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Sample records for diagnostic dental radiography

  1. Diagnostic reference levels in intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Kyung; Han, Won-Jeong; Choi, Jin-Woo; Jung, Yun-Hoa; Yoon, Suk-Ja; Lee, Jae-Seo

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to survey the radiographic exposure parameters, to measure the patient doses for intraoral dental radiography nationwide, and thus to establish the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental X-ray examination in Korea. One hundred two intraoral dental radiographic machines from all regions of South Korea were selected for this study. Radiographic exposure parameters, size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration of machine, and type of dental X-ray machine were documented. Patient entrance doses (PED) and dose-area products (DAP) were measured three times at the end of the exit cone of the X-ray unit with a DAP meter (DIAMENTOR M4-KDK, PTW, Freiburg, Germany) for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography, and corrections were made for room temperature and pressure. Measured PED and DAP were averaged and compared according to the size of hospital, type of image receptor system, installation duration, and type of dental X-ray machine. The mean exposure parameters were 62.6 kVp, 7.9 mA, and 0.5 second for adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography. The mean patient dose was 2.11 mGy (PED) and 59.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) and the third quartile one 3.07 mGy (PED) and 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP). Doses at university dental hospitals were lower than those at dental clinics (p<0.05). Doses of digital radiography (DR) type were lower than those of film-based type (p<0.05). We recommend 3.1 mGy (PED), 87.4 mGycm(2) (DAP) as the DRLs in adult mandibular molar intraoral dental radiography in Korea.

  2. Clinical feline dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Lemmons, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    Dental radiography is a necessary diagnostic modality in small animal practice. It is not possible to accurately assess and diagnose tooth resorption, periodontal disease, endodontic disease, neoplasia and injury without it. Dental radiography is also necessary for treatment and assessment of the patient postoperatively.

  3. Intracranial arachnoid cyst on dental radiography: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lisha; Sun, Zhipeng; Ma, Xuchen

    2013-03-01

    Intracranial arachnoid cysts (IACs) can present as congenital asymptomatic lesions that may predispose them to present as an incidental finding during radiographic examination. On the other hand, IACs may also give rise to a series of neurologic symptoms depending on their size and location, such as vomiting, seizures, headache, and ataxia. Skull deformities, including macrocephaly, may occur and become remarkable on dental radiology. We report 2 patients who were identified with IAC before orthodontic treatment. The dental radiologic appearance of IAC is discussed and may constitute a diagnostic challenge to both the dentist and radiologist.

  4. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for dental intraoral radiography.

    PubMed

    Manousaridis, G; Koukorava, C; Hourdakis, C J; Kamenopoulou, V; Yakoumakis, E; Tsiklakis, K

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) is a tool for the optimisation of radiological procedures. Establishment of a DRL is a requirement of national regulations. Measurements performed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission on 529 dental intraoral radiographic facilities have been used in order to define DRLs for digital and film imaging modalities, taking into account the region of the mouth to be imaged. Thus, different DRL values have been proposed for minimum (usually incisors), maximum (usually maxillary molars) and average exposure settings, both for film and digital imaging. The results have been compared with similar studies performed in Europe and the USA and are in line with the most recent ones.

  5. National reference doses for dental cephalometric radiography.

    PubMed

    Holroyd, J R

    2011-12-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) are an important tool in the optimisation of clinical radiography. Although national DRLs are provided for many diagnostic procedures including dental intra-oral radiography, there are currently no national DRLs set for cephalometric radiography. In the absence of formal national DRLs, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) has previously published National Reference Doses (NRDs) covering a wide range of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The aim of this study was to determine provisional NRDs for cephalometric radiography. Measurements made by the Dental X-ray Protection Service (DXPS) of the HPA, as part of the cephalometric X-ray equipment testing service provided to dentists and dental trade companies throughout the UK, were used to derive provisional NRDs. Dose-area product measurements were made on 42 X-ray sets. Third quartile dose-area product values for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiography were found to be 41 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm², respectively, with individual measurements ranging from 3 mGy cm² to 108 mGy cm². This report proposes provisional NRDs of 40 mGy cm² and 25 mGy cm² for adult and child lateral cephalometric radiographs, respectively; these doses could be considered by employers when establishing their local DRLs.

  6. Local diagnostic reference levels for intraoral dental radiography in the public hospitals of Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Stelios; Pitri, Elina; Lampaskis, Marios; Papaefstathiou, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine local DRLs for children and adults undergoing intraoral dental examinations at the intraoral radiology units of the public hospitals in Cyprus. Measurements were made on all the twenty intraoral X-ray units of the public hospitals in Cyprus with the intention to establish the local DRLs for all the possible intraoral X-ray examinations for children and adults. All units are film based. The measurements were made by a Dose Area Product (DAP) meter (GAMMEX RMI 841-RD) placed at the surface of the dental unit's X-ray shaping cone (FSD 20cm). A diagnostic radiology dosimeter (Dosimax Plus A) was also placed at an FSD of 100cm to compare the dose reading between the two dosimeters. DRLs were established at the 3rd quartile for 7 exposure settings corresponding to 12 types of teeth (Adult and children mandibular and maxillary incisor, premolar and molar) with values of 197, 163, 128, 102, 81, 65 and 49mGycm(-2) and 7.23, 5.94, 4.75, 3.68, 3.10, 2.41 and 1.88mGy for benchmark nominal exposure times of 1000, 800, 640, 500, 400, 320 and 250ms respectively, at a nominal exposure voltage of 70kVp. The local DRLs of the present study compare well with other similar published DRLs. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Establishment of diagnostic reference levels for dental panoramic radiography in Greece.

    PubMed

    Manousaridis, G; Koukorava, C; Hourdakis, C J; Kamenopoulou, V; Yakoumakis, E; Tsiklakis, K

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to present the national diagnostic reference levels (DRL) established for panoramic dental examinations in Greece. The establishment of DRL, as a tool for the optimisation of radiological procedures, is a requirement of national regulations. Measurements performed by the Greek Atomic Energy Commission on 90 panoramic systems have been used for the derivation of DRL values. DRL values have been proposed for exposure settings of different patient types (child, small adult and standard adult), both for film and digital imaging. The DRLs for different patient types are grouped in three categories: children, small adults (corresponding to female) and average adults (corresponding to male). Proposed DRLs for these groups are 2.2, 3.3 and 4.1 mGy, respectively. In order to investigate the correlation of DRLs with the available imaging modalities (CR, DR and film), this parameter was taken into account. DR imaging DRL is the lowest at 3.5 mGy, CR imaging the highest at 4.2 mGy and film imaging at 3.7 mGy. In order to facilitate comparison with other studies, kerma-width product values were calculated from Ki, air and field size.

  8. Clinical canine dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Kristin M

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide small animal veterinarians in private practice a guideline for interpretation of the most common findings in canine intraoral radiology. Normal oral and dental anatomy is presented. A brief review of variations of normal, common periodontal and endodontic pathology findings and developmental anomalies is provided.

  9. Reference doses for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Napier, I D

    1999-04-24

    To establish reference doses for use within dental radiography. Retrospective analysis, single centre. UK General Dental Practice, 1995-1998. A statistical analysis was performed on the results from NRPB evaluations of dental x-ray equipment within general practice. The third quartile patient entrance dose was determined from 6,344 assessments of intra-oral x-ray equipment. The third quartile dose-width product was determined from 387 assessments of panoramic x-ray equipment. The third quartile patient entrance dose for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph is 3.9 mGy. The third quartile dose-width product for a standard adult panoramic radiograph is 66.7 mGy mm. NRPB recommends the adoption of reference doses of 4 mGy for an adult mandibular molar intra-oral radiograph and 65 mGy mm for a standard adult panoramic radiograph. These reference values can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice. Where radiography is carried out using doses above these reference values, a thorough review of radiographic practice should be made to either improve techniques, or justify keeping the current techniques. However, attainment of doses at or below the reference values cannot be construed as achievement of optimum performance; further dose reductions below the reference value are still practicable.

  10. Feline dental radiography and radiology: A primer.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2014-11-01

    Information crucial to the diagnosis and treatment of feline oral diseases can be ascertained using dental radiography and the inclusion of this technology has been shown to be the best way to improve a dental practice. Becoming familar with the techniques required for dental radiology and radiography can, therefore, be greatly beneficial. Novices to dental radiography may need some time to adjust and become comfortable with the techniques. If using dental radiographic film, the generally recommended 'E' or 'F' speeds may be frustrating at first, due to their more specific exposure and image development requirements. Although interpreting dental radiographs is similar to interpreting a standard bony radiograph, there are pathologic states that are unique to the oral cavity and several normal anatomic structures that may mimic pathologic changes. Determining which teeth have been imaged also requires a firm knowledge of oral anatomy as well as the architecture of dental films/digital systems. This article draws on a range of dental radiography and radiology resources, and the benefit of the author's own experience, to review the basics of taking and interpreting intraoral dental radiographs. A simplified method for positioning the tubehead is explained and classic examples of some common oral pathologies are provided. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  11. Use of dental radiography among Lithuanian general dentists.

    PubMed

    Peciuliene, Vytaute; Rimkuviene, Jurate; Maneliene, Rasma; Drukteinis, Saulius

    2009-01-01

    To gather information about the radiographic facilities and techniques used by Lithuanian general dentists. Questionnaires were sent to all 2879 Lithuanian dental practitioners registered on the Lithuanian Dental Chamber licence registry data list. The questionnaire was made with multiple-choice answers. Respondents were invited to choose the only one category of answer that best fitted their clinical attitude. Questions included in the present survey concerned general and specific information regarding peculiarities of radiographic imaging. Only answers of respondents who are licensed as general dentists were included in this study. From the 2850 questionnaires mailed 1532 were returned. The response rate was 53.8%. Of the total responses 1431 questionnaires were received from licensed general dentists. Of total 956 dentists practiced in urban and 576 dentists in rural areas. 61.6% of respondents had access to an intra-oral radiographic unit in their practice and 91.5% of them used dental radiography always or often as the diagnostic tool. To support the film packet in the patient's mouth alternatively film holder or patient's finger was used by 48% of respondents, while film holder was used only by 19.3% of dentists. Recently graduated dental practitioners more common used diagnostic radiography in endodontic pathology than dentists with a longer time from graduation. Film holder was not a popular device among general dental practitioners to perform periapical radioraphs. It is important to improve the existing dental curriculum to ensure the necessary competency when using dental radiography and film holders routinely in clinical practice.

  12. Doses to critical organs from dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Kihara, T; Russell, W J; Beach, D R

    1976-02-01

    Participants in the jointly sponsored Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and Japanese National Institute of Health (ABCC-JNIH) Adult Health Study, a fixed-population sample under continual observation for late effects of the atomic bombs, are also being evaluated for their exposure to other sources of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the subjects' thyroid, lens, pituitary, bone marrow, and gonadal doses acquired during dental radiography were estimated from dosimetry of simulated human material exposed according to technical factors as ascertained in previously reported surveys of patients, dental clinics and hospitals, and dosimetry with phantom human material containing lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters and ionization chambers. Dental radiography comprised a relatively small segment of the contaminating sources of ionizing radiation exposure among this population sample. Efforts should be made to improve exposure conditions, especially in view of the increasing frequency of dental x-ray examinations.

  13. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  14. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  15. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following section... individual State licensure processes, all of which include assessment of competence in dental radiography....

  17. Thyroid dose distribution in dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bristow, R.G.; Wood, R.E.; Clark, G.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The anatomic position and proven radiosensitivity of the thyroid gland make it an organ of concern in dental radiography. A calibrated thermoluminescent dosimetry system was used to investigate the absorbed dose (microGy) to the thyroid gland resultant from a minimum irradiated volume, intraoral full-mouth radiography technique with the use of rectangular collimation with a lead-backed image receptor, and conventional panoramic radiography performed with front and rear lead aprons. Use of the minimum irradiated volume technique resulted in a significantly decreased absorbed dose over the entire thyroid region ranging from 100% to 350% (p less than 0.05). Because this intraoral technique results in radiographs with greater image quality and also exposes the thyroid gland to less radiation than the panoramic, this technique may be an alternative to the panoramic procedure.

  18. Personal computer equipment for dental digital subtraction radiography vs. industrial computer equipment and conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Möystad, A; Svanaes, D B; Larheim, T A

    1992-04-01

    A "low-cost" personal computer (PC) system used to digitize dental radiographs was tested by assessing the accuracy of its subtraction images versus those of "high-cost" industrial equipment and conventional radiography. Subtraction images were made of artificial lesions in human femur bone and subsequently evaluated by students and teachers. The observations were analyzed in terms of true positive and false positive reports. "Low-cost" and "high-cost" subtraction images revealed only small differences in diagnostic accuracy. Compared to conventional radiography, the diagnostic accuracy of the subtraction images with the "low-cost" PC system was significantly higher for all observers. The interexaminer variance was similar for the subtraction and the conventional images for both students and teachers, except for a significantly reduced interexaminer variance for the teachers concerning the true positive reports with the "low-cost" PC subtraction technique.

  19. Dental radiography in New Zealand: digital versus film.

    PubMed

    Ting, N A; Broadbent, J M; Duncan, W J

    2013-09-01

    Digital x-ray systems offer advantages over conventional film systems, yet many dentists have not adopted digital technology. To assess New Zealand dental practitioners' use of--and preferences for--dental radiography systems. Cross-sectional survey. General and specialist dental practice. Postal questionnaire survey of a sample of 770 dentists (520 randomly selected general dental practitioners and all 250 specialists) listed in the 2012 NZ Dental Council Register. Type of radiography systems used by dentists. Dentists' experiences and opinions of conventional film and digital radiography. The participation rate was 55.2%. Digital radiography systems were used by 58.0% of participating dentists, most commonly among those aged 31-40 years. Users of digital radiography tended to report greater satisfaction with their radiography systems than users conventional films. Two-thirds of film users were interested in switching to digital radiography in the near future. Reasons given by conventional film users for not using digital radiography included cost, difficulty in integrating with other software systems, concern about potential technical errors, and the size and nature of the intra-oral sensors. Many dental practitioners have still not adopted digital radiography, yet its users are more satisfied with their radiography systems than are conventional film users. The latter may find changing to a digital system to be satisfying and rewarding.

  20. Quality aspects of digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2007-01-01

    The number of dentists who have converted from conventional film radiography to digital radiography continues to grow. A digital system has numerous advantages, but there are also many new aspects to consider. The overall aim of this thesis was to study how digital radiography was used in general dental practices. The specific aims were to study how different factors affected image quality. To determine whether there were any differences in image quality between conventional film radiographs and digital radiographs, 4863 images (540 cases) were evaluated. The cases had been sent to the Swedish Dental Insurance Office for prior treatment approval. The image quality of digital radiographs was found to be significantly lower than that of film radiographs. This result led to a questionnaire study of dentists experienced in digital radiography. In 2003, a questionnaire was sent to the 139 general practice dentists who worked with digital radiography in Skine, Sweden; the response rate was 94%. Many general practice dentists had experienced several problems (65%), and less than half of the digital systems (40%) underwent some kind of quality control. One of the weaker links in the technical chain of digital radiography appeared to be the monitor. A field study to 19 dentists at their clinics found that the brightness and contrast settings of the monitors had to be adjusted to obtain the subjectively best image quality. The ambient light in the evaluation room was also found to affect the diagnostic outcome of low-contrast patterns in radiographs. To evaluate the effects of ambient light and technical adjustments of the monitor, a study using standardised set-ups was designed. Seven observers evaluated radiographs of 100 extracted human teeth for approximal caries under five different combinations of brightness and contrast settings on two different occasions with high and low ambient light levels in the evaluation room. The ability to diagnose carious lesions was found

  1. A dose monitoring system for dental radiography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chena; Kim, Jo-Eun; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Lee, Woo-Jin; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Choi, Soon-Chul; Yeom, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current study investigates the feasibility of a platform for a nationwide dose monitoring system for dental radiography. The essential elements for an unerring system are also assessed. Materials and Methods An intraoral radiographic machine with 14 X-ray generators and five sensors, 45 panoramic radiographic machines, and 23 cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) models used in Korean dental clinics were surveyed to investigate the type of dose report. A main server for storing the dose data from each radiographic machine was prepared. The dose report transfer pathways from the radiographic machine to the main sever were constructed. An effective dose calculation method was created based on the machine specifications and the exposure parameters of three intraoral radiographic machines, five panoramic radiographic machines, and four CBCTs. A viewing system was developed for both dentists and patients to view the calculated effective dose. Each procedure and the main server were integrated into one system. Results The dose data from each type of radiographic machine was successfully transferred to the main server and converted into an effective dose. The effective dose stored in the main server is automatically connected to a viewing program for dentist and patient access. Conclusion A patient radiation dose monitoring system is feasible for dental clinics. Future research in cooperation with clinicians, industry, and radiologists is needed to ensure format convertibility for an efficient dose monitoring system to monitor unexpected radiation dose. PMID:27358817

  2. DNA damage and cellular death in oral mucosa cells of children who have undergone panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Angelieri, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Gabriela R; Sannomiya, Eduardo K; Ribeiro, Daniel A

    2007-06-01

    Despite wide use as a diagnostic tool in medical and dental practice, radiography can induce cytotoxic effects and genetic damage. To evaluate DNA damage (micronucleus) and cellular death (pyknosis, karyolysis and karyorrhexis) in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to radiation during dental radiography. A total of 17 children who had undergone panoramic dental radiography were included. We found no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between micronucleated oral mucosa cells in children before and after exposure to radiation. On the other hand, radiation did cause other nuclear alterations closely related to cytotoxicity including karyorrhexis, pyknosis and karyolysis. Taken together, these results indicate that panoramic dental radiography might not induce chromosomal damage, but may be cytotoxic. Overall, the results reinforce the importance of evaluating the health side effects of radiography and contribute to the micronucleus database, which will improve our understanding and practice of this methodology in children.

  3. Comparison of state dental radiography safety regulations.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Thomas F; Parashar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and provide an overview of state policies on occupational exposure, dosimetry, collimation, patient protection, and the use of portable handheld X-ray machines in dentistry. State government webpages containing radiation protection rules and regulations were scanned. The contents were compared against current federal regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They were further evaluated in light of current recommendations from the National Council on Radiation Protection & Measurements (NCRP) and the American Dental Association (ADA). Most states' regulations mirror the exposure limits set forth by the NRC and FDA. Nonregulatory recommendations regarding use of dental radiography are periodically put forth by the NCRP and the ADA. State and federal agencies often follow recommendations from these scientific organizations when creating regulations. Clinicians must be aware of their state's radiation protection rules, as variations among states exist. In addition, recommendations published by organizations such as the NCRP and the ADA, while not legally binding, contribute significantly to the reduction of radiation risks for operators and patients alike.

  4. Quality assurance tests for digital radiography in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Greenall, Chris; Drage, Nicholas; Ager, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Quality assurance (QA) is essential in dental radiography. Digital radiography is becoming more common in dentistry, so it is important that appropriate QA tests are carried out on the digital equipment, including the viewing monitor. The aim of this article is to outline the tests that can be carried out in dental practice. Quality assurance for digital equipment is important to ensure consistently high quality images are produced.

  5. Leaded apron for use in panoramic dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Whitcher, B.L.; Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    The leaded aprons currently available for use during dental radiography do not protect the thyroid gland from radiation. Conventional aprons may produce artifacts when used with panoramic dental x-ray units. This study measures the dose reduction obtained with an experimental leaded apron designed for use with panoramic dental x-ray units. Skin exposures measured at the thyroid and at the sternum were reduced with the use of the apron. Films produced during the study were free from apron artifacts.

  6. A benchmark for comparison of dental radiography analysis algorithms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Huang, Cheng-Ta; Lee, Jia-Hong; Li, Chung-Hsing; Chang, Sheng-Wei; Siao, Ming-Jhih; Lai, Tat-Ming; Ibragimov, Bulat; Vrtovec, Tomaž; Ronneberger, Olaf; Fischer, Philipp; Cootes, Tim F; Lindner, Claudia

    2016-07-01

    Dental radiography plays an important role in clinical diagnosis, treatment and surgery. In recent years, efforts have been made on developing computerized dental X-ray image analysis systems for clinical usages. A novel framework for objective evaluation of automatic dental radiography analysis algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2015 Bitewing Radiography Caries Detection Challenge and Cephalometric X-ray Image Analysis Challenge. In this article, we present the datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchmark. The main contributions of the challenge include the creation of the dental anatomy data repository of bitewing radiographs, the creation of the anatomical abnormality classification data repository of cephalometric radiographs, and the definition of objective quantitative evaluation for comparison and ranking of the algorithms. With this benchmark, seven automatic methods for analysing cephalometric X-ray image and two automatic methods for detecting bitewing radiography caries have been compared, and detailed quantitative evaluation results are presented in this paper. Based on the quantitative evaluation results, we believe automatic dental radiography analysis is still a challenging and unsolved problem. The datasets and the evaluation software will be made available to the research community, further encouraging future developments in this field. (http://www-o.ntust.edu.tw/~cweiwang/ISBI2015/). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dental digital radiography: a survey of quality aspects.

    PubMed

    Hellén-Halme, Kristina; Rohlin, Madeleine; Petersson, Arne

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the experiences of Swedish general dental practitioners (GDPs) with digital radiography and their opinion on the same, particularly regarding quality issues. A letter was sent to all GDPs in private care in Region Skåne, Sweden, asking whether they used digital radiography (n=513). The response rate was 79%. The number of private GDPs who replied that they used digital radiography was 106. The Public Dental Service in Region Skåne listed 33 GDPs who worked with digital radiography. Based on these answers, a questionnaire was sent to the GDPs working with digital radiography (n=139). The questionnaire comprised 27 questions about the dentists, the system of intra-oral digital radiography, and the GDPs' experiences of and opinions on issues regarding image quality and quality control. The response rate to the questionnaire was 94%. Almost all, 92%, worked with charge-coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensors. Most GDPs were satisfied with their digital radiographic system. The majority (65%) experienced problems. Detector failure and trouble with the software were common. The GDPs wrote that they used lower exposure times in digital radiography than traditional film radiography. The estimated reduction in exposure time was said to be between 51% and 75%. Thirty-five per cent continued to use film parallel with digital radiography. The answers indicated that less than half of the equipment (40%) underwent quality control. Quality controls, when conducted, were undertaken once or twice a year, mainly by technicians from the companies that had sold the digital equipment. Based on the results of the questionnaire, there seems to be a need to improve the maintenance and the quality of digital radiography. It is also important that the GDPs become more aware of the problems that can occur when a new technique is introduced and that they develop the skills to handle these problems.

