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Sample records for diagnostic dental radiography

  1. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  2. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  3. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  5. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  6. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  7. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  8. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  9. Use of direct digital radiography at remote dental facilities.

    PubMed

    Bartoloni, J A

    2000-12-01

    Digital radiography is changing the practice of dentistry today. This technology offers many advantages compared with conventional radiographic techniques. These advantages include faster imaging times, elimination of conventional dental film/chemicals and processing equipment, reduced radiation exposure, the ability to enhance images, and digitization of images for storage and electronic transfer. The U.S. Air Force Dental Corps completed an evaluation of digital radiography to assess its potential use by deployed units in the field. The Schick Computed Dental Radiography Kit was selected for testing and sent to two remote sites in Saudi Arabia for analysis. After completion of a 6-month evaluation, this system was rated favorably by the evaluators and was determined to be an excellent alternative for field-use radiography. As a result of this study, digital radiography is now being integrated in all expeditionary medical support units for future field deployments.

  10. Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of direct digital radiography system, filtered images, and subtraction radiography

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Filho, Liogi Iwaki; Queiroz, Alfredo De Franco; Geron, Lucas Bachegas Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Background: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of three different imaging systems: Direct digital radiography system (DDR-CMOS), four types of filtered images, and a priori and a posteriori registration of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in the diagnosis of proximal defects. Materials and Methods: The teeth were arranged in pairs in 10 blocks of vinyl polysiloxane, and proximal defects were performed with drills of 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm diameter. Kodak RVG 6100 sensor was used to capture the images. A posteriori DSR registrations were done with Regeemy 0.2.43 and subtraction with Image Tool 3.0. Filtered images were obtained with Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1 software. Images (n = 360) were evaluated by three raters, all experts in dental radiology. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) were higher for DSR images with all three drills (Az = 0.896, 0.979, and 1.000 for drills 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mm, respectively). The highest values were found for 1-mm drills and the lowest for 0.25-mm drills, with negative filter having the lowest values of all (Az = 0.631). Conclusion: The best method of diagnosis was by using a DSR. The negative filter obtained the worst results. Larger drills showed the highest sensitivity and specificity values of the area under the ROC curve. PMID:24124300

  11. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/). PMID:26974042

  12. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/).

  13. Diagnostic Imaging of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques are of paramount importance for dentistry and oral disorders of rabbits, rodents, and other exotic companion mammals. Aside from standard radiography, stomatoscopy is a complementary tool allowing a thorough and detailed inspection of the oral cavity. Computed tomography (CT) generates multiple 2-dimensional views and 3-dimensional reconstructions providing superior diagnostic accuracy also useful for prognosis and treatment of advanced dental disease and its related complications. MRI is a diagnostic imaging technique additional to CT used primarily to enhance soft tissues, including complex odontogenic abscesses.

  14. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice. PMID:25177144

  15. DDS: The Dental Diagnostic Simulation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Daniel E.

    The Dental Diagnostic Simulation (DDS) System provides an alternative to simulation systems which represent diagnostic case studies of relatively limited scope. It may be used to generate simulated case studies in all of the dental specialty areas with case materials progressing through the gamut of the diagnostic process. The generation of a…

  16. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  17. Image quality assessment in panoramic dental radiography: a comparative study between conventional and digital systems.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Tiau, Yu Jin

    2013-02-01

    This study is designed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic image quality of dental panoramic radiography between conventional and digital systems. Fifty-four panoramic images were collected and divided into three groups consisting of conventional, digital with and without post processing image. Each image was printed out and scored subjectively by two experienced dentists who were blinded to the exposure parameters and system protocols. The evaluation covers of anatomical coverage and structures, density and image contrast. The overall image quality score revealed that digital panoramic with post-processing scored the highest of 3.45±0.19, followed by digital panoramic system without post-processing and conventional panoramic system with corresponding scores of 3.33±0.33 and 2.06±0.40. In conclusion, images produced by digital panoramic system are better in diagnostic image quality than that from conventional panoramic system. Digital post-processing visualization can improve diagnostic quality significantly in terms of radiographic density and contrast.

  18. Diagnostics of coated fuel particles by neutron and synchrotron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, G. V.; Podurets, K. M.; Pogorelyi, D. K.; Somenkov, V. A.; Yakovenko, E. V.

    2011-12-15

    The nondestructive monitoring of coated fuel particles has been performed using contact neutron radiography and refraction radiography based on synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these methods supplement each other and have a high potential for determining the sizes, densities, and isotopic composition of the particle components.

  19. Saliva and dental caries: diagnostic tests for normal dental practice.

    PubMed

    Larmas, M

    1992-08-01

    Salivary diagnostics is now entering the surgery of the modern dentist, although no test yet available is so specific and sensitive that caries can be diagnosed from saliva samples only. The present tests are useful for estimating the caries activity due to bad dietary habits (salivary lactobacilli), establishing the presence of infection (salivary mutans streptococci), and identification of salivary yeasts for the determination of the medical condition of the patient. Buffer capacity reveals the most important host response factor acting against caries, while measures of flow rate form the diagnostic basis for treatment planning. These tests, alone or in combination, are now so easy to perform that they should be used in every dental practice.

  20. Dental diagnostics using optical coherence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nathel, H.; Colston, B.; Armitage, G.

    1994-11-15

    Optical radiation can be used for diagnostic purposes in oral medicine. However, due to the turbid, amorphous, and inhomogeneous nature of dental tissue conventional techniques used to transilluminate materials are not well suited to dental tissues. Optical coherence techniques either in the time- of frequency-domain offer the capabilities of discriminating scattered from unscattered light, thus allowing for imaging through turbid tissue. Currently, using optical time-domain reflectometry we are able to discriminate specular from diffuse reflections occurring at tissue boundaries. We have determined the specular reflectivity of enamel and dentin to be approximately 6.6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.3 x 10{sup -6}, respectively. Implications to periodontal imaging will be discussed.

  1. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    PubMed

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  2. Digital radiography in the dental practice: an update.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy; Pawar, Ravikiran

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital imaging in dental practice should be considered. The vast number of advantages of digital imaging include time saving and image manipulation. Dose reduction is a big attraction but in practical terms this might not be fully taken advantage of, as a number of studies suggest. Challenges of images storage, back-up and exchange should be taken into account. Careful planning and integration with practice software should lead to a smooth transition. Remember, computer systems sometimes fail and contingency plans should be in place to avoid disruption to the workflow of the practice.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography in Internal Root Resorption

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Zahrasadat; Moudi, Ehsan; Bijani, Ali; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and periapical (PA) radiography in detecting internal root resorption. Methods and Materials: Eighty single rooted human teeth with visible pulps in PA radiography were split mesiodistally along the coronal plane. Internal resorption like lesions were created in three areas (cervical, middle and apical) in labial wall of the canals in different diameters. PA radiography and CBCT images were taken from each tooth. Two observers examined the radiographs and CBCT images to evaluate the presence of resorption cavities. The data were statistically analyzed and degree of agreement was calculated using Cohen’s kappa (k) values. Results: The mean±SD of agreement coefficient of kappa between the two observers of the CBCT images was calculated to be 0.681±0.047. The coefficients for the direct, mesial and distal PA radiography were 0.405±0.059, 0.421±0.060 and 0.432±0.056, respectively (P=0.001). The differences in the diagnostic accuracy of resorption of different sizes were statistically significant (P<0.05); however, the PA radiography and CBCT, had no statistically significant differences in detection of internal resorption lesions in the cervical, middle and apical regions. Conclusion: Though, CBCT has a higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value in comparison with conventional radiography, this difference was not significant. PMID:26843878

  4. ASSESSING THE USE OF A STANDARDIZED DENTAL DIAGNOSTIC TERMINOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel M.; Stark, Paul C.; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F.; Ramoni, Rachel B.; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E.; Kimmes, Nicole S.; Tavares, Anamaria

    2012-01-01

    Although standardized terminologies, such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), have been in use in medicine for over a century, in the dental profession, efforts to standardize dental diagnostic terms have not achieved widespread acceptance. To address this gap, a standardized dental diagnostic terminology - the ‘EZcodes’ terminology was developed in 2009. Fifteen dental practices and schools in the United States and Europe have implemented the ‘EZcodes’. In this paper we report on the utilization and valid entry of the EZcodes at three of the dental schools that have adopted this standardized dental diagnostic terminology. Electronic data on the use of procedure codes with diagnostic terms from the three schools over a one-year period between July 2010 and June 2011 were aggregated. The diagnostic term and procedure code pairs were adjudicated by three calibrated dentists. Analyses were conducted to gain insight into the utilization and valid entry of the EZcodes diagnostic terminology in the one-year period extending from 7/1/2010 through 6/30/2011. Error proportions in the entry of diagnostic term (and by diagnostic category) were also computed. Within the twelve-month period included in the analysis, a total of 29,965 diagnostic terms and 249,411 procedure codes were entered at the three institutions resulting in a utilization proportion of 12%. Caries and periodontics were the more frequently used categories. More than 1000 of the available 1321 diagnostic terms were never used at the three institutions. Overall, 60.5% of the EZcodes entries were found to be valid. In summary, our results demonstrate low utilization of EZ codes in an electronic dental record and raise the need for specific training of dental providers on the importance of using dental diagnostic terminology and specifically how to use the terms within the EHR. This will serve to increase the use/correct use of the EZcodes diagnostic terminology and ultimately create a

  5. Attitudes and beliefs toward the use of a dental diagnostic terminology A survey of dental providers in a dental practice

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Rachel B.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Kim, Soyun; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; McClellan, Lyle; Simmons, Kristen; Skourtes, Eugene; Yansane, Alfa; White, Joel M.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Attitudes and views are critical to the adoption of innovation. While there have been broadening calls for a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, little is known about the views of private practice dental team members towards the adoption of such a terminology. Methods A survey was developed using validated questions identified through literature review. Domain experts’ input allowed for further modifications. The final survey was administered electronically to 814 team members at a multi-office practice based in the Pacific Northwest. Results Response proportion was 92%. The survey had excellent reliability (Cronbach alpha coefficient = 0.87). Results suggested that participants showed, in general, positive attitudes and beliefs towards using a standardized diagnostic terminology in their practices. Additional written comments by participants highlighted the potential for improved communication with use of the terminology. Conclusions Dental providers and staff in one multi-office practice showed positive attitudes towards the use of a diagnostic terminology, specifically they believed it would improve communication between the dentist and patient as well as among providers, while expressing some concerns if using standardized dental diagnostic terms helps clinicians to deliver better dental care. Practical Implications As the dental profession is advancing towards the use of standardized diagnostic terminologies, successful implementation will require that dental team leaders prepare their dental teams by gauging their attitude toward the use of such a terminology. PMID:26025826

  6. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  7. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  8. Development of dosimetry using detectors of diagnostic digital radiography systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ariga, Eiji; Ito, Shigeki; Deji, Shizuhiko; Saze, Takuya; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2007-01-15

    Dosimetry using an imaging plate (IP) of computed radiography (CR) systems was developed for quality control of output of the x-ray equipment. Sensitivity index, or the S number, of the CR systems was used for estimating exposure dose under the routine condition: exposure dose from 1.0 to 1.0x10{sup 2} {mu}C kg{sup -1}, tube voltages from 50 to 120 kV, and added filtration from 0 to 4.0 mm Al. The IP was calibrated by using a 6 cc ionization chamber having traceability to the National Standard Ionization Chamber. The uncertainty concerning the fading effect was suppressed less than 1.9% by reading the latent image 4 min{+-}5 s after irradiation at the room temperature 25.9{+-}1.0 degree sign C. The S number decreased linearly on the logarithmic graph regardless of the beam quality as exposure dose increased. The relationship between the exposure dose (E) and the S number was fitted by the equation E=a{sup '}xS{sup -b}. The coefficient a{sup '} decreased when the added filtration and the tube voltage were increased. The coefficient b was 0.977{+-}0.007 in all beam qualities. The dosimetry using the IP and the equation can estimate the exposure dose in a range from 9.0x10{sup -2} to 5.0 {mu}C kg{sup -1} within an uncertainty of {+-}5% required by the Japanese Industry Standard. This dose range partially included the doses under routine condition. The doses between 1.0 and 1.0x10{sup 2} {mu}C kg{sup -1} under the routine condition can be shifted to the 5% region by using an absorber. The IP dosimetry is applicable to the quality control of the CR systems.

  9. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    de Haan, R.A.; van Aken, J. )

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  10. Diagnostic sensitivity of ultrasound, radiography and computed tomography for gender determination in four species of lizards.

    PubMed

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Volta, Antonella; Pelizzone, Igor; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Parmigiani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gender determination is frequently requested by reptile breeders, especially for species with poor or absent sexual dimorphism. The aims of the current study were to describe techniques and diagnostic sensitivities of ultrasound, radiography, and computed tomography for gender determination (identification of hemipenes) in four species of lizards. Nineteen lizards of known sex, belonging to four different species (Pogona vitticeps, Uromastyx aegyptia, Tiliqua scincoides, Gerrhosaurus major) were prospectively enrolled. With informed owner consent, ultrasound, noncontrast CT, contrast radiography, and contrast CT (with contrast medium administered into the cloaca) were performed in conscious animals. Imaging studies were reviewed by three different operators, each unaware of the gender of the animals and of the results of the other techniques. The lizard was classified as a male when hemipenes were identified. Nineteen lizards were included in the study, 10 females and nine males. The hemipenes were seen on ultrasound in only two male lizards, and appeared as oval hypoechoic structures. Radiographically, hemipenes filled with contrast medium appeared as spindle-shaped opacities. Noncontrast CT identified hemipenes in only two lizards, and these appeared as spindle-shaped kinked structures with hyperattenuating content consistent with smegma. Hemipenes were correctly identified in all nine males using contrast CT (accuracy of 100%). Accuracy of contrast radiography was excellent (94.7%). Accuracy of ultrasound and of noncontrast CT was poor (64.3% and 63.1%, respectively). Findings from the current study supported the use of contrast CT or contrast radiography for gender determination in lizards.

  11. Assessment of panoramic radiography as a national oral examination tool: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to evaluate the possibility of panoramic radiography as a national oral examination tool. Materials and Methods This report was carried out by review of the literatures. Results Panoramic radiography has sufficient diagnostic accuracy in dental caries, periodontal diseases, and other lesions. Also, the effective dose of panoramic radiography is lower than traditional full-mouth periapical radiography. Conclusion Panoramic radiography will improve the efficacy of dental examination in national oral examination. However, more studies are required to evaluate the benefit, financial cost, and operation time and also to make selection criteria and quality management program. PMID:21977466

  12. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  13. Dental radiography: efficacy in the assessment of intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws in asymptomatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1987-03-01

    In this investigation the efficacy of dental radiography for the detection of occult intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws was evaluated. An analysis of 30 million health insurance records indicated that the period prevalence of malignant lesions was less than 5 cases/million/year, and for benign lesions approximately 100 cases/million/year. Data from a controlled observer-performance study showed that radiographic sensitivities ranged between 50% and 80%. The cost per true-positive finding was estimated to be +8.6 million per malignant case and +430,000 per benign case. An assessment of the dosimetric literature indicated that the benefits of radiographic screening as a means for early detection of a malignancy appear to be counterbalanced by the risk of causing a radiation-induced malignancy. Taken together, these data demonstrate that dental radiography is not efficacious for the purpose of detecting occult lesions.

  14. Diagnostic Ultrasonography of an Ankle Fracture Undetectable by Conventional Radiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Clinton J.; Welk, Aaron B.; Enix, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present diagnostic ultrasonography assessment of an occult fracture in a case of persistent lateral ankle pain. Clinical Features A 35-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with bruising, swelling, and pain along the distal fibula 3 days following an inversion ankle trauma. Prior radiographic examination at an urgent care facility was negative for fracture. Conservative care over the next week noted improvement in objective findings, but the pain persisted. Intervention and Outcome Diagnostic ultrasonography was ordered to assess her persistent ankle pain and showed a minimally displaced fracture of the fibula 4 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. The patient was referred to her primary care physician and successfully managed with conservative care. Conclusion In this case, diagnostic ultrasonography was able to identify a Danis-Weber subtype B1 fracture that was missed by plain film radiography. PMID:27069430

  15. Preliminary display comparison for dental diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odlum, Nicholas; Spalla, Guillaume; van Assche, Nele; Vandenberghe, Bart; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc; Marchessoux, Cédric

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to predict the clinical performance and image quality of a display system for viewing dental images. At present, the use of dedicated medical displays is not uniform among dentists - many still view images on ordinary consumer displays. This work investigated whether the use of a medical display improved the perception of dental images by a clinician, compared to a consumer display. Display systems were simulated using the MEdical Virtual Imaging Chain (MEVIC). Images derived from two carefully performed studies on periodontal bone lesion detection and endodontic file length determination, were used. Three displays were selected: a medical grade one and two consumer displays (Barco MDRC-2120, Dell 1907FP and Dell 2007FPb). Some typical characteristics of the displays are evaluated by measurements and simulations like the Modulation Function (MTF), the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS), backlight stability or calibration. For the MTF, the display with the largest pixel pitch has logically the worst MTF. Moreover, the medical grade display has a slightly better MTF and the displays have similar NPS. The study shows the instability effect for the emitted intensity of the consumer displays compared to the medical grade one. Finally the study on the calibration methodology of the display shows that the signal in the dental images will be always more perceivable on the DICOM GSDF display than a gamma 2,2 display.

  16. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed.

  17. Dental diagnostics: molecular analysis of oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hiyari, Sarah; Bennett, Katie M

    2011-01-01

    Dental biofilms are complex, multi-species bacterial communities that colonize the mouth in the form of plaque and are known to cause dental caries and periodontal disease. Biofilms are unique from planktonic bacteria in that they are mutualistic communities with a 3-dimensional structure and complex nutritional and communication pathways. The homeostasis within the biofilm colony can be disrupted, causing a shift in the bacterial composition of the colony and resulting in proliferation of pathogenic species. Because of this dynamic lifestyle, traditional microbiological techniques are inadequate for the study of biofilms. Many of the bacteria present in the oral cavity are viable but not culturable, which severely limits laboratory analysis. However, with the advent of new molecular techniques, the microbial makeup of oral biofilms can be better identified. Some of these techniques include DNA-DNA hybridization, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and pyrosequencing. This review provides an overview of biofilm formation and examines the major molecular techniques currently used in oral biofilm analysis. Future applications of the molecular analysis of oral biofilms in the diagnosis and treatment of caries and periodontal disease are also discussed. PMID:22309866

  18. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  19. Integrating Research-Informed Teaching within an Undergraduate Level 4 (Year 1) Diagnostic Radiography Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the piloting and evaluation of the Research-informed Teaching experience (RiTe) project. The aim of RiTe was to link teaching and learning with research within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum. A preliminary pilot study of RiTe was undertaken with a group of level 4 (year 1) volunteer BSc (Hons) diagnostic…

  20. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  2. The design and development of hypertext courseware for CAL in diagnostic radiography.

    PubMed

    Cole, P R; Moores, B M

    1995-01-01

    Educational software has been designed and developed for training within the field of diagnostic radiography and is particularly concerned with the science and technology of diagnostic X-rays. The material has been structured into hypertext networks and as such allows interactive exploration of the available information. The courseware development platform was Microsoft Windows and authoring was accomplished using the constructional tool kit ToolBook. The resulting CAL package is highly graphical in nature with a user interface designed to meet the 'friendliness' demands of the end user group. Mechanisms for navigation through, and orientation within, the hypertext have also been established which support two levels of user activities. By changing the level of user freedom, students using the system as a learning tool are restricted to more structured routes than experienced staff using the courseware as an information resource. An aim of this work has been to provide interactive educational activities to support the main courseware, and consequently a novel application has been developed using dynamic data exchange (DDE) and the spreadsheet software Excel. Through a ToolBook front end students can interactively alter an X-ray spectrum by changing the operating conditions of a simulated X-ray tube. PMID:8882562

  3. Dental pulp neurophysiology: part 1. Clinical and diagnostic implications.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elmeguid, Ashraf; Yu, Donald C

    2009-02-01

    Diagnosis in endodontics requires an understanding of pulpal histology, neurology and physiology, and their relationship to the various diagnostic tests commonly used in dental practice. Thermal changes in the oral environment cause rapid displacement of dentinal tubular contents, resulting in pain. This effect, known as the hydrodynamic effect, is the regulator of pain sensation in thermal-pulp testing. Hundreds of axons enter the tooth from the apical foramen to provide it with its sensory supply. The nerve supply of the dentin-pulp complex is mainly made up of A fibres (both delta and beta) and C fibres. They are classified according to their diameter and their conduction velocity. The A fibres are mainly stimulated by an application of cold, producing sharp pain, whereas stimulation of the C fibres produces a dull aching pain. Because of their location and arrangement, the C fibres are responsible for referred pain. This first part of a 2-part review examines the relation between clinical sensations during the diagnostic visit and the neurophysiology of the dental pulp to explore the connection between the art (clinical diagnosis) and the science (neurophysiology) of endodontics.

  4. X-ray vector radiography for bone micro-architecture diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H.; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jürgen; Roschger, Paul; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-06-01

    The understanding of large biophysical systems at the systems level often depends on a precise knowledge of their microstructure. This is difficult to obtain, especially in vivo, because most imaging methods are either limited in terms of achievable field of view, or make use of penetrating ionizing radiations such as x-rays, in which case the resolution is severely limited by the deposited dose. Here, we describe a new method, x-ray vector radiography (XVR), which yields various types of information about the local orientation, anisotropy and average size of the sample microstructures. We demonstrate the feasibility by showing first experimental XVRs of human vertebra bone samples, giving information on the trabecular structures even with a pixel resolution of half a millimetre, much larger than the structures themselves. This last point is critical for the development of low-dose measurement methods which will allow for in vivo studies and potentially in the future for new medical diagnostics methods of bone metabolic disorder diseases such as osteoporosis.

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of an Educational Outcomes Assessment Process for Dental Interpretive Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Richard A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for testing the ability of dental students to detect presence and depth of dental caries was evaluated. Students (n=40) from four experience groups examined radiographs obtained from a model. Results indicated that this method of assessing student competence in radiographic interpretation is valid. (MSE)

  6. The microcomputer in the dental office: a new diagnostic aid.

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    1985-06-01

    The first computer applications in the dental office were based upon standard accountancy procedures. Recently, more and more computer applications have become available to meet the specific requirements of dental practice. This implies not only business procedures, but also facilities to store patient records in the system and retrieve them easily. Another development concerns the automatic calculation of diagnostic data such as those provided in cephalometric analysis. Furthermore, growth and surgical results in the craniofacial area can be predicted by computerized extrapolation. Computers have been useful in obtaining the patient's anamnestic data objectively and for the making of decisions based on such data. Computer-aided instruction systems have been developed for undergraduate students to bridge the gap between textbook and patient interaction without the risks inherent in the latter. Radiology will undergo substantial changes as a result of the application of electronic imaging devices instead of the conventional radiographic films. Computer-assisted electronic imaging will enable image processing, image enhancement, pattern recognition and data transmission for consultation and storage purposes. Image processing techniques will increase image quality whilst still allowing low-dose systems. Standardization of software and system configuration and the development of 'user friendly' programs is the major concern for the near future.

  7. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  8. Organ Doses From Diagnostic Medical Radiography-Trends Over Eight Decades (1930 to 2010).

    PubMed

    Melo, Dunstana R; Miller, Donald L; Chang, Lienard; Moroz, Brian; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    This study provides a retrospective assessment of doses to 13 organs for the most common radiographic examinations conducted between the 1930s and 2010, taking into account typical technical parameters used for radiography during those years. This study is intended to be a resource on changes in medical diagnostic radiation exposure over time with a specific purpose of supporting retrospective epidemiological studies of radiation health risks. The authors derived organ doses to the brain, esophagus, thyroid, red bone marrow, lungs, breast, heart, stomach, liver, colon, urinary bladder, ovaries, and testes based on 14 common radiographic procedures and compared, when possible, with doses reported in the literature. These dose estimates were based on radiographic exposure parameters described in textbooks widely used by radiologic technologists in training from 1939 to 2010. The derived estimated doses presented here are believed to be representative of typical organs for an average-size adult who might be considered to be similar to the reference person. There were large variations in organ doses noted among the different types of radiographic examinations. Doses were highest in organs within the area imaged and next highest in organs in close proximity to the area imaged. Estimated organ doses have declined substantially [overall 22-fold (±38)] over time as a consequence of changes in technology, imaging protocols and protective measures. For some examinations, only slight differences were observed in doses for the decades of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s due to minor changes in technical parameters. Substantial dose reductions were observed in the 1990s and 2000s.

  9. The iliac crest in forensic age diagnostics: evaluation of the apophyseal ossification in conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Vieth, Volker; Domnick, Christoph; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Schmeling, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Due to the increasing significance of forensic age estimations in the age of globalisation, novel radiographic criteria besides clavicles and hand bones may provide additional certainty for forensic age expertises. The present study analyses the suitability of the iliac crest apophysis by means of 643 pelvic radiographs of patients between 10 and 30 years of age. Retrospective assessments were carried out according to the forensically established classification and sub-classification systems modified after Kreitner et al. (Rofo 166(6):481-486, 1997) and Kellinghaus et al. (Int J Legal Med 124(4):321-325, 2010). The basic ossification stages range from 1 to 4, and the sub-stages of stage 2 and 3 range from a to c. While stage 3c was first achieved at the age of 15 by both sexes, stage 4 was first observed in females at the age of 16 and in males at the age of 17. This indicates the possibility of a valid diagnosis of both the age of 14 and the age of 16 years which represent legally relevant age thresholds in numerous countries. Applied as targeted radiography on the iliac crest, the exposure to radiation would range between other radiographic techniques recently applied. Therefore, the iliac crest apophysis appears principally suitable as novel possible criterion for forensic age estimation in the living. However, for the establishment of the iliac crest apophysis in routine diagnostics, further studies are needed focussing on the comparison of different grading systems and different radiological techniques.

  10. In vitro synchrotron-based radiography of micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Rack, A.; Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Zabler, S.; Nelson, K.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants was investigated in vitro using high-resolution radiography in combination with hard X-ray synchrotron radiation. Images were taken with the specimen under different mechanical loads of up to 100 N. The aim of this investigation was to prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. Synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in highly attenuating objects. The first illustration of a micro-gap which was previously indistinguishable by laboratory methods underlines that the complex micro-mechanical behavior of implants requires further in vitro investigations where synchrotron-based micro-imaging is one of the prerequisites. PMID:20157285

  11. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ2 = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats. PMID:25234207

  12. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Seo, Kangmoon

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cemento- enamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ(2) = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats. PMID:25234207

  13. Exposure Geometry And Film Contrast Differences As Bases For Incomplete Cancellation Of Irrelevant Structures In Dental Subtraction Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Okano, Tomohiro; Grondahl, Hans-Goran; Grondahl, Kerstin; Webber, Richard L.

    1981-11-01

    Subtraction radiography for longitudinal studies requires both reproducible imaging geometry and film contrast characteristics to permit perfect alignment of the radiographs, and achieve good cancellation of diagnostically irrelevant background structures. The standard deviation (SD) of gray levels about the mean in a subtraction image was used as a relative measure of the residual structured noise. In order to estimate the effects of improperly standardized radiographs on SD in the subtraction image, both the imaging angle and film exposure time were systematically varied. The results showed that SD changed linear for small misalignment angles of the central beam, the variance attributable to this error source reaching about the same magnitude as the variance due to anatomical differences for angulation errors within ±20. The SD increase due to large film contrast disparity could be partly reverted for angulation errors within this bound by using a quadratic transformation which matched the first two moments of the gray level distributions in the two parent radiographs. Therefore, in order to use some of the retrospective data obtained under less stringent standardizations for subtraction imagery, it appears possible to adjust for differences in film contrast, and, perhaps, correct for geometric misalignment by a separate algorithm.

  14. Correlation of dental pulp stones, carotid artery and renal calcifications using digital panoramic radiography and ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Yeluri, Garima; Kumar, C. Anand; Raghav, Namita

    2015-01-01

    Background: The human tissues continuously undergo modification as deposition of calcium (CA) salts either in an organized or disorganized pattern. The latter pattern usually occurs in the soft tissues such as in arteries, brain, kidneys, lungs, and dental pulp. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification (CDC) as a marker for renal calcification and altered serum biomarkers such as serum CA, phosphorus (P), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Materials and Methods: Digital panoramic radiographs of 50 patients with the presence of pulp stones and suspected CAC were subjected to carotid artery and renal ultrasonography (USG) examination for the presence of vascular calcification and also to evaluate the alterations in serum CA, P, and ALP levels. Data were analyzed statistically using Chi-square test. Results: Panoramic radiographs of 50 patients showed 88.28% of teeth with the presence of pulp stones stones and 91% carotid arteries with calcification. The sensitivity of panoramic radiograph was greater than that of USG (93.67%), but the specificity of USG was more than the panoramic radiograph (44.44%) in detecting CAC. The prevalence rate of renal calcification on USG was 92%. The statistical difference between the patients with or without alteration in serum Ca levels was not significant (χ2 = 0.581 and P = 0.446). On comparison of serum P and ALP, the difference was found to be statistically significant. Conclusion: Presence of pulp stones and CAC's on panoramic radiograph have remarkably proved to establish the chances of renal artery calcification associated with alterations in serum CA levels. PMID:26604565

  15. The effect of cathode ray tube display format on observer performance in dental digitized radiography: comparison with plain films.

    PubMed

    Møystad, A; Svanaes, D B; Larheim, T A; Gröndahl, H G

    1994-11-01

    Studies of observer performance with non-manipulated digital images are almost lacking; nor has the effect of cathode ray tube (CRT) display formats been evaluated. The present study compared the diagnostic accuracy of observers with and without clinical experience in evaluating intra-oral dental films and the corresponding non-manipulated digitized images. Three different-sized (5", 9", 17") monitors were used to study the effect of CRT display format. Artificial radiolucent and radiopaque lesions in dry human mandibles were examined. ROC curve areas were averaged and cross-tabulated according to viewing method and observer experience. For the total group, the non-manipulated digital images resulted in smaller ROC curve areas than the plain films for all CRT formats, with a significantly inferior result for the 17" images (p = 0.036). The increase in diagnostic accuracy of the digital images with decreasing CRT size was not significant (p > 0.05). There was some difference in the mean ROC curve areas between teachers and students, but the effect of the viewing methods was not significant. In terms of observer performance, the experienced observers demonstrated a reduced, and the inexperienced an increased, variability with the digital images compared with conventional film.

  16. Does use of an electronic health record with dental diagnostic system terminology promote dental students' critical thinking?

    PubMed

    Reed, Susan G; Adibi, Shawn S; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G; Wahlquist, Amy E; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H; Walji, Muhammad F; O'Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-06-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students' critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013-17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry. PMID:26034034

  17. Does use of an electronic health record with dental diagnostic system terminology promote dental students' critical thinking?

    PubMed

    Reed, Susan G; Adibi, Shawn S; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G; Wahlquist, Amy E; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H; Walji, Muhammad F; O'Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-06-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students' critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013-17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry.

  18. Does Use of an Electronic Health Record with Dental Diagnostic System Terminology Promote Dental Students’ Critical Thinking?

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan G.; Adibi, Shawn S.; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G.; Wahlquist, Amy E.; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H.; Walji, Muhammad F.; O’Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students’ critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013–17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry. PMID:26034034

  19. Diagnostic radiography as a risk factor for chronic myeloid and monocytic leukaemia (CML).

    PubMed Central

    Preston-Martin, S.; Thomas, D. C.; Yu, M. C.; Henderson, B. E.

    1989-01-01

    This interview study included 136 Los Angeles County residents aged 20-69 with CML diagnosed from 1979 to 1985 (cases) and 136 neighbourhood controls. During the 3-20 years before diagnosis of the case, more cases than controls had radiographic examinations of the back, gastrointestinal (GI) tract and kidneys, and cases more often had GI and back radiography on multiple occasions (odds ratio (OR) for back X-rays on five or more occasions = 12.0; P less than 0.01). Published estimates were used to assign a minimum dose to the active bone marrow for various radiographic procedures. ORs were estimated for cumulative marrow doses for each of four time periods (3-5 years, 6-10 years, 11-20 years and 3-20 years before the diagnosis of the case). The ORs for exposure to 0.99, 100-999, 1000-1999 and greater than or equal to 2000 mrad in the 3-20 years before diagnosis were 1.0, 1.4, 1.6 and 2.4 (P for highest exposure category and P for trend both less than 0.05). The association was strongest for the period 6-10 years before diagnosis, and the effects of radiation exposure during this period remained significant after consideration of other risk factors in a logistic regression analysis. PMID:2713251

  20. LLNL flash x-ray radiography machine (FXR) double-pulse upgrade diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M.; Avalee, C.; Richardson, R.; Zentler, J.

    1997-06-26

    When the FXR machine was first tuned on the 1980`s, a minimal amount of diagnostics was available and consisted mostly of power monitors. During the recent accelerator upgrade, additional beam diagnostics were added. The sensor upgrades included beam bugs (resistive wall beam motion sensors) and high-frequency B-dot. Even with this suite of measurement tools, tuning was difficult. For the current Double- Pulse Upgrade, beam transport is a more complex problem--the beam characteristics must be measured better. Streak and framing cameras, which measure beam size and motions, are being added. Characterization of the beam along the entire accelerator is expected and other techniques will be evaluated also. Each sensor has limitations and only provides a piece of the puzzle. Besides providing more beam data, the set of diagnostics used should be broad enough so results can be cross validated. Results will also be compared to theoretical calculations and computer models, and successes and difficulties will be reported.

