score increased as a function of frequency of intercourse, attempts to conceive and fertility-focused intercourse. FSFI total score showed a negative, stepwise correlation with partner's perceived hypoactive sexual desire (HSD) (r = -0.327; p < 0.0001), whereas no significant correlation was found between FSFI and erectile dysfunction, premature and delayed ejaculation. In an age-adjusted model, partner's HSD was negatively related to FSFI total score (Wald = 9.196, p = 0.002), arousal (Wald = 7.893, p = 0.005), lubrication (Wald = 5.042, p = 0.025), orgasm (Wald = 9.293, p = 0.002), satisfaction (Wald = 12.764, p < 0.0001), and pain (Wald = 6.492, p = 0.011) domains. Partner's HSD was also significantly associated with somatized anxiety, low frequency of intercourse, low partner's care for the patient's sexual pleasure, and with a higher frequency of masturbation, even after adjusting for age. In patients not reporting any reduction in libido, FSFI total score was significantly lower when their partner's libido was low (p = 0.041); the correlation disappeared if the patient also experienced HSD. In conclusion, the presence of erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation of the partner may not act as a primary contributing factor to FSD

  3. Frequency of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol: the results of the EIRE study.

    PubMed

    Bobes, J; Garc A-Portilla, M P; Rejas, J; Hern Ndez, G; Garcia-Garcia, M; Rico-Villademoros, F; Porras, A

    2003-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics seem to differ mainly in their tolerability profile. The aim of this cross-sectional study, the Estudio de Investigaci n de Resultados en Esquizofrenia (Outcomes Research Study in Schizophrenia; EIRE study), was to assess in a clinical setting the frequency of several side-effects related to haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. This article addresses sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects (gynecomastia, menorrhage, amenorrhea, and galactorrhea). We recruited outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria and who had received a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol) for at least 4 weeks. During a single visit, we collected data, including demographic and clinical characteristics, current antipsychotic and concomitant treatment, and adverse effects listed in a modified version of the UKU Scale. We used a Chi-squared test to determine pairs comparisons of the frequency of adverse reactions between treatments. To estimate risk of a given adverse reaction with a given treatment, we used a logistic regression method. We assessed 636 evaluable patients out of 669 recruited. Frequency of sexual dysfunction was high with haloperidol (38.1%) and also with olanzapine (35.3%), quetiapine (18.2%), and risperidone (43.2%). We found the frequency of other reproductive side-effects to be relatively low with all four drugs: haloperidol (6.9%), olanzapine (6.4%), quetiapine (2.7%), and risperidone (11.7%). Sexual dysfunction appeared to be dose-related with haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine. Risperidone and olanzapine showed a higher risk of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive sideeffects than haloperidol. Quetiapine showed a lower risk of sexual dysfunction during short-term treatment (< 12 weeks). However, data on longer-term treatment (> 12 weeks) are lacking

  4. Frequency of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol: the results of the EIRE study.

    PubMed

    Bobes, J; Garc A-Portilla, M P; Rejas, J; Hern Ndez, G; Garcia-Garcia, M; Rico-Villademoros, F; Porras, A

    2003-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics seem to differ mainly in their tolerability profile. The aim of this cross-sectional study, the Estudio de Investigaci n de Resultados en Esquizofrenia (Outcomes Research Study in Schizophrenia; EIRE study), was to assess in a clinical setting the frequency of several side-effects related to haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. This article addresses sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects (gynecomastia, menorrhage, amenorrhea, and galactorrhea). We recruited outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria and who had received a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol) for at least 4 weeks. During a single visit, we collected data, including demographic and clinical characteristics, current antipsychotic and concomitant treatment, and adverse effects listed in a modified version of the UKU Scale. We used a Chi-squared test to determine pairs comparisons of the frequency of adverse reactions between treatments. To estimate risk of a given adverse reaction with a given treatment, we used a logistic regression method. We assessed 636 evaluable patients out of 669 recruited. Frequency of sexual dysfunction was high with haloperidol (38.1%) and also with olanzapine (35.3%), quetiapine (18.2%), and risperidone (43.2%). We found the frequency of other reproductive side-effects to be relatively low with all four drugs: haloperidol (6.9%), olanzapine (6.4%), quetiapine (2.7%), and risperidone (11.7%). Sexual dysfunction appeared to be dose-related with haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine. Risperidone and olanzapine showed a higher risk of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive sideeffects than haloperidol. Quetiapine showed a lower risk of sexual dysfunction during short-term treatment (< 12 weeks). However, data on longer-term treatment (> 12 weeks) are lacking

  5. Reduced Melanocortin Production Causes Sexual Dysfunction in Male Mice With POMC Neuronal Insulin and Leptin Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Latrice D.; Dowling, Abigail R.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides like α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) substantially improve hepatic insulin sensitivity and regulate energy expenditure. Melanocortinergic agents are also powerful inducers of sexual arousal that are being investigated for a possible therapeutic role in erectile dysfunction. It is currently unclear whether reduced melanocortin (MC) activity may contribute to the sexual dysfunction accompanying obesity and type 2 diabetes. Male rodents with leptin and insulin resistance targeted to POMC neurons (leptin receptor [LepR]/insulin receptor [IR]POMC mice) exhibit obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic insulin resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that LepR/IRPOMC males are also subfertile due to dramatic alterations in sexual behavior. Remarkably, these reproductive changes are accompanied by decreased α-MSH production not present when a single receptor type is deleted. Unexpectedly, behavioral sensitivity to α-MSH and MC receptor expression are also reduced in LepR/IRPOMC males, a potential adaptation of the MC system to altered α-MSH production. Together, these results suggest that concurrent insulin and leptin resistance in POMC neurons in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes can reduce endogenous α-MSH levels and impair sexual function. PMID:25590244

  6. Sexual dysfunction with the use of antidepressants in a tertiary care mental health setting - a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Lahon, Kingshuk; Shetty, Harsha M; Paramel, Amith; Sharma, Gyaneswar

    2011-04-01

    Sexual dysfunction affects patients' quality of life. It can occur secondary to physical or mental disorders, substance abuse and treatment with prescription drugs like antidepressants. We wanted to study the prevalence of sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant use in the psychiatric unit of a tertiary care hospital and assess for causality, severity and preventability. We did a retrospective data collection from case records of patients on antidepressants from the Psychiatry outpatient clinic of a tertiary care teaching hospital during the period 1(st) January 2006 to 31(st) December 2006, excluding those with complaints of sexual dysfunction prior to treatment. Data are presented as a case series. Documented adverse events were subjected to analysis for causality, severity and preventability using Naranjo's, modified Hartwig and Siegel and modified Schumock and Thornton's Preventability scales respectively. Out of 169 patients, four patients developed sexual dysfunction (2.36%) associated with duloxetine, mirtazapine, trazodone and sertraline. We observed a possible causal relationship of mild to moderately severe ADR (sexual dysfunction) which was not preventable. Prevalence of antidepressant associated sexual dysfunction was lower than quoted in Western literature probably due to the retrospective nature of our study design. Active monitoring and intervention can greatly improve the quality of life and compliance to treatment. PMID:21772780

  7. Review of Naturopathy of Medical Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps Sinensis, in Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions including desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders are increasing worldwide due to etiological factors and aging. Several types of treatment are claimed in modern medicine, but they have serious side effects and higher costs. In fact, alternative approaches, such as the intake of plants, fungi, and insects, or their extracts, have also been practiced to enhance sexuality and ameliorate illness with notable successes. However, the scientific evidence related to the mechanisms and efficacy of these alternative medicines is both scarce and all too often unconvincing. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is an Ascomycetes fungus parasitic to Lepidoptera larvae, and has long been used as medicine to treat many illnesses and promote longevity in Chinese society. Previous investigations have shown that O. sinensis has many pharmacological activities. This review has focused on illustrating that O. sinensis can enhance libido and sexual performance, and can restore impaired reproductive functions, such as impotency or infertility, in both sexes. PMID:27041868

  8. Review of Naturopathy of Medical Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps Sinensis, in Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions including desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders are increasing worldwide due to etiological factors and aging. Several types of treatment are claimed in modern medicine, but they have serious side effects and higher costs. In fact, alternative approaches, such as the intake of plants, fungi, and insects, or their extracts, have also been practiced to enhance sexuality and ameliorate illness with notable successes. However, the scientific evidence related to the mechanisms and efficacy of these alternative medicines is both scarce and all too often unconvincing. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is an Ascomycetes fungus parasitic to Lepidoptera larvae, and has long been used as medicine to treat many illnesses and promote longevity in Chinese society. Previous investigations have shown that O. sinensis has many pharmacological activities. This review has focused on illustrating that O. sinensis can enhance libido and sexual performance, and can restore impaired reproductive functions, such as impotency or infertility, in both sexes.

  9. Review of Naturopathy of Medical Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps Sinensis, in Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions including desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders are increasing worldwide due to etiological factors and aging. Several types of treatment are claimed in modern medicine, but they have serious side effects and higher costs. In fact, alternative approaches, such as the intake of plants, fungi, and insects, or their extracts, have also been practiced to enhance sexuality and ameliorate illness with notable successes. However, the scientific evidence related to the mechanisms and efficacy of these alternative medicines is both scarce and all too often unconvincing. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is an Ascomycetes fungus parasitic to Lepidoptera larvae, and has long been used as medicine to treat many illnesses and promote longevity in Chinese society. Previous investigations have shown that O. sinensis has many pharmacological activities. This review has focused on illustrating that O. sinensis can enhance libido and sexual performance, and can restore impaired reproductive functions, such as impotency or infertility, in both sexes. PMID:27041868

  10. HIV Screening Rates among Medicaid Enrollees Diagnosed with Other Sexually Transmitted Infections

    PubMed Central

    Adekeye, Oluwatoyosi A.; Abara, Winston E.; Xu, Junjun; Lee, Joel M.; Rust, George; Satcher, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Approximately 20 million new sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diagnosed yearly in the United States costing the healthcare system an estimated $16 billion in direct medical expenses. The presence of other STIs increases the risk of HIV transmission. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has long recommended routine HIV screening for individuals with a diagnosed STI. Unfortunately, HIV screening prevalence among STI diagnosed patients are still sub-optimal in many healthcare settings. Objective To determine the proportion of STI-diagnosed persons in the Medicaid population who are screened for HIV, examine correlates of HIV screening, and to suggest critical intervention points to increase HIV screening in this population. Methods A retrospective database analysis was conducted to examine the prevalence and correlates of HIV screening among participants. Participant eligibility was restricted to Medicaid enrollees in 29 states with a primary STI diagnosis (chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis) or pelvic inflammatory disease claim in 2009. HIV-positive persons were excluded from the study. Frequencies and descriptive statistics were conducted to characterize the sample in general and by STI diagnosis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were performed to estimate unadjusted odds ratios and adjusted odds ratio respectively and the 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression models that included the independent variables (race, STI diagnosis, and healthcare setting) and covariates (gender, residential status, age, and state) were analyzed to examine independent associations with HIV screening. Results About 43% of all STI-diagnosed study participants were screened for HIV. STI-diagnosed persons that were between 20–24 years, female, residing in a large metropolitan area and with a syphilis diagnosis were more likely to be screened for HIV. Participants who received their STI diagnosis in the emergency

  11. Radiation Dose to the Penile Structures and Patient-Reported Sexual Dysfunction in Long-Term Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Thor, Maria; Olsson, Caroline E.; Oh, Jung Hun; Alsadius, David; Pettersson, Niclas; Deasy, Joseph O.; Steineck, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Aim The involvement of various penile structures in radiotherapy (RT)-induced sexual dysfunction among prostate cancer survivors remains unclear and domains beyond erectile dysfunction such as orgasm, and pain have typically not been considered. The purpose of this study was to investigate sexual dysfunction post-RT for localized prostate cancer and to examine whether radiation dose to different penile structures can explain these symptoms. Methods We investigated sexual dysfunction in two treated prostate cancer cohorts and in one non-pelvic-irradiated cohort, 328 sexually active men part of an unselected, population-based study conducted in 2008. The treated subjects were prescribed primary/salvage external-beam RT to 70 Gy@2.0 Gy/fraction. Absorbed RT doses (Dmean and Dmax) of the corpora cavernosa (CC), the penile bulb (PB), and the total penile structure (CC + PB) were related to 13 patient-reported symptoms on sexual dysfunction by means of factor analysis (FA) and logistic regression. Results Three distinct symptom domains were identified across all cohorts: “erectile dysfunction” (ED, two to five symptoms), “orgasmic dysfunction” (OD, two to four symptoms), and “pain” (two to three symptoms). The strongest predictor for ED symptoms was CC + PB Dmax (P = 0.001–0.03), CC and PB Dmean predicted OD symptoms equally well (P = 0.03 and 0.02–0.05, respectively), and the strongest predictor for pain symptoms was CC + PB Dmean (P = 0.02–0.03). Conclusion Sexual dysfunction following RT was separated into three main domains with symptoms related to erectile dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, and pain. Chances for intact sexual functionality may be increased if dose to the total penile structure can be restricted for these domains in the planning of RT. PMID:26564611

  12. Historical and Current Factors Discriminating Sexually Functional from Sexually Dysfunctional Married Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiman, Julia R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compared clinical couples accepted for sex therapy with nonclinical couples using the Personal History Questionnaire and sex and marital defensiveness scales. The best discriminators were sexual functioning scales, historical and affective scales for women, and current and fantasy scales for men. Surprising results and conclusions are discussed.…

  13. Acromegaly is associated with higher frequency of female sexual dysfunction: experience of a single center.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Hatipoglu, Esra; Akhan, Süleyman Engin; Uludag, Seyfettin; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess female sexual dysfunction (FSD), quality of life and depression status in female patients with acromegaly. Fifty-seven sexually active female patients with acromegaly disease (21 controlled, 36 uncontrolled) monitored by Cerrahpasa Medical School, Endocrinology and Metabolism out-patient clinic and age and body mass index-matched 46 healthy female subjects were included in the study. Sexual functions and status of depression in both patient and control groups were evaluated by using the Female Sexual Function Index Form (FSFI) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. Quality of life was evaluated by using the Acromegaly Quality of Life (AcroQoL) Scale. Hormone levels were studied in the groups. The FSFI total score and desire, arousal, orgasm, and satisfaction domains in patients with acromegaly were significantly lower than in the healthy controls (p ≤ 0.0001). There was no difference between biochemically controlled and uncontrolled patients with acromegaly with respect to FSFI scores (p = 0.7). AcroQoL total score in female patients with controlled acromegaly and uncontrolled acromegaly were 46.33 ± 16.5% and 50.13 ± 18.21%, respectively (p = 0.53). The difference in BDI scores between controlled and uncontrolled acromegaly patients was not significant but they were significantly higher in the control group (p ≤ 0.0001). In the correlation analysis, a negative correlation was found between FSFI total and BDI score (r = -0.69, p< 0.001), age (r = -0.45, p< 0.001), and IGF-I (r = -0.28, p = 0.006). This study showed that sexual dysfunction and depression rates in female patients with acromegaly are higher than in healthy females.

  14. A Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Sexual Dysfunction in Men on Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Shane M; Wang, Chi-Hsiung E; Victorson, David E; Helfand, Brian T; Novakovic, Kristian R; Brendler, Charles B; Albaugh, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sexual dysfunction, repeat biopsies and other demographic and clinical factors in men on active surveillance (AS). Methods Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measures were administered at enrollment and every 6 months to assess quality of life (QOL), psychosocial and urological health outcomes. Using mixed-effects models, we examined the impact of repeat biopsies, total number of cores taken, anxiety, age, and comorbidity on sexual function over the first 24 months of enrolling in AS. Main Outcome Measures PROs included the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 (EPIC-26) Sexual Function (SF) subscale, the American Urological Association-Symptom Index (AUA-SI), and the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC). Results At enrollment (n = 195), mean age was 66.5 ± 6.8 with a mean EPIC-26 SF score of 61.4 ± 30.4. EPIC-26 SF scores steadily decreased to 53.9 ± 30.7 at 24 months (P < 0.01). MAX-PC scores also progressively decreased over time (P = 0.03). Factors associated with lower EPIC-26 scores over time included age, unemployed status, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and hypertension (all P < 0.05). Higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was associated with a more rapid decline in EPIC-26 SF over time (P = 0.03). In multivariable analysis, age, diabetes, and PSA × time interaction remained significant predictors of diminished sexual function. Anxiety, number of biopsies, and total cores taken did not predict sexual dysfunction or change over time in our cohort. Conclusions Men on AS experienced a gradual decline in sexual function during the first 24 months of enrollment. Older age, PSA × time, and diabetes were all independent predictors of diminished sexual function over time. Anxiety, AUA-SI, the number of cores and the number of biopsies were not predictors of reduced sexual function in men in AS. PMID:26468379

  15. Clinical Assessment of Tribulus terrestris Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Carlos RB; Lasmar, Ricardo; Gama, Gustavo F; Abreu, Camila S; Nunes, Carlos P; Geller, Mauro; Oliveira, Lisa; Santos, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative–quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days). Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores (P < 0.0001) post-treatment, with improvement among 106 (88.33%) subjects. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) increase in the level of DHEA, while the levels of both serum testosterone (P = 0.284) and free testosterone decreased (P < 0.0001). Most adverse events recorded were related to the gastrointestinal tract. Physical examination showed no significant changes post-treatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that the T. terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:25574150

  16. Efficacy trial of an Internet-based intervention for cancer-related female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; Yuan, Ying; Fellman, Bryan M; Odensky, Evan; Lewis, Pamela E; Martinetti, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The recent NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship recommend systematic evaluation and multidisciplinary treatment of cancer-related sexual dysfunctions. However, most oncology professionals fail to routinely assess sexual problems and lack expertise to treat them. An Internet-based intervention was designed to educate female patients and their partners about cancer-related sexual problems, describe medical treatment options and how to find expert care, and provide self-help strategies. A randomized trial assessed efficacy of the intervention when used as self-help versus the same Web access and 3 supplemental counseling sessions. Survivors of localized breast or gynecologic cancers completed online questionnaires at baseline, posttreatment, and 3- and 6-month follow-up, including the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ), the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) to assess emotional distress, and the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale. Program evaluation ratings were completed posttreatment. Fifty-eight women completed baseline questionnaires (mean age, 53 ± 9 years). Drop-out rates were 22% during treatment and 34% at 6-month follow-up. Linear mixed models for each outcome across time showed improvement in total scores on the FSFI, MSIQ, and QLACS (P<.001) and BSI-18 (P=.001). The counseled group improved significantly more on sexuality measures, but changes in emotional distress and quality of life did not differ between groups. Program content and ease of use were rated positively. Research is needed on how best to integrate this intervention into routine clinical practice, and particularly how to improve uptake and adherence.

  17. EFFICACY TRIAL OF AN INTERNET-BASED INTERVENTION FOR CANCER-RELATED FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; Yuan, Ying; Fellman, Bryan M.; Odensky, Evan; Lewis, Pamela E.; Martinetti, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The recent National Comprehensive Cancer Network Survivorship Guideline recommends systematic evaluation and multidisciplinary treatment of cancer-related sexual dysfunctions. Yet, most oncology professionals fail to routinely assess sexual problems and lack expertise to treat them. An internet-based intervention was designed to educate female patients and their partners about cancer-related sexual problems, to describe medical treatment options and how to find expert care, and to provide self-help strategies. A randomized trial assessed efficacy of the intervention when used as self-help versus the same web access plus three supplemental counseling sessions. Survivors of localized breast or gynecological cancer completed online questionnaires at baseline, post-treatment, and 3- and 6-month follow-up, including the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI); the Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ), the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) to assess emotional distress, and the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors Scale (QLACS). Program evaluation ratings were completed post-treatment. Fifty-eight women completed baseline questionnaires (mean age 53 ± 9). Drop-out rates were 22% during treatment and 34% at 6-month follow-up. Linear mixed models for each outcome across time showed improvement in total scores on the FSFI, MSIQ, and QLACS (P<0.001) and BSI-18 (P=0.001). The counseled group improved significantly more on sexuality measures, but changes in emotional distress and quality of life did not differ between groups. Program content and ease of use were rated positively. Research is needed on how best to integrate this intervention into routine clinical practice, particularly how to improve uptake and adherence. PMID:24225972

  18. Lack of sexual activity from erectile dysfunction is associated with a reversible reduction in serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Jannini, E A; Screponi, E; Carosa, E; Pepe, M; Lo Giudice, F; Trimarchi, F; Benvenga, S

    1999-12-01

    The role of androgenic hormones in human sexuality, in the mechanism of erection and in the pathogenesis of impotence is under debate. While the use of testosterone is common in the clinical therapy of male erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism is a rare cause of impotence. We evaluated serum testosterone levels in men with erectile dysfunction resulting either from organic or non-organic causes before and after non-hormonal impotence therapy. Eighty-three consecutive cases of impotence (70% organic, 30% non-organic, vascular aetiology being the most frequent) were subjected to hormonal screening before and after various psychological, medical (prostaglandin E1, yohimbine) or mechanical therapies (vascular surgery, penile prostheses, vacuum devices). Thirty age-matched healthy men served as a control group. Compared to controls, patients with impotence resulting from both organic and non-organic causes showed reduced serum levels of both total testosterone (11.1 +/- 2.4 vs. 17.7 +/- 5.5 nmol/L) and free testosterone (56.2 +/- 22.9 vs. 79.4 +/- 27.0 pmol/L) (both p < 0.001). Irrespective of the different aetiologies and of the various impotence therapies, a dramatic increase in serum total and free testosterone levels (15.6 +/- 4.2 nmol/L and 73.8 +/- 22.5 pmol/L, respectively) was observed in patients who achieved normal sexual activity 3 months after commencing therapy (p < 0.001). On the contrary, serum testosterone levels did not change in patients in whom therapies were ineffective. Since the pre-therapy low testosterone levels were independent of the aetiology of impotence, we hypothesize that this hormonal pattern is related to the loss of sexual activity, as demonstrated by its normalization with the resumption of coital activity after different therapies. The corollary is that sexual activity may feed itself throughout the increase in testosterone levels.

  19. Epidemiology of Sexual Dysfunction in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mohammad Arash; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Ghaemmaghami, Afagh; Marzabadi, Esfandiar Azad; Pardakhti, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative prevalence rate of every sexual dysfunctions (SDs) in Iranian population. Methods: We searched international database such as: PubMed/Medline, Scopus, PsychNET, and Scholar Google and Iranian database such as Iran Psych, IranDoc, IranMedex, and SID. Search duration was between 1990 and 2013. Results: From 449 articles were retrieved, then 11 articles on male with total sample size of 2142 and 8 articles on female with total sample size of 4391 were selected after critical appraisal. For quality assessment check list to evaluate a prevalence article was contained study population, sampling method, sample size, criteria for SD diagnosis, specific rates, study location, and authors list. In male, erectile dysfunction was 56.1%. In female, pooled estimation prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in complained group was 65.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.1-80.6%) compared to general population 35% (95% CI: 17.6-52.1%). Sexual arousal disorder in clinical patient was 59.6% (95% CI: 39-80%) against 33.8% (95% CI: 18.3-49.3%) in general population. Orgasmic disorder in complained was 35.5% (95% CI: 16-55%) and in general population was 35.3% (95% CI: 26.8-43.8%). Sexual pain disorder pooled estimation prevalence were 35.2% (95% CI: 14.5-56%) versus 20.1% (95% CI: 6.4-33.8%) in complained and general population consecutively. Conclusions: The rate of SD in Iran was approximately the same of worldwide except orgasmic disorder which was two times more than the worldwide average. PMID:26097672

  20. Genome-wide association study of SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction in a Japanese cohort with major depression.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Kouichi; Hiratsuka, Kazuyuki; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Jun; Nonen, Shinpei; Azuma, Junichi; Kato, Masaki; Wakeno, Masataka; Okugawa, Gaku; Kinoshita, Toshihiko; Kurosawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Saito, Yoshiro

    2012-08-15

    Sexual dysfunction is a major side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify the genetic factors contributing to the risk of SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction by testing 186 320 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in a cohort of 201 Japanese major depression patients including 36 with sexual dysfunction induced by SSRI (paroxetine or fluvoxamine) or SNRI (milnacipran). The Cochran-Armitage trend test showed that 11 SNPs, tightly clustered in a distinct region on chromosome 14q21.3, were associated with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction at a genome-wide significance level after false discovery rate (FDR) correction, and the strongest SNP association was with rs1160351 (P=3.04 × 10(-7), risk ratio=2.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.79-4.76). These SNPs mapped to the intronic region of the MDGA2 gene. A Manhattan plot showed that the strong association peak remained in MDGA2 after adjustment for sex and age in a multivariable logistic regression analysis although P values increased slightly and became non-significant. Replication studies with larger sample sizes are required to validate this exploratory study, but our findings may provide insights into the genetic basis of sexual dysfunction induced by SSRI/SNRI. PMID:22445761

  1. Does Information About Neuropsychiatric Diagnoses Influence Evaluation of Child Sexual Abuse Allegations?

    PubMed

    Lainpelto, Katrin; Isaksson, Johan; Lindblad, Frank

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating if attitudes toward children with neuropsychiatric disorders influence evaluations concerning allegations of child sexual abuse. Law students (n = 107) at Stockholm University, Sweden, were presented a transcript of a mock police interview with a girl, 11 years of age. This interview was based on a real case, selected as a "typical" example from these years concerning contributions from the interviewer and the alleged victim. After having read the transcript, the students responded to a questionnaire concerning degree of credibility, if the girl talked about events that had really occurred, richness of details, and if the narrations were considered truthful and age-adequate. Fifty-four of the students were also told that the girl had been given the diagnoses of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and Asperger syndrome. Students who were informed about the diagnoses gave significantly lower scores concerning credibility of the interviewee. To a lesser degree they regarded her narrations as expressions of what had really occurred and considered her statements less truthful. Furthermore, they found that the narrations contained fewer details. Finally, they found the girl less competent to tell about abuse. We conclude that a neuropsychiatric disorder may infer risks of unjustified skeptical attitudes concerning trustworthiness and cognitive capacity. PMID:27135382

  2. Sexual dysfunction in men and women with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure.

  3. Does Bicycle Riding Impact the Development of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Sexual Dysfunction in Men?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Gon; Kim, Dae Woong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether men who engaged in recreational bicycle riding are more likely to be affected by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and sexual dysfunction than are man who exercised by amateur marathon running with less perineal impact. Materials and Methods A total of 22 healthy male amateur bicyclists and 17 healthy male amateur marathoners were enrolled in the study. We evaluated questionnaires including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), uroflowmetric values, postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, and transrectal ultrasound of the prostate in all subjects. We also compared the prevalence of urination disorders (UD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, body mass index, comorbidities, or exercise habits (p>0.05). Mean total and subscale scores of the IPSS and IIEF and the prevalence of UD (8/22 vs. 4/17, p=0.494) and ED (11/22 vs. 10/17, p=0.748) were not significantly different between the two groups. Also, there were no significant differences between the two groups in uroflowmetric parameters such as peak urinary flow rates, voided urine volume, PVR urine volume, prostate volume, or serum PSA level. Conclusions Bicycle riding seems to have no measurable hazardous effect on voiding function or sexual function in men who cycled recreationally. PMID:21687396

  4. Female sexual dysfunction: A comparative study in drug naive 1st episode of depression in a general hospital of South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Payel; Manohar, Shivananda; Raman, Rajesh; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women's sexual dysfunction is found to be highly prevalent in western and Indian literature. Limited studies are available on drug naive depression in western literature and in Indian population. Aim: To determine the prevalence rate and symptom profile of female sexual dysfunctions in patients with untreated depression. Design: A cross-sectional study in the psychiatry out-patient department of general hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: Following written informed consent female sexual functioning index (FSFI) and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) – female version and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD - 17 item) on 30 cases and 30 controls was administered. Sociodemographic data, pattern and type of sexual dysfunctions were enquired. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, contingency co-efficient analysis and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The mean score of HAMD 17 item in study group was 19.13. The study showed that female sexual dysfunction was 70.3% in study group compared to 43.3% in control FSFI scores above 16 in HAMD had dysfunction of 76% with FSFI in study group. With ASEX-F sexual dysfunction was 73.3% in study compared to 20% in control. Scores above 16 in HAMD had 80% of sexual dysfunction with ASEX-F in study group. Conclusion: The study found that ASEX-F co-related better with HAMD 17 item. Following the onset of depression, the incidence of sexual dysfunction started at an early age in women. PMID:26600576

  5. Electroencephalographic activity during sexual behavior: a novel approach to the analysis of drug effects on arousal and motivation relevant for sexual dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Marisela; Guevara, Miguel Angel; Agmo, Anders

    2014-06-01

    The neurobiological bases of human sexual behavior are only partly understood. The etiology of most human sexual dysfunctions is not understood at all. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in the treatment of some male sexual disorders. The prime example should be erectile deficiency, where several efficient and safe treatments are available. Pharmacological treatment for premature ejaculation is also available, although it is still in an early stage. Disorders of sexual desire have attracted much attention when women are affected but far less so when men are concerned. Whereas animal models appropriate for testing treatments for problems with erection and premature ejaculation are available, it is questionable whether such models of the desire disorders have predictive validity. There seems to be many factors involved both in reduced and enhanced sexual desire, most of which are unknown. In this review we present some data suggesting that an electroencephalographic analysis of brain activity during exposure to sexually relevant stimuli in male rats and men and during execution of sexual behaviors in male rats may provide useful information. The effects of a commonly used drug, ethanol, on the electroencephalogram recorded during sexual events in rats and men are also described. Although this approach to the analysis of the central nervous activity associated with sexual desire, arousal and behavior is still in its infancy, the data obtained so far show a remarkable similarity between men and rats. This suggests that animal studies of electroencephalographic responses to drugs in sexual contexts may be useful for predicting effects in the human male.

  6. A qualitative evaluation of online chat groups for women completing a psychological intervention for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hucker, Alice; McCabe, Marita P

    2014-01-01

    Because of the embarrassment that can surround female sexual dysfunctions, online interventions offer an anonymous and private treatment alternative. Recently, an online cognitive-behavioral treatment for female sexual dysfunctions was evaluated. Although significant improvements were observed in sexual functioning, the treatment was primarily a behavioral intervention because of difficulties with engaging participants in cognitive therapy over e-mail. To address this limitation, the use of chat groups was incorporated into a new online treatment for female sexual dysfunctions-the PursuingPleasure program. Thirty-eight women participated in the PursuingPleasure chat groups. The goals of the chat groups were to address and overcome challenges as women progressed through PursuingPleasure and to create a social support network where group therapy processes could be used. The chat groups aimed to address misunderstandings, monitor changes, and receive feedback. A qualitative analysis of the chat groups revealed that they helped to facilitate the cognitive-affective aspects of the program, as well as fulfill their other intended functions. This study demonstrates how the use of chat groups in the online treatment of female sexual dysfunctions is a useful addition to Internet-based treatment. Feedback suggests that the chat groups were one of the most helpful aspects of the program, although a small group of women reported finding the groups unhelpful.

  7. A qualitative evaluation of online chat groups for women completing a psychological intervention for female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hucker, Alice; McCabe, Marita P

    2014-01-01

    Because of the embarrassment that can surround female sexual dysfunctions, online interventions offer an anonymous and private treatment alternative. Recently, an online cognitive-behavioral treatment for female sexual dysfunctions was evaluated. Although significant improvements were observed in sexual functioning, the treatment was primarily a behavioral intervention because of difficulties with engaging participants in cognitive therapy over e-mail. To address this limitation, the use of chat groups was incorporated into a new online treatment for female sexual dysfunctions-the PursuingPleasure program. Thirty-eight women participated in the PursuingPleasure chat groups. The goals of the chat groups were to address and overcome challenges as women progressed through PursuingPleasure and to create a social support network where group therapy processes could be used. The chat groups aimed to address misunderstandings, monitor changes, and receive feedback. A qualitative analysis of the chat groups revealed that they helped to facilitate the cognitive-affective aspects of the program, as well as fulfill their other intended functions. This study demonstrates how the use of chat groups in the online treatment of female sexual dysfunctions is a useful addition to Internet-based treatment. Feedback suggests that the chat groups were one of the most helpful aspects of the program, although a small group of women reported finding the groups unhelpful. PMID:23768099

  8. Genitourinary disorders of old age: therapeutic considerations including counseling for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Finkle, A L

    1978-10-01

    Genitourinary tissues undergo physical changes with advancing age, due partly to hormonal alterations. However, the greatest influence on continuing sexual function during aging is emotional and is directly related to the psychologic history of the individual patient. The interested professional can help his patient substantially by simply taking time to listen, a process which permits identification of any psychogenic basis for the sexual dysfunction. The entire approach and method of counseling presuppose that psychogenic impotence is the most common form of the problem. This preliminary effort can do no harm. Should it fail, the patient can be referred to other consultants who use more protracted or sophisticated modalities. With the elderly, the clinician can advise patients to share interpersonal warmth and to enjoy the satisfaction of body contact at any age at which this desire and capacity persist. To the aging person, the totality of sexual meaning is more significant than performance or technique. The sympathetic counselor who renders supportive reassurance to the patient usually can expect beneficial results. PMID:701694

  9. Genitourinary disorders of old age: therapeutic considerations including counseling for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Finkle, A L

    1978-10-01

    Genitourinary tissues undergo physical changes with advancing age, due partly to hormonal alterations. However, the greatest influence on continuing sexual function during aging is emotional and is directly related to the psychologic history of the individual patient. The interested professional can help his patient substantially by simply taking time to listen, a process which permits identification of any psychogenic basis for the sexual dysfunction. The entire approach and method of counseling presuppose that psychogenic impotence is the most common form of the problem. This preliminary effort can do no harm. Should it fail, the patient can be referred to other consultants who use more protracted or sophisticated modalities. With the elderly, the clinician can advise patients to share interpersonal warmth and to enjoy the satisfaction of body contact at any age at which this desire and capacity persist. To the aging person, the totality of sexual meaning is more significant than performance or technique. The sympathetic counselor who renders supportive reassurance to the patient usually can expect beneficial results.

  10. Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction for the presence of sexual dysfunction within a Ghanaian urological population.

    PubMed

    Amidu, N; Quaye, L; Afoko, A A; Karikari, P; Gandau, B B N; Amoah, E O; Nuwoku, E

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction (SD) is devastating to a man's ego and its presence could defeat his purpose of masculinity. A number of studies have explored and reported on existing comorbidities between SD and medical conditions for which urological problems are no exception. However, in Ghana there is paucity of data exploring the epidemiological, etiological and health associations of medical conditions with SD. This study was therefore conducted to determine the prevalence, types and determinants of SD in a sample of Ghanaian men with urological conditions. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out between December 2012 and April 2013 at the Urology clinic of the Tamale Teaching Hospital in the Northern Region of Ghana. A total of 200 participants were enrolled in the study. All participants were evaluated by using a semistructured questionnaire and the Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction questionnaire. An overall response rate of 47.5% was estimated after 69 patients refused to partake in the study; 6 patients found the questionnaire too sensitive and refused to participate and 30 participants returned incomplete questionnaire. The mean age of the participants was 36.5±13.8 years and ranged from 18 to 70 years. The estimated prevalence of SD was 71.6%. The prevalence of the various SD domains was as follows: non-sensuality (71.6%), premature ejaculation (70.5%), non-communication (69.5%), impotence and infrequency (68.4%), dissatisfaction (61.1%) and avoidance (57.9%). Participants who were married, consumed alcoholic beverages, smoked cigarettes and aging males who had children were at a greater risk of developing SD. Urologic patients have a high prevalence of SD that is dependent on marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking status and aged patients with children. PMID:24430277

  11. Fresh onion juice enhanced copulatory behavior in male rats with and without paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Daradka, Haytham M; Al Barbarawi, Mohammed M; Mustafa, Ayman G

    2014-02-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is one of the most commonly cultivated species of the family Liliaceae, and has long been used in dietary and therapeutic applications. Treatment with fresh onion juice has been reported to promote testosterone production in male rats. Testosterone is the male sex hormone responsible for enhancing sexual libido and potency. This study aimed to investigate the effects of onion juice on copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats and in male rats with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. Sexually experienced male rats were divided into seven groups: a control group, three onion juice-treated groups, a paroxetine-treated group, and two groups treated with paroxetine plus different doses of onion juice. At the end of the treatments, sexual behavior parameters and testosterone levels were measured and compared among the groups. Administration of onion juice significantly reduced mount frequency and latency and increased the copulatory efficacy of potent male rats. In addition, administration of onion juice attenuated the prolonged ejaculatory latency period induced by paroxetine and increased the percentage of ejaculating rats. Serum testosterone levels increased significantly by onion juice administration. However, a significant reduction in testosterone because of paroxetine therapy was observed. This reduction was restored to normal levels by administration of onion juice. This study conclusively demonstrates that fresh onion juice improves copulatory behavior in sexually potent male rats and in those with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction by increasing serum testosterone levels.

  12. Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

    2013-01-01

    In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

  13. Ego Deficiencies in the Areas of Pleasure, Intimacy, and Cooperation: Guidelines in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levay, Alexander N.; Kagle, Arlene

    1977-01-01

    Psychopathology, in the form of a deficiency in ego functions of pleasure, intimacy, or cooperation, is usually associated with sexual dysfunctions that prove refractory to sex therapy techniques alone. Each deficiency forms a distinct clinical syndrome with specific treatment requirements, necessitating further diagnostic subcategorization of…

  14. The effect of menses on standardized assessment of sexual dysfunction among women with uterine fibroids: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K.; Borah, Bijan J.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if assessment of sexual dysfunction by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is related to whether the FSFI is administered during or between menses in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids Design Prospective cohort Setting US academic medical centers Patients Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids enrolled in fibroid treatment trials Interventions FSFI administered during and between menses Main Outcome Measures FSFI mean scores in each of 6 domains and a discordance score to report individual differences in assessment Results Thirty-three women completed the FSFI during menstruation and at a time in their cycle when they were not menstruating. The mean FSFI scores for each domain did not differ based on when in the menstrual cycle the instrument was administered. However, on an individual level, nearly half of the women reported sexual dysfunction differently during menses than between menses. Of those that differed, pain and desire domains improved; lubrication, and satisfaction worsened during menses. Conclusions Although the mean values of the domain scores were not different, women did report differences in sexual functioning between menses and non-menses reporting. Timing of the questionnaire in relation to menses should be considered in sexual dysfunction assessment for women with uterine fibroids. PMID:25989973

  15. A disease difficult to diagnose: Gardner-Diamond syndrome accompanied by platelet dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Karakaş, Zeynep; Karaman, Serap; Avcı, Burcu; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Anak, Sema; Devecioğlu, Ömer

    2014-09-01

    Gardner Diamond syndrome is a rare condition characterized with painful ecchymoses in different parts of the body and cutaneous and mucosal hemorrhages. The etiology is not known fully and psychogenic factors are thought to be involved. Cutaneous lesions and hemorrhages develop mostly following emotional stress and rarely minor traumas and may recur. Although the extremities are involved with the highest rate, the lesions may be observed in any part of the body. Hemostatic tests are generally normal. The majority of the subjects is composed of young women. It is observed more rarely in men and children. In this article, a patient who presented with recurring painful echymoses and bleeding disorder and diagnosed with Gardner Diamond syndrome by intracutaneous injection of autologous blood was presented to emphasize that this syndrome is observed rarely in the childhood and should be considered not only in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions, but also in the differential diagnosis of various system hemorrhages.