  8. Parental knowledge and attitudes towards dental radiography for children.

    PubMed

    Chiri, R; Awan, S; Archibald, S; Abbott, P V

    2013-06-01

    Radiographs are an essential part of most clinical dental examinations and diagnoses. The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of parents towards dental radiographs for their children. A 21-item questionnaire, covering parental level of radiation knowledge and socio-demographics was applied. Sliding scales were used to assess attitude towards dental radiographs. There were 1467 questionnaires distributed between five primary schools in the Perth (Western Australia) metropolitan area, with 309 surveys (21%) returned for collection. Most parents displayed a low level of knowledge, but had a positive attitude towards dental radiographs. Parents with children who have previously had dental radiographs perceived dental radiographs as 'good', 'useful' and 'pleasant'. A higher level of education and parents with children who have previously had radiographs were significantly associated with a higher level of knowledge about dental radiography. Parents who had higher scores on questions assessing radiation knowledge were more likely to perceive dental radiographs as 'safe' and 'beneficial'. Most parents have a positive attitude towards dental radiographs on their children. However, the majority of parents lack knowledge regarding dental radiography, especially regarding the risks involved. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography for diagnosis of dental abnormalities in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luiz Antonio F.; Barriviera, Mauricio; Januário, Alessandro L.; Bezerra, Ana Cristina B.; Fioravanti, Maria Clorinda S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of veterinary dentistry has substantially improved the ability to diagnose canine and feline dental abnormalities. Consequently, examinations previously performed only on humans are now available for small animals, thus improving the diagnostic quality. This has increased the need for technical qualification of veterinary professionals and increased technological investments. This study evaluated the use of cone beam computed tomography and intraoral radiography as complementary exams for diagnosing dental abnormalities in dogs and cats. Cone beam computed tomography was provided faster image acquisition with high image quality, was associated with low ionizing radiation levels, enabled image editing, and reduced the exam duration. Our results showed that radiography was an effective method for dental radiographic examination with low cost and fast execution times, and can be performed during surgical procedures. PMID:22122905

  10. Strut analyses for detecting osteoporosis using dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Young Hyun; Jeong, Ho-Gul; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Park, Wonse; Han, Sang-Sun

    2017-07-14

    The aim of this study was to identify variables that can be used for osteoporosis detection using strut analysis, fractal dimension (FD), and the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) using multiple regions of interest (ROIs) and to develop an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography. A total of 454 panoramic radiographs from oral examinations in our dental hospital from 2012 to 2015 were randomly selected, equally distributed among osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients (n=227 in each group). The radiographs were classified by bone mineral density (T-score). After 3 marrow regions and the endosteal margin area were selected, strut features, FD, and GLCM were analyzed using a customized image processing program. Image upsampling was used to obtain the optimal binarization for calculating strut features and FD. The independent-samples t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the 2 groups. A decision tree and support vector machine (SVM) were used to create and verify an osteoporosis detection model. The endosteal margin area showed statistically significant differences in FD, GLCM, and strut variables between the osteoporotic and non-osteoporotic patients, whereas the medullary portions showed few distinguishing features. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the strut variables in the endosteal margin area were 97.1%, 95.7%, and 96.25 using the decision tree and 97.2%, 97.1%, and 96.9% using SVM, and these were the best results obtained among the 3 methods. Strut variables with FD and/or GLCM did not increase the diagnostic accuracy. The analysis of strut features in the endosteal margin area showed potential for the development of an osteoporosis detection model based on panoramic radiography.

  11. Dental radiography exposure of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki populations

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.; Hoshi, M.; Russell, W.J.; Kihara, T.; Sawada, S.; Takeshita, K.; Otake, M.; Yoshinaga, H.; Beach, D.R.

    1989-03-01

    Dental radiography doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were estimated on the basis of survey data from dental hospitals and clinics in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and doses were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters and a phantom. Doses to organs, including the lens, pituitary fossa, thyroid gland, and skin were calculated from data obtained during a 2-week survey in both cities. The mean caput doses were calculated from the data indicating frequency per year and were tabulated by organs, age, teeth examined, type of examination, population, sex, and city. No significant difference was observed by age, population, sex, or city. Currently the doses incurred during dental radiography may not be sufficiently high to cause bias in the assessments for late radiation effects among atomic-bomb survivors. However, the mean caput thyroid doses of 62 mrad and 67 mrad in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, respectively, cannot be ignored from the standpoint of their potential in contributing to radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  12. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS FOR AND THE CREDENTIALING OF RADIOLOGIC PERSONNEL Pt. 75, App. G Appendix G to Part 75...

  13. Computers in dental radiography: a scenario for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, R.L.

    1985-09-01

    The recent emergence of cost-effective computing power makes it possible to integrate sophisticated data-sampling and image-interpretation techniques into dental radiography for the first time. A prototype system is being developed to permit clinical information expressed in three dimensions--plus time--to be made visible almost instantly. The associated X-ray dose for a complete three-dimensional survey of a selected dental region is predicted to be less than that required for a single conventional periapical radiograph exposed on D-speed film.

  14. Antepartum dental radiography and infant low birth weight.

    PubMed

    Hujoel, Philippe P; Bollen, Anne-Marie; Noonan, Carolyn J; del Aguila, Michael A

    2004-04-28

    Both high- and low-dose radiation exposures in women have been associated with low-birth-weight offspring. It is unclear if radiation affects the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis and thereby indirectly birth weight, or if the radiation directly affects the reproductive organs. To investigate whether antepartum dental radiography is associated with low-birth-weight offspring. A population-based case-control study. Enrollees of a dental insurance plan with live singleton births in Washington State between January 1993 and December 2000. Cases were 1117 women with low-birth-weight infants (<2500 g), of whom 336 were term low-birth-weight infants (1501-2499 g and gestation > or =37 weeks). Four control pregnancies resulting in normal-birth-weight infants (> or =2500 g) were randomly selected for each case (n = 4468). Odds of low birth weight and term low birth weight by dental radiographic dose during gestation. An exposure higher than 0.4 milligray (mGy) during gestation occurred in 21 (1.9%) mothers of low-birth-weight infants and, when compared with women who had no known dental radiography, was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) for a low-birth-weight infant of 2.27 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-4.66, P =.03). Exposure higher than 0.4 mGy occurred in 10 (3%) term low-birth-weight pregnancies and was associated with an adjusted OR for a term low-birth-weight infant of 3.61 (95% CI, 1.46-8.92, P =.005). Dental radiography during pregnancy is associated with low birth weight, specifically with term low birth weight.

  15. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice. PMID:25177144

  16. A note on digital dental radiography in forensic odontology.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Sher-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Digital dental radiography, intraoral and extraoral, is becoming more popular in dental practice. It offers convenience, such as lower exposure to radiation, ease of storing of images, and elimination of chemical processing. However, it also has disadvantages and drawbacks. One of these is the potential for confusion of the orientation of the image. This paper outlines one example of this, namely, the lateral inversion of the image. This source of confusion is partly inherent in the older model of phosphor storage plates (PSPs), as they allow both sides to be exposed without clue to the fact that the image is acquired on the wrong side. The native software allows digital manipulation of the X-ray image, permitting both rotation and inversion. Attempts to orientate the X-ray according to the indicator incorporated on the plate can then sometimes lead to inadvertent lateral inversion of the image. This article discusses the implications of such mistakes in dental digital radiography to forensic odontology and general dental practice.

  17. Lonizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 3. Quality assurance in dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-06-01

    This is the last in a series of three articles on X-ray dose reduction and covers aspects of quality assurance. The first outlined radiation physics and protection and the second the legislation relating to radiation safety. Quality assurance is an essential part of dental radiography and is required to produce images of a consistently high standard, necessary for accurate diagnosis.

  18. Proton Radiography as an electromagnetic field and density perturbation diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Patel, P; Town, R; Edwards, M; Phillips, T; Lerner, S; Price, D; Hicks, D; Key, M; Hatchett, S; Wilks, S; King, J; Snavely, R; Freeman, R; Boehlly, T; Koenig, M; Martinolli, E; Lepape, S; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Audebert, P; Gauthier, J; Borghesi, M; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Pretzler, G; Willi, O

    2004-04-15

    Laser driven proton beams have been used to diagnose transient fields and density perturbations in laser produced plasmas. Grid deflectometry techniques have been applied to proton radiography to obtain precise measurements of proton beam angles caused by electromagnetic fields in laser produced plasmas. Application of proton radiography to laser driven implosions has demonstrated that density conditions in compressed media can be diagnosed with MeV protons. This data has shown that proton radiography can provide unique insight into transient electromagnetic fields in super critical density plasmas and provide a density perturbation diagnostics in compressed matter . PACS numbers: 52.50.Jm, 52.40.Nk, 52.40.Mj, 52.70.Kz

  19. Diagnostic Imaging of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits and Rodents.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques are of paramount importance for dentistry and oral disorders of rabbits, rodents, and other exotic companion mammals. Aside from standard radiography, stomatoscopy is a complementary tool allowing a thorough and detailed inspection of the oral cavity. Computed tomography (CT) generates multiple 2-dimensional views and 3-dimensional reconstructions providing superior diagnostic accuracy also useful for prognosis and treatment of advanced dental disease and its related complications. MRI is a diagnostic imaging technique additional to CT used primarily to enhance soft tissues, including complex odontogenic abscesses.

  20. The quality of dental radiography in the Czech Republic--results of a TLD and film postal audit.

    PubMed

    Novák, Leos

    2006-01-01

    Since 2002, the postal audit in dental radiography has been supplementing standard quality control (QC) tools for dental intraoral X-ray machines. An aim of the audit is to check basic X-ray machine parameters (field size, exposure reproducibility), and a quality of the whole process of diagnostic imaging (entrance surface air-kerma measurement, a check of film processing and an image quality evaluation). The standard QC tests, performed by private companies, check mainly the X-ray unit. Conversely, the audit gives better information about the patient examination practices. During the period of January 2002 to May 2004 approximately 4000 audits were performed. The results confirmed that main problems in dental radiography are due to incorrect film processing, non-optimised setting of the exposure parameters and use of obsolete X-ray machines. Only approximately 30% of performed audits were satisfactory with respect to all checked parameters.

  1. Genotoxic effects of X-rays on keratinized mucosa cells during panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, E M M; Meireles, J R C; Lopes, M A; Junqueira, V C; Gomes-Filho, I S; Trindade, S; Machado-Santelli, G M

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic effects of X-rays on epithelial gingival cells during panoramic dental radiography using a differentiated protocol for the micronucleus test. 40 healthy individuals who underwent this procedure for diagnostic purposes on request from their dentists agreed to participate in this study. All of them answered a questionnaire before the examination. Epithelial gingival cells were obtained from the keratinized mucosa of the upper dental arcade by gentle scraping with a cervical brush immediately before exposure and 10 days later. Cytological preparations were stained according to the Feulgen-Rossenbeck reaction, counterstained with fast green 1% for 1 min and analysed under a light microscope. Micronuclei, nuclear projections (broken eggs) and degenerative nuclear alterations (pyknosis, karyolysis, karyorrhexis and condensed chromatin) were scored. The frequency of micronuclei was significantly higher after exposure (P < 0.05), as were the frequencies of nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis (P < 0.001). These results indicate that X-ray radiation emitted during panoramic dental radiography induces a genotoxic effect on epithelial gingival cells that increases the frequency of chromosomal damage and nuclear alterations indicative of apoptosis.

  2. Patient exposure trends in medical and dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Goetz, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    Patient exposure to medical and dental x rays has long been of interest to the radiological health community. With the cooperation of state and local agencies and professional groups, the Center for Devices and Radiological Health has conducted three major surveys of patient exposure to x rays. The latest of these surveys, the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT), collected x-ray exposure data for each year starting in 1972. Two earlier studies, the 1964 and 1970 X-ray Exposure Studies collected x-ray data during the years these surveys were conducted. Exposure trends presented are based on results of all three studies. Major improvements in beam limitation are seen for medical and dental radiography. Since 1964, when the first nationwide survey was conducted, dental exposures have decreased about 75%. Decreases of up to one-third occurred in exposures for medical examinations. The current exposure data presented continue to show a wide variation in medical exposures. Also presented are organ doses for four organs (ovaries, testes, thyroid and active bone marrow).

  3. Diagnostic procedures employed by dental practitioners in Australia with a focus on endodontic diagnostic procedures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Asj; Bennett, G W; Tan, Jcw; Abbott, P V

    2017-09-01

    An accurate diagnosis is the foundation for determining prognosis and appropriate management. This study adds to pre-existing (albeit limited) evidence by exploring the use of diagnostic techniques amongst dental practitioners. The main aim of the study was to identify the availability, usage and clinician preference for specific diagnostic tests. A secondary aim was to investigate the use of diagnostic tests for common clinical scenarios. A cross-sectional survey was distributed online to dental practitioners registered with the Australian Dental Association. Quantitative data on clinician demography, and the availability and preference of diagnostic tests was summarized with Stata 13 software. Pearson's chi-squared test was used to determine associations. General dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists comprised 86% and 14% of the 433 respondents, respectively. Unlike light transillumination, most GDP had radiography, biting tests and pulp sensibility tests available. The electric pulp test and ethyl chloride were first choices of most practitioners despite markedly lower availability relative to cold spray. Symptoms and endodontic assessments generally attracted wider usage of pulp testing. More dental practitioners should utilize diagnostic testing in order to arrive at accurate diagnoses. The availability of diagnostic tests did not completely translate to usage and none of the scenarios presented warranted pulp sensibility testing from all respondents. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Optimisation of patient doses in programmable dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Lecomber, A R; Downes, S L; Mokhtari, M; Faulkner, K

    2000-03-01

    To estimate the radiation-related risk associated with twelve imaging programs available on the Orthophos (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) dental panoramic radiography unit. Organ absorbed doses for each program were measured using a Rando anthropomorphic phantom loaded with thermoluminescent dosemeters. Effective dose (E) was calculated in two ways; first, using the method recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, which excludes the salivary glands (designated Eexc), and second, with its inclusion (designated Einc). Organ and effective doses were both used to compare the various imaging programs. In 11 of the 12 programs studied the salivary glands received the highest individual organ dose, and Einc was found to be up to double Eexc. When the image was restricted to the dentition (program 2) organ doses were lower than for the complete jaws (program 1) by up to 85%, and Eexc and Einc reduced by about one half. When programs 2 and 6 (to image the temporomandibular joints) are used in place of program 1, the former combination provides more image information at an equivalent risk. The value of E in panoramic radiography depends on the inclusion of the salivary glands in the calculation and the magnitude of the dose.

  5. Quality assurance in digital dental radiography--justification and dose reduction in dental and maxillofacial radiology.

    PubMed

    Hellstern, F; Geibel, M-A

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation of quality assurance requirements for digital dental radiography in routine clinical practice. The results should be discussed by radiation protection authorities in the context of the relevant legal requirements and current debates on radiation protection. Two hundred digital dental radiographs were randomly selected from the digital database of the Department of Dentistry's Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic, Ulm University, and evaluated for various aspects of image quality and compliance with radiographic documentation requirements. The dental films were prepared by different radiology assistants (RAs) using one of two digital intraoral radiographic systems: Sirona Heliodent DS, 60 kV, focal spot size: 0.7 mm (group A) or KaVo Gendex 765 DC, 65 kV, focal spot size: 0.4 mm (group B). Radiographic justification was documented in 70.5% of cases, and the radiographic findings in 76.5%. Both variables were documented in the patient records as well as in the software in 14% of cases. Clinical documentation of the required information (name of the responsible dentist and radiology assistant, date, patient name, department, tube voltage, tube current, exposure time, type of radiograph, film size, department and serial number of the dental radiograph) was 100% complete in all cases. Moreover, the department certified according to DIN ISO 9001:2008 specifications demonstrated complete clinical documentation of radiographic justifications and radiographic findings. The entire dentition was visible on 83% of the digital films. The visible area corresponded to the target region on 85.7% of the digital dental radiographs. Seven to 8.5% of the images were classified as "hypometric" or "hypermetric". This study indicates that improvements in radiology training and continuing education fordentists and dental staff performing x-ray examinations are needed to ensure consistent high quality of digital dental radiography. Implementation of

  6. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  7. DDS: The Dental Diagnostic Simulation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Daniel E.

    The Dental Diagnostic Simulation (DDS) System provides an alternative to simulation systems which represent diagnostic case studies of relatively limited scope. It may be used to generate simulated case studies in all of the dental specialty areas with case materials progressing through the gamut of the diagnostic process. The generation of a…

  8. DDS: The Dental Diagnostic Simulation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Daniel E.

    The Dental Diagnostic Simulation (DDS) System provides an alternative to simulation systems which represent diagnostic case studies of relatively limited scope. It may be used to generate simulated case studies in all of the dental specialty areas with case materials progressing through the gamut of the diagnostic process. The generation of a…

  9. Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radiography is discussed as a method for nondestructive evaluation of internal flaws of solids. Gamma ray and X-ray equipment are described along with radiographic film, radiograph interpretation, and neutron radiography.

  10. Diagnostic radiography and adult acute myeloid leukaemia: an interview and medical chart review study

    PubMed Central

    Pogoda, J M; Nichols, P W; Ross, R K; Stram, D O; Thomas, D C; Preston-Martin, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aetiology of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is not well understood, perhaps because of its distinct subtypes. High-dose ionising radiation is a known risk factor, but less is known about risk from low-dose exposure such as from diagnostic radiography. Methods: Subjects were 412 matched case-control pairs. Ten-year subject histories of diagnostic radiography were based on interview and medical records. Results: There was no convincing association between AML risk and ionising radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging procedures, either for AML overall or for any AML subtype. Conclusion: The association between diagnostic radiography and AML risk remains uncertain. PMID:21522150

  11. Image quality assessment in panoramic dental radiography: a comparative study between conventional and digital systems.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Tiau, Yu Jin

    2013-02-01

    This study is designed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic image quality of dental panoramic radiography between conventional and digital systems. Fifty-four panoramic images were collected and divided into three groups consisting of conventional, digital with and without post processing image. Each image was printed out and scored subjectively by two experienced dentists who were blinded to the exposure parameters and system protocols. The evaluation covers of anatomical coverage and structures, density and image contrast. The overall image quality score revealed that digital panoramic with post-processing scored the highest of 3.45±0.19, followed by digital panoramic system without post-processing and conventional panoramic system with corresponding scores of 3.33±0.33 and 2.06±0.40. In conclusion, images produced by digital panoramic system are better in diagnostic image quality than that from conventional panoramic system. Digital post-processing visualization can improve diagnostic quality significantly in terms of radiographic density and contrast.

  12. Image quality assessment in panoramic dental radiography: a comparative study between conventional and digital systems

    PubMed Central

    Tiau, Yu Jin

    2013-01-01

    This study is designed to compare and evaluate the diagnostic image quality of dental panoramic radiography between conventional and digital systems. Fifty-four panoramic images were collected and divided into three groups consisting of conventional, digital with and without post processing image. Each image was printed out and scored subjectively by two experienced dentists who were blinded to the exposure parameters and system protocols. The evaluation covers of anatomical coverage and structures, density and image contrast. The overall image quality score revealed that digital panoramic with post-processing scored the highest of 3.45±0.19, followed by digital panoramic system without post-processing and conventional panoramic system with corresponding scores of 3.33±0.33 and 2.06±0.40. In conclusion, images produced by digital panoramic system are better in diagnostic image quality than that from conventional panoramic system. Digital post-processing visualization can improve diagnostic quality significantly in terms of radiographic density and contrast. PMID:23483085

  13. Effects of instruction on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of dental students towards digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Scarfe, W C; Potter, B J; Farman, A G

    1996-04-01

    To investigate the effects of a course of instruction in intraoral digital radiology on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of dental students. A questionnaire was administered to dental students at two institutions with (UL) and without (MCG) formal instruction in digital dental radiology, investigating their understanding of the principles of digital radiography, their attitudes to its use in the near future, and on the timing and suitability of the topic in the undergraduate dental curriculum. Differences in the responses between preclinical and clinical students at the two institutions were statistically assessed. The overall response rate was 66% (277) with rates of 52% (103) at MCG and 76% (174) at UL. UL students knew significantly more about digital radiography but they also had some significant misconceptions and differed in their perception of its future role. Most students (93%) believed that digital radiography should be included in the curriculum or offered as an elective course. Dental students want digital radiology to be introduced into the dental radiology curriculum, regardless of whether it is examined or not. The teaching methods and content of such a course need careful consideration.

  14. Diagnostics of coated fuel particles by neutron and synchrotron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, G. V.; Podurets, K. M.; Pogorelyi, D. K.; Somenkov, V. A.; Yakovenko, E. V.

    2011-12-15

    The nondestructive monitoring of coated fuel particles has been performed using contact neutron radiography and refraction radiography based on synchrotron radiation. It is shown that these methods supplement each other and have a high potential for determining the sizes, densities, and isotopic composition of the particle components.

  15. Quality assurance in dental radiography: intra-oral image quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Bolas, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Maurice

    With the introduction of criteria for clinical audit by the Irish Dental Council, and the statutory requirement on dentists to introduce this into their practice, this article will introduce the basic concepts of quality standards in intra-oral radiography and the subsequent application of these standards in an image quality audit cycle. Subjective image quality analysis is not a new concept, but its application can prove beneficial to both patient and dental practitioner. The ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle is fundamental in radiation protection, and therefore the prevention of repeat exposures demonstrates one facet of this that the dental practitioner can employ within daily practice.

  16. General Dental Practitioners’ Concept towards Using Radiography and Apex-Locators in Endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Maryam; Heidaripour, Maryam; Shahravan, Arash; Haghani, Jahangir; Afkham, Arash; Razifar, Mahsa; Mohammadizadeh, Sakineh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Despite being the gold standard as well as a routine technique in endodontics, radiographic working length (WL) determination owns many drawbacks. Electronic apex-locators (EALs) are recommended to complement radiographies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of Iranian general dental practitioners (GDPs) towards using radiography and EAL. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and ninety one GDPs attending the 53th Iranian Dental Association Congress completed a questionnaire focusing on the use of radiography and EALs during the various stages of root canal treatment. The data was analyzed with the chi-square test with the level of significance set at 0.05. The results were then calculated as frequencies and percentages. Results: More than half of the GDPs reported using radiographs as the sole method for WL determination. A total of 30.4% of the practitioners were using the combined approach during root canal therapy of a single-rooted tooth, while 38.9% used this method in multi-rooted teeth. Approximately half of the respondents would not order follow-up radiographies after root canal treatment. Conclusion: Radiography continues to be the most common method for WL determination in Iran. PMID:25386209

  17. Evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital periapical radiography, panoramic radiography, and cone-beam computed tomography in the assessment of alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Vessoni Iwaki, Lilian Cristina; Da Silva, Mariliani Chicarelli; Tonin, Renata Hernandes

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of different radiographic methods in the assessment of proximal alveolar bone loss (ABL). ABL, the distance between cement-enamel junction and alveolar bone crest, was measured in 70 mandibular human teeth - directly on the mandibles (control), using conventional periapical radiography with film holders (Rinn XCP and Han-Shin), digital periapical radiography with complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor, conventional panoramic, and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Three programs were used to measure ABL on the images: Image tool 3.0 (University of Texas Health Sciences Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA), Kodak Imaging 6.1 (Kodak Dental Imaging 6.1, Carestream Health(®), Rochester, NY, USA), and i-CAT vision 1.6.20. Statistical analysis used ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The tomographic images showed the highest means, whereas the lowest were found for periapical with Han-Shin. Controls differed from periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001). CBCT differed from panoramic (P = 0.0130), periapical with Rinn XCP (P = 0.0066), periapical with Han-Shin (P < 0.0001), and digital periapical (P = 0.0027). Conventional periapicals with film holders differed from each other (P = 0.0007). Digital periapical differed from conventional periapical with Han-Shin (P = 0.0004). Conventional periapical with Han-Shin film holder was the only method that differed from the controls. CBCT had the closest means to the controls.

  18. Final-year diagnostic radiography students' perception of role models within the profession.

    PubMed

    Conway, Alinya; Lewis, Sarah; Robinson, John

    2008-01-01

    Within a clinical education setting, the value of role models and prescribed mentors can be seen as an important influence in shaping the student's future as a diagnostic radiographer. A study was undertaken to create a new understanding of how diagnostic radiography students perceive role models and professional behavior in the workforce. The study aimed to determine the impact of clinical education in determining modeling expectations, role model identification and attributes, and the integration of academic education and "hands-on" clinical practice in preparing diagnostic radiography students to enter the workplace. Thirteen final-year (third-year) diagnostic radiography students completed an hour-long interview regarding their experiences and perceptions of role models while on clinical placement. The key concepts that emerged illustrated that students gravitate toward radiographers who enjoy sharing practical experiences with students and are good communicators. Unique to diagnostic radiography, students made distinctions about the presence of role models in private versus public service delivery. This study gives insight to clinical educators in diagnostic radiography and wider allied health into how students perceive role models, interact with preceptors, and combine real-life experiences with formal learning.