  1. Diagnostic usefulness of chest computed radiography--film versus cathode-ray tube images.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, T; Sakuma, S; Endo, T; Ikeda, M

    1995-02-01

    Seventy-one plain chest images obtained by computed radiography (CR) with an imaging plate were interpreted on film and two kinds of cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors installed separately at two facilities (1,024 x 1,536 pixels, 8 bits, and 1,024 x 1,280 pixels, 10 bits) by 20 radiologists and four chest internists. The clinical categories of these 71 cases included pulmonary nodules and interstitial abnormalities. Image reading sessions were held over a total of 4 days, ie, 2 days and then another 2 days, 3 weeks later. Twenty-four observers formed four groups with six members each. Two groups read either films or CRT images at one of the two facilities. In the second experiment, 26 of 71 images were compressed at 10:1, 19 of 71 were compressed at 20:1, and 26 were not compressed. Analyses of the areas under the receiver-operating characteristic curves showed no significant differences in detection of pulmonary abnormalities between film and CRT. In detecting interstitial pulmonary abnormalities, film was more sensitive than CRT monitor. There were no significant differences in observers' performances between the two different kinds of CRT workstation. Subjective evaluation of image quality showed that images irreversibly compressed to the ratios of 10:1 and 20:1 were inferior to original images. Although further considerations are needed with regard to spatial resolution requirements, image processing, and image compression, the utilization of CR CRT image as a substitute for CR film image will be possible.

  2. Formation and propagation of laser-driven plasma jets in an ambient medium studied with X-ray radiography and optical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dizière, A.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Pikuz, S.; Koenig, M.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present experimental results obtained on the LULI2000 laser facility regarding structure and dynamics of astrophysical jets propagating in interstellar medium. The jets, generated by using a cone-shaped target, propagate in a nitrogen gas that mimics the interstellar medium. X-ray radiography as well as optical diagnostics were used to probe both high and low density regions. In this paper, we show how collimation of the jets evolves with the gas density.

  3. In-situ material-motion diagnostics and fuel radiography in experimental reactors

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Material-motion monitoring has become a routine part of in-pile transient reactor-safety experiments. Diagnostic systems, such as the fast-neutron hodoscope, were developed for the purpose of providing direct time-resolved data on pre-failure fuel motion, cladding-breach time and location, and post-failure fuel relocation. Hodoscopes for this purpose have been installed at TREAT and CABRI; other types of imaging systems that have been tested are a coded-aperture at ACRR and a pinhole at TREAT. Diagnostic systems that use penetrating radiation emitted from the test section can non-invasively monitor fuel without damage to the measuring instrument during the radiographic images of test sections installed in the reator. Studies have been made of applications of hodoscopes to other experimental reactors, including PBF, FARET, STF, ETR, EBR-II, SAREF-STF, and DMT.

  4. Dental diagnostic radiology in the forensic sciences: two case presentations.

    PubMed

    Nicopoulou-Karayianni, K; Mitsea, A G; Horner, K

    2007-06-01

    Dentomaxillofacial radiology is a useful tool in forensic science to reveal characteristics of the structures of the dentomaxillofacial region. Postmortem radiographs are valuable to the forensic odontologist for comparison with antemortem radiographs, which are the most consistent part of the antemortem records that can be transmitted during forensic examination procedures. By using dentomaxillofacial radiology we can, therefore, give answers to problems dealing with identification cases, mass disasters and dental age estimation. We present the contribution of dentomaxillofacial radiology to the forensic sciences through two cases of deceased persons, where identification was based on information provided by radiographs. The right performance, interpretation and reportage of dentomaxillofacial radiological examination and procedures can be extremely valuable in solving forensic problems. PMID:17577973

  5. Dental diagnostic clinical instrument ("Canary") development using photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, R. J.; Sivagurunathan, K.; Garcia, J.; Matvienko, A.; Mandelis, A.; Abrams, S.

    2010-03-01

    Since 1999, our group at the CADIFT, University of Toronto, has developed the application of Frequency Domain Photothermal Radiometry (PTR) and Luminescence (LUM) to dental caries detection. Various cases including artificial caries detection have been studied and some of the inherent advantages of the adaptation of this technique to dental diagnostics in conjunction with modulated luminescence as a dual-probe technique have been reported. Based on these studies, a portable, compact diagnostic instrument for dental clinic use has been designed, assembled and tested. A semiconductor laser, optical fibers, a thermoelectric cooled mid-IR detector, and a USB connected data acquisition card were used. Software lock-in amplifier techniques were developed to compute amplitude and phase of PTR and LUM signals. In order to achieve fast measurement and acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for clinical application, swept sine waveforms were used. As a result sampling and stabilization time for each measurement point was reduced to a few seconds. A sophisticated software interface was designed to simultaneously record intra-oral camera images with PTR and LUM responses. Preliminary results using this instrument during clinical trials in a dental clinic showed this instrument could detect early caries both from PTR and LUM signals.

  6. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    the recession of the solid propellant grain can drastically alter the flow-field and effect the recession of internal insulation and nozzle materials. Simultaneous measurement of the overall erosion rate, the development of the char layer, and the recession of the char-virgin interface during the motor operation can be rather difficult. While invasive techniques have been used with limited success, they have serious drawbacks. Break wires or make wire sensors can be installed into a sufficient number of locations in the charring material from which a time history of the charring surface can be deduced. These sensors fundamentally alter the local structure of the material in which they are imbedded. Also, the location of these sensors within the material is not known precisely without the use of an X-ray. To determine instantaneous recession rates, real-time X-ray radiography (X-ray RTR) has been utilized in several SRM experiments at PSU. The X-ray RTR system discussed in this paper consists of an X-ray source, X-ray image intensifier, and CCD camera connected to a capture computer. The system has been used to examine the ablation process of internal insulation as well as nozzle material erosion in a subscale SRM. The X-ray source is rated to 320 kV at 10 mA and has both a large (5.5 mm) and small (3.0 mm) focal spot. The lead-lined cesium iodide X-ray image intensifier produces an image which is captured by a CCD camera with a 1,000 x 1,000 pixel resolution. To produce accurate imagery of the object of interest, the alignment of the X-ray source to the X-ray image intensifier is crucial. The image sequences captured during the operation of an SRM are then processed to enhance the quality of the images. This procedure allows for computer software to extract data on the total erosion rate and the char layer thickness. Figure 1 Error! Reference source not found.shows a sequence of images captured during the operation the subscale SRM with the X-ray RTR system. The X

  7. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  8. Polarization sensitive camera for the in vitro diagnostic and monitoring of dental erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossen, Anke; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Lussi, Adrian; Meier, Christoph

    Due to a frequent consumption of acidic food and beverages, the prevalence of dental erosion increases worldwide. In an initial erosion stage, the hard dental tissue is softened due to acidic demineralization. As erosion progresses, a gradual tissue wear occurs resulting in thinning of the enamel. Complete loss of the enamel tissue can be observed in severe clinical cases. Therefore, it is essential to provide a diagnosis tool for an accurate detection and monitoring of dental erosion already at early stages. In this manuscript, we present the development of a polarization sensitive imaging camera for the visualization and quantification of dental erosion. The system consists of two CMOS cameras mounted on two sides of a polarizing beamsplitter. A horizontal linearly polarized light source is positioned orthogonal to the camera to ensure an incidence illumination and detection angles of 45°. The specular reflected light from the enamel surface is collected with an objective lens mounted on the beam splitter and divided into horizontal (H) and vertical (V) components on each associate camera. Images of non-eroded and eroded enamel surfaces at different erosion degrees were recorded and assessed with diagnostic software. The software was designed to generate and display two types of images: distribution of the reflection intensity (V) and a polarization ratio (H-V)/(H+V) throughout the analyzed tissue area. The measurements and visualization of these two optical parameters, i.e. specular reflection intensity and the polarization ratio, allowed detection and quantification of enamel erosion at early stages in vitro.

  9. Conventional radiography and cross-sectional imaging when planning dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible to support an overdenture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A M; Glenny, A-M; Goodwin, M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for this systematic review were to determine if the pre-operative availability of cross-sectional imaging, such as cone beam CT, has a diagnostic impact, therapeutic impact or impact on patients' outcome when placing two dental implants in the anterior mandible to support an overdenture. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (CENTRAL), MEDLINE® and Embase were searched up to, and including, February 2013. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they compared the impact of conventional and cross-sectional imaging when placing dental implants in sites including the anterior mandible. An adapted quality assessment tool was used for the assessment of the risk of bias in included studies. Pooled quantitative analysis was not possible and, therefore, synthesis was qualitative. Of 2374 potentially eligible papers, 5 studies were included. Little can be determined from a synthesis of these studies because of their small number, clinical diversity and high risks of bias. Notwithstanding, it may be tentatively inferred that cross-sectional imaging has a therapeutic impact in the more challenging cases. In terms of impact, this review has found no evidence to support any specific imaging modality when planning dental implant placement in any region of the mouth. Therefore, those who argue that cross-sectional imaging should be used for the assessment of all dental implant sites are unsupported by evidence.

  10. [Optimization of initial dental caries diagnostics and treatment in patients infected with herpes virus].

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Iu V; Bulgakova, A I

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of examination and treatment of patients with initial caries (K02.0), infected with herpes virus. Technologies and methods used by most dentists are not sensitive enough to detect caries at early stages, while the remineralizing therapy can be very effective. The method of laser fluorescence spectroscopy with DIAGNOdent pen device (KaVo) was used for diagnostic of dental caries at early stages. Treatment was carried out with HealOzon device (KaVo), which is used in oral medicine to produce ozone.

  11. Diagnostic methods for assessing maxillary skeletal and dental transverse deficiencies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Dena; Currie, Kris; Vich, Manuel Lagravere; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the diagnostic tools available for assessing maxillary transverse deficiencies. Methods An electronic search of three databases was performed from their date of establishment to April 2015, with manual searching of reference lists of relevant articles. Articles were considered for inclusion if they reported the accuracy or reliability of a diagnostic method or evaluation technique for maxillary transverse dimensions in mixed or permanent dentitions. Risk of bias was assessed in the included articles, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool-2. Results Nine articles were selected. The studies were heterogeneous, with moderate to low methodological quality, and all had a high risk of bias. Four suggested that the use of arch width prediction indices with dental cast measurements is unreliable for use in diagnosis. Frontal cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reportedly more reliable for assessing intermaxillary transverse discrepancies than posteroanterior cephalograms. Two studies proposed new three-dimensional transverse analyses with CBCT images that were reportedly reliable, but have not been validated for clinical sensitivity or specificity. No studies reported sensitivity, specificity, positive or negative predictive values or likelihood ratios, or ROC curves of the methods for the diagnosis of transverse deficiencies. Conclusions Current evidence does not enable solid conclusions to be drawn, owing to a lack of reliable high quality diagnostic studies evaluating maxillary transverse deficiencies. CBCT images are reportedly more reliable for diagnosis, but further validation is required to confirm CBCT's accuracy and diagnostic superiority.

  12. Diagnostic methods for assessing maxillary skeletal and dental transverse deficiencies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Dena; Currie, Kris; Vich, Manuel Lagravere; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the diagnostic tools available for assessing maxillary transverse deficiencies. Methods An electronic search of three databases was performed from their date of establishment to April 2015, with manual searching of reference lists of relevant articles. Articles were considered for inclusion if they reported the accuracy or reliability of a diagnostic method or evaluation technique for maxillary transverse dimensions in mixed or permanent dentitions. Risk of bias was assessed in the included articles, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool-2. Results Nine articles were selected. The studies were heterogeneous, with moderate to low methodological quality, and all had a high risk of bias. Four suggested that the use of arch width prediction indices with dental cast measurements is unreliable for use in diagnosis. Frontal cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reportedly more reliable for assessing intermaxillary transverse discrepancies than posteroanterior cephalograms. Two studies proposed new three-dimensional transverse analyses with CBCT images that were reportedly reliable, but have not been validated for clinical sensitivity or specificity. No studies reported sensitivity, specificity, positive or negative predictive values or likelihood ratios, or ROC curves of the methods for the diagnosis of transverse deficiencies. Conclusions Current evidence does not enable solid conclusions to be drawn, owing to a lack of reliable high quality diagnostic studies evaluating maxillary transverse deficiencies. CBCT images are reportedly more reliable for diagnosis, but further validation is required to confirm CBCT's accuracy and diagnostic superiority. PMID:27668196

  13. Effect of varying displays and room illuminance on caries diagnostic accuracy in digital dental radiographs.

    PubMed

    Pakkala, T; Kuusela, L; Ekholm, M; Wenzel, A; Haiter-Neto, F; Kortesniemi, M

    2012-01-01

    In clinical practice, digital radiographs taken for caries diagnostics are viewed on varying types of displays and usually in relatively high ambient lighting (room illuminance) conditions. Our purpose was to assess the effect of room illuminance and varying display types on caries diagnostic accuracy in digital dental radiographs. Previous studies have shown that the diagnostic accuracy of caries detection is significantly better in reduced lighting conditions. Our hypothesis was that higher display luminance could compensate for this in higher ambient lighting conditions. Extracted human teeth with approximal surfaces clinically ranging from sound to demineralized were radiographed and evaluated by 3 observers who detected carious lesions on 3 different types of displays in 3 different room illuminance settings ranging from low illumination, i.e. what is recommended for diagnostic viewing, to higher illumination levels corresponding to those found in an average dental office. Sectioning and microscopy of the teeth validated the presence or absence of a carious lesion. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated for each modality and observer. Differences were estimated by analyzing the binary data assuming the added effects of observer and modality in a generalized linear model. The observers obtained higher sensitivities in lower illuminance settings than in higher illuminance settings. However, this was related to a reduction in specificity, which meant that there was no significant difference in overall accuracy. Contrary to our hypothesis, there were no significant differences between the accuracy of different display types. Therefore, different displays and room illuminance levels did not affect the overall accuracy of radiographic caries detection.

  14. Practice Characteristics Associated with Patient-Specific Receipt of Dental Diagnostic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Weems, Richard A; Litaker, Mark S; Shelton, Brent J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To quantify the role of practice characteristics in patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographic services. Data Source/Study Setting Florida Dental Care Study (FDCS). Study Design The FDCS was a 48-month prospective observational cohort study of community-dwelling adults. Participants' dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire about their practice characteristics. Data Collection/Extraction Methods In-person interviews and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline, 24, and 48 months, with 6-monthly telephone interviews in between. A single multivariate (four radiographic service outcomes) multivariable (multiple explanatory covariates) logistic regression was used to model service receipts. Principal Findings These practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of radiographic services: number of different practices attended during follow-up; dentist's rating of how busy the practice was; typical waiting time for a new patient examination; practice size; percentage of patients that the dentist reported as interested in details about the condition of their mouths; percentage of African American patients in the practice; percentage of patients in the practice who do not have dental insurance; and dentist's agreement with a statement regarding whether patients should be dismissed from the practice. Effects had differential magnitudes and directions of effect, depending upon radiograph type. Conclusions Practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of services. These effects were independent of patient-specific disease level and patient-specific sociodemographic characteristics, suggesting that practitioners do influence receipt of these diagnostic services. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that practitioners act in response to a mix of patients' interests, economic self-interests, and their own treatment preferences. PMID:16987308

  15. Diagnostic Value of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Periapical Radiography In Detection of Vertical Root Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Ezzodini Ardakani, Fatemeh; Razavi, Seyed Hossein; Tabrizizadeh, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vertical root fracture (VRF) is the longitudinal fracture of the root in endodontically treated teeth. Considering the limitations of two-dimensional radiographic images in detection of VRF and introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), this study was designed to find the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CBCT and periapical (PA) radiography in detection of VRFs. Methods and Materials: This was a cross-sectional in vitro study on 80 extracted human single canal teeth including 40 maxillary and 40 mandibular teeth. After standardized endodontic treatment of the roots, VRF was induced in half of the teeth in each group, and other half were left without fracture. Teeth were inserted in dry maxillary and mandibular alveoli. PA radiographs and CBCT images were taken from the specimens. Data were analyzed with SPSS software. The McNemar test was used to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of images, and kappa coefficient was used to assess the degree of agreement between the observers. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Sensitivity and specificity values of CBCT were 97.5% and 95%, respectively. However, for PA radiography the sensitivity and specificity were 67.5% and 92.5%, in order of appearance. Accuracy of CBCT (96.25%) and PA radiography (80%) in both jaws were significantly different (P=0.022). Two methods were not significantly different when testing specificity (P=0.298). Conclusion: This study showed that the sensitivity and accuracy of CBCT in detection of vertical root fracture are higher than periapical radiography. CBCT can be recommended to be used in detection of vertical root fractures. PMID:25834597

  16. Automated chest-radiography as a triage for Xpert testing in resource-constrained settings: a prospective study of diagnostic accuracy and costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, R. H. H. M.; Sánchez, C. I.; Maduskar, P.; Melendez, J.; Peters-Bax, L.; Peter, J. G.; Dawson, R.; Theron, G.; Dheda, K.; van Ginneken, B.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular tests hold great potential for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, but are costly, time consuming, and HIV-infected patients are often sputum scarce. Therefore, alternative approaches are needed. We evaluated automated digital chest radiography (ACR) as a rapid and cheap pre-screen test prior to Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert). 388 suspected TB subjects underwent chest radiography, Xpert and sputum culture testing. Radiographs were analysed by computer software (CAD4TB) and specialist readers, and abnormality scores were allocated. A triage algorithm was simulated in which subjects with a score above a threshold underwent Xpert. We computed sensitivity, specificity, cost per screened subject (CSS), cost per notified TB case (CNTBC) and throughput for different diagnostic thresholds. 18.3% of subjects had culture positive TB. For Xpert alone, sensitivity was 78.9%, specificity 98.1%, CSS $13.09 and CNTBC $90.70. In a pre-screening setting where 40% of subjects would undergo Xpert, CSS decreased to $6.72 and CNTBC to $54.34, with eight TB cases missed and throughput increased from 45 to 113 patients/day. Specialists, on average, read 57% of radiographs as abnormal, reducing CSS ($8.95) and CNTBC ($64.84). ACR pre-screening could substantially reduce costs, and increase daily throughput with few TB cases missed. These data inform public health policy in resource-constrained settings.

  17. Automated chest-radiography as a triage for Xpert testing in resource-constrained settings: a prospective study of diagnostic accuracy and costs.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, R H H M; Sánchez, C I; Maduskar, P; Melendez, J; Peters-Bax, L; Peter, J G; Dawson, R; Theron, G; Dheda, K; van Ginneken, B

    2015-01-01

    Molecular tests hold great potential for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, but are costly, time consuming, and HIV-infected patients are often sputum scarce. Therefore, alternative approaches are needed. We evaluated automated digital chest radiography (ACR) as a rapid and cheap pre-screen test prior to Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert). 388 suspected TB subjects underwent chest radiography, Xpert and sputum culture testing. Radiographs were analysed by computer software (CAD4TB) and specialist readers, and abnormality scores were allocated. A triage algorithm was simulated in which subjects with a score above a threshold underwent Xpert. We computed sensitivity, specificity, cost per screened subject (CSS), cost per notified TB case (CNTBC) and throughput for different diagnostic thresholds. 18.3% of subjects had culture positive TB. For Xpert alone, sensitivity was 78.9%, specificity 98.1%, CSS $13.09 and CNTBC $90.70. In a pre-screening setting where 40% of subjects would undergo Xpert, CSS decreased to $6.72 and CNTBC to $54.34, with eight TB cases missed and throughput increased from 45 to 113 patients/day. Specialists, on average, read 57% of radiographs as abnormal, reducing CSS ($8.95) and CNTBC ($64.84). ACR pre-screening could substantially reduce costs, and increase daily throughput with few TB cases missed. These data inform public health policy in resource-constrained settings. PMID:26212560

  18. The efficacy of screening for common dental diseases by hygiene-therapists: a diagnostic test accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Macey, R; Glenny, A; Walsh, T; Tickle, M; Worthington, H; Ashley, J; Brocklehurst, P

    2015-03-01

    Regularly attending adult patients are increasingly asymptomatic and not in need of treatment when attending for their routine dental examinations. As oral health improves further, using the general dental practitioner to undertake the "checkup" on regular "low-risk" patients represents a substantial and potentially unnecessary cost for state-funded systems. Given recent regulatory changes in the United Kingdom, it is now theoretically possible to delegate a range of tasks to hygiene-therapists. This has the potential to release the general dental practitioner's time and increase the capacity to care. The aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic test accuracy of hygiene-therapists when screening for dental caries and periodontal disease in regularly attending asymptomatic adults who attend for their checkup. A visual screen by hygiene-therapists acted as the index test, and the general dental practitioner acted as the reference standard. Consenting asymptomatic adult patients, who were regularly attending patients at 10 practices across the Northwest of England, entered the study. Both sets of clinicians made an assessment of dental caries and periodontal disease. The primary outcomes measured were the sensitivity and specificity values for dental caries and periodontal disease. In total, 1899 patients were screened. The summary point for sensitivity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.87) and 0.89 (0.86 to 0.92), respectively. The summary point for specificity of dental care professionals when screening for caries and periodontal disease was 0.87 (0.78 to 0.92) and 0.75 (0.66 to 0.82), respectively. The results suggest that hygiene-therapists could be used to screen for dental caries and periodontal disease. This has important ramifications for service design in public-funded health systems.

  19. The diagnostic performance of dental maturity for identification of the circumpubertal growth phases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Westphalen, Graziela H; Biasotto, Matteo; Salgarello, Stefano; Contardo, Luca

    2013-05-23

    The present meta-analysis initially evaluates the reliability of dental maturation in the identification of the circumpubertal growth phases, essentially for determining treatment timing in orthodontics. A literature survey was performed using the Medline, LILACS and SciELO databases, and the Cochrane Library (2000 to 2011). Studies of the correlation between dental and cervical vertebral maturation methods were considered. The mandibular canine, the first and second premolars, and the second molar were investigated. After the selection, six articles qualified for the final analysis. The overall correlation coefficients were all significant, ranging from 0.57 to 0.73. Five of these studies suggested the use of dental maturation as an indicator of the growth phase. However, the diagnostic performance analysis uncovered limited reliability only for the identification of the pre-pubertal growth phase. The determination of dental maturity for the assessment of treatment timing in orthodontics is not recommended.

  20. Suresh K. AggarwalQuantified Analysis of a Production Diesel Injector Using X-Ray Radiography and Engine Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anita I.

    The work presented in this thesis pursues further the understanding of fuel spray, combustion, performance, and emissions in an internal combustion engine. Various experimental techniques including x-ray radiography, injection rate measurement, and in-cylinder endoscopy are employed in this work to characterize the effects of various upstream conditions such as injection rate profile and fuel physical properties. A single non-evaporating spray from a 6-hole full-production Hydraulically Actuated Electronically Controlled Unit Injector (HEUI) nozzle is studied under engine-like ambient densities with x-ray radiography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two different injection pressures were investigated and parameters such as fuel mass distribution, spray penetration, cone angle, and spray velocity were obtained. The data acquired with x-ray radiography is used for the development and validation of improved Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. Rate of injection is studied using the same HEUI in a single cylinder Caterpillar test engine. The injection rate profile is altered to have three levels of initial injection pressure rise. Combustion behavior, engine performance, and emissions information was acquired for three rate profile variations. It is found that NOx emission reduction is achieved when the SOI timing is constant at the penalty of lower power generated in the cycle. However, if CA50 is aligned amongst the three profiles, the NOx emissions and power are constant with a slight penalty in CO emissions. The influence of physical and chemical parameters of fuel is examined in a study of the heavy alcohol, phytol (C20H40O), in internal combustion engine application. Phytol is blended with diesel in 5%, 10%, and 20% by volume. Combustion behavior is similar between pure diesel and the phytol/diesel blends with small differences noted in peak cylinder pressure, ignition delay, and heat release rate in the premix burn

  1. Detection of early stages of dental caries by optical PNC diagnostics: comparison with visual inspection, dental probe, and x-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Sokolovsky, Alexander A.; Kesler, Gaby

    2000-11-01

    In this research results of approbation of the optical PNC-method in dental clinic are presented. The PNC-method was used for diagnostics stages of caries (initial, moderate and deep). The variant of the PNC-method adapted for dental diagnosis is based on simultaneous analyses the following parameters by special algorithms: probing radiation, stimulated backscattering and autofluorescence of caries induced batteries. Analyze of informational signals show good correlation with tooth morphological structure and concentration of anaerobic microflora in hearth of caries lesion. Investigation was performed in vivo on 101 tooth in conditions of typical dental clinic. Comparison of the PNC-methods with visual inspection, dental probe and X-ray ones, which are widely used in clinical practice was made. Preliminary results showed high potential of usage of the PNC-method in clinical practice and more high probability of initial caries detection (up to 100%) in comparison with X-ray method (approximately 75%). In cases when X-ray diagnosed absence of initial caries, more sensitive the PNC-method detected initial caries in stage white lesion.

  2. Dental flossing as a diagnostic method for proximal gingivitis: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Grellmann, Alessandra Pascotini; Kantorski, Karla Zanini; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori; Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the clinical diagnosis of proximal gingivitis by comparing two methods: dental flossing and the gingival bleeding index (GBI). One hundred subjects (aged at least 18 years, with 15% of positive proximal sites for GBI, without proximal attachment loss) were randomized into five evaluation protocols. Each protocol consisted of two assessments with a 10-minute interval between them: first GBI/second floss, first floss/second GBI, first GBI/second GBI, first tooth floss/second floss, and first gum floss-second floss. The dental floss was slid against the tooth surface (TF) and the gingival tissue (GF). The evaluated proximal sites should present teeth with established point of contact and probing depth ≤ 3mm. One trained and calibrated examiner performed all the assessments. The mean percentages of agreement and disagreement were calculated for the sites with gingival bleeding in both evaluation methods (GBI and flossing). The primary outcome was the percentage of disagreement between the assessments in the different protocols. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, McNemar, chi-square and Tukey's post hoc tests, with a 5% significance level. When gingivitis was absent in the first assessment (negative GBI), bleeding was detected in the second assessment by TF and GF in 41.7% (p < 0.001) and 50.7% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. In the absence of gingivitis in the second assessment (negative GBI), TF and GF detected bleeding in the first assessment in 38.9% (p = 0.004) and 58.3% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. TF and GF appears to be a better diagnostic indicator of proximal gingivitis than GBI. PMID:27223134

  3. Dental flossing as a diagnostic method for proximal gingivitis: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Grellmann, Alessandra Pascotini; Kantorski, Karla Zanini; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori; Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the clinical diagnosis of proximal gingivitis by comparing two methods: dental flossing and the gingival bleeding index (GBI). One hundred subjects (aged at least 18 years, with 15% of positive proximal sites for GBI, without proximal attachment loss) were randomized into five evaluation protocols. Each protocol consisted of two assessments with a 10-minute interval between them: first GBI/second floss, first floss/second GBI, first GBI/second GBI, first tooth floss/second floss, and first gum floss-second floss. The dental floss was slid against the tooth surface (TF) and the gingival tissue (GF). The evaluated proximal sites should present teeth with established point of contact and probing depth ≤ 3mm. One trained and calibrated examiner performed all the assessments. The mean percentages of agreement and disagreement were calculated for the sites with gingival bleeding in both evaluation methods (GBI and flossing). The primary outcome was the percentage of disagreement between the assessments in the different protocols. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, McNemar, chi-square and Tukey's post hoc tests, with a 5% significance level. When gingivitis was absent in the first assessment (negative GBI), bleeding was detected in the second assessment by TF and GF in 41.7% (p < 0.001) and 50.7% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. In the absence of gingivitis in the second assessment (negative GBI), TF and GF detected bleeding in the first assessment in 38.9% (p = 0.004) and 58.3% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. TF and GF appears to be a better diagnostic indicator of proximal gingivitis than GBI.

  4. Dental anomalies in the primary dentition and their repetition in the permanent dentition: a diagnostic performance study.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Andrea; Giuntini, Veronica; Franchi, Lorenzo; Tollaro, Isabella; Baccetti, Tiziano; Defraia, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the recurrence in the permanent dentition of dental anomalies of the primary dentition. A sample of 189 subjects (100 males, 89 females, mean age of 5 years and 7 months) with anomalies of primary teeth (tooth hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, geminated teeth, and fused teeth) was selected and re-analyzed at a mean age of 11 years and 2 months for the recurrence of the dental anomalies in the permanent dentition. As a control group, 271 subjects (123 males, 148 females) without dental anomalies in the primary dentition were selected. The recurrence in the permanent dentition of the dental anomalies in the primary dentition was evaluated by measures of diagnostic performance. The results showed high values for the repetition of hypodontia (positive likelihood ratio = 102.0); low score for the repetition of hyperdontia (positive likelihood ratio = 6.5); low positive likelihood ratio (9.1) for gemination of primary teeth resulting in supernumerary permanent teeth; high positive likelihood ratio (47.0) for fusion of primary teeth followed by missing permanent teeth. Dental anomalies in the primary dentition are associated with an increased likelihood of anomalies of the succedaneous permanent.

  5. Dental biothermophotonics: How photothermal methods are winning the race with X-rays for dental caries diagnostic needs of clinical dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, A.; Jeon, R.; Matvienko, A.; Abrams, S. H.; Amaechi, B. T.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in biothermophotonics of teeth are presented. The presentation is centered on the development of clinical-level frequency-domain photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence to address issues associated with the early diagnosis of demineralization caries in human teeth. Biothermophotonic principles and applications to the detection of the carious state in human teeth as embodied by laser photothermal radiometry are presented and further supported by modulated luminescence. The emphasis is on recent developments with regard to abilities of these techniques to diagnose interproximal lesions between teeth, etching with phosphoric acid and with an artificial demineralization gel in order to simulate early demineralization, as well as demineralization and remineralization of dental crown enamel and root dentin. These are lesions which normally go undetected by X-ray radiographs. Comparisons with X rays, Micro-Computed Tomography (μ-CT) and Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) are discussed. A theoretical model involving coupled diffuse photon density and thermal-wave fields is developed and applied to frequency scans from demineralized artificial lesions to produce quantitative values for optical and thermophysical parameters of teeth as well as the thickness of the induced lesion.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its role in the detection of latent TB infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Piccazzo, Riccardo; Paparo, Francesco; Garlaschi, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    In this systematic review we evaluate the role of chest radiography (CXR) in the diagnostic flow chart for tuberculosis (TB) infection, focusing on latent TB infection (LTBI) in patients requiring medical treatment with biological drugs. In recent findings, patients scheduled for immunomodulatory therapy with biologic drugs are a group at risk of TB reactivation and, in such patients, detection of LTBI is of great importance. CXR for diagnosis of pulmonary TB has good sensitivity, but poor specificity. Radiographic diagnosis of active disease can only be reliably made on the basis of temporal evolution of pulmonary lesions. In vivo tuberculin skin test and ex vivo interferon-γ release assays are designed to identify development of an adaptive immune response, but not necessarily LTBI. Computed tomography (CT) is able to distinguish active from inactive disease. CT is considered a complementary imaging modality to CXR in the screening procedure to detect past and LTBI infection in specific subgroups of patients who have increased risk for TB reactivation, including those scheduled for medical treatment with biological drugs.

  7. Comparison between diagnostic ultrasonography and radiography in the evaluation of horses and cattle with thoracic disease: 56 cases (1984-1985).

    PubMed

    Reef, V B; Boy, M G; Reid, C F; Elser, A

    1991-06-15

    The results of radiography and ultrasonography were compared on 56 horses and cows with lower respiratory tract disease. Ultrasonography was more sensitive than radiography for the detection of small pleural effusions and consolidations in large animals. The side of the thorax affected and the character of the pleural fluid and lung in large animals with pleural effusion can be evaluated ultrasonographically. The periphery of the lung must be affected to characterize pulmonary lesions ultrasonographically. Radiography is the best technique to characterize lesions deep within the lung when the periphery of the lung is normal. PMID:1885315

  8. Skull Radiography

    MedlinePlus

    What you need to know about… Skull Radiography X-ray images of the skull are taken when it is necessary to see the cranium, facial bones or jaw bones. ... Among other things, x-ray exams of the skull can show fractures. Patient Preparation Before the examination, ...

  9. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  10. Diagnostic accuracy of cardiothoracic ratio on admission chest radiography to detect left or right ventricular systolic dysfunction: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chana, Harmeet S; Martin, Claire A; Cakebread, Holly E; Adjei, Felicia D

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiothoracic ratio on postero-anterior or antero-posterior chest radiographs in predicting left ventricular or right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography in an inpatient population. Design Retrospective study. Setting Two secondary care hospitals in the United Kingdom. Participants Four hundred consecutive inpatient echocardiograms were screened for inclusion along with chest radiographs (both postero-anterior and antero-posterior). The cardiothoracic ratio was calculated from chest radiographs along with quantitative and qualitative measures of left ventricular or right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity of cardiothoracic ratio across a range of values to detect moderate/severe left ventricular and/or right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography. Results Overall, 272 records met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of left ventricular/right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography was 26% in an inpatient population with high clinical suspicion of cardiac disease referred for echocardiography. Over a range of cardiothoracic ratio values on postero-anterior films, a value of >0.55 yielded the best sensitivity (62.5%) and specificity (76.5%) for diagnosing left ventricular/right ventricular impairment (positive likelihood ratio 2.56), with a positive predictive value of 29.5%. Cardiothoracic ratio on antero-posterior film was not predictive of left ventricular/right ventricular impairment on echocardiography. Conclusions In conclusion, in the context of an acute admission, cardiothoracic ratio measured on postero-anterior or antero-posterior films has limited value in detecting moderate left ventricular and/or right ventricular systolic dysfunction. Previously established absolute values may be unreliable by modern standards. PMID:26152673

  11. The diagnostic reliability of clinical dental auxiliaries in caries prevalence surveys--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kwan, S Y; Prendergast, M J; Williams, S A

    1996-09-01

    The Nuffield Report recommended the development of further education and training for dental auxiliary personnel. The extent to which clinical dental auxiliaries might carry out oral assessments is under consideration currently. While other countries have employed clinical dental auxiliaries as examiners in national surveys, there is no evidence to suggest that they are able to perform oral assessments effectively in the United Kingdom. This study aimed to investigate the possibility of using dental hygienists or therapists as examiners in epidemiological surveys. Five dentists and three clinical dental auxiliaries were trained and calibrated together using standardised BASCD training procedures. Forty 5-year-old children in Leeds were recruited to the training and calibration exercise. Data were analysed according to BASCD recommendations. There were no differences in performance between dentists and auxiliaries. All examiners fell within 95 percent confidence limits of the group mean dt, mt, ft and dmft. Mean grouped dmft scores for the benchmark examiner, dentists and auxiliaries were 1.92, 1.84 and 1.92 respectively. Sensitivity values for dentists and auxiliaries ranged from 0.54 to 1.00 and 0.80 to 0.94 respectively. Kappa scores were 0.70 to 0.90 for dentists; and 0.82 to 0.87 for the auxiliaries. It was concluded that the dental hygienists and therapist recruited to this study could be used in epidemiological surveys of caries in 5-year-old children.