  16. A disease difficult to diagnose: Gardner-Diamond syndrome accompanied by platelet dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Karakaş, Zeynep; Karaman, Serap; Avcı, Burcu; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Anak, Sema; Devecioğlu, Ömer

    2014-09-01

    Gardner Diamond syndrome is a rare condition characterized with painful ecchymoses in different parts of the body and cutaneous and mucosal hemorrhages. The etiology is not known fully and psychogenic factors are thought to be involved. Cutaneous lesions and hemorrhages develop mostly following emotional stress and rarely minor traumas and may recur. Although the extremities are involved with the highest rate, the lesions may be observed in any part of the body. Hemostatic tests are generally normal. The majority of the subjects is composed of young women. It is observed more rarely in men and children. In this article, a patient who presented with recurring painful echymoses and bleeding disorder and diagnosed with Gardner Diamond syndrome by intracutaneous injection of autologous blood was presented to emphasize that this syndrome is observed rarely in the childhood and should be considered not only in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions, but also in the differential diagnosis of various system hemorrhages. PMID:26078671

  17. A disease difficult to diagnose: Gardner-Diamond syndrome accompanied by platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Zeynep; Karaman, Serap; Avcı, Burcu; Ünüvar, Ayşegül; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Anak, Sema; Devecioğlu, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    Gardner Diamond syndrome is a rare condition characterized with painful ecchymoses in different parts of the body and cutaneous and mucosal hemorrhages. The etiology is not known fully and psychogenic factors are thought to be involved. Cutaneous lesions and hemorrhages develop mostly following emotional stress and rarely minor traumas and may recur. Although the extremities are involved with the highest rate, the lesions may be observed in any part of the body. Hemostatic tests are generally normal. The majority of the subjects is composed of young women. It is observed more rarely in men and children. In this article, a patient who presented with recurring painful echymoses and bleeding disorder and diagnosed with Gardner Diamond syndrome by intracutaneous injection of autologous blood was presented to emphasize that this syndrome is observed rarely in the childhood and should be considered not only in the differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions, but also in the differential diagnosis of various system hemorrhages. PMID:26078671

  18. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  19. Sexual dysfunction during methadone maintenance treatment and its influence on patient's life and treatment: a qualitative study in South China.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yinghua; Zhang, Di; Li, Xiaoming; Chen, Wen; He, Qun; Jahn, Heiko J; Li, Xin; Chen, Jun; Hu, Pei; Ling, Li

    2013-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has become an important modality of substitution treatment for opioid addicts in China since 2006. However, data are limited regarding the change in sexual function from heroin use to MMT and the influence of sexual dysfunction (SD) during MMT on patient's life and treatment. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 male and 14 female MMT patients, five of their partners, and three clinicians. The interviews took place in four MMT clinics in Guangdong Province between August 2010 and February 2011. The patients and their partners were asked separately for their perceptions of patient's sexual function during MMT, and the influence of SD on personal/family life and treatment. The main SD problems patients perceived were libido inhibition and decreased sexual pleasure. Methadone was thought to have a stronger inhibition effect on sexual desire than heroin. SD decreased quality of patient's sexual life and damaged intimate relationships. There was a gender difference in coping with SD. Men generally tended to refuse, escape, or alienate their partners. Women tended to hide sexual listlessness, endure sexual activity and tried to satisfy their partners. SD might increase risk of voluntary dropout from treatment and illicit drug use during treatment. Patients with SD did not get any effective therapy from clinicians and they also lacked skills on coping with SD-related problems. Sexual dysfunction prevented patients from reconstructing a normal intimate relationship, and affected stability of maintenance treatment. Response to patient's SD and SD-related problems from clinicians was inadequate. There is a need to develop a clinical guide to deal with both SD itself and SD-related problems. PMID:23092392

  20. Physicians' attitudes towards androgen replacement therapy for male and female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, L; Shechter, A; Porst, H; Tripodi, F; Reisman, Y

    2016-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome is a commonly diagnosed condition. The aim of this study was to investigate common clinical practices of specialists in the field of sexual medicine regarding androgen replacement treatment for men and women. Attendees of the 16th Annual Congress of the European Society of Sexual Medicine held in January 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey, were asked to participate in a survey during the congress days. A 24-item self-report, closed-question questionnaire was distributed. Three sections were accessed: sociodemographic data, professional background and personal practice patterns regarding androgen substitution in men and women. A total of 133 physicians (mean age 47 years; range 25-79) completed the survey. Responses were inconsistent regarding the lab tests used for primary evaluation of male androgen deficiency. The majority of participants (62%) recommended testosterone replacement therapy for symptomatic men with testosterone levels <8 nmol l(-1) (231 ng dl(-1)). Similarly, most physicians (88%) recognized a correlation between libido and testosterone levels in women. Only 42% and 53% reported they would prescribe testosterone to women with low libido, premenopausal and postmenopausal, respectively. This survey showed discrepancies among physicians regarding testosterone replacement therapy for men and women. PMID:26865099

  1. Difficulties in Diagnosing Sexual Abuse in Children with Condyloma Acuminata in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulbul, Selda; Demirceken, Fulya; Cakir, Baris; Cakir, Elif Pinar; Unlu, Erdal; Soyer, Tutku

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is responsible for anogenital warts and could be regarded as an indicator of possible sexual abuse in children. A genital wart was detected during an investigation of anti-hepatitis C virus positivity in a four-year-old male patient. No pathological findings of another sexually transmitted disease were found except complete…

  2. Obtaining Self-Samples to Diagnose Curable Sexually Transmitted Infections: A Systematic Review of Patients’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Paudyal, Priyamvada; Llewellyn, Carrie; Lau, Jason; Mahmud, Mohammad; Smith, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine screening is key to sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention and control. Previous studies suggest that clinic-based screening programmes capture only a small proportion of people with STIs. Self-sampling using non- or minimally invasive techniques may be beneficial for those reluctant to actively engage with conventional sampling methods. We systematically reviewed studies of patients’ experiences of obtaining self-samples to diagnose curable STIs. Methods We conducted an electronic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, BNI, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews to identify relevant articles published in English between January 1980 and March 2014. Studies were included if participants self-sampled for the diagnosis of a curable STI and had specifically sought participants’ opinions of their experience, acceptability, preferences, or willingness to self-sample. Results The initial search yielded 558 references. Of these, 45 studies met the inclusion criteria. Thirty-six studies assessed patients’ acceptability and experiences of self-sampling. Pooled results from these studies shows that self-sampling is a highly acceptable method with 85% of patients reporting the method to be well received and acceptable. Twenty-eight studies reported on ease of self-sampling; the majority of patients (88%) in these studies found self-sampling an “easy” procedure. Self-sampling was favoured compared to clinician sampling, and home sampling was preferred to clinic-based sampling. Females and older participants were more accepting of self-sampling. Only a small minority of participants (13%) reported pain during self-sampling. Participants were willing to undergo self-sampling and recommend others. Privacy and safety were the most common concerns. Conclusion Self-sampling for diagnostic testing is well accepted with the majority having a positive experience and willingness to use again. Standardization of self-sampling procedures

  3. Newly diagnosed panic disorder and the risk of erectile dysfunction: A population-based cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Ting; Chen, Hsi-Han; Lin, Ching-Heng; Lee, Shih-Hsiung; Chan, Chin-Hong; Huang, Shiau-Shian

    2016-10-30

    Previous studies indicated that panic disorder is correlated with erectile dysfunction (ED). The primary aim of this study was to explore the incidence rate of ED among panic disorder patients in an Asian country. The secondary aim was to compare the risk of ED in panic disorder patients that were treated with different kinds of antidepressants, and to explore the possible mechanism between these two disorders. We identified 1393 male patients with newly diagnosed panic disorder from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Database. Four matched controls per case were selected for the study group by propensity score. After adjusting for age, obesity and comorbidities, the panic disorder patients had a higher hazard ratio of ED diagnosis than the controls, especially among the untreated panic disorder patients. This retrospective dynamic cohort study supports the link between ED and prior panic disorder in a large sample of panic disorder patients. This study points out the need of early antidepressant treatment for panic disorder to prevent further ED. PMID:27497294

  4. PA03.23. To Evaluate the efficacy of “Vajikar Kalp” in Male sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Khedkar, Amol

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of an aphrodisiac preparation in male sexual dysfunction. Method: The Vajikar Kalp was administered in 30 patients at the dosage of 2 gms twice a day with luke warm cow's milk. The combination was made of 1.Asparagus Racemosa - 500 mg, 2.Tribulus Terrestris - 500 mg, 3. Mucuna Pruriens - 500 mg, 4. Withania Somnifera - 500 mg. Patients were observed on days 0, 15, 30, 60 and 90. International Index of Erectile Function was used to assess the improvement. Other subjective parameters were also checked before and after the treatment. Result: The Clinical Study was conducted for making the data more reliable and authentic. In a 90 day Study Kalp offered significant improvement in Erectile Dysfunction, Libido, and Ejaculation & Orgasm. Kalp offered statistically significant increase in Testosterone level. Vajikar Kalp offered significant increase in sexual desire, intercourse frequency, intercourse satisfaction and orgasmic function. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that the Vaijkar Kalp made of herbs was effective in improving male sexual dysfunction.

  5. Concordance of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction by self-report and those by partner's perception in young adult couples.

    PubMed

    Gungor, S; Keskin, U; Gülsün, M; Erdem, M; Ceyhan, S T; Ergün, A

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated concordance levels of young adult spouses (N=107 couples, total N=214) with regards to sexual satisfaction by using Golombock-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). Each spouse of the couples filled out both female and male forms of the GRISS. Self- and spouse-reported scores were analyzed in terms of inter-rater correlation and agreement. The prevalence of overall sexual dissatisfaction was 10.3% and 26.2% in wives and husbands, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) between the self-reported overall sexual satisfaction scores and those assessed by the spouses was 0.25 (P=0.014) and 0.04 (P=0.680) for wives and husbands, respectively. The sensitivity for perception of partner's sexual problems ranged 11% to 47%, and the specificity was around 64% to 100%, except for vaginismus, which had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 25%. The prevalance-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) value for overall sexual dissatisfaction reported by themselves and that assessed by their spouses was 0.68 and 0.16 for the wives and husbands, respectively. For specific female sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in female dissatisfaction (0.81) followed by anorgasmia (0.78), female avoidance (0.44), vaginismus (0.44), infrequency (0.33), non-communication (0.14) and female nonsensuality (0.14). For specific male sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in male nonsensuality (1.00), followed by male dissatisfaction (0.78), infrequency (0.46), non-communication (0.42), male avoidance (0.36), impotence (0.27) and premature ejaculation (-0.04). Our findings suggested that in this clinical sample the partner's perception of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction did not correlate well with the subject's self-reported sexual problems, and generally male sexual problems were less correctly perceived by the partners than were female sexual problems. This result may provide helpful information for clinicians who take care of patients

  6. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mirblouk, Fariba; Asgharnia, Dr.Maryam; Solimani, Robabeh; Fakor, Fereshteh; Salamat, Fatemeh; Mansoori, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this cross-sectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI) had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5%) and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and 2 test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004), arousal (p=0.001), satisfaction (p=0.022) and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011) in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266), orgasm (p=0.61) and pain (p=0.793) difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality. PMID:27200426

  7. Sexual Excitability and Dysfunctional Coping Determine Cybersex Addiction in Homosexual Males.

    PubMed

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Cybersex addiction (CA) has been mostly investigated in heterosexual males. Recent findings have demonstrated an association between CA severity and indicators of sexual excitability, and that coping by sexual behaviors mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA symptoms. The aim of this study was to test this mediation in a sample of homosexual males. Seventy-one homosexual males were surveyed online. Questionnaires assessed symptoms of CA, sensitivity to sexual excitation, pornography use motivation, problematic sexual behavior, psychological symptoms, and sexual behaviors in real life and online. Moreover, participants viewed pornographic videos and indicated their sexual arousal before and after the video presentation. Results showed strong correlations between CA symptoms and indicators of sexual arousal and sexual excitability, coping by sexual behaviors, and psychological symptoms. CA was not associated with offline sexual behaviors and weekly cybersex use time. Coping by sexual behaviors partially mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA. The results are comparable with those reported for heterosexual males and females in previous studies and are discussed against the background of theoretical assumptions of CA, which highlight the role of positive and negative reinforcement due to cybersex use. PMID:26374928

  8. Sexual Excitability and Dysfunctional Coping Determine Cybersex Addiction in Homosexual Males.

    PubMed

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Cybersex addiction (CA) has been mostly investigated in heterosexual males. Recent findings have demonstrated an association between CA severity and indicators of sexual excitability, and that coping by sexual behaviors mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA symptoms. The aim of this study was to test this mediation in a sample of homosexual males. Seventy-one homosexual males were surveyed online. Questionnaires assessed symptoms of CA, sensitivity to sexual excitation, pornography use motivation, problematic sexual behavior, psychological symptoms, and sexual behaviors in real life and online. Moreover, participants viewed pornographic videos and indicated their sexual arousal before and after the video presentation. Results showed strong correlations between CA symptoms and indicators of sexual arousal and sexual excitability, coping by sexual behaviors, and psychological symptoms. CA was not associated with offline sexual behaviors and weekly cybersex use time. Coping by sexual behaviors partially mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA. The results are comparable with those reported for heterosexual males and females in previous studies and are discussed against the background of theoretical assumptions of CA, which highlight the role of positive and negative reinforcement due to cybersex use.

  9. Depression and HIV Serostatus Disclosure to Sexual Partners Among Newly HIV-Diagnosed Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Abler, Laurie; Sikkema, Kathleen J; Watt, Melissa H; Hansen, Nathan B; Wilson, Patrick A; Kochman, Arlene

    2015-10-01

    HIV disclosure to sexual partners facilitates joint decision-making and risk reduction strategies for safer sex behaviors, but disclosure may be impacted by depression symptoms. Disclosure is also associated with disclosure self-efficacy, which in turn may also be influenced by depressive symptoms. This study examined the relationship between depression and HIV disclosure to partners following diagnosis among men who have sex with men (MSM), mediated by disclosure self-efficacy. Newly HIV-diagnosed MSM (n=92) who reported sexual activity after diagnosis completed an assessment soon after diagnosis which measured depressive symptoms, and another assessment within 3 months of diagnosis that measured disclosure self-efficacy and disclosure. Over one-third of the sample reported elevated depressive symptoms soon after diagnosis and equal proportions (one-third each) disclosed to none, some, or all partners in the 3 months after diagnosis. Depressive symptoms were negatively associated with disclosure self-efficacy and disclosure to partners, while disclosure self-efficacy was positively associated with disclosure. Disclosure self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between depression and disclosure, accounting for 33% of the total effect. These findings highlight the importance of addressing depression that follows diagnosis to enhance subsequent disclosure to sexual partners. PMID:26430721

  10. Comparing the effects of treatment with sildenafil and cognitive-behavioral therapy on treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Abdollah; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Mehrzad, Fateme

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction in women is prevalent and common in women after menopause. Many attempts to treat patients with sexual dysfunction by cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) methods. But to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study that compared these two methods. Objective The aim of this study was to assess and compare the effects of sildenafil and cognitive-behavioral therapy on treatment of sexual dysfunction in women. Methods In this randomized, controlled, clinical trial, 86 women with arousal and orgasm dysfunction were surveyed. The patients were divided into two groups, i.e., sildenafil and CBT groups. The patients in the sildenafil group were treated by 50 mg of oral sildenafil one hour before intercourse, and the other group had weekly sessions of CBT for eight weeks. Sexual dysfunctions were evaluated by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), a sexual satisfaction questionnaire, and the Enrich marital satisfaction scale. Results The mean age of the participants was 33.14 ± 7.34 years. The mean scores for female sexual function index, sexual satisfaction, and the Enrich marital satisfaction scale were increased in both groups during treatment (p < 0.001). It was found that cognitive-behavioral therapy compared to treatment with sildenafil increased all subscales, except arousal, orgasm, and lubrication. Conclusion Cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than treatment with sildenafil for improving female sexual function. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT2014070318338N1. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. PMID:27382439

  11. [Thyroid gland dysfunction, disorders of somatic and sexual development, disturbances of fertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wędrychowicz, Anna; Starzyk, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been performed for malignant and non-malignant disorders leading to increasing numbers of long-term survivors. Some of them develop long-term posttransplantation complications, among them endocrine complications that arise many years after HSCT and demand to be treated till the end of patients´ life. In the paper "classical", observed several years after HSCT had been used as a treatment procedure, endocrine complications are discussed and the review of literature regarding this problem is presented. Thyroid dysfunction, disorders of somatic and sexual development are presented in details. Gonad dysfunction with the problem of fertility disturbances is reported. The paper presents the etiopathogenesis, methods of prevention, as well as treatment and the results of the treatment of these endocrine complications after HSCT. Moreover actual recommendations for screening and prevention of endocrine complications in long-term HCT survivors are presented. PMID:23739647

  12. An analysis of treatment preferences and sexual quality of life outcomes in female partners of Chinese men with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Jun; Bai, Wen-Jun; Dai, Yu-Tian; Xu, Wen-Ping; Wang, Chia-Ning; Li, Han-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The impact of erectile dysfunction is distressing to both males and their female partners, but less attention has been paid to identify female partners' preferred treatment and sexual quality of life outcomes. The present analysis explores female partners' treatment preference for erectile dysfunction in Chinese Men. This was a phase 4, randomized, open-label, multicenter, crossover study in Chinese men with erectile dysfunction who were naïve to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor treatments. Eligible patients were randomized to sequential 20-mg tadalafil/100-mg sildenafil or 100-mg sildenafil/20-mg tadalafil for 8 weeks each. Of 418 patients, female partners of 64 patients agreed to enter the study; of 64 patients who entered the study with female partners, 63 were randomized, and 62 completed the study. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were comparable between treatment groups. Significantly more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil overall (75.4% vs 24.6%; P < 0.001), and irrespective of erectile dysfunction severity at baseline (P ≤ 0.005). Significant improvements in sexual quality of life scores were reported at endpoint (Visit 8) in male patients and female partners in both tadalafil and sildenafil treatment groups (P < 0.001). Significantly higher mean changes from baseline were observed for male patients in the tadalafil group compared with the sildenafil group for the erectile function (P = 0.013) and overall satisfaction (P = 0.019) International Index for Erectile Function domains and the spontaneity domain (P < 0.001) of the Psychological and Interpersonal Relationship Scale. No major safety concerns were reported during the study. Though both treatments were effective, safe, and tolerable, more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil.

  13. An analysis of treatment preferences and sexual quality of life outcomes in female partners of Chinese men with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Jun; Bai, Wen-Jun; Dai, Yu-Tian; Xu, Wen-Ping; Wang, Chia-Ning; Li, Han-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The impact of erectile dysfunction is distressing to both males and their female partners, but less attention has been paid to identify female partners’ preferred treatment and sexual quality of life outcomes. The present analysis explores female partners’ treatment preference for erectile dysfunction in Chinese Men. This was a phase 4, randomized, open-label, multicenter, crossover study in Chinese men with erectile dysfunction who were naïve to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor treatments. Eligible patients were randomized to sequential 20-mg tadalafil/100-mg sildenafil or 100-mg sildenafil/20-mg tadalafil for 8 weeks each. Of 418 patients, female partners of 64 patients agreed to enter the study; of 64 patients who entered the study with female partners, 63 were randomized, and 62 completed the study. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were comparable between treatment groups. Significantly more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil overall (75.4% vs 24.6%; P < 0.001), and irrespective of erectile dysfunction severity at baseline (P ≤ 0.005). Significant improvements in sexual quality of life scores were reported at endpoint (Visit 8) in male patients and female partners in both tadalafil and sildenafil treatment groups (P < 0.001). Significantly higher mean changes from baseline were observed for male patients in the tadalafil group compared with the sildenafil group for the erectile function (P = 0.013) and overall satisfaction (P = 0.019) International Index for Erectile Function domains and the spontaneity domain (P < 0.001) of the Psychological and Interpersonal Relationship Scale. No major safety concerns were reported during the study. Though both treatments were effective, safe, and tolerable, more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil. PMID:26459780

  14. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide improve erectile function, sexual quality of life, and ejaculation function in patients with moderate mild-moderate erectile dysfunction: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Basic, Dragoslav; Morgia, Giuseppe; Cimino, Sebastiano; Russo, Giorgio Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction.

  15. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and Glucosamine Oligosaccharide Improve Erectile Function, Sexual Quality of Life, and Ejaculation Function in Patients with Moderate Mild-Moderate Erectile Dysfunction: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  16. SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction: fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and fluvoxamine in a prospective, multicenter, and descriptive clinical study of 344 patients.

    PubMed

    Montejo-González, A L; Llorca, G; Izquierdo, J A; Ledesma, A; Bousoño, M; Calcedo, A; Carrasco, J L; Ciudad, J; Daniel, E; De la Gandara, J; Derecho, J; Franco, M; Gomez, M J; Macias, J A; Martin, T; Perez, V; Sanchez, J M; Sanchez, S; Vicens, E

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyzed the incidence of sexual dysfunction (SD) with different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) and hence the qualitative and quantitative changes in SD throughout time in a prospective and multicenter study. Outpatients (192 women and 152 men; age = 39.6 +/- 11.4 years) under treatment with SSRIs were interviewed with an SD questionnaire designed for this purpose by the authors and that included questions about the following: decreased libido, delayed orgasm or anorgasmia, delayed ejaculation, inability to ejaculate, impotence, and general sexual satisfaction. Patients with the following criteria were included: normal sexual function before SSRI intake, exclusive treatment with SSRIs or treatment associated with benzodiazepines, previous heterosexual or self-erotic current sexual practices. Excluded were patients with previous sexual dysfunction, association of SSRIs with neuroleptics, recent hormone intake, and significant medical illnesses. There was a significant increase in the incidence of SD when physicians asked the patients direct questions (58%) versus when SD was spontaneously reported (14%). There were some significant differences among different SSRIs: paroxetine provoked more delay of orgasm or ejaculation and more impotence than fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and sertraline (chi 2, p < .05). Only 24.5% of the patients had a good tolerance of their sexual dysfunction. Twelve male patients who suffered from premature ejaculation before the treatment preferred to maintain delayed ejaculation, and their sexual satisfaction, and that of their partners, clearly improved. Sexual dysfunction was positively correlated with dose. Patients experienced substantial improvement in sexual function when the dose was diminished or the drug was withdrawn. Men showed more incidence of sexual dysfunction than women, but women's sexual dysfunction was more intense than men's. In only 5.8% of

  17. [Sexual dysfunction in migraine patients who receive preventive treatment: identification by means of two screening tests].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Elena; Ruiz, Lara; Hernández, Marta S; Muñoz, Irene; Ruiz-Piñero, Marina; Uribe, Fernando; Guerrero-Peral, Ángel L; Toribio-Díaz, M Elena

    2015-01-01

    Introduccion. Las disfunciones sexuales constituyen uno de los problemas mas importantes que afectan a la salud sexual y se asocian a bajos niveles de calidad de vida. Objetivo. Evaluar la funcion sexual en pacientes migrañosos y la disfuncion sexual atribuible al tratamiento preventivo. Pacientes y metodos. Pacientes atendidos en las consultas de cefaleas de dos hospitales generales que acudian a la primera visita tras prescripcion de un preventivo. Respondieron al cuestionario de funcionamiento sexual del Hospital General de Massachusetts (MGH-SFQ) y al cuestionario de disfuncion sexual secundaria a psicofarmacos (SALSEX). Resultados. Muestra de 79 pacientes (17 varones, 62 mujeres), de 37,6 ± 9,1 años (rango: 19-57 años), 31 (39,2%) de ellos con migraña cronica. Como tratamiento preventivo, 23 (29,1%) recibian betabloqueantes; 42 (53,2%), neuromoduladores; 8 (10,1%), antagonistas del calcio, y 6 (7,6%), antidepresivos. El MGH-SFQ detecto en 24 pacientes (30,4%) disminucion al menos moderada de satisfaccion sexual global. El SALSEX mostro cambio de la funcion sexual atribuible al tratamiento preventivo en 36 casos (45,5%), solo excepcionalmente manifestada de forma espontanea. En pacientes con disfuncion al menos moderada en el MGH-SFQ, eran significativamente mayores la edad media en el momento de la inclusion, el numero de dias de dolor al mes y el uso excesivo de medicacion sintomatica (53,3% frente a 46,7%; p = 0,03). Conclusion. La disfuncion sexual evaluada con sencillos test de cribado detecta con frecuencia disfuncion sexual en pacientes migrañosos en tratamiento preventivo y cambios en su vida sexual atribuibles a estos farmacos.

  18. Recent Infection, Sexually Transmitted Infections and Transmission Clusters Frequently Observed Among Persons Newly-Diagnosed with HIV in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Hong-Ha M.; Pipkin, Sharon; O’Keefe, Kara J.; Louie, Brian; Liegler, Teri; McFarland, Willi; Grant, Robert M.; Bernstein, Kyle; Scheer, Susan

    2015-01-01

    There were 1,311 newly-diagnosed HIV cases in San Francisco between 2005 and 2011 that were linked to care at publicly-funded facilities and had viral sequences available for analysis. Of the 214 cases characterized as recently-infected with HIV at time of diagnosis, 25% had a recent sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnosis (vs. 10% among longer-standing HIV infections, p<0.001) and 57% were part of a phylogenetic transmission cluster (vs. 42% among longer-standing HIV infection, p<0.001). The association observed between recent HIV infection and having a STI diagnosis during the interval overlapping likely HIV acquisition points to potential opportunities to interrupt HIV transmission. PMID:25967271

  19. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and its correlation with CD4 count in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive adults--a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dev, Nishanth; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Gadpayle, A K; Sharma, S C

    2015-11-01

    Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in HIV-positive patients is reported to be high in those with severe immune deficiency. However, there is paucity of literature in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive population. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and study its correlation with CD4 count in this population. In this cross-sectional study, patients presenting to the antiretroviral therapy clinic were screened with thyroid function tests, including thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels at the time of diagnosis. Two hundred and twenty-five HIV-positive and an equal number of healthy volunteers were enrolled. The mean (SD) CD4 count in the study group was 147.1 (84) and 70.7% had advanced immune deficiency with CD4 count <200 cells/µL. The overall prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was 75.5% in the study group and 16% in the control group. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the commonest abnormality noted in almost 53%. Significant correlation was observed between CD4 count and thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels (r = -0.86, r = 0.77, and r = 0.84, respectively, p < 0.0001 for all). The present study demonstrated high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in HIV-positive patients. The dysfunction is subclinical in most cases and correlates well with declining CD4 counts.

  20. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and its correlation with CD4 count in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive adults--a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dev, Nishanth; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Gadpayle, A K; Sharma, S C

    2015-11-01

    Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in HIV-positive patients is reported to be high in those with severe immune deficiency. However, there is paucity of literature in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive population. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and study its correlation with CD4 count in this population. In this cross-sectional study, patients presenting to the antiretroviral therapy clinic were screened with thyroid function tests, including thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels at the time of diagnosis. Two hundred and twenty-five HIV-positive and an equal number of healthy volunteers were enrolled. The mean (SD) CD4 count in the study group was 147.1 (84) and 70.7% had advanced immune deficiency with CD4 count <200 cells/µL. The overall prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was 75.5% in the study group and 16% in the control group. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the commonest abnormality noted in almost 53%. Significant correlation was observed between CD4 count and thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels (r = -0.86, r = 0.77, and r = 0.84, respectively, p < 0.0001 for all). The present study demonstrated high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in HIV-positive patients. The dysfunction is subclinical in most cases and correlates well with declining CD4 counts. PMID:25505045

  1. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels.

  2. Female sexual dysfunction in young adult women - Impact of age and lifestyle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, Dana; PAter, Liana; Pater, Flavius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2014-12-01

    Female sexual function is a difficult entity to be assessed. Subjective factors and interview biases can change the perception of it. Using validated questionnaires can improve the scientific approach to this matter. There is a huge difference of severity and incidence among young, apparent healthy women, which are in a harmonious relationship. We evaluated 320 healthy women, with stable sexual active relationship, with no know depressive disease, endocrinological and metabolic pathology, no premature menopause, no malignancy. We compose a mathematic model to study the impact of age, and body weight on the sexual function, with FSFI total score as surrogate marker. We observed that even in healthy women, increase in age and/or weight/body mass significantly impair general sexual function.

  3. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Maca Root as Treatment for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Dording, Christina M.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Parkin, Susannah R.; Walker, Rosemary S. W.; Fehling, Kara B.; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126. PMID:25954318

  4. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Schettler, Pamela J; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Parkin, Susannah R; Walker, Rosemary S W; Fehling, Kara B; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126. PMID:25954318

  5. Potential impact and acceptability of Internet partner notification for men who have sex with men and transgender women recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jesse L; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; Peinado, Jesus; Salvatierra, Hector J; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the potential impact of Internet partner notification among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease. Use of Internet partner notification was anticipated for 55.9% of recent partners, including 43.0% of partners not currently expected to be notified, a 20.6% increase in anticipated notification outcomes.

  6. The Evolution of Self-Reported Urinary and Sexual Dysfunction over the Last Two Decades: Implications for Comparative Effectiveness Research

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, Matthew J.; Barocas, Daniel A.; Morgans, Alicia K.; Phillips, Sharon E.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Albertsen, Peter C.; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Goodman, Michael; Greenfield, Sheldon; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; McCollum, Dan; Paddock, Lisa E.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stroup, Antoinette M.; Wu, Xiao-Cheng; Penson, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the paramount importance of patient-reported outcomes, little is known about the evolution of patient-reported urinary and sexual function over time. Objective To evaluate differences in pretreatment urinary and sexual function in two population-based cohorts of men with prostate cancer enrolled nearly 20 yr apart. Design, setting, and participants Patients were enrolled in the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study (PCOS) or the Comparative Effectiveness Analysis of Surgery and Radiation (CEASAR) study, two population-based cohorts that enrolled patients with incident prostate cancer from 1994 to 1995 and from 2011 to 2012, respectively. Participants completed surveys at baseline and various time points thereafter. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis We performed multivariable logistic and linear regression analysis to investigate differences in pretreatment function between studies. Results and limitations The study comprised 5469 men of whom 2334 (43%) were enrolled in PCOS and 3135 (57%) were enrolled in CEASAR. Self-reported urinary incontinence was higher in CEASAR compared with PCOS (7.7% vs 4.7%; adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39–2.43). Similarly, self-reported erectile dysfunction was more common among CEASAR participants (44.7% vs 24.0%) with an adjusted OR of 3.12 (95% CI, 2.68–3.64). Multivariable linear regression models revealed less favorable self-reported baseline function among CEASAR participants in the urinary incontinence and sexual function domains. The study is limited by its observational design and possibility of unmeasured confounding. Conclusions Reporting of pretreatment urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction has increased over the past two decades. These findings may reflect sociological changes including heightened media attention and direct-to-consumer marketing, among other potential explanations. Patient summary Patient reporting of urinary and sexual function has

  7. Tribulus terrestris for treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: randomized double-blind placebo - controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tribulus terrestris as a herbal remedy has shown beneficial aphrodisiac effects in a number of animal and human experiments. This study was designed as a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial to assess the safety and efficacy of Tribulus terrestris in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder during their fertile years. Sixty seven women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder were randomly assigned to Tribulus terrestris extract (7.5 mg/day) or placebo for 4 weeks. Desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain were measured at baseline and after 4 weeks after the end of the treatment by using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Two groups were compared by repeated measurement ANOVA test. Results Thirty women in placebo group and thirty women in drug group completed the study. At the end of the fourth week, patients in the Tribulus terrestris group had experienced significant improvement in their total FSFI (p < 0.001), desire (p < 0.001), arousal (p = 0.037), lubrication (p < 0.001), satisfaction (p < 0.001) and pain (p = 0.041) domains of FSFI. Frequency of side effects was similar between the two groups. Conclusions Tribulus terrestris may safely and effectively improve desire in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Further investigation of Tribulus terrestris in women is warranted. PMID:24773615

  8. The dark side of 5α-reductase inhibitors' therapy: sexual dysfunction, high Gleason grade prostate cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Mulgaonkar, Ashwini; Giordano, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    With aging, abnormal benign growth of the prostate results in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with concomitant lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Because the prostate is an androgen target tissue, and transforms testosterone into 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT), a potent androgen, via 5α-reductase (5α-R) activity, inhibiting this key metabolic reaction was identified as a target for drug development to treat symptoms of BPH. Two drugs, namely finasteride and dutasteride were developed as specific 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs) and were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of BPH symptoms. These agents have proven useful in the reducing urinary retention and minimizing surgical intervention in patients with BPH symptoms and considerable literature exists describing the benefits of these agents. In this review we highlight the adverse side effects of 5α-RIs on sexual function, high grade prostate cancer incidence, central nervous system function and on depression. 5α-Rs isoforms (types 1-3) are widely distributed in many tissues including the central nervous system and inhibition of these enzymes results in blockade of synthesis of several key hormones and neuro-active steroids leading to a host of adverse effects, including loss of or reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, increased high Gleason grade prostate cancer, observed heart failure and cardiovascular events in clinical trials, and depression. Considerable evidence exists from preclinical and clinical studies, which point to significant and serious adverse effects of 5α-RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, on sexual health, vascular health, psychological health and the overall quality of life. Physicians need to be aware of such potential adverse effects and communicate such information to their patients prior to commencing 5α-RIs therapy. PMID:24955220

  9. Comparing the Efficacy of Bupropion and Amantadine on Sexual Dysfunction Induced by a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zahiroddin, Alireza; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Zamani, Azar; Shahini, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common problem, associated with a significant risk of non-adherence. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with a substantial risk of SD. Only 10 % of patients show spontaneous improvement during follow up period. Objectives: This study aimed to compare two proposed medication (bupropion vs. amantadine) in alleviating SD in patients treated with SSRIs. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial in Iran, 46 patients were recruited based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and semi-structured interview. Then, they were randomized into two treatment groups using table of random numbers. Eight patients were excluded and finally 38 patients completed the study which lasted for 4 weeks. Twenty patients were given bupropion, 18 patients were randomly assigned to another group, and given amantadine. Patients were assessed with the Arizona sexual experience scale (ASEX) at baseline and 4 weeks after the treatment. Results: A total of 38 patients completed the study (18 patients in amantadine vs. 20 patients in bupropion).The mean ASEX scores gradually declined in both study groups during the trial. The reduction of ASEX score in bupropion group was more than that of amantadine group that was statistically significant. So, the addition of bupropion at higher doses appears to be more effective approach in comparison with amantadine. Conclusions: These results provide empirical support for conducting a further study on comparing different add-on strategies for treating drug-induced SD. PMID:26744632

  10. Neural correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction: a placebo-controlled fMRI study on healthy males under subchronic paroxetine and bupropion.

    PubMed

    Abler, Birgit; Seeringer, Angela; Hartmann, Antonie; Grön, Georg; Metzger, Coraline; Walter, Martin; Stingl, Julia

    2011-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like paroxetine in the treatment of depression, imposing a considerable risk on medication adherence and hence therapeutic success. Bupropion, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, is recommended as an alternative treatment without adverse effects concerning sexual arousal and libido. We investigated the neural bases of paroxetine-related subjective sexual dysfunction when compared with bupropion and placebo. We scanned 18 healthy, heterosexual males in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject design while watching video clips of erotic and nonerotic content under steady-state conditions after taking 20 mg of paroxetine, 150 mg of bupropion, and placebo for 7 days each. Under paroxetine, ratings of subjective sexual dysfunction increased compared with placebo or bupropion. Activation along the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), including subgenual, pregenual, and midcingulate cortices, in the ventral striatum and midbrain was decreased when compared with placebo. In contrast, bupropion let subjective ratings and ACC activations unchanged and increased activity of brain regions including posterior midcingulate cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, and extended amygdala relative to placebo and paroxetine. Brain regions that have been related to the processing of motivational (ventral striatum), emotional, and autonomic components of erotic stimulation (anterior cingulate) in previous studies showed reduced responsiveness under paroxetine in our study. Drug effects on these regions may be part of the mechanism underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction. Increased activation under bupropion may point to an opposite effect that may relate to the lack of impaired sexual functioning. PMID:21544071

  11. Sexuality After Breast Cancer: Need for Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Sh; Lotfi Kashani, F

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical experiences have revealed that patients with breast cancer experience various sexual problems following their treatment. Breast cancer negatively impacts the sexual life of the afflicted couples, and as a traumatic event can influence women’s psychosexual functioning and intimate relationship. This review focuses on sexuality after breast cancer and on a growing need for bio-psycho-social guidelines for breast cancer treatment. Methods This study aims to review the literature on management, psychological outcomes and sexual dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. Results Although the benefits of the current treatment strategies are well established, many cancer survivors are at risk for developing psycho physiological symptoms including sexual dysfunction. Cancer and treatment-related factors can influence sexual functioning. We review current treatment-related side effects on sexual functioning such as desire, arousal and orgasm in breast cancer patients. Despite the impact of medical treatment on survival of patients with breast cancer, no satisfactory steps have been taken towards improving sexual functioning of these patients. Conclusion Breast cancer affects many aspects of sexuality, including changes in physical functioning and in the perception of feminity. Sexual dysfunction following breast cancer should be diagnosed and managed as a systematic approach with multidisciplinary inputs. Healthcare professionals should assess the effects of medical and surgical treatment on the sexuality of breast cancer survivors. PMID:25780533

  12. Sexual Dysfunction among Older Adults: Prevalence and Risk Factors from a Nationally Representative U.S. Probability Sample of Men and Women 57–85 Years of Age

    PubMed Central

    Laumann, Edward O.; Das, Aniruddha; Waite, Linda J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Despite increasing demand for clinical interventions into sexual problems in an aging population, epidemiological data on the subject are scarce. Aims To examine the prevalence of sexual problems across different sociodemographic groups, and risk factors for these problems in multiple domains of life. Methods Statistical analysis of data from the 2005–2006 National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), a nationally representative U.S. probability sample of 1,550 women and 1,455 men aged 57–85 at the time of interview. Main Outcome Measures Likelihood of experiencing sexual dysfunction in the preceding 12 months. Results Sexual problems among the elderly are not an inevitable consequence of aging, but instead are responses to the presence of stressors in multiple life domains. This impact may partly be gender differentiated, with older women's sexual health more sensitive to their physical health than is true for men. The mechanism linking life stress with sexual problems is likely to be poor mental health and relationship dissatisfaction. The NSHAP results demonstrate the consistent impact of poor mental health on women's reports of sexual problems and the less consistent association with men's problems. Conclusions The results point to a need for physicians who are treating older adults experiencing sexual problems to take into account not simply their physical health, but also their psychosocial health and satisfaction with their intimate relationship. PMID:18702640

  13. [Erectile and Ejaculatory Dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gross, Oliver; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel

    2015-11-25

    The inability to achieve an erection of the penis sufficient for sexual activity is called erectile dysfunction (ED). In most cases, the diagnosis can be made by medical history. The prevalence of ED in men at the age of 65 has been reported to be up to 50%. Premature ejaculation has a prevalence, up to 20% and is the most frequent ejaculatory dysfunction. The etiology of ED can involve psychological, vascular, neurogenic, hormonal or urogenital pathologies. The main pathophysiological mechanisms of ED are vascular disorders such as diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Because of the common pathophysiology, patients diagnosed with ED should have a diagnostic work-up for systemic vascular pathologies to prevent concomitant cardiac events. Treatment options include invasive and non-invasive procedures. PMID:26602851

  14. Potential impact and acceptability of Internet partner notification for men who have sex with men and transgender women recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jesse L; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; Peinado, Jesus; Salvatierra, Hector J; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the potential impact of Internet partner notification among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru recently diagnosed as having sexually transmitted disease. Use of Internet partner notification was anticipated for 55.9% of recent partners, including 43.0% of partners not currently expected to be notified, a 20.6% increase in anticipated notification outcomes. PMID:24326581

  15. NETWORK POSITION AND SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: IMPLICATIONS OF PARTNER BETWEENNESS FOR MEN*

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Benjamin; Laumann, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper combines relational perspectives on gender identity with social network structural perspectives on health to understand men’s sexual functioning. We argue that network positions that afford independence and control over social resources are consistent with traditional masculine roles and may therefore affect men’s sexual performance. For example, when a heterosexual man’s female partner has more frequent contact with his confidants than he does–a situation that we refer to as partner betweenness – his relational autonomy, privacy, and control are constrained. Analyses of data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) show that about a quarter of men experience partner betweenness, and that these men are 92 percent more likely to report problems getting and/or maintaining an erection (95% CI: 1.274, 2.881). This association is strongest among the youngest men in the sample, which may reflect changing conceptions of masculinity in later life. We close by considering several explanations for these findings, and urge additional research on the linkages between health, gender, and network structure. PMID:22003520

  16. Sexually transmitted disease (STD) diagnoses and mental health disparities among women who have sex with women screened at an urban community health center, Boston, Massachusetts, 2007

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Mimiaga, Matthew; Case, Patricia; Grasso, Chris; O'Brien, Casey T.; Harigopal, Padmini; Skeer, Margie; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    Background A growing body of research documents mental health disparities among women who have sex with women (WSW) compared to women who have sex with men only (WSM). However, there remains a dearth of research exploring these indicators alongside sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and WSW sexual health. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted of all female patients (n=368) screened for STDs between July 2007 and December 2007 at an urban community health center in Boston, MA. De-identified electronic medical record data (e.g., demographics, psychosocial, sexual health) were analyzed and linked to STD positivity. Women who did not have sexual behavior documented in their medical chart (n=58) were excluded from this analysis. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined sexual and psychosocial health indicators, including sexual preference. Results Twenty-seven percent of participants were WSW (17% WSW only and 10% WSW/M). Overall, 5% of WSW were diagnosed with a new STD (HPV, anogenital warts, genital herpes, PID) and 17% had a history of a prior STD. In multivariable models adjusting for demographics, WSW were disproportionately more likely to have mental health and psychosocial issues noted in their medical records, including: a clinical diagnosis of depression, anxiety, and PTSD, history of suicide attempts, and inpatient psychiatric/mental health treatment. However, WSW were significantly less likely than WSM to engage in “high risk” HIV/STD sexual behavior. In a final multivariable model, same sex behavior was not associated with a different likelihood of being diagnosed with an STD, compared to opposite sex behavior. However, WSW diagnosed with STDs were at increased odds of having bipolar disorder and utilizing outpatient mental health counseling services compared to WSW without STDs. WSW with a history of STDs were at increased odds of having attempted suicide in the past, utilizing both outpatient and inpatient

  17. FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNTION AND GYNAECOLOGICAL PRACTICE: REPORT OF SIX CASES.

    PubMed

    Lema, V M

    2012-09-01

    Sexuality is a complex phenomenon, yet an essential part of a healthy life, influenced by biological, psychological and socio-economic factors. Current re-conceptualisation of women's sexual response acknowledges that they have many reasons for engaging in sex beyond sexual desire. Women are increasingly becoming aware of their sexuality and demand sexual fulfilment more than ever before and when that is not realised there may be personal distress. Female sexual dysfunction is prevalent in all populations and cultures globally. However, very few women seek medical help due to belief that the problem is not serious, challenges with access to or affordability of care and lack of awareness of available treatments. It's also infrequently diagnosed, due to lack of awareness among health care providers. Case scenarios on female sexual dysfunction managed by the author are presented with the aim of raising awareness among health professionals. Possible strategies to address the problems are proposed. PMID:26852439

  18. Missed Opportunities in the Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting and Scientific Workshop on Female Sexual Dysfunction Held at the FDA, October 2014.