  19. High-speed dental radiography achieved with a kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Akihito; Yamamoto, Mariko; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The development of a high-intensity kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator and its application to dental radiography are described. The pulsed x-ray generator consisted of the following major components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage main condenser, a hot-cathode triode, a DC power supply for the filament (hot cathode), and a grid controller. The main condenser of 0.5 {micro}F-100 kV in the pulser was charged from 50 to 70 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the triode by the grid controller. To be exact, the tube voltage decreased during the discharging for generating pulsed x-rays, yet the maximum value was equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser. The maximum values of the tube current and the repetition rate were about 0.5 A and 30 kHz, respectively. The pulse width of the x-rays ranged from approximately 20 to 400 {micro}s, and the x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 70 kV and a total resistance of 5.1 M{Omega} was about 0.83 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. Using this generator, high-speed dental radiography, e.g., delayed radiography and multiple-shot radiography, was performed.

  20. The potential of digital dental radiography in recording the adductor sesamoid and the MP3 stages.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Kader, H M

    1999-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to evaluate the reliability of using a recent advance in clinical radiographic technique, digital dental radiography, in recording two growth indicators: the adductor sesamoid and MP3 stages. With an exposure time five times less than that used in the conventional approach, this method shows greatest flexibility in providing a high quality digitized radiographic images of the two growth indicators under investigation. Refereed Paper

  1. Biological effects of radiation from dental radiography. Council on Dental Materials, Instruments, and Equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Clearly, there is ample evidence of adverse effects of radiation in sufficient doses. There is at present no proof of such effects from doses commonly employed in dental practice; however, it has not been possible to prove the absence of such effects. Most experts now agree that there may be a small, difficult to quantify risk of cancer or genetic mutation from diagnostic exposure in patients and in personnel exposed during work. Prudence dictates acceptance of this position until proof to the contrary is available. This report has presented recent attempts to quantify the risk to patients based on speculative calculations and extrapolations. Indices of population risks indicate that medical radiology is the largest source of human-made genetic and leukemogenic radiation burden to the American public. Dental radiology contributes a small-but not necessarily insignificant-portion. Of major concern is the increasing use of radiation for diagnostic purposes in both medicine and dentistry. Technological advances have reduced exposure per examination; presumably this trend will continue so that total exposure of populations to radiation in the healing arts will not increase. Recent analyses suggest that the cancer risk to a patient from a dental radiographic examination is of the order of one in a million; the genetic risk is substantially less, about one in a billion. The risks appear to be essentially equal for full-mouth intraoral and for panoramic examinations. These estimates are numerically quite small, but the effects are severe. Thus, these risks cannot be ignored. However, we currently accept risks of similar magnitude in our daily lives (Table 9)50,51 In addition, the risk of failure to make an accurate diagnosis may be greater than the risk from exposure to the radiation from a justified and properly conducted radiographic examination.

  2. Diagnostic Imaging of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Neonatal Foals: Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lascola, Kara M; Joslyn, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis and monitoring of lower respiratory disease in neonatal foals. Radiography is most widely available to equine practitioners and is the primary modality that has been used for the characterization of respiratory disease in foals. Computed tomography imaging, although still limited in availability to the general practitioner, offers advantages over radiography and has been used diagnostically in neonatal foals with respiratory disease. Recognition of appropriate imaging protocols and patient-associated artifacts is critical for accurate image interpretation regardless of the modality used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Techniques for measurement of dose width product in panoramic dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Doyle, P; Martin, C J; Robertson, J

    2006-02-01

    Dose width product (DWP) is the quantity recommended for assessment of patient dose for panoramic dental radiography. It is the product of the absorbed dose in air in the X-ray beam integrated over an exposure cycle and the width of the beam, both measured at the receiving slit. A robust method for measuring the DWP is required in order to facilitate optimization of practices and enable comparison of dose levels at different centres. In this study, three techniques for measuring the DWP have been evaluated through comparison of results from 20 orthopantomographic units. These used a small in-beam semiconductor detector and X-ray film, a pencil ionization chamber and an array of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The mean results obtained with the three techniques agreed within +/-6%. The technique employing a pencil ionization chamber of the type used for dose assessment of CT scanners is the simplest and most reliable method. The in-beam detector and film method has larger errors both from positioning the radiation detector and from measurement of X-ray beam width, which should be the full width at half maximum obtained from a scan of the film optical density. The TLD array method was accurate, but more time consuming to carry out. The mean DWP for the units studied was 65 mGy mm and the mean dose-area product was 89 mGy cm2. The DWP for 30% of the units tested exceeded the diagnostic reference dose of 65 mGy mm, recommended by the National Radiological Protection Board.

  4. Diagnostic value of panoramic radiography in predicting inferior alveolar nerve injury after mandibular third molar extraction: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Yin, W; Zhang, R; Li, J; Zheng, Y

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of panoramic radiography on inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury after extraction of the mandibular third molar. Relevant studies up to 1 June 2014 that discussed the association of panoramic radiography signs and post-mandibular third molar extraction IAN injury were systematically retrieved from the databases of PubMed, Embase, Springerlink, Web of Science and Cochrane library. The effect size of pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratios (PLR), negative likelihood ratios (NLR) and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) with their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were statistically analysed with Meta-disc 1.4 software. Nine articles were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were 0.56 (95% CI: 0.50-0.61) and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.84-0.87), respectively. The overall PLR was 3.46 (95% CI: 2.02-5.92) and overall NLR was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.45-0.73). The pooled estimate of DOR was 6.49 (95% CI: 2.92-14.44). The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.7143 ± 0.0604. The meta-analysis indicated that interpretation of panoramic radiography based on darkening of the root had a high specificity in predicting IAN injury after mandibular third molar extraction. However, the ability of this panoramic radiography marker to detect true positive IAN injury was not satisfactory. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Digital radiography in the dental practice: an update.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy; Pawar, Ravikiran

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital imaging in dental practice should be considered. The vast number of advantages of digital imaging include time saving and image manipulation. Dose reduction is a big attraction but in practical terms this might not be fully taken advantage of, as a number of studies suggest. Challenges of images storage, back-up and exchange should be taken into account. Careful planning and integration with practice software should lead to a smooth transition. Remember, computer systems sometimes fail and contingency plans should be in place to avoid disruption to the workflow of the practice.

  6. [The exposure dose of the sella turcica in panoramic dental radiography with an intraoral radiogenic source].

    PubMed

    Pastremoli, A; Cucchi, G; Ciminari, R

    1991-06-01

    Panoramic dental radiography using an intraoral X-ray source exposes critical organs, such as the crystalline and the thyroid, as well as organs of fundamental importance such as the pituitary gland, to X-rays. An experimental study was carried out to assess the exposure dose to the sella turcica during the radiological examination of the upper and lower dental arches using an X-ray source within the oral cavity. The comprehensive exposure dose for the upper and lower dental arches exceeded that found in orthopantomography (110 micro Gy/examination vs 47 micro Gy/examination) with errors which are respectively inferior to 15% and 30%. The authors conclude that the risk of provoking anatomical or functional changes of the pituitary gland is extremely remote using this type of examination.

  7. Panoramic dental radiography image intensification employing minification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Cushman, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    Panoramic dental x-ray machine wherein an x-ray source-camera assembly orbits a seated patient is described. A slot in the camera assembly collimates the x-rays which are continuously generated by the x-ray source, which x-rays are converted to light images of the patient's dental arch structure by only a single intensifying screen which remains stationary. This screen comprises about 1/40 the area of conventional intensifying screens and is made thicker for providing improved detection efficiency. A fiber optic minifying lens reduces the size of the image from the screen while proportionately increasing the light intensity of the image, thus making it possible to provide useable film images at reduced x-ray exposures due to non-linear film exposure versus optical density characteristics. The resultant minified, light-intensified image may now be recorded on 35 mm roll film, for example, as opposed to standard radiographic film of 5'' X 12'' size, or 12.70 cm X 30.48 cm.

  8. The development of a dental diagnostic terminology.

    PubMed

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Ramoni, Rachel L; White, Joel M; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E; Stark, Paul C; Kimmes, Nicole S; Zeller, Gregory G; Willis, George P; Walji, Muhammad F

    2011-01-01

    There is no commonly accepted standardized terminology for oral diagnoses. The purpose of this article is to report the development of a standardized dental diagnostic terminology by a work group of dental faculty members. The work group developed guiding principles for decision making and adhered to principles of terminology development. The members used an iterative process to develop a terminology incorporating concepts represented in the Toronto/University of California, San Francisco/Creighton University and International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9/10 codes and periodontal and endodontic diagnoses. Domain experts were consulted to develop a final list of diagnostic terms. A structure was developed, consisting of thirteen categories, seventy-eight subcategories, and 1,158 diagnostic terms, hierarchically organized and mappable to other terminologies and ontologies. Use of this standardized diagnostic terminology will reinforce the diagnosis-treatment link and will facilitate clinical research, quality assurance, and patient communication. Future work will focus on implementation and approaches to enhance the validity and reliability of diagnostic term utilization.

  9. The Development of a Dental Diagnostic Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Ramoni, Rachel L.; White, Joel M.; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E.; Stark, Paul C.; Kimmes, Nicole S.; Zeller, Gregory G.; Willis, George P.; Walji, Muhammad F.

    2011-01-01

    There is no commonly accepted standardized terminology for oral diagnoses. The purpose of this article is to report the development of a standardized dental diagnostic terminology by a work group of dental faculty members. The work group developed guiding principles for decision making and adhered to principles of terminology development. The members used an iterative process to develop a terminology incorporating concepts represented in the Toronto/University of California, San Francisco/Creighton University and International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9/10 codes and periodontal and endodontic diagnoses. Domain experts were consulted to develop a final list of diagnostic terms. A structure was developed, consisting of thirteen categories, seventy-eight subcategories, and 1,158 diagnostic terms, hierarchically organized and mappable to other terminologies and ontologies. Use of this standardized diagnostic terminology will reinforce the diagnosis-treatment link and will facilitate clinical research, quality assurance, and patient communication. Future work will focus on implementation and approaches to enhance the validity and reliability of diagnostic term utilization. PMID:21205730

  10. [Radiation protection in intra-oral dental radiography].

    PubMed

    Rothe, V W

    1975-01-01

    At the time being, all dental X-ray apparatuses in the German Democratic Republic are inspected step by step on the basis of the regulations in force. An essential objective of these measures consists in ensuring that the X-ray apparatuses used comply with the standards for radiation hygiene. In this regard, the present situation is still unsatisfactory. A considerable reduction of the radiation exposure to the patients and the operating personnel, however, may be achieved easily, using simple means. An example is the restriction of the useful beam, as to which practical advice is given. Furthermore, recommendations are presented for the proper operation and for the determination of the control area required by the radiological protection regulation.

  11. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton Radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R

    2010-04-23

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion is time-resolved imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. Here we report on the source and diagnostic development of hard x-ray radiography and on the first radiographs of direct drive implosions obtained at photon energies up to about 100keV, where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the shell opacity. The radiographs of direct drive, plastic shell implosions obtained at the OMEGA laser facility have a spatial resolution of {approx}10um and a temporal resolution of {approx}10ps. This novel Compton Radiography is an invaluable diagnostic tool for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets, and will be integrated at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  12. Dental diagnostics using optical coherence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nathel, H.; Colston, B.; Armitage, G.

    1994-11-15

    Optical radiation can be used for diagnostic purposes in oral medicine. However, due to the turbid, amorphous, and inhomogeneous nature of dental tissue conventional techniques used to transilluminate materials are not well suited to dental tissues. Optical coherence techniques either in the time- of frequency-domain offer the capabilities of discriminating scattered from unscattered light, thus allowing for imaging through turbid tissue. Currently, using optical time-domain reflectometry we are able to discriminate specular from diffuse reflections occurring at tissue boundaries. We have determined the specular reflectivity of enamel and dentin to be approximately 6.6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.3 x 10{sup -6}, respectively. Implications to periodontal imaging will be discussed.

  13. Chemical intensification of dental radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.

    1983-04-01

    The potential applications of chemical intensification in dental radiography are explored. Three standard photographic intensifiers and three methods designed for radiographic use are evaluated. One of these methods is shown to be capable of reducing radiation dose to one half, without loss of diagnostic quality. Further work is necessary to achieve a system sufficiently practicable to deserve widespread use in routine clinical dental radiography.

  14. Use of radiography in public dental care for children and adolescents in northern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Falk Kieri, Catarina; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2009-01-01

    The primary aims were to investigate the total number of radiographs and the reason for dental radiography in children and adolescents in the Public Dental Health Service. Secondary aims were to study the influence of caries experience and orthodontic treatment on the number of radiographs. For this retrospective study, 544 adolescents regularly attending three Public Dental Health clinics in the county of Västerbotten, northern Sweden were selected. The number of radiographs exposed each year from 3 to 19 years of age was registered. Information on reason for the radiographic examination was extracted from dental records as well as the caries experience at 19 years of age. The attrition rate was 7% due to incomplete data. The total mean number of radiographs exposed was 23+/-6 of which 1+/-2 were extra-oral radiographs. Bitewing radiographs for caries registration constituted 87% of the intra-oral radiographs with a mean number of 19+/-4 exposures. There was a statistically significant difference (p<0.01) between subjects with caries experience (20+/-4) and those with no caries (16+/-4). No gender-related differences were displayed. During preschool ages, bitewing radiographs were taken in less than 10% of the children. Children treated at specialist clinics in orthodontics displayed higher number of radiographic examinations than non-referred children (p<0.01). A mean of 23 radiographs were exposed and bitewings for caries detection were the most common radiographic examination. Fewer bitewing radiographs were exposed in caries-free subjects over time but its use during the preschool ages was low. Orthodontics treatment increased the frequency of radiography significantly.

  15. Evaluation of conventional and digital radiography capacities for distinguishing dental materials on radiograms depending on the present radiopacifying agent.

    PubMed

    Antonijević, Djordje; Ilić, Dragan; Medić, Vesna; Dodić, Slobodan; Obradović-Djuriĉić, Kosovka; Rakoĉević, Zoran

    2014-11-01

    The radiopacity of an endodontic material can considerably vary as measured on film and a digital sensor. Digital radiography offers numerous advantages over conventional film-based radiography in dental clinical practice regarding both diagnostic capabilities and postintervention procedures. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of conventional and charge-conpled device (CCD) based digital radiography to detect material on radiograph depending on the radio-pacifying agent present in the mate- rial. Experimental cements were formulated by mixing Portland cement with the following radiopacifying agents: zinc oxide (ZnO), zirconium oxide (ZrO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium sulphate (BaSO4), iodoform (CHI3), bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) and ytterbium trifluoride (YbF3). In addition, 5 endodontic materials comprising Endometh- asone, Diaket, N2, Roth 801 and Acroseal were investigated to serve as control. Per three specimens of each material were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge on film (Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, NY) and a CCD-based digital sensor (Trophy Radiologie, Cedex, France). Radiopacity values were calculated by converting the radiographic densities of the specimens expressed as a mean optical densities or mean grey scale values into equivalent thickness of aluminum. Two-way ANOVA detected no significant differences with respect to the imaging system (p > 0.05), but the differences were significant with respect to radiopacifier (p < 0.001) and the interaction of the two factors (p < 0.05). Paired t-test revealed significant differences between the methods used for pure Portland cement, all concentrations of BaSO4 and CHI3, 10% and 20% additions of ZrO2 and Bi2O3 and 10% and 30% additions of YbF3 (p < 0.05). The materials which incorporate CHI3 OR BaSO4 as radiopacifying agents are expected to be significantly more radiopaque on a digital sensor than on film. During clinical practice one should concern to the quality of contrast

  16. An investigation into dental digital radiography in dental practices in West Kent following the introduction of the 2006 NHS General Dental Services contract.

    PubMed

    Mauthe, Peter W; Eaton, Kenneth A

    2011-04-01

    The primary aims of the study were to investigate the use of digital radiography within primary dental care practices in the West Kent Primary Care Trust (PCT) area and general dental practitioners' (GDPs) self-reported change in radiographic prescribing patterns following the introduction of the nGDS contract in 2006. Data were gathered via a piloted, self-completed questionnaire, and circulated to all GDPs listed on the National Health Service (NHS) Choices website as practising in the West Kent PCT area. There were three mailings and follow-up telephone calls. The resulting data were entered into a statistical software database and, where relevant, statistically tested, using the chi-square test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Of 223 GDPs, 168 (75%) responded. There were 163 usable questionnaires. The respondents represented 85% of the general dental practices in West Kent. Eighty (49%) respondents were using digital intra-oral radiography. Of those who used digital radiography, 44 (55%) reported that they used phosphor plate systems and 36 (45%) that they used direct digital sensors. Eighty-three (51%) had a panoramic machine in their practice, 46 of whom (55%) were using digital systems; of these, 32 (67%) were using a direct digital system. Seventy-one GDPs reported that they worked exclusively or mainly in private practice. Forty (56%) of these 'mainly private' GDPs reported that they used digital radiographic systems, whereas only 40 (44%) of the 89 'mainly NHS' GDPs reported using digital radio-graphic systems. On average, mainly private GDPs made the transition to a digital radiographic system six months before mainly NHS GDPs. Of those who provided NHS dentistry before and after April 2006, only 18 (14%) reported taking fewer radiographs and seven (6%) taking more. In February 2010, of the West Kent GDPs who responded to the questionnaire, just under 50% used digital radio graphy. Mainly private GDPs were more likely to use digital radiography than

  17. Diagnostic imaging of the equine fetlock region using radiography and ultrasonography. Part 2: the bony disorders.

    PubMed

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2009-08-01

    The metacarpophangeal/metatarsophalangeal (fetlock) joint in the horse is commonly associated with equine lameness and diagnostic imaging is routinely used to investigate disorders of the joint and its surrounding tissues. This review describes the osseous disorders of the fetlock as well as the technical aspects of taking radiographic and ultrasonographic images of the different lesions. In current clinical practice, a combination of radiography and ultrasonography is still the most frequently used approach to arrive at a diagnosis.

  18. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA-950. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. • Tomosynthesis showed significantly better diagnostic performance for pulmonary emphysema than radiography. • Interobserver agreement for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than that for radiography. • Sensitivity increased with increasing LAA -950 in both tomosynthesis and radiography. • Tomosynthesis imparts a similar radiation dose to two projection chest radiography. • Radiation dose and cost of tomosynthesis are lower than those of MDCT.

  19. Survey of radiography and radiation protection in general dental practice in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mutyabule, T K; Whaites, E J

    2002-05-01

    To carry out the first survey in Uganda of all dentists and all public health dental officers (PHDO) to assess the status of dental radiography and radiation protection. All 74 dentists and 76 PHDOs in Uganda were sent a postal questionnaire including 33 questions relating to various demographic details, radiographic equipment and radiographic techniques, including processing and radiation protection. A second questionnaire was sent to non-respondents after 3 months. Eighty-two per cent of dentists responded and 83% of PHDOs. Seventy per cent of the dentists and 100% of the PHDOs were trained in Uganda. Seventy-five per cent of the dentists and 30% of the PHDOs had access to one of the approximately 30 X-ray machines in the country. The majority of the equipment did not comply with current recommendations in Europe. Fifty-one per cent of dentists used machines with mechanical timers, 28% used machines with no visual warning signal and 17% used equipment with no audible warning signal. Most of the equipment was over 30 years old and only 15% of dentists knew when the equipment was last serviced. The most relevant finding of the surveys was the level of 'don't know' responses to many questions from both groups. The lack of knowledge regarding dental radiography and radiation protection plus the condition of most equipment in Uganda is a matter of concern. Standards of care are considerably lower than in developed countries requiring improved undergraduate training, provision of postgraduate courses and Ugandan governmental or international financial assistance.

  20. Diagnostic value of plain abdominal radiography in stroke patients with bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyo Jeong; Noh, Se Eung; Kim, Ji Hee; Joo, Min Cheol

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of plain abdominal radiography in stroke patients with bowel dysfunction. A total of 59 stroke patients were recruited and assigned into constipation or non-constipation group. Patients were interviewed to obtain clinical information, constipation score, and Bristol stool form scale. The total and segmental colon transit time (CTT) was measured using radio-opaque markers (Kolomark). The degree of stool retention was evaluated by plain abdominal radiography and scored by two different methods (Starreveld score and Leech score). The relationship between the clinical aspects, CTT, and stool retention score using plain abdominal radiography was determined. Average constipation score was 4.59±2.16. Average Bristol stool form scale was 3.86±1.13. The total and segmental CTTs showed significant differences between the constipation and non-constipation groups. There was statistically significant (p<0.05) correlation between the total CTT and constipation score or between Starreveld score and Leech score. Each segmental CTT showed significant correlation (p<0.05) between segmental stool retention scores. The stool retention score showed significant correlation with constipation score as well as total and segmental CTT. Thus, plain abdominal radiography is a simple and convenient method for the evaluation of bowel dysfunction in stroke patients.

  1. Integrating photo-stimulable phosphor plates into dental and dental hygiene radiography curricula.

    PubMed

    Tax, Cara L; Robb, Christine L; Brillant, Martha G S; Doucette, Heather J

    2013-11-01

    It is not known whether the integration of photo-stimulable phosphor (PSP) plates into dental and dental hygiene curricula creates unique learning challenges for students. The purpose of this two-year study was to determine if dental hygiene students had more and/or different types of errors when using PSP plates compared to film and whether the PSP imaging plates had any particular characteristics that needed to be addressed in the learning process. Fifty-nine first-year dental hygiene students at one Canadian dental school were randomly assigned to two groups (PSP or film) before exposing their initial full mouth series on a teaching manikin using the parallel technique. The principal investigator determined the number and types of errors based on a specific set of performance criteria. The two groups (PSP vs. film) were compared for total number and type of errors made. Results of the study indicated the difference in the total number of errors made using PSP or film was not statistically significant; however, there was a difference in the types of errors made, with the PSP group having more horizontal errors than the film group. In addition, the study identified a number of unique characteristics of the PSP plates that required special consideration for teaching this technology.

  2. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    de Haan, R.A.; van Aken, J. )

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  3. Effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography.

    PubMed

    de Haan, R A; van Aken, J

    1990-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent to the operator in intra-oral dental radiography has been determined. The exposure from a bitewing radiograph and periapical views of the left maxillary incisors and first molar was measured at nine heights and 16 positions, all 1 m from the patient. The effective dose equivalent was determined using data from ICRP 51 (International Commission on Radiological Protection: Data for Use in Protection Against External Radiation). The values presented are related to an exposure of 1 C kg-1 (3876 R) measured free in air at the tube-end. They thus constitute ratios which are not influenced by the sensitivity of the film or other detector used and form standard tables which permit the calculation of the effective dose equivalent in clinical situations.

  4. The diagnostic accuracy of a laser fluorescence device and digital radiography in detecting approximal caries lesions in posterior permanent teeth: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Menem, R; Barngkgei, I; Beiruti, N; Al Haffar, I; Joury, Easter

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to test the diagnostic accuracy of a pen-type laser fluorescence (LFpen) device in detecting approximal caries lesions, in posterior permanent teeth, at the cavitation and non-cavitation thresholds, and compare it with that of digital bitewing radiography. Thirty patients (aged 18-37), who attended the Faculty of Dentistry at Damascus University for a dental examination, were consecutively screened. Ninety approximal surfaces of posterior permanent teeth without frank cavitations, enamel hypoplasia or restorations were selected and examined using the LFpen (DIAGNOdent pen) and digital bitewing radiography. The reference standard was the visual-tactile inspection, after performing temporary tooth separation, using orthodontic rubber rings, placed for 7 days. The status of included approximal surfaces was recorded as intact/sound, with white/brown spots or cavitated. One trained examiner performed all examinations. There were statistically significant differences in LFpen readings between the three types of approximal surface status (P < 0.001). The optimal cut-off values for detecting approximal caries lesions in posterior permanent teeth were >16 and 8 at the cavitation and non-cavitation thresholds respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (measured by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve) were 100, 85 and 95 and 92, 90 and 95% at the cavitation and non-cavitation thresholds respectively. The intra-class correlation coefficient for intra-examiner reliability was 0.95. The diagnostic accuracy of the LFpen was significantly higher than that of digital bitewing radiography (P < 0.001). The LFpen's diagnostic performance was accurate and significantly better than digital bitewing radiography in detecting approximal caries lesions, in posterior permanent teeth.