  12. Early dental caries detection by method of PNC-diagnostics: comparison with visual and x-ray methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masychev, Victor I.; Sokolovsky, Alexander A.; Kesler, Gaby; Alexandrov, Michail T.

    2000-03-01

    In this research results of approbation of the optical PNC- method in dental clinic are presented. The PNC-method was used for diagnostics stages of caries (initial, moderate and deep). The variant of the PNC-method adapted for dental diagnosis is based on simultaneous analyses the following parameters by special algorithms: backscattering and probing radiation, stimulated (endogenous) autofluorescence of caries induced batteries. Analyze of informational signals show good correlation with tooth morphological structure and concentration of anaerobic microflora in hearth of caries lesion. Investigation was performed in vivo on 101 tooth in conditions of typical dental clinic. Comparison of the PNC- method with visual and X-ray ones, which are widely used in clinical practice was made. Preliminary results showed high potential of usage the PNC-method in clinical practice and more high probability of initial caries detection (up to 100%) in comparison with X-ray method (approximately 75%). In cases when X-ray diagnosed absence of initial caries, more sensitive the PNC-method detected initial caries in stage 'white lesion.'

  13. [Digital radiography in tomography of the facial bones].

    PubMed

    Ibing, H P; Vogel, H; Biebesheimer, V

    1988-09-01

    In 14 patients the x-ray findings of dental, mandibular and maxillary roentgen diagnosis were compared with conventional tomography and tomography by digital radiography. All details important for diagnosis were shown by both techniques. Tomography by digital radiography offered a more convenient approach and pictures easier to be interpreted than pictures by conventional tomography. PMID:3175474

  14. Cone beam computed tomography imaging as a primary diagnostic tool for computer-guided surgery and CAD-CAM interim removable and fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Charette, Jyme R; Goldberg, Jack; Harris, Bryan T; Morton, Dean; Llop, Daniel R; Lin, Wei-Shao

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a digital workflow using cone beam computed tomography imaging as the primary diagnostic tool in the virtual planning of the computer-guided surgery and fabrication of a maxillary interim complete removable dental prosthesis and mandibular interim implant-supported complete fixed dental prosthesis with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing technology. Diagnostic impressions (conventional or digital) and casts are unnecessary in this proposed digital workflow, providing clinicians with an alternative treatment in the indicated clinical scenario. PMID:27086108

  15. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  16. The Use of Audiovisual Procedures in Evaluating Oral Diagnostic and Treatment Planning Skills of Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Stephen L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A new test developed by the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry that included videotape, visual aids, and relevant dental data as part of the exam is reported. The degree of student anxiety before, during, and after the examination was measured. A videotaped segment simulating a case history was used. (Author/MLW)

  17. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  18. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is a two- ... Exams Dental Cone Beam CT X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety About this Site ...

  19. Accuracy of Digital Subtraction Radiography in Combination with a Contrast Media in Assessment of Proximal Caries Depth

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Solmaz; Ehsani, Sara; Esmaeili, Farzad; Tavakoli, Mohammad Amin

    2008-01-01

    Background and aims Radiography is used to diagnose the demineralization process and carious lesions; however, conventional radiography and direct digital images do not show these lesions when the amount of demineralization is less than 40%. Digital subtraction radiography has recently been used to improve the diagnostic quality of these le-sions. The purpose of this study was to compare the caries depth estimated by digital subtraction radiog-raphy in combination with barium sulfate in diag-nosing proximal dental caries with histopathologic evaluation. Materials and methods In this study 30 molars and premolars (24 demineralized lesions with cavity, 8 without cavity) were studied. Direct digital images were taken (kVp: 68, mA: 8; t: 0.12 for premolars and t: 0.16 for molars) whereas the position of X-ray tube and CCD receptor and teeth was fixed. To prepare the second images 135 gr/L barium sulfate was used. The images obtained with the same exposure and geometry and then subtracted. The depth of the lesions in direct digital and subtracted images were assessed and compared with the depth measured in histopathologic assessments. Results The mean depths (± SD) of the lesions were 1.80 ± 0.77 mm in direct digital radiography, 2.32 ± 0.76 mm in subtracted images after barium sulfate treatment, and 2.51 ± 0.43 mm in histopathologic sections. The statistical difference between direct digital radiography and the other methods was significant (P < 0.05). However, the differences were not statistically significant between subtracted images and histopathologic sections. The average intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.7241 (CI: 95%). Conclusion The present study has demonstrated that digital subtraction radiography images have the potential to measure the depth of proximal caries with no significant difference with histopathologic evaluation. PMID:23277849

  20. Electron radiography

    DOEpatents

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  1. An investigation of potential applications of intensifying screens in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.G.; Kogon, S.L.; Reid, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    In medicine, the somewhat degraded image from the screen/film system is accepted for most diagnostic purposes in the interest of radiation thrift. In dentistry, however, the superb image resolution and sharpness of the radiation-intensive, direct-exposure film is the standard for intraoral radiography. There may be occasions in dental practice where such quality is not necessary, thus making the high level of exposure difficult to justify. In a laboratory study, screen-type radiographs were effectively substituted for ultraspeed film in the monitoring stages of endodontic therapy and as posttreatment films in operative dentistry. Even with a slow system, the radiation exposure was one sixteenth of the usual periapical dose. If clinical trials support these conclusions, only the lack of a practical periapical cassette limits the application of this significant method of radiation reduction to dental practice.

  2. Optimisation in general radiography

    PubMed Central

    Martin, CJ

    2007-01-01

    Radiography using film has been an established method for imaging the internal organs of the body for over 100 years. Surveys carried out during the 1980s identified a wide range in patient doses showing that there was scope for dosage reduction in many hospitals. This paper discusses factors that need to be considered in optimising the performance of radiographic equipment. The most important factor is choice of the screen/film combination, and the preparation of automatic exposure control devices to suit its characteristics. Tube potential determines the photon energies in the X-ray beam, with the selection involving a compromise between image contrast and the dose to the patient. Allied to this is the choice of anti-scatter grid, as a high grid ratio effectively removes the larger component of scatter when using higher tube potentials. However, a high grid ratio attenuates the X-ray beam more heavily. Decisions about grids and use of low attenuation components are particularly important for paediatric radiography, which uses lower energy X-ray beams. Another factor which can reduce patient dose is the use of copper filtration to remove more low-energy X-rays. Regular surveys of patient dose and comparisons with diagnostic reference levels that provide a guide representing good practice enable units for which doses are higher to be identified. Causes can then be investigated and changes implemented to address any shortfalls. Application of these methods has led to a gradual reduction in doses in many countries. PMID:21614270

  3. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  4. Charged particle radiography.

    PubMed

    Morris, C L; King, N S P; Kwiatkowski, K; Mariam, F G; Merrill, F E; Saunders, A

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography. PMID:23481477

  5. Charged particle radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.; King, N. S. P.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Saunders, A.

    2013-04-01

    New applications of charged particle radiography have been developed over the past two decades that extend the range of radiographic techniques providing high-speed sequences of radiographs of thicker objects with higher effective dose than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. In this paper, we review the motivation and the development of flash radiography and in particular, charged particle radiography.

  6. Comparison of periapical radiography with cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in teeth with metallic post

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Iwaki, Lilian Cristina Vessoni; da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Sabio, Sergio; Albino, Paulo Ricardo Febrairo

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional periapical radiography and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting vertical root fracture (VRF) in tooth with metallic post (MP). Materials and Methods: Twenty endodontically-treated teeth received MPs, artificial fractures were created in 10 teeth, and they were all examined with tomography and radiography. The sample consisted of periapical radiography with post and without post, and tomography with post and without post; each group with five fractured and five non-fractured teeth. The images were evaluated by three dental/maxillofacial radiologists and statistical validations were carried out using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Sensitivity and specificity of the area under the ROC (Az) of tomography with post (Az = 0.953) and without post (Az = 0.956) were significantly higher than those of periapical radiography with post (Az = 0.753) and without post (Az = 0.778). Conclusion: CBCT was more accurate than conventional periapical radiography in detecting VRF. PMID:24944444

  7. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  8. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  9. Research on optical properties of dental enamel for early caries diagnostics using a He-Ne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Liu, Li; Li, Song-zhan

    2008-12-01

    A new and non-invasive method adapted for optical diagnosis of early caries is proposed by researching on the interaction mechanism of laser with dental tissue and relations of remitted light with optical properties of the tissue. This method is based on simultaneous analyses of the following parameters: probing radiation, backscattering and auto-fluorescence. Investigation was performed on 104 dental samples in vitro by using He-Ne laser (λ=632.8nm, 2.0+/-0.1mW) as the probing. Spectrums of all samples were obtained. Characteristic spectrums of dental caries in various stages (intact, initial, moderate and deep) were given. Using the back-reflected light to normalize the intensity of back-scattering and fluorescence, a quantitative diagnosis standard for different stages of caries is proposed. In order to verify the test, comparison research was conducted among artificial caries, morphological damaged enamel, dental calculus and intact tooth. Results show that variations in backscattering characteristic changes in bio-tissue morphological and the quantity of auto-fluorescence is correlated with concentration of anaerobic microflora in hearth of caries lesion. This method poses a high potential of diagnosing various stages of dental caries, and is more reliability to detect early caries, surface damage of health enamel and dental calculus.

  10. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge involving a case of dysphagia in association with cervical osteophytosis and a dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Dable, Rajani A.; Wasnik, Pradnya B.; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L.; Ali, Mukkaram Faridi

    2013-01-01

    Herein, presenting a case of a 42-year-old female with the chief complaint of dysphagia. The problem was assumed to be of dental origin, due to the onset of dental pain followed by dysphagia. A cervical radiograph revealed the presence of osteophytic lipping which proved to be the cause of dysphagia. Confusing and overlapping disease entities showing similar symptoms need thorough investigation. Dysphagia related to cervical spondylosis may have a direct connection with the person's occupation. Dentistry is considered a potentially hazardous occupation with regard to musculoskeletal disorders. However, additional studies are required to understand the occupational hazards faced by dentists. PMID:24250178

  11. Detection of urinary stones at reduced radiation exposure: a phantom study comparing computed radiography and a low-dose digital radiography linear slit scanning system

    PubMed Central

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Chakraborty, D. P.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Loupatatzis, Christos; Vock, Peter; Harald, Bonel

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this experimental study we assessed the diagnostic performance of linear slit scanning radiography (LSSR) compared to conventional computed radiography (CR) in the detection of urinary calculi in an anthropomorphic phantom imitating patients weighing approximately 58 to 88 kg. Conclusion Compared to computed radiography, LSSR is superior in the detection of urinary stones and may be used for pretreatment localization and follow-up at a lower patient exposure. PMID:19457787

  12. Trauma and Mobile Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Drafke, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    Trauma and Mobile Radiography focuses on the radiography of trauma patients and of patients confined to bed. This book offers students a foundation in the skills they need to produce quality radiograms without causing additional injury or pain to the patient. Features of this new book include: coverage of the basics of radiography and patient care, including monitoring of heavily sedated, immobile, and accident patients. Information on the injuries associated with certain types of accidents, and methods for dealing with these problems. Detailed explanation of the positioning of each anatomical area. A Quick Reference Card with information on evaluating, monitoring and radiographing trauma patients.

  13. Implementation of a PACS for radiography training and clinical service in a university setting through a multinational effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Yuen Y.; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Hai L.; Chang, Tony; Matsuda, Koyo; Cao, Fei

    2001-08-01

    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has a Radiography Division under the Development of Optometry and Radiography. The Division trains both diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers with 60 students/year and offers a B.Sc. degree. In addition the Division together with the University Health Service operates a radiography clinic with radiology consultation from radiologists from other hospitals and clinics. This paper describers the implementation of a PACS in the Division for radiography training, and for clinical service.

  14. X-ray sources for radiography of warm dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Brambrink, Erik; Barbrel, Benjamin; Koenig, Michel; Gregory, Chris; Loupias, Bérénice; Ravasio, Alessandra; Rabec Le Gloahec, Marc; Vinci, Tommaso; Boehly, Tom; Endo, Takashi; Kimura, Tomoaki; Ozaki, Norimasa; Wei, Huigang; Aglitskiy, Yefim; Faenov, Anatoly; Pikuz, Tatiana

    2008-11-01

    The knowledge of Warm Dense Matter is important in different domains such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics and geophysics. The development of techniques for direct probing of this type of matter is of great interest. X-ray radiography is one of the most promising diagnostic to measure density directly. Here we present some results of low-Z material radiography and an experiment devoted to characterize a short pulse laser driven hard x-ray source for the radiography of medium and high Z matter. Experiments have been performed on LULI2000 and TW facilities at the Ecole Polytechnique.

  15. Order of magnitude dose reduction in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Angin, L.L.; Lorton, L.

    1987-03-01

    This comparative clinical investigation concerns the radiation dose from intraoral radiography using E-speed film and rectangular and circular beam collimation. Dose to organs not of diagnostic importance (brain, lens of the eye, thyroid, and breast) is reduced by approximately an order of magnitude when rectangular collimation and E-speed film are used in periapical radiography. And dose to the thyroid and breast is further reduced by a third with the use of a full leaded apron and thyroid shield.

  16. Accuracy of Digital Bitewing Radiography versus Different Views of Digital Panoramic Radiography for Detection of Proximal Caries

    PubMed Central

    Abdinian, Mehrdad; Razavi, Sayed Mohammad; Samety, Amir Abbas; Faghihian, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Dental caries are common and have a high incidence among populations. Radiographs are essential for detecting proximal caries. The best technique should be recognized for accurate detection of caries. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of detection of proximal caries using intraoral bitewing, extraoral bitewing, improved interproximal panoramic, improved orthogonality panoramic and conventional panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross sectional study, 100 extracted human teeth with and without proximal caries were used. Intra and extraoral radiographs were taken. Images were evaluated and scored by two observers. Scores were compared with the histological gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of radiographs was assessed by means of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis (P<0.05). Results: Microscopic evaluation of proximal surfaces revealed that 54.8% of the surfaces were sound and 45.2% were carious (with different depths). The differences in the area under the ROC curve (Az value) among the five techniques were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Improved interproximal panoramic and extraoral bitewing radiographs were superior to conventional panoramic radiography for detection of proximal caries ex vivo and should be considered for patients with contraindications for intraoral radiographs. PMID:26622284

  17. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  19. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  20. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  1. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  2. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars.

    PubMed

    Kircos, L T; Eakle, W S; Smith, R A

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography. PMID:3458783

  3. Reduced radiation-absorbed dose to tissues with partial panoramic radiography for evaluation of third molars

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Eakle, W.S.; Smith, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The radiation-absorbed doses from panoramic radiography, distal molar radiography, and a partial panoramic radiographic technique that exposes only the third molar region to radiation are compared. Doses of radiation to the submandibular salivary gland were comparable by all three techniques, but doses of radiation to the head and neck were reduced greatly by the partial panoramic radiographic technique. Partial panoramic radiography is a diagnostically satisfactory and a radiologically safer technique for evaluation of third molar pathosis than is panoramic or distal molar radiography.

  4. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  5. Progress in thermal neutron radiography at LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jack; Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. NSF.

  6. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental sonography device for monitoring—(1) Identification. A dental sonography device for monitoring is...

  7. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental sonography device for monitoring—(1) Identification. A dental sonography device for monitoring is...

  8. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental sonography device for monitoring—(1) Identification. A dental sonography device for monitoring is...

  9. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental sonography device for monitoring—(1) Identification. A dental sonography device for monitoring is...

  10. 21 CFR 872.2050 - Dental sonography device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental sonography device. 872.2050 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2050 Dental sonography device. (a) Dental sonography device for monitoring—(1) Identification. A dental sonography device for monitoring is...

  11. Optical velocimetry at the Los Alamos Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupa, Dale; Tainter, Amy; Neukirch, Levi; Hollander, Brian; Buttler, William; Holtkamp, David; The Los Alamos Proton Radiography Team Team

    2016-05-01

    The Los Alamos Proton Radiography Facility (pRad) employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials driven by high explosives. We will discuss features of pRad and describe some recent experiments, highlighting optical diagnostics for surface velocity measurements.

  12. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  13. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  14. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 ≥ −0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 ≥ −0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42–0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo. PMID:22029364

  15. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r(2) ≥ -0.86) as well as calcium release (r(2) ≥ -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r(2) = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  16. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 >= -0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 >= -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  17. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r(2) ≥ -0.86) as well as calcium release (r(2) ≥ -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r(2) = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo. PMID:22029364

  18. A Taxonomy of Functions of Dental X-Ray Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    The taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists presented in this report resulted from a dental radiography curriculum development project undertaken at Middlesex County College (MCC) in 1981. After an introductory section citing arguments for creating taxonomies of objectives, the report explains the impetus for the curriculum…

  19. [Hardening of dental tissue by CO2 laser radiation].

    PubMed

    Aboites, V; Díaz, O; Cuevas, F

    1989-03-01

    A study was conducted to test the effects of CO2 laser irradiation on dental tissue. It was found that hardening of the dental tissue occurs. This was observed qualitatively by direct observation and by X-ray radiography. The hardening produced was also quantitatively measured using a hardness-meter on Rockwell scale.

  20. Regulatory aspects of neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J.

    1999-11-01

    While full legislation for industrial radiography with gamma and X-rays already exists in many countries, the situation is different for neutron radiography. Therefore, the licensing for equipment and procedures in this field has to be based on basic principles of national and international rules. This contribution will explain how the regulatory body in Switzerland deals with neutron radiography installations in order to maintain national standards of health and safety.

  1. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  2. Modified Bootstrap Sensitometry In Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    1981-04-01

    A new modified bootstrap approach to sensitometry is presented which provides H and D curves that show almost exact agreement with those obtained using conventional methods. Two bootstrap techniques are described; both involve a combination of inverse-square and stepped-wedge modulation of the radiation field and provide intensity-scale sensitometric curves as appropriate for medical radiography. H and D curves obtained with these modified techniques are compared with those obtained for screen-film combinations using inverse-square sensitometry as well as with those obtained for direct x-ray film using time-scale sensitometry. The stepped wedge of the Wisconsin X-Ray Test Cassette was used in the bootstrap approach since it provides sufficient exposure latitude to encompass the useful density range of medical x-ray film. This approach makes radiographic sensitometry quick and convenient, allowing accurate characteristic curves to be obtained for any screen-film cassette using standard diagnostic x-ray equipment.

  3. Dosimetric considerations in dental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goble, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The integration of the Lixiscope into dental procedures was studied and compared with conventional dental radiographic techniques. It was found that through the use of intraoral sealed sources in conjunction with microchannel plate technology, the Lixiscope gives increased diagnostic information with decreased radiation dosage.

  4. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. PMID:27601691

  5. 42 CFR 440.100 - Dental services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dental services. 440.100 Section 440.100 Public...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS SERVICES: GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 440.100 Dental services. (a) “Dental services” means diagnostic, preventive, or corrective procedures provided by or under...

  6. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  7. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  8. Musculoskeletal injuries in a resource-constrained environment: comparing diagnostic accuracy of on-the-spot ultrasonography and conventional radiography for bone fracture screening during the Paris–Dakar rally raid

    PubMed Central

    Larbi, Ahmed; Lefere, Mathieu; Perozziello, Anne; Hauger, Olivier; Pommerie, Florence; Fraboulet, Bénédicte; Jacob, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) is a good first-line alternative for the diagnosis of bone fractures in adults as well as children. Our study shows that, compared to X-ray, in a resource-constrained environment, on-site US has a high sensitivity (98%) and specificity (96%) in the diagnosis of bone fractures. Purpose To compare the accuracy of on-the-spot US with conventional radiography in the screening for bone fractures during the Paris–Dakar rally raid. Material and Methods Eighty-three patients (81 men, 2 women) with clinically suspected bone fractures were included in 2013 and 2014. They underwent X-ray and US on the spot, blindly interpreted by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Using X-ray as gold standard, we calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US, for each anatomic location. The accuracy of US and radiography were also assessed, as were the number of fragments and their degree of displacement (Student’s t-test). Results Compared with X-ray, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of on-site US were, respectively, for the presence (or absence) of fractures: 98%, 98%, 100%, and 95%. The accuracy of US was 99%. Only one radial styloid process fracture was misdiagnosed with US. There was no significant difference between US and X-ray (P > 0.93) concerning the number of fragments and their degree of displacement. Conclusion Bedside musculoskeletal ultrasound performed by trained musculoskeletal radiologists is a useful method in determining and assessing bone fractures in a resource constrained environment. PMID:26034643

  9. On the sensitivity of thermophotonic lock-in imaging and polarized Raman spectroscopy to early dental caries diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Dehghany, Mehdi; Michaelian, Kirk H; Amaechi, Bennet T

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the leading cause of tooth loss, which can promptly be prevented if detected in early stages of progression. Unfortunately, conventional diagnostic modalities currently used in dentistry lack the sensitivity to detect early caries. The authors' intention is to compare the ability of polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging to make early caries diagnosis. Extracted human teeth with no visible stain or defects were artificially demineralized in accordance to a well-known protocol in dentistry for simulated early caries development at several demineralization stages. Samples were then inspected using polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging. The sensitivities of these two diagnostic modalities are compared, and the results are verified using transverse micro-radiography. It was found that compared to polarized Raman spectroscopy, thermophotonic imaging exhibits superior sensitivity to very early stages of demineralization.

  10. On the sensitivity of thermophotonic lock-in imaging and polarized Raman spectroscopy to early dental caries diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Dehghany, Mehdi; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Amaechi, Bennet T.

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the leading cause of tooth loss, which can promptly be prevented if detected in early stages of progression. Unfortunately, conventional diagnostic modalities currently used in dentistry lack the sensitivity to detect early caries. The authors' intention is to compare the ability of polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging to make early caries diagnosis. Extracted human teeth with no visible stain or defects were artificially demineralized in accordance to a well-known protocol in dentistry for simulated early caries development at several demineralization stages. Samples were then inspected using polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging. The sensitivities of these two diagnostic modalities are compared, and the results are verified using transverse micro-radiography. It was found that compared to polarized Raman spectroscopy, thermophotonic imaging exhibits superior sensitivity to very early stages of demineralization.

  11. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  12. State-of-the-art digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Lee, K R; Siegel, E L; Templeton, A W; Dwyer, S J; Murphey, M D; Wetzel, L H

    1991-11-01

    Technologic advances in digital radiography have improved the ways in which radiographic images are acquired, displayed, transmitted, recorded, and archived. With computed radiography, performed with storage phosphor plates and interactive high-resolution workstations, radiation dose is reduced and repeat exposures necessitated due to technical errors are eliminated. Digital fluorography allows reductions in dose, procedure time, and film costs. These digital imaging modalities have been well accepted clinically and are equal in diagnostic accuracy to conventional methods. Teleradiology has advanced with the development of laser film digitization, fiberoptic networks, and dial-up circuit switching technology. Laser film printers yield improved hard copies of transmitted images, but further work is needed to faithfully reproduce the images displayed on high-resolution work-stations. Although the capacity for archiving digital image data has increased (260,000 examinations or 23,500 Gbytes can be stored in a six-unit optical disc library), higher capacity storage media are needed. Further technologic advances in the speed of image transmission and storage capacity are anticipated. PMID:1749846

  13. Dental care demand among children with dental insurance.

    PubMed Central

    Grembowski, D; Conrad, D A; Milgrom, P

    1987-01-01

    As the number of families with dental insurance and expenditures for dental care has increased over the past two decades, so has interest in determining cost-sharing effects on dental demand among insureds. Using a representative sample of Pennsylvania Blue Shield children insureds during 1980, we estimate cost-sharing effects on dental demand for basic (diagnostic, preventive, restorative, endodontic, and extraction services) and orthodontic care. Results indicate that cost-sharing has little influence on the probability of using any dental services and basic expenditures. However, the probability of using orthodontic services decreases 2.1 percent when the proportion of orthodontic expenditures paid by the parent increases 10 percent. By reducing the cost of care, cost-sharing reduces social class differences in dental demand common in unisured populations, likely producing public oral health benefits. PMID:2952622

  14. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  15. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  17. Advanced clinical KCD scanner for digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBianca, Frank A.; Davis, Keana M.; Jordan, Lawrence M.; Laughter, Joseph S.; Krishnamurthy, Anand; Hu, Bo

    1998-07-01

    One of the goals of medical imaging scientists and bioengineers remains the development of digital electronic technologies that can replace film-based methods of acquiring x-ray images. With the achievement of this goal, all diagnostic imaging technologies would be based on digital techniques with all the attending benefits. Based on the performance of numerous research prototype small-field and one large-field Kinestatic Charge Detector (KCD) system for digital radiography, a large-field clinical KCD scanner is currently being designed and built for technical evaluation and for clinical evaluation of 200 volunteer patients (including clinical comparisons with film, storage phosphor, and other available clinical systems). The state of development of this clinical KCD system, including detector, data-acquisition system and scanning gantry design, is reviewed in this paper.

  18. Medical radiography examinations and carcinogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Domina, E A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the review was the synthesis of the literature data and the results of our radiobiological (biodosimetric) research on the development of radiation-associated tumors as a result of medical radiography (X-ray) diagnostic. Medical X-ray examinations contribute the most to the excess of radiation exposure of the population, much of which is subject to examination to diagnose the underlying disease, the dynamic observation of the patient during treatment, the research of related deseases, and preventative examinations. The review provides arguments for the necessity of developing a more balanced indication for preventative radiological examination of the population in the aftermath of radio-ecological crisis caused by the Chornobyl accident, taking into account the likelihood of radiation carcinogenesis. The problems and tasks of biological (cytogenetic) dosimetry in radiology are formulated. PMID:25536546

  19. Clinical validation of the use of fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stookey, George K.; Isaacs, Roger L.; Ferreira Zandona, Andrea G.; Ando, Masatoshi; Gonzalez, Carlos; Mau, Melissa S.; Kelly, Sue A.; Analoui, Mostafa

    1999-05-01

    A clinical investigation was conducted in children to validate the use of fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries. A total of 150 children were examined for the presence of dental caries at baseline and at 4-month intervals for one year using conventional visual-tactile with and without a dental explorer, electrical conductivity and light fluorescence methods on the occlusal, buccal and lingual tooth surfaces. Interproximal tooth surfaces were examined using conventional film and direct digital radiography at baseline and 12 months. Validation of the clinical methods was performed by the histologic examination of exfoliated primary teeth. The results indicate that visual-tactile examinations with an explorer detected more carious lesions than similar examinations without an explorer. The use of quantitative light fluorescence permitted the detection of a substantially greater number of enamel lesions or demineralized areas than the conventional visual-tactile-radiographic diagnostic procedure. Further, the use of the quantitative light fluorescence permitted the monitoring of both the progression of regression of early carious lesions.

  20. Use of laser fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stookey, George K.; Analoui, Mostafa

    1998-04-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent oral disease in spite of remarkable progress made during the past half- century to reduce its prevalence. Conventional procedures for caries detection are unable to detect the lesions until they are well advanced and involve about one-third of the thickness of enamel. Laboratory research on alternative caries detection methods based upon alterations in the conductance and optical properties associated with enamel demineralization has shown significant promise in recent years. Of these alternative measures, quantitative laser/light fluorescence appears to show the greatest promise for the detection of dental caries at a much earlier stage of development than is currently possible. A clinical trial was initiated in 150 children to evaluate, compare and validate several caries detection methods; in addition to the conventional diagnostic procedure, these detection methods involved quantitative light fluorescence, electrical conductivity, and direct digital radiography. Although the clinical trial is not yet complete, early results suggest the possibility for the earlier detection of dental caries with these alternative methods.

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Ability of Storage Phosphor Plate in Detecting Proximal Caries with Direct Measurement by Stereomicroscope: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Sunila; Nair, Bindu J.; Vineet, Alex Daniel; Thomas, Jincy; Ranimol, Prasanna; Vijayan, Aswathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Radiography plays an important role in detection of interproximal caries. The aim of study is to compare diagnostic ability of photo stimulable phosphor (PSP) with direct measurement using stereomicroscope in detecting proximal caries. Hundred proximal surfaces of 50 extracted human posterior teeth were radiographed with dental X-ray unit. The image receptors used was storage phosphor plate Vista scan (size 2), (time of exposure 0.4 s). Radiographs were interpreted and caries lesions were classified on a 4-point scale suggested by Abesi et al. The teeth were sectioned with diamond disc and were examined under a stereomicroscope with 20x magnification. Diagnostic accuracy of digital image is similar to that observed with stereomicroscope. The PSP plate digital X ray system can effectively be employed for detecting proximal caries as compared to direct observation by stereomicro-scope. Further study with more number of observer/evaluator and large sample size is recommended. PMID:26664712

  2. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  3. Blast wave energy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Thomas E; Tierney, Heidi E; Idzorek, George C; Watt, Robert G; Peterson, Robert R; Peterson, Darrell L; Fryer, Christopher L; Lopez, Mike R; Jones, Michael C; Sinars, Daniel; Rochau, Gregory A; Bailey, James E

    2008-10-01

    The distance radiation waves that supersonically propagate in optically thick, diffusive media are energy sensitive. A blast wave can form in a material when the initially diffusive, supersonic radiation wave becomes transonic. Under specific conditions, the blast wave is visible with radiography as a density perturbation. [Peterson et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056901 (2006)] showed that the time-integrated drive energy can be measured using blast wave positions with uncertainties less than 10% at the Z Facility. In some cases, direct measurements of energy loss through diagnostic holes are not possible with bolometric and x-ray radiometric diagnostics. Thus, radiography of high compression blast waves can serve as a complementary technique that provides time-integrated energy loss through apertures. In this paper, we use blast waves to characterize the energy emerging through a 2.4 mm aperture and show experimental results in comparison to simulations. PMID:19044574

  4. Digital photography enhances diagnostics, communication, and documentation.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Edward A; Schoenbaum, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Digital dental photography is an exceptional tool for communication, diagnosis, and documentation. So much of what is possible today with dental treatment hinges strongly upon dentists' ability to fully capture the necessary diagnostic information and properly educate their patients. With the proper training, techniques, equipment, and implementation, dental photography can significantly enhance the level of treatment provided.

  5. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  6. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  7. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  8. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter. PMID:20821133

  9. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  10. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  11. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  12. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  13. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  14. System for uncollimated digital radiography

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Han; Hall, James M.; McCarrick, James F.; Tang, Vincent

    2015-08-11

    The inversion algorithm based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) removes unwanted effects in high energy imaging resulting from an uncollimated source interacting with a finitely thick scintillator. The algorithm takes as input the image from the thick scintillator (TS) and the radiography setup geometry. The algorithm then outputs a restored image which appears as if taken with an infinitesimally thin scintillator (ITS). Inversion is accomplished by numerically generating a probabilistic model relating the ITS image to the TS image and then inverting this model on the TS image through MEM. This reconstruction technique can reduce the exposure time or the required source intensity without undesirable object blurring on the image by allowing the use of both thicker scintillators with higher efficiencies and closer source-to-detector distances to maximize incident radiation flux. The technique is applicable in radiographic applications including fast neutron, high-energy gamma and x-ray radiography using thick scintillators.