    PubMed

    Tiefer, Leonore; Laan, Ellen; Basson, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    There were numerous missed opportunities at the October 2014 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meeting on female sexual dysfunction (FSD). They included opportunities to hear from a diverse range of patients and to engage in evidence-based discussions of unmet medical needs, diagnostic instruments, trial end points, and inclusion criteria for clinical trials. Contributions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) nomenclature, based on extensive research, were dismissed in favor of language favoring a seemingly clear but scientifically unsupportable distinction between women's sexual desire and arousal. Numerous participants, including patients recruited by their physicians, acknowledged travel expenses paid for by interested pharmaceutical companies. Conflicts of interest were manifold. The meeting did not advance the FDA's understanding of women's sexual distress and represents a setback for our field. PMID:26010838

  19. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  20. Prevalent and Incident HIV Diagnoses among Entamoeba histolytica-Infected Adult Males: A Changing Epidemiology Associated with Sexual Transmission — Taiwan, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Yi-Chun; Ji, Dar-Der; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted Entamoeba histolytica infection (EHI) has been increasingly recognized among men who have sex with men (MSM). We used the National Disease Surveillance Systems (NDSS) to identify prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses among adults with EHI and to determine the associated factors. Methodology The NDSS collect demographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of case patients through physician reports and public health interviews. EHI was confirmed by polymerase-chain-reaction assays, histopathology, or serology with documented liver abscess. We linked NDSS databases to identify prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses among noninstitutionalized Taiwanese adults with confirmed EHI during 2006–2013. Cox proportional-hazards analysis was used to determine associated factors. Principal findings Of noninstitutionalized adults with EHI, we identified prevalent HIV diagnosis in 210 (40%) of 524 males and one (1.7%) of 59 females, and incident HIV diagnosis in 71 (23%) of 314 males. MSM accounted for 183 (87%) and 64 (90%) of prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses in males, respectively. From 2006–2009 to 2010–2013, the prevalence of HIV diagnosis increased from 32% to 45% (P = 0.001) while the incidence of HIV diagnosis increased from 5.4 to 11.3 per 100 person-years (P = 0.001) among males with EHI. Incident HIV diagnosis was independently associated with a younger age, residing in metropolitan areas, hospitalization, previous syphilis, and engagement in oral, anal, or oral–anal sex before illness onset. Conclusions/significance Prevalent and incident HIV diagnoses were increasingly identified among adult males in Taiwan, preferentially affecting younger urban MSM. Surveillance and risk-reduction interventions are recommended against the interplay of HIV epidemic and sexually transmitted EHI. PMID:25299178

  1. Rosa damascena oil improves SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in male patients suffering from major depressive disorders: results from a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Farnia, Vahid; Shirzadifar, Mehdi; Shakeri, Jalal; Rezaei, Mansour; Bajoghli, Hafez; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background A substantial disadvantage of psychopharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) with selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the impact on sexual dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the oil of Rosa damascena can have a positive influence on SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction (SSRI-I SD) of male patients who are suffering from MDD and are being treated with SSRIs. Method In a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial, a total of 60 male patients treated with an SSRI and suffering from MDD (mean age =32 years) and SSRI-I SD were randomly assigned to take either verum (R. damascena oil) or a placebo. Patients completed self-ratings of depression and sexual function at baseline, at 4 weeks later, and at the end of the study, 8 weeks after it started. Results Over time, sexual dysfunction improved more in the verum group than in the control group. Improvements were observed in the verum group from week 4 to week 8. Self-rated symptoms of depression reduced over time in both groups, but did so more so in the verum group than in the control group. Conclusion This double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that the administration of R. damascena oil ameliorates sexual dysfunction in male patients suffering from both MDD and SSRI-I SD. Further, the symptoms of depression reduced as sexual dysfunction improved. PMID:25834441

  2. Life history interviews with 11 boys diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who had sexually offended: a sad storyline.

    PubMed

    Tidefors, Inga; Strand, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Little is known of the possible relationship between a diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sexually offensive behavior in adolescents. Our aim was to understand how adolescents with ADHD who had sexually offended described their childhood experiences and spoke about their diagnostic symptoms. The boys' early lives and relations were unpredictable, and emotional, physical, and sexual limits had been crossed. However, many boys saw themselves or their diagnosis, rather than their parents, school, or "society," as the underlying cause of their behavior. They used different strategies, for example repressing memories or regarding traumatic experiences as normal, to manage their lives. Most boys had difficulty with emotions and expressed sadness or frustration through anger. They spoke of being inattentive and restless in school and impulsive before and during their sexual offenses. The psychiatric assessment was described as a "messy" experience that strengthened their belief that something was wrong with them. Some had incorporated neuropsychiatric language into otherwise limited vocabularies and tended to use their diagnostic symptoms to excuse their offenses. The focus in the assessment on the boys themselves and their behaviors may darken their understandings of themselves, their experiences of abuse, and the offenses they have committed. Further research is needed into the possible consequences of a diagnosis of ADHD on adolescents' self-image and sense of self-control.

  3. Can Internet-Based Sexual Health Services Increase Diagnoses of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI)? Protocol for a Randomized Evaluation of an Internet-Based STI Testing and Results Service

    PubMed Central

    Free, Caroline; Morris, Tim P; Kenward, Michael G; Syred, Jonathan; Baraitser, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Ensuring rapid access to high quality sexual health services is a key public health objective, both in the United Kingdom and internationally. Internet-based testing services for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are considered to be a promising way to achieve this goal. This study will evaluate a nascent online STI testing and results service in South East London, delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Objective The aim of this study is to establish whether an online testing and results services can (1) increase diagnoses of STIs and (2) increase uptake of STI testing, when delivered alongside standard face-to-face STI testing services. Methods This is a single-blind randomized controlled trial. We will recruit 3000 participants who meet the following eligibility criteria: 16-30 years of age, resident in the London boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark, having at least one sexual partner in the last 12 months, having access to the Internet and willing to take an STI test. People unable to provide informed consent and unable to read and understand English (the websites will be in English) will be excluded. Baseline data will be collected at enrolment. This includes participant contact details, demographic data (date of birth, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation), and sexual health behaviors (last STI test, service used at last STI test and number of sexual partners in the last 12 months). Once enrolled, participants will be randomly allocated either (1) to an online STI testing and results service (Sexual Health 24) offering postal self-administered STI kits for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, and HIV; results via text message (short message service, SMS), except positive results for HIV, which will be delivered by phone; and direct referrals to local clinics for treatment or (2) to a conventional sexual health information website with signposting to local clinic-based sexual health services. Participants will be free to

  4. A Trilogy Case Review Highlighting the Clinical and Pharmacologic Applications of Mirtazapine in Reducing Polypharmacy for Anxiety, Agitation, Insomnia, Depression, and Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Barkin, Robert L.; Chor, Philip N.; Braun, Bennett G.; Schwer, William A.

    1999-10-01

    BACKGROUND: Mirtazapine, a noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA), is characterized by a unique receptor-specific pharmacologic profile and tolerable side-effect profile in comparison to other antidepressants. It has been reported to have a low incidence of agitation, anxiety, and insomnia, which may be due to blockade of 5-HT(2) and 5-HT(3) receptors. This unique multireceptor-mediated clinical pharmacologic profile may reduce the need for polypharmacy in selected patients. CASE REPORTS: Three cases are presented. In case 1, mirtazapine was able to rapidly treat anxiety and agitation in a 90-year-old woman. This was confirmed with 3 consecutive challenges with mirtazapine. In case 2, both a mood disorder and insomnia were successfully treated with rapid resolution in a patient by using mirtazapine. In case 3, the patient experienced sexual dysfunction while receiving sertraline and developed insomnia with the addition of bupropion. The addition of mirtazapine and the discontinuation of sertraline and bupropion resolved the sexual dysfunction and insomnia. Polypharmacy interventions were decreased in these patients through receptor-specific events from mirtazapine. CONCLUSION: The new antidepressant mirtazapine appears to be an effective strategy for treating anxiety, agitation, and insomnia and for diminishing SSRI-related sexual dysfunction without compromising the patient's therapeutic response to the medication while decreasing the need for additional pharmacotherapies. More than 70% of patients with major depression will have anxiety symptoms. The 5-HT(2) receptor seems to play a major role in the regulation of anxiety. The anxiolytic properties of mirtazapine may be due to its antagonism of 5-HT(2) receptors and can appear as early as the first week of treatment. PMID:15014675

  5. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes, heart disease, cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or alcohol abuse Medicines to treat high blood pressure, depression, pain; oral contraceptives Gynecological issues: Medical conditions such ...

  6. An update on female sexual function and dysfunction in old age and its relevance to old age psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Wood, Alison; Runciman, Ross; Wylie, Kevan R; McManus, Ross

    2012-10-01

    Numerous studies have now demonstrated that many older women retain an interest in their sexual lives. Yet, how many old age psychiatrists commonly check with older women about whether the depression they are treating, or the SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors) they have prescribed, have adversely affected their patient's sexual lives? We consider the latest evidence regarding cultural, social and medical influences on older women's sexual lives and some specific issues which affect lesbian and transsexual people. We examine how mental illness and psychotropic medication in particular can adversely affect older women's sexual functioning and at how difficult it often proves to be for women to seek help. We also focus on why doctors and in particular psychiatrists may not take a sexual history, look for sexual side effects or refer for appropriate treatment, especially when interviewing older women patients. Most published information about psychiatric training and sexual issues focuses on the younger male patient. We therefore aimed to provide a broad-ranging review of the literature regarding female sexual functioning in old age, the difficulties that can arise and the role that old age psychiatrists have an opportunity to fulfil, in this often neglected aspect of their patients' treatment. From our review it was clear that, in the light of the increasing cultural acceptability of discussions regarding sexuality and older women, the training of student doctors and trainee psychiatrists needs to reflect this change so that old age psychiatrists can enhance the quality of their patient care.

  7. Current Issues in the Evaluation and Treatment of Sexual Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses causes of sexual disturbance, assessment of sexual dysfunction, treatment of sexual dysfunction, psychological issues associated with chronic physical illness and sexual behavior, theory and treatment in child molestation, and the psychosocial outcomes of sex reassignment surgery. (BL)

  8. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    McMahon, C G

    2014-01-01

    In the past 30 years, advances in basic science have been instrumental in the evolution of the male sexual health treatment paradigm from a psychosexual model to a new model, which includes oral and intracavernosal injection pharmacotherapy, vacuum constriction devices and penile prostheses for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. This progress has coincided with an increased understanding of the nature of male sexual health problems, and epidemiological data that confirm that these problems are widely prevalent and the source of considerable morbidity, both for individuals and within relationships.

  9. Development and Validation of a Five-Factor Sexual Satisfaction and Distress Scale for Women: The Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women (SSS-W)

    PubMed Central

    Meston, Cindy; Trapnell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Introduction This article presents data based on the responses of over 800 women who contributed to the development of the Sexual Satisfaction Scale for Women (SSS-W). Aim The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive, multifaceted, valid, and reliable self-report measure of women’s sexual satisfaction and distress. Methods Phase I involved the initial selection of items based on past literature and on interviews of women diagnosed with sexual dysfunction and an exploratory factor analysis. Phase II involved an additional administration of the questionnaire, factor analyses, and refinement of the questionnaire items. Phase III involved administration of the final questionnaire to a sample of women with clinically diagnosed sexual dysfunction and controls. Results Psychometric evaluation of the SSS-W conducted in a sample of women meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for female sexual dysfunction and in a control sample provided preliminary evidence of reliability and validity. The ability of the SSS-W to discriminate between sexually functional and dysfunctional women was demonstrated for each of the SSS-W domain scores and total score. Conclusion The SSS-W is a brief, 30-item measure of sexual satisfaction and sexual distress, composed of five domains supported by factor analyses: contentment, communication, compatibility, relational concern, and personal concern. It exhibits sound psychometric properties and has a demonstrated ability to discriminate between clinical and nonclinical samples. PMID:16422909

  10. Using a three-dimension head mounted displayer in audio-visual sexual stimulation aids in differential diagnosis of psychogenic from organic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moon, K-H; Song, P-H; Park, T-C

    2005-01-01

    We designed this study to compare the efficacy of using a three-dimension head mounted displayer (3-D HMD) and a conventional monitor in audio-visual sexual stimulation (AVSS) in differential diagnosis of psychogenic from organic erectile dysfunction (ED). Three groups of subjects such as psychogenic ED, organic ED, and healthy control received the evaluation. The change of penile tumescence in AVSS was monitored with Nocturnal Electrobioimpedance Volumetric Assessment and sexual arousal after AVSS was assessed by a simple question as being good, fair, or poor. Both the group of healthy control and psychogenic ED demonstrated a significantly higher rate of normal response in penile tumescence (P<0.05) and a significantly higher level of sexual arousal (P<0.05) if stimulated with 3-D HMD than conventional monitor. In the group of organic ED, even using 3-D HMD in AVSS could not give rise to a better response in both assessments. Therefore, we conclude that using a 3-D HMD in AVSS helps more to differentiate psychogenic from organic ED than a conventional monitor in AVSS.

  11. Sexual and reproductive health in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Shari; Mulhall, John; Nelson, Christian; Kelvin, Joanne; Dickler, Maura; Carter, Jeanne

    2013-12-01

    As patients live longer after cancer diagnosis and treatment, attention to symptoms and quality of life (QoL) are of increasing importance both during treatment and throughout survivorship. Two complications of multi-modal cancer treatment that can profoundly affect both men and women are sexual dysfunction and infertility. Survivors at highest risk for treatment-related sexual dysfunction are those with tumors that involve the sexual or pelvic organs and those whose treatment affects the hormonal systems mediating sexual function. Sexual dysfunction may not abate without appropriate intervention. Therefore, early identification and treatment strategies are essential. Likewise, multiple factors contribute to the risk of infertility from cancer treatment and many cancer patients of reproductive age would prefer to maintain their fertility, if possible. Fortunately, advances in reproductive technology have created options for young newly diagnosed patients to preserve their ability to have a biologic child. This paper will focus on the sexual and reproductive problems encountered by cancer survivors and discuss some treatment options.

  12. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    PubMed

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues. PMID:27061770

  13. Testosterone and Sexual Function.

    PubMed

    Gannon, John R; Walsh, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone and sexual function are related. Current evidence suggests that testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may improve sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in men who are hypogonadal, mixed, or eugonadal have all been examined through numerous studies. The most recent large analysis showed an overall improvement in sexual function outcomes in men treated with TRT. This improvement is difficult to measure and seems to differ based on the baseline hormonal status of the patient at the beginning of treatment. PMID:27132579

  14. A Streetcar Named "Derousal"? A Psychophysiological Examination of the Desire-Arousal Distinction in Sexually Functional and Dysfunctional Women.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sabina; Amsel, Rhonda; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that desire and arousal problems are highly interrelated in women. Therefore, hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) were removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), and a new diagnostic category, female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD), was created to include both arousal and desire difficulties. However, no research has tried to distinguish these problems based on psychosocial-physiological patterns to identify whether unique profiles exist. This study compared psychosocial-physiological patterns in a community sample of 84 women meeting DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 2000 ) criteria for HSDD (n = 22), FSAD (n = 18), both disorders (FSAD/HSDD; n = 25), and healthy controls (n = 19). Women completed self-report measures and watched neutral and erotic films while genital arousal (GA) and subjective arousal (SA) were measured. Results indicated that GA increased equally for all groups during the erotic condition, whereas women with HSDD and FSAD/HSDD reported less SA than controls or FSAD women. Women in the clinical groups also showed lower concordance and greater impairment on psychosocial variables as compared to controls, with women with FSAD/HSDD showing lowest functioning. Results have important implications for the classification and treatment of these difficulties. PMID:26457746

  15. Animal models of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Mandeep Singh; Khan, Samsroz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Choudhary, Rajesh; Bodakhe, Surendra H

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a prevalent male sexual dysfunction with profound adverse effects on the physical and the psychosocial health of men and, subsequently, on their partners. The expanded use of various types of rodent models has produced some advances in the study of ED, and neurophysiological studies using various animal models have provided important insights into human sexual dysfunction. At present, animal models play a key role in exploring and screening novel drugs designed to treat ED.

  16. An epidemiological study of sexual disorders in south Indian rural population

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.; Tandon, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexuality is an important aspect of the personality of an individual and influences psychological, physical and social well-being of both men and women. It is a paradox, that in the country where ‘kamasutra’ (by Vatsyayana) took birth, there is a lack of research publications and sexuality related literature; hence the current study was conducted, to estimate the prevalence and association of sexual disorders with various socio-demographic variables, in the selected rural population. Materials and Methods: Subjects who were sexually active and fulfilled the study criteria were administered Arizona Sexual Experience Scale as screening tool for the presence of sexual problems. Those who were found to be having sexual problems were interviewed further using appropriate questionnaires. Results: 21.15% of the male subjects were diagnosed to have one (or more) sexual disorder. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction was found to be 15.77%, male hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) 2.56%; premature ejaculation was found to be prevalent in 8.76% of the male subjects. Around 14% of the female subjects were diagnosed to have female sexual disorders. Prevalence of female arousal dysfunction was found to be 6.65%, female HSDD 8.87%, female anorgasmia 5.67%, female dyspareunia 2.34% and female sexual aversion disorder was found to be prevalent in 0.37% of the female subjects. Conclusion: This study concluded that one in five males and one in seven females were suffering from one (or more) sexual disorder. Improving the training of undergraduate medical and nursing students in sexuality related issues, increasing trained individuals in sexual medicine by starting new courses, providing sex education to the general population using media and merging sexual health care with primary care, are likely to play a significant role in addressing the increasing sexual health morbidity. PMID:26124520

  17. Genital abnormalities in early childhood in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Rettenberger, Martin; Hill, Andreas; Dekker, Arne; Berner, Wolfgang; Briken, Peer

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: The present study investigates the relevance of genital abnormalities (GA) like cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and phimosis usually diagnosed in early childhood for the development of psychosexual problems and deficits in a sample of N = 163 convicted sexual homicide perpetrators. AIMS.: The first aim was to investigate the prevalence of early childhood GA in a sample of sexual homicide perpetrators. The second was to explore differences in the psychosexual development of participants with GA in early childhood compared with those without GA. It was expected that offenders with GA show specific problems in their psychosexual development compared with offenders without GA. METHODS.: The data for the present study were obtained by reanalyzing an existing database derived from a large-scale research project about sexual homicide. Using a predominantly exploratory design we, therefore, divided the total sample into two subgroups (with vs. without indicators of GA). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Main outcome measures were the number of sexual homicide perpetrators showing GA in early childhood and the differences of subjects with and without GA with regard to their psychosexual development (i.e., according to sexual deviant interests or sexual dysfunctions). RESULTS.: The prevalence of GA is substantially higher in this sample than epidemiological studies indicated in the normal population. This result provided first support for the importance of GA in the population of sexual homicide perpetrators. Further analyses indicate significant differences between both subgroups: Offenders with GA in early childhood showed indicators for more sexual dysfunctions (e.g., erectile dysfunction) in adulthood and a distinct tendency of more masochistic sexual interests. CONCLUSION.: Even if the exploratory design of the present investigation allows no causal conclusions between GA and sexual homicide offenses, the result provided support for the relevance of early

  18. Genital abnormalities in early childhood in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Rettenberger, Martin; Hill, Andreas; Dekker, Arne; Berner, Wolfgang; Briken, Peer

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: The present study investigates the relevance of genital abnormalities (GA) like cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and phimosis usually diagnosed in early childhood for the development of psychosexual problems and deficits in a sample of N = 163 convicted sexual homicide perpetrators. AIMS.: The first aim was to investigate the prevalence of early childhood GA in a sample of sexual homicide perpetrators. The second was to explore differences in the psychosexual development of participants with GA in early childhood compared with those without GA. It was expected that offenders with GA show specific problems in their psychosexual development compared with offenders without GA. METHODS.: The data for the present study were obtained by reanalyzing an existing database derived from a large-scale research project about sexual homicide. Using a predominantly exploratory design we, therefore, divided the total sample into two subgroups (with vs. without indicators of GA). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Main outcome measures were the number of sexual homicide perpetrators showing GA in early childhood and the differences of subjects with and without GA with regard to their psychosexual development (i.e., according to sexual deviant interests or sexual dysfunctions). RESULTS.: The prevalence of GA is substantially higher in this sample than epidemiological studies indicated in the normal population. This result provided first support for the importance of GA in the population of sexual homicide perpetrators. Further analyses indicate significant differences between both subgroups: Offenders with GA in early childhood showed indicators for more sexual dysfunctions (e.g., erectile dysfunction) in adulthood and a distinct tendency of more masochistic sexual interests. CONCLUSION.: Even if the exploratory design of the present investigation allows no causal conclusions between GA and sexual homicide offenses, the result provided support for the relevance of early

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 null mutation causes infertility in male mice associated with testosterone deficiency and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Robertson, Sarah A

    2007-08-01

    TGFbeta1 is a multifunctional cytokine implicated in gonad and secondary sex organ development, steroidogenesis, and spermatogenesis. To determine the physiological requirement for TGFbeta1 in male reproduction, Tgfb1 null mutant mice on a Prkdc(scid) immunodeficient background were studied. TGFbeta1-deficient males did not deposit sperm or induce pseudopregnancy in females, despite an intact reproductive tract with morphologically normal penis, seminal vesicles, and testes. Serum and intratesticular testosterone and serum androstenedione were severely diminished in TGFbeta1-deficient males. Testosterone deficiency was secondary to disrupted pituitary gonadotropin secretion because serum LH and to a lesser extent serum FSH were reduced, and exogenous LH replacement with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) induced serum testosterone to control levels. In the majority of TGFbeta1-deficient males, spermatogenesis was normal and sperm were developmentally competent as assessed by in vitro fertilization. Analysis of sexual behavior revealed that although TGFbeta1 null males showed avid interest in females and engaged in mounting activity, intromission was infrequent and brief, and ejaculation was not attained. Administration of testosterone to adult males, even after neonatal androgenization, was ineffective in restoring sexual function; however, erectile reflexes and ejaculation could be induced by electrical stimulation. These studies demonstrate the profound effect of genetic deficiency in TGFbeta1 on male fertility, implicating this cytokine in essential roles in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and in testosterone-independent regulation of mating competence.

  20. Sexual dimorphism in miR-210 expression and mitochondrial dysfunction in the placenta with maternal obesity

    PubMed Central

    Muralimanoharan, S; Guo, C; Myatt, L; Maloyan, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal obesity is a major problem in obstetrics, and the placenta is involved in obesity-related complications via its roles at the maternal–fetal interface. We have recently shown a causative role for micro(mi)RNA-210, a so called ‘hypoxamir’ regulated by HIF-1α, in mitochondrial dysfunction in placentas from women with preeclampsia. We also reported mitochondrial dysfunction in placentas with maternal obesity. Here we hypothesized that expression of miR-210 is dysregulated in the placentas with obesity. METHODS Placentas from uncomplicated pregnancies were collected at term from healthy weight or control (CTRL, pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI)<25), overweight (OW, BMI = 25–24.9) and obese (OB, BMI>30) women following C-section with no labor. Expression of miRNA-210 and its target genes was measured by reverse transcription–PCR and Western Blot, respectively. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by Seahorse Analyzer in syncytiotrophoblast (ST) 72 h after cytotrophoblast isolation. RESULTS Expression of miR-210 was significantly increased in placentas of OB and OW women with female but not male fetuses compared with CTRL placentas of females. However, expression of HIF-1α in these placentas remained unchanged. Levels of tumor-necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) were increased in OW and OB placentas of females but not males, and in silico analysis suggested that activation of miR-210 expression in these placentas might be activated by NFκB1 (p50) signaling. Indeed, chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay showed that NFkB1 binds to placental miR-210 promoter in a fetal sex-dependent manner. Female but not male STs treated with TNFα showed overexpression of miR-210, reduction of mitochondrial target genes and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Pre-treatment of these STs with small interfering RNA to NFkB1 or antagomiR-210 prevented the TNFα-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. CONCLUSIONS Our data suggest that the inflammatory

  1. Sexual Abuse and Sexual Functioning in a Chronic Pelvic Pain Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Mary E.; Reddy, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Sexual abuse, particularly childhood sexual abuse, has been linked to chronic pelvic pain and to sexual dysfunction, though the sexual functioning of survivors of sexual abuse has not been studied in a chronic pain population. Sixty-three women with chronic pelvic pain completed measures of sexual function, sexual abuse, and pain. Using an index…

  2. The relationship between eating disorders and sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Madowitz, Jennifer; Matheson, Brittany E; Liang, June

    2015-09-01

    Research aimed at understanding the causes and comorbidities of eating disorders (ED) identifies sexual trauma as one potential pathway to the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Based on current literature, there are two main etiological pathways between sexual trauma and ED-body perceptions and psychological difficulties. However, previously published reviews on this topic are outdated and have not yielded consistent findings. Therefore, authors completed a literature review covering years 2004-2014 to examine the relationship between sexual trauma and ED according to both proposed pathway models. Authors utilized PubMed, GoogleScholar, and PsychINFO as search engines. Search terms included "sexual assault", "sexual abuse", "sexual trauma", and "rape" in conjunction with relevant ED terminology. Thirty-two studies met inclusion criteria for this review. Current data indicate an increased prevalence of sexual trauma for individuals with ED. Although limited, recent evidence suggests that sexual trauma precedes and contributes to the development of ED. Existing literature indicates that the body perceptions pathway may impact ED through body dissatisfaction, shame, sexual dysfunction, and fear of future sexual trauma. The psychological difficulties pathway indicates a link between ED and the desire to cope with the failure of the average expected environment, psychological diagnoses, the need for control, and the regulation of emotions. However, further research is needed to assess the potential causal role that sexual trauma may play in the etiology of ED. PMID:25976911

  3. The relationship between eating disorders and sexual trauma.

    PubMed

    Madowitz, Jennifer; Matheson, Brittany E; Liang, June

    2015-09-01

    Research aimed at understanding the causes and comorbidities of eating disorders (ED) identifies sexual trauma as one potential pathway to the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Based on current literature, there are two main etiological pathways between sexual trauma and ED-body perceptions and psychological difficulties. However, previously published reviews on this topic are outdated and have not yielded consistent findings. Therefore, authors completed a literature review covering years 2004-2014 to examine the relationship between sexual trauma and ED according to both proposed pathway models. Authors utilized PubMed, GoogleScholar, and PsychINFO as search engines. Search terms included "sexual assault", "sexual abuse", "sexual trauma", and "rape" in conjunction with relevant ED terminology. Thirty-two studies met inclusion criteria for this review. Current data indicate an increased prevalence of sexual trauma for individuals with ED. Although limited, recent evidence suggests that sexual trauma precedes and contributes to the development of ED. Existing literature indicates that the body perceptions pathway may impact ED through body dissatisfaction, shame, sexual dysfunction, and fear of future sexual trauma. The psychological difficulties pathway indicates a link between ED and the desire to cope with the failure of the average expected environment, psychological diagnoses, the need for control, and the regulation of emotions. However, further research is needed to assess the potential causal role that sexual trauma may play in the etiology of ED.

  4. Subjective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) extract on well-being and sexual performances in patients with mild erectile dysfunction: a randomised, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zenico, T; Cicero, A F G; Valmorri, L; Mercuriali, M; Bercovich, E

    2009-04-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a cultivated root belonging to the brassica family used in the Andean region for its supposed aphrodisiac properties. We carried out a double-blind clinical trial on 50 Caucasian men affected by mild erectile dysfunction (ED), randomised to treatment with Maca dry extract, 2400 mg, or placebo. The treatment effect on ED and subjective well-being was tested administrating before and after 12 weeks the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). After 12 weeks of treatment, both Maca- and placebo-treated patients experienced a significant increase in IIEF-5 score (P < 0.05 for both). However, patients taking Maca experienced a more significant increase than those taking placebo (1.6 +/- 1.1 versus 0.5 +/- 0.6, P < 0.001). Both Maca- and placebo-treated subjects experienced a significant improvement in psychological performance-related SAT-P score, but the Maca group higher than that of placebo group (+9 +/- 6 versus +6 +/- 5, P < 0.05). However, only Maca-treated patients experienced a significant improvement in physical and social performance-related SAT-P score compared with the baseline (+7 +/- 6 and +7 +/- 6, both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data support a small but significant effect of Maca supplementation on subjective perception of general and sexual well-being in adult patients with mild ED. PMID:19260845

  5. [Depressive symptoms and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Porto, Robert

    2014-10-01

    The mutually reinforcing dyad of depressive symptoms and erectile dysfunction is scientifically established. The cure of depression improves sexual dysfunction (SD) and the treatment of SD induces improvement of depression. Most of anti-depressants induce negative sexual side effects that lead to non-compliance of these treatments. The knowledge of interrelation between depression, anti-depressants and sexuality is of great importance in clinical practice.

  6. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management.

  7. Sexual Health.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lisa; Mann, Janice; McMahon, Sharon; Wong, Thomas

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: Much attention is devoted to women's reproductive health, but the formative and mature stages of women's sexual lives are often overlooked. We have analyzed cross-sectional data from the Sexual Behaviour module of the 2000/2001 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS), and reviewed the literature and available indicators of the sexual health of Canadian women. KEY FINDINGS: Contemporary Canadian adolescents are becoming sexually active at younger ages than in previous generations. The gender gap between young males and females in age at first intercourse has virtually disappeared. The mean age at first intercourse for CCHS respondents aged 15-24 years was between 16 and 17. Canadian-born respondents are significantly younger at first intercourse than those who were born outside of Canada. Few adolescents recognize important risks to their sexual health. Older Canadians are sexually active, and continue to find emotional and physical satisfaction in their sexual relationships. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: Both health surveys and targeted research must employ a broader understanding of sexuality to measure changes in and determinants of the sexual health of Canadians. There is reluctance to direct questions about sexual issues to younger Canadians, even though increased knowledge of sexual health topics is associated with delayed onset of sexual intercourse. Among adults, sex-positive resources are needed to address aspects of aging, rather than medicalizing age-related sexual dysfunction. Age and gender-appropriate sexual health care, education, and knowledge are important not only for women of reproductive age, but for Canadians at all stages of life.

  8. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A.; Aneja, J.

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:26157303

  9. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  10. The SSES-E: a measure of sexual self-efficacy in erectile functioning.

    PubMed

    Libman, E; Rothenberg, I; Fichten, C S; Amsel, R

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Sexual Self-Efficacy Scale (SSES-E) for erectile disorder. The subjects consisted of 15 heterosexual couples with nonproblematic sexual functioning (normal group) and a sexually dysfunctional sample consisting of nine heterosexual couples and eight heterosexual single males (dysfunctional group). Most of the males in the dysfunctional sample were diagnosed as suffering from erectile disorder. Reliability of the SSES-E, based on test-retest and split-half correlations and on item analyses, appears to be reasonable. Validity, measured in three different ways, is also acceptably high. Suggestions for the use of this instrument in clinical practice and for future research are made.

  11. Human Sexual Desire Disorder: Do We Have a Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.; Henry, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), loss of sexual desire for sexual activity, is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions of men and women in the United States. This article presents an overview of this specific sexual dysfunction including incidence, possible causes, treatment options, and the role of the health educator in addressing…

  12. Cues Resulting in Desire for Sexual Activity in Women

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Katie; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A number of questionnaires have been created to assess levels of sexual desire in women, but to our knowledge, there are currently no validated measures for assessing cues that result in sexual desire. A questionnaire of this nature could be useful for both clinicians and researchers, because it considers the contextual nature of sexual desire and it draws attention to individual differences in factors that can contribute to sexual desire. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a multidimensional assessment tool of cues for sexual desire in women that is validated in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Methods Factor analyses conducted on both an initial sample (N = 874) and a community sample (N = 138) resulted in the Cues for Sexual Desire Scale (CSDS) which included four factors: (i) Emotional Bonding Cues; (ii) Erotic/ Explicit Cues; (iii) Visual/Proximity Cues; and (iv) Implicit/Romantic Cues. Main Outcome Measures Scale construction of cues associated with sexual desire and differences between women with and without sexual dysfunction. Results The CSDS demonstrated good reliability and validity and was able to detect significant differences between women with and without HSDD. Results from regression analyses indicated that both marital status and level of sexual functioning predicted scores on the CSDS. The CSDS provided predictive validity for the Female Sexual Function Index desire and arousal domain scores, and increased cues were related to a higher reported frequency of sexual activity in women. Conclusions The findings from the present study provide valuable information regarding both internal and external triggers that can result in sexual desire for women. We believe that the CSDS could be beneficial in therapeutic settings to help identify cues that do and do not facilitate sexual desire in women with clinically diagnosed desire difficulties. PMID:16942529

  13. Female Genital Dialogues: Female Genital Self-Image, Sexual Dysfunction, and Quality of Life in Patients With Vitiligo With and Without Genital Affection.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Deena; Mohammed, Ghada F A; Gomaa, Amal H A; Eyada, Moustafa M K

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo has a major effect on sexual health because of the disfiguring skin lesions affecting self-image and self-esteem. However, this topic has not explored. This article aimed to assess the effect of vitiligo on genital self-image, sexual function, and quality of life in female patients. This cross-sectional study included 50 sexually active women with vitiligo and 25 women without vitiligo. All participants subjected to full history taking and examination. Extent of vitiligo was assessed with the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score, sexual function with the Female Sexual Function Index, genital self-image with Female Genital Self-Image Score and quality of life with the Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaires. The main outcome measures were correlation between Vitiligo Area Scoring Index, Female Genital Self-Image Score, Female Sexual Function Index, and Dermatology Life Quality Index domains was determined using t test and Pearson correlation. This study revealed a negative correlation between the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score and sexual satisfaction. Vitiligo Area Scoring Index and Dermatology Life Quality Index score was significantly correlated with Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score alone and with Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index alone and with both the Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score and the Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index (p <.05). Sexual and psychological assessment of patients with vitiligo is imperative to improve outcomes and increase patients' compliance with treatment.

  14. Executive Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovici, Gil D.; Stephens, Melanie L.; Possin, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Executive functions represent a constellation of cognitive abilities that drive goal-oriented behavior and are critical to the ability to adapt to an ever-changing world. This article provides a clinically oriented approach to classifying, localizing, diagnosing, and treating disorders of executive function, which are pervasive in clinical practice. Recent Findings: Executive functions can be split into four distinct components: working memory, inhibition, set shifting, and fluency. These components may be differentially affected in individual patients and act together to guide higher-order cognitive constructs such as planning and organization. Specific bedside and neuropsychological tests can be applied to evaluate components of executive function. While dysexecutive syndromes were first described in patients with frontal lesions, intact executive functioning relies on distributed neural networks that include not only the prefrontal cortex, but also the parietal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum. Executive dysfunction arises from injury to any of these regions, their white matter connections, or neurotransmitter systems. Dysexecutive symptoms therefore occur in most neurodegenerative diseases and in many other neurologic, psychiatric, and systemic illnesses. Management approaches are patient specific and should focus on treatment of the underlying cause in parallel with maximizing patient function and safety via occupational therapy and rehabilitation. Summary: Executive dysfunction is extremely common in patients with neurologic disorders. Diagnosis and treatment hinge on familiarity with the clinical components and neuroanatomic correlates of these complex, high-order cognitive processes. PMID:26039846

  15. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  16. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include: A history of sexual abuse or rape Boredom in sexual activity Certain prescription drugs, including ... eating disorders, substance abuse, "difficult" patients, sexual function, rape intimate partner violence, and grief. In: Lentz GM, ...