  5. Comparison of radiography and scintigraphy in the diagnosis of dental disorders in the horse.

    PubMed

    Weller, R; Livesey, L; Maierl, J; Nuss, K; Bowen, I M; Cauvin, E R; Weaver, M; Schumacher, J; May, S A

    2001-01-01

    Scintigraphy, with 99mTechnetium methylenediphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) and 99mTc-labelled leucocytes, was compared to radiography in the diagnosis of dental disease in the horse in a prospective case-controlled study, comprising 30 horses with clinical signs of dental disease and 30 control horses. In each case, right and left lateral, ventral and dorsal soft tissue and bone phase scintigraphic images were obtained after i.v. injection of 1 GBq/100 kg bwt 99mTc-MDP, using a gamma camera. The same views were acquired in 10 horses with clinical signs of dental disease and 12 control horses after injection of 99mTc-labelled leucocytes. Standard radiographic projections of the paranasal sinuses and of the apices of the maxillary and mandibular teeth were obtained. The scintigraphs and radiographs were assessed subjectively by 2 board-certified surgeons and one board-certified radiologist, with extensive experience of equine radiology, from who the clinical history was withheld. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa, as a measure of agreement, were calculated for the different methods. Bone phase images were also scored subjectively on a scale from 0 to 3 on the basis of isotope uptake over the teeth. Regions of interest were defined over the teeth, and normal teeth compared to diseased counterparts. Total scintigraphic counts were related to the age of the animal and to the disease process. Differences in density ratios between left and right teeth were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney Test. Dental disease was confirmed in 22 horses at surgery or postmortem examination. Horses with dental disease showed a significant increase in scintigraphic activity over the affected tooth compared to the contralateral tooth, with a typical pattern for different diseases. The sensitivity of scintigraphy with 99mTc-MDP proved to be excellent (95.5%), whereas the specificity was moderate (86.4%). In contrast, radiography had excellent specificity (95.0%) and a low sensitivity (51.5%). The

  6. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  7. Curricular Guidelines for Clinical Competency by Dental Auxiliaries in Dental Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Guidelines developed for educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. They are the result of efforts within the American Association of Dental Schools (AADS) by the Section on Oral Radiology. Their use as course development aids is suggested by AADS policy. (MLW)

  8. Quality of digital panoramic radiography in a newly established dental school.

    PubMed

    Kullman, Leif; Joseph, Bobby

    2006-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are known to be difficult to expose without errors. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the degree of success in taking error free digital panoramic radiographs. An experienced Oral and Maxillofacial Radiologist assessed the subjective image quality of 199 panoramic radiographs exposed in a newly established dental school in Kuwait. The number of errors according to an international "quality standard" in a panoramic radiograph was assessed. All radiographs were exposed by a dentist with minimal experience in taking panoramic radiographs. It was found that the number of errors in each radiograph ranged from 1 to 9 and no radiograph was completely free from errors. The average number of errors in the radiographs was 3.7. Hence, these results confirm that panoramic radiography is a difficult radiographic technique, which needs an experienced operator in order to get high quality radiographs. Both theoretical and practical training is recommended for radiology staff, as in Sweden, where dental staff should be properly trained to make exposures.

  9. Diagnostic Ultrasonography of an Ankle Fracture Undetectable by Conventional Radiography: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Clinton J.; Welk, Aaron B.; Enix, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to present diagnostic ultrasonography assessment of an occult fracture in a case of persistent lateral ankle pain. Clinical Features A 35-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with bruising, swelling, and pain along the distal fibula 3 days following an inversion ankle trauma. Prior radiographic examination at an urgent care facility was negative for fracture. Conservative care over the next week noted improvement in objective findings, but the pain persisted. Intervention and Outcome Diagnostic ultrasonography was ordered to assess her persistent ankle pain and showed a minimally displaced fracture of the fibula 4 cm proximal to the lateral malleolus. The patient was referred to her primary care physician and successfully managed with conservative care. Conclusion In this case, diagnostic ultrasonography was able to identify a Danis-Weber subtype B1 fracture that was missed by plain film radiography. PMID:27069430

  10. A Prospective Study of Medical Diagnostic Radiography and Risk of Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neta, Gila; Rajaraman, Preetha; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Doody, Michele M.; Alexander, Bruce H.; Preston, Dale; Simon, Steven L.; Melo, Dunstana; Miller, Jeremy; Freedman, D. Michal; Linet, Martha S.; Sigurdson, Alice J.

    2013-01-01

    Although diagnostic x-ray procedures provide important medical benefits, cancer risks associated with their exposure are also possible, but not well characterized. The US Radiologic Technologists Study (1983–2006) is a nationwide, prospective cohort study with extensive questionnaire data on history of personal diagnostic imaging procedures collected prior to cancer diagnosis. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate thyroid cancer risks related to the number and type of selected procedures. We assessed potential modifying effects of age and calendar year of the first x-ray procedure in each category of procedures. Incident thyroid cancers (n = 251) were diagnosed among 75,494 technologists (1.3 million person-years; mean follow-up = 17 years). Overall, there was no clear evidence of thyroid cancer risk associated with diagnostic x-rays except for dental x-rays. We observed a 13% increase in thyroid cancer risk for every 10 reported dental radiographs (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.26), which was driven by dental x-rays first received before 1970, but we found no evidence that the relationship between dental x-rays and thyroid cancer was associated with childhood or adolescent exposures as would have been anticipated. The lack of association of thyroid cancer with x-ray procedures that expose the thyroid to higher radiation doses than do dental x-rays underscores the need to conduct a detailed radiation exposure assessment to enable quantitative evaluation of risk. PMID:23529772

  11. A prospective study of medical diagnostic radiography and risk of thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Neta, Gila; Rajaraman, Preetha; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Doody, Michele M; Alexander, Bruce H; Preston, Dale; Simon, Steven L; Melo, Dunstana; Miller, Jeremy; Freedman, D Michal; Linet, Martha S; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2013-04-15

    Although diagnostic x-ray procedures provide important medical benefits, cancer risks associated with their exposure are also possible, but not well characterized. The US Radiologic Technologists Study (1983-2006) is a nationwide, prospective cohort study with extensive questionnaire data on history of personal diagnostic imaging procedures collected prior to cancer diagnosis. We used Cox proportional hazard regressions to estimate thyroid cancer risks related to the number and type of selected procedures. We assessed potential modifying effects of age and calendar year of the first x-ray procedure in each category of procedures. Incident thyroid cancers (n = 251) were diagnosed among 75,494 technologists (1.3 million person-years; mean follow-up = 17 years). Overall, there was no clear evidence of thyroid cancer risk associated with diagnostic x-rays except for dental x-rays. We observed a 13% increase in thyroid cancer risk for every 10 reported dental radiographs (hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% confidence interval: 1.01, 1.26), which was driven by dental x-rays first received before 1970, but we found no evidence that the relationship between dental x-rays and thyroid cancer was associated with childhood or adolescent exposures as would have been anticipated. The lack of association of thyroid cancer with x-ray procedures that expose the thyroid to higher radiation doses than do dental x-rays underscores the need to conduct a detailed radiation exposure assessment to enable quantitative evaluation of risk.

  12. Diagnostic imaging of the equine fetlock region using radiography and ultrasonography. Part 1: Soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Vanderperren, Katrien; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2009-08-01

    The equine fetlock is the joint most commonly associated with lameness. Although the fetlock is regarded as a simple joint, diagnosis of a fetlock disorder can be a challenge and various imaging modalities are routinely used to arrive at an accurate diagnosis. This review describes the principal disorders affecting the soft tissues of the fetlock region and addresses some of the technical aspects involved in taking radiographic and ultrasonographic images of the different soft tissue lesions. A combination of radiography and ultrasonography is still the most commonly used diagnostic approach in clinical practice.

  13. Diagnostic sensitivity of ultrasound, radiography and computed tomography for gender determination in four species of lizards.

    PubMed

    Di Ianni, Francesco; Volta, Antonella; Pelizzone, Igor; Manfredi, Sabrina; Gnudi, Giacomo; Parmigiani, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gender determination is frequently requested by reptile breeders, especially for species with poor or absent sexual dimorphism. The aims of the current study were to describe techniques and diagnostic sensitivities of ultrasound, radiography, and computed tomography for gender determination (identification of hemipenes) in four species of lizards. Nineteen lizards of known sex, belonging to four different species (Pogona vitticeps, Uromastyx aegyptia, Tiliqua scincoides, Gerrhosaurus major) were prospectively enrolled. With informed owner consent, ultrasound, noncontrast CT, contrast radiography, and contrast CT (with contrast medium administered into the cloaca) were performed in conscious animals. Imaging studies were reviewed by three different operators, each unaware of the gender of the animals and of the results of the other techniques. The lizard was classified as a male when hemipenes were identified. Nineteen lizards were included in the study, 10 females and nine males. The hemipenes were seen on ultrasound in only two male lizards, and appeared as oval hypoechoic structures. Radiographically, hemipenes filled with contrast medium appeared as spindle-shaped opacities. Noncontrast CT identified hemipenes in only two lizards, and these appeared as spindle-shaped kinked structures with hyperattenuating content consistent with smegma. Hemipenes were correctly identified in all nine males using contrast CT (accuracy of 100%). Accuracy of contrast radiography was excellent (94.7%). Accuracy of ultrasound and of noncontrast CT was poor (64.3% and 63.1%, respectively). Findings from the current study supported the use of contrast CT or contrast radiography for gender determination in lizards. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  14. Comparative evaluation of the sensitometric properties of screen-film systems and conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Staninec, M.; Chou, L.

    1989-12-01

    This investigation determined the sensitometric properties of 27 rare-earth screen-film combinations and compared them to E- and D-speed films and xeroradiography, the current standards for intraoral radiography. A series of exposures from base plus fog to film saturation were made to determine the Hurter and Driffield curve of each image receptor. The base plus fog, film saturation, speed, gamma, average gradient, and resolution were determined. When dental receptors and screen-film systems are compared on the basis of radiographic quality (contrast and resolution), many screen-film systems have similar resolution (greater than 10 line pairs/mm), significantly greater contrast (greater than 2.0), and a substantial speed advantage (greater than 10). Thus selected screen-film systems may be an alternative to conventional dental receptors for intraoral radiography.

  15. Dental radiography: efficacy in the assessment of intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws in asymptomatic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L.

    1987-03-01

    In this investigation the efficacy of dental radiography for the detection of occult intraosseous lesions of the face and jaws was evaluated. An analysis of 30 million health insurance records indicated that the period prevalence of malignant lesions was less than 5 cases/million/year, and for benign lesions approximately 100 cases/million/year. Data from a controlled observer-performance study showed that radiographic sensitivities ranged between 50% and 80%. The cost per true-positive finding was estimated to be +8.6 million per malignant case and +430,000 per benign case. An assessment of the dosimetric literature indicated that the benefits of radiographic screening as a means for early detection of a malignancy appear to be counterbalanced by the risk of causing a radiation-induced malignancy. Taken together, these data demonstrate that dental radiography is not efficacious for the purpose of detecting occult lesions.

  16. Removing Distortion of Periapical Radiographs in Dental Digital Radiography Using Embedded Markers in an External frame

    PubMed Central

    Kafieh, Rahele; Shahamoradi, Mahdi; Hekmatian, Ehsan; Foroohandeh, Mehrdad; Emamidoost, Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    To carry out in vivo and in vitro comparative pilot study to evaluate the preciseness of a newly proposed digital dental radiography setup. This setup was based on markers placed on an external frame to eliminate the measurement errors due to incorrect geometry in relative positioning of cone, teeth and the sensor. Five patients with previous panoramic images were selected to undergo the proposed periapical digital imaging for in vivo phase. For in vitro phase, 40 extracted teeth were replanted in dry mandibular sockets and periapical digital images were prepared. The standard reference for real scales of the teeth were obtained through extracted teeth measurements for in vitro application and were calculated through panoramic imaging for in vivo phases. The proposed image processing thechnique was applied on periapical digital images to distinguish the incorrect geometry. The recognized error was inversely applied on the image and the modified images were compared to the correct values. The measurement findings after the distortion removal were compared to our gold standards (results of panoramic imaging or measurements from extracted teeth) and showed the accuracy of 96.45% through in vivo examinations and 96.0% through in vitro tests. The proposed distortion removal method is perfectly able to identify the possible inaccurate geometry during image acquisition and is capable of applying the inverse transform to the distorted radiograph to obtain the correctly modified image. This can be really helpful in applications like root canal therapy, implant surgical procedures and digital subtraction radiography, which are essentially dependent on precise measurements. PMID:23724372

  17. Comparison of the diagnostic value of ultrasonography and standing radiography for pelvic-femoral disorders in horses.

    PubMed

    Geburek, Florian; Rötting, Anna K; Stadler, Peter M

    2009-04-01

    To assess agreement between ultrasonography (transcutaneous and transrectal) and standing radiography in horses with fractures in the pelvic region and disorders of the coxofemoral joint. Case series. Warmblood horses (n=23) and 2 ponies. Medical records (1999-2008) of equids with pelvic or coxofemoral disorders that had pelvic radiography and ultrasonography were retrieved and results of both techniques compared. Radiography and ultrasonography each identified equal numbers of fractures of the tuber coxa (n=4), ilial shaft (2), ischium (3), femoral neck (2), and osteoarthritis/osis of the coxofemoral joint (6). Fractures of the ilial wing (4) were only identified by ultrasonography not by standing radiography. Of 9 acetabular fractures, 3 were identified on radiographs only, 5 were identified with both modalities. One pubic fracture was identified using ultrasonography and radiography. One acetabular and 1 pubic fracture were only diagnosed on necropsy. We found reasonable agreement (73%; 24/33) between ultrasonography and standing radiography for diagnosis of pelvic-femoral disorders. Ultrasonography was more useful for ilial wing fractures and radiography for acetabular fractures. Ultrasonography is a rapid, safe imaging technique for detecting disorders of the pelvic region with a high diagnostic yield and is a preferred initial approach in horses with severe hindlimb lameness.

  18. Dental radiology for children

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The benefit for the child from the judicious use of diagnostic dental radiography is improved dental health. The risk to the child from dental diagnostic radiation exposure appears to be extremely low. Despite the low risk, the dentist must minimize the child's exposure to ionizing radiation by using sound clinical judgment to determine what radiographs are necessary and to provide children with optimal protection from ionizing radiation.

  19. Attitudes and beliefs toward the use of a dental diagnostic terminology A survey of dental providers in a dental practice

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Rachel B.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Kim, Soyun; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; McClellan, Lyle; Simmons, Kristen; Skourtes, Eugene; Yansane, Alfa; White, Joel M.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Attitudes and views are critical to the adoption of innovation. While there have been broadening calls for a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, little is known about the views of private practice dental team members towards the adoption of such a terminology. Methods A survey was developed using validated questions identified through literature review. Domain experts’ input allowed for further modifications. The final survey was administered electronically to 814 team members at a multi-office practice based in the Pacific Northwest. Results Response proportion was 92%. The survey had excellent reliability (Cronbach alpha coefficient = 0.87). Results suggested that participants showed, in general, positive attitudes and beliefs towards using a standardized diagnostic terminology in their practices. Additional written comments by participants highlighted the potential for improved communication with use of the terminology. Conclusions Dental providers and staff in one multi-office practice showed positive attitudes towards the use of a diagnostic terminology, specifically they believed it would improve communication between the dentist and patient as well as among providers, while expressing some concerns if using standardized dental diagnostic terms helps clinicians to deliver better dental care. Practical Implications As the dental profession is advancing towards the use of standardized diagnostic terminologies, successful implementation will require that dental team leaders prepare their dental teams by gauging their attitude toward the use of such a terminology. PMID:26025826

  20. Dosimetric study of the effective doses resulting during dental X-ray and panoramic radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Abd-El Hafez, A. I.; Ahmad, Fawzia

    2011-01-01

    The panoramic image is one of the most commonly used radiographic examinations in dentistry, owing to its low dose and large area for evaluation, including bone and teeth in the same image. Although digital images are usually reported to deliver a lower radiation dose to the patient, conventional images are still available, especially in countries where digital systems are not widely economically available. Dentists should weigh the benefits of dental radiographs against the consequences of increasing a patient's exposure to radiation, the effects of which accumulate from multiple sources over time. The "as low as reasonably achievable" principle should be followed to minimize the exposure to radiation. The purpose of this investigation is to measure the absorbed radiation doses at 12 anatomical sites of a Rando-phantom and calculate the effective doses result from a full-mouth survey and panoramic radiography. Organ-absorbed doses are measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD 100) and effective organ doses (μ Sv) are estimated according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection in 2007. The total effective dose results from the panoramic imaging system have so far been below those obtained using the full-mouth survey technique used in intra-oral radiographic examination.

  1. Diagnostic sensitivity and interobserver agreement of radiography and ultrasonography for detecting trochlear ridge osteochondrosis lesions in the equine stifle.

    PubMed

    Beccati, Francesca; Chalmers, Heather J; Dante, Sara; Lotto, Eleonora; Pepe, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Osteochondrosis lesions commonly occur on the femoral trochlear ridges in horses and radiography and ultrasonography are routinely used to diagnose these lesions. However, poor correlation has been found between radiographic and arthroscopic findings of affected trochlear ridges. Interobserver agreement for ultrasonographic diagnoses and correlation between ultrasonographic and arthroscopic findings have not been previously described. Objectives of this study were to describe diagnostic sensitivity and interobserver agreement of radiography and ultrasonography for detecting and grading osteochondrosis lesions of the equine trochlear ridges, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Twenty-two horses were sampled. Two observers independently recorded radiographic and ultrasonographic findings without knowledge of arthroscopic findings. Imaging findings were compared between observers and with arthroscopic findings. Agreement between observers was moderate to excellent (κ 0.48-0.86) for detecting lesions using radiography and good to excellent (κ 0.74-0.87) for grading lesions using radiography. Agreement between observers was good to excellent (κ 0.78-0.94) for detecting lesions using ultrasonography and very good to excellent (κ 0.86-0.93) for grading lesions using ultrasonography. Diagnostic sensitivity was 84-88% for radiography and 100% for ultrasonography. Diagnostic specificity was 89-100% for radiography and 60-82% for ultrasonography. Agreement between radiography and arthroscopy was good (κ 0.64-0.78). Agreement between ultrasonography and arthroscopy was very good to excellent (κ 0.81-0.87). Findings from this study support ultrasound as a preferred method for predicting presence and severity of osteochondrosis lesions involving the femoral trochlear ridges in horses. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  2. Diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio Giulio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2016-08-01

    To assess the actual diagnostic impact of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography (CXR). A total of 237 patients (135 male, 102 female; age, 70.8 ± 10.4 years) with a known primary malignancy and suspected pulmonary lesion(s) on CXR and who underwent DTS were retrospectively identified. Two radiologists (experience, 10 and 15 years) analysed in consensus CXR and DTS images and proposed a diagnosis according to a confidence score: 1 or 2 = definitely or probably benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion, or pseudolesion; 3 = indeterminate; 4 or 5 = probably or definitely pulmonary lesion. DTS findings were proven by CT (n = 114 patients), CXR during follow-up (n = 105) or histology (n = 18). Final diagnoses included 77 pulmonary opacities, 26 pulmonary scars, 12 pleural lesions and 122 pulmonary pseudolesions. DTS vs CXR presented a higher (P < 0.05) sensitivity (92 vs 15 %), specificity (91 vs 9 %), overall accuracy (92 vs 12 %), and diagnostic confidence (area under ROC, 0.997 vs 0.619). Mean effective dose of CXR vs DTS was 0.06 vs 0.107 mSv (P < 0.05). DTS improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in comparison to CXR alone in oncologic patients with suspected pulmonary lesions on CXR with only a slight, though significant, increase in radiation dose. • Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) improves accuracy of chest radiography (CXR) in oncologic patients. • DTS improves confidence of CXR in oncologic patients. • DTS allowed avoidance of CT in about 50 % of oncologic patients.

  3. The use of intrathecal analgesia and contrast radiography as preoperative diagnostic methods for digital flexor tendon sheath pathology.

    PubMed

    Fiske-Jackson, A R; Barker, W H J; Eliashar, E; Foy, K; Smith, R K W

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of manica flexoria (MF) tears within the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) is lower than for diagnosis of marginal tears of the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). Additional diagnostic tools would assist in appropriate decision making for either conservative or surgical management. To evaluate the improvement in lameness of horses with MF or DDFT tears following intrathecal analgesia and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of contrast radiography for the diagnosis of these tears. The case records of horses presented to a referral clinic over a 7-year period that underwent intrathecal diagnostic analgesia, or intrathecal analgesia and contrast radiography, of the DFTS with subsequent tenoscopy were examined. Fifty-three limbs had intrathecal diagnostic analgesia performed and 23 contrast tenograms were assessed in horses undergoing DFTS tenoscopy. Horses with DDFT tears were significantly more likely to respond positively to intrathecal diagnostic analgesia than those with MF tears (P = 0.02). Using contrast radiography, tears of the MF were predicted with an overall sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 80%; marginal tears of the DDFT were predicted with an overall sensitivity of 57% and specificity of 84%. The results of intrathecal analgesia of the DFTS in combination with contrast radiography have a high sensitivity for predicting MF tears. The sensitivity of contrast radiography for predicting tears of the DDFT is lower but the specificity remains high. Contrast radiography performed at the same time as intrathecal analgesia provides useful information regarding the presence of MF tears and DDFT tears, which can assist in the decision of whether to manage the lameness conservatively or with tenoscopic evaluation. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  4. Accuracy and head positioning effects on measurements of anterior tooth length using 3-dimensional and conventional dental panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kitai, Noriyuki; Murabayashi, Manabu; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Tome, Wakako; Katsumata, Akitoshi

    2017-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the accuracy and the head positioning effects on measurements of anterior tooth length using 3-dimensional (3D) and conventional dental panoramic radiography and to investigate whether 3D panoramic radiography is suitable for the evaluation of anterior tooth length. A simulated human head was radiographed at 4, 8, and 12 mm displaced positions, and at 5°, 10°, and 15° tilted positions from the standard head position using 3D and conventional panoramic radiography, and also using cone-beam computed tomography. Anterior tooth lengths were measured on the panoramic and cone-beam computed tomography images. The values for the standard head position in the panoramic radiographs were defined as the standard values. Measurement error was defined as the standard value minus the cone-beam computed tomography value on each panoramic radiograph. The head position ratio of the measurement value to the standard value at each head position was calculated. Measurement errors for the 3D panoramic radiographs were significantly smaller than those for the conventional panoramic radiographs. In the 3D panoramic radiographs, the head position ratios at the 4, 8, and 12 mm displaced positions and at the 5° tilted position were within ±5% of the standard value. Three-dimensional panoramic radiography is suitable for the quantitative evaluation of anterior tooth length with high accuracy. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrating Research-Informed Teaching within an Undergraduate Level 4 (Year 1) Diagnostic Radiography Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the piloting and evaluation of the Research-informed Teaching experience (RiTe) project. The aim of RiTe was to link teaching and learning with research within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum. A preliminary pilot study of RiTe was undertaken with a group of level 4 (year 1) volunteer BSc (Hons) diagnostic…

  6. Integrating Research-Informed Teaching within an Undergraduate Level 4 (Year 1) Diagnostic Radiography Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Robert; Hogg, Peter; Robinson, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the piloting and evaluation of the Research-informed Teaching experience (RiTe) project. The aim of RiTe was to link teaching and learning with research within an undergraduate diagnostic radiography curriculum. A preliminary pilot study of RiTe was undertaken with a group of level 4 (year 1) volunteer BSc (Hons) diagnostic…

  7. Radiographers' perceptions of their professional rights in diagnostic radiography: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, Kati; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kangasniemi, Mari

    2017-03-01

    Considering the ethics of each profession is important as inter-professional collaboration increases. Professional ethics creates a basis for radiographers' work, as it includes values and principles, together with rights and duties that guide and support professionals. However, little is known about radiographers' rights when it comes to professional ethics. The aim of this study was to describe radiographers' perceptions and experiences of their professional rights. The ultimate aim was to increase the understanding of professional ethics in this context and support radiographers' ethical pondering in diagnostic radiography. A qualitative method was used. Semistructured group interviews with 15 radiographers were conducted in spring 2013 at two publicly provided diagnostic imaging departments in Finland. Data were analysed by inductive content analysis. All the participants were women, and they had worked as radiographers for an average of 18 years. Based on our analysis, radiographers' professional rights consisted of rights related to their expertise in radiography and the rights related to working conditions that ensured their wellbeing. Expertise-based rights included rights to plan, conduct and assess radiological care with patient advocacy. Radiographers have the right to contribute to a culture of safe radiation in their organisation and to use their professional knowledge to achieve their main target, which is the safe imaging of patients. Radiographers also have right to work in conditions that support their well-being, including the legal rights stated in their employment contract, as well as their rights concerning resources at work. Radiographers' professional rights are an elementary and multidimensional part of their clinical practice. In future, more theoretical and empirical research is needed to deepen the understanding of their rights in the clinical practice and support radiographers on issues related to this aspect of their work. © 2016

  8. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy for the Low-Type Imperforate Anus Between Prone Cross-Table Radiography and Sonography.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Hosokawa, Mayumi; Tanami, Yutaka; Hattori, Shinya; Sato, Yumiko; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eiji; Yamada, Yoshitake

    2017-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy for the low-type imperforate anus between prone cross-table radiography and sonography. We included 20 neonates with imperforate anus: 13 with a surgically proven low type and 7 with an intermediate or high type. The distance between the distal rectal pouch and the perineum (pouch-perineum distance) was measured by both sonography and prone cross-table radiography. A previously established pouch-perineum distance of 10 mm was used as the cutoff for diagnosis of a low-type imperforate anus. The fistula location was also determined with sonography. We then compared the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods for a low-type imperforate anus using the cutoff value of the pouch-perineum distance alone and both the cutoff value of the pouch-perineum distance and fistula location. The McNemar test was used for statistical analysis. With the use of only the pouch-perineum distance, the diagnostic accuracy for the low-type imperforate anus based on sonographic measurements was comparable with the accuracy achieved by prone cross-table radiographic measurements (60.0% [12 of 20] versus 45.0% [9 of 20]; P = .625). With the use of the pouch-perineum distance and fistula location, the diagnostic accuracy of sonography was significantly better than the accuracy of prone cross-table radiography (90.0% [18 of 20] versus 45% [9 of 20]; P = .012). The diagnostic accuracy of sonography for the low-type imperforate anus based on both the pouch-perineum distance and fistula location is better than that of prone cross-table radiography. If the pouch-perineum distance on prone cross-table radiography is greater than 10 mm, a sonographic examination to determine the fistula location could be recommended. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  10. Diagnostic imaging for dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy.