  15. Dental Assistant. Post Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Bruce; And Others

    This curriculum guide was designed for use in postsecondary dental assistant education programs in Georgia. Its purpose is to provide for development of entry level skills in dental assisting in the areas of knowledge, theoretical structure, tool usage, diagnostic ability, related supportive skills, and occupational survival skills. The first…

  16. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  17. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  18. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  19. Radiographic diagnosis of dental restoration misfit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liedke, G S; Spin-Neto, R; da Silveira, H E D; Wenzel, A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfit in dental prostheses and restorations. The MEDLINE bibliographic database was searched from 1950 to February 2014 for reports on the radiographic diagnosis of misfits. The search strategy was limited to English-language publications using the following combined MeSH terms in the search strategy: (Dental Restoration OR Dental Prosthesis OR Crown OR Inlays OR Dental Abutments) and (Dental Leakage OR Prosthesis Fitting OR Dental Marginal Adaptation OR Surface Properties) and (Radiography, Dental OR Radiography, Dental, Digital OR Cone-Beam Computed Tomography). Twenty-eight publications were identified and read in full text, and 14 studies fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Information regarding the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations, and in which the methodology/results comprised information regarding how the sample was collected/prepared, the method, imaging protocol, presence of a reference test and the outcomes were evaluated. QUADAS criteria was used to rate the studies in high, moderate or low quality. The evidence supporting the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations is limited to low-/moderate-quality studies. The well-established intra-oral orthogonal projection is still under investigation and considered the most appropriate method, both when evaluating the relation between dental restoration to tooth and abutment to implant. Studies using digital radiographs have not evaluated the effect of image post-processing, and tomography has not been evaluated. PMID:25142004

  20. Radiographic diagnosis of dental restoration misfit: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liedke, G S; Spin-Neto, R; da Silveira, H E D; Wenzel, A

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfit in dental prostheses and restorations. The MEDLINE bibliographic database was searched from 1950 to February 2014 for reports on the radiographic diagnosis of misfits. The search strategy was limited to English-language publications using the following combined MeSH terms in the search strategy: (Dental Restoration OR Dental Prosthesis OR Crown OR Inlays OR Dental Abutments) and (Dental Leakage OR Prosthesis Fitting OR Dental Marginal Adaptation OR Surface Properties) and (Radiography, Dental OR Radiography, Dental, Digital OR Cone-Beam Computed Tomography). Twenty-eight publications were identified and read in full text, and 14 studies fulfilled criteria for inclusion. Information regarding the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations, and in which the methodology/results comprised information regarding how the sample was collected/prepared, the method, imaging protocol, presence of a reference test and the outcomes were evaluated. QUADAS criteria was used to rate the studies in high, moderate or low quality. The evidence supporting the use of radiographic methods for the diagnosis of misfits in dental prosthesis and restorations is limited to low-/moderate-quality studies. The well-established intra-oral orthogonal projection is still under investigation and considered the most appropriate method, both when evaluating the relation between dental restoration to tooth and abutment to implant. Studies using digital radiographs have not evaluated the effect of image post-processing, and tomography has not been evaluated.

  1. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  2. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  3. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  4. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  6. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  7. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  8. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  9. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  10. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  11. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  12. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  13. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  14. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  15. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE TO AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY IS COORDINATED WITH LESSONS IN THE STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES AND IS BASED ON MATERIAL IN THE COURSE MANUAL, INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY. THE COURSE IS INTENDED TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AS BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS WHO ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABLE TO EXTEND THEIR…

  16. ARG portable neutron radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In this report all available neutron radiographic data, including results of tests run at LANL, McClellan AFB, and University of Virginia, will be combined to outline specific transportable neutron radiography systems that could achieve the desired results as a complement to x-radiography capabilities for the Accident Response Group (ARG).

  17. The effects of noise reduction, sharpening, enhancement, and image magnification on diagnostic accuracy of a photostimulable phosphor system in the detection of non-cavitated approximal dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Tayefeh Davalloo, Reza; Tavangar, Mayam; Valizade, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Contrast, sharpness, enhancement, and density can be changed in digital systems. The important question is to what extent the changes in these variables affect the accuracy of caries detection. Materials and Methods Forty eight extracted human posterior teeth with healthy or proximal caries surfaces were imaged using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) sensor. All original images were processed using a six-step method: (1) applying "Sharpening 2" and "Noise Reduction" processing options to the original images; (2) applying the "Magnification 1:3" option to the image obtained in the first step; (3) enhancing the original images by using the "Diagonal/" option; (4) reviewing the changes brought about by the third step of image processing and then, applying "Magnification 1:3"; (5) applying "Sharpening UM" to the original images; and (6) analyzing the changes brought about by the fifth step of image processing, and finally, applying "Magnification 1:3." Three observers evaluated the images. The tooth sections were evaluated histologically as the gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the observers was compared using a chi-squared test. Results The accuracy levels irrespective of the image processing method ranged from weak (18.8%) to intermediate (54.2%), but the highest accuracy was achieved at the sixth image processing step. The overall diagnostic accuracy level showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.0001). Conclusion This study shows that the application of "Sharpening UM" along with the "Magnification 1:3" processing option improved the diagnostic accuracy and the observer agreement more effectively than the other processing procedures. PMID:26125002

  18. CANDLE Syndrome: orodfacial manifestations and dental implications.

    PubMed

    Roberts, T; Stephen, L; Scott, C; di Pasquale, T; Naser-Eldin, A; Chetty, M; Shaik, S; Lewandowski, L; Beighton, P

    2015-01-01

    A South African girl with CANDLE Syndrome is reported with emphasis on the orodental features and dental management. Clinical manifestations included short stature, wasting of the soft tissue of the arms and legs, erythematous skin eruptions and a prominent abdomen due to hepatosplenomegaly. Generalized microdontia, confirmed by tooth measurement and osteopenia of her jaws, confirmed by digitalized radiography, were previously undescribed syndromic components. Intellectual impairment posed problems during dental intervention. The carious dental lesions and poor oral hygiene were treated conservatively under local anaesthetic. Prophylactic antibiotics were administered an hour before all procedures.Due to the nature of her general condition, invasive dental procedures were minimal. Regular follow-ups were scheduled at six monthly intervals. During this period, her overall oral health status had improved markedly.The CANDLE syndrome is a rare condition with grave complications including immunosuppression and diabetes mellitus. As with many genetic disorders, the dental manifestations are often overshadowed by other more conspicuous and complex syndromic features. Recognition of both the clinical and oral changes that occur in the CANDLE syndrome facilitates accurate diagnosis and appropriate dental management of this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26711936

  19. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-29

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250 ∙ 250 ∙ 500 μm(3) was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  20. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  1. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  2. In-bore radiography for large-caliber gun

    SciTech Connect

    Lucht, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques for dense object radiography, fast-transient digitization, modern computation, digital averaging and enhancement of multifilm radiographs, and microwave interferometry have been combined to provide modern propulsion and launch diagnostics for large-bore gun shots. An in-bore multifilm radiograph of a rod and sabot assembly was taken using a 2.3-MeV flash x-ray system. The launch system was radiographed approx.1 m from the muzzle end, where the gun tube walls are >1 in. thick. Excellent spatial resolution was achieved, and the straightness of the rod was determined to within 0.1 mm. A microwave interferometer produced in-bore position-vs-time measurements. External x-ray shadowgraphs were used to view yaw and sabot separation, and dynamic pressure measurements were compared with theoretical velocity profiles. The entire set of diagnostics comprises a self-consistent description of early projectile history.

  3. Survey of neutron radiography facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.R.; McClellan, G.G.

    1996-08-01

    A directory of neutron radiography facilities around the world was informally compiled about ten years ago under the auspices of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), Subcommittee E7.05 (Radiology, Neutron). The work lay dormant for a number of years, but was revived in earnest in the fall of 1995. At that time, letters were mailed to all the facilities with available addresses in the original directory, requesting updated information. Additionally, information was gathered at the Second Topical meeting on neutron Radiography Facility System Design and Beam Characterization (November, 1995, Shonan Village, Japan). A second mailing was sent for final confirmation and updates in January, 1996. About 75% of the information in the directory has now been confirmed by the facility management. This paper presents a summary of the information contained in the facility directory. An electronic version of the directory in Wordperfect 6.1, uuencode, or rtf format is available by sending e-mail to the authors at imel{at}anl.gov or imel{at}baobab.cad.cea.fr. A WWW site for the directory is presently under construction.

  4. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  5. Patient dose monitoring in Dubai in radiography and interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    AlSuwaidi, J S; AlMazrouei, N K; Pottybindu, S; Siraj, M; Mathew, D; Al Blooshi, A A; Kuriakose, V P

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents ongoing actions in Dubai on patient dose monitoring in digital radiographic examinations, mammography, interventional procedures, and dental radiological procedures. The aim of Dubai Health Authority (DHA) is to move towards the establishment of local diagnostic reference levels. DHA has participated in national and regional projects under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The need for local radiation protection educational programmes and wider patient dosimetry monitoring and recording emerged from this work.

  6. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  7. Sensitometric characteristics of dental xeroradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1983-11-01

    Dental xeroradiography is a high-quality intraoral imaging system which provides a potentially convenient, rapid, low-dose alternative to conventional film radiography. In this study the sensitometric properties of dental xeroradiography were investigated via assessment of high- and low-contrast xeroradiographic processor settings, transmission versus reflection densitometry, reciprocity-law failure, and kVp (tube voltage) plate dependence. Findings of the study indicated that imaging at high-contrast processor settings results in greater dynamic range but less exposure latitude than imaging at low-contrast processor settings. Determination of characteristic curves demonstrated greater contrast in reflection mode than imaging by transillumination for all but the very densest of images (greater than 1.6 O.D.). There was also little difference in characteristic curves produced from 50 to 90 kVp, indicating that the xeroradiographic plate exhibits a relatively constant sensitivity over the tube voltages tested if exposure is expressed in roentgens. Finally, no substantial reciprocity-law failure was observed for dental xeroradiography over a clinically relevant range of exposure times.

  8. Effective exposure level and diagnostic performance in endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, T.; Wiebe, J.D.; Webber, R.L.; Wagner, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    Image quality is limited by the information capacity of the image-forming system and can be computed from three parameters: contrast, resolution, and noise. These parameters can be combined to yield a single measure which determines the maximum amount of information obtainable from any x-ray system and is called the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area. The effects of image quality, expressed as noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area, on the radiographic performance by dentists reading the position of an endodontic file in a root canal were studied. Three different speed films were used in conjunction with a fixed screen. Components of variance associated with the position of the tooth apex and the tip of an endodontic file in a root canal were compared for the effect of different NEQs and observers. Results show that the standard deviation in locating a file tip and tooth apex may be a linear function of log NEQ. These findings indicate that a significant reduction in exposure would have a relatively small effect on the precision of endodontic distance measurements.

  9. Validation of a computed radiography device to monitor the HIV-1 RNase H activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.; Tramontano, E.; Zinzula, L.

    2009-08-01

    A commercially available computed radiography (CR) system for dental radiography was used to produce images from radiolabeled polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays. Typically, similar investigations require specific and expensive autoradiography devices. The CR unit was characterized in terms of sensitivity and fading by means of a 90Sr source that well simulates the experimental conditions, and then used for quantitative analyses of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase-independent ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity monitored by PAGE analysis. The results showed that the present methodology allows quantifying effectively the RNase H catalyses and that the obtained data are in good agreement with previous reference works. Finally, in order to further validate the present method in terms of relationship between enzyme activity, the rate of products formation and signal intensity, a PAGE analyses of the HIV-1 RNase H inhibition by the known diketo acid derivative RDS1643 was carried out.

  10. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  12. Phase contrast radiography: Image modeling and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Mancuso, Adrian P.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2004-12-01

    We consider image formation for the phase-contrast radiography technique where the radiation source is extended and spatially incoherent. A model is developed for this imaging process which allows us to define an objective filtering criterion that can be applied to the recovery of quantitative phase images from data obtained at different propagation distances. We test our image model with experimental x-ray data. We then apply our filter to experimental neutron phase radiography data and demonstrate improved image quality.

  13. Ultra-high-speed embossed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Etsuro; Sato, Koetsu; Izumisawa, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Akira; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2008-11-01

    Embossed radiography is an important technique for imaging target region by decreasing absorption contrast of objects. The ultra-high-speed embossed radiography system consists of a computed radiography system, an intense flash x-ray generator, and a computer program for shifting the image pixel. In the flash x-ray generator, a high-voltage condenser of 200 nF was charged to 50 kV, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the flash x-ray tube after triggering the cathode electrode. The molybdenum-target evaporation lead to the formation of weakly ionized linear plasma, and intense molybdenum K-series x-rays were produced. High-speed radiography was performed using molybdenum K-rays, and the embossed radiography was carried out utilizing single-energy subtraction after the image shifting. The minimum spatial resolution was equal to the sampling pitch of the CR system of 87.5 μm, and concavoconvex radiography such as phase-differential imaging was performed with an x-ray duration of approximately 0.5 Μs.

  14. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  15. Automatic Measurement System For Congenital Hip Dislocation Using A Computed Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komori, M.; Minato, K.; Nakano, Y.; Hirakawa, A.; Kuwahara, M.

    1988-06-01

    Acetabular angle which is a diagnostic parameter of congenital hip dislocation has been measured manually in conventional X-ray film system. Using digital image directly provided from a computed radiography, an automatic measurement system was developed for this parameter. The process of the measurement was completed within a reasonable time, and accurate enough. The system was combined with an image database, so that it would be a measurement tool of PACS.

  16. The need for skull radiography in patients presenting for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    One thousand patients had both CT of the head and a conventional skull series of radiographs. Radiographic findings were abnormal in 250 patients (25%), but only 64 patients (6.4%) had diagnostically significant abnormalities at radiography that were not detected by CT. If the 163 patients who presented after acute trauma were excluded from the series, only 39 (4.7%) of the remaining patients had radiographically significant abnormal findings that were not seen at CT, and only two (0.2%) of these abnormalities could not be diagnosed by a lateral skull radiograph alone. In only five patients (0.5%) was the management actively changed because an abnormaltiy that was detected at skull radiography was not detected at CT. Thus, in nontrauma patients who have stroke, epilepsy, dementia, or non-specific symptoms without focal signs, or have recently undergone craniotomy, and who have been referred for CT, skull radiographs are not justified. In the patient with a history and findings that are strongly suggestive of a pathological disorder anywhere other than in the sella turcica, cerebello-pontine angle, and paranasal sinuses, only the lateral skull radiograph should be obtained after CT, and only if CT is equivocal.

  17. High-energy test of proton radiography concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Amann, J.F.; Atencio, L.G.; Espinoza, C.J.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this work was to demonstrate the use of high energy protons to produce radiographs of heavy metal test objects. The authors executed a proof-of-principle experiment using GeV proton beams available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The experiment produced proton radiographs of a suitably dense, unclassified test object. The experiment tested capabilities in data collection, image reconstruction, and hydro-code simulation and validated models of high-energy proton radiography. A lens was designed using existing quadrupole magnets, constructed on the A1 beam line of the AGS and used to image 10-GeV protons. The results include: (1) images made with an integrating detector, (2) measurements of the background and measurements of the resolution functions, and (3) forward model fits to the transmission data. In all cases the results agree with initial estimates and provide strong support for the utility of proton radiography as a new hydrotest diagnostic.

  18. Sensitivity of plain radiography for pediatric cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li W; Probst, Marc A; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injuries (CSI) often receive a computed tomography (CT) scan as an initial diagnostic imaging test. While sensitive, CT of the cervical spine carries significant radiation and risk of lethal malignant transformation later in life. Plain radiographs carry significantly less radiation and could serve as the preferred screening tool, provided they have a high functional sensitivity in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We hypothesize that plain cervical spine radiographs can reliably detect pediatric patients with CSI and seek to quantify the functional sensitivity of plain radiography as compared to CT. We analyzed data from the NEXUS cervical spine study to assess the sensitivity of plain radiographs in the evaluation of CSI. We identified all pediatric patients who underwent plain radiographic imaging, and all pediatric patients found to have CSI. We then determined the sensitivity of plain radiographs in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We identified 44 pediatric patients with CSI in the dataset with age ranging from 2 to 18 years old. Thirty-two of the 44 pediatric patients received cervical spine plain films as a part of their workup. Plain films were able to identify all 32 pediatric patients with CSI to yield a sensitivity of 100 % in detecting injury victims (95 % confidence interval 89.1-100.0 %). Plain radiography was highly sensitive for the identification of CSI in our cohort of pediatric patients and is useful as a screening tool in the evaluation of pediatric CSI. PMID:27321014

  19. Use of Digital Technology and Support Software Programs in the Private Dental Offices in Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fattore-Bruno, LaDeane

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this survey research was to determine the diffusion of digital radiography, the electronic oral health record (EOHR), digital intraoral photography, and diagnosis and clinical decision-making support software into the dental offices of Nevada. A cross-sectional survey design was utilized with a random sample of 600 Nevada dentists.…

  20. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  1. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  2. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  3. Comparison between DICOM-calibrated and uncalibrated consumer grade and 6-MP displays under different lighting conditions in panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Haapea, M; Liukkonen, E; Huumonen, S; Tervonen, O; Nieminen, M T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare observer performance in the detection of anatomical structures and pathology in panoramic radiographs using consumer grade with and without digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-calibration and 6-megapixel (6-MP) displays under different lighting conditions. Methods: 30 panoramic radiographs were randomly evaluated on three displays under bright (510 lx) and dim (16 lx) ambient lighting by two observers with different years of experience. Dentinoenamel junction, dentinal caries and periapical inflammatory lesions, visibility of cortical border of the floor and pathological lesions in maxillary sinus were evaluated. Consensus between the observers was considered as reference. Intraobserver agreement was determined. Proportion of equivalent ratings and weighted kappa were used to assess reliability. The level of significance was set to p < 0.05. Results: The proportion of equivalent ratings with consensus differed between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in the lower molar in dim lighting (p = 0.021) and between DICOM-calibrated consumer grade and 6-MP display in bright lighting (p = 0.038) for an experienced observer. Significant differences were found between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in bright lighting (p = 0.044) and periapical lesions in the upper molar in dim lighting (p = 0.008) for a less experienced observer. Intraobserver reliability was better at detecting dentinal caries than at detecting periapical and maxillary sinus pathology. Conclusions: DICOM calibration may improve observer performance in panoramic radiography in different lighting conditions. Therefore, a DICOM-calibrated consumer grade display can be used instead of a medical display in dental practice without compromising the diagnostic quality. PMID:25564888

  4. Stress radiography in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garcés, G L; Perdomo, E; Guerra, A; Cabrera-Bonilla, R

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out to test the sensitivity and specificity of stress radiography in detecting anterior cruciate ligament deficiency in both knees of 116 patients using the Telos device. In 47 of these a total or partial rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament was diagnosed by arthroscopy, while the ligament was intact in the remaining 69 patients. The mean difference in radiological translation between the injured and the normal knee was greater than 5 mm (p < 0.001) in those with anterior cruciate deficiency, and less than 3 mm in the others. A differential displacement of up to 3 mm was considered normal. The sensitivity of the method was less than 67% and the specificity was 100%. Clinical diagnosis had a sensitivity of 70.2% and a specificity of 98.5%. Our findings suggest that, although a differential translation of more than 3 mm can be diagnostic, smaller differences do not rule out anterior cruciate deficiency.

  5. Utility and effectiveness of computer-aided diagnosis of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Kyle D; Dykstra, Bradley A; Gakenheimer, David C; Scheetz, James P; Lacina, Stephani; Scarfe, William C; Farman, Allan G

    2011-01-01

    Digital radiography has created a growing opportunity for computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) tools. The Logicon Caries Detector (LCD), with upgraded CAD software based on user feedback, was re-evaluated for its effectiveness via a retrospective clinical study. Using the upgraded LCD software, 12 dentists (evaluators) blindly assessed 17 radiographs taken by another (attending) dentist, who restored 28 proximal surfaces. The attending dentist confirmed the presence of early dentinal caries, as well as identifying 48 surfaces as caries-free or with enamel caries only subject to noninvasive treatment. The radiographs, imported into the software using a digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) reader, were visually assessed under typical operatory lighting conditions, then with the aid of the software's density analysis tool. The effectiveness of the evaluators was gauged by calculating two measures of performance, sensitivity and specificity, for the detection and classification of dentinal caries. Sensitivity among all evaluator dentists was 30% with the initial image; 34% with the brightness and contrast adjusted image; 39% when the image was sharpened; and 69% when the density analysis tool was utilized. Specificity was found to be 97% with the initial image; 95% with the brightness and contrast adjusted image; 93% with the sharpened image; and 94% when the density analysis tool was used. Compared to the unaided eye, the LCD can significantly improve dentists' ability to detect and classify caries. Dentists may be able to find twice as much early dentinal caries requiring restoration (or at least aggressive noninvasive treatment) than previously, while not unnecessarily restoring additional healthy teeth. The LCD enables dentists to obtain more information from dental digital radiography than is possible with the unaided eye, leading to improved patient care.

  6. Intraoral Treatment of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The intraoral treatment of dental disease in pet rabbits follows a complete clinical examination, intraoral inspection under general anesthesia, and diagnostic imaging. It also implies thorough knowledge of dental disease in this species. The most common intraoral procedures are extraction of incisor teeth, coronal reduction, and extraction of cheek teeth. These dental procedures require specific instruments and equipment. They should be performed in conjunction with supportive and medical treatment followed by appropriate nutrition.

  7. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  8. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  9. The Past and Future of the Electronic Dental Record from the Practitioners' View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiburger, E. J.; Diehl, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Future dental practice is seen to include not only the electronic dental record (EDR) but a fully electronic clinical dental documentation package, computer-assisted diagnostic support, and digital imaging. The EDR's development since the 1970s is reviewed. Specific suggestions are made concerning hardware, software, administration, and practical…

  10. Comparison of digital radiography, ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography for determining reproductive status of female cats.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Meghan; Pack, LeeAnn; Rist, Paul; Crane, Bronwyn

    2014-01-01

    It is not always possible to identify female cats that have undergone previous ovariohysterectomy based on physical examination alone. An easy, cost-effective method for screening female cats for reproductive status would be helpful for avoiding unnecessary exploratory laparotomies. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of digital radiography, ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography for determining reproductive status in female cats. Sixty-seven recently euthanized female cats of unknown medical history and reproductive status were randomly selected and included in the study. Digital abdominal radiography, digital abdominal radiography with compression, abdominal ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography were performed in sequence by a board-certified veterinary radiologist and a second-year radiology resident. Immediately following diagnostic imaging procedures, necropsy was performed. Ultrasonography of the uterus had the highest sensitivity (86%) for determining reproductive status of all the imaging modalities tested. The specificity was 88%, and the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 96% and 68%, respectively. The calculated sensitivities and specificities of other modalities were as follows: digital radiographs (28%, 100%), digital compression radiographs (58%, 100%), and vaginourethrography (32%, 100%). Based on McNemar's test statistic, there was a significant difference in the sensitivity of ultrasound compared to digital radiographs (P ≤ 0.05), compression radiographs (P ≤ 0.05), and vaginourethrogram (P ≤ 0.05). Findings from the current study indicated that ultrasonography is a sensitive diagnostic test for determining reproductive status in female cats. Although more readily available in private practice and shelters, digital radiography and vaginourethrography are not reliable predictors of reproductive status.

  11. Dental practice in Paris.

    PubMed

    Baron, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    This describes dental practice and the availability of dental patent remedies in Paris. Accounts of legal disputes, from original sources, illustrate the status and social history of some of the most wealthy dental practitioners in Paris during the Revolution.

  12. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Prevention Summit ADA Find-a-Dentist Health Literacy in Dentistry Volunteer Efforts Dental Benefit Plan Information ... on Sleep Bruxism Rethinking Dental Insurance Oral Health Literacy's Role in Missed Appointments Dental Implant Failure Rate ...

  13. Treating dental caries as an infectious disease. Applying the medical model in practice to prevent dental caries.

    PubMed

    Limeback, H

    1996-01-01

    The above diagnostic and treatment principles may be self evident to most dental practitioners. To many, however, this treatment philosophy is a new one. Continuing dental education and quality assurance programs will play a significant role in helping dentists make the philosophical shift from a highly technical restorative approach to one that uses the medical model and treats dental caries as an infectious disease. While a total cure in humans suffering from dental disease may never be attainable, dental practitioners should soon be better able to direct more of their attention to the patients who already demonstrate a high incidence of dental decay and to those who are clearly at risk to develop future dental decay. PMID:9470624

  14. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-01

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO.

  15. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  16. New developments in proton radiography at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Christopher; Proton Radiography Team

    2014-09-01

    In a new application of nuclear physics, a facility for using proton for flash radiography has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons will be discussed and data from some of the recent experiments will be presented.

  17. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  18. Lithium batteries: Application of neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Esaka, Takao; Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Kanda, Keiji

    Several kinds of primary and secondary commercial lithium batteries, such as CR1/3 · 1H (Fujitsu), CR1220 and BR435 (Panasonic), ML1220 (Sanyo Excel) were investigated using neutron radiography; the variation of the lithium distribution inside these batteries upon discharging (and charging) were clarified by analyzing their visualized images. It was demonstrated that neutron radiography is a potential and useful method, especially in evaluating the reversibility of rechargeable batteries, which have been used under different discharging/charging conditions.

  19. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Inubushi, Yuichi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 μm and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  20. Dental students--dental advocates.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  1. Dental students--dental advocates.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future. PMID:21314046

  2. Evaluation of the maxillary premolar roots dissociation using radiographic holders with conventional and digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Bardauil, Marcia Regina Ramalho da Silva; Moura Netto, Cacio de; Moura, Abílio Albuquerque Maranhão de

    2010-01-01

    This in vivo study evaluated the dissociation quality of maxillary premolar roots combining variations of vertical and horizontal angulations by using X-ray holders (Rinn -XCP), and made a comparison between two types of intraoral radiography systems - conventional film (Kodak Insight, Rochester, USA) and digital radiography (Kodak RVG 6100, Kodak, Rochester, USA). The study sample was comprised of 20 patients with a total of 20 maxillary premolars that were radiographed, using the paralleling angle technique (GP), with a 20º variation of the horizontal angle (GM) and 25º variation of the horizontal angle combined with 15º vertical angle (GMV). Each image was independently analyzed by two experienced examiners. These examiners assigned a score to the diagnostic capability of root dissociation and the measurement of the distance between the apexes. Statistical data was derived using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, Friedman and T test. The means of the measured distances between buccal and lingual root apexes were greater for the GMV, which ranged from 2.3 mm to 3.3 mm. A statistically significant difference was found between GM and GMV when compared to GP with p < 0.01. An established best diagnostic dissociation roots image was found in the GMV. These results support the use of the anterior X-ray holders which offer a better combined deviation (GMV) to dissociate maxillary premolar roots in both radiography systems.

  3. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  4. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ˜16% and ˜26% of the mean for DD and D3He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad-1 contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)], 10.1016/S0168-9002(03)01368-8 framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  5. Use of deep penetration flash radiography in conventional ordnance, and impact dynamics research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Fradkin, D.B.

    1995-05-01

    The use of penetrating flash radiography (FXR) as a diagnostic tool in explosive ordnance and impact dynamics research and development is discussed by the presentation of numerous examples of its utility in analyzing dynamic interactions and in bench marking hydrodynamic computer codes. The Los Alamos Terminal Ballistic Test Range is described. Examples of the use of the new Los Alamos Pulsed Intense X raY (PIXY) machine for deep-penetration radiography are also presented. PIXY is a state-of-the-art, flash x-ray machine recently installed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Along with the LANL sled track and the large- and small-bore gun range, it is a major component of the LANL Terminal Ballistic Test Range. When operating at full voltage, the machine is capable of obtaining a radiographic image through 8-12 in. of armor steel or ceramic. Deep-penetration flash radiographs show the capabilities of PIXY and further illustrate the enhanced information now available to the conventional munitions research and development community. Commercially available radiographic machines are also described and examples of their use presented. It is concluded that flash radiography is an excellent diagnostic tool for benchmarking hydrodynamic and finite-element computer codes.

  6. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  7. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  8. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  9. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  10. 21 CFR 872.1905 - Dental x-ray film holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray film holder. 872.1905 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1905 Dental x-ray film holder. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray film holder is a device intended to position and to hold x-ray film inside the...

  11. Safety Testing of Industrial Radiography Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, D.J.

    1999-09-29

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted the Savannah River Technology Center to verify the relevancy of the 10 CFR Part 34 requirements for the normal use of portable gamma radiography systems and to propose recommendations for changes or modifications to the requirements.

  12. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  13. Portable radiography: a reality and necessity for ISS and explorer-class missions.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J

    2015-02-01

    On ISS missions and explorer class missions, unexpected medical and surgical emergencies could be disastrous. Lack of ability to rapidly assess and make critical decisions affects mission capability. Current imaging modalities on ISS consist only of ultrasound. There are many acute diagnoses which ultrasound alone cannot diagnose. Portable X-Ray imaging (radiography) technology has advanced far enough to where it is now small enough, cheap enough, and accurate enough to give diagnostic quality images sent wirelessly to the onboard computer and on Earth for interpretation while fitting in something the size of a briefcase. Although further research is warranted, Portable Radiography is an important addition to have on ISS and future Explorer Class Missions while maintaining a very small footprint. PMID:25946740

  14. Portable radiography: a reality and necessity for ISS and explorer-class missions.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J

    2015-02-01

    On ISS missions and explorer class missions, unexpected medical and surgical emergencies could be disastrous. Lack of ability to rapidly assess and make critical decisions affects mission capability. Current imaging modalities on ISS consist only of ultrasound. There are many acute diagnoses which ultrasound alone cannot diagnose. Portable X-Ray imaging (radiography) technology has advanced far enough to where it is now small enough, cheap enough, and accurate enough to give diagnostic quality images sent wirelessly to the onboard computer and on Earth for interpretation while fitting in something the size of a briefcase. Although further research is warranted, Portable Radiography is an important addition to have on ISS and future Explorer Class Missions while maintaining a very small footprint.

  15. Shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Han, G-S; Cheng, J-G; Li, G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography. Methods: 4 machines [Orthopantomograph® OP200 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland), Orthophos CD (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany), Orthophos XG Plus (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH) and ProMax® (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland)] were used in this study. Average tissue-absorbed doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in an anthropomorphic phantom. Effective organ and total effective doses were derived according to the International Commission of Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. The shielding effect of one collar in front and two collars both in front and at the back of the neck was measured. Results: The effective organ doses of the thyroid gland obtained from the 4 panoramic machines were 1.12 μSv for OP200, 2.71 μSv for Orthophos CD, 2.18 μSv for Orthophos XG plus and 2.20 μSv for ProMax, when no thyroid collar was used. When 1 collar was used in front of the neck, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were 1.01 μSv (9.8% reduction), 2.45 μSv (9.6% reduction), 1.76 μSv (19.3% reduction) and 1.70 μSv (22.7% reduction), respectively. Significant differences in dose reduction were found for Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. When two collars were used, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were also significantly reduced for the two machines Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. The same trend was observed in the total effective doses for the four machines. Conclusions: Wearing a thyroid collar was helpful when the direct digital panoramic imaging systems were in use, whereas for the indirect digital panoramic imaging systems, the thyroid collar did not have an extra protective effect on the thyroid gland and whole body. PMID:24005060

  16. Computerized Tool to Manage Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Tellez, M; Potter, C M; Kinner, D G; Jensen, D; Waldron, E; Heimberg, R G; Myers Virtue, S; Zhao, H; Ismail, A I

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety regarding dental and physical health is a common and potentially distressing problem, for both patients and health care providers. Anxiety has been identified as a barrier to regular dental visits and as an important target for enhancement of oral health-related quality of life. The study aimed to develop and evaluate a computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy dental anxiety intervention that could be easily implemented in dental health care settings. A cognitive-behavioral protocol based on psychoeducation, exposure to feared dental procedures, and cognitive restructuring was developed. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 151) to test its efficacy. Consenting adult dental patients who met inclusion criteria (e.g., high dental anxiety) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate treatment (n = 74) or a wait-list control (n = 77). Analyses of covariance based on intention-to-treat analyses were used to compare the 2 groups on dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia. Baseline scores on these outcomes were entered into the analyses as covariates. Groups were equivalent at baseline but differed at 1-mo follow-up. Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, but analyses of covariance demonstrated significant differences in dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia in favor of immediate treatment at the follow-up assessment. Of the patients who met diagnostic criteria for phobia at baseline, fewer patients in the immediate treatment group continued to meet criteria for dental phobia at follow-up as compared with the wait-list group. A new computer-based tool seems to be efficacious in reducing dental anxiety and fear/avoidance of dental procedures. Examination of its effectiveness when administered in dental offices under less controlled conditions is warranted (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02081365). PMID:26202996

  17. Application of biophysical technologies in dental research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higham, Susan M.; Pender, Neil; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Smith, Philip W.

    2009-05-01

    There is a wealth of evidence to indicate that if dental caries can be recognized at an early stage, it is possible to halt its progression or even reverse it. This has led to an increased interest in the development of diagnostic techniques capable of visualizing caries at an early stage in addition to providing clinicians with an aid to diagnosis. Several techniques are available for research and clinical applications for detecting early demineralization. This manuscript has reviewed some of the techniques currently available to determine their advantages, whether they have any limitations and their applicability to dental research and clinical dentistry. Not one method is the perfect choice in all situations, but what is clear is that the development and application of biophysical technologies have allowed major advances to be made in dental research as well as in clinical dentistry. With continued developments these technologies will play an important role in the future management of dental disease.

  18. Subjective image quality comparison between two digital dental radiographic systems and conventional dental film

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammed; Elshinawy, Mohamed I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Digital radiography has become an integral part of dentistry. Digital radiography does not require film or dark rooms, reduces X-ray doses, and instantly generates images. The aim of our study was to compare the subjective image quality of two digital dental radiographic systems with conventional dental film. Materials & methods A direct digital (DD) ‘Digital’ system by Sirona, a semi-direct (SD) digital system by Vista-scan, and Kodak ‘E’ speed dental X-ray films were selected for the study. Endodontically-treated extracted teeth (n = 25) were used in the study. Details of enamel, dentin, dentino-enamel junction, root canal filling (gutta percha), and simulated apical pathology were investigated with the three radiographic systems. The data were subjected to statistical analyzes to reveal differences in subjective image quality. Results Conventional dental X-ray film was superior to the digital systems. For digital systems, DD imaging was superior to SD imaging. Conclusion Conventional film yielded superior image quality that was statistically significant in almost all aspects of comparison. Conventional film was followed in image quality by DD, and SD provided the lowest quality images. Conventional film is still considered the gold standard to diagnose diseases affecting the jawbone. Recommendations Improved software and hardware for digital imaging systems are now available and these improvements may now yield images that are comparable in quality to conventional film. However, we recommend that studies still use more observers and other statistical methods to produce ideal results. PMID:25382946

  19. Therapeutic ultrasound for dental tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Scheven, B A A; Shelton, R M; Cooper, P R; Walmsley, A D; Smith, A J

    2009-10-01

    Dental disease affects human health and the quality of life of millions worldwide. Tooth decay (caries) and diseases of the dental pulp result in loss of tooth vitality and function requiring invasive treatment to restore the tooth to health. "Therapeutic" low intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to accelerate bone fracture healing indicating that ultrasound may be used as a tool to facilitate hard tissue regeneration. We have shown recently that low frequency ultrasound is able to exert biological effects on odontoblast-like cells. In this paper, we postulate that low frequency, low intensity ultrasound may stimulate endogenous coronal tooth repair by stimulating dentine formation from existing odontoblasts or by activating dental pulp stem cells to differentiate into new reparative dentine-producing cells. Ultrasound therapy promoting dentine formation and repair may also have the potential benefit of alleviating dentine hypersensitivity by inducing occlusion of dentinal tubules. It is envisaged that therapeutic ultrasound may be used in future to facilitate dental tissue engineering and stem cell therapy applications for dental tissue regeneration. Further research is warranted in this clinically important area and we envisage that novel strategies in dental therapy will be realised that may ultimately lead to the development of novel non-invasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for dental diagnostics, repair and regeneration.