  17. Sexual function in women receiving maintenance dialysis.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Srikanth; Hess, Rachel; Bossola, Maurizio; Unruh, Mark L; Weisbord, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    While substantial attention has been paid to the issue of sexual dysfunction in men on chronic dialysis, less is known about this problem in women with end-stage renal disease. We sought to assess sexual dysfunction in women on chronic dialysis and determine whether patients discuss this problem with their providers and receive treatment. We prospectively enrolled women receiving chronic hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis in Pittsburgh, PA. We asked patients to complete the 19-item Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess sexual function and a 5-item survey that assessed whether patients had discussed sexual dysfunction with their providers and/or received treatment for this problem in the past. We enrolled 66 patients; 59 (89%) on hemodialysis and 7 (11%) on peritoneal dialysis. All patients completed the FSFI, of whom 53 (80%) had FSFI scores <26.55, consistent with the presence of sexual dysfunction. Of 37 patients who were married or residing with a significant other, 27 (73%) had sexual dysfunction. Among 24 participants who reported having been sexually active over the previous 4 weeks, 11 (46%) had sexual dysfunction. Only 21% of patients with sexual dysfunction had discussed this problem with their gynecologist, renal or primary provider, and 3 (6%) reported having received treatment. Sexual dysfunction is common in women on dialysis, even among patients who are married or residing with a significant other and those who are sexually active. However, few women discuss this issue with their providers or receive treatment.

  18. Sexuality of Disabled Athletes Depending on the Form of Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Plinta, Ryszard; Sobiecka, Joanna; Drosdzol-Cop, Agnieszka; Nowak-Brzezińska, Agnieszka; Skrzypulec-Plinta, Violetta

    2015-11-22

    The main purpose of this study was to determine sexuality of disabled athletes depending on the form of locomotion. The study included 170 disabled athletes, aged between 18 and 45. The entire population was divided into 3 research groups depending on the form of locomotion: moving on wheelchairs (n=52), on crutches (n=29) and unaided (n=89). The research tool was a questionnaire voluntarily and anonymously completed by the respondents of the research groups. The questionnaire was composed of a general part concerning the socio-demographic conditions, medical history, health problems, a part dedicated to physical disability as well as the Polish version of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) evaluating sexual life. STATISTICA 10.0 for Windows was used in the statistical analysis. Subjects moving on crutches were significantly older than ones moving on wheelchairs and unaided (34.41 ±11.00 vs. 30.49 ±10.44 and 27.99 ±10.51 years, respectively) (p=0.018). Clinically significant erectile dysfunctions were most often diagnosed in athletes moving on wheelchairs (70.27%), followed by athletes moving on crutches and moving unaided (60% and 35.42%, respectively; p=0.048). Clinical sexual dysfunctions were diagnosed on a similar level among all female athletes. It was concluded that the form of locomotion may determine sexuality of disabled men. Males on wheelchair revealed the worst sexual functioning. Female athletes moving on wheelchairs, on crutches and moving unaided were comparable in the aspect of their sexual life. PMID:26834876

  19. Newly Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Suggestions Examine Your Skin Newly Diagnosed? Understanding Your Pathology Biopsy: The First Step Sentinel Node Biopsy Melanoma ... start this journey: Get a copy of your pathology report. We can help you understand the report ...

  20. [Physiology and physiopathology of sexuality].

    PubMed

    Cuzin, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    From desire to orgasm, sexuality, in women and men, is underpinned by a complex organic, psychological and emotional function. Sexual dysfunction encompasses diverse aetiologies, including chronic diseases and iatrogenesis resulting from medication or surgery. The effects of a chronic disease can have an impact on all phases of the sexual response. PMID:27317816

  1. Sexual Interaction in Nonclinical Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woody, Jane D.; D'Souza, Henry J.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the sexual functioning and interaction of 58 nonclinical heterosexual couples as measured by the Sexual Interaction System Scale (SISS). On all five SISS factors, the nonclinical sample scored significantly better than persons in therapy for sexual dysfunction; they also reported satisfactory relationship adjustment and high levels of…

  2. BORDERLINE PERSONALITY DISORDER IN THE MEDICAL SETTING: Suggestive Behaviors, Syndromes, and Diagnoses

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder is a personality dysfunction that is characterized by disinhibition and impulsivity, which oftentimes manifest as self-regulation difficulties. Patients with this disorder have always been present in medical settings, but have been described as “difficult patients” rather than patients with borderline personality disorder. According to empirical findings, a number of behaviors and medical syndromes/diagnoses are suggestive of borderline personality disorder. Suggestive behaviors in the medical setting may include aggressive or disruptive behaviors, the intentional sabotage of medical care, and excessive healthcare utilization. Suggestive medical syndromes and diagnoses in the medical setting may include alcohol and substance misuse (including the abuse of prescription medications), multiple somatic complaints, chronic pain, obesity, sexual impulsivity, and hair pulling. While not all-inclusive or diagnostic, these behaviors and syndromes/diagnoses may invite further clinical evaluation of the patient for borderline personality disorder. PMID:26351624

  3. [Sexuality and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    de Molina Román, M R; Salvador Carulla, L; Foras Eroles, F

    1994-09-01

    The sex behaviour of patients suffering from schizophrenia has been largely overlooked. This study is aimed at describing the pattern of sexual responses and conducts in 113 inpatients with schizophrenia (DSM-III-R). A high rate of sexual dysfunction was found in both males (62.9%) and females (50%). These rates are higher than found in other previous studies. The possible cause factors of sexual dysfunctions in this group of patients and the methodological problems related to this type of study are reviewed.

  4. Meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Driver, P J; Lemp, M A

    1996-01-01

    Blepharitis is probably the most common disease entity seen in the general ophthalmologist's office. A significant proportion of these cases are secondary to meibomian gland disease. This review outlines our knowledge of the histopathology, lipid abnormalities and role of microorganisms in meibomian gland dysfunction. We will also review the physiology of meibomian gland secretion and present models of meibomian gland dysfunction which have enhanced our knowledge of this condition. The importance of diagnosing associated conditions such as aqueous tear deficiency, contact lens intolerance, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis is emphasized. Although this condition causes significant morbidity in the population, there are effective treatments available and these will be discussed.

  5. Diagnosing Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... your symptoms and their clinical judgment. Will my health care provider test me for flu if I have flu-like ... flu symptoms do not require testing because the test results usually do not change how you are treated. Your health care provider may diagnose you with flu based on ...

  6. Erectile dysfunction in the cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Jackson, Graham; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Montorsi, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common in the patient with cardiovascular disease. It is an important component of the quality of life and it also confers an independent risk for future cardiovascular events. The usual 3-year time period between the onset of erectile dysfunction symptoms and a cardiovascular event offers an opportunity for risk mitigation. Thus, sexual function should be incorporated into cardiovascular disease risk assessment for all men. A comprehensive approach to cardiovascular risk reduction (comprising of both lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment) improves overall vascular health, including sexual function. Proper sexual counselling improves the quality of life and increases adherence to medication. This review explores the critical connection between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease and evaluates how this relationship may influence clinical practice. Algorithms for the management of patient with erectile dysfunction according to the risk for sexual activity and future cardiovascular events are proposed.

  7. Health-Related Quality of Life, Mental Health and Psychotherapeutic Considerations for Women Diagnosed with a Disorder of Sexual Development: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Matthew A.; Inman, Arpana G.; Carr, Amanda G.; Franco, Jill; Brooks, Lindsey M.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) and mental health outcomes for women diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a disorder of sex development. Though recommendations for therapists exist, no research has empirically investigated women's experiences in therapy or their recommendations for therapy. Thus the purpose of the study was to investigate HRQL, mental health concerns of women with CAH, and patients' recommendations for therapists. A qualitative methodology, consensual qualitative research, was used to answer these questions. Eight women with CAH participated in the study. Results from their interviews revealed six domains: physical functioning, psychological functioning, interpersonal processes and relationships, healthcare experiences of women with CAH, recommendations for health care professionals, and systemic considerations. Domains were further broken down into categories with results yielding implications for both medical and mental health professionals and shedding light on issues related to normalcy, concerns both related and unrelated to CAH, sex, and gender, and highlighting effective supports and therapeutic interventions. PMID:20614002

  8. Women's Endorsement of Models of Sexual Response: Correlates and Predictors.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Beata; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated endorsement of female sexual response models, and no single model has been accepted as a normative description of women's sexual response. The aim of the study was to establish how women from a population-based sample endorse current theoretical models of the female sexual response--the linear models and circular model (partial and composite Basson models)--as well as predictors of endorsement. Accordingly, 174 heterosexual women aged 18-55 years were included in a cross-sectional study: 74 women diagnosed with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) based on DSM-5 criteria and 100 non-dysfunctional women. The description of sexual response models was used to divide subjects into four subgroups: linear (Masters-Johnson and Kaplan models), circular (partial Basson model), mixed (linear and circular models in similar proportions, reflective of the composite Basson model), and a different model. Women were asked to choose which of the models best described their pattern of sexual response and how frequently they engaged in each model. Results showed that 28.7% of women endorsed the linear models, 19.5% the partial Basson model, 40.8% the composite Basson model, and 10.9% a different model. Women with FSD endorsed the partial Basson model and a different model more frequently than did non-dysfunctional controls. Individuals who were dissatisfied with a partner as a lover were more likely to endorse a different model. Based on the results, we concluded that the majority of women endorsed a mixed model combining the circular response with the possibility of an innate desire triggering a linear response. Further, relationship difficulties, not FSD, predicted model endorsement.

  9. Women's Endorsement of Models of Sexual Response: Correlates and Predictors.

    PubMed

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Beata; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated endorsement of female sexual response models, and no single model has been accepted as a normative description of women's sexual response. The aim of the study was to establish how women from a population-based sample endorse current theoretical models of the female sexual response--the linear models and circular model (partial and composite Basson models)--as well as predictors of endorsement. Accordingly, 174 heterosexual women aged 18-55 years were included in a cross-sectional study: 74 women diagnosed with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) based on DSM-5 criteria and 100 non-dysfunctional women. The description of sexual response models was used to divide subjects into four subgroups: linear (Masters-Johnson and Kaplan models), circular (partial Basson model), mixed (linear and circular models in similar proportions, reflective of the composite Basson model), and a different model. Women were asked to choose which of the models best described their pattern of sexual response and how frequently they engaged in each model. Results showed that 28.7% of women endorsed the linear models, 19.5% the partial Basson model, 40.8% the composite Basson model, and 10.9% a different model. Women with FSD endorsed the partial Basson model and a different model more frequently than did non-dysfunctional controls. Individuals who were dissatisfied with a partner as a lover were more likely to endorse a different model. Based on the results, we concluded that the majority of women endorsed a mixed model combining the circular response with the possibility of an innate desire triggering a linear response. Further, relationship difficulties, not FSD, predicted model endorsement. PMID:26601676

  10. The Impact of Sexual Orientation on Sexuality and Sexual Practices in North American Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Smith, James F.; Eisenberg, Michael L.; Ando, Kathryn A.; Rowen, Tami S.; Shindel, Alan W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There has been limited investigation of the sexuality and sexual dysfunction in non-heterosexual subjects by the sexual medicine community. Additional research in these populations is needed. Aims To investigate and compare sexuality and sexual function in students of varying sexual orientations. Methods An internet-based survey on sexuality was administered to medical students in North American between the months of February and July of 2008. Main Outcome Measures All subjects provided information on their ethnodemographic characteristics, sexual orientation, and sexual history. Subjects also completed a series of widely-utilized instruments for the assessment of human sexuality (International Index of Erectile Function [IIEF], Female Sexual Function Index [FSFI], Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool [PEDT], Index of Sex Life [ISL]). Results There were 2,276 completed responses to the question on sexual orientation. 13.2% of male respondents and 4.7% of female respondents reported a homosexual orientation; 2.5% of male and 5.7% of female respondents reported a bisexual orientation. Many heterosexual males and females reported same-sex sexual experiences (4% and 10%, respectively). Opposite-sex experiences were very common in the male and female homosexual population (37% and 44%, respectively). The prevalence of premature ejaculation (PEDT > 8) was similar among heterosexual and homosexual men (16% and 17%, P = 0.7, respectively). Erectile dysfunction (IIEF-EF < 26) was more common in homosexual men relative to heterosexual men (24% vs. 12%, P = 0.02). High risk for female sexual dysfunction (FSFI < 26.55) was more common in heterosexual and bisexual women compared with lesbians (51%, 45%, and 29%, respectively, P = 0.005). Conclusion In this survey of highly educated young professionals, numerous similarities and some important differences in sexuality and sexual function were noted based on sexual orientation. It is unclear whether the

  11. Scripted Sexual Health Informational Intervention in Improving Sexual Function in Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Anxiety Disorder; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Sexual Dysfunction; Uterine Sarcoma; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  12. Sexual Function in Males After Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bruheim, Kjersti; Guren, Marianne G.; Dahl, Alv A.; Skovlund, Eva; Balteskard, Lise; Carlsen, Erik; Fossa, Sophie D.; Tveit, Kjell Magne

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of sexual problems after pre- or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) with 50 Gy for rectal cancer is limited. In this study, we aimed to compare self-rated sexual functioning in irradiated (RT+) and nonirradiated (RT-) male patients at least 2 years after surgery for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients diagnosed with rectal cancer from 1993 to 2003 were identified from the Norwegian Rectal Cancer Registry. Male patients without recurrence at the time of the study. The International Index of Erectile Function, a self-rated instrument, was used to assess sexual functioning, and serum levels of serum testosterone were measured. Results: Questionnaires were returned from 241 patients a median of 4.5 years after surgery. The median age was 67 years at survey. RT+ patients (n = 108) had significantly poorer scores for erectile function, orgasmic function, intercourse satisfaction, and overall satisfaction with sex life compared with RT- patients (n = 133). In multiple age-adjusted analysis, the odds ratio for moderate-severe erectile dysfunction in RT+ patients was 7.3 compared with RT- patients (p <0.001). Furthermore, erectile dysfunction of this degree was associated with low serum testosterone (p = 0.01). Conclusion: RT for rectal cancer is associated with significant long-term effects on sexual function in males.

  13. The primary health care physician and the cancer patient: tips and strategies for managing sexual health

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Eric S.; Nekhlyudov, Larissa

    2015-01-01

    There is a large and growing population of long-term cancer survivors. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are playing an increasingly greater role in the care of these patients across the continuum of cancer survivorship. In this role, PCPs are faced with the responsibility of managing a range of medical and psychosocial late effects of cancer treatment. In particular, the sexual side effects of treatment which are common and have significant impact on quality of life for the cancer survivor, often go unaddressed. This is an area of clinical care and research that has received increasing attention, highlighted by the presentation of this special issue on Cancer and Sexual Health. The aims of this review are 3-fold. First, we seek to overview common presentations of sexual dysfunction related to major cancer diagnoses in order to give the PCP a sense of the medical issues that the survivor may present with. Barriers to communication about sexual health issues between patient/PCPs in order are also described in order to emphasize the importance of PCPs initiating this important conversation. Next, we provide strategies and resources to help guide the PCP in the management of sexual dysfunction in cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss case examples of survivorship sexual health issues and highlight the role that a PCP can play in each of these case examples. PMID:26816826

  14. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Rany; Ghanem, Hussein

    2013-01-12

    Erectile dysfunction is a common clinical entity that affects mainly men older than 40 years. In addition to the classical causes of erectile dysfunction, such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension, several common lifestyle factors, such as obesity, limited or an absence of physical exercise, and lower urinary tract symptoms, have been linked to the development of erectile dysfunction. Substantial steps have been taken in the study of the association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Erectile dysfunction is a strong predictor for coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular assessment of a non-cardiac patient presenting with erectile dysfunction is now recommended. Substantial advances have occurred in the understanding of the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction that ultimately led to the development of successful oral therapies, namely the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors. However, oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors have limitations, and present research is thus investigating cutting-edge therapeutic strategies including gene and cell-based technologies with the aim of discovering a cure for erectile dysfunction.

  15. Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of patients affected, the understanding of diastolic dysfunction and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is still poor. Clinical trials, largely based on successful treatments for systolic heart failure, have been disappointing, suggesting that HFpEF has a different pathology to that of systolic dysfunction. In this review, general concepts, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of diastolic dysfunction are summarized, with an emphasis on new experiments suggesting that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of at least some forms of the disease. This observation has lead to potential new diagnostics and therapeutics for diastolic dysfunction and heart failure caused by diastolic dysfunction. PMID:25746522

  16. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bulllying

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Friend Who Cuts? Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying KidsHealth > For Teens > Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying ... being sexually harassed or bullied. What Are Sexual Bullying and Harassment? Just like other kinds of bullying, ...

  17. Sexual activity and aging.

    PubMed

    Ni Lochlainn, Mary; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2013-08-01

    Sexuality is an important component of emotional and physical intimacy that men and women experience throughout their lives. Research suggesting that a high proportion of men and women remain sexually active well into later life refutes the prevailing myth that aging and sexual dysfunction are inexorably linked. Age-related physiological changes do not render a meaningful sexual relationship impossible or even necessarily difficult. Many of these physiological changes are modifiable. There are various therapeutic options available to patients to achieve maximum sexual capacity in old age. This article reviews the prevalence of sexual activity among older adults, the problems these adults encounter with sexual activity, and the role of the health care professional in addressing these problems. The physiological sex-related changes that occur as part of the normal aging process in men and women are reviewed, as well as the effect of age-related physical and psychological illness on sexual function. The attitudes and perceptions of the media and general public toward sexual activity and aging are summarized. An understanding of the sexual changes that accompany the aging process may help general practitioners and other doctors to give practical and useful advice on sexuality as well as refute the misconception that aging equates to celibacy. A thorough awareness of this aspect of older people's quality of life can raise meaningful expectations for aging patients. PMID:23540950

  18. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction. Classification and management.

    PubMed

    Rosen, R C

    2001-05-01

    Psychogenic factors are involved alone or in combination with organic causes in a substantial number of cases of erectile dysfunction. Epidemiologic studies have implicated the role of depressed mood, loss of self-esteem, and other psychosocial stresses in the cause of erectile dysfunction. A new definition and classification of psychogenic erectile dysfunction has been proposed based on recent clinical and research findings. According to this new classification, psychogenic erectile dysfunction is categorized as generalized or situational type, with subcategories of each type proposed. Traditional treatment approaches for psychogenic erectile dysfunction have included anxiety reduction and desensitization procedures, cognitive-behavioral interventions, guided sexual stimulation techniques, and couples' or relationship counseling. Recently, these approaches increasingly have been combined with pharmacologic therapy such as sildenafil. Special situations have been identified in which combining psychosocial interventions with medical therapy is recommended. These situations include problems of sexual initiation, low sexual desire, other sexual dysfunctions, and significant couples' or relationship problems. More research is needed on the role of psychosocial interventions in the treatment of erectile dysfunction.

  19. The Clinician's Toolbox: Assessing the Sexual Impacts of Cancer on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer (AYAC)

    PubMed Central

    Aubin, Sylvie; Perez, Samara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents and young adults aged 15–39 years who have been diagnosed with cancer (AYAC) have unique medical and psychosocial needs. Following their cancer treatments, AYAC must learn to manage the sometimes irreversible general side effects of cancer treatments including side effects that impact their sexuality. These side effects include but are not limited to: infertility, altered body/physical appearance, and sexual dysfunction. Such effects may hinder AYAC efforts to date and experiment sexually, limiting sexual maturation and confidence, as well as the formation or maintenance of meaningful couple and sexual relationships. It is clear that we need to tailor our clinical approaches to ensure that we assess the unique needs and concerns faced by AYAC. Aims Based on consistent study findings substantiating the distinctive needs of AYAC, the main objective of this article is to present the core clinical components involved in assessing sexuality among AYAC. Methods The clinical recommendations are based on the authors and experts' clinical experiences coupled with a thorough examination of the literature related to AYAC sexuality. Main Outcome Measures This article first describes the three components (clinical interview, review of chart notes, and self-report questionnaires) of a sexuality assessment and the seven core domains that highlight target areas of focus. Results A detailed outline of each of the core domains of assessment (socio-demographics; medical history; fertility and sexually transmitted infection; sexual functioning; sexual coping style; body and self-image; and sexual history and dating/couple experience) is presented. A “toolbox” table containing useful resources for clinicians (e.g., questionnaires and red flags) and direct resources for AYAC patients are included. Conclusion Cancer can have a significant impact on numerous domains of AYAC sexuality. The assessment of and attention to the impact of sexuality on AYAC is

  20. [Gonadal dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Tahara, R; Toma, Y; Yanaihara, T

    1997-11-01

    Function of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is an essential factor for the maintenance of regular cycles in mature women. The disturbance of function of those organs causes gonadal dysfunction such as anovulation, amenorrhea and menstrual disorders. Therefore, the correct diagnosis for the assessment of CNS and ovarian function is clinically important to treat the patients those who have an menstrual disorders. In this review, the mechanism of normal gonadal cycles and the diagnostic method and the treatment of gonadal dysfunction are described.

  1. Current Concepts in Ejaculatory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Jeffrey P; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G

    2006-01-01

    Although erectile dysfunction has recently become the most well-known aspect of male sexual dysfunction, the most prevalent male sexual disorders are ejaculatory dysfunctions. Ejaculatory disorders are divided into 4 categories: premature ejaculation (PE), delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation/anorgasmia. Pharmacologic treatment for certain ejaculatory disorders exists, for example the off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for PE. Unfortunately, the other ejaculatory disorders are less studied and not as well understood. This review revisits the physiology of the normal ejaculatory response, specifically explores the mechanisms of anejaculation, and presents emerging data. The neurophysiology of the ejaculatory reflex is complex, making classification of the role of individual neurotransmitters extremely difficult. However, recent research has elucidated more about the role of serotonin and dopamine at the central level in the physiology of both arousal and orgasm. Other recent studies that look at differing pharmacokinetic profiles and binding affinities of the α1-antagonists serve as an indication of the centrally mediated role of ejaculation and orgasm. As our understanding of the interaction between central and peripheral modulations and regulation of the process of ejaculation increases, the probability of developing centrally acting pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of sexual dysfunction approaches reality. PMID:17215997

  2. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation: A Standardized Protocol for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza, Rodrigo; Nieto, Javier; Ibarra, Sergio; Haas, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes present with voiding, sexual, and anorectal disturbances, which may be associated with one another, resulting in complex presentation. Thus, an integrated diagnosis and management approach may be required. Pelvic muscle rehabilitation (PMR) is a noninvasive modality involving cognitive reeducation, modification, and retraining of the pelvic floor and associated musculature. We describe our standardized PMR protocol for the management of pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes. Pelvic Muscle Rehabilitation Program. The diagnostic assessment includes electromyography and manometry analyzed in 4 phases: (1) initial baseline phase; (2) rapid contraction phase; (3) tonic contraction and endurance phase; and (4) late baseline phase. This evaluation is performed at the onset of every session. PMR management consists of 6 possible therapeutic modalities, employed depending on the diagnostic evaluation: (1) down-training; (2) accessory muscle isolation; (3) discrimination training; (4) muscle strengthening; (5) endurance training; and (6) electrical stimulation. Eight to ten sessions are performed at one-week intervals with integration of home exercises and lifestyle modifications. Conclusions. The PMR protocol offers a standardized approach to diagnose and manage pelvic floor dysfunction syndromes with potential advantages over traditional biofeedback, involving additional interventions and a continuous pelvic floor assessment with management modifications over the clinical course. PMID:25006337

  3. Predictive factors for the Nursing Diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 1

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo; Costa, Romanniny Hévillyn Silva; Nelson, Ana Raquel Cortês; Duarte, Fernando Hiago da Silva; Prado, Nanete Caroline da Costa; Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to identify the predictive factors for the nursing diagnoses in people living with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. Method: a cross-sectional study, undertaken with 113 people living with AIDS. The data were collected using an interview script and physical examination. Logistic regression was used for the data analysis, considering a level of significance of 10%. Results: the predictive factors identified were: for the nursing diagnosis of knowledge deficit-inadequate following of instructions and verbalization of the problem; for the nursing diagnosis of failure to adhere - years of study, behavior indicative of failure to adhere, participation in the treatment and forgetfulness; for the nursing diagnosis of sexual dysfunction - family income, reduced frequency of sexual practice, perceived deficit in sexual desire, perceived limitations imposed by the disease and altered body function. Conclusion: the predictive factors for these nursing diagnoses involved sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, defining characteristics, and related factors, which must be taken into consideration during the assistance provided by the nurse. PMID:27384466

  4. Attention bias for sexual words in females with low sexual functioning: A brief report

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Attention bias (i.e., tendency to selectively attend to disorder-relevant stimuli) has been associated with numerous emotional disorders, but few studies have examined attention bias in the context of sexual problems. The current study tested the hypothesis that females with low sexual functioning show an attention bias toward sexual stimuli compared to females with high sexual functioning. We assessed attention bias using a modified probe detection task using sexual and neutral words. Females with low sexual functioning (n=25) showed an attention bias toward sexual words, whereas females with high sexual functioning (n=25) did not. These results suggest that attention bias may be involved in the maintenance of female sexual dysfunction. Moreover, our findings have implications for both models of sexual dysfunction, as well as clinical interventions. PMID:20432123

  5. The Synergistic (MARATHON) Effect of Combined Methamphetamine with Sexual Stimulant Drugs on Increasing the Likelihood of High-Risk Sexual Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinifard, Seyed Mehdi; Ahmadian, Alireza; Smaeelifar, Neda

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic drug abuse and sexual dysfunction specifically erectile dysfunction may lead drug abusers to seek over-the-counter or non-prescription medications, out of which Sildenafil citrate, sold as the trade name of Viagra® can be considered as a prime and important treatment. Therefore, the research purpose was to draw a comparison and review the role of methamphetamine abuse and sildenafil use in increasing the likelihood of high-risk sexual behaviors (both concomitant and non-concomitant use). Methods Hence, a total of 40 patients diagnosed with methamphetamine abuse were recruited through the administration of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition), through purposive sampling and subsequent to being qualified in accordance with the selection criteria by psychologists and general practitioners. All the 40 drug abusers (20 methamphetamine abusers with concomitant use of Aphrodisiac drugs (sexual stimulant pills) and 20 methamphetamine abusers) described their sexual risk behaviors subsequent to the drug use. Findings Supported the between-group difference that is to say that, the group with concomitant methamphetamine abuse differed significantly in all the items when compared with the control group. However, this group scored lower on the item of sexual intercourse with drug addicted prostitutes using condom and both groups demonstrated high pick on this item. Conclusion Overall, the concomitant methamphetamine chronic abuse with sexual stimulant drugs generates Aphrodisiac drugs impulses and is found to be related to higher frequencies of sexual risk behaviors and sexual intercourse with addicted prostitutes. PMID:25984278

  6. Sexual Function, Activity, and Satisfaction among Women Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Maria K.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Shields, Anne Marie; Green, Jamie A.; Palevsky, Paul M.; Arnold, Robert M.; Fine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Past studies that demonstrated that sexual dysfunction is common among women receiving chronic hemodialysis did not distinguish sexual dysfunction/difficulty from sexual inactivity. This study sought to differentiate these in order to elucidate the prevalence of true “sexual dysfunction” in this population. Design, setting, participants, & measurements As part of a clinical trial of symptom management strategies in patients receiving chronic hemodialysis, female sexual function was prospectively assessed monthly for 6 months and quarterly thereafter using the Female Sexual Function Index, to which questions were added differentiating sexual dysfunction/difficulty from sexual inactivity. Beginning in month 7, patients were asked three questions about sexual activity, difficulty, and satisfaction monthly. Results Of the women enrolled in the clinical trial,125 participants completed 1721 assessments between 2009 and 2011. Scores on 574 of 643 (89%) quarterly Female Sexual Function Index assessments were consistent with sexual dysfunction, due largely to sexual inactivity, which was reported on 525 (82%) quarterly assessments. When reported (n=1663), the most frequently described reasons for sexual inactivity were lack of interest in sex (n=715; 43%) and lack of a partner (n=647; 39%), but rarely sexual difficulty (n=36; 2%). When reported (n=1582), women were moderately to very satisfied with their sexual life on 1020 (64%) assessments and on 513 of 671 (76%) assessments in which lack of interest was cited as a reason for sexual inactivity. Women indicated an interest in learning about the causes of and treatment for sexual dysfunction on just 5% of all assessments. Conclusions Although many women receiving chronic hemodialysis are sexually inactive, few describe sexual difficulty. Most, including those with a lack of interest in sex, are satisfied with their sexual life and few wish to learn about treatment options. These

  7. Development and Validation of Turkish Version of The Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Serdar; Onaran, Öykü Izel; Topalan, Kıvanç; Aydın, Çağrı Arıoğlu; Dansuk, Ramazan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The sexually related personal distress becomes an obligation for the diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction (FSD). The Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised (FSDS-R) was developed, extensively validated, and is among the most widely used tools to measure distress associated with impaired sexual function. Aim This study aims to develop a Turkish version of the FSDS-R, to evaluate its psychometric reliability and validity, and to estimate the optimal cutoff score that corresponds best to the clinical diagnosis of sexual dysfunction. Methods Ninety-five participants were diagnosed with female sexual interest and arousal disorder (FSIAD), 25 participants were diagnosed with another FSD, and 128 participants were healthy. Alpha coefficients (α) were used as an indicator of internal consistency. Test–retest reliability over a 2-week period was estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Correlation analysis conducted between the FSDS-R total score, the Female Sexual Function Index subscale, and total score was examined for convergent validity. Discriminant validity was assessed by comparing mean scores of the FSD and control groups in a between-groups analysis of variance. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoff values of the Turkish version of Female Sexual Distress Scale-Revised (Tr-FSDS-R). Main Outcomes Measures Sexuality-related distress measured by the Turkish version of the FSDS-R. Results Internal consistencies of the FSDS-R across the two assessments point for the three groups of women ranged from α = 0.87 to α = 0.99. ICCs ranged from 0.92 to 0.94 for baseline and day 15 for FSIAD, other FSD, and no FSD groups. One-factor unidimensional model explained 85.7% of the total variance of the Tr-FSDS-R items. The optimal cutoff score was found to be >11.5 to provide optimal sensitivity (97.9%) and specificity (83.2%). Significant differences in the FSDS-R scores were found between healthy

  8. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:26388109

  9. Sexual activity and concerns in people with coronary heart disease from a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Steptoe, Andrew; Jackson, Sarah E; Wardle, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sexual activity is a central component of intimate relationships, but sexual function may be impaired by coronary heart disease (CHD). There have been few representative population-based comparisons of sexual behaviour and concerns in people with and without CHD. We therefore investigated these issues in a large nationally representative sample of older people. Methods We analysed cross-sectional data from 2979 men and 3711 women aged 50 and older from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Sexual behaviour and concerns were assessed by validated self-completion questionnaire and analyses were weighted for non-response. Covariates included age, partnerships status and comorbidities. Results There were 376 men and 279 women with CHD. Men with CHD were less likely to be sexually active (68.7% vs 80.0%, adjusted OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.81), thought less about sex (74.7% vs 81.9%, OR 0.72, CI 0.54 to 0.95), and reported more erectile difficulties (47.4% vs 38.1%, OR 1.46, CI 1.10 to 1.93) than men without CHD. Effects were more pronounced among those diagnosed within the past 4 years. Women diagnosed <4 years ago were also less likely to be sexually active (35.4% vs 55.6%, OR 0.44, CI 0.23 to 0.84). There were few differences in concerns about sexual activity. Cardiovascular medication showed weak associations with erectile dysfunction. Conclusions There is an association between CHD and sexual activity, particularly among men, but the impact of CHD is limited. More effective advice after diagnosis might reverse the reduction in sexual activity, leading to improved quality of life. PMID:27126394

  10. Treatment outcomes for female offenders: relationship to number of Axis I diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Joann Y; McKendrick, Karen; Hamilton, Zachary; Cleland, Charles M; Pearson, Frank S; Banks, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a study that examined the relationship between multiple Axis I mental health diagnoses and treatment outcomes for female offenders in prison substance abuse treatment programs. Preliminary findings of the effectiveness of therapeutic community (TC) treatment, modified for female offenders, relative to a control cognitive behavioral treatment condition, are presented. The hypothesis--that participants who fit into multiple diagnostic categories have more dysfunctional symptoms and behaviors at baseline--was confirmed; however, a hypothesized relationship between the number of Axis I diagnoses and 6 month treatment outcomes across five domains (mental health, trauma exposure, substance use, HIV needle risk behaviors, and HIV sexual risk) was not supported. Across all Axis I mental health groups, TC treatment was significantly more effective than the control condition overall, as well as on measures of mental health symptoms and HIV sexual risk. These findings suggest that this TC treatment program, as modified, is an effective model for women with varied diagnoses and diagnostic complexities. PMID:18683197

  11. Challenges in sexual medicine.

    PubMed

    Cellek, Selim; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2012-09-01

    The sexual medicine field has been in mode of revolution until recently. Like all other fields of biomedical research, the economic situation around the world has had a negative impact on the field's momentum-research funding bodies, regulatory bodies and pharmaceutical companies seem to have placed sexual medicine in their low-priority list. But this is not the only challenge the field is facing. The successful development of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) means that research in this area seems to have slowed. However, there remain several unmet medical needs within sexual medicine such as premature ejaculation, severe ED and hypoactive sexual desire disorder, which await novel therapeutic approaches. Despite these challenges, research into finding and developing such therapies is likely to continue in the sexual medicine field, in an effort to improve the lives of our patients, who wait for effective therapies. PMID:22777290

  12. Women and sexual problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Revised Mar 11, 2014. Accessed Jan 14, 2015. Moore CK. Female sexual function and dysfunction. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Novick AC, Partin AW, and Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 30.

  13. Gustatory dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Maheswaran, T.; Abikshyeet, P.; Sitra, G.; Gokulanathan, S.; Vaithiyanadane, V.; Jeelani, S.

    2014-01-01

    Tastes in humans provide a vital tool for screening soluble chemicals for food evaluation, selection, and avoidance of potentially toxic substances. Taste or gustatory dysfunctions are implicated in loss of appetite, unintended weight loss, malnutrition, and reduced quality of life. Dental practitioners are often the first clinicians to be presented with complaints about taste dysfunction. This brief review provides a summary of the common causes of taste disorders, problems associated with assessing taste function in a clinical setting and management options available to the dental practitioner. PMID:25210380

  14. Encompassing Sexual Medicine within Psychiatry: Pros and Cons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segraves, Robert Taylor

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the positive and negative aspects of psychiatry encompassing sexual medicine within its purview. Methods: MEDLINE searches for the period between 1980 to the present were performed with the terms "psychiatry," "sexual medicine," and "sexual dysfunction." In addition, sexual medicine texts were reviewed for chapters…

  15. Erectile Dysfunction in the Elderly: An Old Widespread Issue with Novel Treatment Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    De Fazio, Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting men and its prevalence increases with aging. It is also the most frequently diagnosed sexual dysfunction in the older male population. A number of different diseases potentially worsening sexual function may occur in elderly people, together with polypharmacy. Related causes of ED are variable and can include arterial, neurogenic, hormonal, cavernosal, iatrogenic, and psychogenic causes. The aim of the present review was to examine the main aspects of erectile dysfunction going through epidemiology and pathophysiology and revise most of ED in elderly disabled men and in those affected with psychiatric disorders. Lastly we tried to focus on the main aspects of nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments of ED and the recreational use in the elderly. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5-I) are commonly used for on-demand or chronic treatment of ED. It is widely known that PDE5-I have lower response rates in older men than in younger patients, but they have the advantages of ease of use and excellent safety profile, also in the elderly. The old and new PDE5-I as well as the alternative treatments for ED are extensively discussed. PMID:24744785

  16. Sensory Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Web version Sensory Dysfunction Overview Why are smell and taste important? Your senses of smell and taste let you fully enjoy the scents ... bitter and sour. Flavor involves both taste and smell. For example, because a person is able to ...

  17. Sexual function and male cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life in general and sexual functioning in particular have become very important in cancer patients. Biological factors such as anatomic alterations, physiological changes and secondary effect of medical interventions may preclude normal sexual functioning even when sexual desire is intact. In spite of modern surgical techniques, improved chemotherapeutical drugs and sophisticated radiation techniques, still many patients complain of impaired sexual function after cancer treatment. A large number of instruments already exist to assess quality of life in cancer patients. It is important to standardize procedures and to use validated questionnaires. Collecting data on an ongoing basis before and long after treatment is mandatory, and control groups must be used. Patients should be offered sexual counselling and informed about the availability of therapies for sexual dysfunctions. In this paper we review the topic of sexual functioning after treatment (predominantly after radiotherapy) of the most common malignancies in men and give suggestions for treatment. PMID:26816727

  18. [Sexuality in overweight and obesity].

    PubMed

    Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    The association between obesity and sexual dysfunction has been described in many studies. Neurobiological, hormonal, vascular and mental disturbances are the main reasons in male and in female gender. Sexual interest and desire, sexual arousal, orgasm, painful intercourse and premature ejaculation can be involved. Data for prevalence of sexual function disturbances in obese people are scarce and most studies were small. For screening of sexual function we recommend the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-Score, which contains 15 Items for males and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), which contains 19 items for females. Treatment of sexual function disturbances include lifestyle changes with an increase of physical activity, weight control, healthy eating and smoking cessation. Testosterone substitution in cases of real hypogonadism and treatment with PDE-5 inhibitors are well documented treatment options in male individuals. New treatment options for female patients with variable effectiveness are fibanserin, testosterone, bupropione and oxytocin. PMID:26811242

  19. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility.

    PubMed

    Cho, Moon Kyoung

    2015-12-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  20. Thyroid dysfunction and subfertility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones act on nearly every cell in the body. Moreover, the thyroid gland continuously interacts with the ovaries, and the thyroid hormones are involved in almost all phases of reproduction. Thyroid dysfunctions are relatively common among women of reproductive age, and can affect fertility in various ways, resulting in anovulatory cycles, high prolactin levels, and sex hormone imbalances. Undiagnosed and untreated thyroid disease can be a cause of subfertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH), also known as mild thyroid failure, is diagnosed when peripheral thyroid hormone levels are within the normal reference laboratory range, but serum thyroid-stimulating hormone levels are mildly elevated. Thyroid autoimmunity (TAI) is characterized by the presence of anti-thyroid antibodies, which include anti-thyroperoxidase and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. SCH and TAI may remain latent, asymptomatic, or even undiagnosed for an extended period. It has also been demonstrated that controlled ovarian hyperstimulation has a significant impact on thyroid function, particularly in women with TAI. In the current review, we describe the interactions between thyroid dysfunctions and subfertility, as well as the proper work-up and management of thyroid dysfunctions in subfertile women. PMID:26816871

  1. The Challenge of Erectile Dysfunction Management in the Young Man.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Seth D

    2015-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in a young man is an important health problem that significantly impacts the patient's quality of life and can have a detrimental effect on his well-being and relationship with his partner. Erectile dysfunction or impotence is one of the few disorders that will bring a young man into the doctor's office. This review article focuses on the epidemiology, etiology, presentation, work-up, and treatment of young men (age ~20-40 years old) presenting with complaints of ED. It is important to identify the precise etiology of the ED before proceeding with further evaluation and treatment because the work-up can be invasive and costly. ED is estimated to affect 20 % of men above 40 years of age, with the incidence increasing with increasing age. Erectile dysfunction has traditionally been seen as an age-dependent problem; however, approximately 2 % of men are affected at 40 years of age but this may be a gross underestimation secondary to reporting bias. Because ED is traditionally seen in the aging male population, studies regarding ED tend to be more frequently carried out among middle-aged and elderly men rather than in young men. These studies underline how comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular or neurological pathologies, and medication use are strongly linked with ED. In addition, ED has been described to be associated with obesity or physical inactivity. This review article summarizes the important information that all sexual medicine providers should be familiar with when diagnosing, counseling, and treating young men with erectile dysfunction.