  11. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  12. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W.; Arokoski, Jari P.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T.; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level. PMID:26926836

  13. Comparison of Diagnostic Performance of Semi-Quantitative Knee Ultrasound and Knee Radiography with MRI: Oulu Knee Osteoarthritis Study.

    PubMed

    Podlipská, Jana; Guermazi, Ali; Lehenkari, Petri; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Roemer, Frank W; Arokoski, Jari P; Kaukinen, Päivi; Liukkonen, Esa; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Nieminen, Miika T; Tervonen, Osmo; Koski, Juhani M; Saarakkala, Simo

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative musculoskeletal disease highly prevalent in aging societies worldwide. Traditionally, knee OA is diagnosed using conventional radiography. However, structural changes of articular cartilage or menisci cannot be directly evaluated using this method. On the other hand, ultrasound is a promising tool able to provide direct information on soft tissue degeneration. The aim of our study was to systematically determine the site-specific diagnostic performance of semi-quantitative ultrasound grading of knee femoral articular cartilage, osteophytes and meniscal extrusion, and of radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing and osteophytes, using MRI as a reference standard. Eighty asymptomatic and 79 symptomatic subjects with mean age of 57.7 years were included in the study. Ultrasound performed best in the assessment of femoral medial and lateral osteophytes, and medial meniscal extrusion. In comparison to radiography, ultrasound performed better or at least equally well in identification of tibio-femoral osteophytes, medial meniscal extrusion and medial femoral cartilage morphological degeneration. Ultrasound provides relevant additional diagnostic information on tissue-specific morphological changes not depicted by conventional radiography. Consequently, the use of ultrasound as a complementary imaging tool along with radiography may enable more accurate and cost-effective diagnostics of knee osteoarthritis at the primary healthcare level.

  14. Adherence to NICE guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP(UK) Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kristian J M; Drage, Nicholas A

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated adherence of GDPs to National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP (UK)'s Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. It also explored any factors that might influence GDPs' compliance with the guidelines. A previously piloted questionnaire was circulated to all GDPs within the district of the Cardiff and Vale University Health Board (UHB). The questionnaire sought demographic data as well as answers to questions relating to compliance with guidelines. Of 215 questionnaires, 133 (61.9%) were returned. One hundred a nd thirty (97.7%) respondents were familiar with NICE recall guidelines and 112 (84.2%) were familiar with the FGDP(UK) publication Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. Thirty six (27.7%) 'always' followed the NICE recall guidelines and, overall, 108 (81.8%) 'always or mostly' followed the guidance. Fifty one (38.6%) respondents 'always' carried out a caries risk assessment for adult patients and 57 (43.5%) 'always' carried out a caries risk assessment for child patients. Seventy nine (59.8%) reported that they 'always or mostly' recorded the patient's disease risk category in the notes. Fifty two (39.7%) respondents 'always' took bitewing radiographs that corresponded to disease risk. Overall, however, 119 GDPs (90.8%) 'always or mostly' took bitewing radiographs at appropriate intervals according to disease risk. Bitewing radiographs for new adult patients were prescribed more often for new child patients. The dentist's length of experience, NHS commitment, country of graduation, access to digital radiography or panoramic machines, receipt of any postgraduate qualifications or involvement in dental foundation training were proven not to have any statistically significant association with adherence to NICE or FGDP(UK) guidelines. Most dentists are familiar with NICE guidelines on recall intervals and the FGDP(UK)'s Selection Criteria for Dental Radiography. The number

  15. Diagnostic sensitivity of radiography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging for detecting shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans in dogs.

    PubMed

    Wall, Corey R; Cook, Cristi R; Cook, James L

    2015-01-01

    Radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonography are commonly used for diagnosis of shoulder osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans (OC/OCD) in dogs, however there is a lack of published information on the relative diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of these modalities for detecting shoulder OC/OCD in a group of dogs, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Inclusion criteria were history and clinical findings consistent with osteochondrosis and/or osteochondritis dissecans involving at least one shoulder. With informed client consent, both shoulders for all included dogs were examined using standardized radiography, ultrasonography, MRI, and arthroscopy protocols. One of three veterinary surgeons recorded clinical and arthroscopic findings without knowledge of diagnostic imaging findings. One of two veterinary radiologists recorded diagnostic imaging findings without knowledge of clinical and arthroscopic findings. Eighteen client-owned dogs (n = 36 shoulders) met inclusion criteria. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy (correct classification rate) values for detecting presence or absence of shoulder osteochondrosis/osteochondritis dissecans were as follows: radiography (88.5%, 90%, 88.9%), ultrasonography (92%, 60%, 82.6%), and MRI (96%, 88.9%, 94.4%). Odds of a correct diagnosis for MRI were 3.2 times more than ultrasonography and two times more than radiography. For MRI detection of lesions, the sagittal T2 or PD-FAT SAT sequences were considered to be most helpful. For radiographic detection of lesions, the additional supinated-mediolateral and pronated-mediolateral projections were considered to be most helpful. Findings from the current study support more evidence-based diagnostic imaging recommendations for dogs with clinically suspected shoulder osteochondrosis or osteochondritis dissecans. © 2014 American College of

  16. Free focus radiography with miniaturized dental x-ray machines: a comparison of ''midline'' and ''lateral'' techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The use of free focus radiography (FFR) employing miniaturized dental x-ray machines with radiation probes has never been generally accepted in dentistry despite its recognized radiographic potential. The present investigation studied ways to improve imaging and lower radiation burdens in dental free focus radiography. Relatively high air exposures ranging from 42,050 mR per film for high-resolution images to 3,214 mR per film for lower-resolution images using a current midline radiographic technique for panoramic FFR were found. In a proposed lateral FFR panoramic technique, reduced exposures ranged from 420 mR per film for high-resolution images to 14 mR per film for lower-resolution images. In each technique the lower exposure was obtained with a rare earth imaging system. A proposed modification of the current midline FFR technique using a rare earth imaging system and heavy added copper filtration was found to produce exposures in the range normally used in dentistry (207 mr), and the resultant image was high in contrast with relatively low detail. A comparison of essential characteristics of midline and lateral FFR techniques failed to identify specific advantages for the midline technique in current use. Lateral exposure modes in dental FFR should receive increased attention in the interest of good imaging and radiation control. It was noted that existing miniaturized dental x-ray machines may have been designed specifically for use of the midline FFR exposure technique, and modification of this equipment to support reliable lateral exposure modes was recommended.

  17. Forensic age diagnostics using projection radiography of the clavicle: a prospective multi-center validation study.

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Ottow, Christian; Schulz, Ronald; Püschel, Klaus; Bajanowski, Thomas; Ramsthaler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Vieth, Volker; Schmidt, Sven; Schmeling, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The radiological investigation of the ossification stage of the medial clavicular epiphysis represents the crucial tool for assessing whether a living individual has completed the age of 18 years. However, exposure to radiation cannot always be accepted due to legal reasons and radiation-free methods still lack reference data or are not available. Therefore, this study examines the role of pre-existing radiographic material of the clavicles, making it necessary to prospectively validate the established five-stage classification system for evaluating the clavicular ossification process as well as to enlarge the so far very limited pool of available reference data. Accordingly, standard posterior-anterior projection radiographs of 836 sternoclavicular joints prospectively obtained during 418 forensic autopsies (age range 15-30 years) were analyzed. Stage III was first found at ages 16 and 15 (males/females), stage IV at ages 22 and 21 (males/females), and stage V at age 26 in both sexes. The presented results principally corroborate the previous reference data from 2004, suggesting reliability of the five-stage classification system. In conclusion, chest radiographs may still be useful for forensic age diagnostics in living individuals but only in certain cases. In age estimations which can be planned in advance, projection radiography of the clavicle must still be considered obsolete.

  18. X-ray vector radiography for bone micro-architecture diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jürgen; Roschger, Paul; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-06-07

    The understanding of large biophysical systems at the systems level often depends on a precise knowledge of their microstructure. This is difficult to obtain, especially in vivo, because most imaging methods are either limited in terms of achievable field of view, or make use of penetrating ionizing radiations such as x-rays, in which case the resolution is severely limited by the deposited dose. Here, we describe a new method, x-ray vector radiography (XVR), which yields various types of information about the local orientation, anisotropy and average size of the sample microstructures. We demonstrate the feasibility by showing first experimental XVRs of human vertebra bone samples, giving information on the trabecular structures even with a pixel resolution of half a millimetre, much larger than the structures themselves. This last point is critical for the development of low-dose measurement methods which will allow for in vivo studies and potentially in the future for new medical diagnostics methods of bone metabolic disorder diseases such as osteoporosis.

  19. X-ray vector radiography for bone micro-architecture diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Jensen, Torben H.; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jürgen; Roschger, Paul; Kerschnitzki, Michael; Wagermaier, Wolfgang; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-06-01

    The understanding of large biophysical systems at the systems level often depends on a precise knowledge of their microstructure. This is difficult to obtain, especially in vivo, because most imaging methods are either limited in terms of achievable field of view, or make use of penetrating ionizing radiations such as x-rays, in which case the resolution is severely limited by the deposited dose. Here, we describe a new method, x-ray vector radiography (XVR), which yields various types of information about the local orientation, anisotropy and average size of the sample microstructures. We demonstrate the feasibility by showing first experimental XVRs of human vertebra bone samples, giving information on the trabecular structures even with a pixel resolution of half a millimetre, much larger than the structures themselves. This last point is critical for the development of low-dose measurement methods which will allow for in vivo studies and potentially in the future for new medical diagnostics methods of bone metabolic disorder diseases such as osteoporosis.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy and added value of dual-energy subtraction radiography compared to standard conventional radiography using computed tomography as standard of reference

    PubMed Central

    Martini, Katharina; Baessler, Marco; Baumueller, Stephan; Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively evaluate diagnostic performance of dual-energy subtraction radiography (DESR) for interpretation of chest radiographs compared to conventional radiography (CR) using computed tomography (CT) as standard of reference. Material and methods A total of 199 patients (75 female, median age 67) were included in this institutional review board (IRB)-approved clinical trial. All patients were scanned in posteroanterior and lateral direction with dual-shot DE-technique. Chest CT was performed within ±72 hours. The system provides three types of images: bone weighted-image, soft tissue weighted-image, herein termed as DESR-images, and a standard image, termed CR-image (marked as CR-image). Images were evaluated by two radiologists for presence of inserted life support lines, pneumothorax, pleural effusion, infectious consolidation, interstitial lung changes, tumor, skeletal alterations, soft tissue alterations, aortic or tracheal calcification and pleural thickening. Inter-observer agreement between readers and diagnostic performance were calculated. McNemar’s test was used to test for significant differences. Results Mean inter-observer agreement throughout the investigated parameters was higher in DESR images compared to CR-images (kDESR = 0.935 vs. kCR = 0.858). DESR images provided significantly increased sensitivity compared to CR-images for the detection of infectious consolidations (42% vs. 62%), tumor (46% vs. 57%), interstitial lung changes (69% vs. 87%) and aortic or tracheal calcification (25 vs. 73%) (p<0.05). There were no significant differences in sensitivity for the detection of inserted life support lines, pneumothorax, pleural effusion, skeletal alterations, soft tissue alterations or pleural thickening (p>0.05). Conclusion DESR increases significantly the sensibility without affecting the specificity evaluating chest radiographs, with emphasis on the detection of interstitial lung diseases. PMID:28301584

  1. Comparison of Diagnostic Accuracy of Radiation Dose-Equivalent Radiography, Multidetector Computed Tomography and Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Fractures of Adult Cadaveric Wrists

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Reidelbach, Carolin; Krauß, Tobias; Lampert, Florian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Fiebich, Martin; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy of radiography, to radiography equivalent dose multidetector computed tomography (RED-MDCT) and to radiography equivalent dose cone beam computed tomography (RED-CBCT) for wrist fractures. Methods As study subjects we obtained 10 cadaveric human hands from body donors. Distal radius, distal ulna and carpal bones (n = 100) were artificially fractured in random order in a controlled experimental setting. We performed radiation dose equivalent radiography (settings as in standard clinical care), RED-MDCT in a 320 row MDCT with single shot mode and RED-CBCT in a device dedicated to musculoskeletal imaging. Three raters independently evaluated the resulting images for fractures and the level of confidence for each finding. Gold standard was evaluated by consensus reading of a high-dose MDCT. Results Pooled sensitivity was higher in RED-MDCT with 0.89 and RED-MDCT with 0.81 compared to radiography with 0.54 (P = < .004). No significant differences were detected concerning the modalities’ specificities (with values between P = .98). Raters' confidence was higher in RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT compared to radiography (P < .001). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of RED-MDCT and RED-CBCT for wrist fractures proved to be similar and in some parts even higher compared to radiography. Readers are more confident in their reporting with the cross sectional modalities. Dose equivalent cross sectional computed tomography of the wrist could replace plain radiography for fracture diagnosis in the long run. PMID:27788215

  2. Updated quality assurance self-assessment exercise in intraoral and panoramic radiography. American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Radiology Practice Committee.

    PubMed

    Goren, A D; Lundeen, R C; Deahl, S T; Hashimoto, K; Kapa, S F; Katz, J O; Ludlow, J B; Platin, E; Van Der Stelt, P F; Wolfgang, L

    2000-03-01

    This updated self-assessment exercise for the dental team by the Radiology Practice Committee of the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology is intended to produce the highest quality diagnostic radiographs while keeping patient exposure as low as is reasonably achievable. To continue to provide the best radiographic services to patients, those involved in dental radiography need to be aware of the latest changes and advances in dental radiography and need to use them in their practice.

  3. Dental and dental hygiene students' diagnostic accuracy in oral radiology: effect of diagnostic strategy and instructional method.

    PubMed

    Baghdady, Mariam T; Carnahan, Heather; Lam, Ernest W N; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-09-01

    There has been much debate surrounding diagnostic strategies and the most appropriate training models for novices in oral radiology. It has been argued that an analytic approach, using a step-by-step analysis of the radiographic features of an abnormality, is ideal. Alternative research suggests that novices can successfully employ non-analytic reasoning. Many of these studies do not take instructional methodology into account. This study evaluated the effectiveness of non-analytic and analytic strategies in radiographic interpretation and explored the relationship between instructional methodology and diagnostic strategy. Second-year dental and dental hygiene students were taught four radiographic abnormalities using basic science instructions or a step-by-step algorithm. The students were tested on diagnostic accuracy and memory immediately after learning and one week later. A total of seventy-three students completed both immediate and delayed sessions and were included in the analysis. Students were randomly divided into two instructional conditions: one group provided a diagnostic hypothesis for the image and then identified specific features to support it, while the other group first identified features and then provided a diagnosis. Participants in the diagnosis-first condition (non-analytic reasoning) had higher diagnostic accuracy then those in the features-first condition (analytic reasoning), regardless of their learning condition. No main effect of learning condition or interaction with diagnostic strategy was observed. Educators should be mindful of the potential influence of analytic and non-analytic approaches on the effectiveness of the instructional method.

  4. Reliability of panoramic radiography in determination of neurosensory disturbances related to dental implant placement in posterior mandible.

    PubMed

    Kütük, Nükhet; Gönen, Zeynep Burçin; Yaşar, M Taha; Demirbaş, Ahmet Emin; Alkan, Alper

    2014-12-01

    During implantology procedures, one of the most serious complications is the damage of the inferior alveolar nerve, which may result in neurosensory disturbances (NSD). Panoramic radiographs have been considered for a primary evaluation to determine the bone height and implant-mandibular canal distance. One thousand five hundred ninety-seven panoramic radiographs of patients, who were treated with 3608 dental implants in Erciyes University, Oral and Maxillofacial Hospital between 2007 and 2012, were examined. Forty-eight implants were determined to be near the mandibular canal using a 2-dimensional software program. A total of 48 implants were closer than 2 mm to the mandibular canal. A range of 0 to 1.9 mm distance was detected between the mandibular canal and these implants. Fourteen implants (29.16%) placed in a distance less than 1 mm to the mandibular canal, and 34 (70.83%) between 1 and 2 mm. One patient had NSD. Determination of the dental implant length using panoramic radiography is a reliable technique to prevent neurosensory complications. However computed tomography or cone-beam computed tomography based planning of dental implants may be required for borderline cases.

  5. Diagnostic accuracy of carious lesions in digital radiographs at a public dental clinic - can it be improved by optimizing viewing conditions and further education?.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Westerberg, Jane; Hellén-Halme, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the diagnostic accuracy of digital dental radiograpny for detecting carious lesions on approximal surfaces before and after optimization of the environ- ment, and after joint training on evaluation and review of x-rays. A further aim was to evaluate differences in diagnostic accuracy between general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental hygienists (DHs). One hundred extracted teeth (premolars and molars) underwent standardized radiography. Eleven participants (seven GDPs and four DHs) evaluated digital images for approximal carious lesions in three sessions: (1) at current conditions with no optimization or further training, (2) under optimized viewing conditions, and (3) under optimized viewing conditions after a short educational session. Receiver operating characteristic curves were,used to evaluate the results. Histological evaluation was made and served as a cri- terion standard for differentiating sound teeth and teeth with carious lesions. Kappa statistics evaluated intra-observer agreement. Diagnostic accuracy in the GDP group differed sig- nificantlyfor all types of carious lesions between the first and third evaluations (p=0.002), and also between the second and third (p=0.015). Diagnostic accuracy also differed significantly for carious lesions into the dentin between the first and third evaluations (p=0.010) and between the second and third (p=0.015). Most of the staff had optimized the environment when evaluating digital radiographs. A short educational session highlighting the difficulty of caries diagnostics in digital dental radiography can increase diagnostic accuracy. Diagnostic accuracy in the detection of approximal carious lesions on digital radiographs did not differ between GDPs and DHs.

  6. The iliac crest in forensic age diagnostics: evaluation of the apophyseal ossification in conventional radiography.

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Vieth, Volker; Domnick, Christoph; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Schmeling, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    Due to the increasing significance of forensic age estimations in the age of globalisation, novel radiographic criteria besides clavicles and hand bones may provide additional certainty for forensic age expertises. The present study analyses the suitability of the iliac crest apophysis by means of 643 pelvic radiographs of patients between 10 and 30 years of age. Retrospective assessments were carried out according to the forensically established classification and sub-classification systems modified after Kreitner et al. (Rofo 166(6):481-486, 1997) and Kellinghaus et al. (Int J Legal Med 124(4):321-325, 2010). The basic ossification stages range from 1 to 4, and the sub-stages of stage 2 and 3 range from a to c. While stage 3c was first achieved at the age of 15 by both sexes, stage 4 was first observed in females at the age of 16 and in males at the age of 17. This indicates the possibility of a valid diagnosis of both the age of 14 and the age of 16 years which represent legally relevant age thresholds in numerous countries. Applied as targeted radiography on the iliac crest, the exposure to radiation would range between other radiographic techniques recently applied. Therefore, the iliac crest apophysis appears principally suitable as novel possible criterion for forensic age estimation in the living. However, for the establishment of the iliac crest apophysis in routine diagnostics, further studies are needed focussing on the comparison of different grading systems and different radiological techniques.

  7. Collimator with filtration compensator: clinical adaptation to meet European Union recommendation 4F on radiological protection for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, M; García-Vera, M C; Bravo, L A; Martínez-Beneyto, Y; Armero, D; Morant, J J; Canteras, M

    2009-09-01

    Our aim was to develop a compensated filtration collimator for use in paediatric patients undergoing cephalometric radiography that reduces the radiation dose administered and fulfils recommendation 4F of the European guidelines on radiation protection in dental radiology. An easy to use filtration-compensated collimator was constructed of plastic, lead and aluminium and used randomly with a group of 32 children (mean age 11 years) undergoing cephalometric radiography before receiving orthodontic treatment. The radiation doses administered to patients (eye lens and thyroid, submandibular and parotid glands) and to the chassis of the radiographic equipment were determined. The filtration-compensated collimator is easily fixed to the external surface of the radiographic equipment and results in (a) as collimator, a reduction of 40% in the surface irradiated in the children and of 61.4% in the dose administered to the thyroid glands (P<0.001); (b) as filtration compensator, a reduction of 32.8% administered to the eye lens (P<0.001), 31.45% to the submaxillary gland (P<0.01) and 11.4% to the parotid gland (P<0.05); there was no difference in the dose determined on the radiographic film. A radiographic examination can be carried out with children using only a third of the dose normally used with no increase in the time or cost involved.