  20. Measurement of the Interantral Bone in Implant Dentistry Using Panoramic Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography: A Human Radiographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Kopecka, D; Simunek, A; Streblov, J; Slezak, R; Capek, L

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyse the dimensions of interantral bone available for dental implant placement in the fully edentulous maxilla. Methods: Interantral bone height (IBH) was measured using panoramic radiography and computed tomography (CT). Interantral bone width (IBW) was measured by means of CT. Results: The difference between both imaging methods in IBH assessment was highly statistically significant (p < 0.001) in the canine area, whereas in other areas, it was found to not be significant. Measured in the CT scans, bone is significantly higher in the canine area compared to the area of central and lateral incisors (p < 0.001). Significant variations in IBW were found in all three locations: bone in the central incisor area is the widest, in the area of the lateral incisor, the narrowest (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Panoramic radiography is a sufficiently accurate method for IBH imaging in the incisor area, but not in the canine area. PMID:25781290

  1. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  2. Hardware-Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-08-04

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32-bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. The hardware accelerated solutions are accurate enough to enable scientists to explore the experimental design space with greater efficiency than the methods currently in use. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedral meshes that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester.

  3. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  4. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  5. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison.

  6. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  7. Diagnostic and technical approach to esthetic rehabilitations.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Giuseppe; Bresciano, Mario

    2003-01-01

    The success of an esthetic rehabilitation depends on the understanding of the patient's needs and on effective communication among the entire dental team. The involvement of the dental technician since the beginning of the treatment plan is one of the keys for success. This article describes a systematic approach to oral rehabilitations involving esthetic areas. Technical suggestions for the construction of the diagnostic wax-up, the provisional, and the final ceramic restorations are illustrated in a logical sequence.

  8. Inter-observer reproducibility of diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis based on a combination of probe-to-bone test and simple radiography.

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Molines-Barroso, Raúl J

    2014-07-01

    Probe-to-bone test and simple X-rays are both standard tests for the diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. This study demonstrates the importance of considering jointly clinical information (probe-to-bone test) and diagnostic tests (simple radiography) to increase agreement among clinicians on diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

  9. Fragile X syndrome: panoramic radiographic evaluation of dental anomalies, dental mineralization stage, and mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh-Haddad, Aida; Haddad, Denise Sabbagh; Michel-Crosato, Edgard; Arita, Emiko Saito

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a disorder linked to the chromosome X long arm (Xq27.3), which is identified by a constriction named fragile site. It determines various changes, such as behavioral or emotional problems, learning difficulties, and intellectual disabilities. Craniofacial abnormalities such as elongated and narrow face, prominent forehead, broad nose, large and prominent ear pavilions, strabismus, and myopia are frequent characteristics. Regarding the oral aspects, deep and high-arched palate, mandibular prognathism, and malocclusion are also observed. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dental radiographic characteristics as described in 40 records of patients with panoramic radiography. Material and Methods: The patients were in the range of 6–17 years old, and were divided into two groups (20 subjects who were compatible with the normality standard and 20 individuals diagnosed with the FXS), which were matched for gender and age. Analysis of the panoramic radiographic examination involved the evaluation of dental mineralization stage, mandibular angle size, and presence of dental anomalies in both deciduous and permanent dentitions. Results: The results of radiographic evaluation demonstrated that the chronology of tooth eruption of all third and second lower molars is anticipated in individuals with FXS (p<0.05). In this group, supernumerary deciduous teeth (2.83%), giroversion of permanent teeth (2.31%), and partial anodontia (1.82%) were the most frequent dental anomalies. In addition, an increase was observed in the mandibular angle size in the FXS group (p<0.05). Conclusion: We conclude that knowledge of dental radiographic changes is of great importance for dental surgeons to plan the treatment of these individuals. PMID:27812623

  10. Deflection evaluation using time-resolved radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.A.; Lucero, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved radiography is the creation of an x-ray image for which both the start-exposure and stop-exposure times are known with respect to the event under study. The combination of image and timing are used to derive information about the event. We have applied time-resolved radiography to evaluate motions of explosive-driven events. In the particular application discussed here, our intent is to measure maximum deflections of the components involved. Exposures are made during the time just before to just after the event of interest occurs. A smear or blur of motion out to its furthest extent is recorded on the image. Comparison of the dynamic images with static images allows deflection measurements to be made. 2 figs.

  11. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Wizardry and radiography: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Desrentes, M

    1990-10-01

    The author encountered a patient who had undergone various sorcery and wizardry practices. At radiography performed because of lower back pain, 100 sharp metal foreign bodies (such as needles and sharpened paper clips) were found scattered between his neck and pelvis. The patient evidently swallowed some of the objects to gain protection against aggression from humans or spiritual beings. However, the means of introduction of some of the objects (eg, the needles in the neck) cannot be determined. PMID:2399308

  13. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; et al

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  14. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  15. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  16. Emergency skull radiography: the effect of restrictive criteria on skull radiography and CT use

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, S.R.; Gaylord, G.M.; Lantos, G.; Tabaddor, K.; Gallagher, E.J.

    1985-08-01

    A prospective study was performed to determine the effect of restrictive criteria on the use of emergency skull radiography and computed tomography (CT) of the head. Emergency skull radiography required the completion of a special requisition form. Emergency CT of the head was done at the request of senior consultants and was available on a full-time basis. Over 1 year, 2758 skull studies were performed, a decrease of 39.1% when compared with the year before restrictive criteria were instituted, during which 4587 skull examinations were done. In the same period, the number of emergency CT scans of the head increased by 45.7%, from 471 in the control year to 686 in the experimental year. With the use of restrictive criteria, a net savings of $164,000 was achieved. Our results suggest that the use of restrictive criteria is a cost-effective means of limiting skull radiography when CT of the head is readily available.

  17. AXIS: an instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Zacharias, R; Felker, B; Holder, J P; Allen, F V; Bell, P M; Bradley, D; Montesanti, R; Landen, O L

    2014-11-01

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV-200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition. PMID:25430200

  18. AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N. Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Zacharias, R.; Felker, B.; Holder, J. P.; Allen, F. V.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Montesanti, R.; Landen, O. L.

    2014-11-15

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  19. AXIS: an instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF.

    PubMed

    Hall, G N; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Carpenter, A C; Palmer, N E; Zacharias, R; Felker, B; Holder, J P; Allen, F V; Bell, P M; Bradley, D; Montesanti, R; Landen, O L

    2014-11-01

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV-200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  20. High-energy K{alpha} radiography using high-intensity, short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H.-S.; Chung, H.-K.; Izumi, N.; Key, M.H.; King, J.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landen, O.L.; Patel, P.K.; Price, D.F.; Remington, B.A.; Robey, H.F.; Snavely, R.A.; Tabak, M.; Town, R.P.J.; Wickersham, J.E.; Chambers, D.M.; Eagleton, R.; Goldsack, T.; Clarke, R.J.; Heathcote, R.

    2006-05-15

    The characteristics of 22-40 keV K{alpha} x-ray sources are measured. These high-energy sources are produced by 100 TW and petawatt high-intensity lasers and will be used to develop and implement workable radiography solutions to probe high-Z and dense materials for the high-energy density experiments. The measurements show that the K{alpha} source size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {mu}m, too large for most radiography applications. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses, verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. One-dimensional radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {mu}m features with high contrast. Experiments were performed to test a variety of small volume two-dimensional point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measured photon yields, and compared the measurements with predictions from hybrid-particle-in-cell simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the high-energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  1. An unexpected cause of vaginal bleeding: the role of pelvic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Kyrgios, Ioannis; Emmanouilidou, Eleftheria; Theodoridis, Theodoros; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina

    2014-01-01

    Vaginal bleeding and/or discharge in young girls may result from infection, urological problems, endocrine causes, bleeding disorders, dermatological conditions, trauma, sexual abuse, masses or foreign bodies. We report a case of excessive vaginal bleeding caused by a foreign body in a prepubertal girl with emphasis on the diagnostic challenges and pitfalls regarding imaging techniques. In our patient, although invasive and expensive investigations had been initially made, the foreign body was last detected only when a plain pelvic radiography was performed. PMID:24532235

  2. Clinical performance of a prototype flat-panel digital detector for general radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda, Walter; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Roskopf, Marsha L.; Geiger, Robert

    2001-08-01

    Digital radiographs obtained using a prototype Digital Radiography System (Stingray) were compared with those obtained using conventional screen-film. Forty adult volunteers each had two identical radiographs taken at the same level of radiation exposure, one using screen-film and the other the digital detector. Each digital image was processed by hand to ensure that the printed quality was optimal. Ten radiologists compared the diagnostic image quality of the digital images with the corresponding film radiographs using a seven point ranking scheme.

  3. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY EXAMINATION OF UNBURNED REGIONS IN PBX 9502 CORNER TURNING EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    E. N. FERM; C. L. MORRIS; ET AL

    2001-06-01

    PBX 9502 Corner Turning Experiments have been used with various diagnostics techniques to study detonation wave propagation and the boosting of the insensitive explosive. In this work, the uninitiated region of the corner turning experiment is examined using Proton Radiography. Seven transmission radiographs obtained on the same experiment are used to map out the undetonated regions on each of three different experiments. The results show regions of high-density material, a few percent larger than initial explosive density. These regions persist at nearly this density while surrounding material, which has reacted, is released as expected. Calculations using Detonation Shock Dynamics are used to examine the situations that lead to the undetonated regions.

  4. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  5. Perceptions of Australian dental practitioners about using telemedicine in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Estai, M; Kruger, E; Tennant, M

    2016-01-15

    Objective This study aimed to explore Australian dental practitioners' perceptions of the usefulness of teledentistry in improving dental practice and patient outcomes.Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study involving an anonymous electronic survey of a sample of 169 Australian dental practitioners. We designed a 24-item, 5-point Likert-scale questionnaire assessing perceptions of dentists in four domains: usefulness of teledentistry for patients; usefulness of teledentistry for dental practice; capability of teledentistry to improve practice; and perceived concerns about the use of teledentistry.Results Of the 144 respondents (response rate 85%), 135 completed responses that were suitable for analysis. More than 80% of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that teledentistry would improve dental practice through enhancing communication with peers, guidance and referral of new patients. The majority also felt that teledentistry is quite useful in improving patient management, and increasing patient satisfaction. A substantial proportion of respondents expressed uncertainty with technical reliability, privacy, practice expenses, the cost of setting up teledentistry, surgery time and diagnostic accuracy.Conclusion Dental practitioners generally reported optimism and support to the concept of teledentistry and its integration into current dental practices. Addressing how teledentistry can benefit specific practice issues, would encourage more dentists to use telemedicine in routine practice.

  6. Improvement of material decomposition and image quality in dual-energy radiography by reducing image noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D.; Kim, Y.-s.; Choi, S.; Lee, H.; Choi, S.; Jo, B. D.; Jeon, P.-H.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.-J.

    2016-08-01

    Although digital radiography has been widely used for screening human anatomical structures in clinical situations, it has several limitations due to anatomical overlapping. To resolve this problem, dual-energy imaging techniques, which provide a method for decomposing overlying anatomical structures, have been suggested as alternative imaging techniques. Previous studies have reported several dual-energy techniques, each resulting in different image qualities. In this study, we compared three dual-energy techniques: simple log subtraction (SLS), simple smoothing of a high-energy image (SSH), and anti-correlated noise reduction (ACNR) with respect to material thickness quantification and image quality. To evaluate dual-energy radiography, we conducted Monte Carlo simulation and experimental phantom studies. The Geant 4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) v 6.0 and tungsten anode spectral model using interpolation polynomials (TASMIP) codes were used for simulation studies and digital radiography, and human chest phantoms were used for experimental studies. The results of the simulation study showed improved image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and coefficient of variation (COV) values and bone thickness estimation accuracy by applying the ACNR and SSH methods. Furthermore, the chest phantom images showed better image quality with the SSH and ACNR methods compared to the SLS method. In particular, the bone texture characteristics were well-described by applying the SSH and ACNR methods. In conclusion, the SSH and ACNR methods improved the accuracy of material quantification and image quality in dual-energy radiography compared to SLS. Our results can contribute to better diagnostic capabilities of dual-energy images and accurate material quantification in various clinical situations.

  7. Dosimetric analysis of the use of CBCT in diagnostic radiology: sinus and middle ear.

    PubMed

    Dierckx, D; Saldarriaga Vargas, C; Rogge, F; Lichtherte, S; Struelens, L

    2015-01-01

    The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in diagnostic radiology departments is increasing. Several discussions arise whether with the CBCT application, some multi-slice CT (MSCT) examinations can be replaced by it. High hopes are set regarding the dosimetric aspects of CBCT: are patient doses in between those of conventional X-rays and MSCT? In this study, effective dose and organ doses were evaluated for two non-dental CBCT examinations: sinus and middle ear. A comparison with the dose obtained with a MSCT protocol was performed. Moreover, the sinus examination was also compared with the dose obtained by projection radiography (RX). Effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent detector dose measurements in an anthropomorphic phantom and were compared against Monte Carlo simulations. Results show that the effective dose for the sinus examination is more than three times higher with MSCT than with CBCT and about five times lower with RX compared with CBCT, whereas for the middle ear examination, the effective dose obtained with MSCT is almost six times higher than that of CBCT. Finally, a sensitivity study on the size and position of the CBCT field of view showed the influence of these two factors on the dose received by the patient.

  8. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity and Inclusion ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education What is ADEA CCI? ADEA ... Education, 2016–2017 Beyond the Crossroads: Change and Innovation in Dental Education ADEA Guidelines for Ethical Academic ...

  9. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  10. Dental laser technology.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2008-10-01

    Dental technology is rapidly affecting the treatment options available to patients. Dental lasers are an innovative technology for both hard- and soft-tissue treatment applications. The ability to recontour soft tissues efficiently and predictably with immediate hemostatsis and minimal postoperative sequelae is of value to both the dentist and the patient. This article reviews the principles of dental lasers, criteria to consider when selecting a dental laser, and some of their clinical applications.

  11. Comparison Of Modified Bootstrap And Conventional Sensitometry In Medical Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    1980-08-01

    A new modified bootstrap approach to sensitometry is presented which provides H and D curves that show almost exact agreement with those obtained using conventional methods. Two bootstrap techniques are described; both involve a combination of inverse-square and step-ped wedge modulation of the radiation field and provide intensity-scale sensitometric curves as appropriate for medical radiography. H and D curves obtained with these modified techniques are compared with those obtained for screen-film combinations using inverse-square sensitometry as well as with those obtained for direct x-ray film using time-scale sensitometry. The stepped-wedge of the Wisconsin X-Ray Test Cassette was used in the boot-strap approach since it provides sufficient exposure latitude to encompass the useful den-sity range of medical x-ray film. This approach makes radiographic sensitometry quick and convenient, allowing accurate characteristic curves to be obtained for any screen-film cassette using standard diagnostic equipment.

  12. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  13. Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

  14. Dental records: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Charangowda, B K

    2010-01-01

    Dental records consist of documents related to the history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment done, and the prognosis. A thorough knowledge of dental records is essential for the practicing dentist, as it not only has a forensic application, but also a legal implication with respect to insurance and consumerism. This article reviews the importance of dental records in forensics. PMID:21189983

  15. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  16. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  17. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  18. Single-exposure dual-energy subtraction chest radiography: detection of pulmonary nodules and masses in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Szucs-Farkas, Zsolt; Patak, Michael A; Yuksel-Hatz, Seyran; Ruder, Thomas; Vock, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the impact of energy subtraction (ES) chest radiography on the detection of pulmonary nodules and masses in daily routine. Seventy-seven patients and 25 healthy subjects were examined with a single exposure digital radiography system. Five blinded readers evaluated first the non-subtracted PA and lateral chest radiographs alone and then together with the subtracted PA soft tissue images. The size, location and number of lung nodules or masses were registered with the confidence level. CT was used as standard of reference. For the 200 total lesions, a sensitivity of 33.5-52.5% was found at non-subtracted and a sensitivity of 43.5-58.5% at energy-subtracted radiography, corresponding to a significant improvement in four of five readers (p < 0.05). However, in three of five readers the rate of false positives was higher with ES. With ES, sensitivity, but not the area under the alternative free-response receiver operating characteristics (AFROC) curve, showed a good correlation with reader experience (R = 0.90, p = 0.026). In four of five readers, the diagnostic confidence improved with ES (p = 0.0036). We conclude that single-exposure digital ES chest radiography improves detection of most pulmonary nodules and masses, but identification of nodules <1 cm and false-positive findings remain a problem.

  19. Accuracy of digital periapical radiography and cone-beam computed tomography in detecting external root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Geha, Hassem; Sankar, Vidya; Teixeira, Fabricio B.; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Noujeim, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital intraoral radiography in diagnosing simulated small external root resorption cavities. Materials and Methods Cavities were drilled in 159 roots using a small spherical bur at different root levels and on all surfaces. The teeth were imaged both with intraoral digital radiography using image plates and with CBCT. Two sets of intraoral images were acquired per tooth: orthogonal (PA) which was the conventional periapical radiograph and mesioangulated (SET). Four readers were asked to rate their confidence level in detecting and locating the lesions. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the accuracy of each modality in detecting the presence of lesions, the affected surface, and the affected level. Analysis of variation was used to compare the results and kappa analysis was used to evaluate interobserver agreement. Results A significant difference in the area under the ROC curves was found among the three modalities (P=0.0002), with CBCT (0.81) having a significantly higher value than PA (0.71) or SET (0.71). PA was slightly more accurate than SET, but the difference was not statistically significant. CBCT was also superior in locating the affected surface and level. Conclusion CBCT has already proven its superiority in detecting multiple dental conditions, and this study shows it to likewise be superior in detecting and locating incipient external root resorption. PMID:26389057

  20. Evaluation of the Radiopacities of Bulk-fill Restoratives Using Two Digital Radiography Systems.

    PubMed

    Yasa, E; Yasa, B; Aglarci, O S; Ertas, E T

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the radiopacity values of bulk-fill restoratives by using two digital radiography systems. Nine bulk-fill restoratives and a conventional composite were used in the study. Six disc-shaped specimens were prepared from each of these materials, three each at thicknesses of 1 mm and 2 mm, and tooth slices with these same thicknesses were obtained. As a control, an aluminum step wedge varying in thickness from 0.5 to 10 mm in was used. Three specimens of each of the materials, together with the tooth slice and the aluminum step wedge, were placed over a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor and a storage photostimulable phosphor (PPS) plate system and exposed using a dental x-ray unit. The images were analyzed using a software program to measure the mean gray values (MGVs). Five measurements were obtained from each of the restorative materials, the enamel, the dentin, and the stepwedge. The MGVs were converted to the equivalent aluminum thicknesses. Three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the significance of the differences among the groups. A Tukey test was applied for pairwise comparisons (p<0.05). All composite-based restoratives were found to have greater radiopacities than enamel or dentin. Equia Fil had the lowest radiopacity value. Radiopacity increased as the thicknesses of the restorative material increased. The CMOS system showed significantly higher radiopacity values than the PSP system. In conclusion, all investigated bulk-fill restoratives passed the International Organization for Standardization and American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association requirements for radiopacity values when evaluated with the two digital radiography systems.

  1. Optimization of exposure in panoramic radiography while maintaining image quality using adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Svenson, Björn; Larsson, Lars; Båth, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential of using advanced external adaptive image processing for maintaining image quality while reducing exposure in dental panoramic storage phosphor plate (SPP) radiography. Materials and methods Thirty-seven SPP radiographs of a skull phantom were acquired using a Scanora panoramic X-ray machine with various tube load, tube voltage, SPP sensitivity and filtration settings. The radiographs were processed using General Operator Processor (GOP) technology. Fifteen dentists, all within the dental radiology field, compared the structural image quality of each radiograph with a reference image on a 5-point rating scale in a visual grading characteristics (VGC) study. The reference image was acquired with the acquisition parameters commonly used in daily operation (70 kVp, 150 mAs and sensitivity class 200) and processed using the standard process parameters supplied by the modality vendor. Results All GOP-processed images with similar (or higher) dose as the reference image resulted in higher image quality than the reference. All GOP-processed images with similar image quality as the reference image were acquired at a lower dose than the reference. This indicates that the external image processing improved the image quality compared with the standard processing. Regarding acquisition parameters, no strong dependency of the image quality on the radiation quality was seen and the image quality was mainly affected by the dose. Conclusions The present study indicates that advanced external adaptive image processing may be beneficial in panoramic radiography for increasing the image quality of SPP radiographs or for reducing the exposure while maintaining image quality. PMID:26478956

  2. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  3. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  4. Pain Sensation and Postsurgical Complications in Posterior Mandibular Implant Placement Using Ridge Mapping, Panoramic Radiography, and Infiltration Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to investigate intrasurgical and after surgical, pain and the incidence of after surgical alteration of sensation in the mandible and lower lip when placing implants in the posterior mandible using ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia. Methods. This was a longitudinal clinical study of healthy patients needing implant placement in the posterior mandible. After thorough examination and treatment plan using ridge mapping and panoramic radiography, all patients received dental implants under local infiltration anesthesia. The patients were then given a questionnaire to assess the pain during anesthesia and implant surgery. Change of sensation in the lower lip was evaluated by standard neurosensory examination tests at 7 days and 1 and 4 months. Prosthetic treatment was carried out 4 months postsurgery and the patients were followed for an average of 28.5 months afterwards. Results. A total of 103 implants were placed in 62 patients. Patients reported very minor pain during injection. No pain was reported during either implant placement or bone grafting procedures. No alteration of sensation in the mandible or lower lip was recorded postsurgery. Conclusion. In most cases, ridge mapping, panoramic radiography, and infiltration anesthesia are sufficient for posterior mandibular implant placement without pain or complications. PMID:23762571

  5. Technique for chest radiography for pneumoconiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, E.N.

    1982-01-01

    Routine radiographic chest examinations have been performed using a variety of techniques. Although chest radiography is one of the most commonly performed radiographic examinations, it is often difficult to obtain consistently good quality roentgenograms. This publication provides a simple guide and relatively easy solution to the many problems that radiologic technologists might encounter. The language is purposely relatively simple and care has been taken to avoid difficult mathematical and physical explanations. The intent is to provide an easily referrable text for those who may encounter difficulties in producing acceptable chest radiographs.

  6. Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

    1985-01-18

    Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

  7. Digital radiography in the aerospace industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, R. A.; Bueno, C.; Barry, R. C.; Barker, M. D.

    An account is given of the bases of digital radiography (DR), with a view to the identification of NDE systems with the greatest usefulness to the aerospace industry and the nature of the advanced image processing and reconstruction techniques that have been devised thus far. The spatial resolution of any DR system is fundamentally limited by the number of pixels in the digital image and the system field-of-view. Attention is given to the problems of image geometric unsharpness and radiation quantum noise limits, as well as to the potential role of advanced DR in future NDT of aerospace components.

  8. Digital Radiography Qualification of Tube Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, Chad

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Project will be directing Lockheed Martin to perform orbital arc welding on commodities metallic tubing as part of the Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle assembly and integration process in the Operations and Checkout High bay at Kennedy Space Center. The current method of nondestructive evaluation is utilizing traditional film based x-rays. Due to the high number of welds that are necessary to join the commodities tubing (approx 470), a more efficient and expeditious method of nondestructive evaluation is desired. Digital radiography will be qualified as part of a broader NNWG project scope.

  9. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license...

  10. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license...

  11. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license...

  12. Computed radiography imaging plates and associated methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Nathaniel F.; Moses, Alex K.

    2015-08-18

    Computed radiography imaging plates incorporating an intensifying material that is coupled to or intermixed with the phosphor layer, allowing electrons and/or low energy x-rays to impart their energy on the phosphor layer, while decreasing internal scattering and increasing resolution. The radiation needed to perform radiography can also be reduced as a result.

  13. 10 CFR 34.13 - Specific license for industrial radiography.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Specific license for industrial radiography. 34.13 Section 34.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Specific Licensing Provisions § 34.13 Specific license...

  14. The pregnant dental patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Medha

    2012-01-01

    When dealing with a pregnant patient, the dental practitioner should keep in mind the various physiological changes that occur in the pregnant female and the potential effects on the fetus in using various types of local anesthesia. This article reviews the current considerations in the use of local anesthesia in the pregnant dental patient, and the safety of local anesthetics, their dosage, and any adverse effect on mother and fetus. It also discusses various dental procedures and the trimester during which they can be performed. Lastly, this article talks about the complications that can occur with a pregnant dental patient in the dental chair.

  15. Screening Performance Characteristic of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Pleural Effusion; a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Baikpour, Masoud; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Asady, Hadi; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Moghadas Jafari, Ali; Hosseini, Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The role of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion has long been a subject of interest but controversial results have been reported. Accordingly, this study aims to conduct a systematic review of the available literature on diagnostic value of ultrasonography and radiography in detection of pleural effusion through a meta-analytic approach. Methods: An extended search was done in databases of Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest. Two reviewers independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of the articles. Meta-analysis was performed using a mixed-effects binary regression model. Finally, subgroup analysis was carried out in order to find the sources of heterogeneity between the included studies. Results: 12 studies were included in this meta-analysis (1554 subjects, 58.6% male). Pooled sensitivity of ultrasonography in detection of pleural effusion was 0.94 (95% CI: 0.88-0.97; I2= 84.23, p<0.001) and its pooled specificity was calculated to be 0.98 (95% CI: 0.92-1.0; I2= 88.65, p<0.001), while sensitivity and specificity of chest radiography were 0.51 (95% CI: 0.33-0.68; I2= 91.76, p<0.001) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.68-0.98; I2= 92.86, p<0.001), respectively. Sensitivity of ultrasonography was found to be higher when the procedure was carried out by an intensivist or a radiologist using 5-10 MHz transducers. Conclusion: Chest ultrasonography, as a screening tool, has a higher diagnostic accuracy in identification of plural effusion compared to radiography. The sensitivity of this imaging modality was found to be higher when performed by a radiologist or an intensivist and using 5-10MHz probes. PMID:26862542

  16. Accuracy in the Diagnosis of the Mental Nerve Loop. A Comparative Study Between Panoramic Radiography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    do Couto-Filho, Carlos Eduardo Gomes; de Moraes, Paulo Hemerson; Alonso, Maria Beatriz Carrazzone; Haiter-Neto, Francisco; Olate, Sergio; de Albergaria-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dental implant and chin osteotomy are executed on the mandible body and the mental nerve is an important anatomical limit. The aim of this research was to know the position of the mental nerve loop comparing result in panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography. We analyzed 94 hemimandibles and the patient sample comprised female and male subjects of ages ranging from 18 to 52 years (mean age, 35 years) selected randomly from the database of patients at the Division of Oral Radiology at Piracicaba Dental School State University of Campinas; the anterior loop (AL) of the mental nerve was evaluated regarding the presence or absence, which was classified as rectilinear or curvilinear and measurement of its length was obtained. The observations were made in the digital panoramic radiography (PR) and the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) according to a routine technique. The frequencies of the AL identified through PR and CBCT were different: in PR the loop was identified in 42.6% of cases, and only 12.8% were bilateral. In contrast, the AL was detected in 29.8% of the samples using CBCT, with 6.4% being bilateral; Statistical comparison between PR and CBCT showed that the PR led to false-positive diagnosis of the AL in this sample. According to the results of this study, the frequency of AL is low. Thus, it can be assumed that it is not a common condition in this population. PMID:27667898

  17. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study

    PubMed Central

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Background: EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. Methods: All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Results: Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. Conclusion: EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower

  18. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities, the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.

  19. Using ytterbium-169 for safe and economical industrial radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Dowalo, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    Safety has become an issue of paramount importance for industrial radiography. Many NDE facilities and suppliers are finding the cost of performing radiography Prohibitive due to heightened safety concerns for radiation area protection. The most common sources used in radiography, Iridium-192 and Cobalt-60, result in high radiation fields over a large area. Even when collimators are used large radiation fields can result from multicurie source radiography. Radiographic operations are being forced to find alternative test methods and techniques to the use of the old stand-by sources. These alternate methods are not always as comprehensive a test as full volumetric examination with radiography. Since Iridium and Cobalt are in such wide spread use, they are sometimes called upon to perform test of materials which are not in their optimum sensitivity range.

  20. Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel at Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Craft, Aaron E.; Wachs, Daniel M.; Okuniewski, Maria A.; Chichester, David L.; Williams, Walter J.; Papaioannou, Glen C.; Smolinski, Andrew T.

    2015-09-10

    Neutron radiography of irradiated nuclear fuel provides more comprehensive information about the internal condition of irradiated nuclear fuel than any other non-destructive technique to date. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has multiple nuclear fuels research and development programs that routinely evaluate irradiated fuels using neutron radiography. The Neutron Radiography reactor (NRAD) sits beneath a shielded hot cell facility where neutron radiography and other evaluation techniques are performed on these highly radioactive objects. The NRAD currently uses the foil-film transfer technique for imaging fuel that is time consuming but provides high spatial resolution. This study describes the NRAD and hot cell facilities,more » the current neutron radiography capabilities available at INL, planned upgrades to the neutron imaging systems, and new facilities being brought online at INL related to neutron imaging.« less

  1. Simulation of computed radiography with imaging plate detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tisseur, D.; Costin, M.; Mathy, F.; Schumm, A.

    2014-02-18

    Computed radiography (CR) using phosphor imaging plate detectors is taking an increasing place in Radiography Testing. CR uses similar equipment as conventional radiography except that the classical X-ray film is replaced by a numerical detector, called image plate (IP), which is made of a photostimulable layer and which is read by a scanning device through photostimulated luminescence. Such digital radiography has already demonstrated important benefits in terms of exposure time, decrease of source energies and thus reduction of radioprotection area besides being a solution without effluents. This paper presents a model for the simulation of radiography with image plate detectors in CIVA together with examples of validation of the model. The study consists in a cross comparison between experimental and simulation results obtained on a step wedge with a classical X-ray tube. Results are proposed in particular with wire Image quality Indicator (IQI) and duplex IQI.

  2. Dental and bone abnormalities in patients with familial polyposis coli.

    PubMed

    Carl, W; Herrera, L

    1987-01-01

    Dental and bone abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible are present in approximately 80% of patients with familial polyposis coli. The dental abnormalities include impacted teeth (other than third molars), supernumerary teeth, congenitally missing teeth, fused roots of first and second molars, and unusually long and tapered roots of posterior teeth. The bone lesions consist mostly of osteomas, either isolated or in clusters, in the maxilla and mandible or of exostoses with lateral and/or lingual extensions. Since dental and bone abnormalities are already present early in life there is a strong suggestion that they may be used as diagnostic features in the recognition of familial polyposis coli.

  3. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  4. Neutron Radiography Reactor Reactivity -- Focused Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Woolstenhulme; Randal Damiana; Kenneth Schreck; Ann Marie Phillips; Dana Hewit

    2010-11-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was converted from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. After the conversion, NRAD resumed operations and is meeting operational requirements. Radiography image quality and the number of images that can be produced in a given time frame match pre-conversion capabilities. However, following the conversion, NRAD’s excess reactivity with the LEU fuel was less than it had been with the HEU fuel. Although some differences between model predictions and actual performance are to be expected, the lack of flexibility in NRAD’s safety documentation prevented adjusting the reactivity by adding more fuel, until the safety documentation could be modified. To aid future reactor conversions, a reactivity-focused Lessons Learned meeting was held. This report summarizes the findings of the lessons learned meeting and addresses specific questions posed by DOE regarding NRAD’s conversion and reactivity.

  5. Spectrum optimization for computed radiography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Semturs, Friedrich; Kaar, Marcus; Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Technical quality assurance (TQA) is one of the key issues in breast screening protocols where the two crucial aspects are image quality and dose. While digital radiography (DR) systems can produce excellent image quality at low dose, it appears often to be difficult with computed radiography (CR) systems to fulfill the requirements for image quality and to keep the dose below the limits. Here, the choice of the optimal spectrum can be necessary to comply with the limiting values given by the standards. To determine the optimal spectrum, we calculated the contrast-noise ratio (CNR) for different anode/filter (a/f) combinations in dependence of tube voltage. This was done for breast thicknesses of 50, 60 and 70 mm. The figure-of-merit to be optimized was the quotient of squared CNR and average glandular dose. The investigated imaging plates were made of BaFBrI:Eu from a Fuji CR system. For comparison we repeated the measurements on a Carestream system. With respect to the Fuji system we found that the two k-edges of Iodine at 33 kV and Barium at 37 kV influence the results significantly. A peak as found in DR systems is followed by two additional peaks resulting from the higher absorption at the k-edges. This can be experienced with all a/f combinations. The same effect also occurred on the Carestream system.