  2. Sexual Desire Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients’ sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the physiological changes of humans during sexual stimulation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition this article will review the current literature on the desire disorders focusing on prevalence, etiology, and treatment. PMID:19727285

  3. [Diagnosis and care of senile sexual problems].

    PubMed

    Harima, Katsuki

    2013-10-01

    By aging process, sexual behaviors of elderly people may change. Some changes are normal ones, but may be misunderstood as abnormal by prejudice and ignorance of the senile sexuality. As the sexual function of elderly people is influenced by many factors, evaluation of it should include physical, pharmacological, psychological, and partner relational aspects. By using drug, some sexual dysfunctions may be improved. But treatment should not be focused only on penile-vaginal intercourse. Kissing, touching and other alternative sexual behaviors may be useful for the improvement of the senile sexual problems.

  4. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pneumonia Diagnosed? Pneumonia can be hard to diagnose because it may ... than these other conditions. Your doctor will diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history, a physical exam, ...

  5. Female Sexual Victimization Among College Students: Assault Severity, Health Risk Behaviors, and Sexual Functioning.

    PubMed

    Turchik, Jessica A; Hassija, Christina M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between college women's sexual victimization experiences, health risk behaviors, and sexual functioning. A sample of 309 college women at a mid-sized Midwestern university completed measures assessing sexual victimization, sexual risk taking, substance use behaviors, sexual desire, sexual functioning, prior sexual experiences, and social desirability. Severity of sexual victimization was measured using a multi-item, behaviorally specific, gender-neutral measure, which was divided into four categories based on severity (none, sexual contact, sexual coercion, rape). Within the sample, 72.8% (n = 225) of women reported at least one experience of sexual victimization since age 16. Results from MANCOVAs and a multinomial logistic regression, controlling for social desirability and prior sexual experience, revealed that sexual victimization among female students was related to increased drug use, problematic drinking behaviors, sexual risk taking, sexual dysfunction, and dyadic sexual desire. In addition, findings indicated that women exposed to more severe forms of sexual victimization (i.e., rape) were most likely to report these risk-taking behaviors and sexual functioning issues. Implications for sexual assault risk reduction programming and treatment are discussed.

  6. [Management of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Crespo-Burillo, José A; Alarcia-Alejos, Raquel

    2015-04-16

    Autonomic dysfunction is a common manifestation in patients with in Parkinson's disease, which can sometimes precede motor impairment. It can be expressed as orthostatic and postprandial hypotension, supine hypertension, hypersalivation, constipation, delayed gastric emptying, dyshidrosis, bladder and sexual dysfunction. It impairs the quality of life of patients and complicates the management of motor symptoms. Evidence available to treat complications is low. Our aim is to review the pathophysiology and clinical features of autonomic dysfunction in Parkinson's disease and provide a practical approach to handling the available evidence.

  7. Nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ryota; Fujisawa, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Yoshino, Koji; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2016-06-01

    Nivolumab (ONO-4538) is an anti-programmed death-1 specific monoclonal antibody, which has become a standard treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma. Nivolumab induces autoimmune adverse events, defined as immune-related adverse events. Herein, we report a case of nivolumab-induced thyroid dysfunction in the clinical setting. Fourteen patients were treated with nivolumab at our institute, of which three developed thyroid dysfunction, an incidence higher than previously reported in the initial clinical trials. Interestingly, one patient achieved complete remission; suggesting that in some patients, the occurrence of immune-related adverse events, including thyroid dysfunction, might reflect the drug's antitumour efficacy. No patient died or discontinued nivolumab treatment owing to thyroid dysfunction. Although thyroid dysfunction first appeared to be asymptomatic, two of the three patients developed symptoms related to hypothyroidism soon after, requiring hormone replacement therapy. Another patient developed hyperthyroidism that was initially asymptomatic; the patient subsequently developed myalgia with fever >39.5°C after two additional courses of nivolumab. Treatment with nivolumab was therefore discontinued, and treatment with prednisolone was initiated. Symptoms resolved within a few days, and thyroid function normalized. Thyroid dysfunction is sometimes difficult to diagnose because its symptoms similar to those of many other diseases. In addition, thyroid-related immune-related adverse events may present with unique symptoms such as myalgia with high fever, abruptly worsening patients' quality of life. Consequently, thyroid dysfunction should be considered as a possible immune-related adverse event. Thus, it is important to test for thyroid dysfunction at baseline and before the administration of each nivolumab dose if possible. PMID:27012985

  8. Memory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Brandy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article highlights the dissociable human memory systems of episodic, semantic, and procedural memory in the context of neurologic illnesses known to adversely affect specific neuroanatomic structures relevant to each memory system. Recent Findings: Advances in functional neuroimaging and refinement of neuropsychological and bedside assessment tools continue to support a model of multiple memory systems that are distinct yet complementary and to support the potential for one system to be engaged as a compensatory strategy when a counterpart system fails. Summary: Episodic memory, the ability to recall personal episodes, is the subtype of memory most often perceived as dysfunctional by patients and informants. Medial temporal lobe structures, especially the hippocampal formation and associated cortical and subcortical structures, are most often associated with episodic memory loss. Episodic memory dysfunction may present acutely, as in concussion; transiently, as in transient global amnesia (TGA); subacutely, as in thiamine deficiency; or chronically, as in Alzheimer disease. Semantic memory refers to acquired knowledge about the world. Anterior and inferior temporal lobe structures are most often associated with semantic memory loss. The semantic variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA) is the paradigmatic disorder resulting in predominant semantic memory dysfunction. Working memory, associated with frontal lobe function, is the active maintenance of information in the mind that can be potentially manipulated to complete goal-directed tasks. Procedural memory, the ability to learn skills that become automatic, involves the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and supplementary motor cortex. Parkinson disease and related disorders result in procedural memory deficits. Most memory concerns warrant bedside cognitive or neuropsychological evaluation and neuroimaging to assess for specific neuropathologies and guide treatment. PMID:26039844

  9. Stress management and erectile dysfunction: a pilot comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kalaitzidou, I; Venetikou, M S; Konstadinidis, K; Artemiadis, A K; Chrousos, G; Darviri, C

    2014-08-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a complex disorder with various biopsychosocial implications leading the individual into a state of chronic stress that further worsens ED symptoms. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a 8-week stress management programme on erectile dysfunction (ED). A convenience sample of 31 newly diagnosed men with ED, aged between 20 and 55 years, was recruited during a period of 5 months to receive either tadalafil (12 patients) or tadalafil and the 8-week stress management programme. Both groups showed statistical significant improvement of both perceived stress and erectile function scores. Men practising stress management showed a statistical significant reduction in perceived stress score compared with men receiving tadalafil alone. No other statistical significant differences were noted between the two groups, although the stress management group showed a lower daily exposure to cortisol compared with the control group after 8 weeks. Finally, perceived stress and cortisol showed some interesting correlations with sexual function measurements. These findings provide important insight into the role of stress management, as part of the recommended biopsychosocial approach, in ED. Future studies should focus on randomised, controlled trials with larger samples and longer follow-up time.

  10. Personality and birth order in monozygotic twins adopted apart: a test of Sulloway's theory; Research Reviews: twin births and cancer risk in mothers, male sexual dysfunction, twin study of ultimatum game behavior; Human Interest: 'The Land of Twins', twin-like reunion-I, twin-like reunion-II.

    PubMed

    Segal, Nancy L

    2008-02-01

    A brief overview of Sulloway's (1996) theory of birth order and personality is presented. A reared apart twin approach for testing his personality findings regarding openness to experience and conscientiousness in first borns and later borns is described. This is followed by summaries of three recent twin studies. The topics include cancer risk in mother of twins, sexual dysfunction in males and responder behavior during ultimatum games. This article concludes with a discussion of twinning rates and rituals among the Yoruba of western Nigeria, and descriptions of two unusual reunions between siblings and twins.

  11. Symptoms of Autonomic Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Dominic; Nakamoto, Beau K.; Sullivan, Katherine; Sletten, David M.; Fujii, Satomi; Umekawa, Sari; Kocher, Morgan; Kallianpur, Kalpana J.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Low, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequencies of symptoms associated with autonomic dysfunction in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on stable combined antiretroviral therapy. Patients infected with HIV reported higher frequencies of dysautonomia symptoms compared with HIV-negative patients, particularly in the autonomic domains related to urinary, sleep, gastroparesis, secretomotor, pupillomotor, and male sexual dysfunction. PMID:26269797

  12. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Rovó, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  13. Developmental Risk Factors for Sexual Offending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joseph K. P.; Jackson, Henry J.; Pattison, Pip; Ward, Tony

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 64 Australian sex offenders and 33 non-sex offenders found childhood emotional abuse and family dysfunction, childhood behavior problems, and childhood sexual abuse were developmental risk factors for paraphilia. Emotional abuse and family dysfunction was found to be a risk factor for pedophilia, exhibitionism, rape, or multiple…

  14. Perspectives on Sexual Health and Function of Recent Male Combat Veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, Drew A; Beaulieu, Gregory; Powers, Catherine; Houlette, Cheryl; Latini, David; Kauth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background U.S. veterans of recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan may be at greater risk for sexual dysfunction due to injuries, mental health conditions, medications used to treat those conditions, and psychosocial factors. Objective To explore the perceptions of recent Veterans about sexual health and dysfunction, contributing factors, its impact and solutions. Design Qualitative study. Participants Eight men who screened positive for sexual dysfunction at initial presentation to a postdeployment clinic at a Veterans Affairs medical center Approach Patients who screened positive for sexual dysfunction and indicated an interest in participating were contacted and scheduled for an in-person private interview with a researcher. Interviews were semistructured, utilizing open-ended and follow-up probe questions to elicit the individual's perspective about sexual dysfunction and its cause, impact and solutions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed for themes. Key Results These heterosexual men discussed a range of sexual dysfunction in their activities including lack of desire, erectile dysfunction, delayed orgasm, premature ejaculation, and distraction. They also discussed the importance of setting or context and changes over time to their sexual health and function. The men shared their ideas about contributory factors, including normal aging, medication side effects, injury and a possible role for combat deployment more generally. Reported solutions for sexual dysfunction included medications, herbal remedies, and new positions and approaches to sexual activity. Participants reported discussing sexual dysfunction with their health-care providers and what was helpful. Finally, the men expressed in their own words the significant impact of sexual dysfunction on their self-perception, their partners, and their relationships. Conclusions Sexual dysfunction in recent combat veterans can have important negative effects on their health and relationships. Our

  15. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual assault is any sexual activity to which you haven't freely given your consent. This includes completed ... trust, a friend, an acquaintance, or a stranger. Sexual assault can affect your health in many ways. It ...

  16. Sexual Hypnotherapy for Couples and Family Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araoz, Daniel; Burte, Jan; Goldin, Eugene

    2001-01-01

    Presents the utilization of Ericksonian hypnotic techniques in conjunction with cognitive behavioral techniques collectively labeled the New Hypnosis, as they apply to the treatment of male and female sexual dysfunction within a counseling setting. Specific techniques to improve functioning throughout the five stages of sexual response are…

  17. Neurodevelopmental Biology Associated with Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bellis, Michael D.; Spratt, Eve G.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Child maltreatment appears to be the single most preventable cause of mental illness and behavioral dysfunction in the United States. Few published studies examine the developmental and the psychobiological consequences of sexual abuse. There are multiple mechanisms through which sexual abuse can cause post-traumatic stress disorder, activate…

  18. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Basic HIV/AIDS information and resources for prevention LGBT Health Information for lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individuals Sexual Health News & Information Understanding Sexual Health ...

  19. Sexualization and lifestyle impulsivity: clinically valid discriminators in sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Eher, Reinhard; Neuwirth, Wolfgang; Fruehwald, Stefan; Frottier, Patrick

    2003-08-01

    Following clinical observations in this study a comparison was undertaken between nonsexualized rapists, sexualized rapists, and pedophilic child molesters in terms of psychometric measures, criminological data, and DSM-IV diagnoses following the authors' hypotheses that nonsexualized and sexualized rapists differ in respect of psychiatric comorbidity and criminal history and sexualized rapists and pedophilic child molesters are more similar as regards to psychiatric comorbidity (anxiety, depression, and aggression) and criminal history variables than nonsexualized and sexualized rapists are. Preliminary findings confirmed the hypotheses: the authors found significant differences between paraphilic and sexualized sex offenders on one hand--regardless whether they had offended against minors or adults--and a group of sex offenders exhibiting a history of high lifestyle impulsivity on the other hand. From a psychiatric clinical point of view, paraphilic or sexualized rapists could be shown to resemble more the pedophilic child molesters. Therapeutic approaches should take these findings into account. PMID:12971185

  20. Diagnosing Tic Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Websites Information For... Media Policy Makers Diagnosing Tic Disorders Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... or postviral encephalitis). Persistent (Chronic) Motor or Vocal Tic Disorder For a person to be diagnosed with ...

  1. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose sarcoidosis based on ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  2. The impact of non-urologic drugs on sexual function in men.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Ferdinando; Franco, Marco; Longo, Nicola; Palmieri, Alessandro; Mirone, Vincenzo

    2014-03-01

    Sexual dysfunctions have commonly been reported as the resulting side effects of many drugs. To understand the impact of a single drug, the mechanism of action of the most commonly prescribed drugs and the physiological mechanisms of sexual function have to be taken into dual consideration. Psychotropic drugs (Antidepressants, Antipsychotics and Antiepileptic) in particular result in both short and long-term effects on sexual function. Antihypertensive drugs have also produced evidence certifying their role in determining sexual dysfunction. Patients affected with sexual dysfunction are often aged and assume several drugs and, while Iatrogenic sexual dysfunction is prevalent in men, urological drugs are not the only drugs to be held accountable. Many different drugs acting on different sites and with several mechanisms of action can induce sexual dysfunction. The drug classes involved are widely diffused and frequently assumed in combination therapies. PMID:24704935

  3. [Ineffective sexuality pattern in an adolescent: nursing approach in primary health care].

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Angel; Oter-Quintana, Cristina; Brito-Brito, Pedro Ruymán; Martín-Iglesias, Susana; Alcolea-Cosín, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent is a phase of continual physiological, psychological and social adaptation. It is during this time that young people tend to have their first sexual experiences. Sexual dysfunctions are characterized by important clinical changes in sexual desire and/or by psycho-physiological changes in the sexual response cycle. Premature ejaculation is one of the most frequent sexual dysfunction amongst men, with a higher prevalence in the younger population compared to other populations. The clinical case is presented of a 17 year-old male who experienced difficulties during his sexual relations. It is discussed whether his condition was a sexual dysfunction or ineffective sexual pattern. The care plan which was developed in nursing consultation was described for ineffective sexual pattern; the pending nursing treatment incorporated activities recommended by scientific evidence. Finally, the role of primary health care nursing professionals is pointed out in the detection and approach of sexual problems in adolescents.

  4. [Eating disorders and sexual function].

    PubMed

    Kravvariti, V; Gonidakis, Fr

    2016-01-01

    groups of patients report more often than general population a lack of satisfaction from their sexual experiences. Other factors that are common to eating disorders and sexual dysfunction are personality traits, negative body-image, adverse childhood experiences, negative family climate and especially early traumatic experiences such as sexual abuse. Furthermore, comorbidity of eating disorders with depression may have a negative impact on the patient's sexual function. The treatment and improvement of sexual behavior is quite problematic when the patient is also suffering from an eating disorder. Eating Disorder patients are often very reluctant to discuss their sexual life with the therapist and to engage in any kind of therapeutic intervention. Comorbidity with a number of other disorders makes psychotherapy even more difficult for those patients. Furthermore, a considerable percentage of Anorexia Nervosa patients do not have any kind of sexual activity, at least until nutrition and weight are restored. PMID:27467034

  5. [Eating disorders and sexual function].

    PubMed

    Kravvariti, V; Gonidakis, Fr

    2016-01-01

    groups of patients report more often than general population a lack of satisfaction from their sexual experiences. Other factors that are common to eating disorders and sexual dysfunction are personality traits, negative body-image, adverse childhood experiences, negative family climate and especially early traumatic experiences such as sexual abuse. Furthermore, comorbidity of eating disorders with depression may have a negative impact on the patient's sexual function. The treatment and improvement of sexual behavior is quite problematic when the patient is also suffering from an eating disorder. Eating Disorder patients are often very reluctant to discuss their sexual life with the therapist and to engage in any kind of therapeutic intervention. Comorbidity with a number of other disorders makes psychotherapy even more difficult for those patients. Furthermore, a considerable percentage of Anorexia Nervosa patients do not have any kind of sexual activity, at least until nutrition and weight are restored.

  6. High-risk sexual offenders: an examination of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, psychopathy, and offence characteristics.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Michael; Freimuth, Tabatha; Hutton, Erin L; Carpenter, Tara; Agar, Ava D; Logan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    High-risk sexual offenders are a complex and heterogeneous group of offenders about whom researchers, clinicians, and law enforcement agencies still know relatively little. In response to the paucity of information that is specifically applicable to high-risk offenders, the present study investigated the potential influence of sexual fantasy, sexual paraphilia, and psychopathy on the offending behaviour of 139 of the highest risk sexual offenders in one province of Canada. The sample included 41 child molesters, 42 rapists, 18 rapist/molesters, 30 mixed offenders, and 6 "other" sexual offenders. Two offenders could not be categorized by type due to insufficient file information. Data analyses revealed significant differences between offender types for a number of criminal history variables including past sexual and nonsexual convictions, number of victims, weapon use, and age of offending onset. Further, there were significant differences between offender types for sexual fantasy themes, paraphilia diagnoses, and levels of psychopathy. For example, results revealed that offenders' sexual fantasies were significantly more likely to correspond with the specific type of index sexual offence that they had committed. Further, offenders scoring high in psychopathy were significantly more likely to have a sadistic paraphilia than offenders with either low or moderate psychopathy scores. Results from the current study provide a refined and informed understanding of sexual offending behaviour with important implications for future research, assessment, and treatment, as well as law enforcement practices when working with high-risk sexual offenders.

  7. Breast cancer and sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Boswell, Erica N.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common malignancy affecting women within the United States, breast cancer can bring about multiple physical and psychological challenges. Among the greatest challenges are those associated with female sexual function. Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, surgeries and radiation can all have a large effect in altering a woman’s sexual health and function. Sexual concerns result in significant emotional distress, including sadness/depression, issues related to personal appearance, stigma, and negative impacts on personal relationships. In this article, we discuss some of the specific challenges that present with each type of treatment and the socio-physical impact they have on survivorship. Among the most detrimental to sexual function, are the use of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Additionally, anatomical changes that transpire in patients who have undergone surgery or radiation therapy (RT), disrupt perceptions of body image. Here we will discuss and also review the contemporary literature to determine effective management and treatment of sexual dysfunction. PMID:26816822

  8. Breast cancer and sexual function.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Erica N; Dizon, Don S

    2015-04-01

    As the most common malignancy affecting women within the United States, breast cancer can bring about multiple physical and psychological challenges. Among the greatest challenges are those associated with female sexual function. Chemotherapy, endocrine therapy, surgeries and radiation can all have a large effect in altering a woman's sexual health and function. Sexual concerns result in significant emotional distress, including sadness/depression, issues related to personal appearance, stigma, and negative impacts on personal relationships. In this article, we discuss some of the specific challenges that present with each type of treatment and the socio-physical impact they have on survivorship. Among the most detrimental to sexual function, are the use of chemotherapy and endocrine therapy. Additionally, anatomical changes that transpire in patients who have undergone surgery or radiation therapy (RT), disrupt perceptions of body image. Here we will discuss and also review the contemporary literature to determine effective management and treatment of sexual dysfunction. PMID:26816822

  9. Neuropsychologists diagnose traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wade, James B; DeMatteo, David; Hart, Robert P

    2004-07-01

    The case of John versus Im (2002) stands for the proposition that clinical neuropsychologists are not qualified to diagnose traumatic brain injury. This ruling by the Supreme Court of Virginia prohibits neuropsychologists from testifying about these professional conclusions in the courtroom. However, in clinical practice neuropsychologists are often asked to disentangle the relative contribution of brain dysfunction and psychological factors to presenting symptomology. In the proposed submission, the authors provide an analysis of the neuropsychological testimony at issue in John versus Im using the admissibility standards for expert testimony that were established and refined by a trilogy of cases from the Supreme Court of the United States. The paper provides support for the notion that neuropsychological method has an established scientific base of knowledge, standards for clinical competence, and evidence of peer-reviewed acceptance by medical related disciplines. No other scientific discipline has employed a more rigorous methodology for assessing cognitive function and disentangling the relative contributions of brain dysfunction and psychological factors to presenting symptomology. By limiting the testimony of neuropsychologists as to cause of an individual's cognitive impairment, courts will exclude opinions based on scientific research and specialized knowledge that would assist in the trier of fact.

  10. How can heart failure patients and their partners be counseled on sexual activity?

    PubMed

    Steinke, Elaine E

    2013-09-01

    Sexual intimacy is part of a healthy relationship and is often reflected in overall quality of life and satisfaction. There are many psychological, physical, and medical components that influence sexual activity in heart failure (HF), and patients and partners alike often have sexual concerns and misconceptions. This article addresses what is known about sexual concerns and sexual dysfunction from a variety of perspectives, and provides guidance for health care providers on the essential elements of sexual counseling for those with HF. PMID:23666900

  11. Sinus node dysfunction: recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rusk, Karla; Scordo, Kristine

    2012-12-10

    Sinus node dysfunction (SND) refers to a wide range of abnormalities involving sinus node and atrial impulse generation and propagation. SND occurs at any age and is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Clinicians must be able to accurately diagnose this syndrome, which can present from asymptomatic bradycardia to atrial standstill.

  12. Prevalence of Erectile Dysfunction and Associated Factors in Korean Older Adults With Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Son, Youn-Jung; Jang, Miyoun; Jun, Eun-Young

    2016-10-01

    The current study aimed to identify the prevalence and associated factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) among 161 Korean adults 60 and older with coronary artery disease (CAD). ED was diagnosed in 72.2% of patients-the prevalence of which was significantly associated with age, education, employment, monthly income, frequency of sexual intercourse, body mass index, and low-density lipoprotein. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was lower in patients with ED than in those without ED (p < 0.001). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that ED significantly influenced HRQoL in patients with CAD after adjusting for sociodemographic and disease-related characteristic variables (p < 0.001). Interventions and training courses for health care providers should focus on improving caregivers' knowledge and communication skills with patients and spouses regarding sexual health. Furthermore, guidelines to improve HRQoL in patients with CAD should consider incorporating sexual counseling. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(10), 32-41.]. PMID:27379456

  13. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing’s disease) in a Thoroughbred stallion: a single report

    PubMed Central

    HATAZOE, Takashi; KAWAGUCHI, Hiroaki; HOBO, Seiji; MISUMI, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) generally occurs in older horses showing hirsutism, delayed molting, weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria, laminitis, and reproductive disorders (in broodmares), but there have been no reports on stallions. This report presents a case of a 21-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that developed hirsutism and experienced delayed molting. There were no abnormal findings for semen quality or the stallion’s sexual desire. The horse was diagnosed with PPID based on dexamethasone suppression test and plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone. It was then medicated with pergolide mesylate. Since the horse died due to humerus fracture, an autopsy was conducted, and pituitary adenoma was confirmed. No pathological findings were defined in the testicles; therefore, reproductive activity might not have been impaired. PMID:26858577

  14. Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (equine Cushing's disease) in a Thoroughbred stallion: a single report.

    PubMed

    Hatazoe, Takashi; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Hobo, Seiji; Misumi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Equine pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) generally occurs in older horses showing hirsutism, delayed molting, weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria, laminitis, and reproductive disorders (in broodmares), but there have been no reports on stallions. This report presents a case of a 21-year-old Thoroughbred stallion that developed hirsutism and experienced delayed molting. There were no abnormal findings for semen quality or the stallion's sexual desire. The horse was diagnosed with PPID based on dexamethasone suppression test and plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone. It was then medicated with pergolide mesylate. Since the horse died due to humerus fracture, an autopsy was conducted, and pituitary adenoma was confirmed. No pathological findings were defined in the testicles; therefore, reproductive activity might not have been impaired. PMID:26858577

  15. [Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Führer, D; Mann, K; Feldkamp, J; Krude, H; Spitzweg, C; Kratzsch, J; Schott, M

    2014-10-01

    Thyroid dysfunction may impair fertility, course of pregnancy and fetal development. Physiological alterations of thyroid function parameters, that occur during pregnancy need to be distinguished from pathophysiological states of hypo- and hyperthyroidism. We performed a literature search (PubMed 1990-2013) and review relevant publications as well as consensus and practice guidelines of international thyroid/endocrine societies. Interpretation of thyroid function values in pregnancy must be based on trimester-specific TSH and T4 ranges. Alterations in thyroid function are present in up to 15% of pregnancies (0.4% overt hypothyroidism, 0.1-0.4% hyperthyroidism) and may lead to preventable complications in the pregnant woman and the fetus. Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk for abortion, premature delivery and stillbirth, besides impairment of neurocognitive development. The latter has also been shown in situations of grave iodine deficiency. In addition to new-born screening directed at early recognition of congenital hypothyroidism (incidence 0.03%), universal screening of all pregnant women should be implemented in health care guidelines. Newly diagnosed overt hypothyroidism in a pregnant woman requires immediate levothyroxine substitution at adequate doses. In subclinical hypothyroidism thyroid hormone replacement should be considered. Iodine supplementation is strongly recommended in all pregnant and breast-feeding women. Pregnancy causes a number of, that need to be of thyroid dysfunction. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis may impair the course of pregnancy and may negatively affect the fetus. In particular, maternal hypothyroidism may lead to irreparable and detrimental deficits in the neurocognitive development of the fetus. Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common cause of thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with impaired fertility and miscarriage, and may first manifest in pregnancy due to the

  16. [Biopsychosocial understanding of human sexuality. Prerequisite for diagnostics and treatment in sexual medicine].

    PubMed

    Beier, K M

    2006-08-01

    Sexual medicine is a subdiscipline of clinical medicine that deals with human sexuality and disorders. Sexuality eludes a unilateral definition. As a biologically, psychologically, and socially determined experience dimension of the human being, its individual form depends on biological factors and developments in the person's life. Moreover, sexuality exhibits different dimensions--lust, reproduction, and relationship--that are indeed closely interrelated. For this reason, directing therapy at only one of these dimensions is not adequate. All human beings are programmed toward fulfillment of elementary biopsychosocial needs such as acceptance, closeness, warmth, and security. If these basic needs are shortchanged in terms of fulfillment, all sorts of restrictions in the quality of life ensue, even to the point of resultant disorders of sexual function. Treatment then approaches the roots when it does not center on the sexual dysfunction but rather on the underlying frustrated relationship of the partners. Syndyastic sexual therapy is an important treatment method in sexual medicine.

  17. Queer diagnoses revisited: The past and future of homosexuality and gender diagnoses in DSM and ICD.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) recently completed a several year process of revising the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). During that time, there were objections raised to retaining DSM's gender identity disorder diagnoses and calls to remove them, just as homosexuality had been removed from DSM-II in 1973. At the conclusion of the DSM-5 revision process, the gender diagnoses were retained, albeit in altered form and bearing the new name of 'gender dysphoria'. The author of this paper was a member of the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and presently serves on the WHO Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. Both groups faced similar tasks: reconciling patients' needs for access to care with the stigma of being given a psychiatric diagnosis. The differing nature of the two diagnostic manuals led to two different outcomes. As background, this paper updates the history of homosexuality and the gender diagnoses in the DSM and in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) as well as what is expected to happen to the homosexuality and gender diagnoses following the current ICD-11 revision process.

  18. Queer diagnoses revisited: The past and future of homosexuality and gender diagnoses in DSM and ICD.

    PubMed

    Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) recently completed a several year process of revising the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). During that time, there were objections raised to retaining DSM's gender identity disorder diagnoses and calls to remove them, just as homosexuality had been removed from DSM-II in 1973. At the conclusion of the DSM-5 revision process, the gender diagnoses were retained, albeit in altered form and bearing the new name of 'gender dysphoria'. The author of this paper was a member of the DSM-5 Workgroup on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders and presently serves on the WHO Working Group on Sexual Disorders and Sexual Health. Both groups faced similar tasks: reconciling patients' needs for access to care with the stigma of being given a psychiatric diagnosis. The differing nature of the two diagnostic manuals led to two different outcomes. As background, this paper updates the history of homosexuality and the gender diagnoses in the DSM and in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) as well as what is expected to happen to the homosexuality and gender diagnoses following the current ICD-11 revision process. PMID:26242413

  19. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder: inventing a disease to sell low libido.

    PubMed

    Meixel, Antonie; Yanchar, Elena; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2015-10-01

    Condition branding is a marketing technique in which companies develop conditions concurrently with developing drugs; examples include gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, social anxiety disorder, erectile dysfunction and hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Although it is illegal for pharmaceutical companies to market drugs prior to regulatory approval, there are no restrictions on marketing diseases, and industry seeks to establish a disease state in the minds of clinicians years before an expected drug launch. Continuing medical education (CME) courses are an important part of promotion prior to drug approval and have become a key marketing tool for increasing clinician receptivity to new products. We systematically identified 14 free, internet-based, industry-funded, accredited CME modules on hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women which came out before a new drug, flibanserin, was being considered for regulatory approval in the USA. Common themes in these modules included the following: (1) Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is common, underdiagnosed and can have a profound effect on quality of life. (2) Women may not be aware that they are sick or distressed. (3) Simple questionnaires can assist clinicians in diagnosing the disorder. (4) It is problematic that there are medicines available to treat sexual problems for men but not women. In fact, there is no scientifically established norm for sexual activity, feelings or desire, and there is no evidence that hypoactive sexual desire disorder is a medical condition. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder is a typical example of a condition that was sponsored by industry to prepare the market for a specific treatment. PMID:26124287

  20. The ICD diagnoses of fetishism and sadomasochism.

    PubMed

    Reiersøl, Odd; Skeid, Svein

    2006-01-01

    In this article we discuss psychiatric diagnoses of sexual deviation as they appear in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), the internationally accepted classification and diagnostic system of the World Health Organization (WHO). Namely, we discuss the background of three diagnostic categories: Fetishism (F65.0), Fetishistic Transvestism (F65.1), and Sadomasochism (F65.5). Pertinent background issues regarding the above categories are followed by a critique of the usefulness of diagnosing these phenomena today. Specifically, we argue that Fetishism, Fetishistic Transvestism, and Sadomasochism, also labeled Paraphilia or perversion, should not be considered illnesses. Finally, we present the efforts of an initiative known as ReviseF65, which was established in 1997, to abolish these diagnoses. PMID:16803767

  1. [Relationship between lower urinary tract symptoms in men and erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Pérez Feito, D

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction (ED) is the result of their greater association in advanced age. Nevertheless, several investigations show that urinary tract symptoms have an independent relationship with sexual dysfunction and lower satisfaction. Likewise, the severity of LUTS correlates with the magnitude of sexual dysfunction, which suggests a possible causal relationship. The combined therapeutic approach of these 2 entities (ED and LUTS) brings a benefit to the patient both in urinary symptoms and sexual sphere. This review focuses on the relationship between ED, LUTS due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, and related therapies. PMID:26452608

  2. Sexual self schema as a moderator of sexual and psychological outcomes for gynecologic cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Kristen M; Andersen, Barbara L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Maxwell, G Larry

    2009-10-01

    Gynecologic cancer patients are at high risk for emotional distress and sexual dysfunction. The present study tested sexual self schema as an individual difference variable that might be useful in identifying those at risk for unfavorable outcomes. First, we tested schema as a predictor of sexual outcomes, including body change stress. Second, we examined schema as a contributor to broader quality of life outcomes, specifically as a moderator of the relationship between sexual satisfaction and psychological statue (depressive symptoms and quality of life). A cross-sectional design was used. Gynecologic cancer survivors (N = 175) 2-10 years post treatment were assessed during routine follow up. In regression analyses controlling for sociodemographic variables, patients' physical symptoms/signs as evaluated by nurses, health status, and extent of partner sexual difficulties, sexual self schema accounted for significant variance in the prediction of current sexual behavior, responsiveness, and satisfaction. Moreover, schema moderated the relationship between sexual satisfaction and psychological outcomes, suggesting that a positive sexual self schema might "buffer" patients from depressive symptoms when their sexual satisfaction is low. Furthermore, the combination of a negative sexual self schema and low sexual satisfaction might heighten survivors' risk for psychological distress, including depressive symptomatology. These data support the consideration of sexual self schema as a predictor of sexual morbidity among gynecologic cancer survivors.

  3. Auditory Dysfunction in Patients with Cerebrovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Auditory dysfunction is a common clinical symptom that can induce profound effects on the quality of life of those affected. Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is the most prevalent neurological disorder today, but it has generally been considered a rare cause of auditory dysfunction. However, a substantial proportion of patients with stroke might have auditory dysfunction that has been underestimated due to difficulties with evaluation. The present study reviews relationships between auditory dysfunction and types of CVD including cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cerebrovascular malformation, moyamoya disease, and superficial siderosis. Recent advances in the etiology, anatomy, and strategies to diagnose and treat these conditions are described. The numbers of patients with CVD accompanied by auditory dysfunction will increase as the population ages. Cerebrovascular diseases often include the auditory system, resulting in various types of auditory dysfunctions, such as unilateral or bilateral deafness, cortical deafness, pure word deafness, auditory agnosia, and auditory hallucinations, some of which are subtle and can only be detected by precise psychoacoustic and electrophysiological testing. The contribution of CVD to auditory dysfunction needs to be understood because CVD can be fatal if overlooked. PMID:25401133

  4. Sexual Assault

    MedlinePlus

    ... to anyone of any age, race or ethnicity, religion, ability, appearance, sexual orientation, or gender identity. However, ... to anyone of any age, race or ethnicity, religion, ability, appearance, sexual orientation, or gender identity. However, ...

  5. A comprehensive review of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kamenov, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is more common in men with diabetes (DM). Dependent on the selected population, age, DM type and duration, the prevalence of diabetic ED (DED) varies from 32 to 90%. In 12-30% of men ED is the first sign of diabetes, diagnosed later. Today men with diabetes live longer than ever, and develop more late diabetic complications. Having in mind also the global ageing of the world population all this data suggests an increasing number of men with DED in the future. The main factors playing in the complex pathogenesis of DED are diabetic neuropathy (oxidative stress, polyol pathway, advanced glycation end-products, nerve growth factor deficiency, dysfunction of protein kinase C, tissue remodeling, etc.), macrovascular arterial disease (endothelial dysfunction, abnormal collagen deposition and smooth muscle degeneration, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension, veno-occlusive dysfunction, etc.), hypogonadism, structural remodeling of the corporeal tissue, psychogenic components and adverse drug reactions. The diagnostic process is based on the results of questionnaires, neurological, vascular (Doppler) and other more rarely used investigations.Because of the complex pathogenesis of DED diabetic men represent a "difficult" treatment group. The difficulties are from the "beginning", because patients do not talk about their problem spontaneously, and doctors do not ask about it. The treatment of DED should be team work, preferably including also specialists in sexual medicine. Psychological support and counseling of the couple is necessary in most cases. The general measures include implementation of a healthier lifestyle, improved glycemic-, lipids-, and arterial pressure control, and careful re-evaluation of the concomitant medications. The specific treatment includes as first line therapy the inhibitors of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) with lesser effectiveness compared to non-DM men. There are rare studies with selected diabetic populations and

  6. Characteristics of Sexual Abuse in Childhood and Adolescence Influence Sexual Risk Behavior in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Senn, Theresa E.; Vanable, Peter A.; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Urban, Marguerite

    2006-01-01

    Childhood and adolescent sexual abuse has been associated with subsequent (adult) sexual risk behavior, but the effects of force and type of sexual abuse on sexual behavior outcomes have been less well-studied. The present study investigated the associations between sexual abuse characteristics and later sexual risk behavior, and explored whether gender of the child/adolescent moderated these relations. Patients attending an STD clinic completed a computerized survey that assessed history of sexual abuse as well as lifetime and current sexual behavior. Participants were considered sexually abused if they reported a sexual experience (1) before age 13 with someone 5 or more years older, (2) between the ages of 13 and 16 with someone 10 or more years older, or (3) before the age of 17 involving force or coercion. Participants who were sexually abused were further categorized based on two abuse characteristics, namely, use of penetration and force. Analyses included 1177 participants (n=534 women; n=643 men). Those who reported sexual abuse involving penetration and/or force reported more adult sexual risk behavior, including the number of lifetime partners and number of previous STD diagnoses, than those who were not sexually abused and those who were abused without force or penetration. There were no significant differences in sexual risk behavior between nonabused participants and those who reported sexual abuse without force and without penetration. Gender of the child/adolescent moderated the association between sexual abuse characteristics and adult sexual risk behavior; for men, sexual abuse with force and penetration was associated with the greatest number of episodes of sex trading, whereas for women, those who were abused with penetration, regardless of whether the abuse involved force, reported the most episodes of sex trading. These findings indicate that more severe sexual abuse is associated with riskier adult sexual behavior. PMID:17192833

  7. Sexual desire, not hypersexuality, is related to neurophysiological responses elicited by sexual images

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Vaughn R.; Staley, Cameron; Fong, Timothy; Prause, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Background Modulation of sexual desires is, in some cases, necessary to avoid inappropriate or illegal sexual behavior (downregulation of sexual desire) or to engage with a romantic partner (upregulation of sexual desire). Some have suggested that those who have difficulty downregulating their sexual desires be diagnosed as having a sexual ‘addiction’. This diagnosis is thought to be associated with sexual urges that feel out of control, high-frequency sexual behavior, consequences due to those behaviors, and poor ability to reduce those behaviors. However, such symptoms also may be better understood as a non-pathological variation of high sexual desire. Hypersexuals are thought to be relatively sexual reward sensitized, but also to have high exposure to visual sexual stimuli. Thus, the direction of neural responsivity to sexual stimuli expected was unclear. If these individuals exhibit habituation, their P300 amplitude to sexual stimuli should be diminished; if they merely have high sexual desire, their P300 amplitude to sexual stimuli should be increased. Neural responsivity to sexual stimuli in a sample of hypersexuals could differentiate these two competing explanations of symptoms. Methods Fifty-two (13 female) individuals who self-identified as having problems regulating their viewing of visual sexual stimuli viewed emotional (pleasant sexual, pleasant-non-sexual, neutral, and unpleasant) photographs while electroencephalography was collected. Results Larger P300 amplitude differences to pleasant sexual stimuli, relative to neutral stimuli, was negatively related to measures of sexual desire, but not related to measures of hypersexuality. Conclusion Implications for understanding hypersexuality as high desire, rather than disordered, are discussed. PMID:24693355

  8. [Meibomian gland dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Finis, D; Schrader, S; Geerling, G

    2012-05-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a chronic disease, usually caused by obstruction of the secretory Meibomian glands. The subsequent reduction of gland secretion results in a decreased amount of lipids in the tear film. This results in a faster evaporation of the tear film and thus an evaporative dry eye. MGD alone is responsible for about 60% of all cases in combination with aqueous deficiency for a further 20% of dry eyes. While in Europe up to 20% of the population are suffering from MDD, this is true in Asia for over 60% of the population. MGD is more common in women and it incidence increases with age. It is influenced by the hormonal status as well as chemical and mechanical noxious stimuli. Additional risk factors include various skin diseases such as rosacea, acne or atopy. To diagnose MGD, particular attention should be paid to changes in the lid margin such as plugging or pouting of the ducts, thickening and telangiectasia. However, most important is the diagnostic expression of the glands. At first it should be assessed whether secretion can be caused by pressure to the eyelid against the globe and secondly the quality of the expressed secretions should be evaluated. MGD should be treated according to the severity of the disease. While in mild stages instructions for lid margin hygiene, warming and massage in combination with artificial tears might be sufficient, in more severe stages oral tetracyclin derivatives and anti-inflammatory eye drops such as steroids or CSA are necessary for successful treatment.