  8. Preliminary Evaluation of an Educational Outcomes Assessment Process for Dental Interpretive Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Richard A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for testing the ability of dental students to detect presence and depth of dental caries was evaluated. Students (n=40) from four experience groups examined radiographs obtained from a model. Results indicated that this method of assessing student competence in radiographic interpretation is valid. (MSE)

  9. Preliminary Evaluation of an Educational Outcomes Assessment Process for Dental Interpretive Radiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Richard A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for testing the ability of dental students to detect presence and depth of dental caries was evaluated. Students (n=40) from four experience groups examined radiographs obtained from a model. Results indicated that this method of assessing student competence in radiographic interpretation is valid. (MSE)

  10. Comparative Study of the Diagnostic Value of Panoramic and Conventional Radiography of the Wrist in Scaphoid Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ezoddini Ardakani, Fatemeh; Zangoie Booshehri, Maryam; Banadaki, Seyed Hossein Saeed; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Scaphoid fractures are the most common type of carpal fractures. Objectives The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value of panoramic and conventional radiographs of the wrist in scaphoid fractures. Patients and Methods The panoramic and conventional radiographs of 122 patients with acute and chronic wrist trauma were studied. The radiographs were analyzed and examined by two independent radiologist observers; one physician radiologist and one maxillofacial radiologist. The final diagnosis was made by an orthopedic specialist. Kappa test was used for statistical calculations, inter- and intra-observer agreement and correlation between the two techniques. Results Wrist panoramic radiography was more accurate than conventional radiography for ruling out scaphoid fractures. There was an agreement in 85% or more of the cases. Agreement values were higher with better inter and intra observer agreement for panoramic examinations than conventional radiographic examinations. Conclusion The panoramic examination of the wrist is a useful technique for the diagnosis and follow-up of scaphoid fractures. Its use is recommended as a complement to conventional radiography in cases with inconclusive findings. PMID:23599708

  11. The current status of panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, P N

    1987-03-01

    The current status of dental panoramic tomography (rotational panoramic radiography) is reviewed. This technique is based on a combination of tomography and slit-beam radiography to provide an image of both jaws on a single film. There is a greater degree of image degradation when compared with conventional radiographic techniques due to tomographic blurring, magnification and distortion, secondary images and burn-out. Meticulous patient position is essential to accommodate their jaws to the image layer determined by the manufacturers. The absorbed doses from panoramic radiography are of a similar order to that from bitewing radiography and lower than those from a full-mouth periapical series. The individual risk of 1.3 X 10(-6) is compared with that from other radiographic examinations and smoking. The collective risk, 1.04 deaths in the UK in 1981, is relatively insignificant as is the genetic dose. The risk to the dentist and his staff is also low compared to other risks. The methods of dose limitation currently available are reviewed. The clinical indications are considered in relation to the guidelines of the American Dental Association and the Dental Estimates Board in the UK. The problems associated with attempts to measure diagnostic yield are considered. In view of the world-wide public concern at the potential dangers of ionising radiation, dentists are urged to maximize the diagnostic yield from their panoramic radiography by taking such radiographs only when clinically necessary, ensuring meticulous positioning and processing, followed by scrupulous assessment of the radiography for any sign of pathological change.

  12. How valid are current diagnostic criteria for dental erosion?

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    In principle, there is agreement about the clinical diagnostic criteria for dental erosion, basically defined as cupping and grooving of the occlusal/incisal surfaces, shallow defects on smooth surfaces located coronal from the enamel–cementum junction with an intact cervical enamel rim and restorations rising above the adjacent tooth surface. This lesion characteristic was established from clinical experience and from observations in a small group of subjects with known exposure to acids rather than from systematic research. Their prevalence is higher in risk groups for dental erosion compared to subjects not particularly exposed to acids, but analytical epidemiological studies on random or cluster samples often fail to find a relation between occurrence or severity of lesions and any aetiological factor. Besides other aspects, this finding might be due to lack of validity with respect to diagnostic criteria. In particular, cupping and grooving might be an effect of abrasion as well as of erosion and their value for the specific diagnosis of erosion must be doubted. Knowledge about the validity of current diagnostic criteria of different forms of tooth wear is incomplete, therefore further research is needed. PMID:18228062

  13. Comparison of conventional and digital radiography for radiometric differentiation of dental cements.

    PubMed

    Baksi, B Güniz; Ermis, R Banu

    2007-10-01

    To test the efficacy of conventional radiometry with indirect digital image analysis in the assessment of the relative radiopacity of dental cements used as liners or bases compared to human enamel and dentin. Disks of 15 different dental cements, 5 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick, were exposed to radiation together with 2-mm-thick disks of enamel and dentin and an aluminum step wedge. Density was evaluated by digital transmission densitometry and with the histogram function of an image analysis program following digitization of the radiographs with a flatbed scanner. A higher number of dental cements were discriminated from both dentin and enamel with conventional radiographic densitometer. All the cements examined, except Ionoseal (Voco) and Ionobond (Voco), were more radiopaque than dentin. With both methods, Chelon-Silver (3M ESPE) had the highest radiopacity and glass-ionomer cements the lowest. Radiodensity of dental cements can be differentiated with a high probability with the conventional radiometric method.

  14. Pulse oximetry as a diagnostic tool in dental medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosturkov, D.; Uzunov, Ts.; Uzunova, P.

    2016-01-01

    One of the most widespread optical methods used in biophotonics is the pulse oximetry, which is based on the measurement of light-modulated pulse wave of blood. This is a non-invasive, objective method for evaluation of the blood supply. Recently it has become very popular in dental medicine for the measurement of the condition of pulp microcirculation. The aim of our research is to evaluate the possibilities of pulse oximetry for estimation the pulp microcirculation in intact teeth among young patients. Results obtained clearly show that this method can be applied to assess the pulp condition and could be used in clinical practice in combination with other diagnostic methods.

  15. Digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Mattoon, J S

    2006-01-01

    Digital radiography has been used in human medical imaging since the 1980s with recent and rapid acceptance into the veterinary profession. Using advanced image capture and computer technology, radiographic images are viewed on a computer monitor. This is advantageous because radiographic images can be adjusted using dedicated computer software to maximize diagnostic image quality. Digital images can be accessed at computer workstations throughout the hospital, instantly retrieved from computer archives, and transmitted via the internet for consultation or case referral. Digital radiographic data can also be incorporated into a hospital information system, making record keeping an entirely paperless process. Digital image acquisition is faster when compared to conventional screen-film radiography, improving workflow and patient throughput. Digital radiography greatly reduces the need for 'retake' radiographs because of wide latitude in exposure factors. Also eliminated are costs associated with radiographic film and x-ray film development. Computed radiography, charged coupled devices, and flat panel detectors are types of digital radiography systems currently available.

  16. Informing radiography curriculum development: The views of UK radiology service managers concerning the 'fitness for purpose' of recent diagnostic radiography graduates.

    PubMed

    Sloane, C; Miller, P K

    2017-09-01

    Recent years have seen significant changes in the way medical imaging services are delivered, rapid changes in technology and big increases in the number and ranges of examinations undertaken. Given these changes the study aimed to critically evaluate the fitness for purpose of newly qualified diagnostic radiography. The study employed a grounded theory approach to analyse the interviews of 20 radiology managers from a range of medical imaging providers across the UK. Four key themes emerged from the analysis. These were: curriculum content and structure review; diversification in the role of the radiographer; professionalism and coping and the reformation of career structures. The results indicate the role of the radiographer is now in a state of flux and challenge radiology managers and educators to design curricula and career structures which are better matched the role of the radiographer in the very rapidly changing technological, organisational and social contexts of modern society. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing use of a standardized dental diagnostic terminology in an electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel; Stark, Paul C; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F; Ramoni, Rachel; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta; Kimmes, Nicole; Tavares, Anamaria; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2013-01-01

    Although standardized terminologies such as the International Classification of Diseases have been in use in medicine for over a century, efforts in the dental profession to standardize dental diagnostic terms have not achieved widespread acceptance. To address this gap, a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, the EZCodes, was developed in 2009. Fifteen dental education institutions in the United States and Europe have implemented the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology. This article reports on the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes at three of the dental schools that have adopted this standardized dental diagnostic terminology. Electronic data on the use of procedure codes with diagnostic terms from the three schools over a period from July 2010 to June 2011 were aggregated. The diagnostic term and procedure code pairs were adjudicated by three calibrated dentists. Analyses were conducted to gain insight into the utilization and valid entry of the EZCodes diagnostic terminology in the one-year period. Error proportions in the entry of diagnostic term (and by diagnostic category) were also computed. In the twelve-month period, 29,965 diagnostic terms and 249,411 procedure codes were entered at the three institutions resulting in a utilization proportion of 12 percent. Caries and periodontics were the most frequently used categories. More than 1,000 of the available 1,321 diagnostic terms were never used. Overall, 60.5 percent of the EZCodes entries were found to be valid. The results demonstrate low utilization of EZCodes in an electronic health record and raise the need for specific training of dental providers on the importance of using dental diagnostic terminology and specifically how to use the terms in the electronic record. These findings will serve to increase the use/correct use of the EZCodes dental diagnostic terminology and ultimately create a reliable platform for undertaking clinical, outcomes, and quality improvement-related research.

  18. The diagnostic performance of radiography for detection of osteoarthritis-associated features compared with MRI in hip joints with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Hayashi, Daichi; Guermazi, Ali; Hunter, David J; Li, Ling; Winterstein, Anton; Bohndorf, Klaus; Roemer, Frank W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of radiography for the detection of MRI-detected osteoarthritis-associated features in various articular subregions of the hip joint. Forty-four patients with chronic hip pain (mean age, 63.3 ± 9.5 years), who were part of the Hip Osteoarthritis MRI Scoring (HOAMS) cohort, underwent both weight-bearing anteroposterior pelvic radiography and 1.5 T MRI. The HOAMS study was a prospective observational study involving 52 subjects, conducted to develop a semiquantitative MRI scoring system for hip osteoarthritis features. In the present study, eight subjects were excluded because of a lack of radiographic assessment. On radiography, the presence of superior and medial joint space narrowing, superior and inferior acetabular/femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts, and bone attrition of femoral head was noted. On MRI, cartilage, osteophytes, subchondral cysts, and bone attrition were evaluated in the corresponding locations. Diagnostic performance of radiography was compared with that of MRI, and the area under curve (AUC) was calculated for each pathological feature. Compared with MRI, radiography provided high specificity (0.76-0.90) but variable sensitivity (0.44-0.78) for diffuse cartilage damage (using JSN as an indirect marker), femoral osteophytes, acetabular subchondral cysts and bone attrition of the femoral head, and a low specificity (0.42 and 0.58) for acetabular osteophytes. The AUC of radiography for detecting overall diffuse cartilage damage, marginal osteophytes, subchondral cysts and bone attrition was 0.76, 0.78, 0.67, and 0.82, respectively. Diagnostic performance of radiography is good for bone attrition, fair for marginal osteophytes and cartilage damage, but poor for subchondral cysts.

  19. Attitudes toward and beliefs about the use of a dental diagnostic terminology: A survey of dental care providers in a dental practice.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel B; Walji, Muhammad F; Kim, Soyun; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; McClellan, Lyle; Simmons, Kristen; Skourtes, Eugene; Yansane, Alfa; White, Joel M; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-06-01

    Attitudes and views are critical to the adoption of innovation. Although there have been broadening calls for a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, little is known about the views of private practice dental team members regarding the adoption of such a terminology. The authors developed a survey by using validated questions identified through literature review. Domain experts' input allowed for further modifications. The authors administered the final survey electronically to 814 team members at a multioffice practice based in the US Pacific Northwest. Response proportion was 92%. The survey had excellent reliability (Cronbach α coefficient = 0.87). Results suggested that participants showed, in general, positive attitudes and beliefs about using a standardized diagnostic terminology in their practices. Additional written comments by participants highlighted the potential for improved communication with use of the terminology. Dental care providers and staff in 1 multioffice practice showed positive attitudes about the use of a diagnostic terminology; specifically, they believed it would improve communication between the dentist and patient, as well as among providers, while expressing some concerns about whether using standardized dental diagnostic terms helps clinicians to deliver better dental care. As the dental profession is advancing toward the use of standardized diagnostic terminology, successful implementation will require that dental team leaders prepare their teams by gauging their attitude about the use of such a terminology. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Determining the age of cats by pulp cavity/tooth width ratio using dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungsun; Ahn, Jaesang; Kang, Sunmee; Lee, Euiri; Kim, Soohyun; Park, Sangwan; Park, Sungwon; Noh, Hyunwoo; Seo, Kangmoon

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the ratio of pulp cavity/tooth width (P/T ratio) in healthy cats. The dental radiographs of 32 cats (16 males and 16 females) were generated with a digital dental X-ray unit with the animals under general anesthesia. Standardized measurement of the canine teeth was performed by drawing a line on the radiograph perpendicular to the cemento- enamel junction (CEJ) of the tooth. There was an inversely proportional correlation between chronological age and the P/T ratio. Moreover, a strong Pearson squared correlation (γ(2) = 0.92) was identified by the curved regression model. No significant differences in the P/T ratio based on gender or breed were found. These results suggest that determination of age by P/T ratio could be clinically useful for estimating the chronological age of cats.

  1. Assessment of dental abnormalities by full-mouth radiography in small breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chun-Geun; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Ju-Won; Park, Hee-Myung

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate full-mouth radiographic findings to determine the prevalence of dental abnormalities and analyze the relationship between dental abnormalities and age in small breed dogs. Sixteen predetermined categories of abnormal radiographic findings were evaluated in 233 small breed dogs. In total, 9,786 possible permanent teeth could be evaluated. Of those, 8,308 teeth were evaluated and abnormal radiographic findings were found in 2,458 teeth (29.6%). The most common teeth with abnormal radiographic findings were the mandibular first molars (74.5% on the left and 63.9% on the right) and the maxillary fourth premolars (40.5% on the left and 38.2% on the right). Bone loss of any type (15.8%) was the most commonly detected radiographic abnormal finding among the 16 categories. Dental conditions with a genetic predisposition were frequently occurred in the mandibular premolar teeth. Shih tzu frequently had unerupted teeth and dentigerous cysts. Among the teeth with abnormal radiographic findings, 4.5%, 19.8%, and 5.3% were considered incidental, additional, and important, respectively. Findings that were only detected on radiographs, which were not noted on routine oral examination, were more common in older dogs. Full-mouth radiographic evaluation should be performed to obtain important information for making accurate diagnoses.

  2. Identification of Nasal Bone Fractures on Conventional Radiography and Facial CT: Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy in Different Imaging Modalities and Analysis of Interobserver Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Lee, Yoo Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been no study to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an experienced radiologist with a trainee in nasal bone fracture. Objectives To compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) for the identification of nasal bone fractures and to evaluate the interobserver reliability between a staff radiologist and a trainee. Patients and Methods A total of 108 patients who underwent conventional radiography and CT after acute nasal trauma were included in this retrospective study. Two readers, a staff radiologist and a second-year resident, independently assessed the results of the imaging studies. Results Of the 108 patients, the presence of a nasal bone fracture was confirmed in 88 (81.5%) patients. The number of non-depressed fractures was higher than the number of depressed fractures. In nine (10.2%) patients, nasal bone fractures were only identified on conventional radiography, including three depressed and six non-depressed fractures. CT was more accurate as compared to conventional radiography for the identification of nasal bone fractures as determined by both readers (P <0.05), all diagnostic indices of an experienced radiologist were similar to or higher than those of a trainee, and κ statistics showed moderate agreement between the two diagnostic tools for both readers. There was no statistical difference in the assessment of interobserver reliability for both imaging modalities in the identification of nasal bone fractures. Conclusion For the identification of nasal bone fractures, CT was significantly superior to conventional radiography. Although a staff radiologist showed better values in the identification of nasal bone fracture and differentiation between depressed and non-depressed fractures than a trainee, there was no statistically significant difference in the interpretation of conventional radiography and CT between a radiologist and a trainee. PMID:24348599

  3. Identification of Nasal Bone Fractures on Conventional Radiography and Facial CT: Comparison of the Diagnostic Accuracy in Different Imaging Modalities and Analysis of Interobserver Reliability.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Lee, Yoo Jin

    2013-09-01

    There has been no study to compare the diagnostic accuracy of an experienced radiologist with a trainee in nasal bone fracture. To compare the diagnostic accuracy between conventional radiography and computed tomography (CT) for the identification of nasal bone fractures and to evaluate the interobserver reliability between a staff radiologist and a trainee. A total of 108 patients who underwent conventional radiography and CT after acute nasal trauma were included in this retrospective study. Two readers, a staff radiologist and a second-year resident, independently assessed the results of the imaging studies. Of the 108 patients, the presence of a nasal bone fracture was confirmed in 88 (81.5%) patients. The number of non-depressed fractures was higher than the number of depressed fractures. In nine (10.2%) patients, nasal bone fractures were only identified on conventional radiography, including three depressed and six non-depressed fractures. CT was more accurate as compared to conventional radiography for the identification of nasal bone fractures as determined by both readers (P <0.05), all diagnostic indices of an experienced radiologist were similar to or higher than those of a trainee, and κ statistics showed moderate agreement between the two diagnostic tools for both readers. There was no statistical difference in the assessment of interobserver reliability for both imaging modalities in the identification of nasal bone fractures. For the identification of nasal bone fractures, CT was significantly superior to conventional radiography. Although a staff radiologist showed better values in the identification of nasal bone fracture and differentiation between depressed and non-depressed fractures than a trainee, there was no statistically significant difference in the interpretation of conventional radiography and CT between a radiologist and a trainee.

  4. The microcomputer in the dental office: a new diagnostic aid.

    PubMed

    van der Stelt, P F

    1985-06-01

    The first computer applications in the dental office were based upon standard accountancy procedures. Recently, more and more computer applications have become available to meet the specific requirements of dental practice. This implies not only business procedures, but also facilities to store patient records in the system and retrieve them easily. Another development concerns the automatic calculation of diagnostic data such as those provided in cephalometric analysis. Furthermore, growth and surgical results in the craniofacial area can be predicted by computerized extrapolation. Computers have been useful in obtaining the patient's anamnestic data objectively and for the making of decisions based on such data. Computer-aided instruction systems have been developed for undergraduate students to bridge the gap between textbook and patient interaction without the risks inherent in the latter. Radiology will undergo substantial changes as a result of the application of electronic imaging devices instead of the conventional radiographic films. Computer-assisted electronic imaging will enable image processing, image enhancement, pattern recognition and data transmission for consultation and storage purposes. Image processing techniques will increase image quality whilst still allowing low-dose systems. Standardization of software and system configuration and the development of 'user friendly' programs is the major concern for the near future.

  5. Fast scanning tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector-row computed tomography as the reference.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Sugiura, Hiroaki; Abe, Takayuki; Sato, Yuji; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2011-08-01

    : To evaluate the diagnostic performance of fast scanning tomosynthesis in comparison with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary nodules, using multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) as the reference, and to assess the association of the true-positive fraction (TPF) with the size, CT attenuation value, and location of the nodules. : The institutional review board approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Fifty-seven patients with and 59 without pulmonary nodules underwent chest MDCT, fast scanning tomosynthesis, and radiography. The images of tomosynthesis and radiography were randomly read by 3 blinded radiologists; MDCT served as the reference standard. Free-response receiver-operating characteristic (FROC) and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, Cochran-Armitage trend or Fisher exact test, a conditional logistic regression model, and McNemar test were used. : Both FROC and ROC analyses revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.01) of fast scanning tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary nodules. For fast scanning tomosynthesis, the average TPF and false-positive rate as determined by FROC analysis were 0.80 and 0.10, respectively. For both fast scanning tomosynthesis and radiography, the average TPF increased with increasing nodule size and CT attenuation values, and was lower for subpleural nodules (all P < 0.01). : The diagnostic performance of fast scanning tomosynthesis for the detection of pulmonary nodules was significantly superior to that of radiography. The TPF was affected by the size, CT attenuation value, and location of the nodule, in both fast scanning tomosynthesis and radiography.

  6. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.E.; Bristow, R.G.; Clark, G.M.; Nussbaum, C.; Taylor, K.W.

    1989-06-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed.

  7. Technique-dependent decrease in thyroid absorbed dose for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Wood, R E; Bristow, R G; Clark, G M; Nussbaum, C; Taylor, K W

    1989-06-01

    A LiF thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) system, calibrated in the tissue of interest with the beam used for experimentation, was employed to investigate dosages (muGy) to the thyroid region of an anthropomorphic phantom resultant from two dental complete-mouth radiographic procedures. Both techniques were compared in terms of dosages associated with combinations of lead apron and thyroid collar shielding while using a 70-kVp or 90-kVp x-ray beam for a 20-film complete-mouth series. Lead shielding significantly decreased the dose to the thyroid using both techniques (p less than 0.05). The use of the 90-kVp beam resulted in a significant reduction in the thyroid absorbed dose when using the bisecting angle technique (p less than 0.05) but caused a significant increase in the thyroid absorbed dose when the paralleling technique was used (p less than 0.05). The implementation of higher kilovoltage techniques in dental offices must therefore be dependent on the radiographic technique employed.

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Detection of Pulmonary Contusion; a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mostafa; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Baikpour, Masoud; Tafakhori, Abbas; Asady, Hadi; Haji Ghanbari, Mohammad Javad; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Safari, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasonography is currently being used as one of the diagnostic modalities in various medical emergencies for screening of trauma patients. The diagnostic value of this modality in detection of traumatic chest injuries has been evaluated by several studies but its diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of pulmonary contusion is a matter of discussion. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography and radiography in detection of pulmonary contusion through a systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: An extended systematic search was performed by two reviewers in databases of Medline, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest. They extracted the data and assessed the quality of the studies. After summarization of data into true positive, false positive, true negative, and false negative meta-analysis was carried out via a mixed-effects binary regression model. Further subgroup analysis was performed due to a significant heterogeneity between the studies. Results: 12 studies were included in this meta-analysis (1681 chest trauma patients, 76% male). Pooled sensitivity of ultrasonography in detection of pulmonary contusion was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.81-0.96; I2= 95.81, p<0.001) and its pooled specificity was calculated to be 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.93; I2 = 67.29, p<0.001) while these figures for chest radiography were 0.44 (95% CI: 0.32-0.58; I2= 87.52, p<0.001) and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.88-1.0; I2= 95.22, p<0.001), respectively. Subgroup analysis showed that the sources of heterogeneity between the studies were sampling method, operator, frequency of the transducer, and sample size. Conclusion: Ultrasonography was found to be a better screening tool in detection of pulmonary contusion. Moreover, an ultrasonography performed by a radiologist / intensivist with 1-5MHz probe has a higher diagnostic value in identifying pulmonary contusions. PMID:26495401

  9. Diagnostic Value of Conventional and Digital Radiography for Detection of Cavitated and Non-Cavitated Proximal Caries.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Mahdieh; Barzegari, Rasool; Tabatabai, Hosein; Ghanea, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of conventional and digital radiography for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated proximal caries. Fifty extracted human premolars and molars were mounted in a silicone block. Charge-coupled device (CCD) and photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) receptors and intra-oral films were exposed with 60 and 70 kVp with parallel technique. Two observers interpreted the radiographs twice with a two-week interval using a 5-point scale. Teeth were then serially sectioned in mesiodistal direction and evaluated under a stereomicroscope (gold standard). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of enamel lesions was low (5.5-44.4%) but it was higher for dentin lesions (42.8-62.8%); PSP with 70 kVp and 0.03s exposure time had the highest sensitivity for enamel lesions, but the difference among receptors was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of non-cavitated lesions was lower than that for cavitated lesions; PSP with 60 kVp and 0.07s exposure time had higher sensitivity and lower patient radiation dose for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated lesions, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Digital radiography using PSP receptor with 70 kVp is recommended to detect initial enamel caries. For detection of non-cavitated and cavitated dentin caries, PSP with 60 kVp is more appropriate. Change in kVp did not affect the diagnostic accuracy for detection of caries, and type of receptor was a more important factor.