  6. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  7. The Future of Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The author, a representative of the American Dental Trade Association, identifies major challenges facing dental education in the areas of predoctoral dental education, postdoctoral dental education, and continuing dental education. Ten recommendations address preclinical and clinical courses, licensing examinations, mandatory continuing…

  8. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  9. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries

  10. Reduction of radiation dose and imaging costs in scoliosis radiography. Application of large-screen image intensifier photofluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, H.; Kiekara, O.; Soimakallio, S.; Vainio, J.

    1988-04-01

    Photofluorography using a large-field image intensifier (Siemens Optilux 57) was applied to scoliosis radiography and compared with a full-size rare-earth screen/film technique. When scoliosis radiography (PA-projection) was performed on 25 adolescent patients, the photofluorographs were found to be of comparable diagnostic quality with full-size films. A close correspondence between the imaging techniques was found in the Cobb angle measurements as well as in the grading of rotation with the pedicle method. The use of photofluorography results in a radiation dose reduction of about one-half and considerable savings in direct imaging costs and archive space. In our opinion the method is particularly well-suited for follow-up and screening evaluation of scoliosis, but in tall patients the image field size of 40 x 40 cm restricts its usefulness as initial examination.

  11. The Role of Online Learning in Radiographic Diagnosis in Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsao, Ariel; Park, Sang E.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the pilot study was to investigate whether an interactive online module improved third-year dental students' radiographic caries diagnosis abilities and conceptual understanding. Third year dental students were given online tutoring modules and assessed afterward to determine whether their diagnostic skills improved, whether they…

  12. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  13. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  14. Treatment of dental anxiety disorders. Outcome related to DSM-IV diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Kvale, Gerd; Raadal, Magne; Vika, Margrete; Johnsen, Bjørn Helge; Skaret, Erik; Vatnelid, Herborg; Oiama, Ingrid

    2002-04-01

    In this study we evaluated treatment effects in 70 consecutively admitted patients in a specialized university clinic for treatment of dental fear. Thirty-three (47%) of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for Specific Phobia alone (Dental Phobia, DP), 24 (33%) had severe dental anxiety without fulfilling the criteria for phobia (ND), and 13 (19%) fulfilled the criteria for multiple DSM-IV diagnoses (MD). Dental anxiety was measured prior to, immediately after and at follow-up (mean = 19 months) using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and Dental Fear Survey. Dental attitudes were measured by Getz' Dental Beliefs Survey. Dental attendance and everyday functioning were measured by self-report. DP patients received significantly more treatment-sessions as compared to the ND group. Despite significant overall reductions in scores on all psychometric instruments from pretreatment to follow up, patients in the MD group reported significantly more severe anxiety at pre- and post-treatment and at follow-up as compared to patients in the ND group. There was no interaction between diagnostic group and assessment occasion (pre treatment, post treatment and follow up) on the self-reported anxiety. Patients reported significant improvements in self-esteem, social relations and everyday functioning, regardless of diagnostic group. Sixty-three percentage of the respondents had been to the dentist within 1 year after completed treatment. Patients treated by dentists who had received supervised training in exposure treatment had significantly more often seen the dentist at follow-up.

  15. A Survey of Programs and Services for Learning Disabled Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonoff, Stanley; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A national survey sought information on the availability in dental schools of support-type programs, diagnostic evaluations, curriculum accommodations, services, and counseling for learning-disabled students. (MSE)

  16. [Diagnostic imaging of "body packers"].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, K; Tajima, N; Tajima, H; Murakami, R; Okada, S; Hosaka, J; Ito, K; Yamamoto, K; Kumazaki, T; Masuno, T; Yokota, H; Makino, T

    1997-02-01

    Drug smuggling by intra-abdominal concealment, so called "body packing," has recently increased, even in Japan. Because of fatal drug intoxication and other adverse side effects, it is important to make a radiological diagnosis of body packers as soon as possible. A retrospective analysis of the images of plain abdominal radiography, computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US) was performed in twenty-three body packers to evaluate the imaging characteristics of three drugs (cannabis, cocaine and heroin). Cannabis (16 patients) and cocaine (5 patients) packages were demonstrated as well-demarcated rectangular-shaped high-density shadows surrounded by gas halo ("double condom sign") in abdominal plain radiographs and CT. Heroin packages (2 patients) were demonstrated as obscure shadows and were difficult to identify on plain radiographs, because they resembled stool masses. US was performed in one cannabis patient because of the refusal of radiological examination, and packages were demonstrated as round echogenic structures with dorsal echo extinctions. In conclusion, abdominal plain radiography, CT and US represent valuable diagnostic modalities in the assessment of body packers.

  17. Case based dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice. PMID:19410233

  18. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2 to 2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR(6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  19. Direct magnification radiography of the newborn infant

    SciTech Connect

    Brasch, R.C.; Gould, R.G.

    1982-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have made direct radiographic magnification of the newborn infant clinically feasible. A microfocus radiographic tube and a rare-earth, high-speed recording system were combined to obtain more than 2,000 radiographs at magnifications of 2-2.5. Special positioning devices permitted imaging of even those infants confined to incubators and connected to life-supporting systems. When quantitatively compared with three conventional contact radiographic systems with respect to resolution, contrast, and noise, magnification radiography showed overall superiority of image characteristics. Definition of subtle abnormalities and anatomically small structures permitted diagnoses which could not be made from conventional images. Furthermore, infant radiation exposure was markedly less (15 mR (3.9 mC/kg) maximum skin exposure) as compared with conventional contact radiographic systems (24 mR (6.1 mC/kg) to 45 mR (11.6 mC/kg)).

  20. Measuring microfocus focal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification (especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application); (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. When determining microfocus focal spot dimensions using unsharpness measurements both signal-to-noise (SNR) and magnification can be important. There is a maximum accuracy that is a function of SNR and therefore an optimal magnification. Greater than optimal magnification can be used but it will not increase accuracy.

  1. Real time radiography of Titan 4 booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachapell, M.; Turner, D.; Dolan, K.; Perkins, D.; Costerus, B.

    1993-04-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory successfully completed a real-time radiography of the Titan 4 booster motor in February 1993. The success of this project depended on the quick response to Air Force criteria and securing a multi-disciplinary team addressing the numerous technical challenges. The team's challenges included the following: large area imager design and fabrication problems; vibrating mitigation obstacles; sound mitigation dilemmas; high levels of fail safe confidence; and operating a fragile, transportable x-ray linear accelerator. The data was viewed in real-time and stored utilizing standard video hardware. The data from the test is presently being analyzed. The multi-disciplinary team was presented with many serious technical challenges that needed to be addressed expeditiously. The purpose of this paper is to examine some of the technical issues and how they were executed.

  2. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    PubMed Central

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-01-01

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research. PMID:26229645

  3. Digital radiography exposure indices: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Mothiram, Ursula; Brennan, Patrick C; Lewis, Sarah J; Moran, Bernadette; Robinson, John

    2014-06-15

    Digital radiography (DR) technologies have the advantage of a wide dynamic range compared to their film-screen predecessors, however, this poses a potential for increased patient exposure if left unchecked. Manufacturers have developed the exposure index (EI) to counter this, which provides radiographers with feedback on the exposure reaching the detector. As these EIs were manufacturer-specific, a wide variety of EIs existed. To offset this, the international standardised EI has been developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The purpose of this article is to explore the current literature relating to EIs, beginning with the historical development of the EI, the development of the standardised EI and an exploration of common themes and studies as evidenced in the research literature. It is anticipated that this review will provide radiographers with a useful guide to understanding EIs, their application in clinical practice, limitations and suggestions for further research.

  4. NBS work on neutron resonance radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schrack, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    NBS has been engaged in a wide-ranging program in Neutron Resonance Radiography utilizing both one- and two-dimensional position-sensitive neutron detectors. The ability to perform a position-sensitive assay of up to 16 isotopes in a complex matrix has been demonstrated for a wide variety of sample types, including those with high gamma activity. A major part of the program has been the development and application of the microchannel-plate-based position-sensitive neutron detector. This detector system has high resolution and sensitivity, together with adequate speed of response to be used with neutron time-of-flight techniques. This system has demonstrated the ability to simultaneously image three isotopes in a sample with no interference.

  5. [Aplication of demineralized human bone matrix in the surgical dental fusion treatment. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Mora-Rincones, Oscar A; Corona-Rodríguez, Julio C; Díaz-Carvajal, Alvaro L; Franco-Carrero, Isabel C

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a surgical alternative in the treatment of the dental fusions through the placement of demineralized human bone matrix (DHBM) (Grafton Putty)*, immediately after the separation and extraction of the fused tooth to the permanent one. The dental fusion is a dental anomaly of union, that consists in the union of two dental germs during development. It could happen at any of the dental germ evolution stages from the dental sheet or from more advanced processes of differentiation. For the clinical treatment, an allograft of DHBM with osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties was used. This had several factors of bone growth, it allowed the gradual growth of a new bone that helped to correct the bone defects post-extraction and to cover the exposed distal wall of the remaining permanent tooth. The clinic evaluation and the periapical and panoramic radiographies images were used for the clinical control. It can be concluded that the surgical separation and the extraction of the tooth with less anatomical likeness to the contralateral and the placement of the DHBM, represent a surgical treatment alternative of the dental fusion.

  6. [Determination of dental age].

    PubMed

    Willems, Guy

    2005-01-01

    A review of the most commonly used dental age estimating techniques is generated. The most important issue for the forensic odontologist involved in dental age estimation is to employ as many of these methods as possible by performing repetitive measurements and calculations of different age-related parameters. That is the only way in order to try and establish reliable dental age estimations. In particular, a special chapter is attributed to the complex problem of determining the age of majority. PMID:16370435

  7. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  8. The Enhanced Workflow and Efficiency of the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)-Based Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Tsz-Lung; Wong, Edward Ting-Hei; Ng, Kris Lap-Shun; Jeor, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Lo, Gladys Goh

    2015-06-01

    With the implementation of the PACS in the hospital, there is an increasing demand from the clinicians for immediate access and display of radiological images. Recently, our hospital has installed the first wireless local area network (WLAN)-based direct digital radiography (DDR) portable radiography system. The DDR portable radiography system allows wireless retrieval of modality worklist and wireless transmission of portable X-ray image on the console to the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), via WLAN connection of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi). The aim of this study was to analyze the workflow and performance between the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system and the old practice using conventional portable X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) system. A total of 190 portable chest X-ray examinations were evaluated and timed, using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR from March to April of 2012 and using the new DDR portable radiography system on December of 2012 (n = 97 for old system and n = 93 for DDR portable system). The time interval of image becoming available to the PACS using the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system was significantly shorter than that of the old practice using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR (6.8 ± 2.6 min for DDR portable system; 23 ± 10.2 min for old system; p < 0.0001), with the efficiency improved by 70 %. The implementation of the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system can enhance the workflow of portable radiography by reduction of procedural steps. PMID:25561071

  9. The Enhanced Workflow and Efficiency of the Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN)-Based Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Ngan, Tsz-Lung; Wong, Edward Ting-Hei; Ng, Kris Lap-Shun; Jeor, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Lo, Gladys Goh

    2015-06-01

    With the implementation of the PACS in the hospital, there is an increasing demand from the clinicians for immediate access and display of radiological images. Recently, our hospital has installed the first wireless local area network (WLAN)-based direct digital radiography (DDR) portable radiography system. The DDR portable radiography system allows wireless retrieval of modality worklist and wireless transmission of portable X-ray image on the console to the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), via WLAN connection of wireless fidelity (Wi-Fi). The aim of this study was to analyze the workflow and performance between the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system and the old practice using conventional portable X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) system. A total of 190 portable chest X-ray examinations were evaluated and timed, using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR from March to April of 2012 and using the new DDR portable radiography system on December of 2012 (n = 97 for old system and n = 93 for DDR portable system). The time interval of image becoming available to the PACS using the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system was significantly shorter than that of the old practice using the conventional portable X-ray machine with CR (6.8 ± 2.6 min for DDR portable system; 23 ± 10.2 min for old system; p < 0.0001), with the efficiency improved by 70 %. The implementation of the WLAN-based DDR portable radiography system can enhance the workflow of portable radiography by reduction of procedural steps.

  10. Distinguishing materials in inspected objects by digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V.; Lysetska, O.; Opolonin, A.; Danilenko, V.; Galkin, S.; Voronkin, E.; Kostyukevich, S. A.

    2005-08-01

    We used detector arrays of types "scintillator-photodiode" (S-PD) and scintillator-photoreceiving device (PRD). In non-destructive testing systems using S-PD arrays it is possible to use scintillators of different atomic number and density, which allows functioning in the energy range from 20 keV to 10 MeV, i.e., steel equivalent thickness I from 100μm to 300mm. For different objects and different purposes, different types of detector arrays and methods of control can be recommended. Results of experimental studies of detector arrays S-PD and S-PRD used for X-ray digital radiography have shown that there exist further possibilities to increase spatial resolution of this system for up to 2-3 line pairs per mm. It was investigated experimental results with used two array detectors for low-energy and high - energy detections (HED and LED). It is show in principle to distinguish not only organic from inorganic materials, but so as safety organic from explosive. Our aim was to show (theoretically and experimentally) that is could be possible to substantially increase the accuracy of separation of substances in the inspected object by their atomic number, as well as to increase the sensitivity of the method as a whole by using a multi-energy approach and detectors that have substantially different sensibility in the low-and high-energy range of the X-ray emitter spectrum. It was show the possibility to distinct materials with effective atomic number difference about 10-15%. It can be used in inspection systems, including anti-terrorist activities, in technical diagnostics, medicine.

  11. Diagnostic Tools of Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pleural effusion is not a rare disease in Korea. The diagnosis of pleural effusion is very difficult, even though the patients often complain of typical symptoms indicating of pleural diseases. Pleural effusion is characterized by the pleural cavity filled with transudative or exudative pleural fluids, and it is developed by various etiologies. The presence of pleural effusion can be confirmed by radiological studies including simple chest radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography. Identifying the causes of pleural effusions by pleural fluid analysis is essential for proper treatments. This review article provides information on the diagnostic approaches of pleural effusions and further suggested ways to confirm their various etiologies, by using the most recent journals for references. PMID:24920946

  12. 5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING A CONTROL ROOM INSIDE THE RADIOGRAPHY ROOM; PASS-THROUGH FOR EXPOSED FILM ON RIGHT - Fort McCoy, Building No. T-1031, North side of South Tenth Avenue, Block 10, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  13. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  14. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  15. Digital radiography using amorphous selenium: photoconductively activated switch (PAS) readout system.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Nikita; Komljenovic, Philip T; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, John A

    2008-03-01

    A new amorphous selenium (a-Se) digital radiography detector is introduced. The proposed detector generates a charge image in the a-Se layer in a conventional manner, which is stored on electrode pixels at the surface of the a-Se layer. A novel method, called photoconductively activated switch (PAS), is used to read out the latent x-ray charge image. The PAS readout method uses lateral photoconduction at the a-Se surface which is a revolutionary modification of the bulk photoinduced discharge (PID) methods. The PAS method addresses and eliminates the fundamental weaknesses of the PID methods--long readout times and high readout noise--while maintaining the structural simplicity and high resolution for which PID optical readout systems are noted. The photoconduction properties of the a-Se surface were investigated and the geometrical design for the electrode pixels for a PAS radiography system was determined. This design was implemented in a single pixel PAS evaluation system. The results show that the PAS x-ray induced output charge signal was reproducible and depended linearly on the x-ray exposure in the diagnostic exposure range. Furthermore, the readout was reasonably rapid (10 ms for pixel discharge). The proposed detector allows readout of half a pixel row at a time (odd pixels followed by even pixels), thus permitting the readout of a complete image in 30 s for a 40 cm x 40 cm detector with the potential of reducing that time by using greater readout light intensity. This demonstrates that a-Se based x-ray detectors using photoconductively activated switches could form a basis for a practical integrated digital radiography system. PMID:18404939

  16. The use of diagnostic wax-ups in treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Lily T; Bohnenkamp, David M

    2003-03-01

    The use of diagnostic wax-ups as diagnostic aids in treatment planning has been presented for use in various situations--from simple patient assessment to more extensive prosthodontic rehabilitation. Requesting a diagnostic wax-up from the dental technician may add to the expense of treatment planning for a patient because of the laboratory fee incurred for this service. The cost is negligible, considering the value of identifying potential treatment obstacles that could affect both treatment outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  17. Simple methods to reduce patient exposure during scoliosis radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, P.F.; Thomas, A.W.; Thompson, W.E.; Wollerton, M.A.; Rachlin, J.A.

    1986-05-01

    Radiation exposure to the breasts of adolescent females can be reduced significantly through the use of one or all of the following methods: fast, rare-earth screen-film combinations; specially designed compensating filters; and breast shielding. The importance of exposure reduction during scoliosis radiography as well as further details on the above described methods are discussed. In addition, the early results of a Center for Devices and Radiological Health study, which recorded exposure and technique data for scoliosis radiography, is presented.

  18. TU-F-9A-01: Balancing Image Quality and Dose in Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, D; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Emphasis is often placed on minimizing radiation dose in diagnostic imaging without a complete consideration of the effect on image quality, especially those that affect diagnostic accuracy. This session will include a patient image-based review of diagnostic quantities important to radiologists in conventional radiography, including the effects of body habitus, age, positioning, and the clinical indication of the exam. The relationships between image quality, radiation dose, and radiation risk will be discussed, specifically addressing how these factors are affected by image protocols and acquisition parameters and techniques. This session will also discuss some of the actual and perceived radiation risk associated with diagnostic imaging. Regardless if the probability for radiation-induced cancer is small, the fear associated with radiation persists. Also when a risk has a benefit to an individual or to society, the risk may be justified with respect to the benefit. But how do you convey the risks and the benefits to people? This requires knowledge of how people perceive risk and how to communicate the risk and the benefit to different populations. In this presentation the sources of errors in estimating risk from radiation and some methods used to convey risks are reviewed. Learning Objectives: Understand the image quality metrics that are clinically relevant to radiologists. Understand how acquisition parameters and techniques affect image quality and radiation dose in conventional radiology. Understand the uncertainties in estimates of radiation risk from imaging exams. Learn some methods for effectively communicating radiation risk to the public.

  19. Malignant hyperthermia in dental patients.

    PubMed

    Adriani, J; Sundin, R

    1984-02-01

    Malignant hyperthermia is a hypermetabolic, frequently fatal syndrome triggered by anesthetic drugs that occurs in genetically susceptible persons. Fatalities have been reported in patients receiving dental treatment with general anesthesia. The syndrome may also be triggered by stress, exercise, muscle injury, mild infections, and other nonpharmacologic agents or stimuli in conscious patients. Treatment is symptomatic and empiric, and potential reactors are not easily identified. However, criteria for identifying most susceptible persons have been established, and therapeutic agents for prophylaxis and treatment, which appear to be effective, are available. In this paper we report experiences with the syndrome and discuss an overview of its features, criteria used for identifying susceptible persons, prophylaxis, diagnostic features, and procedures to be followed should the syndrome develop. PMID:6584489

  20. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  1. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  2. Diagnostic imaging of the acutely injured patient

    SciTech Connect

    Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides an analysis of pathophysiologic concepts of trauma and reviews the effectiveness of the available imaging modalities in acute trauma of various organ system. Topics covered are chest injuries; abdominal trauma; fractures of long bones; the foot and ankle; the knee; hand and wrist; the elbow; the shoulder; the pelvis hips; the spine; the skull and facial trauma and the clinical assessment of multiple injuries patients. Comparative evaluation of diagnostic techniques of radiography is discussed. Normal anatomy and bone fractures along with soft-tissue injuries are described.

  3. Anxiety and depressive disorders and dental fear among adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Pohjola, Vesa; Mattila, Aino K; Joukamaa, Matti; Lahti, Satu

    2011-02-01

    We studied the association between dental fear and anxiety or depressive disorders, as well as the comorbidity of dental fear with anxiety and depressive disorders, controlling for socio-demographic characteristics, dental attendance, and dental health. Nationally representative data on Finnish adults, ≥ 30 yr of age (n = 5,953), were gathered through interviews and clinical examination. Dental fear was measured using the question: 'How afraid are you of visiting a dentist?' Anxiety and/or depressive disorders were assessed using a standardized structured psychiatric interview according to criteria presented in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition) (DSM-IV).Those with depressive disorders, generalized anxiety disorder or social phobia more commonly reported high dental fear than did those without these disorders. When age, gender, education, dental attendance, and the number of decayed, missing, and restored teeth were considered, those with generalized anxiety disorder were more likely to have high dental fear than were participants with neither anxiety nor depressive disorders. The comorbidity of depressive and anxiety disorders also remained statistically significantly associated with dental fear; those with both depressive and anxiety disorders were more likely to have high dental fear than were those without these disorders. Our findings support the suggestion that some individuals may have a personality that is vulnerable to dental fear. PMID:21244512

  4. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  5. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  6. Is dosimetry still a necessity in current dental practice?

    PubMed

    Reddy, S S; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Clint, Joseph Ben; Sharma, Shivani

    2015-12-01

    Today, dentists have a wide range of imaging modalities to choose from, the film based techniques, digital techniques, and the recent introduction of 3D volumetric or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The inherent design features of the new generation dental x-ray equipment has significantly improved over the years with no evidence of substandard x-ray units in operation. In dental facilities radiological workload is comparatively low, newer radiation equipments and accessories follow safety guidelines and employ better radiation protection measures for the patient and the operator. Dentists' knowledge and expertise in radiation protection measures is good, enabling them to carry out riskfree radiation procedures in their practice. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the need for dosimeters in current dental scenario. 'Is there currently a significant risk from dental radiography to merit the use of personal dosimetery in dental practice. 'Dental health professionals (Oral radiologists) and radiographic assistants of fourteen dental colleges in Karnataka state participated in this questionnaire study. The questionnaire consisted of the following questions--the make, type, year of manufacture of radiographic machines used in their setup, number of radiographs made per day in the institution, type of receptors used, number of personnel at risk for radiation exposure, radiation protection measures used, regular monitoring by personal dosimeters, equivalent dosage readings for the past 12 months and whether the reading of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for any personnel had exceeded the recommended exposure value in the last 3 years. Dosimetry records of the radiology staff in the last three years shows doses no more than 1.50 mSv per year. The various institutions' dose (person mSv) was in the range of 3.70 mSv-3.90 mSv. Personal monitoring for Dentists can be omitted in the dental colleges since the estimated dose of oral radiologists

  7. A back projection dosimetry method for diagnostic and orthovoltage x-ray from 40 to 140 kVp for patients and phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrashteh, Hossein

    2005-07-01

    Patient dosimetry in practice is involved with time consuming, tedious calculations during the measurement process. There is a need for a straight forward and accurate method to perform patient dosimetry when required. A back projection dosimetry method for patient/phantom using Entrance Surface Dose (ESD) and its corresponding Exit Surface Dose with an average value for attenuation coefficient (mu), (e.g., mean effective attenuation coefficient (mu`)), was developed. The method focused on low energy X-ray units (40--140 kVp), primarily for conventional diagnostic radiography and low energy radiation therapy procedures. The assumption is that it may be used for similar concepts and modalities within the same energy range, (e.g., fluoroscopy, where the skin injuries have been common in the past, or mammography, where the radiation carcinogenesis has been a matter of concern). A new Gafchromic film, XR-QA, as a precision dosimeter was assessed and used with this algorithm. Due to the fact that the dose range often seen in conventional radiography exams in most cases is not high enough to activate the sensitive layer of this film sufficiently, the measured net Optical Density (OD) changes were not substantial enough. Therefore, a conventional and relatively low speed dental film, DF58 Ultra, was used. Various thicknesses of Acrylic, a tissue equivalent material, were used with the algorithm. When compared with the other sources and reference data, the results from the developed mathematical algorithm are in a reasonable agreement with these values. The developed method is straight forward, and within the acceptable accuracy range. The back projection dosimetry method is effective and may be used individually for the desired body parts or fetus areas, depending on the clinical practice and interests.

  8. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety, and protection; X-ray films and...-radiation; and X-radiation units, detection and monitoring devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum...

  9. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Hygienists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... must include content in seven areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety... devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum content should include: Interaction of ionizing radiation...

  10. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Hygienists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... must include content in seven areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety... devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum content should include: Interaction of ionizing radiation...

  11. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Hygienists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... must include content in seven areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety... devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum content should include: Interaction of ionizing radiation...

  12. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Hygienists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... must include content in seven areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety... devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum content should include: Interaction of ionizing radiation...

  13. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety, and protection; X-ray films and...-radiation; and X-radiation units, detection and monitoring devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum...

  14. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety, and protection; X-ray films and...-radiation; and X-radiation units, detection and monitoring devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety, and protection; X-ray films and...-radiation; and X-radiation units, detection and monitoring devices. —Radiation Biology. Curriculum...

  16. 42 CFR Appendix C to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Assistants

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety, and protection; X-ray films and.... —Radiation Physics. Curriculum content should include: Historical background; role of radiology in...

  17. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Standards for Accreditation of Dental Radiography Training for Dental Hygienists

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... must include content in seven areas: radiation physics; radiation biology; radiation health, safety... processing techniques; and film mounting. —Radiation Physics. Curriculum content should include:...

  18. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. PMID:22610892

  19. Advantages of the dental practice-based research network initiative and its role in dental education.

    PubMed

    Curro, Frederick A; Grill, Ashley C; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G; Vena, Don; Keenan, Analia V; Naftolin, Frederick

    2011-08-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a novel venue in which providers can increase their knowledge base and improve delivery of care through participation in clinical studies. This article describes some aspects of our experience with a National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-supported PBRN and discusses the role it can play in dental education. PBRNs create a structured pathway for providers to advance their professional development by participating in the process of collecting data through clinical research. This process allows practitioners to contribute to the goals of evidence-based dentistry by helping to provide a foundation of evidence on which to base clinical decisions as opposed to relying on anecdotal evidence. PBRNs strengthen the professional knowledge base by applying the principles of good clinical practice, creating a resource for future dental faculty, training practitioners on best practices, and increasing the responsibility, accountability, and scope of care. PBRNs can be the future pivotal instruments of change in dental education, the use of electronic health record systems, diagnostic codes, and the role of comparative effectiveness research, which can create an unprecedented opportunity for the dental profession to advance and be integrated into the health care system.

  20. Sensitivity study of proton radiography and comparison with kV and MV x-ray imaging using GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depauw, Nicolas; Seco, Joao

    2011-04-01

    The imaging sensitivity of proton radiography has been studied and compared with kV and MV x-ray imaging using Monte Carlo simulations. A phantom was specifically modeled using 21 different material inserts with densities ranging from 0.001 to 1.92 g cm-3. These simulations were run using the MGH double scattered proton beam, scanned pencil proton beams from 200 to 490 MeV, as well as pure 50 keV, 100 keV, 1 MeV and 2 MeV gamma x-ray beams. In order to compare the physics implied in both proton and photon radiography without being biased by the current state of the art in detector technology, the detectors were considered perfect. Along with spatial resolution, the contrast-to-noise ratio was evaluated and compared for each material. These analyses were performed using radiographic images that took into account the following: only primary protons, both primary and secondary protons, and both contributions while performing angular and energetic cuts. Additionally, tissue-to-tissue contrasts in an actual lung cancer patient case were studied for simulated proton radiographs and compared against the original kV x-ray image which corresponds to the current patient set-up image in the proton clinic. This study highlights the poorer spatial resolution of protons versus x-rays for radiographic imaging purposes, and the excellent density resolution of proton radiography. Contrasts around the tumor are higher using protons in a lung cancer patient case. The high-density resolution of proton radiography is of great importance for specific tumor diagnostics, such as in lung cancer, where x-ray radiography operates poorly. Furthermore, the use of daily proton radiography prior to proton therapy would ameliorate patient set-up while reducing the absorbed dose delivered through imaging.

  1. Digital chest radiography: an update on modern technology, dose containment and control of image quality

    PubMed Central

    Neitzel, Ulrich; Venema, Henk W.; Uffmann, Martin; Prokop, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    The introduction of digital radiography not only has revolutionized communication between radiologists and clinicians, but also has improved image quality and allowed for further reduction of patient exposure. However, digital radiography also poses risks, such as unnoticed increases in patient dose and suboptimum image processing that may lead to suppression of diagnostic information. Advanced processing techniques, such as temporal subtraction, dual-energy subtraction and computer-aided detection (CAD) will play an increasing role in the future and are all targeted to decrease the influence of distracting anatomic background structures and to ease the detection of focal and subtle lesions. This review summarizes the most recent technical developments with regard to new detector techniques, options for dose reduction and optimized image processing. It explains the meaning of the exposure indicator or the dose reference level as tools for the radiologist to control the dose. It also provides an overview over the multitude of studies conducted in recent years to evaluate the options of these new developments to realize the principle of ALARA. The focus of the review is hereby on adult applications, the relationship between dose and image quality and the differences between the various detector systems. PMID:18431577

  2. High Energy K(alpha) Radiography Using High-intensity, Short-pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Izumi, N; Key, M H; King, J A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Snavely, R A; Tabak, M; Town, R J; Wickersham, J E; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Theobald, W; Chambers, D M; Eagelton, R; Goldsack, T; Clarke, R J; Heathcote, R; Giraldez, E; Nikroo, A; Steinman, D A; Stephens, R B; Zhang, B B

    2005-11-16

    We have performed experiments using Callisto, the Vulcan 100 TW and the Vulcan Petawatt high intensity lasers to understand the characteristics of high energy, K{alpha} x-ray sources and to implement workable radiography solutions at 20-100 keV. Our measurements show that the K{alpha} size from a simple foil target is larger than 60 {micro}m, far larger than the experiment resolution requirement. The total K{alpha} yield is independent of target thicknesses verifying that refluxing plays a major role in photon generation. Smaller radiating volumes emit brighter K{alpha} radiation. 1-D radiography experiments using small-edge-on foils resolved 10 {micro}m features with high contrast. We tested a variety of small volume 2-D point sources such as cones, wires, and embedded wires, measuring photon yields and comparing our measurements with predictions from hybrid-PIC LSP simulations. In addition to high-energy, high-resolution backlighters, future experiments will also need imaging detectors and diagnostic tools that are workable in the 20-100 keV energy range. An initial look at some of these detector issues is also presented.

  3. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes. PMID:9720100

  4. Lumbar spine radiography — poor collimation practices after implementation of digital technology

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, L G; Espeland, A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The transition from analogue to digital radiography may have reduced the motivation to perform proper collimation, as digital techniques have made it possible to mask areas irradiated outside the area of diagnostic interest (ADI). We examined the hypothesis that collimation practices have deteriorated since digitalisation. Methods After defining the ADI, we compared the proportion of the irradiated field outside the ADI in 86 digital and 86 analogue frontal lumbar spine radiographs using the Mann–Whitney test. 50 digital images and 50 analogue images were from a Norwegian hospital and the remainder from a Danish hospital. Consecutive digital images were compared with analogue images (from the hospitals' archives) produced in the 4 years prior to digitalisation. Both hospitals' standard radiographic procedures remained unchanged during the study. For digital images, the irradiated field was assessed using non-masked raw-data images. Results The proportion of the irradiated field outside the ADI was larger in digital than in analogue images (mean 61.7% vs 42.4%, p<0.001), and also in a subsample of 39 image pairs that could be matched for patient age (p<0.001). The mean total field size was 46% larger in digital than in analogue images (791 cm2 vs 541 cm2). Conclusion Following the implementation of digital radiography, considerably larger areas were irradiated. This causes unnecessarily high radiation doses to patients. PMID:21606070

  5. Effects of dose reduction on the detectability of standardized radiolucent lesions in digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Dula, K; Sanderink, G; van der Stelt, P F; Mini, R; Buser, D

    1998-08-01

    Dose reduction in digital panoramic radiography was studied. Intentional underexposure was performed with the Orthophos DS while six different human mandibles were radiographed. Exposure settings were 69 kV/15 mA (standard), 64 kV/16 mA, and 60 kV/16 mA. Standardized spherical defects, each either 1 or 1.25 mm in diameter, were simulated in 288 of 432 images, and seven observers decided whether defects were present or not. Areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves were calculated. They showed no significant differences in the detectability of the 1-mm defect at 69, 64, or 60 kV. For the 1.25-mm defect, no difference was found between the 69 and 60 kV images, but a statistically significant different detectability was found for 64 kV images in comparison with both 69 and 60 kV images. A dose reduction of up to 43% was ascertained with a Pedo-RT-Humanoid phantom when panoramic radiography was performed at 60 kV/16 mA. The conclusion is that with the Orthophos DS, it seems possible to reduce the dose rate of x-rays without loss of diagnostic quality in the case of radiolucent changes.

  6. Dose reduction using non lineal diffusion and smoothing filters in computed radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, M. G.; Juste, B.; Vidal, V.; Verdú, G.; Mayo, P.; Rodenas, F.

    2014-02-01

    The use of Computed Radiography (CR) into clinical practice has been followed by a high increase in the number of examinations performed and overdose cases in patients, especially children in pediatric applications. Computed radiographic images are corrupted by noise because either data acquisition or data transmission. The level of this inherent noise is related with the X-ray dose exposure: lower radiation exposure involves higher noise level. The main aim of this work is to reduce the noise present in a low radiation dose CR image in order to the get a CR image of the same quality as a higher radiation exposure image. In this work, we use a non lineal diffusion filtering method to reduce the noise level in a CR, this means that we are able to reduce the exposure, milliampere-second (mAs), and the dose absorbed by the patients. In order to get an optimal result, the diffusive filter is complemented with a smoothing filter with edge detection in order to preserve edges. Therefore, the proposed method consists in obtaining a good quality CR image for diagnostic purposes by selection of lower X-ray exposure jointly with a reduction of the noise. We conclude that a good solution to minimize the dose to patients, especially children in pediatric applications, in X-ray computed radiography consists in decreasing the mAs of the X-ray exposure and then processing the image with the proposed method.