  9. Time Out from Sex or Romance: Sexually Experienced Adolescents' Decisions to Purposefully Avoid Sexual Activity or Romantic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Byers, E Sandra; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Brotto, Lori A

    2016-05-01

    Researchers have given significant attention to abstinence among adolescents, but far less is known about purposeful avoidance of sexual activity (and relationship involvement). Typically, it is assumed that, once adolescents have initiated sexual activity, they will thereafter engage in sexual activity if given the opportunity. However, it is unclear whether that is true as some research indicates that many adolescents engage in sexual activity intermittently. Sexually experienced adolescents may purposefully avoid engaging in sexual activity for a period of time and, if so, this has implications for understanding their sexual decision-making. We used a mixed methods approach to investigate sexually experienced adolescents' decisions to purposefully avoid further sexual activity and/or romantic relationships with a focus on how common these decisions are and factors influencing them. Participants were 411 (56 % female) adolescents (16-21 years old) who completed an on-line survey that assessed reasons for each type of avoidance, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs. Overall, 27 % of participants had engaged in sexual avoidance and 47 % had engaged in romantic avoidance. Significantly more female than male adolescents reported sexual and romantic avoidance. Adolescents' reasons for sexual avoidance included: lack of sexual pleasure or enjoyment, relationship reasons, negative emotions, values, fear of negative outcomes, negative physical experience, and other priorities. Reasons for romantic avoidance included: effects of previous relationship, not interested in commitment, wrong time, other priorities, negative emotions, no one was good enough, and sexual concerns. Logistical regressions were used to assess associations between age, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, experience of sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs and having engaged in romantic and/or sexual avoidance. The

  10. Time Out from Sex or Romance: Sexually Experienced Adolescents' Decisions to Purposefully Avoid Sexual Activity or Romantic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Byers, E Sandra; O'Sullivan, Lucia F; Brotto, Lori A

    2016-05-01

    Researchers have given significant attention to abstinence among adolescents, but far less is known about purposeful avoidance of sexual activity (and relationship involvement). Typically, it is assumed that, once adolescents have initiated sexual activity, they will thereafter engage in sexual activity if given the opportunity. However, it is unclear whether that is true as some research indicates that many adolescents engage in sexual activity intermittently. Sexually experienced adolescents may purposefully avoid engaging in sexual activity for a period of time and, if so, this has implications for understanding their sexual decision-making. We used a mixed methods approach to investigate sexually experienced adolescents' decisions to purposefully avoid further sexual activity and/or romantic relationships with a focus on how common these decisions are and factors influencing them. Participants were 411 (56 % female) adolescents (16-21 years old) who completed an on-line survey that assessed reasons for each type of avoidance, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs. Overall, 27 % of participants had engaged in sexual avoidance and 47 % had engaged in romantic avoidance. Significantly more female than male adolescents reported sexual and romantic avoidance. Adolescents' reasons for sexual avoidance included: lack of sexual pleasure or enjoyment, relationship reasons, negative emotions, values, fear of negative outcomes, negative physical experience, and other priorities. Reasons for romantic avoidance included: effects of previous relationship, not interested in commitment, wrong time, other priorities, negative emotions, no one was good enough, and sexual concerns. Logistical regressions were used to assess associations between age, religiosity, sexual esteem, sexual distress, experience of sexual coercion, and dysfunctional sexual beliefs and having engaged in romantic and/or sexual avoidance. The

  11. Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Perceived Source of Infection Among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) and Transgender Women (TW) Recently Diagnosed with HIV and/or STI in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Blair, Cheríe S; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R; Clark, Jesse L

    2016-10-01

    Risk perception and health behaviors result from individual-level factors influenced by specific partnership contexts. We explored individual- and partner-level factors associated with partner-specific perceptions of HIV/STI risk among 372 HIV/STI-positive MSM and transgender women (TW) in Lima, Peru. Generalized estimating equations explored participants' perception of their three most recent partner(s) as a likely source of their HIV/STI diagnosis. Homosexual/gay (PR = 2.07; 95 % CI 1.19-3.61) or transgender (PR = 2.84; 95 % CI 1.48-5.44) partners were more likely to be considered a source of infection than heterosexual partners. Compared to heterosexual respondents, gay and TW respondents were less likely to associate their partner with HIV/STI infection, suggesting a cultural link between gay or TW identity and perceived HIV/STI risk. Our findings demonstrate a need for health promotion messages tailored to high-risk MSM partnerships addressing how perceived HIV/STI risk aligns or conflicts with actual transmission risks in sexual partnerships and networks. PMID:26767533

  12. Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Perceived Source of Infection Among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) and Transgender Women (TW) Recently Diagnosed with HIV and/or STI in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Blair, Cheríe S; Segura, Eddy R; Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R; Clark, Jesse L

    2016-10-01

    Risk perception and health behaviors result from individual-level factors influenced by specific partnership contexts. We explored individual- and partner-level factors associated with partner-specific perceptions of HIV/STI risk among 372 HIV/STI-positive MSM and transgender women (TW) in Lima, Peru. Generalized estimating equations explored participants' perception of their three most recent partner(s) as a likely source of their HIV/STI diagnosis. Homosexual/gay (PR = 2.07; 95 % CI 1.19-3.61) or transgender (PR = 2.84; 95 % CI 1.48-5.44) partners were more likely to be considered a source of infection than heterosexual partners. Compared to heterosexual respondents, gay and TW respondents were less likely to associate their partner with HIV/STI infection, suggesting a cultural link between gay or TW identity and perceived HIV/STI risk. Our findings demonstrate a need for health promotion messages tailored to high-risk MSM partnerships addressing how perceived HIV/STI risk aligns or conflicts with actual transmission risks in sexual partnerships and networks.

  13. Uric Acid Level and Erectile Dysfunction In Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Yalcin; Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Aribas, Alpay; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Turk, Suleyman; Perez-Pozo, Santos E.; Covic, Adrian; McFann, Kim; Johnson, Richard J.; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a frequent complaint of elderly subjects, and is closely associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. Uric acid is also associated with endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease, raising the hypothesis that an increased serum uric acid might predict erectile dysfunction in patients who are at risk for coronary artery disease. Aim To evaluate the association of serum uric acid levels with presence and severity of ED in patients presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 312 adult male patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent exercise stress test (EST) for workup of chest pain and completed a sexual health inventory for men (SHIM) survey form to determine the presence and severity of ED. Routine serum biochemistry (and uric acid levels) were measured. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for ED. Main Outcome Measures The short version of the international index of erectile function (IIEF-5) questionnaire diagnosed ED (cutoff score ≤21). Serum Uric acid levels were determined. Patients with chest pain of suspected cardiac origin underwent an exercise stress test. Results 149 of 312 (47.7%) male subjects had ED by survey criteria. Patients with ED were older and had more frequent CAD, hypertension, diabetes, and impaired renal function, and also had significantly higher levels of uric acid, fibrinogen, glucose, CRP, triglycerides compared with patients without ED. Uric acid levels were associated with ED by univariate analysis (OR = 1.36, p = 0.002); however, this association was not observed in multivariate analysis adjusted for eGFR. Conclusion Subjects presenting with chest pain of presumed cardiac origin are more likely to have ED if they have elevated uric acid levels. PMID:24433559

  14. Sexual Desire and Linguistic Analysis: A Comparison of Sexually-Abused and Non-Abused Women

    PubMed Central

    Rellini, Alessandra H.

    2010-01-01

    Although studies have identified a relationship between a history of child sexual abuse (CSA) and problems with hypoactive sexual desire, little is known about the potential cognitive and affective mechanisms involved in the sexual desire of women with a history of CSA. In this study, 27 women with a history of CSA and 22 women with no history of abuse were asked to write about sexual and non sexual topics. The Linguistic Inquiry Word Count software program was used to compute the percentage of words that fell into positive emotions, negative emotions, body, and sex categories. As expected, women with a history of CSA used more negative emotions words when writing about sexual topics, but not non-sexual topics, compared to non-abused women. Women with a history of CSA also used more sex words when writing about the non-sexual topics compared to non-abused women. Frequencies of body and sex words used in the sexual texts were positively linked to levels of sexual desire function. This association was not different between women with and without a history of CSA. A history of CSA remained an independent predictor of levels of sexual desire dysfunction even when taking into consideration the language used in the sexual texts, indicating that there may be aspects of the sexual desire experienced by women with a history of CSA that differ from non-abused women that remain unexplored. PMID:17136590

  15. How Is Lymphocytopenia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of lymphocytes—T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells. The test can help diagnose the underlying ... cause low levels of B cells or natural killer cells. Tests for Underlying Conditions Many diseases and ...

  16. How Is Endocarditis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can get detailed pictures of the heart's structures. EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects your ... signals as they pass through your heart. An EKG typically isn't used to diagnose IE. However, ...

  17. Treatment of Sexual Disorders in the 1990s: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Raymond C.; Leiblum, Sandra R.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews existing data regarding the etiology and treatment of male and female sexual dysfunctions. Discusses the use of multidimensional assessment models, especially in the evaluation of erectile dysfunction and sexual pain disorders. Despite the conceptual and technological sophistication of current approaches, treatment outcomes are…

  18. Impact of Antidepressant Drugs on Sexual Function and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, David S; Manson, Chris; Nowak, Magda

    2015-11-01

    Pleasurable sexual activity is important in many human relationships and can provide a sense of physical, emotional and social well-being. Depressive symptoms and depressive illness are associated with impairments in sexual function and sexual dissatisfaction in untreated and treated patients. Most currently available antidepressant drugs are associated with development or worsening of sexual dysfunction in a substantial proportion of patients. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment often resolve as depression lifts, but can persist over long periods, reducing self-esteem and affecting mood and relationships adversely. Sexual difficulties during antidepressant treatment typically have many possible causes but the incidence and nature of dysfunction varies between drugs. Many interventions can be considered when managing sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressants but no approach is 'ideal'. Because treatment-emergent sexual difficulties are less frequent with certain drugs, presumably related to differences in pharmacological properties, and since current interventions are suboptimal, a lower incidence of sexual dysfunction is a relevant tolerability target when developing novel antidepressants. PMID:26519341

  19. Possible association between erectile dysfunction and osteoporosis in men.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Murat; Özbek, Emin; Otunctemur, Alper; Cakir, Suleyman Sami

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction in general and erectile dysfunction (ED) in particular significantly affect men's quality of life. Some patients who have ED, also develop osteoporosis. So, in this study we investigated the relationship between erectile dysfunction and osteoporosis in men. 95 men with erectile dysfunction and 82 men with normal sexual function were included in the study. The men's sexual functions were evaluated by International Index of Erectile Function-5 items (IIEF-5). All men received a Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA; Hologic) scan to measure bone mineral density (BMD) for osteoporosis. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. Mean age was 53.5 (38-69) in ED group and 50.1 (31-69) in control group. In ED group the men have lower T score levels than those of the control group. In conclusion, the men who have erectile dysfunction were at more risk for osteoporosis. The results of the present study demonstrate that the men with erectile dysfunction have low bone mineral density and they are at higher risk for osteoporosis. Because of easy and noninvasive evaluation of osteoporosis, patients with ED should be checked for bone mineral density and osteoporotic male subjects should be evaluated for ED.

  20. Neurological rehabilitation: sexuality and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Aisen, Mindy Lipson

    2013-01-01

    Sexuality is the embodiment of sexual and reproductive activities involving complex interactions among biological, psychological, and social systems. An individual's perception of their sexuality, as well as society's perception, can have an inestimable impact on self-esteem, and hence willingness to openly address these issues Earle S (2001). Disability, facilitated sex and the role of the nurse. J Adv Nurs 3: 433-440. Such barriers to communication represent a real challenge to practicing clinicians. However, advances in treatment options obligate the clinician providing care to those with neurogenic sexual/reproductive dysfunction to learn to communicate effectively about these issues, provide effective therapies, and refer patients to appropriate specialists. This chapter will address counseling, an overview of male and female sexual and reproductive physiological responses in the case of an intact nervous system, and a description of the impact of disorders of the nervous system on sexual function and reproductive health. Treatment options are also reviewed.

  1. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  2. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  3. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  4. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah

    2016-04-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  5. Female sexuality.

    PubMed

    Rao, T S Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M

    2015-07-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35-40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  6. Female sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Rao, T.S. Sathyanarana; Nagaraj, Anil Kumar M.

    2015-01-01

    Sex is a motive force bringing a man and a woman into intimate contact. Sexuality is a central aspect of being human throughout life and encompasses sex, gender identities and roles, sexual orientation, eroticism, pleasure, intimacy, and reproduction. Sexuality is experienced and expressed in thoughts, fantasies, desires, beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, practices, roles and relationships. Though generally, women are sexually active during adolescence, they reach their peak orgasmic frequency in their 30 s, and have a constant level of sexual capacity up to the age of 55 with little evidence that aging affects it in later life. Desire, arousal, and orgasm are the three principle stages of the sexual response cycle. Each stage is associated with unique physiological changes. Females are commonly affected by various disorders in relation to this sexual response cycle. The prevalence is generally as high as 35–40%. There are a wide range of etiological factors like age, relationship with a partner, psychiatric and medical disorders, psychotropic and other medication. Counseling to overcome stigma and enhance awareness on sexuality is an essential step in management. There are several effective psychological and pharmacological therapeutic approaches to treat female sexual disorders. This article is a review of female sexuality. PMID:26330647

  7. Pharmacotherapeutic management of erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hawksworth, D J; Burnett, A L

    2015-12-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common condition in aging men and significantly affects their quality of life and interpersonal relationships. Its prevalence and incidence are associated with aging, lifestyle factors and cardiovascular comorbidities. Preoccupation with male virility has been present for centuries, and a wide variety of herbs and potions have been used to treat any sexual deficiencies. Recent major advances in understanding of erectile physiology and pathophysiology led to development of currently available systemic and local pharmacotherapies. They are designed to work either centrally or peripherally and to either suppress anti-erectile mechanisms, enhance the pro-erectile ones or influence both. Since all the current formulations have variable safety and efficacy profiles, the search for highly specific, simple, convenient and clinically effective impotence treatments or prophylactics continues.

  8. Sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Hosken, David J; House, Clarissa M

    2011-01-25

    Sexual selection is a concept that has probably been misunderstood and misrepresented more than any other idea in evolutionary biology, confusion that continues to the present day. We are not entirely sure why this is, but sexual politics seems to have played its role, as does a failure to understand what sexual selection is and why it was initially invoked. While in some ways less intuitive than natural selection, sexual selection is conceptually identical to it, and evolution via either mechanism will occur given sufficient genetic variation. Recent claims that sexual selection theory is fundamentally flawed are simply wrong and ignore an enormous body of evidence that provides a bedrock of support for this major mechanism of organic evolution. In fact it is partly due to this solid foundation that current research has largely shifted from documenting whether or not sexual selection occurs, to addressing more complex evolutionary questions. PMID:21256434

  9. Sexual Functioning among Married Iranian Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bazarganipour, Fatemeh; Ziaei, Saeideh; Montazeri, Ali; Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess sexual functioning among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in Iran. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted to ascertain factors re- lated to sexual functioning in 300 PCOS patients attending to the private practice centers in Kashan, Isfahan Province, Iran, from May to October 2012. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to measure sexual functioning. Moreover, the socio-demo-graphic details and clinical information of PCOS including obesity, hirsutism, acne, mestrual cycle disturbances, infertility and endocrine profile were recorded for each patient. Results Overall the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) was 16.6%. In particular patients indicated poorer sexual functioning for the desire (48.3%) and the arousal (44.7%) subscales. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested patients with lower educational level (OR: 2.94; 95% CI: 1.46-5.92) and irregular menstrual status (OR: 4.61; 95% CI: 1.93-11) were more likely to report sexual dysfunction. Conclusion The findings suggest that desire and arousal were the most prevalent sexual disorders reported in this patient population. In addition, findings suggested that women with limited or no formal education and a history of menstrual irregularities were the most likely to report female sexual dysfunction. Further investigations are needed to examine female sexual functioning among women with PCOS, to educate their health care providers, and to develop therapeutic interventions. PMID:25379156

  10. Compulsory sexuality.

    PubMed

    Emens, Elizabeth F

    2014-02-01

    Asexuality is an emerging identity category that challenges the common assumption that everyone is defined by some type of sexual attraction. Asexuals--those who report feeling no sexual attraction to others--constitute one percent of the population, according to one prominent study. In recent years, some individuals have begun to identify as asexual and to connect around their experiences interacting with a sexual society. Asexuality has also become a protected classification under the antidiscrimination law of one state and several localities, but legal scholarship has thus far neglected the subject. This Article introduces asexuality to the legal literature as a category of analysis, an object of empirical study, and a phenomenon of medical science. It then offers a close examination of the growing community of self-identified asexuals. Asexual identity has revealing intersections with the more familiar categories of gender, sexual orientation, and disability, and inspires new models for understanding sexuality. Thinking about asexuality also sheds light on our legal system. Ours is arguably a sexual law, predicated on the assumption that sex is important. This Article uses asexuality to develop a framework for identifying the ways that law privileges sexuality. Across various fields, these interactions include legal requirements of sexual activity, special carve-outs to shield sexuality from law, legal protections from others' sexuality, and legal protections for sexual identity. Applying this framework, the Article traces several ways that our sexual law burdens, and occasionally benefits, asexuals. This Article concludes by closely examining asexuality's prospects for broader inclusion into federal, state, and local antidiscrimination laws.

  11. Internet Sexualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Nicola

    The term “internet sexuality” (or OSA, online sexual activities) refers to sexual-related content and activities observable on the internet (cf. Adams, Oye, & Parker, 2003; Cooper, McLoughlin, & Campbell, 2000; Leiblum & Döring, 2002). It designates a variety of sexual phenomena (e.g., pornography, sex education, sexual contacts) related to a wide spectrum of online services and applications (e.g., websites, online chat rooms, peer-to-peer networks). If an even broader range of computer networks - such as the Usenet or bulletin board systems - is included in this extensional definition, one speaks of “online sexuality” or “cybersexuality.”

  12. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  13. Adolescent sexuality.

    PubMed

    Grant, L M; Demetriou, E

    1988-12-01

    The consequences of adolescent sexual behavior are an enormous burden both for the adolescent and society. The problem is not that teens are sexually active but rather that they have little preparation and guidance in developing responsible sexual behavior. Developmentally, adolescents reach physical maturity before they are cognitively able to appreciate the consequences of their behavior. A teenager's primary source of information regarding sexuality is his or her peer group, all of whom are experiencing and reinforcing the same behaviors. The family, the major socializer of other behaviors, is not as powerful a force in shaping responsible sexual behavior because of parental discomfort with sex education and sexual discussions. This is the result of a social milieu in which sex is frequently portrayed but rarely linked with responsible behavior or accurate, nonjudgmental information. The pediatric practitioner is in an ideal position to intervene in these dynamics. In the office, the practitioner can provide accurate sexual information to both parents and adolescents, support parental-child communication on sexual issues, and provide appropriate services or referral. In the community, the practitioner can advocate for school-based sex education as well as act as an information resource. Finally, the practitioner can advocate for the health care needs for adolescents on a national level, supporting legislation that provides adolescents with information and access to services necessary to make responsible sexual decisions.

  14. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  15. How Are Genetic Conditions Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consultation How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How are genetic conditions diagnosed? A doctor may suspect a diagnosis ... and advocacy resources. For more information about diagnosing genetic conditions: Genetics Home Reference provides information about genetic ...

  16. Childhood Risk Factors in Dually Diagnosed Homeless Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined prevalence of five childhood risk factors (sexual abuse, physical abuse, parental mental illness, substance abuse, out-of-home placement) among dually diagnosed (mentally ill and substance abusing) homeless adults (n=156) in rehabilitation programs. Findings suggest that childhood risk factors, whether single or multiple, are very…

  17. Animal models of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Snehlata V.; Jadhav, Kshitij S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Pawar, Dattatray B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have contributed to a great extent to understanding and advancement in the field of sexual medicine. Many current medical and surgical therapies in sexual medicine have been tried based on these animal models. Extensive literature search revealed that the compiled information is limited. In this review, we describe various experimental models of erectile dysfunction (ED) encompassing their procedures, variables of assessment, advantages and disadvantages. The search strategy consisted of review of PubMed based articles. We included original research work and certain review articles available in PubMed database. The search terms used were “ED and experimental models,” “ED and nervous stimulation,” “ED and cavernous nerve stimulation,” “ED and central stimulation,” “ED and diabetes mellitus,” “ED and ageing,” “ED and hypercholesteremia,” “ED and Peyronie's disease,” “radiation induced ED,” “telemetric recording,” “ED and mating test” and “ED and non-contact erection test.” PMID:25624570

  18. Sexuality and intimacy among people living with serious mental illnesses: Factors contributing to sexual activity

    PubMed Central

    Bonfils, Kelsey A.; Firmin, Ruth L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Wright, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Limited research has focused on sexuality for those diagnosed with a severe mental illness. We aimed to extend existing work by exploring relationships between mastery (perception of control of one's life and future), sexual self-esteem (perceptions of one's capacity to engage in healthy sexual behavior), sexual attitudes (permissive ideas about sexuality), and perceived importance of relationships/sexuality and number of sexual partners. Methods A secondary analysis of survey data from adult participants living with a severe mental illness (N=401) in the Indiana Mental Health Services and HIV-Risk Study (Perry & Wright, 2006) was conducted. Analysis of covariance (controlling for marital status) compared those with zero partners, one partner, or multiple partners over the past three months on the dependent variables of mastery, sexual self-esteem, sexual attitudes, and perceived importance. Results Participants with more permissive attitudes, greater perceived importance, and higher mastery were more likely to be sexually active with multiple partners. Self-esteem did not differentiate groups. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Given the key role of sexual satisfaction in quality of life and the high rates of sexual risk behavior in this population, it is important that clinicians systematically assess mastery, perceived importance, and attitudes about sexuality when working with consumers diagnosed with a severe mental illness. Individually tailoring existing interventions based on consumers' levels of mastery, related to self-efficacy for implementing changes in life, could improve long-term outcomes for these programs. Future research should examine other constructs that may account for more variance in sexual activity, such as perceptions of risk, intentions for sexual safety, or romantic relationship functioning. PMID:25664756

  19. Sexual health for people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Kathy; Ray, Sunanda

    2007-05-01

    Sexual health is defined in terms of well-being, but is challenged by the social, cultural and economic realities faced by women and men with HIV. A sexual rights approach puts women and men with HIV in charge of their sexual health. Accurate, accessible information to make informed choices and safe, pleasurable sexual relationships possible is best delivered through peer education and health professionals trained in empathetic approaches to sensitive issues. Young people with HIV especially need appropriate sex education and support for dealing with sexuality and self-identity with HIV. Women and men with HIV need condoms, appropriate services for sexually transmitted infections, sexual dysfunction and management of cervical and anogenital cancers. Interventions based on positive prevention, that combine protection of personal health with avoiding HIV/STI transmission to partners, are recommended. HIV counselling following a positive test has increased condom use and decreased coercive sex and outside sexual contacts among discordant couples. HIV treatment and care have reduced stigma and increased uptake of HIV testing and disclosure of positive status to partners. High adherence to antiretroviral therapy and safer sexual behaviour must go hand-in-hand. Sexual health services have worked with peer educators and volunteer groups to reach those at higher risk, such as sex workers. Technological advances in diagnosis of STIs, microbicide development and screening and vaccination for human papillomavirus must be available in developing countries and for those with the highest need globally.

  20. Diagnosing and Managing Violence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Available categorization systems for violence encountered in medical practice do not constitute optimal tools to guide management. In this article, 4 common patterns of violence across psychiatric diagnoses are described (defensive, dominance-defining, impulsive, and calculated) and management implications are considered. The phenomenologic and neurobiological rationale for a clinical classification system of violence is also presented. PMID:22295257

  1. Diagnosing ADHD in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Margaret H.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Molina, Brooke S. G.; Gnagy, Elizabeth M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Garefino, Allison C.; Kuriyan, Aparajita B.; Babinski, Dara E.; Karch, Kathryn M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines adolescent-specific practical problems associated with current practice parameters for diagnosing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to inform recommendations for the diagnosis of ADHD in adolescents. Specifically, issues surrounding the use of self- versus informant ratings, diagnostic threshold, and…

  2. Understanding and Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Treated for Cancer.

    PubMed

    Annam, Kiran; Voznesensky, Maria; Kreder, Karl J

    2016-04-01

    Cancer can cause sexual adverse effects by direct and indirect pathways. It can involve sexual organs, indirectly affect body image, or cause fatigue or depression with subsequent effects on libido. Erectile dysfunction (ED), the inability to obtain or maintain an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse, can also result from adverse effects of cancer treatment, such as fatigue, pain, or anxiety about therapy. In addition, depressed feelings about having cancer can affect sexuality, causing a range of signs and symptoms that can lead to ED. Chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation can all cause sexual adverse effects. Additional factors that play a role include patient age and degree of ED before starting cancer treatment. In this article, we discuss how chemotherapy, hormone therapy, surgery, and radiation affect erectile function as well as possible treatment options for ED. PMID:27072383

  3. Prevalence of erectile dysfunction and possible risk factors among men of South-Western Nigeria: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Oyelade, Bolaji Oyetunde; Jemilohun, Abiodun Christopher; Aderibigbe, Sunday Adedeji

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is currently one of the most common sexual dysfunctions worldwide but it is usually underestimated because it is not a life threatening condition. The associated stigma makes men who have it to suffer in silence. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of erectile dysfunction and the possible associated risk factors among Nigerian men. Methods The study was a descriptive cross-sectional population based survey among men aged 30-80 years in Ogbomoso, South-west, Nigeria. A multistage random sampling method was used. The instrument used was the International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire-5 (IIEF-5). Unadjusted odds ratios of possible risk factors were calculated by univariate analyses. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to eliminate the effect of possible confounders on the risk factors to get the adjusted odds ratios. Results The general prevalence of ED in this study was 58.9%. Sixty-seven (47.2%), 16 (11.3%) and 59(41.5%) respondents had mild, moderate and severe ED respectively. Age, hypertension, use of anti-hypertensive drugs, diabetes mellitus and heart disease all had significant unadjusted associations with ED, but their adjusted associations were not statistically significant. Diabetes mellitus maintained a positive statistically significant relationship with ED after adjustment for potential confounders [OR= 8.31(95% CI 1.02 - 67.65), P= 0.048]. Conclusion The prevalence of ED is high among south-western Nigeria male adults. Physicians, especially primary care ones, need to pay more attention to the sexual history of their patients in order to diagnose and manage ED more frequently. PMID:27642462

  4. NEURODEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY ASSOCIATED WITH CHILDHOOD SEXUAL ABUSE

    PubMed Central

    De Bellis, Michael D.; Spratt, Eve G.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Child maltreatment appears to be the single most preventable cause of mental illness and behavioral dysfunction in the US. There are few published studies examining the developmental and the psychobiological consequences of sexual abuse. There are multiple mechanisms through which sexual abuse can cause PTSD, activate biological stress response systems, and contribute to adverse brain development. This article will critically review the psychiatric problems associated with maltreatment and the emerging biologic stress system research with a special emphasis on what is known about victimization by sexual abuse. PMID:21970646

  5. Sexual prejudice.

    PubMed

    Herek, Gregory M; McLemore, Kevin A

    2013-01-01

    Despite shifts toward greater acceptance in U.S. public opinion and policy, lesbian, gay, and bisexual people remain widely stigmatized. This article reviews empirical research on sexual prejudice, that is, heterosexuals' internalization of cultural stigma, manifested in the form of negative attitudes toward sexual minorities and same-sex desires and behaviors. After briefly reviewing measurement issues, we discuss linkages between sexual prejudice and religion, gender, sexuality, and related variables, and consider how the cultural institutions encompassing these domains create a social context within which individual expressions of prejudice can meet important psychological needs. These include needs for securing social acceptance, affirming values that are central to one's self-concept, and avoiding anxiety and other negative emotions associated with threats to self-esteem. We conclude by discussing factors that may motivate heterosexuals to reduce their own sexual prejudice, including intergroup contact, as well as avenues for future empirical inquiry.

  6. Physiologic Measures of Sexual Function in Women: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Terri L.; Diamond, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review and describe physiologic measures of assessing sexual function in women Design Literature review Setting Studies that utilize instruments designed to measure female sexual function Patients Women participating in studies of female sexual function Interventions Various instruments that measure physiologic features of female sexual function Main Outcome Measures Appraisal of the various instruments, including their advantages and disadvantages. Results Many unique physiologic methods of evaluating female sexual function have been developed over the last four decades. Each method has its benefits and limitations. Conclusions Many physiologic methods exist, but most are not well-validated. Additionally, there has been an inability to correlate most physiologic measures with subjective measures of sexual arousal. Furthermore, given the complex nature of the sexual response in women, physiologic measures should be considered in context of other data, including the history, physical exam, and validated questionnaires. Nonetheless, the existence of appropriate physiologic measures is vital to our understanding of female sexual function and dysfunction. PMID:19046582

  7. Brief Emotion Regulation Training Facilitates Arousal Control During Sexual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; Borg, Charmaine

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, a negative emotion which evokes strong behavioral avoidance tendencies, has been associated with sexual dysfunction. Recently, it was postulated that healthy sexual functioning requires a balance between excitatory (increased sexual arousal) and inhibitory processes (lowered disgust levels). This suggests that amplification of excitatory processes (like sexual arousal) could be a valuable addition to treatments for affect-based sexual dysfunctions. The major aim of the present study was to establish whether up-regulation could effectively enhance arousal levels during sexual stimuli, and whether such a training would simultaneously reduce disgust. Students (N = 163, mean age = 20.73 years, SD = 2.35) were trained in up-regulation of affect using either a sexual arousal film (i.e., female-friendly erotic movie) or a threat arousal film clip (i.e., horror movie), while control groups viewed the films without training instructions. Following this, participants viewed and rated state emotions during a series of pictures (sexual, disgusting, or neutral). Up-regulation of mood successfully enhanced general arousal in both groups, yet these arousal levels were not paralleled by reductions in disgust. Overall, the findings indicate that emotion regulation training by maximizing positive affect and general arousal could be an effective instrument to facilitate affect-related disturbances in sexual dysfunctions.

  8. Brief Emotion Regulation Training Facilitates Arousal Control During Sexual Stimuli.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; Borg, Charmaine

    2015-01-01

    Disgust, a negative emotion which evokes strong behavioral avoidance tendencies, has been associated with sexual dysfunction. Recently, it was postulated that healthy sexual functioning requires a balance between excitatory (increased sexual arousal) and inhibitory processes (lowered disgust levels). This suggests that amplification of excitatory processes (like sexual arousal) could be a valuable addition to treatments for affect-based sexual dysfunctions. The major aim of the present study was to establish whether up-regulation could effectively enhance arousal levels during sexual stimuli, and whether such a training would simultaneously reduce disgust. Students (N = 163, mean age = 20.73 years, SD = 2.35) were trained in up-regulation of affect using either a sexual arousal film (i.e., female-friendly erotic movie) or a threat arousal film clip (i.e., horror movie), while control groups viewed the films without training instructions. Following this, participants viewed and rated state emotions during a series of pictures (sexual, disgusting, or neutral). Up-regulation of mood successfully enhanced general arousal in both groups, yet these arousal levels were not paralleled by reductions in disgust. Overall, the findings indicate that emotion regulation training by maximizing positive affect and general arousal could be an effective instrument to facilitate affect-related disturbances in sexual dysfunctions. PMID:25258109

  9. [Erectile Dysfunction in Diabetic Men - Current Diagnostics and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, M; Kliesch, S

    2015-07-01

    Sexual functional dysfunctions represent a multidimensional nosological entity. Apart from the directly measurable pathophysiological parameters, psychological and dynamic partnership aspects are almost always involved. These can exert a triggering and a potentiating influence. Similarly, sociocultural factors have to be taken into account. In men the problem most frequently has a physiological focus and the main symptom within the complex of sexual difficulties, especially for diabetic patients, is erectile dysfunction. Disorders of ejaculation and orgasm may also occur. Testosterone production in men may be impaired due to obesity-related dysfunctions of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and this can lead to a clinically significant androgen deficit and thus also to a decline of libido.

  10. What is sexual satisfaction? Thematic analysis of lay people's definitions.

    PubMed

    Pascoal, Patrícia Monteiro; Narciso, Isabel de Santa Bárbara; Pereira, Nuno Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    Sexual satisfaction is an important indicator of sexual health and is strongly associated with relationship satisfaction. However, research exploring lay definitions of sexual satisfaction has been scarce. We present thematic analysis of written responses of 449 women and 311 men to the question "How would you define sexual satisfaction?" The participants were heterosexual individuals with a mean age of 36.05 years (SD = 8.34) involved in a committed exclusive relationship. In this exploratory study, two main themes were identified: personal sexual well-being and dyadic processes. The first theme focuses on the positive aspects of individual sexual experience, such as pleasure, positive feelings, arousal, sexual openness, and orgasm. The second theme emphasizes relational dimensions, such as mutuality, romance, expression of feelings, creativity, acting out desires, and frequency of sexual activity. Our results highlight that mutual pleasure is a crucial component of sexual satisfaction and that sexual satisfaction derives from positive sexual experiences and not from the absence of conflict or dysfunction. The findings support definitions and models of sexual satisfaction that focus on positive sexual outcomes and the use of measures that incorporate items linked to personal and dyadic sexual rewards for both men and women. PMID:24070214

  11. Approach in sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Belda Junior, Walter; Shiratsu, Ricardo; Pinto, Valdir

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, sexually transmitted diseases are one of the most common public health issues. Among its consequences are the possibility of transmission from mother to baby - which may cause miscarriages and congenital disease, male and female infertility, and the increase of HIV infection risk. Therefore, the main goal of these guidelines is to contribute to the improvement of the treatment for sexually transmitted diseases patients by presenting to the medical community how today's science stands on the matter and also what the recommendation for diagnosing and treating a patient are.

  12. A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study of Migraine and Organic-Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chuang, Eric; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Yen, Der-Jen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    As chronic illnesses and chronic pain are related to erectile dysfunction (ED), migraine as a prevalent chronic disorder affecting lots of people all over the world may negatively affect quality of life as well as sexual function. However, a large-scale population-based study of erectile dysfunction and other different comorbidities in patients with migraine is quite limited. This cohort longitudinal study aimed to estimate the association between migraine and ED using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan.The data used for this cohort study were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 in Taiwan. We identified 5015 patients with migraine and frequency matched 20,060 controls without migraine from 2000 to 2011. The occurrence of ED was followed up until the end of 2011. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyze the risks of ED.The overall incidence of ED was 1.78-fold greater in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (23.3 vs 10.5 per 10,000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31-2.41). Furthermore, patients with migraine were 1.75-fold more likely to develop organic ED (95% CI = 1.27-2.41) than were the comparison cohort. The migraine patients with anxiety had a 3.6-fold higher HR of having been diagnosed with ED than the comparison cohort without anxiety (95% CI, 2.10-6.18).The results support that patients with migraine have a higher incidence of being diagnosed with ED, particularly in the patient with the comorbidity of anxiety.

  13. A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study of Migraine and Organic-Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chuang, Eric; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Yen, Der-Jen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-03-01

    As chronic illnesses and chronic pain are related to erectile dysfunction (ED), migraine as a prevalent chronic disorder affecting lots of people all over the world may negatively affect quality of life as well as sexual function. However, a large-scale population-based study of erectile dysfunction and other different comorbidities in patients with migraine is quite limited. This cohort longitudinal study aimed to estimate the association between migraine and ED using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan.The data used for this cohort study were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 in Taiwan. We identified 5015 patients with migraine and frequency matched 20,060 controls without migraine from 2000 to 2011. The occurrence of ED was followed up until the end of 2011. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyze the risks of ED.The overall incidence of ED was 1.78-fold greater in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (23.3 vs 10.5 per 10,000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31-2.41). Furthermore, patients with migraine were 1.75-fold more likely to develop organic ED (95% CI = 1.27-2.41) than were the comparison cohort. The migraine patients with anxiety had a 3.6-fold higher HR of having been diagnosed with ED than the comparison cohort without anxiety (95% CI, 2.10-6.18).The results support that patients with migraine have a higher incidence of being diagnosed with ED, particularly in the patient with the comorbidity of anxiety. PMID:26962838

  14. A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study of Migraine and Organic-Psychogenic Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Szu-Hsien; Chuang, Eric; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Ming-Chia; Yen, Der-Jen; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As chronic illnesses and chronic pain are related to erectile dysfunction (ED), migraine as a prevalent chronic disorder affecting lots of people all over the world may negatively affect quality of life as well as sexual function. However, a large-scale population-based study of erectile dysfunction and other different comorbidities in patients with migraine is quite limited. This cohort longitudinal study aimed to estimate the association between migraine and ED using a nationwide population-based database in Taiwan. The data used for this cohort study were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 in Taiwan. We identified 5015 patients with migraine and frequency matched 20,060 controls without migraine from 2000 to 2011. The occurrence of ED was followed up until the end of 2011. We used Cox proportional hazard regression models to analyze the risks of ED. The overall incidence of ED was 1.78-fold greater in the migraine cohort than in the comparison cohort (23.3 vs 10.5 per 10,000 person-years; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.31–2.41). Furthermore, patients with migraine were 1.75-fold more likely to develop organic ED (95% CI = 1.27–2.41) than were the comparison cohort. The migraine patients with anxiety had a 3.6-fold higher HR of having been diagnosed with ED than the comparison cohort without anxiety (95% CI, 2.10–6.18). The results support that patients with migraine have a higher incidence of being diagnosed with ED, particularly in the patient with the comorbidity of anxiety. PMID:26962838

  15. Sexual function of the ageing male.

    PubMed

    Corona, Giovanni; Rastrelli, Giulia; Maseroli, Elisa; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario

    2013-08-01

    With the progressive increase in the proportion of older people, there is an increasing interest in characterizing the modifications of sexual health and the effect of its perturbations as a function of the aging process. The aim of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the age-dependent modifications of male sexual function and their interaction with general health and age-dependent modification of endocrine function. Elderly patients are often affected by multiple organic diseases which can interfere with sexual function. Despite this evidence, several studies have indicated that, with advancing age, normal erections are not an absolute prerequisite to remain sexually active. Good physical health, the availability of a partner, and a regular and stable pattern of sexual activity earlier in life predict the maintenance of sexual activity in old age. Conversely, there are no convincing data that hormonal changes, associated with aging, have a primary role in underlying changes in sexual function in healthy aging men. Nonetheless, sexual dysfunctions especially in elderly people are poor investigated. Asking about sexual health remains difficult or embarrassing for many primary care physicians. In addition, many patients find it difficult to raise sexual issues with their doctor. This situation often results in sexual issues not being adequately addressed thus resulting in depression, social withdrawal and delayed diagnosis of underlying medical conditions often resulting in forthcoming cardiovascular events. Education and permission from a health care professional may help to alter such misconceptions. Information from physicians regarding normal age-related changes in sexuality and encouragement, together with advice on how to continue meaningful sexual relations, may play a key role in altering such negative attitudes. PMID:24054932

  16. The Effect of Education on Sexual Health of Women with Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kaviani, Maasumeh; Rahnavard, Tahereh; Azima, Sara; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Asadi, Nasrin; Sayadi, Mehrab

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexuality constitutes an important part of women’s life. Healthy and proper sexual functioning is one of the signs of physical and mental health. The present study aimed to identify the effect of education on sexual health of women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 80 married women at reproductive age were randomly divided into a control and an education group. These women participated in this study based on self-reporting of having hypoactive sexual desire disorder. After six weekly educational sessions regarding sexual health, percentage of changes in sexual desire was assayed using Hurlbert index of sexual desire. Independent and paired t-test and Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Results: After the intervention, a significant difference was found between the two groups regarding the sexual desire score (P<0.001). The results also showed a significant difference within groups in this regard (P<0.001). Conclusion: According to the results of this study, it seems that educational intervention regarding sexual health was effective for the women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Thus, establishing sexual health education units in different health centers is highly necessary. These centers can help couples to promote their sexual knowledge and treat their sexual dysfunctions. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2012101911032N2 PMID:25349850

  17. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered.