  10. Diagnostic Value of Conventional and Digital Radiography for Detection of Cavitated and Non-Cavitated Proximal Caries

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Mahdieh; Barzegari, Rasool; Tabatabai, Hosein

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of conventional and digital radiography for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated proximal caries. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted human premolars and molars were mounted in a silicone block. Charge-coupled device (CCD) and photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) receptors and intra-oral films were exposed with 60 and 70 kVp with parallel technique. Two observers interpreted the radiographs twice with a two-week interval using a 5-point scale. Teeth were then serially sectioned in mesiodistal direction and evaluated under a stereomicroscope (gold standard). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. Results: Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of enamel lesions was low (5.5–44.4%) but it was higher for dentin lesions (42.8–62.8%); PSP with 70 kVp and 0.03s exposure time had the highest sensitivity for enamel lesions, but the difference among receptors was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of non-cavitated lesions was lower than that for cavitated lesions; PSP with 60 kVp and 0.07s exposure time had higher sensitivity and lower patient radiation dose for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated lesions, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions: Digital radiography using PSP receptor with 70 kVp is recommended to detect initial enamel caries. For detection of non-cavitated and cavitated dentin caries, PSP with 60 kVp is more appropriate. Change in kVp did not affect the diagnostic accuracy for detection of caries, and type of receptor was a more important factor. PMID:28828014

  11. Stitched large format CMOS image sensors for dental x-ray digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinqiao (Chiao); Fowler, Boyd; Do, Hung; Jaffe, Mark; Rassel, Richard; Leidy, Bob

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present a family of large format CIS's designed for dental x-ray applications. The CIS areas vary from small 31.5mm x 20.1mm, to medium 34.1mm x 26.3mm, to large 37.1mm x 26.3mm. Pixel size is 19.5um x 19.5um. The sensor family was fabricated in a 0.18um CIS process. Stitching is used in the CIS fabrication for the medium and large size sensors. We present the CIS and detector system design that includes pixel circuitry, readout circuitry, x-ray trigger mechanism, scintillator, and the camera electronics. We also present characterization results including the detector performances under both visible light and x-ray radiation.

  12. Exposure Geometry And Film Contrast Differences As Bases For Incomplete Cancellation Of Irrelevant Structures In Dental Subtraction Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, Urs E.; Okano, Tomohiro; Grondahl, Hans-Goran; Grondahl, Kerstin; Webber, Richard L.

    1981-11-01

    Subtraction radiography for longitudinal studies requires both reproducible imaging geometry and film contrast characteristics to permit perfect alignment of the radiographs, and achieve good cancellation of diagnostically irrelevant background structures. The standard deviation (SD) of gray levels about the mean in a subtraction image was used as a relative measure of the residual structured noise. In order to estimate the effects of improperly standardized radiographs on SD in the subtraction image, both the imaging angle and film exposure time were systematically varied. The results showed that SD changed linear for small misalignment angles of the central beam, the variance attributable to this error source reaching about the same magnitude as the variance due to anatomical differences for angulation errors within ±20. The SD increase due to large film contrast disparity could be partly reverted for angulation errors within this bound by using a quadratic transformation which matched the first two moments of the gray level distributions in the two parent radiographs. Therefore, in order to use some of the retrospective data obtained under less stringent standardizations for subtraction imagery, it appears possible to adjust for differences in film contrast, and, perhaps, correct for geometric misalignment by a separate algorithm.

  13. [The diagnostic value of oblique technique for periapical radiography and its usefulness in endodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Teresa; Wilk, Grazyna

    2008-01-01

    The applicability of the intraoral X-rays in the oblique projection during the endodontic treatment is described in this study. The rules concerning the positioning of the X-ray tube, intraoral film and the examined tooth, necessary to obtain images in mesial and distal oblique projections are discussed. The usefulness of the aforementioned projections in visualizing the anatomy, anomalies as well as periapical changes of the dental roots and canals during the endodontic treatment is presented.

  14. Dental Providers’ Perspectives on Diagnosis-Driven Dentistry: Strategies to Enhance Adoption of Dental Diagnostic Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Obadan-Udoh, Enihomo; Etolue, Jini; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel; Spallek, Heiko; Walji, Muhammad; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2017-01-01

    The routine use of standardized diagnostic terminologies (DxTMs) in dentistry has long been the subject of academic debate. This paper discusses the strategies suggested by a group of dental stakeholders to enhance the uptake of DxTMs. Through unstructured interviewing at the ‘Toward a Diagnosis-Driven Profession’ National Conference held on 19 March 2016 in Los Angeles, CA, USA participants were asked how enthusiastic they were about implementing and consistently using DxTMs at their work. They also brainstormed on strategies to improve the widespread use of DxTMs. Their responses are summarized by recursive abstraction and presented in themes. Conference participants were very enthusiastic about using a DxTM in their place of work. Participants enumerated several strategies to make DxTMs more appealing including: the use of mandates, a value proposition for providers, communication and education, and integration with EHRs and existing systems. All groups across the dental healthcare delivery spectrum will need to work together for the success of the widespread and consistent use of DxTMs. Understanding the provider perspective is however the most critical step in achieving this goal, as they are the group who will ultimately be saddled with the critical task of ensuring DxTM use at the point of care. PMID:28703751

  15. Manifestations, acquisition and diagnostic categories of dental fear in a self-referred population.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Brødsgaard, I; Birn, H

    1991-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify how manifestations and acquisition relate to diagnostic categories of dental fear in a population of self-referred dental fear patients, since diagnostic criteria specifically related to dental fear have not been validated. DSM III-R diagnostic criteria for phobias were used to compare with four existing dental fear diagnostic categories, referred to as the Seattle system. Subjects were 208 persons with dental fear who were telephone interviewed, of whom a subsample of 155 responded to a mailed Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a modified FSS-II Geer Fear Scale (GFS). Personal interviews and a Dental Beliefs Scale of perceived trust and social interaction with dentists were also used to evaluate a subsample of 80 patients selected by sex and high dental fear. Results showed that the majority of the 80 patients (66%), suffered from social embarrassment about their dental fear problem and their inability to do something about it. The largest cause of their fear (84%) was reported to be traumatic dental experiences, especially in childhood (70%). A minority of patients (16%) could not isolate traumatic experiences and had a history of general fearfulness or anxiety. Analysis of GFS data for the 155 subjects showed that fear of snakes and injuries were highest among women; heights and injections among men. Fear of blood was rarely reported. Spearman correlations between GFS individual items and DAS scores indicated functional independence between dental fear and common fears such as blood, injections and enclosures in most cases. Only in specific types of dental fear did these results support Rachman and Lopatka's contention that fears are thought to summate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Projection radiography of the clavicle: still recommendable for forensic age diagnostics in living individuals?

    PubMed

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Ottow, Christian; Vieth, Volker; Küppers, Martin; Schulz, Ronald; Hassu, Juan; Bajanowski, Thomas; Püschel, Klaus; Ramsthaler, Frank; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Schmidt, Sven; Schmeling, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    As superimposition effects often impede the evaluation of the ossification status of the medial clavicular epiphysis in standard posterior-anterior (PA) radiographs, additional oblique images (right anterior oblique, RAO, and left anterior oblique, LAO) are currently recommended to allow for reliable stage assessments. The present study examines the influence of the radiographic projection type on stage determination. To this end, 836 sternoclavicular joints were prospectively obtained during forensic autopsies of bodies aged between 15 and 30 years. Subsequently, three different radiographs (PA, RAO, and LAO) were taken from each specimen and separately evaluated as to the developmental stage of the medial clavicular epiphysis. A forensically established five-stage classification system was used. In 25 % of the cases, the medial clavicular epiphysis depicted in an oblique projection showed a different ossification stage than in the PA projection. In at least 10 % of the cases, a higher ossification stage was observed which would have significant disadvantages in criminal proceedings (ethically unacceptable error). In conclusion, the usage of the current radiographic reference data, which rely upon chest radiographs taken as PA projections, appears to be inadmissible for oblique projections. Projection radiography of the clavicle can therefore no longer be recommended for forensic age estimation practice. As to the question of whether an individual has achieved the age of 18 or 21, computed tomography of the clavicle must be regarded as the exclusive method of choice.

  17. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton radiography diagnostic of inertial confinement fusion targets (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; MacPhee, A.; Hey, D.; Ma, T.; Chen, C.; Izumi, N.; Unites, W.; MacKinnon, A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Remington, B. A.; Park, H. S.; Springer, P.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Seely, John; Holland, Glenn; Hudson, Larry

    2008-10-15

    We present scaled demonstrations of backlighter sources, emitting bremsstrahlung x rays with photon energies above 75 keV, that we will use to record x-ray Compton radiographic snapshots of cold dense DT fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In experiments performed at the Titan laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we measured the source size and the bremsstrahlung spectrum as a function of laser intensity and pulse length from solid targets irradiated at 2x10{sup 17}-5x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} using 2-40 ps pulses. Using Au planar foils we achieved source sizes down to 5.5 {mu}m and conversion efficiencies of about 1x10{sup -13} J/J into x-ray photons with energies in the 75-100 keV spectral range. We can now use these results to design NIF backlighter targets and shielding and to predict Compton radiography performance as a function of the NIF implosion yield and associated background.

  18. Development of backlighting sources for a Compton radiography diagnostic of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R; MacPhee, A; Hey, D; Ma, T; Chen, C; Izumi, N; Unites, W; MacKinnon, A; Hatchett, S P; Remington, B A; Park, H S; Springer, P; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Seely, J; Holland, G; Hudson, L

    2008-05-07

    We present scaled demonstrations of backlighter sources, emitting Bremsstrahlung x-rays with photon energies above 75 keV, that we will use to record x-ray Compton radiographic snapshots of cold dense DT fuel in inertial confinement fusion implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In experiments performed at the Titan laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we measured the source size and the Bremsstrahlung spectrum as a function of laser intensity and pulse length, from solid targets irradiated at 2e17-5e18 W/cm{sup 2} using 2-40 ps pulses. Using Au planar foils we achieved source sizes down to 5.5 {micro}m, and conversion efficiencies of about 1e-3 J/J into x-ray photons with energies in the 75-100 keV spectral range. We can now use these results to design NIF backlighter targets and shielding, and to predict Compton radiography performance as a function of the NIF implosion yield and associated background.

  19. Obesity, heuristic reasoning and the organisation of communicative embarrassment in diagnostic radiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, P K; Woods, A L; Sloane, C; Booth, L

    2017-05-01

    This paper, the second of three arising from a broader qualitative study, explores difficulties emerging around radiographer-patient communication regarding obesity in hospital-based encounters, and the situated strategies found by experienced radiographers for handling such situations. Semi-structured interviews with eight clinicians working in plain radiography (mean experience = 21.56 years) were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), so as to highlight the practical, nuanced and real-world experiences of these individuals regarding obesity communication. Participants generally viewed communicating with obese patients as a potential interpersonal 'minefield'. Most reported having had negative experiences in which patients had acted with denial or outright aggression during examinations but, conversely, all reported cases in which patients had been frank and open about their obesity, and even been happy to joke about it. Equally, all participants were able to document a range of communicative strategies for effectively handling potentially difficult situations. Results further indicate that the documented communicative problems and embarrassment for the patient only generally arose within specific material contexts; i.e. when equipment is inadequate or multiple exposures are necessary. It is concluded that, while participants largely expected any interaction about obesity with a patient to be embarrassing for both parties, their actual experience was much more varied. This indicates a more complex communicative environment than may be expected, and also a potential metacognitive availability heuristic in play - something that might be clarified with future quantitative investigation. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. All rights reserved.

  20. Digital radiography: update for oral health care workers.

    PubMed

    Noffke, C E E; Nzima, N; Chabikuli, N J

    2004-08-01

    Digital Radiography is an imaging system that does away with the use of films. It constitutes an advance in computer technology and has made a significant impact on the field of Maxillofacial- and Dental Radiology. This paper presents an overview of the basic concepts and applications of dental digital radiography and compares it with conventional film-based imaging. In addition, it provides a thorough understanding of the direct, semi-direct and indirect dental digital imaging systems with their advantages and disadvantages. Universal acceptance of digital radiographic imaging as a diagnostic tool makes it important for oral health care workers to understand the principles thereof and to master the techniques involved in acquiring a diagnosable digital radiographic image.

  1. Formation and propagation of laser-driven plasma jets in an ambient medium studied with X-ray radiography and optical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Dizière, A.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Yurchak, R.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Sakawa, Y.; Morita, T.; Pikuz, S.; Koenig, M.

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we present experimental results obtained on the LULI2000 laser facility regarding structure and dynamics of astrophysical jets propagating in interstellar medium. The jets, generated by using a cone-shaped target, propagate in a nitrogen gas that mimics the interstellar medium. X-ray radiography as well as optical diagnostics were used to probe both high and low density regions. In this paper, we show how collimation of the jets evolves with the gas density.

  2. In-situ material-motion diagnostics and fuel radiography in experimental reactors

    SciTech Connect

    DeVolpi, A.

    1982-01-01

    Material-motion monitoring has become a routine part of in-pile transient reactor-safety experiments. Diagnostic systems, such as the fast-neutron hodoscope, were developed for the purpose of providing direct time-resolved data on pre-failure fuel motion, cladding-breach time and location, and post-failure fuel relocation. Hodoscopes for this purpose have been installed at TREAT and CABRI; other types of imaging systems that have been tested are a coded-aperture at ACRR and a pinhole at TREAT. Diagnostic systems that use penetrating radiation emitted from the test section can non-invasively monitor fuel without damage to the measuring instrument during the radiographic images of test sections installed in the reator. Studies have been made of applications of hodoscopes to other experimental reactors, including PBF, FARET, STF, ETR, EBR-II, SAREF-STF, and DMT.

  3. [Validity of self-perceived dental caries as a diagnostic test and associated factors in adults].

    PubMed

    Haikal, Desirée Sant'Ana; Roberto, Luana Leal; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima; Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista de; Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira E

    2017-08-21

    This study aimed to analyze the validity of self-perceived dental caries and associated factors in a sample of 795 adults (35-44 years). The dependent variable was self-perceived dental caries, and the independent variables were combined in blocks. Three logistic models were performed: (1) all adults; (2) adults with a formal diagnosis of caries; and (3) adults without such caries. Self-perceived dental caries showed 77.7% sensitivity, 58% specificity, 65% accuracy, 52% positive predictive value, and 81% negative predictive value. In Model 1, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, access to information, flossing, formal diagnosis of caries, self-perceived need for treatment, toothache, and dissatisfaction with oral health and general health. In Model 2, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, self-perceived need for treatment, and dissatisfaction with oral health and general health. In Model 3, self-perceived dental caries was associated with time of use of dental services, access to information, flossing, self-perceived need for treatment, and dissatisfaction with oral health. Self-perceived dental caries showed limited utility as a diagnostic method.

  4. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    the recession of the solid propellant grain can drastically alter the flow-field and effect the recession of internal insulation and nozzle materials. Simultaneous measurement of the overall erosion rate, the development of the char layer, and the recession of the char-virgin interface during the motor operation can be rather difficult. While invasive techniques have been used with limited success, they have serious drawbacks. Break wires or make wire sensors can be installed into a sufficient number of locations in the charring material from which a time history of the charring surface can be deduced. These sensors fundamentally alter the local structure of the material in which they are imbedded. Also, the location of these sensors within the material is not known precisely without the use of an X-ray. To determine instantaneous recession rates, real-time X-ray radiography (X-ray RTR) has been utilized in several SRM experiments at PSU. The X-ray RTR system discussed in this paper consists of an X-ray source, X-ray image intensifier, and CCD camera connected to a capture computer. The system has been used to examine the ablation process of internal insulation as well as nozzle material erosion in a subscale SRM. The X-ray source is rated to 320 kV at 10 mA and has both a large (5.5 mm) and small (3.0 mm) focal spot. The lead-lined cesium iodide X-ray image intensifier produces an image which is captured by a CCD camera with a 1,000 x 1,000 pixel resolution. To produce accurate imagery of the object of interest, the alignment of the X-ray source to the X-ray image intensifier is crucial. The image sequences captured during the operation of an SRM are then processed to enhance the quality of the images. This procedure allows for computer software to extract data on the total erosion rate and the char layer thickness. Figure 1 Error! Reference source not found.shows a sequence of images captured during the operation the subscale SRM with the X-ray RTR system. The X

  5. Phase-contrast and magnification radiography at diagnostic X-ray energies using a pseudo-microfocus X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the use of conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes for applications in which specialist microfocus sources are normally required. Methods: A conventional diagnostic X-ray tube was used in conjunction with a range of apertures to investigate improvements in spatial resolution using a line-pairs test object. Phase-contrast effects were investigated by varying source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances using a 2-French catheter as a clinically realistic test object. Results: For magnification radiography using a computed radiography receptor and conventional X-ray tube with a 1-mm nominal focus size, the limiting spatial resolution was improved from 3.55 line-pairs per millimetre, for a conventional contact image, to 5.6 line-pairs per millimetre, for a ×2 magnified view with a 250-µm aperture. For inline phase-contrast radiography, phase contrast enhancement of a 2-French catheter was demonstrated, and the expected trends with variations in source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances were found. Images of a neonatal phantom demonstrated a subtle improvement in visibility of a superimposed 1-French catheter simulating a percutaneously inserted central catheter for no increase in patient radiation dose. Conclusion: Spatial resolution improvement and visible phase contrast can be produced in clinically relevant objects using a pseudo-microfocus geometry at X-ray energies in the normal diagnostic range, using conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes and image receptors. The disadvantages of the proposal are the large distances required to produce phase contrast and limitations imposed by the resulting tube loading. Advances in knowledge: It is possible to use conventional diagnostic X-ray equipment in applications that normally require microfocus X-ray sources. This presents some possibilities for clinical applications. PMID:24779409

  6. Dental diagnostic X-ray exposure and risk of benign and malignant brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, M C; Lee, C F; Lin, C L; Wu, Y C; Wang, H E; Chen, C L; Sung, F C; Kao, C H

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluates the risk of benign brain tumors (BBTs) and malignant brain tumors (MBTs) associated with dental diagnostic X-ray, using a large population-based case-control study. We identified 4123 BBT cases and 16 492 controls without BBT (study 1) and 197 MBT cases and 788 controls without MBT (study 2) from Taiwan National Health Insurance claim data. The risks of both types of tumor were estimated in association with the frequency of received dental diagnostic X-ray. The mean ages were ~44.2 years in study 1 and 40.6 years in study 2. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of BBT increases as the frequency of received dental diagnostic X-ray increases. The BBT odds ratio increased from 1.33 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-1.44] for those with annual mean X-ray examination of less than one to 1.65 (95% CI 1.37-1.98) for those with three or more X-ray examinations, after controlling for comorbidities. No significant association was found between MBTs and dental diagnostic X-ray exposure. Exposure to dental diagnostic X-rays in oral and maxillofacial care increases the risk of BBTs, but not MBTs.

  7. Diagnostic validity of periapical radiography and CBCT for assessing periapical lesions that persist after endodontic surgery.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Casper; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Reibel, Jesper; Wenzel, Ann; Kirkevang, Lise-Lotte

    2017-07-14

    Traditionally, healing after surgical endodontic retreatment (SER); i.e. apicectomy with or without a retrograde filling, is assessed in periapical radiographs (PR). Recently, the use of Cone Beam CT (CBCT) has increased within endodontics. Generally, CBCT detects more periapical lesions than PR, but basic research on the true nature of these lesions is missing. The objective was to assess the diagnostic validity of PR and CBCT for determining inflammation in SER-cases that were re-operated (SER-R) due to unsuccessful healing, using histology of the periapical lesion as reference for inflammation. Records from 149 patients, receiving SER 2004-10, were screened. In total 108 patients (119 teeth) were recalled for clinical follow-up examination, PR and CBCT, of which 74 patients (83 teeth) participated. Three observers assessed PR and CBCT as "successful healing" or "unsuccessful healing" using Rud and Molven´s criteria. SER-R was offered to all non-healed teeth with expected favorable prognosis for subsequent functional retention. During SER-R, biopsy was performed and histopathology verified whether or not inflammation was present. All re-operated cases were assessed non-healed in CBCT while 11 of these were assessed successfully healed in PR. Nineteen biopsies were examined. Histopathologic diagnosis revealed 42% (teeth=8) without periapical inflammation, 16% (teeth=3) with mild inflammation, and 42% (teeth=8) with moderate to intense inflammation. A correct diagnosis was obtained in 58% with CBCT (true positives) and 63% with PR (true positives+true negatives). Of the re-operated teeth, 42% had no periapical inflammatory lesion, and hence no benefit from SER-R. Not all lesions observed in CBCT represented periapical inflammatory lesions.

  8. The value of digital tomosynthesis in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography: analysis of diagnostic accuracy and confidence.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Baratella, Elisa; Cioffi, Vincenzo; Bregant, Paola; Cernic, Stefano; Cuttin, Roberto; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of digital tomosynthesis in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography. Two-hundred twenty-eight patients (133 men, 95 women; mean age, 70.8 ± 11.1 years) with suspected pulmonary lesions after initial analysis of chest radiography underwent digital tomosynthesis. Two independent readers (with 3 and 20 years of experience) prospectively analyzed the chest radiographic and digital tomosynthesis images on a picture archiving and communication system workstation and proposed a diagnostic confidence score for each lesion (1 or 2 = definitely or probably extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion, 3 = indeterminate, 4 or 5 = probably or definitely pulmonary lesion). Chest computed tomography was the reference standard examination. A total of 251 suspected pulmonary lesions were identified. In 71 patients, digital tomosynthesis and computed tomography did not confirm any lesion. In the remaining 157 patients, 180 lesions were identified, including 112 pulmonary and 68 extrapulmonary lesions. In 110 (reader 1) and 123 (reader 2) lesions, correct diagnoses were provided after analysis of the chest radiographs. All lesions were correctly classified after digital tomosynthesis except for 14 extrapulmonary lesions (both readers) that were misinterpreted as pulmonary and 10 (reader 1) and six (reader 2) pulmonary lesions that were misinterpreted as pleural. Digital radiography versus tomosynthesis differed in accuracy (reader 1, 43% vs 90%; reader 2, 49% vs 92%; P < .05) and confidence by area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (reader 1, 0.788 vs 0.944; reader 2, 0.840 vs 0.997; P < .05). Digital tomosynthesis improved diagnostic accuracy and confidence in the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary lesions on chest radiography. Copyright © 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic Accuracy of Central Venous Catheter Confirmation by Bedside Ultrasound Versus Chest Radiography in Critically Ill Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ablordeppey, Enyo A; Drewry, Anne M; Beyer, Alexander B; Theodoro, Daniel L; Fowler, Susan A; Fuller, Brian M; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2017-04-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the accuracy of bedside ultrasound for confirmation of central venous catheter position and exclusion of pneumothorax compared with chest radiography. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists, conference proceedings and ClinicalTrials.gov. Articles and abstracts describing the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound compared with chest radiography for confirmation of central venous catheters in sufficient detail to reconstruct 2 × 2 contingency tables were reviewed. Primary outcomes included the accuracy of confirming catheter positioning and detecting a pneumothorax. Secondary outcomes included feasibility, interrater reliability, and efficiency to complete bedside ultrasound confirmation of central venous catheter position. Investigators abstracted study details including research design and sonographic imaging technique to detect catheter malposition and procedure-related pneumothorax. Diagnostic accuracy measures included pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio. Fifteen studies with 1,553 central venous catheter placements were identified with a pooled sensitivity and specificity of catheter malposition by ultrasound of 0.82 (0.77-0.86) and 0.98 (0.97-0.99), respectively. The pooled positive and negative likelihood ratios of catheter malposition by ultrasound were 31.12 (14.72-65.78) and 0.25 (0.13-0.47). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for pneumothorax detection was nearly 100% in the participating studies. Bedside ultrasound reduced mean central venous catheter confirmation time by 58.3 minutes. Risk of bias and clinical heterogeneity in the studies were high. Bedside ultrasound is faster than radiography at identifying pneumothorax after central venous catheter insertion. When a central venous catheter malposition exists, bedside ultrasound will identify four out of every five earlier than

  10. Neutron imaging and tomography with Medipix2 and dental micro-roentgenography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Holy, T.; Lehmann, E.; Linhart, V.; Pospisil, S.; Rypar, V.; Uher, J.; Vacik, J.; Vavrik, D.; Vykydal, Z.; Cevallos, M.