  7. Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyonmin; Deirmengian, Carl A.; Hickok, Noreen J.; Morrison, Tiffany N.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic infections are complex conditions that require immediate diagnosis and accurate identification of the causative organisms to facilitate appropriate management. Conventional methodologies for diagnosis of these infections sometimes lack accuracy or sufficient rapidity. Current molecular diagnostics are an emerging area of bench-to-bedside research in orthopaedic infections. Examples of promising molecular diagnostics include measurement of a specific biomarker in the synovial fluid, polymerase chain reaction–based detection of bacterial genes, and metabolomic determination of responses to orthopaedic infection. PMID:25808967

  8. The Development of a Proficiency Examination for Dental Auxiliaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastrinos, William; Livingston, Samuel A.

    This report describes the development of a criterion-referenced proficiency examination for dental auxiliaries that consists of both written and performance tests in each of five areas: chairside assisting, patient education, diagnostic aids, therapeutics, and laboratory procedures. The content outlines of the tests are presented. The formation of…

  9. Septic pulmonary embolism induced by dental infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Yutaro; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Watanabe, Yoichi; Tohmori, Hidetoshi; Ono, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Dental infection can be an important source for septic pulmonary embolism (SPE), but only a few cases of SPE accompanying dental infection have been reported. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of SPE induced by dental infection. Patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria described in the text were recruited in a retrospective fashion. All 9 patients were men, with a median age of 59 years (range:47 to 74 years). Eight patients had chest pain (88.9%), 5 had a preceding toothache (55.6%) and 3 had preceding gingival swelling (33.3%). Blood cultures obtained from 7 patients were negative. Periodontitis was found in all of the cases, periapical periodontitis in 5 cases, and gingival abscess in 3 cases. The median duration of hospitalization was 15 days, and symptoms were mild in some cases. In addition to antimicrobial therapy, tooth extraction was performed in 3 cases, tooth scaling in 6. SPE induced by dental infection has prominent clinical characteristics such as male preponderance, chest pain, preceding toothache, and mild clinical course.

  10. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Levrini, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giulia

    2014-01-01

    Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction) studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp), to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders). It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction. PMID:25548769

  11. Genetic factors affecting dental caries risk.

    PubMed

    Opal, S; Garg, S; Jain, J; Walia, I

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the literature on genetic aspects of dental caries and provides a framework for the rapidly changing disease model of caries. The scope is genetic aspects of various dental factors affecting dental caries. The PubMed database was searched for articles with keywords 'caries', 'genetics', 'taste', 'diet' and 'twins'. This was followed by extensive handsearching using reference lists from relevant articles. The post-genomic era will present many opportunities for improvement in oral health care but will also present a multitude of challenges. We can conclude from the literature that genes have a role to play in dental caries; however, both environmental and genetic factors have been implicated in the aetiology of caries. Additional studies will have to be conducted to replicate the findings in a different population. Identification of genetic risk factors will help screen and identify susceptible patients to better understand the contribution of genes in caries aetiopathogenesis. Information derived from these diverse studies will provide new tools to target individuals and/or populations for a more efficient and effective implementation of newer preventive measures and diagnostic and novel therapeutic approaches in the management of this disease.

  12. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  13. Dental journals: yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Woodmansey, Karl

    2012-10-01

    Today's dentists may subscribe to, or receive complimentarily, a number of periodical publications containing technical professional information. Dental journals are the prime example: providing timely, reliable and useful information. The development of dental journals is a component of the evolution of scientific communication. This article reviews the origins and evolution of dental journals, including the Texas Dental Journal. PMID:23311024

  14. In vitro assessment of the accuracy of extraoral periapical radiography in root length determination

    PubMed Central

    Nazeer, Muhammad Rizwan; Khan, Farhan Raza; Rahman, Munawwar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the accuracy of extra oral periapical radiography in obtaining root length by comparing it with the radiographs obtained from standard intraoral approach and extended distance intraoral approach. Materials and Methods: It was an in vitro, comparative study conducted at the dental clinics of Aga Khan University Hospital. ERC exemption was obtained for this work, ref number 3407Sur-ERC-14. We included premolars and molars of a standard phantom head mounted with metal and radiopaque teeth. Radiation was exposed using three radiographic approaches: Standard intraoral, extended length intraoral and extraoral. Since, the unit of analysis was individual root, thus, we had a total of 24 images. The images were stored in VixWin software. The length of the roots was determined using the scale function of the measuring tool inbuilt in the software. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 19.0 and GraphPad software. Pearson correlation coefficient and Bland–Altman test was applied to determine whether the tooth length readings obtained from three different approaches were correlated. P = 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: The correlation between standard intraoral and extended intraoral was 0.97; the correlation between standard intraoral and extraoral method was 0.82 while the correlation between extended intraoral and extraoral was 0.76. The results of Bland–Altman test showed that the average discrepancy between these methods is not large enough to be considered as significant. Conclusions: It appears that the extraoral radiographic method can be used in root length determination in subjects where intraoral radiography is not possible. PMID:27011737

  15. Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

    2013-01-01

    The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

  16. [Optimal beam quality for chest digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Oda, Nobuhiro; Tabata, Yoshito; Nakano, Tsutomu

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the optimal beam quality for chest computed radiography (CR), we measured the radiographic contrast and evaluated the image quality of chest CR using various X-ray tube voltages. The contrast between lung and rib or heart increased on CR images obtained by lowering the tube voltage from 140 to 60 kV, but the degree of increase was less. Scattered radiation was reduced on CR images with a lower tube voltage. The Wiener spectrum of CR images with a low tube voltage showed a low value under identical conditions of amount of light stimulated emission. The quality of chest CR images obtained using a lower tube voltage (80 kV and 100 kV) was evaluated as being superior to those obtained with a higher tube voltage (120 kV and 140 kV). Considering the problem of tube loading and exposure in clinical applications, a tube voltage of 90 to 100 kV (0.1 mm copper filter backed by 0.5 mm aluminum) is recommended for chest CR. PMID:25410333

  17. Optical compensation device for chest film radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Robert G.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; DeForest, Sherman E.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hier, Richard G.

    1990-07-01

    Although chest radiography is the most commonly performed radiographic examination and one of the most valuable and cost-effective studies in medicine it suffers from relatively high error rates in both missing pathology and false positive interpretations. Detectability of lung nodules and other structures in underpenetrated regions of the chest film can be improved by both exposure and optical compensation but current compensation systems require major capital cost or a significant change in normal clinical practice. A new optical compensation system called the " Intelligent X-Ray Illuminator" (IXI) automatically and virtually instantaneously generates a patient-specific optical unsharp mask that is projected directly on a radiograph. When a radiograph is placed on the IXI which looks much like a conventional viewbox it acquires a low-resolution electronic image of this film from which the film transmission is derived. The transmission information is inverted and blurred in an image processor to form an unsharp mask which is fed into a spatial light modulator (SLM) placed between a light source and the radiograph. The SLM tailors the viewbox luminance by decreasing illumination to underexposed (i. e. transmissive) areas of the radiograph presenting the observer with an optically unsharp-masked image. The IXI uses the original radiograph and will allow it to be viewed on demand with conventional (uniform illumination. Potentially the IXI could introduce the known beneficial aspects of optical unsharp masking into radiology at low capital

  18. Applications of Cosmic Ray Muon Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardincerri, E.; Durham, J. M.; Morris, C. L.; Rowe, C. A.; Poulson, D. C.; Bacon, J. D.; Plaud-Ramos, K.; Morley, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Dome of Santa Maria del Fiore, Florence Cathedral, was built between 1420 and 1436 by architect Filippo Brunelleschi and it is now cracking under its own weight. Engineering efforts are underway to model the dome's structure and reinforce it against further deterioration. According to some scholars, Brunelleschi might have built reinforcement structures into the dome itself; however, the only confirmed known subsurface reinforcement is a chain of iron and stone around the dome's base. Tomography with cosmic ray muons is a non-destructive imaging method that can be used to image the interior of the wall and therefore ascertain the layout and status of any iron substructure in the dome. We will show the results from a muon tomography measurement of iron hidden in a mockup of the dome's wall performed at Los Alamos National Lab in 2015. The sensitivity of this technique, and the status of this project will be also discussed. At last, we will show results on muon attenuation radiography of larger shallow targets.

  19. Portable Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-11-01

    This user manual describes the function and use of the portable digital radiography and computed tomography (DRCT) scanner. The manual gives a general overview of x-ray imaging systems along with a description of the DRCT system. An inventory of the all the system components, organized by shipping container, is also included. In addition, detailed, step-by-step procedures are provided for all of the exercises necessary for a novice user to successfully collect digital radiographs and tomographic images of an object, including instructions on system assembly and detector calibration and system alignment. There is also a short section covering the limited system care and maintenance needs. Descriptions of the included software packages, the DRCT Digital Imager used for system operation, and the DRCT Image Processing Interface used for image viewing and tomographic data reconstruction are given in the appendixes. The appendixes also include a cheat sheet for more experienced users, a listing of known system problems and how to mitigate them, and an inventory check-off sheet suitable for copying and including with the machine for shipment purposes.

  20. Diagnostic problems in oral pathology.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, C L; Barker, B F

    1985-02-01

    Diagnostic problems within the oral cavity may be associated with lesions of the odontogenic apparatus, salivary glands, bone, mucosa, and connective tissue. Some lesions are unique to the oral cavity, others have a systemic distribution. Several unique and controversial lesions have been selected for discussion, including (1) necrotizing sialometaplasia, a benign salivary gland disease easily mistaken for malignancy; (2) verrucous lesions including verrucous carcinoma, verrucous hyperplasia, and papillary carcinoma; (3) spindle-cell carcinoma, which is often confused with sarcoma; (4) named and unnamed embryonic rests, which may resemble metastatic carcinomas; (5) dental pulp mistaken for odontogenic myxoma; and (6) granular cell tumor with associated pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia.

  1. Dental student debt.

    PubMed

    Mannion, H; Bedi, R

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this investigation is to provide information about the financial status of dental students enrolled on the Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree course at the University of Birmingham. All undergraduate dental students enrolled during the academic year 1993-94 were asked to participate in the study. The pre-tested questionnaire, which was given to all students, covered personal details, expenditure levels, income, loans, overdrafts, use of government schemes ('top-up loans'), and so on. The questionnaire was completed by 115 dental students (response rate 47%). The results showed that dental students' debts increased each year throughout the course. A top-up loan (range 700 Pounds-850 Pounds) had been taken out by 36% of students. The financial status of 9% of students was severe enough to warrant their eligibility for awards from access funds. Credit cards were possessed by 52% of the surveyed students, and although only half of these owed money, 22% owed between 500 Pounds and 2000 Pounds. Personal overdrafts were held by 56% of respondents. A total of 17% of students engaged in weekly part-time employment. The average debt for final year students was 1200 Pounds. Dental students' estimates of the level of debt they were likely to incur was greater than the actual debt presently experienced by final year students. In conclusion, this preliminary study showed that most dental students incur debt during their undergraduate course and that this debt increases during the course.

  2. Application of a novel confocal imaging technique for early the detection of dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Christel; Girkin, John M.; Vaidya, Shilpa; Hall, Andrew F.; Whitters, C. J.; Creanor, Steve L.

    2002-06-01

    In order to stop or prevent the progression of dental disease, early detection and quantification of decay are crucially important. Dental decay (caries) detection methods have traditionally involved clinical examination by eye, using probes and dental radiography, but up to 60% of lesions are missed. What the dentist requires is a cheap, reliable method of detection of early disease, ideally with information on the depth and rate of growth or healing. Conventional commercial scanning confocal microscopes are unsuitable for use on dental patients. We report on a fibre optic based confocal microscope designed for in vivo examination of caries lesions. The system utilizes a common fibre both as the source and to detect the reflected confocal signal. The initial system has been optimized using dielectric mirrors and the thickness of the stack has been measured with high precision. Dental samples have been examined and the system has been demonstrated to provide information on the depth and mineral loss of a lesion. Fibre optic microscopy (FOCM) demonstrates a practical route to developing an in vivo caries profiler. In this paper, the FOCM and its applications in caries detection are described and the potential of this scheme as a practical dental probe is discussed.

  3. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images.

  4. A method to optimize the processing algorithm of a computed radiography system for chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, C S; Liney, G P; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2007-09-01

    A test methodology using an anthropomorphic-equivalent chest phantom is described for the optimization of the Agfa computed radiography "MUSICA" processing algorithm for chest radiography. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the lung, heart and diaphragm regions of the phantom, and the "system modulation transfer function" (sMTF) in the lung region, were measured using test tools embedded in the phantom. Using these parameters the MUSICA processing algorithm was optimized with respect to low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution. Two optimum "MUSICA parameter sets" were derived respectively for maximizing the CNR and sMTF in each region of the phantom. Further work is required to find the relative importance of low-contrast detectability and spatial resolution in chest images, from which the definitive optimum MUSICA parameter set can then be derived. Prior to this further work, a compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was applied to a range of clinical images. A group of experienced image evaluators scored these images alongside images produced from the same radiographs using the MUSICA parameter set in clinical use at the time. The compromised optimum MUSICA parameter set was shown to produce measurably better images. PMID:17709364

  5. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  6. Treatment Capabilities of Postgraduate Dental Trainees at Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital Based on Dental Services Income.

    PubMed

    Sugito, Hiroki; Hirata, SoIchiro; Sakayori, Takaharu; Sato, Yuko; Furusawa, Masahiro; Yamashita, Shuichiro

    2015-01-01

    As of fiscal year 2006, it became compulsory for all newly licensed dentists in Japan to undergo a year of practical training at one of the designated training facilities found throughout the country as part of their postgraduate programs. The goal of this training is for the trainees to acquire diagnostic and therapeutic skills. While officially trainees, they are nonetheless regarded as members of staff. Clinical training emphasizes improving both technical skills and theoretical knowledge. However, taking on such trainees is sometimes considered unprofitable, as work productivity is claimed to be low. The purpose of this study was to compare work outcomes and income generated between trainees and part-time dentists working at the Tokyo Dental College Suidobashi Hospital. The part-time dentists comprised clinical instructors and dentists responsible for outpatients. Postgraduate dental trainees also generally conduct dental treatment for outpatients. Therefore, part-time dentists were considered the most suitable for a control group. No significant difference was observed in the total number of patients seen by either group by the final term of clinical training. Furthermore, no significant difference was observed in insurance-based dental treatment unit income (insured care unit income) per patient between the two groups from the mid-term period of training onwards. These results suggest that, although the trainees were less efficient in terms of time taken to provide a diagnosis and treatment, their performance was almost equal when viewed from the viewpoint of insured care provided. Taken together, this suggests that time-related care efficiency must be increased and specific training policies and strategies developed to improve the work productivity of dental trainees. PMID:26370575

  7. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  8. Fungal Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, Thomas R.; Wickes, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of fungal infection is critical to effective treatment. There are many impediments to diagnosis such as a diminishing number of clinical mycologists, cost, time to result, and requirements for sensitivity and specificity. In addition, fungal diagnostics must meet the contrasting needs presented by the increasing diversity of fungi found in association with the use of immunosuppressive agents in countries with high levels of medical care and the need for diagnostics in resource-limited countries where large numbers of opportunistic infections occur in patients with AIDS. Traditional approaches to diagnosis include direct microscopic examination of clinical samples, histopathology, culture, and serology. Emerging technologies include molecular diagnostics and antigen detection in clinical samples. Innovative new technologies that use molecular and immunoassay platforms have the potential to meet the needs of both resource-rich and resource-limited clinical environments. PMID:24692193

  9. Accuracy of Cone Beam Computed Tomography, Photostimulable Phosphor Plate Digital Radiography and Conventional Radiography for Detection of Artificial Cancellous Bone Defects

    PubMed Central

    Bardal, Roghieh; Jahanihashemi, Hassan; Mostafavi, Maryam; Kalhor, Esmaeil; Tofangchiha, Maryam; Dehghani, Mahdieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The optimal goal of radiography is to provide high-quality diagnostic images with the least patient radiation dose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and intraoral photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) digital and film-based conventional radiography for detection of artificial cancellous bone defects. Materials and Methods: Five dry human mandibles were used in this study. The mandibles were placed inside a water bath made of plexiglass plates; then PSP and CBCT scans were obtained. The mandibles were cut by a coping saw in buccolingual dimension and oval defects measuring 6.1×6.1 mm, 3×6.1 mm and 4×4 mm were created by a milling machine in the spongy bone. After fixing the two parts together (buccal and lingual), radiographs were repeated. Presence or absence of defects on images was evaluated and recorded by the two observers. Using SPSS 16, compatibility level, sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis were determined for each observer. Results: The intraobserver agreement in all three imaging modalities was low to moderate (kappa≤0.613). The inter-observer agreement in all the three imaging modalities was moderate (kappa=0.406). The area under the curve (AUC) of the imaging modalities in each observation was not significantly different. The area under the curve based on defect size for the two observers was not significantly different either. Conclusion: Defects confined to spongy bone can be identified on film and PSP radiographs and CBCT scans. However, interpretation of PSP images and CBCT scans needs greater expertise and skills. PMID:27507990

  10. The use of low-level laser therapy for controlling the gag reflex in children during intraoral radiography.

    PubMed

    Elbay, Mesut; Tak, Önjen; Şermet Elbay, Ülkü; Kaya, Can; Eryılmaz, Kubilay

    2016-02-01

    The current literature suggests that low-level laser stimulation of the PC 6 acupuncture points may prevent gagging. This study aimed to determine if low-level laser therapy (LLLT) can reduce the gag reflex in children undergoing intraoral maxillary radiography. This randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial was conducted with 25 children with moderate-to-very severe gag reflexes who required bilateral periapical radiographic examination of the maxillary molar region. Children's anxiety levels were initially evaluated using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) to identify any possible relationship between gagging and anxiety. A control radiograph was taken of one randomly selected side in each patient after simulated laser application so that the patient was blinded to the experimental conditions (control group). Laser stimulation was then performed for the experimental side. A laser probe was placed on the Pericardium 6 (PC 6) acupuncture point on each wrist, and laser energy was delivered for 14 s (300 mW, energy density 4 J/cm(2)) at a distance of 1 cm from the target tissue. Following laser stimulation, the experimental radiograph was taken (experimental group). Gagging responses were measured using the Gagging Severity Criteria for each group. Data were analyzed using Spearman's rho correlations and Mann-Whitney U tests. Both mean and median gagging scores were higher in the control group than in the experimental group. Patients who were unable to tolerate the intraoral control radiography were able to tolerate the procedure after LLLT. Differences between gagging scores of the control and experimental groups were statistically significant (P = .000). There was no significant correlation between gagging severity and anxiety score (P > .05). A negative correlation was found between age and gagging score in the control group (P ˂ .05). Within the limitations of this study, LLLT of the PC 6 acupuncture points appears to be a useful technique

  11. Recent advances in fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowerby, B. D.; Tickner, J. R.

    2007-09-01

    Fast neutron radiography techniques are attractive for screening cargo for contraband such as narcotics and explosives. Neutrons have the required penetration, they interact with matter in a manner complementary to X-rays and they can be used to determine elemental composition. Compared to neutron interrogation techniques that measure secondary radiation (neutron or gamma-rays), neutron radiography systems are much more efficient and rapid and they are much more amenable to imaging. However, for neutron techniques to be successfully applied to cargo screening, they must demonstrate significant advantages over well-established X-ray techniques. This paper reviews recent developments and applications of fast neutron radiography for cargo inspection. These developments include a fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography system that utilizes a 14 MeV neutron generator as well as fast neutron resonance radiography systems that use variable energy quasi-monoenergetic neutrons and pulsed broad energy neutron beams. These systems will be discussed and compared with particular emphasis on user requirements, sources, detector systems, imaging ability and performance.

  12. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Nelson, K.; Rack, A.

    2010-10-15

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 {mu}m are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 {mu}m in absorption mode and {approx}14 {mu}m in phase contrast mode (z{sub 2}=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  13. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zakher B, Mitchell JP, Pappas M. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... chap 7. Ng MW, Chase I. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  14. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  15. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  16. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  17. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  18. Application of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Hemothorax; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Baikpour, Masoud; Tafakhori, Abbas; Asady, Hadi; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza; Hosseini, Mostafa; Safari, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hemothorax is one of the most prevalent injuries caused by thoracic traumas. Early detection and treatment of this injury is of utmost importance in prognosis of the patient, but there are still controversial debates on the diagnostic value of imaging techniques in detection of hemothorax. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of hemothorax through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: Two independent reviewers performed an extended systematic search in databases of Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest. Data were extract and quality of the relevant studies were assessed. The number of true positive, false positive, true negative and false negative cases were extracted and screening performance characteristics of two imaging techniques were calculated using a mixed-effects binary regression model. Results: Data from 12 studies were extracted and included in the meta-analysis (7361 patients, 77.1% male). Pooled sensitivity and specificity of ultrasonography in detection of hemothorax were 0.67 (95% CI: 0.41-0.86; I2= 68.38, p<0.001) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.95-1.0; I2= 88.16, p<0.001), respectively. These measures for radiography were 0.54 (95% CI: 0.33-0.75; I2= 92.85, p<0.001) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.94-1.0; I2= 99.22, p<0.001), respectively. Subgroup analysis found operator of the ultrasonography device, frequency of the transducer and sample size to be important sources of heterogeneity of included studies. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that although the sensitivity of ultrasonography in detection of hemothorax is relatively higher than radiography, but it is still at a moderate level (0.67%). The specificity of both imaging modalities were found to be at an excellent level in this regard. The screening characteristics of ultrasonography was found to be influenced of the operator and frequency of transducer

  19. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  20. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  1. Dental operatory water lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, J W

    1993-02-01

    Water samples were collected from dental handpiece and air-water syringe lines at various times during the day and cultured for the presence and prevalence of various microbes. It was found that the longer a dental unit was out of use, the greater the microbial build-up in water lines. However, purging lines for two to three minutes at the start of the day and between patients significantly reduced microbial presence.

  2. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  3. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  4. Diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Morris, Peter; Perkins, Alan

    2012-04-21

    Physical techniques have always had a key role in medicine, and the second half of the 20th century in particular saw a revolution in medical diagnostic techniques with the development of key imaging instruments: x-ray imaging and emission tomography (nuclear imaging and PET), MRI, and ultrasound. These techniques use the full width of the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio waves, and sound. In most cases, the development of a medical imaging device was opportunistic; many scientists in physics laboratories were experimenting with simple x-ray images within the first year of the discovery of such rays, the development of the cyclotron and later nuclear reactors created the opportunity for nuclear medicine, and one of the co-inventors of MRI was initially attempting to develop an alternative to x-ray diffraction for the analysis of crystal structures. What all these techniques have in common is the brilliant insight of a few pioneering physical scientists and engineers who had the tenacity to develop their inventions, followed by a series of technical innovations that enabled the full diagnostic potential of these instruments to be realised. In this report, we focus on the key part played by these scientists and engineers and the new imaging instruments and diagnostic procedures that they developed. By bringing the key developments and applications together we hope to show the true legacy of physics and engineering in diagnostic medicine. PMID:22516558

  5. Diagnostic Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    Diagnostic imaging lets doctors look inside your body for clues about a medical condition. A variety of machines and techniques can create pictures of the structures and activities inside your body. The type of imaging your doctor uses depends on your symptoms and ...

  6. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-12

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  7. Study of pipe thickness loss using a neutron radiography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Wahab, Aliff Amiru Bin; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Md; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this preliminary work is to study for thickness changes in objects using neutron radiography. In doing the project, the technique for the radiography was studied. The experiment was done at NUR-2 facility at TRIGA research reactor in Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Malaysia. Test samples of varying materials were used in this project. The samples were radiographed using direct technique. Radiographic images were recorded using Nitrocellulose film. The films obtained were digitized to processed and analyzed. Digital processing is done on the images using software Isee!. The images were processed to produce better image for analysis. The thickness changes in the image were measured to be compared with real thickness of the objects. From the data collected, percentages difference between measured and real thickness are below than 2%. This is considerably very low variation from original values. Therefore, verifying the neutron radiography technique used in this project.

  8. Studies of solid propellant combustion with pulsed radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godai, T.; Tanemura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Shimizu, M.

    1987-01-01

    Pulsed radiography was applied to observe solid propellant surface regression during rocket motor operation. Using a 150 KV flash X-ray system manufactured by the Field Emission Corporation and two kinds of film suppliers, images of the propellant surface of a 5 cm diameter end burning rocket motor were recorded on film. The repetition frame rate of 8 pulses per second and the pulse train length of 10 pulses are limited by the capability of the power supply and the heat build up within the X-ray tube, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the effectiveness of pulsed radiography for observing solid propellant surface regression. Measuring the position of burning surface images on film with a microdensitometer, quasi-instantaneous burning rate as a function of pressure and the variation of characteristic velocity with pressure and gas stay time were obtained. Other research items to which pulsed radiography can be applied are also suggested.

  9. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Merrill, F E; Campos, E; Espinoza, C; Hogan, G; Hollander, B; Lopez, J; Mariam, F G; Morley, D; Morris, C L; Murray, M; Saunders, A; Schwartz, C; Thompson, T N

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution. PMID:22047305

  10. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  11. Magnifying lens for 800 MeV proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, F. E.; Campos, E.; Espinoza, C.; Hogan, G.; Hollander, B.; Lopez, J.; Mariam, F. G.; Morley, D.; Morris, C. L.; Murray, M.; Saunders, A.; Schwartz, C.; Thompson, T. N.

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the design and performance of a magnifying magnetic-lens system designed, built, and commissioned at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for 800 MeV flash proton radiography. The technique of flash proton radiography has been developed at LANL to study material properties under dynamic loading conditions through the analysis of time sequences of proton radiographs. The requirements of this growing experimental program have resulted in the need for improvements in spatial radiographic resolution. To meet these needs, a new magnetic lens system, consisting of four permanent magnet quadrupoles, has been developed. This new lens system was designed to reduce the second order chromatic aberrations, the dominant source of image blur in 800 MeV proton radiography, as well as magnifying the image to reduce the blur contribution from the detector and camera systems. The recently commissioned lens system performed as designed, providing nearly a factor of three improvement in radiographic resolution.

  12. Application of Neutron Radiography to Flow Visualization in Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, N.; Sugimoto, K.; Takami, S.; Sugioka, K.; Tsukada, T.; Adschiri, T.; Saito, Y.

    Supercritical water is used in various chemical reaction processes including hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nano-particles, oxidation, chemical conversion of biomass and plastics. Density of the super critical water is much less than that of the sub-critical water. By using neutron radiography, Peterson et al. have studied salt precipitation processes in supercritical water and the flow pattern in a reverse-flow vessel for salt precipitation, and Balasko et al. have revealed the behaviour of supercritical water in a container. The nano-particles were made by mixing the super critical flow and the sub critical water solution. In the present study, neutron radiography was applied to the flow visualization of the super and sub critical water mixture in a T-junction made of stainless steel pipes for high pressure and temperature conditions to investigate their mixing process. Still images by a CCD camera were obtained by using the neutron radiography system at B4 port in KUR.

  13. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  14. Deterministic simulation of thermal neutron radiography and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal Chowdhury, Rajarshi; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, thermal neutron radiography and tomography have gained much attention as one of the nondestructive testing methods. However, the application of thermal neutron radiography and tomography is hindered by their technical complexity, radiation shielding, and time-consuming data collection processes. Monte Carlo simulations have been developed in the past to improve the neutron imaging facility's ability. In this paper, a new deterministic simulation approach has been proposed and demonstrated to simulate neutron radiographs numerically using a ray tracing algorithm. This approach has made the simulation of neutron radiographs much faster than by previously used stochastic methods (i.e., Monte Carlo methods). The major problem with neutron radiography and tomography simulation is finding a suitable scatter model. In this paper, an analytic scatter model has been proposed that is validated by a Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. [Digital subtraction radiography for the detection of periodontal bone changes].

    PubMed

    Mera, T

    1989-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of digital subtraction radiography in detecting alveolar bone changes. In order to test the sensitivity of quantitative evaluation by subtraction radiography, a copper equivalent thickness obtained from digitized radiographs was compared with the actual mineral content of bone phantoms with 15 different minerals and 25 bone specimens. Results demonstrated that the copper equivalent thickness correlated well with the actual mineral content (bone phantoms: gamma s = 1.0, bone specimens: gamma s = 0.985). In order to test the ability of digitized subtraction radiography in assessing alveolar bone changes in vivo, subtraction images were compared with histological features. The experimental angular bony defects were treated with conservative periodontal therapy in 3 monkeys. The standardized radiographs were taken longitudinally after therapy, and subtraction images were made from the sequentially obtained radiographs. In addition, for fluorescent histomorphometrical evaluations of new bone formations, the animals were dosed with oxytetracycline, calsein solution and arizarin complex solution. Radiographic and histological evaluations were scheduled to provide healing periods of 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 9 weeks after periodontal therapy. Subtraction radiography offered an objective method to follow histological changes of alveolar bone, and the copper equivalent thickness obtained from subtraction radiographs correlated with the histometric bone volume (gamma s = 0.9023, p less than 0.01). The results of these studies indicated that subtraction radiography was useful in monitoring alveolar bone changes associated with periodontal disease and treatment and that the quanitative measurement of periodontal bone changes by subtraction radiography was feasible. PMID:2517790

  16. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  17. Microradiography of Microcalcifications in Breast Specimen: A New Histological Correlation Procedure and the Effect of Improved Resolution on Diagnostic Validity

    PubMed Central

    Langen, H.-J.; Koehler, S.; Bielmeier, J.; Jocher, R.; Kranzfelder, D.; Jagusch, N.; Treutlein, G.; Wetzler, Th.; Müller, J.; Ott, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Does high-resolution visualization of microcalcifications improve diagnostic reliability? Method. X-rays were taken of mamma specimens with microcalcifications in 32 patients (10 malignant; 22 benign) using conventional radiography (12 Lp/mm) and high-resolution radiography (2000 Lp/mm). Histological sections were subsequently prepared and correlated to the microradiographic image and every calcification was assigned an exact malignant or benign histological diagnosis. Five radiologists classified single groups of calcifications in both methods according to the BIRADS classification system. Results. Using microradiography microcalcifications can be shown in high resolution at the cell level including histological correlation. In some cases, the diagnostic validity was improved by the high resolution in microradiography. In other cases, the high resolution resulted in more visible calcifications, thus giving benign calcifications a malignant appearance. In the BIRADS 2 and 3 group, the probability of malignancy was 28.6% in the conventional radiography evaluation and 37.8% in the microradiography evaluation. In the BIRADS 4 and 5 group, the probability of malignancy was 34.2% in the conventional radiography evaluation and 24.4% in the microradiography evaluation. The differences were not significant. Summary. Overall, the improved resolution in microradiography did not show an improvement in diagnostic accuracy compared to conventional radiography. PMID:23097699

  18. Proton radiography, nuclear cross sections and multiple Coulomb scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, Sky K.

    2015-11-04

    The principles behind proton radiography including multiple Coulomb scattering are discussed for a purely imaginary square well nucleus in the eikonal approximation. It is found that a very crude model can reproduce the angular dependence of the cross sections measured at 24 GeV/c. The largest differences are ~3% for the 4.56 mrad data, and ~4% for the 6.68 mrad data. The prospect of understanding how to model deterministically high-energy proton radiography over a very large range of energies is promising, but it should be tested more thoroughly.

  19. Neutron radiography and tomography facility at IBR-2 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Rutkauskas, A. V.; Belushkin, A. V.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Savenko, B. N.

    2016-05-01

    An experimental station for investigations using neutron radiography and tomography was developed at the upgraded high-flux pulsed IBR-2 reactor. The 20 × 20 cm neutron beam is formed by the system of collimators with the characteristic parameter L/D varying from 200 to 2000. The detector system is based on a 6LiF/ZnS scintillation screen; images are recorded using a high-sensitivity video camera based on the high-resolution CCD matrix. The results of the first neutron radiography and tomography experiments at the developed facility are presented.

  20. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society. PMID:24046337

  1. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  2. Evaluation of TMJ by conventional transcranial radiography and indirect digitized images to determine condylar position in primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano José; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Castelo, Paula Midori; Haiter Neto, Francisco; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate temporomandibular joint radiographs of children in primary dentition, obtained by conventional transcranial radiography, indirect digitization, digitized images using 3D and brightness/contrast tools. Condyle position was also determined measuring anterior, superior and posterior joint space. The X-Ray machine GE-1000 and the head positioner Accurad 200 were used. Radiographs were digitized using a scanner with transparency and registered in Adobe Photoshop 5.0. Images were evaluated by four examiners as follows: 0--unacceptably quality; 1--poorly diagnostic quality; 2--optimal visualization quality. Articular space was measured using a digital caliper. A significant difference (Sign Test) was found between conventional radiography and the remaining modalities (Conventional/Unenhanced p<0.001; Conventional/3D p<0.001; Conventional/Brightness and Contrast p=0.017). The mean distance of anterior, superior and posterior regions was 2.2(0.5), 3.5(0.9) and 3.9(1.2) mm, respectively. Conventional and brightness/contrast digitized radiographs showed higher diagnostic quality. The posterior joint space was larger than the anterior one, demonstrating anterior condylar position. PMID:15163152

  3. Measuring microfocal spots using digital radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, David A; Ewert, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of microfocus spot size can be important for several reasons: (1) Quality assurance during manufacture of microfocus tubes; (2) Tracking performance and stability of microfocus tubes; (3) Determining magnification is especially important for digital radiography where the native spatial resolution of the digital system is not adequate for the application; and (4) Knowledge of unsharpness from the focal spot alone. The European Standard EN 12543-5 is based on a simple geometrical method of calculating focal spot size from unsharpness of high magnification film radiographs. The following equations are used for the focal spot size measurement: By similar triangles the following equations are presupposed: f/a = U/b and M = (a+b)/a. These equations can be combined to yield the well known expression: U = f(M - 1). Solving for f, f = U/(M-1). Therefore, the focal spot size, f, can be calculated by measuring the radiographic unsharpness and magnification of a known object. This is the basis for these tests. The European standard actually uses one-half of the unsharpness (which are then added together) from both sides of the object to avoid additional unsharpness contributions due to edge transmission unsharpness of the round test object (the outside of the object is measured). So the equation becomes f = (1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2})/(M-1). In practice 1/2 U is measured from the 50% to the 90% signal points on the transition profile from ''black'' to ''white,'' (positive image) or attenuated to unattenuated portion of the image. The 50% to 90% points are chosen as a best fit to an assumed Gaussian radiation distribution from the focal spot and to avoid edge transmission effects. 1/2 U{sub 1} + 1/2 U{sub 2} corresponds about to the full width at half height of a Gaussian focal spot. A highly absorbing material (Tungsten, Tungsten Alloy, or Platinum) is used for the object. Either wires or a sphere are used as the object to eliminate alignment issues. One

  4. Factors associated with no dental treatment in preschoolers with toothache: a cross-sectional study in outpatient public emergency services.