  18. Student perspectives on sexual health: implications for interprofessional education.

    PubMed

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Wilson, Christina K; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Valvano, Abbey K; Waller, Jennifer L; West, Lindsey M; Stepleman, Lara M

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional collaboration requires that health professionals think holistically about presenting concerns, particularly for multimodal problems like sexual dysfunction. However, health professions students appear to receive relatively little sexual health education, and generally none is offered on an interprofessional basis. To assess current degree of interprofessional thinking in sexual health care, 472 health professions students in Georgia, United States, were presented with a sexual dysfunction vignette and asked to rate the relevance of, and their familiarity with, interventions offered by several professionals. They also were asked to identify the most likely cause of the sexual dysfunction. Students rated relevance and familiarity with interventions as highest for physicians and lowest for dentists, with higher ratings of nurses by nursing students. More advanced students reported greater familiarity with mental health, physician, and physical therapy interventions. Finally, nursing students were less likely to attribute the dysfunction to a physical cause. These findings indicate that students may prioritize biomedical approaches in their initial assessment and may need additional supports to consider the spectrum of biopsychosocial factors contributing to sexual functioning. To encourage interprofessional critical thinking and prepare students for interprofessional care, sexual health curricula may be improved with the inclusion of interprofessional training. Specific recommendations for curriculum development are offered. PMID:24547937

  19. Asthma: vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) and other dysfunctional breathing disorders.

    PubMed

    Balkissoon, Ron; Kenn, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    . DB is a poorly understood disorder with features that overlap with VCD and asthma. The dysfunctional pattern may reflect abnormalities in the rate or depth of breathing or in breathing mechanics that may involve the nasal passages, oropharynx, larynx, or chest wall muscles. Not unlike VCD, patients with DB are often diagnosed with asthma, and their symptoms do not improve on asthma medicines. There is no consensus regarding diagnostic criteria or appropriate testing for DB. The pathophysiology of DB is poorly understood, but psychological or physiological stress may precipitate episodes in some patients. Treatment requires a multidisciplinary approach (including speech therapy and psychological support). Prognosis is usually good. PMID:23047311

  20. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  1. How the rheumatologist can guide the patient with rheumatoid arthritis on sexual function.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Pedro Henrique Tavares Queiroz de; Castro Ferreira, Clarissa de; Kurizky, Patricia Shu; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality, an integral part of human life and quality of life, is one of those responsible for our individual welfare. Sexual dysfunction can be defined as a change in any component of sexual activity, which may cause frustration, pain and decreased sexual intercourse. Although it is known that chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), influence the quality of sexual life, sexual dysfunction is still underdiagnosed, due to two reasons: both patients fail to report the complaint because of shame or frustration, and this subject is rarely called into question by doctors. Rheumatologists are increasingly willing to discuss areas which are not directly related to drug treatment of joint diseases, such as quality of life, fatigue, and education of patients; however, sexuality is rarely addressed. The aim of this review is to present some useful concepts to Rheumatologists for orientation of their patients with RA with respect to sexual function/dysfunction, some considerations concerning the role of these professionals in order to instruct the patient, general notions about sexual function, including practical concepts about the more appropriate sexual positions for patients with RA, and a multidisciplinary approach to sexual dysfunction.

  2. Sexual Functioning in Men Living with a Spinal Cord Injury–A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Sunilkumar, MM; Boston, Patricia; Rajagopal, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for Indian men living with a spinal cord injury Objectives: To examine the literature related to sexuality traumatic cord injury and its impact on sexual functioning. Materials and Methods: Databases using Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) 2000–2012, Medline 1989–2012, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA) 1989–2012 and Google Scholar were the search engines used used for literature review. Results: The search yielded a total of 457 articles and only 75 of them were found relevant. The minimum number of articles required to meet the inclusion criteria for this review was 25–30 articles. Out of the 75 articles, 33 were considered relevant or related to the topic of sexual functioning, spinal cord injury, and paraplegia. Six areas were identified: Sexual stigmatization, physiological barriers to sexual satisfaction, clinical aspects of sexual functioning, biomedical approaches to sexual dysfunction, partner satisfaction, and lack of accessibility to sexual education. Conclusion: Spinal cord injury and sexual functioning affects a large segment of the male Indian population, yet most current research focuses on quantitative measurement with the emphasis on ejaculatory dysfunction, orgasm impairment, incontinence, and other physiological dysfunction. Further research is needed to address the subjective accounts of patients themselves with respect to the emotional and social impact of sexual disability. This would help to identify the best possible outcomes for both treatment and rehabilitation. PMID:26600694

  3. Healthy Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... a person is biologically male or female), gender identity (how people identify themselves as male, female or ... positive health benefits, such as reducing stress, improving self-esteem, and cardiovascular health. A person’s physical sexual ...

  4. Sexual Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Sexual Health Basic Facts & Information All adults, including older people, ... the opportunity to enjoy a satisfying and fulfilling sex life. In fact, most of them do, even ...

  5. Erectile Dysfunction in the Older Adult Male.

    PubMed

    Mola, Joanna R

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) in the older adult male is a significant problem affecting more than 75% of men over 70 years of age in the United States. Older men have an increased likelihood of developing ED due to chronic disease, comorbid conditions, and age-related changes. Research has demonstrated that while the prevalence and severity of ED increases with age, sexual desire often remains unchanged. This article discusses the clinical picture of ED, including relevant pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and evaluation and treatment options. PMID:26197627

  6. Erectile dysfunction in uremic dialysis patients: diagnostic evaluation in the sildenafil era.

    PubMed

    Bellinghieri, G; Santoro, D; Lo Forti, B; Mallamace, A; De Santo, R M; Savica, V

    2001-10-01

    The two words that mean sexual dysfunction, impotence and erectile dysfunction (ED), express two different concepts. Impotence is a general male sexual dysfunction that includes libidinal, orgasmic, and ejaculatory dysfunction. ED is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient to allow satisfactory sexual intercourse and is part of the general male sexual dysfunction termed impotence that includes libidinal, orgasmic, and ejaculatory dysfunction. Uremic men of different ages report a variety of sexual problems, including sexual hormonal pattern alterations, reduction in or loss of libido, infertility, and impotence, conditioning their well-being status. In evaluating and treating sexual dysfunction, a nephrologist must consider factors involved in its pathogenesis, such as hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis alterations, psychological problems related to chronic disease, secondary hyperparathyroidism, anemia, autonomic neuropathy, derangements in arterial supply or venous outflow, and the normal structure of cavernous body smooth muscle cells. The introduction of sildenafil to treat impotent patients has completely changed the approach to evaluating these subjects because this drug is considered an effective well-tolerated treatment for men with ED. In the past, we proposed an algorithm that gave the opportunity to explore the previously mentioned factors using such instrumental interventions as the nocturnal penile tumescence test, penile echo color Doppler, nervous conduction velocity, and cavernous body biopsy, addressed to prescribe needed surgical or medical interventions. The complexity of the proposed algorithm requires many diagnostic procedures and much time and economic resources to localize the pathological lesions responsible for ED. Because of the new oral drug sildenafil, we propose a new algorithm to test the possibility of obtaining an erection and classify patients as responders or nonresponders to the sildenafil test.

  7. Dysfunctional affect regulation in borderline personality disorder and in somatoform disorder

    PubMed Central

    van Dijke, Annemiek

    2012-01-01

    Background Although affect dysregulation is considered a core component of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and somatoform disorders (SoD), remarkably little research has focused on the prevalence and nature of affect dysregulation in these disorders. Also, despite apparent similarities, little is known about how dysfunctional under- and overregulation of affect and positive and negative somatoform and psychoform dissociative experiences inter-relate. Prior studies suggest a clear relationship between early childhood psychological trauma and affect dysregulation, especially when the caretaker is emotionally, sexually, or physically abusing the child, but how these relate to under- and overregulation while differentiating for developmental epochs is not clear. Although an elevated risk of childhood trauma exposure or complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) symptoms has been reported in BPD and SoD, trauma histories, dysfunctional affect regulation, dissociation, PTSD, and CPTSD were never assessed in unison in BPD and/or SoD. Method BPD and/or SoD diagnoses were confirmed or ruled out in 472 psychiatric inpatients using clinical interviews. Dysfunctional under- and overregulation of affect and somatoform and psychoform dissociation, childhood trauma-by-primary-caretaker (TPC), PTSD, and CPTSD were all measured using self reports. Results No disorder-specific form of dysfunctional affect regulation was found. Although both BPD and SoD can involve affect dysregulation and dissociation, there is a wide range of intensity of dysfunctional regulation phenomena in patients with these diagnoses. Evidence was found for the existence of three qualitatively different forms of experiencing states: inhibitory experiencing states (overregulation of affect and negative psychoform dissociation) most commonly found in SoD, excitatory experiencing states (underregulation of affect and positive psychoform dissociation) most commonly found in BPD, and combination of

  8. Sexual sadism in sexual offenders and sexually motivated homicide.

    PubMed

    Briken, Peer; Bourget, Dominique; Dufour, Mathieu

    2014-06-01

    This article gives a clinically oriented overview of forensically relevant forms of sexual sadism disorder and its specific relationship to sexual homicide. In sexual homicide perpetrators, peculiar patterns of sexual sadism may be a motivational pathway to kill. Sexual sadism increases the risk for reoffending in sexual offenders. Through psychotherapy and pharmacological interventions, treatment of sadistic sex offenders has to consider special characteristics that may be different from those of nonsadistic sex offenders. Many of these offenders share a combination of sexual sadistic motives and an intact self-regulation, sometimes combined with a high level of sexual preoccupation.

  9. Breaking the silence: helping men with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    2012-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a condition that is often under-reported. This article provides the community nurse with a brief overview of erectile dysfunction in the context of sexual health and its importance to wellbeing. The article outlines issues concerning epidemiology, the possible causes of erectile dysfunction and the impact the condition can have on the man's quality of life. Often men with erectile dysfunction report being stigmatised, feeling shame and experiencing guilt. The role of the community nurse in assessing, making a diagnosis and helping the man with the condition is described. The article emphasises the fact that in order to offer care effectively and competently the community nurse must be up to date and knowledgeable concerning the condition. PMID:22875181

  10. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  11. Velopharyngeal function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L

    1991-01-01

    The concepts regarding velopharyngeal function, the production of disordered nasalization, and the management of velopharyngeal dysfunction can be summarized as follows: 1. Although the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism is critical to the control of oral-nasal balance, the configuration and function of the speech articulatory system as a whole will determine the degree of nasalized speech that is produced. 2. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be related to one or a combination of structural and motor limitations within the velopharyngeal mechanism. 3. There are two perceptual manifestations of velopharyngeal dysfunction. One is acoustic (nasality); the other is aerodynamic (nasal emission). For any given speaker, it is possible to hear both, and it is possible to hear one and not the other. 4. Velopharyngeal dysfunction can be treated in a variety of ways. The method of treatment should be determined by the structural characteristics of the velopharyngeal mechanism and the speech-motor abilities of the patient.

  12. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed? Doctors diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) based on ... to see whether the baby has CF. Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Testing People who have one normal CFTR ...

  13. How Is Muscular Dystrophy Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How is muscular dystrophy diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content The first step in diagnosing muscular dystrophy (MD) is a visit with a health care ...

  14. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Meets Senescence.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Suchira; Gil, Jesús

    2016-03-01

    Cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction are hallmarks of ageing, but until now their relationship has not been clear. Recent work by Wiley et al. shows that mitochondrial defects can cause a distinct senescence phenotype termed MiDAS (mitochondrial dysfunction-associated senescence). MiDAS has a specific secretome that is able to drive some of the aging phenotypes. These findings suggest novel therapeutic opportunities for treating age-related pathologies. PMID:26874922

  16. Male endocrine dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hotaling, James M; Patel, Zamip

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation for endocrine function is a pivotal part of the male infertility workup. Endocrine dysfunction may result from endogenous and exogenous sources. This article describes the traditional roles that the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis plays in spermatogenesis and testicular dysfunction, as well as other insults that may contribute to hypospermatogenesis. Recent research into the role alternative hormonal axes play in spermatogenesis and promising new technologies that may correct inborn or acquired endocrinopathies leading to impaired sperm growth and maturation are discussed.

  17. Dysfunctional Families of the Student with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels-Mohring, Debbie; Lambie, Rosemary

    1993-01-01

    This paper outlines the changes that occur in family systems when a child is diagnosed with special needs and examines the structure of dysfunctional families in which there is a child with physical disabilities, including chronic illness; behavior disorders, including social maladjustment; learning disabilities; or mental retardation. (JDD)

  18. Diagnosable structured logic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling (Inventor); Miles, Lowell (Inventor); Gambles, Jody (Inventor); Maki, Gary K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A diagnosable structured logic array and associated process is provided. A base cell structure is provided comprising a logic unit comprising a plurality of input nodes, a plurality of selection nodes, and an output node, a plurality of switches coupled to the selection nodes, where the switches comprises a plurality of input lines, a selection line and an output line, a memory cell coupled to the output node, and a test address bus and a program control bus coupled to the plurality of input lines and the selection line of the plurality of switches. A state on each of the plurality of input nodes is verifiably loaded and read from the memory cell. A trusted memory block is provided. The associated process is provided for testing and verifying a plurality of truth table inputs of the logic unit.

  19. [Obesity--significant risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men].

    PubMed

    Skrypnik, Damian; Bogdański, Paweł; Musialik, Katarzyna

    2014-02-01

    The obesity affects around 312 million people over the world. In The United States it causes more than 300 000 deaths per year. It leads to many complications, such as ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism. It was proven recently that obesity is also an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction in men. 79% of men presenting erectile disorders have BMI of 25 kg/m2 or greater. BMI in the range 25-30 kg/m2 is associated with 1,5 times, and in the range of over 30 kg/m2 with 3 times greater risk of sexual dysfunction. The occurrence of erectile dysfunction in patients with obesity is caused by a number of complications which are characteristic for an excessive amount of fat tissue, in example: cardiovascular diseases, diabetes or dyslipidemia. In the United States diabetes and obesity are responsible for 8 million cases of erectile dysfunction. Scientific evidence indicates that excessive body weight should be considered as an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction. This risk increases with increasing BMI. Erectile disorders correlate with the occurrence of obesity at any time during the patient's life. Obesity leads to erectile dysfunction in a considerably greater extent than aging. Mechanisms responsible for the independent influence of obesity on the erectile dysfunction are: hormonal imbalance, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance, psychological factors and physical inactivity. The basis for erectile dysfunction treatment in obesity is body weight loss. Erectile disorders in obese men are significantly more frequent than in general population. Obesity is beyond any doubts an independent risk factor of erectile dysfunction.

  20. Ejaculatory dysfunction in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; Nutt, Max; McVary, Kevin T

    2016-08-01

    The link between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and sexual dysfunction is well established. Sexual dysfunction can encompass both ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Ejaculatory dysfunction can consist of premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, anejaculation, decreased force of ejaculation and pain upon ejaculation. The impact of different medical and surgical therapies on ejaculatory function will be reviewed. We reviewed the various categories of LUTS treatment including the canonical epidemiology and pathophysiology as well as the surgical and medical treatments for LUTS/BPH. We note that most surgeries and several medical treatments have a certain but ill-defined negative impact on ejaculatory function. Several MISTs and selected medical therapies appear to have little impact on EjD. Both EjD and BPH are very common disorders in men under the care of an urologist. It is well documented that there is a clinical association between these two entities. Unfortunately many of the medical treatments and almost all surgical treatment impact the ejaculatory function of the patient. The surgical treatment of BPH often leads to retrograde ejaculation while medical treatment leads to anejaculation. PMID:27652217

  1. Ejaculatory dysfunction in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; Nutt, Max

    2016-01-01

    The link between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and sexual dysfunction is well established. Sexual dysfunction can encompass both ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Ejaculatory dysfunction can consist of premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, anejaculation, decreased force of ejaculation and pain upon ejaculation. The impact of different medical and surgical therapies on ejaculatory function will be reviewed. We reviewed the various categories of LUTS treatment including the canonical epidemiology and pathophysiology as well as the surgical and medical treatments for LUTS/BPH. We note that most surgeries and several medical treatments have a certain but ill-defined negative impact on ejaculatory function. Several MISTs and selected medical therapies appear to have little impact on EjD. Both EjD and BPH are very common disorders in men under the care of an urologist. It is well documented that there is a clinical association between these two entities. Unfortunately many of the medical treatments and almost all surgical treatment impact the ejaculatory function of the patient. The surgical treatment of BPH often leads to retrograde ejaculation while medical treatment leads to anejaculation. PMID:27652217

  2. Ejaculatory dysfunction in the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    DeLay, Kenneth Jackson; Nutt, Max

    2016-01-01

    The link between lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and sexual dysfunction is well established. Sexual dysfunction can encompass both ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Ejaculatory dysfunction can consist of premature ejaculation, delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, anejaculation, decreased force of ejaculation and pain upon ejaculation. The impact of different medical and surgical therapies on ejaculatory function will be reviewed. We reviewed the various categories of LUTS treatment including the canonical epidemiology and pathophysiology as well as the surgical and medical treatments for LUTS/BPH. We note that most surgeries and several medical treatments have a certain but ill-defined negative impact on ejaculatory function. Several MISTs and selected medical therapies appear to have little impact on EjD. Both EjD and BPH are very common disorders in men under the care of an urologist. It is well documented that there is a clinical association between these two entities. Unfortunately many of the medical treatments and almost all surgical treatment impact the ejaculatory function of the patient. The surgical treatment of BPH often leads to retrograde ejaculation while medical treatment leads to anejaculation.

  3. A dual physiological character for sexual function: libido and sexual pheromones.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G

    2009-12-01

    Human sexual response is a complex function involving many cerebral, spinal and peripheral aspects; the last are relatively known and benefit from good pharmacological control, as in the case of erectile dysfunction. Spinal cord sexual reflexes also have a good theoretical and experimental description. There is minimal understanding of the cerebral sexual processes (libido, sexual arousal, orgasm). The initial perspective was that the cerebral areas implied in sexuality exert descending stimulatory and inhibitory influences on spinal cord sexual centres/reflexes. This was a wrong supposition, which inhibited progress in this subject, with a considerable impact on a subject's individual and social life. A new approach to sexual function arises from the idea that simple neurological structures can support only simple functions, while a more complex function requires correspondingly complex anatomical structures. For this reason the spinal cord would not be able to realise the integration of multiple (spinal and psychosensorial) stimuli into a unique and coherent ejaculation response. Consequently, all mechanisms implied in human sexuality would be cerebral processes, ejaculation reflexes ascending in evolution to the cerebral level. This new evolutionary concept was developed after 2001 in five distinct articles on the cerebral duality of sexual arousal, sexual hormones, ejaculation and serotonergic receptors. During this period other published results suggested a possible cerebral duality for sexual pheromones and libido in humans. All these dual physiological aspects are integrated in this review into one neurophysiological model, thus trying to further develop the new concepts of sexual function and perhaps relational behaviour. In conclusion, ejaculation is a dual cerebral process with arousal sensation (hormonally modulated) and libido perception (pheromonally modulated) as the afferent part. Two neurophysiological axes could exist in both men and women. In this

  4. A dual physiological character for sexual function: libido and sexual pheromones.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G

    2009-12-01

    Human sexual response is a complex function involving many cerebral, spinal and peripheral aspects; the last are relatively known and benefit from good pharmacological control, as in the case of erectile dysfunction. Spinal cord sexual reflexes also have a good theoretical and experimental description. There is minimal understanding of the cerebral sexual processes (libido, sexual arousal, orgasm). The initial perspective was that the cerebral areas implied in sexuality exert descending stimulatory and inhibitory influences on spinal cord sexual centres/reflexes. This was a wrong supposition, which inhibited progress in this subject, with a considerable impact on a subject's individual and social life. A new approach to sexual function arises from the idea that simple neurological structures can support only simple functions, while a more complex function requires correspondingly complex anatomical structures. For this reason the spinal cord would not be able to realise the integration of multiple (spinal and psychosensorial) stimuli into a unique and coherent ejaculation response. Consequently, all mechanisms implied in human sexuality would be cerebral processes, ejaculation reflexes ascending in evolution to the cerebral level. This new evolutionary concept was developed after 2001 in five distinct articles on the cerebral duality of sexual arousal, sexual hormones, ejaculation and serotonergic receptors. During this period other published results suggested a possible cerebral duality for sexual pheromones and libido in humans. All these dual physiological aspects are integrated in this review into one neurophysiological model, thus trying to further develop the new concepts of sexual function and perhaps relational behaviour. In conclusion, ejaculation is a dual cerebral process with arousal sensation (hormonally modulated) and libido perception (pheromonally modulated) as the afferent part. Two neurophysiological axes could exist in both men and women. In this

  5. Sexual Education and Morality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiecker, Ben

    1992-01-01

    Distinguishes five interpretations of sexual education including factual knowledge; self-control; stressing love; sexual training; and sexual morality. Suggests that sexual education should be understood as teaching children the moral tendencies relevant to sexual conduct. Argues that infantile sexual desire is based on a contradiction in terms…

  6. Diagnostic testing for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, D O

    1992-09-01

    What can we expect in the next decade? In addition to the obviously anticipated clarification of normal values relating to erectile function and anatomy and refinement of examinations, tests, and procedures, there is still much to be discovered, refined, and defined. We can anticipate new medications being found to enhance penile erections. Maybe a pacemaker will be possible that will stimulate an erection. New methods will be developed to insert coils and scarring agents for veno-occlusive disorders. Drugs will be produced in the form of pills, creams, or injectables that will dilate, clean out, or prevent blockage in the arteries. Preventing erectile dysfunction should become the issue in the 1990s and the next century. Changes in life-style such as reducing stress, eating healthier, stopping smoking, exercising more, and reducing alcohol consumption will lead to better bodily functioning. Essentially, taking responsibility for our own well being will become important. Health promotion, instead of curing, will receive greater focus. Education will play an important part in realizing a goal of mature sexuality and improved general well-being. PMID:1529366

  7. Brief Report: Sexual Sensation Seeking and Its Relationship to Risky Sexual Behaviour among African-American Adolescent Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitalnick, Joshua S.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.; Crosby, Richard A.; Milhausen, Robin R.; Sales, Jessica M.; McCarty, Frances; Rose, Eve; Younge, Sinead N.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between sexual sensation seeking and sexual risk taking has been investigated among adult populations. There are limited data, however, regarding this relationship for adolescents. Since African-American adolescent females continue to be disproportionately diagnosed with STDs, including HIV, we examined this association among a…

  8. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  9. Sexually transmitted parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Levine, G I

    1991-03-01

    Sexual activity is the primary method of transmission for several important parasitic diseases and has resulted in a significant prevalence of enteric parasitic infection among male homosexuals. The majority of parasitic sexually transmitted diseases involve protozoan pathogens; however, nematode and arthropod illnesses are also included in this group. Trichomoniasis, caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common parasitic STD. Infection with this organism typically results in the signs and symptoms of vaginitis. Trichomoniasis can be diagnosed in the office setting by performing a microscopic evaluation of infected vaginal secretions and can be successfully treated with metronidazole. Both pediculosis pubis, caused by the crab louse Pthirus pubis, and scabies, caused by the itch mite Sarcoptes scabiei, present with severe pruritus. A papular or vesicular rash and linear burrows seen in the finger webs and genital area are characteristic of scabies. Pediculosis pubis is diagnosed by observing adult lice or their nits in areas that bear coarse hair. The diagnosis of scabies is confirmed by scraping suspicious burrows and viewing the mite or its byproducts under the microscope. Lindane, 1% used in treating scabies, is also very effective for treating pediculosis pubis. Synthetic pyrethrins, also applied as a cream or lotion, are less toxic alternatives for the treatment of either condition. Oral-anal and oral-genital sexual practices predispose male homosexuals to infection with many enteric pathogens, including parasitic protozoans and helminths. The most common of these parasitic infections are amebiasis, caused by Entamoeba histolytica, and giardiasis caused by Giardia lamblia. Both entities may cause acute or chronic diarrhea, as well as other abdominal symptoms. Most gay men with amebiasis are asymptomatic, and invasive disease in this group is extremely rare. Both amebiasis and giardiasis can be diagnosed on the basis of microscopic examination of stool

  10. Antihypertensive medications and sexual function in women: Baseline data from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Holly N.; Evans, Gregory W.; Berlowtiz, Dan R.; Chertow, Glenn M.; Conroy, Molly B.; Foy, Capri G.; Glasser, Stephen P.; Lewis, Cora E.; Riley, William T.; Russell, Laurie; Williams, Olubunmi; Hess, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hypertension is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular and kidney disease, but treatment can substantially reduce risks. Many patients avoid antihypertensive medications due to fear of side effects. While associations between antihypertensives and sexual dysfunction in men have been documented, it remains unclear whether antihypertensives are associated with sexual dysfunction in women. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from women in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT) to evaluate the relations among class of antihypertensive medication and the outcomes (a) sexual activity and (b) sexual function. Methods SPRINT enrolled individuals 50 and older with hypertension at high risk for cardiovascular disease. A subset of participants completed questionnaires regarding quality of life (QoL), including sexual function. Antihypertensive class was determined by medications taken at baseline. Results Of 690 women in the QoL subset of SPRINT, 183 (26.5%) were sexually active. There were no significant differences in sexual activity among women taking one or more antihypertensives and women not taking any. Women taking an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) had higher odds of sexual activity [OR 1.66 (1.12-4.27), p=0.011]. Among sexually active women, the prevalence of sexual dysfunction was high (52.5%). No class of medication was associated with sexual dysfunction in the multivariable model. Conclusions ACEI/ARB use was associated with higher odds of sexual activity. While prevalence of sexual dysfunction was high, no single class of antihypertensive medication was associated with sexual dysfunction. PMID:27032074

  11. Female Sexual Function During the Menopausal Transition in a Group of Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Dashti, Mahboobeh; Shariat, Mamak; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Raisi, Firoozeh; Ghahghaei-Nezamabadi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women and association of sexual dysfunction with menopausal symptoms. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 151 married women with the age of 40-60 yearsold who were referred for treatmentto Department of Gynecology in Vali-e-Asr Hospital (Tehran, Iran) from April to July 2012, were recruited. They were evaluated concerning their sexual function in the domains of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain with the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire.Menopause rating scale (MRS) was developed for the diagnosis and quantification of climacteric symptoms. Results: Total frequency of sexual dysfunction was 53% with the domains of lubrication, arusal and desire being commonly affected 62%, 70% and 98.5% of cases respectively. There is a relationship between severity of somatic and urogenital symptoms with sexual dysfunction (p = 0.03, p = 0.00 respectively). Conclusion: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in this period. Somatic and urogenital symptoms during the menopausal period could be a factor to maintain or intensity of sexual dysfunctions. PMID:27648093

  12. Female Sexual Function During the Menopausal Transition in a Group of Iranian Women

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Tahereh; Dashti, Mahboobeh; Shariat, Mamak; Haghollahi, Fedyeh; Raisi, Firoozeh; Ghahghaei-Nezamabadi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women and association of sexual dysfunction with menopausal symptoms. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study, 151 married women with the age of 40-60 yearsold who were referred for treatmentto Department of Gynecology in Vali-e-Asr Hospital (Tehran, Iran) from April to July 2012, were recruited. They were evaluated concerning their sexual function in the domains of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction and pain with the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire.Menopause rating scale (MRS) was developed for the diagnosis and quantification of climacteric symptoms. Results: Total frequency of sexual dysfunction was 53% with the domains of lubrication, arusal and desire being commonly affected 62%, 70% and 98.5% of cases respectively. There is a relationship between severity of somatic and urogenital symptoms with sexual dysfunction (p = 0.03, p = 0.00 respectively). Conclusion: A considerable percentage of women experienced sexual dysfunctions in this period. Somatic and urogenital symptoms during the menopausal period could be a factor to maintain or intensity of sexual dysfunctions.

  13. [Why do cardiologists disregard sexual health of their patients? A critical review].

    PubMed

    Scardi, Sabino

    2016-05-01

    Sexual activity is an essential aspect of normal human function, well-being and quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a common problem of increasing incidence in patients with cardiovascular disease, particularly younger and male, and continues over time in life, but these issues are not often discussed in daily practice both for a limited patient-physician relationship and clinicians' poor knowledge. Many studies suggest that the majority of patients and their partners have questions or concerns about their sexual health. Healthcare providers can help their patients if they are aware of the problem. Cardiologists need more knowledge and specific practical training in providing information on sexual concerns and sexual counseling to cardiac patients. This review aims at providing clinicians with most recent evidence about sexual dysfunction, and its management in patients with cardiac disease. Sexual couseling of cardiac patients is an important role for healthcare providers.

  14. Optimizing Outcomes of Oral Therapy for Patients With Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Barada, James H

    2003-01-01

    The evaluation and treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) differs from that of many medical conditions. An intimate dialogue between the patient and physician must be established for accurate assessment of ED severity and successful therapy. Patient and partner education on the nuances of oral phosphodiesterase inhibitor therapy is important to maximize treatment success with this currently first-line therapy. Realistic expectations for the erectile response and patience are necessary to resume satisfactory sexual functioning. Relationship issues or partner resistance can contribute to a suboptimal erectile response to therapy, in which case the patient may benefit from sexual therapy referral. PMID:16985980

  15. Diagnosing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA.

    PubMed

    Wood, Timothy C; Harvey, Katie; Beck, Michael; Burin, Maira Graeff; Chien, Yin-Hsiu; Church, Heather J; D'Almeida, Vânia; van Diggelen, Otto P; Fietz, Michael; Giugliani, Roberto; Harmatz, Paul; Hawley, Sara M; Hwu, Wuh-Liang; Ketteridge, David; Lukacs, Zoltan; Miller, Nicole; Pasquali, Marzia; Schenone, Andrea; Thompson, Jerry N; Tylee, Karen; Yu, Chunli; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Diagnosis can be challenging and requires agreement of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings. A group of biochemical genetics laboratory directors and clinicians involved in the diagnosis of MPS IVA, convened by BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc., met to develop recommendations for diagnosis. The following conclusions were reached. Due to the wide variation and subtleties of radiographic findings, imaging of multiple body regions is recommended. Urinary glycosaminoglycan analysis is particularly problematic for MPS IVA and it is strongly recommended to proceed to enzyme activity testing even if urine appears normal when there is clinical suspicion of MPS IVA. Enzyme activity testing of GALNS is essential in diagnosing MPS IVA. Additional analyses to confirm sample integrity and rule out MPS IVB, multiple sulfatase deficiency, and mucolipidoses types II/III are critical as part of enzyme activity testing. Leukocytes or cultured dermal fibroblasts are strongly recommended for enzyme activity testing to confirm screening results. Molecular testing may also be used to confirm the diagnosis in many patients. However, two known or probable causative mutations may not be identified in all cases of MPS IVA. A diagnostic testing algorithm is presented which attempts to streamline this complex testing process.

  16. Diagnosing pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, M

    2004-01-01

    Objective testing for pulmonary embolism is necessary, because clinical assessment alone is unreliable and the consequences of misdiagnosis are serious. No single test has ideal properties (100% sensitivity and specificity, no risk, low cost). Pulmonary angiography is regarded as the final arbiter but is ill suited for diagnosing a disease present in only a third of patients in whom it is suspected. Some tests are good for confirmation and some for exclusion of embolism; others are able to do both but are often non-diagnostic. For optimal efficiency, choice of the initial test should be guided by clinical assessment of the likelihood of embolism and by patient characteristics that may influence test accuracy. Standardised clinical estimates can be used to give a pre-test probability to assess, after appropriate objective testing, the post-test probability of embolism. Multidetector computed tomography can replace both scintigraphy and angiography for the exclusion and diagnosis of this disease and should now be considered the central imaging investigation in suspected pulmonary embolism. PMID:15192162

  17. Postpartum thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Browne-Martin, K; Emerson, C H

    1997-03-01

    Four disorders of the postpartum period are associated with thyroid dysfunction. The most common is PPT. Although recovery from thyroid dysfunction often occurs in PPT, many patients eventually develop permanent hypothyroidism. Postpartum Graves' Disease is less common than PPT, but it is not unusual. Whereas antithyroid drugs are indicated for postpartum Graves' Disease, they are not useful in PPT. Although they are rare, lymphocytic hypophysitis and postpartum pituitary infarction are important entities because they cause deficiencies of many critical hormones. The autoimmune nature of PPT, postpartum Graves' disease, and lymphocytic hypophysitis highlights the unique effects of pregnancy on the immune system.

  18. Mental Illness Sexual Stigma: Implications for Health and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Wainberg, Milton L.; Cournos, Francine; Wall, Melanie M.; Pala, Andrea Norcini; Mann, Claudio Gruber; Pinto, Diana; Pinho, Veronica; McKinnon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Among people in psychiatric care worldwide, the majority is sexually active, and sharply elevated rates of HIV infection compared to the general population have been shown. Recovery-oriented treatment does not routinely address sexuality. We examined the relationship between gender, severe mental illness diagnosis, and stigma experiences related to sexuality among people in psychiatric outpatient care. Method 641 sexually active adults attending eight public outpatient psychiatric clinics in Rio de Janeiro were interviewed for psychiatric diagnosis and stigma experiences. Stigma mechanisms well established in the literature but not previously examined in relation to sexuality were measured with the Mental Illness Sex Stigma Questionnaire, a 27-item interview about stigma in sexual situations and activities. Results Experiences of stigma were reported by a majority of participants for 48% of questionnaire items. Most people reported supportive attitudes toward their sexuality from providers and family members. Those with severe mental illness diagnoses showed greater stigma on Individual Discrimination and Structural Stigma mechanisms than those with non-severe mental illness diagnoses, while there was no difference on the Social Psychological Processes (internalized stigma) mechanism. Regardless of diagnosis or gender, a majority of participants devalued themselves as sexual partners. Conclusions and Implications for Practice Adults in psychiatric outpatient care frequently reported stigma experiences related to aspects of their sexual lives. From the perspectives of both HIV prevention and recovery from mental illness, examining the consequences of stigma in the sexual lives of people in psychiatric care and improving their measurement would have wide applicability. PMID:27030909

  19. Sexual problems in people with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Henning, Oliver J; Nakken, Karl O; Træen, Bente; Mowinckel, Petter; Lossius, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is an important but often neglected aspect of epilepsy. The objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and types of sexual problems in patients with epilepsy and compare the results with similar data obtained from a representative sample of the general population. At the National Centre for Epilepsy in Norway, 171 of 227 consecutive adult inpatients and outpatients with epilepsy (response rate: 75.3%) and their neurologists participated in a questionnaire study about epilepsy and sexuality. The results were compared with data available from 594 adult Norwegians who had completed the same questionnaire. Patients with epilepsy had a significantly higher prevalence of sexual problems (women: 75.3% vs. 12.0%; men: 63.3% vs. 9.6%). The most commonly reported problems (>30%) were reduced sexual desire, orgasm problems, erection problems, and vaginal dryness. The patients reported considerable dissatisfaction regarding sexual functioning. Significantly more sexual problems were found in patients of both sexes with reduced quality of life and in women with symptoms of depression. We found no significant association between sexual problems and age of epilepsy onset, type of epilepsy, or use of enzyme-inducing antiepileptic drugs. Whereas age at sexual debut did not differ between the patients with epilepsy and the general population, men with epilepsy had a lower number of partners during the last 12months, and the proportion of women with a low frequency of intercourse was higher in the group with epilepsy. In conclusion, sexual problems are significantly greater in Norwegian patients with epilepsy than in the general adult population. As no single epilepsy type or treatment could be identified as a specific predisposing factor, it seems likely that there are multiple causes underlying our results, including both organic and psychosocial factors. PMID:27371882

  20. Sexuality in advanced age in Jewish thought and law.

    PubMed

    David, Benjamin E; Weitzman, Gideon A

    2015-01-01

    Judaism has a positive attitude to sexual relations within a marriage, and views such sexual relations as important not only for procreation but also as part of the framework of marriage. This is true for any age group, and sexuality is seen as an essential element of marriage for couples of advanced age. In this article, the authors present the views of Jewish law and thought regarding sexuality among older couples. The authors illustrate this using 3 case studies of couples who sought guidance in the area of sexuality. In addition, this area of counseling benefits greatly from an ongoing relationship and dialogue between expert rabbis in the field and therapists treating older Orthodox Jewish patients for sexual dysfunction. The triad relationship of couple, therapist, and rabbi enhances the ability to treat and assist such couples to seek treatment and overcome their difficulties. PMID:24313599

  1. Attitudes About Sexual Activity Among Postmenopausal Women in Different Ethnic Groups: A Cross-sectional Study in Jahrom, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Safieh; Javadpour, Shohreh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Parnian, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual function is affected by personal and interpersonal factors, familial and social traditions, culture, religion, menopause, and aging. So, ethnicity is a determining factor in sexual function. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and attitudes towards sexuality in postmenopausal women among three different ethnic groups in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 746 postmenopausal women between 50 and 89 years who referred to Honoree clinic, Jahrom in 2013. Among the study participants, 42.4% were Arab, 33.5% were Persian, and 24.1% were Lor. Data were collected about women's socio-demographic characteristics, attitudes regarding sexuality and sexual function. The descriptive statistics were used for demographic variables. Moreover, ANOVA, post hoc (LSD) was used. Besides, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The participants' mean age was 60.10±6.89 years and the total mean score of Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was 19.31±8.5. In addition, 81.5% of the women had sexual dysfunction (FSFI <26.55) and only 147 women (18.5%) had normal sexual function (FSFI >26.55). Sexual dysfunction was 75.3% in Arabs, 83.2% in Persians, and 86.1% in Lors. Besides, the most prevalent sexual dysfunction was dyspareunia in Arabs and arousal disorder in Persians and Lors. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that sexual dysfunction is considerable among postmenopausal women. The most prevalent sexual dysfunction was dyspareunia in Arabs and arousal disorder in Persians and Lors. PMID:26962483

  2. Sexual abuse in childhood and the mentally disordered female offender.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    This study examines the role that a history of child sexual abuse played in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders in a sample of 321 female offenders incarcerated in a maximum-security prison for women. The results show that a history of child sexual abuse increases the likelihood that an inmate would receive mental health treatment. Psychotropic medication is frequently prescribed in response to adjustment problems associated with childhood sexual abuse. White women who exhibit adjustment problems associated with a history of child sexual abuse are especially likely to be diagnosed as mentally disordered at admission and to be sent to the mental health unit for treatment. In the absence of a diagnosed mental disorder at admission, women who receive psychotropic medication to help them adjust to prison life are likely to be diagnosed with a mental disorder later on.