    PubMed

    Machado, Geovanna C M; Daher, Anelise; Costa, Luciane R

    2014-08-01

    Many parents rely on emergency services to deal with their children's dental problems, mostly pain and infection associated with dental caries. This cross-sectional study analyzed the factors associated with not doing an oral procedure in preschoolers with toothache attending public dental emergency services. Data were obtained from the clinical files of preschoolers treated at all nine dental emergency centers in Goiania, Brazil, in 2011. Data were children's age and sex, involved teeth, oral procedures, radiography request, medications prescribed and referrals. A total of 531 files of children under 6 years old with toothache out of 1,108 examined were selected. Children's mean age was 4.1 (SD 1.0) years (range 1-5 years) and 51.6% were girls. No oral procedures were performed in 49.2% of cases; in the other 50.8%, most of the oral procedures reported were endodontic intervention and temporary restorations. Primary molars were involved in 48.4% of cases. With the exception of "sex", the independent variables tested in the regression analysis significantly associated with non-performance of oral procedures: age (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.5-0.8), radiography request (OR 3.8; 95% CI 1.7-8.2), medication prescribed (OR 7.5; 95% CI 4.9-11.5) and patient referred to another service (OR 5.7; 3.0-10.9). Many children with toothache received no oral procedure for pain relief. PMID:25111875

  5. Frequency and pattern of idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis lesions in panoramic radiography of Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Farrokh; Ruhani, Mohammad Razavi; Zarandi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate of radiographic pattern and relative frequency of idiopathic osteosclerosis (IO) and condensing osteitis (CO) in panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: Totally 411 panoramic radiographies were randomly selected from patients referred to Radiology Department of Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Descriptive characteristics of radiopacities, including shape, border, localization, and dental relationship, were recorded. The Chi-squared test was used. Results: IO was detected in 31 (7.5%) patients and 22 (68.8%) lesions had exact border while their shape was mostly irregular. About 17 (53.1%) lesions were apical, and 13 (40.6%) lesions had no relation to the teeth. The most involved teeth were the second premolar (28.1%) and first molar (25%). Moreover, CO was detected in 32 (7.8%) patients. 17 (53.1%) lesions had an ill-defined border, and their shape was mostly irregular (65.6%) with ill-defined border. Around 18 (56.3%) lesions were apical, and 11 (34.4) lesions were apical and interradicular. The most involved teeth were the second premolar (59.4%) and the first molar (21.9%). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that relative frequency of IO in the selected population was 7.5% and for CO, it was 7.8%.

  6. Frequency and pattern of idiopathic osteosclerosis and condensing osteitis lesions in panoramic radiography of Iranian patients

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Farrokh; Ruhani, Mohammad Razavi; Zarandi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate of radiographic pattern and relative frequency of idiopathic osteosclerosis (IO) and condensing osteitis (CO) in panoramic radiographs. Materials and Methods: Totally 411 panoramic radiographies were randomly selected from patients referred to Radiology Department of Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Descriptive characteristics of radiopacities, including shape, border, localization, and dental relationship, were recorded. The Chi-squared test was used. Results: IO was detected in 31 (7.5%) patients and 22 (68.8%) lesions had exact border while their shape was mostly irregular. About 17 (53.1%) lesions were apical, and 13 (40.6%) lesions had no relation to the teeth. The most involved teeth were the second premolar (28.1%) and first molar (25%). Moreover, CO was detected in 32 (7.8%) patients. 17 (53.1%) lesions had an ill-defined border, and their shape was mostly irregular (65.6%) with ill-defined border. Around 18 (56.3%) lesions were apical, and 11 (34.4) lesions were apical and interradicular. The most involved teeth were the second premolar (59.4%) and the first molar (21.9%). Conclusion: The results demonstrated that relative frequency of IO in the selected population was 7.5% and for CO, it was 7.8%. PMID:27605989

  7. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  8. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education.

  9. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  10. Curriculum Guidelines foe Dental Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' curriculum guidelines for dental nutrition include an overview of the curriculum, primary educational objectives, suggested prerequisites, a core content outline, and suggestions for sequencing and faculty qualifications. (MSE)

  11. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  12. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  13. Dental implant design--effect on bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pilliar, R M; Deporter, D A; Watson, P A; Valiquette, N

    1991-04-01

    Bone remodeling around three different endosseous dental implant designs placed in dog mandibles was studied using radiography during lengthy periods of function and by histology after animal sacrifice. The three designs investigated were (a) threaded (c.p. titanium), (b) fully porous-coated (titanium alloy), and (c) partially porous-coated (titanium alloy). The implants were kept in function for either 32 weeks (fully porous-coated) or 73 to 77 weeks (partially porous-coated and threaded). The studies indicated that some crestal bone loss occurred for both the threaded and partially porous-coated implants while no significant bone loss was seen with fully porous-coated implants in the absence of plaque-associated infection. It is suggested that these observed differences are a result of the different stress states that develop in bone surrounding the three designs underlying the importance of implant design on bone remodeling.

  14. Guidelines for use of lumbar spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelen, G.D.; Noji, E.K.; Doris, P.E.

    1986-03-01

    In deciding whether to obtain lumbosacral spine films, the emergency physician must not ask whether a diagnosis can be established, but whether obtaining films will affect management. Low back pain is a considerable problem for society with cost in billions of dollars. Gonadal radiation from lumbosacral radiographs is significant, and thus ordering films should be minimized. Plain radiographs are rarely indicated in otherwise healthy patients 20 to 50 years old with mechanical or root pain on initial presentation. In other patients alternative diagnostic methodologies such as computed tomography may be superior, with less radiation risk. Specific recommendations for emergency radiographic evaluation of the lumbosacral spine are offered.68 references.

  15. Application of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) of optimal deblurring filters for dental X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J. E.; Cho, H. S.; Kim, D. S.; Choi, S. I.; Je, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited-angle tomographic technique that provides some of the tomographic benefits of computed tomography (CT) but at reduced dose and cost. Thus, the potential for application of DTS to dental X-ray imaging seems promising. As a continuation of our dental radiography R&D, we developed an effective DTS reconstruction algorithm and implemented it in conjunction with a commercial dental CT system for potential use in dental implant placement. The reconstruction algorithm employed a backprojection filtering (BPF) method based upon optimal deblurring filters to suppress effectively both the blur artifacts originating from the out-focus planes and the high-frequency noise. To verify the usefulness of the reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation works and evaluated the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works in which DTS images of enhanced anatomical resolution were successfully obtained by using the algorithm and were promising to our ongoing applications to dental X-ray imaging. In this paper, our approach to the development of the DTS reconstruction algorithm and the results are described in detail.

  16. Radiography Capabilities for Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell; Garnett, Robert William; Chapman, Catherine A. B; Salazar, Harry Richard; Otoole, Joseph Alfred; Barber, Ronald L.; Gomez, Tony Simon

    2015-04-28

    The Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) experimental facility will be used to discover and design the advanced materials needed to meet 21st century national security and energy security challenges. This new facility will provide the new tools scientists need to develop next-generation materials that will perform predictably and on-demand for currently unattainable lifetimes in extreme environments. The MaRIE facility is based on upgrades to the existing LANSCE 800-MeV proton linac and a new 12-GeV electron linac and associated X-ray FEL to provide simultaneous multiple probe beams, and new experimental areas. In addition to the high-energy photon probe beam, both electron and proton radiography capabilities will be available at the MaRIE facility. Recently, detailed radiography system studies have been performed to develop conceptual layouts of high-magnification electron and proton radiography systems that can meet the experimental requirements for the expected first experiments to be performed at the facility. A description of the radiography systems, their performance requirements, and a proposed facility layout are presented.

  17. Point Scattered Function (PScF) for fast neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohamed H.

    2009-08-01

    Fast neutron radiography opened up a new range of possibilities to image extremely dense objects. The removal of the scattering effect is one of the most challenging problems in neutron imaging. Neutron scattering in fast neutron radiography did not receive much attention compared with X-ray and thermal neutron radiography. The purpose of this work is to investigate the behavior of the Point Scattered Function (PScF) as applied in fast neutron radiography. The PScF was calculated using MCNP as a spatial distribution of scattered neutrons over the detector surface for one emitting source element. Armament and explosives materials, namely, Rifle steel, brass, aluminum and trinitrotoluene (TNT) were simulated. Effect of various sample thickness and sample-to-detector distance were considered. Simulated sample geometries included a slab with varying thickness, a sphere with varying radii, and a cylinder with varying base radii. Different neutron sources, namely, Cf-252, DT as well as DD neutron sources were considered. Neutron beams with zero degree divergence angle; and beams with varying angles related to the normal to the source plane were simulated. Curve fitting of the obtained PScF, in the form of Gaussian function, were given to be used in future work using image restoration codes. Analytical representation of the height as well as the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of the obtained Gaussian functions eliminates the need to calculate the PScF for sample parameters that were not investigated in this study.

  18. [Comparative study between film mammography and xeromammography; including specimen radiography].

    PubMed

    Maeda, M; Hayakawa, K; Okuno, Y; Torizuka, T; Mitsumori, M; Soga, T; Misaki, T; Dokou, S; Ito, K

    1990-10-01

    We retrospectively evaluated preoperative film- and xeromammography of 23 cases with breast cancers, and compared with postoperative specimen radiography to assess tumor delineation and microcalcification detectability. In tumor detection and margin delineation, film mammography was superior to xeromammography, and in microcalcification, film mammography was equal to xeromammography. These results had a effect on the diagnosis of breast cancers.

  19. Common positioning errors in panoramic radiography: A review

    PubMed Central

    Rondon, Rafael Henrique Nunes; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara

    2014-01-01

    Professionals performing radiographic examinations are responsible for maintaining optimal image quality for accurate diagnoses. These professionals must competently execute techniques such as film manipulation and processing to minimize patient exposure to radiation. Improper performance by the professional and/or patient may result in a radiographic image of unsatisfactory quality that can also lead to a misdiagnosis and the development of an inadequate treatment plan. Currently, the most commonly performed extraoral examination is panoramic radiography. The invention of panoramic radiography has resulted in improvements in image quality with decreased exposure to radiation and at a low cost. However, this technique requires careful, accurate positioning of the patient's teeth and surrounding maxillofacial bone structure within the focal trough. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for the most common types of positioning errors in panoramic radiography to suggest the correct techniques. We would also discuss how to determine if the most common positioning errors occurred in panoramic radiography, such as in the positioning of the patient's head, tongue, chin, or body. PMID:24701452

  20. Beam Physics in X-Ray Radiography Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Falabella, S; Goldin, F J; Guethlein, G; Lauer, E L; McCarrick, J F; Neurath, R; Richardson, R A; Sampayan, S; Weir, J T

    2002-12-02

    Performance of x-ray radiography facilities requires focusing the electron beams to sub-millimeter spots on the x-ray converters. Ions extracted from a converter by impact of a high intensity beam can partially neutralize the beam space charge and change the final focusing system. We will discuss these ion effects and mitigation.

  1. Neutron radiography determination of water diffusivity in fired clay brick.

    PubMed

    El Abd, A; Czachor, A; Milczarek, J

    2009-04-01

    The real time neutron and gamma radiography station at Maria reactor, Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk, Poland, was used to investigate the isothermal water absorption into fired clay brick samples. The investigated brick is different from the bricks reported in El Abd and Milczarek [2004. Neutron radiology study of water absorption in porous building materials: anomalous diffusing analysis. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 37, 2305-2313] in density and chemical composition. Neutron radiography images were acquired regularly as the absorption time elapses. The water content, theta, along the flow direction, x, namely the water profiles theta(x,t) and the water front position as a function of the absorption time, t, were extracted from neutron radiography images. The results were discussed in terms of the macroscopic theory of water infiltration in unsaturated porous media. It was shown that the water front position followed the square root t-scaling (x(m)=phi(m) square root t) and the profiles (theta-phi) converged to a universal one master curve. The water diffusivity was analytically determined from the experimental results. It has the so-called hypo-diffusive character, namely its gradient with respect to the water content is positive. Neutron radiography is a powerful method to distinguish among the unsaturated flow in different porous construction materials.

  2. Phase contrast radiography. II. Imaging of complex objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Nugent, Keith A.; Peele, Andrew G.; Thornton, John

    2005-11-01

    An image model for phase contrast in projection radiography of complex objects is presented and tested experimentally. The model includes the wavelength distribution of the radiation. The model is used to optimize the contrast of a radiograph of a piece of aluminium containing a fine crack.

  3. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  4. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  5. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  6. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    PubMed

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  7. Dental obturation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Elizabeth; Chudej, Lauren; Bilyeu, Brian; Brostow, Witold

    2006-10-01

    During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites that can be used as dental replacements. The main objective of this work is to study the scratch and wear resistance of these nano composites. To meet this goal, scratch tests are performed using a micro scratch tester machine (CSEM), where a diamond indenter is used to make the scratch and the penetration of this indenter is measured with high resolution (7nm). We will be looking at the penetration depth (Rp) and the residual (or healing) depth (Rh) to calculate the percent recovery. These measurements represent the scratch resistance of the material.

  8. Dental amalgam: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ramesh; Wadhwani, Kulvinder Kaur; Tikku, Aseem Prakash; Chandra, Anil

    2010-01-01

    Dental amalgam has served as an excellent and versatile restorative material for many years, despite periods of controversy. The authors review its history, summarize the evidence with regard to its performance and offer predictions for the future of this material. The PubMed database was used initially; the reference list for dental amalgam featured 8641 articles and 13 publications dealing with recent advances in dental amalgam. A forward search was undertaken on selected articles and using some author names. For the present, amalgam should remain the material of choice for economic direct restoration of posterior teeth. When esthetic concerns are paramount, tooth-colored materials, placed meticulously, can provide an acceptable alternative. All alternative restorative materials and procedures, however, have certain limitations. PMID:21217947

  9. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  10. Dental Implant Complications.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Kevin; Delfini, Ronald H; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants have increased in the last few decades thus increasing the number of complications. Since many of these complications are easily diagnosed on postsurgical images, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with them and to be able to recognize and diagnose them. Radiologists should also have a basic understanding of their treatment. In a pictorial fashion, this article will present the basic complications of dental implants which we have divided into three general categories: biomechanical overload, infection or inflammation, and other causes. Examples of implant fracture, loosening, infection, inflammation from subgingival cement, failure of bone and soft tissue preservation, injury to surround structures, and other complications will be discussed as well as their common imaging appearances and treatment. Lastly, we will review pertinent dental anatomy and important structures that are vital for radiologists to evaluate in postoperative oral cavity imaging.

  11. Dental Support Organizations.

    PubMed

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  12. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  13. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented.

  14. Dental education: a leadership challenge for dental educators and practitioners.

    PubMed

    Roth, Kathleen

    2007-08-01

    By all outward signs, the dental profession is prospering. However, signs of a looming crisis in dental education threaten the future effectiveness of the profession. Transforming dental education through the application of principles espoused by the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (CCI) is essential for securing the future of the profession. To meet the future oral health needs of the public, dental schools must retain their research mission and prepare students for evidence-based practice. To accomplish this, both the curricular content and the environment and approach to dental education must change. Besides the knowledge and abilities needed to care for a more diverse and aging population, future practitioners must possess tools needed to thrive in the world of small business and have the ethical foundation to conduct themselves as responsible professionals. Ensuring the future of the profession is a leadership challenge to be shared by both dental educators and practitioners.

  15. Diagnostic Applications of Cone-Beam CT for Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    AlJehani, Yousef A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This paper aims to review the diagnostic application of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the field of periodontology. Data. Original articles that reported on the use of CBCT for periodontal disease diagnosis were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1990 to January 2014), PubMed (using medical subject headings), and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “CBCT,” “volumetric CT,” “periodontal disease ,” and “periodontitis.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. Bony defects, caters, and furcation involvements seem to be better depicted on CBCT, whereas bone quality and periodontal ligament space scored better on conventional intraoral radiography. CBCT does not offer a significant advantage over conventional radiography for assessing the periodontal bone levels. PMID:24803932

  16. Liner Stability Experiments at Pegasus: Diagnostics and Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Morgan, D.V.; Rodriguez, G.

    1998-10-18

    A series of experiments to compare imploding liner performance with magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modeling has been performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Pegasus II pulse power machine. Liner instability growth originating from initial perturbations machined into the liner has been observed with high resolution. Three major diagnostics were used: radiography, Velocity Interferometer for a Surface of Any Reflector (VISAR), and fiber optic impact pins. For radiography, three flash x-ray units were mounted radially to observe liner shape at three different times during the implosion. Liner velocity was measured continuously with the VISAR for the entire distance traveled in two experiments. Optical impact pins provide a high-resolution measure of liner symmetry and shape near the end of travel. Liner performance has compared well with predictions.

  17. Dental caries pathogenicity: a genomic and metagenomic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Scott N.; Snesrud, Erik; Schork, Nicholas J.; Bretz, Walter A.

    2013-01-01

    In this review we address the subject of dental caries pathogenicity from a genomic and metagenomic perspective. The application of genomic technologies is certain to yield novel insights into the relationship between the bacterial flora, dental health and disease. Three primary attributes of bacterial species are thought to have direct impact on caries development, these include: adherence on tooth surfaces (biofilm formation), acid production and acid tolerance. Attempts to define the specific aetiological agents of dental caries have proven to be elusive, supporting the notion that caries aetiology is perhaps complex and multi-faceted. The recently introduced Human Microbiome Project (HMP) that endeavors to characterise the micro-organisms living in and on the human body is likely to shed new light on these questions and improve our understanding of polymicrobial disease, microbial ecology in the oral cavity and provide new avenues for therapeutic and molecular diagnostics developments. PMID:21726221

  18. BigMouth: a multi-institutional dental data repository

    PubMed Central

    Walji, Muhammad F; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Stark, Paul C; White, Joel M; Kookal, Krishna K; Phan, Dat; Tran, Duong; Bernstam, Elmer V; Ramoni, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Few oral health databases are available for research and the advancement of evidence-based dentistry. In this work we developed a centralized data repository derived from electronic health records (EHRs) at four dental schools participating in the Consortium of Oral Health Research and Informatics. A multi-stakeholder committee developed a data governance framework that encouraged data sharing while allowing control of contributed data. We adopted the i2b2 data warehousing platform and mapped data from each institution to a common reference terminology. We realized that dental EHRs urgently need to adopt common terminologies. While all used the same treatment code set, only three of the four sites used a common diagnostic terminology, and there were wide discrepancies in how medical and dental histories were documented. BigMouth was successfully launched in August 2012 with data on 1.1 million patients, and made available to users at the contributing institutions. PMID:24993547

  19. Craniofacial and dental characteristics of cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Rönning, O; Myllarniemi, S; Perheentupa, J

    1978-01-01

    The cranio-facial and dental features were studied by means of roentgencephalometry and anthropometry in 24 patients with cartilage-hair-hypoplasia. Data pertaining to the cranial base were considered indicative of subnormal growth in some of the cranial synchondroses. The width of the neurocranium was slightly below the values of the controls, whereas neurocranial length and circumference appeared unaffected. Facial height was larger than in the controls and facial index values were high. The chin was receding, but the other values of facial depth were relatively large. No abnormalities were observed in tooth morphology, dental age, or dental occlusion. The neurocranial morphology in CHH and achondroplasia show some similarities; the skull base, however, is clearly less bent in the CHH-syndrome. This, together with the virtually normal face and dentition in CHH-patients, is, perhaps, of differential diagnostic value.

  20. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to Mexicali... the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7037). At the request of the State Agency,...

  1. Objective measures of quality assurance in a computed radiography-based radiology department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Charles E.; Leckie, Robert G.; Carter, Jon R.; Williamson, Morgan P.; Scotti, Stephen D.; Norton, Gary S.

    1995-05-01

    Parameters are needed to assess quality assurance in a radiology department where computed radiography (CR) is the principal means of image acquisition. Laser-printed computed radiographs were collected for all patients examined over a period of several days. A sample of 1200 was sorted by subject anatomy and the associated exam information was entered into an EXCEL spreadsheet. Sensitivity (S) numbers were sorted into histogram and analyzed using standard descriptive statistics. Each film was over-read by a board-certified radiologist to assess whether the image was diagnostic and to determine if there were pathologic findings. A significant proportion of images were acquired using inappropriate menu codes. The histogram of S numbers for a given menu code describes a log normal distribution. The S number depends on the technologist's ability to control the technique. A significant proportion of the images were deemed non diagnostic, and many correlated to excessive S numbers. Some were a result of mispositioning. The S number is a valid retrospective measure of radiographic quality assurance. Departments using CR should strive for control on menu codes selected and S numbers produced. Such data should be available from PACS databases.

  2. A clinical image preference study comparing digital tomosynthesis with digital radiography for pediatric spinal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jenna M.; Elbakri, Idris A.; Reed, Martin; Wrogemann, Jens

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic quality of digital tomosynthesis (DT) images for pediatric imaging of the spine. We performed a phantom image rating study to assess the visibility of anatomical spinal structures in DT images relative to digital radiography (DR) and computed tomography (CT). We collected DT and DR images of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine using anthropomorphic phantoms. Four pediatric radiologists and two residents rated the visibility of structures on the DT image sets compared to DR using a four point scale (0 = not visible; 1 = visible; 2 = superior to DR; 3 = excellent, CT unnecessary). In general, the structures in the spine received ratings between 1 and 3 (cervical), or 2 and 3 (thoracic, lumbar), with a few mixed scores for structures that are usually difficult to see on diagnostic images, such as vertebrae near the cervical-thoracic joint and the apophyseal joints of the lumbar spine. The DT image sets allow most critical structures to be visualized as well or better than DR. When DR imaging is inconclusive, DT is a valuable tool to consider before sending a pediatric patient for a higher-dose CT exam.

  3. The role of dental hygienists, assistants, and office staff in CAMBRA.

    PubMed

    Gutkowski, Shirley; Gerger, Debi; Creasey, Jean; Nelson, Anna; Young, Douglas A

    2007-11-01

    The role of the dental team in caries management by risk assessment is critical to successful patient outcomes. Positive patient interactions and communication, proper appointment scheduling, diagnostics and data gathering, as well as implementation of noninvasive or minimally invasive procedures can be the responsibility of all members of the dental team. This article will evaluate the role of the clinical and administrative staff in maintaining a practice with a focus on disease prevention and management..

  4. Optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy investigations of dental structures and restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Rominu, Mihai; Hughes, Michael; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2009-02-01

    Nowadays, optical tomographic techniques are of particular importance in the medical imaging field, because these techniques can provide non-invasive diagnostic images. The present study evaluates the potential of en-face optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a possible non-invasive high resolution imaging method in supplying the necessary information on the quality of dental hard tissues and defects of dental restorative materials. Teeth after several treatment methods are imaged in order to asses the material defects and micro-leakage of tooth-filling interface as well as to evaluate the quality of dental hard tissue. C-scan and B-scan OCT images as well as confocal images are acquired from a large range of samples. Cracks and voids in the dental structures as well as gaps between the dental interfaces and material defects are clearly exposed. The advantages of the OCT method consist in non-invasiveness and high resolution.

  5. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary diseases using x-ray darkfield radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einarsdóttir, Hildur; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Hellbach, Katharina; Auweter, Sigrid; Yildirim, Önder; Meinel, Felix G.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Reiser, Maximilian; Larsen, Rasmus; Kjær Ersbøll, Bjarne; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-12-01

    In this work we develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme for classification of pulmonary disease for grating-based x-ray radiography. In addition to conventional transmission radiography, the grating-based technique provides a dark-field imaging modality, which utilizes the scattering properties of the x-rays. This modality has shown great potential for diagnosing early stage emphysema and fibrosis in mouse lungs in vivo. The CAD scheme is developed to assist radiologists and other medical experts to develop new diagnostic methods when evaluating grating-based images. The scheme consists of three stages: (i) automatic lung segmentation; (ii) feature extraction from lung shape and dark-field image intensities; (iii) classification between healthy, emphysema and fibrosis lungs. A study of 102 mice was conducted with 34 healthy, 52 emphysema and 16 fibrosis subjects. Each image was manually annotated to build an experimental dataset. System performance was assessed by: (i) determining the quality of the segmentations; (ii) validating emphysema and fibrosis recognition by a linear support vector machine using leave-one-out cross-validation. In terms of segmentation quality, we obtained an overlap percentage (Ω) 92.63  ±  3.65%, Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) 89.74  ±  8.84% and Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 82.39  ±  12.62%. For classification, the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of diseased lung recognition was 100%. Classification between emphysema and fibrosis resulted in an accuracy of 93%, whilst the sensitivity was 94% and specificity 88%. In addition to the automatic classification of lungs, deviation maps created by the CAD scheme provide a visual aid for medical experts to further assess the severity of pulmonary disease in the lung, and highlights regions affected.

  6. Patient dose measurements in diagnostic radiology procedures in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Milatović, Aleksandra; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Ivanović, Sonja; Jovanović, Slobodan; Spasić-Jokić, Vesna

    2012-05-01

    It was the aim of the study presented here to estimate for the first time patient dose levels in conventional diagnostic radiology in Montenegro. Measurements of patient dose in terms of entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and kerma-area product (KAP) were performed on at least 10 patients for each examination type, in each of five randomly selected health institutions in Montenegro, so that a total of 872 patients for 16 different examination categories were included in the survey (817 patients for 1049 radiographies and 55 fluoroscopy patients). Exposure settings and individual data were recorded for each patient. Mean, median and third quartile values ESAK of patient doses are reported. The estimated mean ESAK values obtained are as follows: 4.7 mGy for pelvis anteroposterior (AP), 4.5 mGy for lumbar spine AP, 7.8 mGy for lumbar spine lateral (LAT), 3.1 mGy for thoracic spine AP and 4.3 mGy for thoracic spine LAT. When compared with the European diagnostic reference values, the mean ESAK for all studied examination types are found to be below the reference levels, except in chest radiography. Mean ESAK values for chest radiography are 0.9 mGy for posteroanterior (PA) projection and 2.0 mGy for LAT. The results exhibit a wide range of variation. For fluoroscopy examinations, the total KAP was measured. The mean KAP value per procedure for barium meal is found to be 22 Gy cm(2), 41 Gy cm(2) for barium enema and 19 Gy cm(2) for intravenous urography. Broad dose ranges for the same types of examinations indicate the necessity of applying practice optimisation in diagnostic radiology and establishment of national diagnostic reference levels.

  7. Comparison of Self-Instruction Methods for Teaching Diagnostic Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puskas, Jane C.

    1991-01-01

    Self-teaching booklets and computer media were evaluated for teaching diagnostic testing with first (n=49), second (n=41) and third year (n=71) dental students as a foundation for further development of clinical decision-making skills. Results found the media more effective than no instruction and equally effective to the traditional lecture…

  8. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  9. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  10. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  11. The sensitivity of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index to dental care.

    PubMed

    Dolan, T A

    1997-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI) to dental treatment was evaluated using data from a community-based oral health promotion project. Ninety-six subjects completed baseline and twenty-four-month follow-up interviews that included the GOHAI as well as other self-reported measures of oral health. Subjects were predominantly white, female, not currently married, with less than a high school education, and had average age of seventy-six years at baseline. Through the health promotion project, participants were offered low cost diagnostic and preventive services on a sliding fee basis. At twenty-four months, subjects' records were abstracted regarding the receipt of dental hygiene, transportation, emergency, diagnostic, restorative, and prosthodontic services. Subjects were also asked about dental expenditures in the previous year and the type of dental care received, regardless of the source of care. The mean change in GOHAI scores from baseline to the twenty-four-month interview was 2.2 (std. dev. 6.6) and ranged from -15 to 30. Findings suggest that the GOHAI is sensitive to the provision of dental care, although additional research is needed to understand the impact of various dental services on the individual items of the GOHAI, as well as the overall index score. The potential applications of self-reported oral health outcome measures such as the GOHAI in dental education are discussed.

  12. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  13. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  14. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental school, has extra training in caring for patients with disabilities. The Special Care Dentistry Association is a resource to find a dentist ... for children who grind their teeth, because the risk of the child choking on the mouthguard if it breaks ... Academy of Pediatric Dentistry www.aapd.org Find a dentist at www. ...

  15. Dental Health in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... to occur in nearly 100% of the TSC population. Not all dental pits are cavities; they are just areas where enamel did not form, but can be an area where food can build up and start a cavity. Gums The gums may have small areas of growth called gingival fibromas , which are mostly harmless and ...

  16. Skylab Dental Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

  17. Ethics of dental health screening.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Chandrashekar; Taha, Farheen

    2016-01-01

    Screening is the detection of disease at a point in its natural history when it is not yet symptomatic. In the natural history of dental caries, for example, the incipient lesions are at a reversible stage, which is a pre-symptomatic or an unrecognised symptomatic disease. Ideally, this is the stage during which screening should identify the risk of dental caries; however, presently, the so-called dental screening employed identifies the clinical cavitation of the tooth, which is very obvious to the individual. The individual already knows that he/she has dental caries and needs treatment, which the screening personnel (dental doctor) explains again during the screening procedure. Is it ethical to call such an event screening? The mushrooming of dental teaching hospitals has promoted regular screening of dental diseases among the communities and schoolchildren through their community dentistry-related activities. More often, it is a dental "check-up" that is carried out on the pretext of screening for dental diseases. Though the basic intention of this activity is to promote awareness of dental diseases and promote good health, there is also a hidden agenda to it. An artificial demand for dental care is created that is easily capitalised on by the dental teaching institutions to enhance its clinical activity. Dental screening is doing more harm than good as patients are made aware of the diseases for which they may not be able to afford treatment. This narrative review gives an account of the scientific evidence on screening for oral diseases, the current practices in screening and the ethical dilemmas of dental screening programmes. PMID:27474698

  18. Stunted root development: A rare dental complication of Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Aditi; Sangwan, Pankaj; Dahiya, Parveen

    2016-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a severe cutaneous reaction seen rarely in clinical practice. Most often, it occurs as an adverse reaction to certain drugs. When it affects children at a very young age, arrested tooth root development may also be seen. We present a case of a 13 year old boy who suffered from SJ syndrome at the age of 7 years. Incomplete root development was observed in all teeth, as demonstrated by panaromic radiography. Clinical features of this condition and its management are further discussed. We aim to emphasise on the need for dental practitioners to be aware of the potential dental complications of SJS and enable them to recognise and manage the condition at the earliest so as to avoid any undesirable sequelae. Key words:Adverse drug reaction, amoxycillin, arrested root development, Stevens-Johnson syndrome. PMID:27703617

  19. Evaluation of dental morphometrics during the orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic orthodontic and prosthetic procedures commence with an initial examination, during which a number of individual findings on occlusion or malocclusion are clarified. Nowadays we try to replace standard plaster casts by scanned objects and digital models. Method Geometrically calibrated images aid in the comparison of several different steps of the treatment and show the variation of selected features belonging to individual biomedical objects. The methods used are based on geometric morphometrics, making a new approach to the evaluation of the variability of features. The study presents two different methods of measurement and shows their accuracy and reliability. Results The experimental part of the present paper is devoted to the analysis of the dental arch objects of 24 patients before and after the treatment using the distances between the canines and premolars as the features important for diagnostic purposes. Our work proved the advantage of measuring digitalized orthodontic models over manual measuring of plaster casts, with statistically significant results and accuracy sufficient for dental practice. Conclusion A new method of computer imaging and measurements of a dental stone cast provides information with the precision required for orthodontic treatment. The results obtained point to the reduction in the variance of the distances between the premolars and canines during the treatment, with a regression coefficient RC=0.7 and confidence intervals close enough for dental practice. The ratio of these distances pointed to the nearly constant value of this measure close to 0.84 for the given set of 24 individuals. PMID:24893983

  20. [Dynamics of tooth decay prevalence in children receiving long-term preventive program in school dental facilities].

    PubMed

    Avraamova, O G; Kulazhenko, T V; Gabitova, K F

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the assessment of tooth decay prevalence in clinically homogenous groups of children receiving long-term preventive program (PP) in school dental facilities. Five-years PP were introduced in clinical practice in 2 Moscow schools. Preventive treatment was performed by dental hygienist. The results show that systematic preventive treatment in school dental offices starting from elementary school allows reducing dental caries incidence 46-53% and stabilize the incidence of caries complications. It should be mentioned though that analysis of individualized outcomes proves heterogeneity of study results despite of equal conditions of PP. Potentially significant hence is early diagnostics and treatment of initial caries forms as demineralization foci, especially in children with intensive tooth decay. Optimization of pediatric dentist and dental hygienist activity in school dental facilities is the main factor of caries prevention efficiency. PMID:27239995