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michelle L.; Chourasia, Aparajita H.; Macleod, Kay F.

    2013-01-01

    A mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to cell growth and tumorigenesis is emerging beyond Warburg as an area of research that is under-explored in terms of its significance for clinical management of cancer. Work discussed in this review focuses less on the Warburg effect and more on mitochondria and how dysfunctional mitochondria modulate cell cycle, gene expression, metabolism, cell viability, and other established aspects of cell growth and stress responses. There is increasing evidence that key oncogenes and tumor suppressors modulate mitochondrial dynamics through important signaling pathways and that mitochondrial mass and function vary between tumors and individuals but the significance of these events for cancer are not fully appreciated. We explore the interplay between key molecules involved in mitochondrial fission and fusion and in apoptosis, as well as in mitophagy, biogenesis, and spatial dynamics of mitochondria and consider how these distinct mechanisms are coordinated in response to physiological stresses such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Importantly, we examine how deregulation of these processes in cancer has knock on effects for cell proliferation and growth. We define major forms of mitochondrial dysfunction and address the extent to which the functional consequences of such dysfunction can be determined and exploited for cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24350057

  4. Perceptual-Motor Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyfer, Jean L.

    Discussed are theoretical and treatment aspects of perceptual motor dysfunction and rehabilitation in 4- to 12-year-old academically failing children involved in a 3-year investigation at the University of Kansas. The program is said to stress increasing the amount of stimulation received by sensory receptors of the vestibular, reflex, and haptic…

  5. Shared Parenting Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkat, Ira Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Joint custody of children is the most prevalent court ordered arrangement for families of divorce. A growing body of literature indicates that many parents engage in behaviors that are incompatible with shared parenting. This article provides specific criteria for a definition of the Shared Parenting Dysfunction. Clinical aspects of the phenomenon…

  6. Pharmacology of alpha-adrenoceptors in male sexual function.

    PubMed

    Rampin, O

    1999-01-01

    Data issued from morphological and physiological experiments suggests that the noradrenergic system, through ascending pathways to the brain and descending pathways to the spinal cord, may regulate male sexual functions. Adrenoceptors have been shown to be present in the brain and spinal cord of animals and humans. The activity of spinal preganglionic neurons is modulated by noradrenaline. Pharmacological approaches aiming at selectively targeting alpha1- or alpha2-adrenoceptors have been conducted in patients with erectile dysfunction or in monkeys and rats in a variety of tests. Briefly, conclusions arising from these studies are: activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors facilitates copulation, where activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors inhibits copulation. alpha2-adrenoceptors antagonists like yohimbine facilitate sexual behavior, reducing ejaculation latency in male rats and increasing their sexual motivation. Furthermore, yohimbine induces copulation in rats either castrated or sexually naive. In contrast, activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors depresses sexual responses in another context, i.e. reflexive erections. Activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors activates reflexive erections in rats, and alpha2-adrenoceptors antagonists (yohimbine) inhibit them. Today's challenge is to separate the effects of any drug acting at the level of the alpha-adrenoceptors on the central vs. peripheral control of sexual functions, on the brain vs. spinal cord control of the same functions, and the search for any specialization of alpha-adrenoceptors subtypes in a given sexual function. Treatment of sexual dysfunctions in man (e.g. ejaculation) focusing on the spinal cord as a pharmacological target should also be expanded. Finally, considering the similarities between neural networks controlling male and female sexual functions, the treatment of female sexual dysfunction with comparable pharmacological approaches should be evaluated. PMID:10393482

  7. Sexual and marital relationships after radiotherapy for seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schover, L.R.; Gonzales, M.; von Eschenbach, A.C.

    1986-02-01

    Questionnaires on sexual function, marital status, and fertility were returned by 84 men who received radiotherapy for seminoma (Stage I, II, or III). The mean length of follow-up was ten years. Although 93 per cent were married, 19 per cent had low rates of sexual activity, 12 per cent reported low sexual desire, 15 per cent had erectile dysfunction, 10 per cent had difficulty reaching orgasm, and 14 per cent had premature ejaculation. The most common problems were reduced intensity of orgasm (33%) and reduced semen volume (49%). Twenty-one men remained childless, and 30 per cent of men worried at least occasionally about infertility. Thirteen children were conceived after cancer therapy. The data suggest that sexual dysfunction and infertility are important concerns for a subgroup of men treated for seminoma.

  8. An Exploration of Returning Veterans' Sexual Health Issues Using a Brief Self‐Report Measure

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Gregory R.; Latini, David M.; Powers‐James, Catherine; Houlette, Cheryl; Kauth, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Sexual health is an integral aspect of quality of life with important implications for satisfaction with intimate relationships, emotional well‐being, and life as a whole. Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan frequently encounter a wide range of known risk factors for sexual health concerns. Aim This article seeks to examine the overall frequency, important covariates associated with sexual difficulties, and the relevant domains of sexual dysfunction among a group of recent US veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan. Methods This is a retrospective chart review of 247 veterans of conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan evaluated for an initial visit at the post‐deployment clinic of a large veterans affairs medical center (VAMC). Patient demographic and medical characteristics were calculated using descriptive statistics. The prevalence and burden of sexual health issues in our patient sample were calculated using descriptive statistics from these veterans' responses to a self‐report measure of sexual functioning. Item‐level regression analyses were then conducted between sexual functioning responses and other patient data. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures used were the responses to the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX). Results Almost 18% of veterans screened positive for sexual functioning difficulties. Self‐reported sexual dysfunction was most strongly associated with depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, female sex, and service connection rating. Co‐occurring characteristics varied with specific areas of sexual functioning. Conclusions Screening using an empirically validated self‐report instrument indicates that there is a high prevalence of reported sexual dysfunction among recently deployed veterans. Analyses indicated that there are specific characteristics associated with both overall self‐reported sexual dysfunction and specific subtypes of sexual dysfunction. Active assessment of specific aspects

  9. [Adolescent sexuality].

    PubMed

    Calero, Juan del Rey

    2010-01-01

    The social Adolescent features are insecurity, narcissism, eroticism, more impetuosity than reason. 1/3 of adolescents have risk behaviour for health. The pregnancy rate in adolescent are 9/1,000 (11,720, the abort about 50 %). The total abort (2009) were 114,480. Increase the rate of 8,4 (1990) to 14,6/ 1,000 (2009). The sexual education fails. The consulting about contraceptives get pregnancy of the OR 3,2, condom OR 2,7. The adolescent are influenced in his matter: oeer have 70-75 % of influence, mother 30-40 %, father 15 %, for yhe environment and education Cyberspace access to information: 33 % exposed to unwanted sexual materials, 1 in 7 solicited sexual online. The argument have 4 central topic: Morality and Responsibility, Desire (responsibility vs gratification), Danger (fear related to pregnancy and STD/VIH), and Victimization. The prevention of STD: so called safe sex, delayed, and abstinence, Prevention HPV vaccine. The information is not enough, are necessary personal integral formation in values as self control, abstinence, mutual respect, responsibility, reasonable decisions. PMID:21877398

  10. Sexuality and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2000-01-01

    Describes normal aspects of sexuality during the early years, including masturbation and children's fanciful sexual ideas. Presents inappropriately mature sexual knowledge as a danger sign of abuse. Discusses whether and what teachers/caregivers should tell children about sexuality, and notes the importance of teaching staff about sexual identity…

  11. Sexual healing in patients with prostate cancer on hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R

    2015-01-01

    Since prostate cancer becomes more common with age, at least one-third of men have sexual problems at diagnosis. All localized treatments for prostate cancer greatly increase the prevalence of sexual dysfunction, which include loss of desire, erectile dysfunction, and changes in orgasm. Even men on active surveillance have a higher rate of problems than matched peers without prostate cancer. However, men given androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) have the worst rates of sexual dysfunction. Even after 3 to 4 months of ADT, men's desire for sex is decreased and irreversible damage may occur to the erectile tissue in the penis. Erections do not recover in about one-half of men, even if ADT is discontinued. Although intermittent ADT allows some recovery of sexual function, serum testosterone requires 9 to 12 months off ADT to recover. Again, one-half of men have permanent erectile dysfunction. If ADT causes atrophy of the erectile tissue, blood leaks out of the venous system during erection. This syndrome is difficult to treat except with surgery to implant a penile prosthesis. Despite the high rate of sexual problems in men on ADT, a small group stays sexually active and is able to have reliable erections. To improve men's sexual satisfaction on ADT, it may be important to educate them about getting extra mental and physical sexual stimulation, as well as using penile rehabilitation during hormone therapy. Information on reaching orgasm and coping with problems such as dry orgasm, pain with orgasm, and urinary incontinence during sex also should be provided. PMID:25993223

  12. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  13. Recognition and Management of Nonrelaxing Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Faubion, Stephanie S.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2012-01-01

    Nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction is not widely recognized. Unlike in pelvic floor disorders caused by relaxed muscles (eg, pelvic organ prolapse or urinary incontinence, both of which often are identified readily), women affected by nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction may present with a broad range of nonspecific symptoms. These may include pain and problems with defecation, urination, and sexual function, which require relaxation and coordination of pelvic floor muscles and urinary and anal sphincters. These symptoms may adversely affect quality of life. Focus on the global symptom complex, rather than the individual symptoms, may help the clinician identify the condition. The primary care provider is in a position to intervene early, efficiently, and effectively by (1) recognizing the range of symptoms that might suggest nonrelaxing pelvic floor dysfunction, (2) educating patients, (3) performing selective tests when needed to confirm the diagnosis, and (4) providing early referral for physical therapy. PMID:22305030

  14. Rise of herbal and traditional medicine in erectile dysfunction management.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher C K; Tan, Hui Meng

    2011-12-01

    Herbal medicine long has been used in the management of sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction. Many patients have attested to the efficacy of this treatment. However, is it evidence-based medicine? Studies have been done on animal models, mainly in the laboratory. However, randomized controlled trials on humans are scarce. The only herbal medications that have been studied for erectile dysfunction are Panax ginseng, Butea superba, Epimedium herbs (icariin), Tribulus terrestris, Securidaca longipedunculata, Piper guineense, and yohimbine. Of these, only Panax ginseng, B. superb, and yohimbine have published studies done on humans. Unfortunately, these published trials on humans were not robust. Many herbal therapies appear to have potential benefits, and similarly, the health risks of various phytotherapeutic compounds need to be elucidated. Properly designed human trials should be worked out and encouraged to determine the efficacy and safety of potential phytotherapies. PMID:21948222

  15. What Is a Dysfunctional School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Whether or not a school is dysfunctional depends largely on how dysfunctionality in schools is defined and measured. Dysfunctionality, as any construct, is subject to definition and interpretation, and it is thus always marked by perspectivism. But regardless of the definition games occasionally played by academics, some form of reality takes…

  16. Sexual health in adult men with spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Bong, Gary W; Rovner, Eric S

    2007-09-01

    Medical and surgical advances in the treatment of spina bifida (SB) have resulted in increasing numbers of patients reaching adulthood. As such, issues related to sexual maturity are being investigated to offer optimal healthcare to men with spina bifida. This report constitutes a review of the current literature relating to adults with spina bifida and issues of sexuality, erectile dysfunction and fertility. In general, adult males with spina bifida have normal sexual desires and an interest in addressing these issues with healthcare providers. Sexual education and access to intimacy are delayed compared to the general population. 75% of men achieve erections, but maintaining erections is a problem and some may be merely reflexive in nature. The many of these men show marked improvement with sildenafil. In SB erectile dysfunction and infertility are related to the level of neurological lesion with the best performance status in those with sacral lesions and intact reflexes. Men with lesions higher than T10 are at risk for azoospermia. There is an increased risk of neural tube defects in the children of men with spina bifida, but the current incidence with modern folic acid therapy is unknown. As the number of males with spina bifida reaching sexual maturity increases, further investigation into sexuality, sex education, intimacy, and treatments for erectile dysfunction and infertility will be needed.

  17. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  18. Military Sexual Trauma

    MedlinePlus

    ... used by VA to refer to experiences of sexual assault or repeated, threatening sexual harassment that a Veteran ... make an estimate of the actual rates of sexual assault and harassment experiences among all individuals serving in ...

  19. [Libido in limbo. What to do when your sexual impulses have diminished].

    PubMed

    Rice, B

    1995-01-01

    HIV-positive individuals find their sexual impulses affected because they may feel less attractive and fear transmitting the virus to their mate. Their low self-image may cause a decrease in sexual desire or ability. Many doctors insist that sexual desires can return. As the illness progresses, however, HIV-positive individuals can experience loss of libido as levels of T-cells decrease, or fever and weight loss occur. Testosterone levels often decrease, causing lack of sexual desire. Various drugs used to treat AIDS, including Megace, AZT, ddI, ddC and Prozac, may also cause sexual dysfunction.

  20. The cone dysfunction syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aboshiha, Jonathan; Dubis, Adam M; Hardcastle, Alison J; Michaelides, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The cone dysfunction syndromes are a heterogeneous group of inherited, predominantly stationary retinal disorders characterised by reduced central vision and varying degrees of colour vision abnormalities, nystagmus and photophobia. This review details the following conditions: complete and incomplete achromatopsia, blue-cone monochromatism, oligocone trichromacy, bradyopsia and Bornholm eye disease. We describe the clinical, psychophysical, electrophysiological and imaging findings that are characteristic to each condition in order to aid their accurate diagnosis, as well as highlight some classically held notions about these diseases that have come to be challenged over the recent years. The latest data regarding the genetic aetiology and pathological changes observed in the cone dysfunction syndromes are discussed, and, where relevant, translational avenues of research, including completed and anticipated interventional clinical trials, for some of the diseases described herein will be presented. Finally, we briefly review the current management of these disorders. PMID:25770143

  1. Effects of low sleep quality on sexual function, in women with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Amasyali, A S; Taştaban, E; Amasyali, S Y; Turan, Y; Kazan, E; Sari, E; Erol, B; Cengiz, M; Erol, H

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common experience in women with fibromyalgia. However, the physiopathology of this association is unclear. We aimed to evaluate whether sleep disturbance has an influence on sexual function in women with fibromyalgia. Fifty-four sexually active premenopausal women with fibromyalgia were enrolled in the study. The following questionnaires were used: the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Appropriate statistical analyses were used by using SPSS 18. The mean FSFI score was 25.344 ± 6.52 and showed no correlation with age, body mass index, BDI or duration of fibromyalgia. However, a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and low sleep quality was found (r=0.43; P=0.001). In addition, the median FSFI score was 29.2 (27.2-32.4) in patients with higher sleep quality (PSQI⩽5), whereas it was 21.4 (18.9-25.3) in patients with lower sleep quality (PSQI>5) (P<0.001). There was a positive correlation between sexual dysfunction and symptoms of fibromyalgia as indicated by a higher FIQ score (r=0.37; P=0.006). Sexual dysfunction in female patients with fibromyalgia may be due to low sleep quality. Treatment of the sleep disorder may improve female sexual function. PMID:26581913

  2. A Review of the Long-Term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitchman, Joseph H.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Evidence suggests that sexual abuse has serious long-term effects; but specific effects, independent of force, threatened force, or family variables such as parental psychopathology, are not yet clarified. Effects among adults in terms of their relationship to sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, fear, multiple or borderline personality…

  3. EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry.

    PubMed

    van Sweden, B

    1987-07-01

    Electro-clinical correlations are reported in 200 elderly patients admitted to a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. Normal EEG characteristics were generally associated with functional psychiatric disorder. Abnormal EEG features correlated with organic brain syndromes (O.B.S.). The diagnostic and pathogenetic considerations and restrictions of EEG foci, intermittent rhythmic delta activity (Irda) and diffuse EEG slowing are discussed. The informative value of EEG dysfunction in geropsychiatry is emphasised.

  4. Speaking out for sexual and reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Nowrojee, S

    1993-01-01

    The view was presented that the living conditions of South Asian women do not allow for information, power, or support for controlling their own sexuality and reproductive health. Western biases are frequently incorporated into women's programs. The Asian rules governing women's sexuality are governed by sexism, racism, and class consciousness. Asian reproductive policies and programs need to break the silences, destroy the stereotypes, and give women control of their own sexuality and health. Cultures in South Asia prevent open discussion of sexuality, and the female body is considered "unclean." The perception of the Asian women who emigrated to the US is replete with visions of exotic sex or tightly controlled segregation. Asian males were denied involvement with American women. American servicemen abroad have used Asian women in the sex industry; the stereotyped Asian woman is "exotically beautiful, submissive, and willing." Stereotyped American pornography depicts female images in the Kama Sutra in a distorted way. The Asian community does not provide women with the information, tools, and services needed for Asian women to protect themselves from the consequences of unwanted and unprotected sex. The Asian community uses fear and shame to control women's sexuality outside the reproductive role. It is difficult for Asian women to exercise control over their own bodies or exercise reproductive choice. Decisions are made by husbands and families and may be dependent on the sex of the children born. Sexually transmitted diseases are not adequately diagnosed or treated. Asian women need to continue to speak out and to challenge the external controls on their sexuality. The consequences of the stereotyping and controls on Asian women's expression of sexuality are negative feelings about sexuality, lack of attention to proper gynecological care, and a lower likelihood of protection against unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases.

  5. Does change in hostility predict sexual recidivism?

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Cathrine; Nunes, Kevin L; Woods, Mandie; Maimone, Sacha; Hermann, Chantal A; Looman, Jan; Spape, Jessica

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether scores on a widely used measure of hostility--the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI)--and change on this measure predicted sexual recidivism in a sample of 120 adult male incarcerated sexual offenders. Pre- and posttreatment scores, simple difference scores, and clinically significant change were examined. The majority of participants had functional scores on the BDHI prior to treatment. Of those who had dysfunctional pretreatment scores, the majority remained unchanged. Higher posttreatment scores on the Assault and Verbal Hostility subscales significantly predicted sexual recidivism. The remaining pre- and posttreatment scores as well as change scores and classifications did not significantly predict sexual recidivism. Our findings suggest that the Assault and Verbal Hostility subscales may be useful for predicting sexual recidivism but were not clearly consistent with the notion that the BDHI assesses a dynamic risk factor(s) for sexual recidivism. Due to a number of limitations of the current study, however, more rigorous research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

  6. Dissociation during sex and sexual arousal in women with and without a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Bird, Elizabeth R; Seehuus, Martin; Clifton, Jessica; Rellini, Alessandra H

    2014-07-01

    Women with a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) experience dissociative symptoms and sexual difficulties with greater frequency than women without a history of CSA. Current models of sexual dysfunction for sexual abuse survivors suggest that dissociation may mediate the relationship between CSA and sexual arousal difficulties. Dissociation, however, is often conceptualized as a single construct in studies of CSA and not as separate domains as in the dissociation literature. In the present study, women with (CSA, N = 37) and without (NSA, N = 22) a history of CSA recruited from the community were asked to indicate the frequency and intensity of their experience in two dissociation subgroups, derealization and depersonalization, during sex with a partner and in their daily life. Findings showed that, in the NSA group, more depersonalization during sex with a partner was associated with lower sexual arousal functioning. However, for both the NSA and CSA groups, more derealization during sex was associated with higher sexual arousal functioning. No measure of dissociation was significantly associated with sexual responses in the laboratory. These findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between different forms of dissociation (i.e., derealization and depersonalization) in the study of sexual arousal functioning. In addition, the findings challenge the notion that dissociation is a main predictor of sexual arousal problems in survivors of CSA and suggest that a more nuanced relationship may exist.

  7. The Circle of Female Sexual Desire-Have We Come a Long Way?

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the release of sildenafil (Viagra) two decades ago to treat erectile dysfunction in men, there has been a conversation around whether there is a need for a "female Viagra." Last year's release of flibanserin (Addyi) was hailed by some as an achievement in women's sexual health. But how effective is this drug in affecting women's sexual desire? And are the things being labeled as women's sexual desire problems really problems to be fixed with a drug? PMID:27287350

  8. Diagnosing Dementia—Positive Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. A new blood test offers promise in the early detection of Alzheimer's. By Mary Best What if there were an easy, affordable blood test that could accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD)—even ...

  9. How Are Uterine Fibroids Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are uterine fibroids diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... probably won’t know that you have uterine fibroids. Sometimes, health care providers find fibroids during a ...

  10. How Is Lactose Intolerance Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... following tests also can help diagnose lactose intolerance: Hydrogen breath test. For this test, a person drinks ... beverage that has lactose in it. Then, the hydrogen level in the breath is measured at set ...

  11. How Is Atrial Fibrillation Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... too much thyroid hormone). Diagnostic Tests and Procedures EKG An EKG is a simple, painless test that records the ... the most useful test for diagnosing AF. An EKG shows how fast your heart is beating and ...

  12. How Is Bone Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic How is bone cancer staged? How is bone cancer diagnosed? A patient’s symptoms, physical exam, and results ... and other imaging tests. Imaging tests to detect bone cancer X-rays Most bone cancers show up on ...

  13. How Is Penile Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... These might include a biopsy and imaging tests. Biopsy A biopsy is needed to diagnose penile cancer. ... depends on the nature of the abnormality. Incisional biopsy For an incisional biopsy only a part of ...

  14. Sexual Therapy of Patients with Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scalzi, Cynthia C.; Golden, Joshua S.; Loya, Fred

    1977-01-01

    Physical illness or disability inevitably has a damaging effect on sexual relationships. Physicians are usually unaware of the sexual consequences of illness on their patients, and lack experience in treating sexual dysfunctions. The report of treatment of a couple with serious cardiovascular disease illustrates the potential efficacy of brief sex therapy for improving the quality of a patient's life. If a primary physician lacks the skills to conduct sex therapy, he may collaborate with nonphysician therapists. The physician's knowledge of the physiological and psychological effects of a specific illness on his patient is essential to successful therapy. Often, simple education, encouragement or reassurance by the physician is enough to overcome the damaging effects of illness on a patient's sex life. PMID:613543

  15. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior. PMID:949223

  16. Sexual excitement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, R J

    1976-08-01

    Sexual excitement depends on a scenario the person to be aroused has been writing since childhood. The story is an adventure, an autobiography disguised as fiction, in which the hero/heroine hides crucial intrapsychic conflicts, mysteries, screen memories of actual traumatic events and the resolution of these elements into a happy ending, best celebrated by orgasm. The function of the fantasy is to take these painful experiences and convert them to pleasure-triumph. In order to sharpen excitement-the vibration between the fear of original traumas repeating and the hope of a pleasurable conclusion this time-one introduces into the story elements of risk (approximations of the trauma) meant to prevent boredom and safety factors (sub-limnal signals to the storyteller that the risk are not truly dangerous). Sexual fantasy can be studied by means of a person's daydreams (including those chosen in magazines, books, plays, television, movies, and outright pornography), masturbatory behavior, object choice, foreplay, techniques of intercourse, or postcoital behavior.

  17. Sexual Functioning in Young Women and Men: Role of Attachment Orientation.

    PubMed

    Dunkley, Cara R; Dang, Silvain S; Chang, Sabrina C H; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2016-07-01

    Prior research has documented various ways in which adult attachment styles are characteristic of differential behavioral and cognitive patterns within romantic relationships and sexuality. However, few studies have examined the direct influence of anxious or avoidant attachment orientation on sexual function. The aim of the present study was to assess the impact of insecure attachment on sexual function. Undergraduate students completed questionnaires measuring attachment style and sexual functioning. Among women, attachment avoidance tended to be associated with impairments in all aspects of sexual function, whereas anxious attachment tended to be associated with declines in arousal, satisfaction, and ability to achieve orgasm. A different trend was seen in men: Anxious attachment tended to be associated with multiple facets of sexual dysfunction, while avoidant attachment did not correlate with any sexual function deficits and was associated with superior physiological competence. These results suggest that both anxious and avoidant attachment styles are important yet differential predictors of sexual function in men and women.

  18. Multidimensional sexual perfectionism.

    PubMed

    Stoeber, Joachim; Harvey, Laura N; Almeida, Isabel; Lyons, Emma

    2013-11-01

    Perfectionism is a multidimensional personality characteristic that can affect all areas of life. This article presents the first systematic investigation of multidimensional perfectionism in the domain of sexuality exploring the unique relationships that different forms of sexual perfectionism show with positive and negative aspects of sexuality. A sample of 272 university students (52 male, 220 female) completed measures of four forms of sexual perfectionism: self-oriented, partner-oriented, partner-prescribed, and socially prescribed. In addition, they completed measures of sexual esteem, sexual self-efficacy, sexual optimism, sex life satisfaction (capturing positive aspects of sexuality) and sexual problem self-blame, sexual anxiety, sexual depression, and negative sexual perfectionism cognitions during sex (capturing negative aspects). Results showed unique patterns of relationships for the four forms of sexual perfectionism, suggesting that partner-prescribed and socially prescribed sexual perfectionism are maladaptive forms of sexual perfectionism associated with negative aspects of sexuality whereas self-oriented and partner-oriented sexual perfectionism emerged as ambivalent forms associated with positive and negative aspects. PMID:23842783

  19. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies. PMID:26951056

  20. Endocrine dysfunction in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Pelusi, C; Gasparini, D I; Bianchi, N; Pasquali, R

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is a genetic disorder of iron overload and subsequent organ damage. Five types of HH are known, classified by age of onset, genetic cause, clinical manifestations and mode of inheritance. Except for the rare form of juvenile haemochromatosis, symptoms do not usually appear until after decades of progressive iron loading and may be triggered by environmental and lifestyle factors. Despite the last decades discovery of genetic and phenotype diversity of HH, early studies showed a frequent involvement of the endocrine glands where diabetes and hypogonadism are the most common encountered endocrinopathies. The pathogenesis of diabetes is still relatively unclear, but the main mechanisms include the loss of insulin secretory capacity and insulin resistance secondary to liver damage. The presence of obesity and/or genetic predisposition may represent addictive risk factor for the development of this metabolic disease. Although old cases of primary gonad involvement are described, hypogonadism is mainly secondary to selective deposition of iron on the gonadotropin-producing cells of the pituitary gland, leading to hormonal impaired secretion. Cases of hypopituitarism or selected tropin defects, and abnormalities of adrenal, thyroid and parathyroid glands, even if rare, are reported. The prevalence of individual gland dysfunction varies enormously within studies for several bias due to small numbers of and selected cases analyzed, mixed genotypes and missing data on medical history. Moreover, in the last few years early screening and awareness of the disease among physicians have allowed hemochromatosis to be diagnosed in most cases at early stages when patients have no symptoms. Therefore, the clinical presentation of this disease has changed significantly and the recognized common complications are encountered less frequently. This review summarizes the current knowledge on HH-associated endocrinopathies.

  1. Sexual function in Moroccan women with rheumatoid arthritis and its relationship with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Hari, Asmae; Rostom, Samira; Lahlou, Racha; Bahiri, Rachid; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate sexual function in women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using an auto-questionnaire Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and study its correlation with disease activity. Sixty patients with RA and 40 healthy controls were included in this exploratory study. Sociodemographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics were assessed. The disease activity was assessed by auto-questionnaires Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3) and Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity Index 5 (RADAI5) judged by 28 DAS ESR. Sexual function was assessed by an auto-questionnaire specific for female sexuality: FSFI during the last 4 weeks. The definition of sexual dysfunction was considered by FSFI score less than or equal to 26.5. The mean age of RA patients and controls was 45.95 ± 9.3 and 45.01 ± 9.2, respectively. According to FSFI, the percentage of FSD in women with RA was significantly higher than that in the control group. All dimensions of sexuality were affected (desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and satisfaction) except pain. The multivariate linear regression analysis indicated that the swollen joints and the RADAI5 were the independent variables of disease activity associated with sexual dysfunction in women with RA. This study suggests that sexual dysfunction among women suffering from rheumatoid arthritis is found when a targeted questionnaire is used to identify it and that the increased disease activity has a negative effect of sexual function. PMID:25677567

  2. Psychosocial perspectives on sexual recovery after prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lauren M; Wassersug, Richard J; Robinson, John W

    2015-03-01

    Many therapies for erectile dysfunction (ED) after prostate cancer treatment improve erectile firmness, yet, most couples stop using aids within 1-2 years. Patients and partners who expect immediate and complete success with their first ED treatment can be demoralized when they experience treatment failure, which contributes to reticence to explore other ED aids. Comprehensive patient education should improve sustainability and satisfaction with ED treatments. Pre-emptive and realistic information should be provided to couples about the probability of recovering natural erections. Beginning intervention early and using a couple-based approach is ideal. Recommendations are provided about the timing of ED treatment, the order of aid introduction, and combination therapies. Renegotiation of sexual activity is an essential part of sexual adaptation. From the outset of therapy, couples should be encouraged to broaden their sexual repertoire, incorporate erection-independent sexual activities, and continue to be sexual despite ED and reduced libido. PMID:25753250

  3. [TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING TRANSVESICAL PROSTATECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Motin, P I; Andrjuhin, M I; Pul'bere, S A; Alekseev, O Ju; Agaev, N K

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors in treating erectile dysfunction after transvesical prostatectomy. The study involved 63 men aged 55 to 68 years, divided into two groups--29 and 34 patients, respectively. Patients in group 1 received 50 mg of sildenafil citrate (Ereksezil®) on a daily basis, in group 2--100 mg of sildenafil citrate (Ereksezil®) on demand. Postoperative visits were scheduled at the stage of screening, then after a month of treatment and on day 14 after treatment completion (3 visits altogether). Changes of patients' complaints according to IIEF-15 questionnaire showed a significant improvement in erectile function and its components of sexual life satisfaction in both groups of patients, but more significantly with regular medication intake, which has a positive impact on patients' quality of life. At the same time, treatment by PDE-5 inhibitors did not affect the maximum urinary flow rate and residual urine volume. Given the high incidence of the postoperative erectile dysfunction, postoperative administration of PDE-5 inhibitors is relevant and promising.

  4. [TREATMENT OF ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION FOLLOWING TRANSVESICAL PROSTATECTOMY].

    PubMed

    Motin, P I; Andrjuhin, M I; Pul'bere, S A; Alekseev, O Ju; Agaev, N K

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the efficacy and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors in treating erectile dysfunction after transvesical prostatectomy. The study involved 63 men aged 55 to 68 years, divided into two groups--29 and 34 patients, respectively. Patients in group 1 received 50 mg of sildenafil citrate (Ereksezil®) on a daily basis, in group 2--100 mg of sildenafil citrate (Ereksezil®) on demand. Postoperative visits were scheduled at the stage of screening, then after a month of treatment and on day 14 after treatment completion (3 visits altogether). Changes of patients' complaints according to IIEF-15 questionnaire showed a significant improvement in erectile function and its components of sexual life satisfaction in both groups of patients, but more significantly with regular medication intake, which has a positive impact on patients' quality of life. At the same time, treatment by PDE-5 inhibitors did not affect the maximum urinary flow rate and residual urine volume. Given the high incidence of the postoperative erectile dysfunction, postoperative administration of PDE-5 inhibitors is relevant and promising. PMID:26665774

  5. Sexual Concerns of Male Spouses of Female Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litz, Brett T.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Presents case study which highlights attendant cognitive changes that occur in Alzheimer's patient, presenting caregiver with challenges to couple's sexual functioning. Describes man who reported erectile dysfunction directly stemming from stressful changes that had occurred in his relationship to his wife who had Alzheimer's disease. General…

  6. Quality of life and sexuality in disease-free survivors of cervical cancer after radical hysterectomy alone

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Meizhu; Gao, Huiqiao; Bai, Huimin; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-01-01

    . Additionally, the scores on the FSFI items were comparable between the 2 groups; however, the total FSFI scores were 19.7 and 17.4 for total laparoscopy and laparotomy survivors, respectively, both of which were less than the validated cutoff value of 26.6 for diagnosing female sexual dysfunction. Disease-free cervical cancer survivors after RH and/or lymphadenectomy were able to cope well, although RH could greatly impair females’ sexual function regardless of surgical approach. Moreover, the long-term quality of life and sexual function of survivors seemed to be independent of the surgical approach chosen. Randomized controlled and longitudinal trials with larger populations are needed to better compare these issues between patients receiving laparoscopy and laparotomy. PMID:27603383

  7. Addressing Sexual Harassment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Ashbaker, Betty Y.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses ways on how to address the problem of sexual harassment in schools. Sexual harassment--simply defined as any unwanted and unwelcome sexual behavior--is a sensitive topic. Merely providing students, parents, and staff members with information about the school's sexual harassment policy is insufficient; schools must take…

  8. Sexuality and the law.

    PubMed

    Portelli, C J

    1998-01-01

    Federal, state, and local laws in the US now govern almost every aspect of sexuality. This includes sexuality at the workplace, sexuality education, adolescent sexuality, access to sexuality information and sexually explicit materials, sexual orientation, and sexually transmitted disease(STD)/HIV transmission. Almost 33% of the US Supreme Court's docket this past term concerned sexuality issues. In contrast to 50 years ago, when sexuality law was confined to the criminal arena, contemporary "sex crimes" primarily relate to nonconsensual and exploitative behaviors. It is time for lawmakers, judges, lawyers, policy analysts, lobbyists, and advocates to realize they cannot legislate or litigate how, when, or why people fall in love. Rather, the role of the law should be to create and preserve models of justice and equality that seek to preserve one's individual rights to privacy and freedom to choose in matters related to one's sexuality. This includes free access to age-appropriate sexuality information, the right to marriage and children regardless of sexual orientation, comprehensive sexuality education that encompasses information about avoiding unwanted pregnancies and HIV/STDs, access to contraception and abortion, protection from sexually abusive or exploitative relationships, and access to sexual health care. PMID:12295182

  9. Sexuality and Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanctuary, Gerald

    The author examines specific manifestations of violence in relation to sexuality: (1) forcible rape rate; (2) war atrocities; (3) sexual violence in prisons; and (4) pornography. Drawing much from Hannah Arendt's book on violence, he views sexual violence as symptomatic of a lack of sexual power, not a sign of its possession. The causes are seen…

  10. Sexual Harassment in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Nancy A.

    1988-01-01

    Three situations of sexual harassment, typical of the complaints received by various departments and offices on all Indiana University campuses, are presented. According to the National Advisory Council on Women's Educational Programs, "academic sexual harassment is the use of authority to emphasize the sexuality or sexual identity of a student in…

  11. Assessing sexual problems in women at midlife using the short version of the female sexual function index.

    PubMed

    Chedraui, Peter; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-11-01

    Assessment of sexual function is a complex process, especially in women, which requires in any individual case: time, appropriate training and experience. The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction is quite variable depending on the studied population, assessment methods, comorbid conditions and treatments, and age. A large number of screening methods have been developed over the last decades which range from tedious, exhaustive and boring tools to very simple standardized questionnaires. The 19-item female sexual function index (FSFI-19) is among the most used and useful- instrument designed to assess female sexual function in all types of circumstances, sexual orientation and perform the comparison of transcultural factors. A short 6-item- version of the FSFI-19 has been developed to provide a quick general approach to the six original domains (one item per domain). Nevertheless, further studies are needed to demonstrate its validity in different clinical situations as it has been extensively demonstrated with the original tool. PMID:26323235

  12. [Epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Azusa; Midorikawa, Akira; Koyama, Shinichi; Futamura, Akinori; Kuroda, Takeshi; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Itaya, Kazuhiro; Ishigaki, Seiichiro; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2013-02-01

    Acquired higher brain dysfunction is for the most part due to cerebral vascular disease, but epilepsy may also be a cause. In this study with five patients, we discuss the advantages of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) for persistent higher brain dysfunction. The patients showed chronic amnesia or acute aphasia, with associated symptoms like personality change. All five cases affected automatism or convulsive attack, though only after the emergence of higher brain dysfunction and administration of AEDs. There were underlying diseases like cerebral arteriovenous malformation in four cases, but the other patient had none. Electroencephalogram and single photon emission computed tomography revealed one case of aphasia epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction. These results suggest the potential therapeutic efficacy of AEDs for persistent higher brain dysfunction, and we must differentiate epilepsy with higher brain dysfunction from dementia or cerebral vascular disease. PMID:23399676

  13. Assessment of the Effects of Perineoplasty on Female Sexual Function

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Cihan; Ağır, Meriç Çağrı; Sağır, Fulya Gökdağlı; Özer, Atınç; Özbek, Özlem; Dayanır, Hakan; Uysal, Gökçe Saygı; Uysal, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Background: The scar tissue formed by episiotomy during vaginal delivery, and the related pain, is very frequent. The change in the normal anatomy can cause cosmetic and physiologic problems. It can affect and cause deterioration in sexual functions. Therefore, making the right diagnosis and applying the right surgical procedures are very important. Aims: Our aim was to examine the effect of the perineoplasty operation on the sexual dysfunctions that present due to vaginal delivery. Study Design: Self-controlled study. Methods: Forty patients, who attended our clinic between April 2012 and May 2013, and who were between the ages of 20 and 50 years, were included in the study. The patients had complaints of scar tissue in the perineum and various sexual dysfunctions after vaginal delivery, and they were suitable for perineoplasty. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was applied to the patients before and 6 months after the operation, and the results were compared. Results: After the perineoplasty operation, there was a statistically significant improvement in the patients in the domains of sexual desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, and sexual satisfaction (p<0.005). However, there was no significant improvement in the feeling of pain during sexual intercourse (p=0.184). The mean±SD total FSFI score increased significantly after the operation (p<0.005). Conclusion: The sexual dysfunctions that develop due to perineal damage during vaginal delivery can benefit significantly from the perineoplasty operation if the indications are correct. However, vaginal perineoplasty did not provide an improvement in dyspareunia. PMID:26185713

  14. Assessment of female sexual arousal in forensic populations.

    PubMed

    Knack, Natasha M; Murphy, Lisa; Ranger, Rebekah; Meston, Cindy; Fedoroff, J Paul

    2015-04-01

    Sexual offenses cause significant harm to victims, their families, and society as a whole and thus are an important social concern. While it is commonly assumed that sexual offenses are committed solely by males, research has shown that approximately 5 % of sex crimes in the USA and Canada are committed by females. Penile plethysmography (PPG) is a method to measure male genital arousal, which is commonly used in the assessment and treatment of male sex offenders and men with paraphilic sexual interests. Similarly, vaginal photoplethysmography (VPP) is a test to measure female genital arousal and is commonly used to assess female sexual dysfunctions. Although VPP is currently the most validated method to measure genital arousal in women, its use with female sex offenders or females with paraphilic sexual interests has been almost nonexistent. One explanation for this is that some research has suggested that female genital arousal may not be category-specific, meaning that women will respond to any sexual cues, not just those involving their preferred sexual interests. However, not all research supports this finding. Due to the potential benefits of using VPP in the assessment and treatment of female sex offenders or females with paraphilic sexual interests, it is important that further research be done before dismissing the use of VPP in forensic populations. The purpose of this article is to review the current research on VPP and its applicability to female sex offenders and females with paraphilic sexual interests.

  15. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  16. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  17. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided.

  18. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

    PubMed

    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided. PMID:26769116

  19. A Comparative Evaluation of Minimal Therapist Contact and 15-Session Treatment for Female Orgasmic Dysfunction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morokoff, Patricia J.; LoPiccolo, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    Compared a four-session minimal therapist contact (MTC) program for treatment of lifelong global orgasmic dysfunction in women to a 15-session full therapist contact (FTC) program. Both programs were effective in producing female orgasm and in improving satisfaction with the sexual relationship and, for women in MTC treatment, happiness in…

  20. Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Hantavirus Share Compartir Diagnosing and Treating Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Diagnosing HPS Diagnosing HPS in ... of patients that develop HPS from New World Hantaviruses recover completely. No chronic infection has been detected ...