    2006-12-01

    The position-sensitive semiconductor Medipix2 detector has been adapted for high-resolution dental X-ray and neutron imaging. As a fully electronic, low-dose and high spatial resolution digital dental-imaging device the system aims to observe the bone-to-implant tissue of order of tens of microns. Neutron radiography is proposed as a complementary diagnostic method to standard X-ray radiography as it can produce contrast images of materials which are otherwise indistinguishable in X-ray images. Neutron radiography and tomography tests have been carried out. Results are compared with other techniques. A review of recent developments and current status is presented.

  11. Evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of four-view radiography and conventional computed tomography analysing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stieger-Vanegas, S M; Senthirajah, S K J; Nemanic, S; Baltzer, W; Warnock, J; Bobe, G

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was (1) to determine whether four-view radiography of the pelvis is as reliable and accurate as computed tomography (CT) in diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures, in addition to coxofemoral and sacroiliac joint subluxation or luxation, and (2) to evaluate the effect of the amount of training in reading diagnostic imaging studies on the accuracy of diagnosing sacral and pelvic fractures in dogs. Sacral and pelvic fractures were created in 11 canine cadavers using a lateral impactor. In all cadavers, frog-legged ventro-dorsal, lateral, right and left ventro-45°-medial to dorsolateral oblique frog leg ("rollover 45-degree view") radiographs and a CT of the pelvis were obtained. Two radiologists, two surgeons and two veterinary students classified fractures using a confidence scale and noted the duration of evaluation for each imaging modality and case. The imaging results were compared to gross dissection. All evaluators required significantly more time to analyse CT images compared to radiographic images. Sacral and pelvic fractures, specifically those of the sacral body, ischiatic table, and the pubic bone, were more accurately diagnosed using CT compared to radiography. Fractures of the acetabulum and iliac body were diagnosed with similar accuracy (at least 86%) using either modality. Computed tomography is a better method for detecting canine sacral and some pelvic fractures compared to radiography. Computed tomography provided an accuracy of close to 100% in persons trained in evaluating CT images.

  12. Genotoxic effects of dental panoramic radiograph in children.

    PubMed

    El-Ashiry, Eman A; Abo-Hager, Eman A; Gawish, Abeer S

    2010-01-01

    This study was completed to evaluate chromosomal damage (micronucleus) and cellular death in exfoliated buccal mucosa cells taken from healthy children following exposure to panoramic radiation during dental radiography. Twenty children who underwent panoramic dental radiography for diagnostic purposes were included. Cytological preparations were stained with Feulgen stain, identified under light microscopy. Micronuclei, apoptotic nuclear alterations (condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis, pyknosis) and necrosis (karyolysis) were scored. showed no statistically significant differences in children's micronucleated oral mucosa cells before and after panoramic dental X-Ray exposure. On the other hand, there was a statistically significant increase in nuclear alterations closely related to genotoxicity such as condensed chromatin, karyorrhexis and pyknosis, while karyolysis of oral mucosal cells did not show significant increase after panoramic X-Ray exposure. Dental panoramic radiography may not be a factor that induces chromosomal damage, but is able to promote genotoxicity in children.

  13. Strategic Shift to a Diagnostic Model of Care in a Multi-Site Group Dental Practice

    PubMed Central

    Kalenderian, E; Maramaldi, P; Kim, S; Etolue, J; McClellan, L; Simmons, K; Yansane, A; White, JM; Walji, MF; Ramoni, RB

    2016-01-01

    Background Documenting standardized dental diagnostic terms represents an emerging change for how dentistry is practiced. We focused on a mid-sized dental group practice as it shifted to a policy of documenting patients’ diagnoses using standardized terms in the electronic health record. Methods Kotter’s change framework was translated into interview questions posed to the senior leadership in a mid-size dental group practice. In addition, quantitative content analyses were conducted on the written policies and forms before and after the implementation of standardized diagnosis documentation to assess the extent to which the forms and policies reflected the shift. Three reviewers analyzed the data individually and reached consensuses where needed. Results Kotter’s guiding change framework explained the steps taken to 97 percent utilization rate of the Electronic Health Record and Dental Diagnostic Code. Of the 96 documents included in the forms and policy analysis, 31 documents were officially updated but only two added a diagnostic element. Conclusion Change strategies established in the business literature hold utility for dental practices seeking diagnosis-centered care. Practical Implications A practice that shifts to a diagnosis-driven care philosophy would be best served by ensuring that the change process follows a leadership framework that is calibrated to the organization’s culture. PMID:28042605

  14. The value of high resolution computed tomography in the diagnostics of small opacities and complications of silicosis in mine machinery manufacturing workers, compared to radiography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinkai; Weng, Dong; Jin, Changshan; Yan, Bo; Xu, Guihua; Jin, Bo; Xia, Shenning; Chen, Jie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value and usefulness of high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in the diagnostics of small opacities and complications of silicosis in mine machinery manufacturing workers, compared to conventional radiograms. The diagnosis of silicosis is mainly based on the radiological findings of workers exposed to the dust causing lung fibrosis. However, on radiograms many parenchymal structures overlap, which limits the sensitivity and specificity of the method. Difficulties in accurate interpretation of conventional radiograms in silicosis also result from their relatively low resolution. We randomly selected 30 I period silicosis patients from 77 I period silicosis patients working at a mine machinery manufacturing company. Out of 1078 non-silicosis and 162 0+ period silicosis subjects, 30 non-silicosis and 30 0+ period silicosis subjects were randomly selected and matched with the 30 I period silicosis subjects by age (+/- 3.0 yr) and occupational exposure time (+/- 2.0 yr). Chest X-rays were taken at maximal inspiration. For the HRCT examination, the GE Somatom plus apparatus was used. Eight, five and six subjects were respectively diagnosed as 0+, I or I+ period silicosis based on HRCT among 90 subjects whose original diagnoses were non-silicosis, 0+ or I period silicosis based on radiography. The numbers of small opacities in HRCT scans were significantly higher than those seen in radiography in all lung zones (p<0.01). HRCT was more sensitive than radiography in detecting small opacities of mid-out zones of the lung, but no statistical significance was found between the two methods in the detection of small opacities of lower zones of the lung. A statistically significant increase in the detectability of bulla, emphysema, pleural, mediastinal and hilar changes was observed (p<0.05). HRCT might be more sensitive than radiography in detecting lung parenchymal changes suggestive of silicosis.

  15. Effect of diabetes mellitus and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants: a digital subtraction radiography study in rats.

    PubMed

    de Morais, Juliana Aparecida Najarro Dearo; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Pepato, Maria Teresa; Marcantonio, Elcio; Wenzel, Ann; Scaf, Gulnara

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin therapy on bone density around osseointegrated dental implants by digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Forty implants were placed in tibiae of 40 adult rats. After a healing period of 2 months, the animals were divided into four groups of 10 animals each: a 2-month control group, sacrificed at time (A), a diabetic group (D), an insulin-treated group (I) and a 4-month control group (C). During 2 months, group I received subcutaneous doses of insulin, whereas groups C and D received only saline. The animals in groups D, I and C were thereafter sacrificed. The glucose plasma levels (GPLs) were monitored throughout the experiment. Film radiographs were taken at implant surgery and on the day of sacrifice. The radiographs were digitized, and bone density in regions of osseointegration (OR) around the implants was evaluated by quantitative DSR between baseline and final images. Differences in shades of gray among the groups were assessed using ANOVA. GPLs were within normal range for groups A, C and I and higher for group D. There was a significant difference in mean gray shade values in the OR of subtraction images between groups D (122+/-7) and I (136+/-5) (P<0.05) while there were no significant differences between control groups A (128+/-13) and C (134+/-10) and the insulin group I. DM impaired bone density around osseointegrated dental implant. Further, insulin therapy maintained bone density in diabetic rats.

  16. Using the Monte Carlo method for assessing the tissue and organ doses of patients in dental radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, K. O.; Minenko, V. F.; Verenich, K. A.; Kuten, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    This work is dedicated to modeling dental radiographic examinations to assess the absorbed doses of patients and effective doses. For simulating X-ray spectra, the TASMIP empirical model is used. Doses are assessed on the basis of the Monte Carlo method by using MCNP code for voxel phantoms of ICRP. The results of the assessment of doses to individual organs and effective doses for different types of dental examinations and features of X-ray tube are presented.

  17. Does use of an electronic health record with dental diagnostic system terminology promote dental students' critical thinking?

    PubMed

    Reed, Susan G; Adibi, Shawn S; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G; Wahlquist, Amy E; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H; Walji, Muhammad F; O'Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-06-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students' critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013-17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry.

  18. Does Use of an Electronic Health Record with Dental Diagnostic System Terminology Promote Dental Students’ Critical Thinking?

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Susan G.; Adibi, Shawn S.; Coover, Mullen; Gellin, Robert G.; Wahlquist, Amy E.; AbdulRahiman, Anitha; Hamil, Lindsey H.; Walji, Muhammad F.; O’Neill, Paula; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    The Consortium for Oral Health Research and Informatics (COHRI) is leading the way in use of the Dental Diagnostic System (DDS) terminology in the axiUm electronic health record (EHR). This collaborative pilot study had two aims: 1) to investigate whether use of the DDS terms positively impacted predoctoral dental students’ critical thinking skills measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and 2) to refine study protocols. The study design was a natural experiment with cross-sectional data collection using the HSRT for 15 classes (2013–17) of students at three dental schools. Characteristics of students who had been exposed to the DDS terms were compared with students who had not, and the differences were tested by t-tests or chi-square tests. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate the relationship between exposure and outcome on the overall critical thinking score. The results showed that exposure was significantly related to overall score (p=0.01), with not-exposed students having lower mean overall scores. This study thus demonstrated a positive impact of using the DDS terminology in an EHR on the critical thinking skills of predoctoral dental students in three COHRI schools as measured by their overall score on the HSRT. These preliminary findings support future research to further evaluate a proposed model of critical thinking in clinical dentistry. PMID:26034034

  19. Cone-beam computed tomography versus digital periapical radiography in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions: A pilot study of the diagnostic accuracy of endodontists using both techniques

    PubMed Central

    Campello, Andrea Fagundes; Gonçalves, Lucio Souza; Guedes, Fábio Ribeiro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of previously trained endodontists in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography (DPR). Materials and Methods An ex vivo model using dry skulls was used, in which simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged using #1/2, #2, #4, and #6 round burs. A total of 11 teeth were included in the study, and 110 images were obtained with CBCT and with an intraoral digital periapical radiographic sensor (Instrumentarium dental, Tuusula, Finland) initially and after each bur was used. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated. All images were evaluated by 10 previously trained, certified endodontists. Agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient. The accuracy of each method in detecting apical lesions was calculated using the chi-square test. Results The kappa coefficient between examiners showed low agreement (range, 0.17-0.64). No statistical difference was found between CBCT and DPR in teeth without apical lesions (P=.15). The accuracy for CBCT was significantly higher than for DPR in all corresponding simulated lesions (P<.001). The correct diagnostic rate for CBCT ranged between 56.9% and 73.6%. The greatest difference between CBCT and DPR was seen in the maxillary teeth (CBCT, 71.4%; DPR, 28.6%; P<.01) and multi-rooted teeth (CBCT, 83.3%; DPR, 33.3%; P<.01). Conclusion CBCT allowed higher accuracy than DPR in detecting simulated lesions for all simulated lesions tested. Endodontists need to be properly trained in interpreting CBCT scans to achieve higher diagnostic accuracy. PMID:28361026

  20. Assessment of digital panoramic radiography's diagnostic value in angular bony lesions with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Bardia Vadiati; Nemati, Somayeh; Malekzadeh, Meisam; Javanmard, Afrooz

    2017-01-01

    Assessment of alveolar bone level in periodontitis is very important in determining prognosis and treatment plan. Panoramic radiography is a diagnostic tool used to screen patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of digital panoramic radiography in angular bony defects with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars. In this cross-sectional study, ninety angular bony defects in mandibular molars teeth with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth were selected in sixty patients with the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. Before surgery, bone probing was performed. During the surgery, the vertical distance from cementoenamel junction to the most apical part of bony defect was measured using a Williams probe and this measurements were employed as gold standard. This distance was measured on the panoramic radiographs by a Digital Calliper and Digital Ruler. All data were compare dusing independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. No significant difference was found between the results of bone probing and intra-surgical measurements (P = 0.377). The mean defect depth determined by Digital Caliper and Digital Ruler on panoramic radiographs was significantly less than surgical measurements (P < 0.001). The correlation between bone probing and surgical measurements in determining the defect depth was strong (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). Radiographic measurements made by Digital Ruler (r = 0.86), comparing to Digital Caliper (r = 0.79), showed a higher degree of correlation with surgical measurements. Based on this study, bone probing is a reliable method in vertical alveolar bone defect measurements. While the information obtained from digital panoramic radiographs should be used with caution and the ability of digital panoramic radiography in the determination of defect depth is limited.

  1. Assessment of digital panoramic radiography's diagnostic value in angular bony lesions with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Bardia Vadiati; Nemati, Somayeh; Malekzadeh, Meisam; Javanmard, Afrooz

    2017-01-01

    Background: Assessment of alveolar bone level in periodontitis is very important in determining prognosis and treatment plan. Panoramic radiography is a diagnostic tool used to screen patients. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of digital panoramic radiography in angular bony defects with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth in mandibular molars. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, ninety angular bony defects in mandibular molars teeth with 5 mm or deeper pocket depth were selected in sixty patients with the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis. Before surgery, bone probing was performed. During the surgery, the vertical distance from cementoenamel junction to the most apical part of bony defect was measured using a Williams probe and this measurements were employed as gold standard. This distance was measured on the panoramic radiographs by a Digital Calliper and Digital Ruler. All data were compare dusing independent samples t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results: No significant difference was found between the results of bone probing and intra-surgical measurements (P = 0.377). The mean defect depth determined by Digital Caliper and Digital Ruler on panoramic radiographs was significantly less than surgical measurements (P < 0.001). The correlation between bone probing and surgical measurements in determining the defect depth was strong (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). Radiographic measurements made by Digital Ruler (r = 0.86), comparing to Digital Caliper (r = 0.79), showed a higher degree of correlation with surgical measurements. Conclusion: Based on this study, bone probing is a reliable method in vertical alveolar bone defect measurements. While the information obtained from digital panoramic radiographs should be used with caution and the ability of digital panoramic radiography in the determination of defect depth is limited. PMID:28348615

  2. Diagnostic imaging costs before and after digital tomosynthesis implementation in patient management after detection of suspected thoracic lesions on chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio; Grisi, Guido; Baratella, Elisa; Cuttin, Roberto; Poillucci, Gabriele; Kus, Sara; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate diagnostic imaging costs before and after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions on CXR. Four hundred sixty-five patients (263 male, 202 female; age, 72.47 ± 11.33 years) with suspected thoracic lesion(s) after CXR underwent DTS. Each patient underwent CT when a pulmonary non-calcified lesion was identified by DTS while CT was not performed when a benign pulmonary or extrapulmonary lesion or pseudolesion was identified. The average per-patient imaging cost was calculated by normalising the costs before and after DTS implementation. In 229/465 patients who underwent DTS after suspicious CXR, DTS showed 193 pulmonary lesions and 36 pleural lesions, while in the remaining 236/465 patients, lesions were ruled out as pseudolesions of CXR. Chest CT examination was performed in 127/465 (27 %) patients while in the remaining 338/465 patients (73 %) CXR doubtful findings were resolved by DTS. The average per-patient costs of CXR, DTS and CT were 15.15, 41.55 and 113.66. DTS allowed an annual cost saving of 8,090.2 considering unenhanced CT and 19,298.12 considering contrast-enhanced CT. Considering a DTS reimbursement rate of 62.7 the break even point corresponds to 479 DTS examinations. Per-patient diagnostic imaging costs decreased after DTS implementation in patients with suspected thoracic lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis improves the diagnostic accuracy and confidence in chest radiography • Digital tomosynthesis reduces the need for CT for a suspected pulmonary lesion • Digital tomosynthesis requires a dose level equivalent to that of around two chest radiographies • Digital tomosynthesis produces a significant per-patient saving in diagnostic imaging costs.

  3. Dental diagnostic radiology in the forensic sciences: two case presentations.

    PubMed

    Nicopoulou-Karayianni, K; Mitsea, A G; Horner, K

    2007-06-01

    Dentomaxillofacial radiology is a useful tool in forensic science to reveal characteristics of the structures of the dentomaxillofacial region. Postmortem radiographs are valuable to the forensic odontologist for comparison with antemortem radiographs, which are the most consistent part of the antemortem records that can be transmitted during forensic examination procedures. By using dentomaxillofacial radiology we can, therefore, give answers to problems dealing with identification cases, mass disasters and dental age estimation. We present the contribution of dentomaxillofacial radiology to the forensic sciences through two cases of deceased persons, where identification was based on information provided by radiographs. The right performance, interpretation and reportage of dentomaxillofacial radiological examination and procedures can be extremely valuable in solving forensic problems.

  4. Association and comparison between visual inspection and bitewing radiography for the detection of recurrent dental caries under restorations.

    PubMed

    Lino, José R; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Coelho, Valéria Silveira; Ramos-Jorge, Maria L; Moysés, Marcos R; Ribeiro, José C R

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate, in posterior teeth, the association between the characteristics of the margins of a restoration visually inspected and the presence, under restorations, of recurrent or residual dental caries detected by radiographic examination. Furthermore, the agreement between visual inspection and radiographs to detect dental caries was assessed. Eighty-five permanent molars and premolars with resin restorations on the interproximal and/or occlusal faces, from 18 patients, were submitted for visual inspection and radiographic examination. The visual inspection involved the criteria of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS). Bitewing radiographs were used for the radiographic examination. Logistic regression was used to analyse the association between the characteristics of the margins of a restoration assessed by visual inspection (absence of dental caries, or early, established, inactive and active lesions) and the presence of recurrent caries detected by radiographs. Kappa coefficients were calculated for determining agreement between the two methods. The Kappa coefficient for agreement between visual inspection and radiographic examination was 0.19. Established lesions [odds ratio (OR) = 9.89; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 2.94-33.25; P < 0.05] and lesion activity (OR = 2.57; 95% CI: 0.91-7.27; P < 0.05) detected by visual inspection, were associated with recurrent or residual dental caries detected by radiographs. Restorations with established and active lesions at the margins had a greater chance of exhibiting recurrent or residual lesions in the radiographic examination. The present findings demonstrate that restorations with established and active lesions at the margins when visually inspected often require removal and retreatment. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  5. Evaluation of different Diagnostic Modalities for Diagnosis of Dental Caries: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Rani; Jaidka, Shipra; Nishad, Muhamad; Singh, Shikha; Tomar, Divya

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the efficacy of different diagnostic aids for diagnosis of dental caries and to compare the validity in terms of sensitivity and specificity of all four diagnostic modalities for diagnosis of caries. Materials and methods Occlusal surfaces of 100 primary and permanent molars were examined using the four diagnostic systems (visual, intraoral camera, DIAGNOdent, and DIAGNOdent with dye). These results were compared with operative intervention gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each diagnostic system for both enamel and dentin caries. Interrater agreement was calculated for each diagnostic system using kappa statistics. Results For both enamel and dentin caries, the highest sensitivity values were provided by DIAGNOdent (0.91 and 0.72) and lowest for visual examination on wet surface (0.60 and 0.50). For both enamel and dentin caries, the specificity was found to be highest for intraoral camera on dry surface and lowest for visual examination. The DIAGNOdent gave the highest value of interrater agreement (kappa), i.e., 0.816 as compared with 0.03 for visual examination. Conclusion The study clearly demonstrated that DIAGNO-dent was the most accurate and valid system tested for the detection of occlusal caries. It has the advantage of quantifying the mineral content, helping to improve the diagnostic efficacy and treatment and accurate assessment of fissures where the visual examination alone is not adequate, thus complementing the traditional dental examination. How to cite this article Zaidi I, Somani R, Jaidka S, Nishad M, Singh S, Tomar D. Evaluation of different Diagnostic Modalities for Diagnosis of Dental Caries: An in vivo Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(4):320-325. PMID:28127163

  6. Conventional radiography and cross-sectional imaging when planning dental implants in the anterior edentulous mandible to support an overdenture: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shelley, A M; Glenny, A-M; Goodwin, M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2014-01-01

    The objectives for this systematic review were to determine if the pre-operative availability of cross-sectional imaging, such as cone beam CT, has a diagnostic impact, therapeutic impact or impact on patients' outcome when placing two dental implants in the anterior mandible to support an overdenture. The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (CENTRAL), MEDLINE® and Embase were searched up to, and including, February 2013. Studies were considered eligible for inclusion if they compared the impact of conventional and cross-sectional imaging when placing dental implants in sites including the anterior mandible. An adapted quality assessment tool was used for the assessment of the risk of bias in included studies. Pooled quantitative analysis was not possible and, therefore, synthesis was qualitative. Of 2374 potentially eligible papers, 5 studies were included. Little can be determined from a synthesis of these studies because of their small number, clinical diversity and high risks of bias. Notwithstanding, it may be tentatively inferred that cross-sectional imaging has a therapeutic impact in the more challenging cases. In terms of impact, this review has found no evidence to support any specific imaging modality when planning dental implant placement in any region of the mouth. Therefore, those who argue that cross-sectional imaging should be used for the assessment of all dental implant sites are unsupported by evidence.

  7. Diagnostic efficacy of panoramic radiography in detection of osteoporosis in post-menopausal women with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunanda; Krishnamurthy, Vasavi; Pagare, Sandeep S

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate panoramic radiograph, a commonly taken dental radiograph as a screening tool to detect early osseous changes (normal, mildly or severely eroded) of the mandibular inferior cortex and measure the mandibular cortical width (CW) in post-menopausal women and correlate it with the bone mineral density (BMD) measured by the ultrasound bone sonometer at the mid-shaft tibia region. The study included females between 45 years and 65 years of age in their post-menopausal stage (no menstruation for at least 6-12 months). Mandibular indices (mandibular CW and mandibular cortical shape) were evaluated from panoramic radiographs. The BMD assessment was carried out at the mid-shaft tibia region, exactly half-way between the heel and the knee joint perpendicular to the direction of the bone, using an ultrasound bone sonometer. It is a non-invasive device designed for quantitative measurement of the velocity of ultrasound waves as speed of sound in m/s, capable of measuring bone density at one or more skeletal sites. Using 1994 WHO criteria the study subjects were categorized as Group 1: Normal, Group 2: Osteopenia, Group 3: Osteoporosis. (WHO T score for tibia BMD can be used as a standard). The diagnostic efficacy of the panoramic radiograph in detecting osseous changes in post-menopausal women with low BMD was shown to have 96% specificity and 60% sensitivity with mandibular cortical shape and 58% specificity and 73% sensitivity with mandibular CW measurement. Factorial ANOVA analysis carried out indicated a significant correlation of BMD classification with mandibular cortical shape (F = 29.0, P < 0.001, partial eta squared [η(2)] =0.85), a non-significant correlation with mandibular CW, (F = 1.6, P = 0.23, η(2) = 0.86), and a more significant correlation with combined cortical shape and width (F = 3.3, P < 0.05, η(2) = 0.70). The study concludes that the combined mandibular cortical findings (P < 0.05) and mandibular cortical shape

  8. Automated chest-radiography as a triage for Xpert testing in resource-constrained settings: a prospective study of diagnostic accuracy and costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipsen, R. H. H. M.; Sánchez, C. I.; Maduskar, P.; Melendez, J.; Peters-Bax, L.; Peter, J. G.; Dawson, R.; Theron, G.; Dheda, K.; van Ginneken, B.

    2015-07-01

    Molecular tests hold great potential for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis, but are costly, time consuming, and HIV-infected patients are often sputum scarce. Therefore, alternative approaches are needed. We evaluated automated digital chest radiography (ACR) as a rapid and cheap pre-screen test prior to Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert). 388 suspected TB subjects underwent chest radiography, Xpert and sputum culture testing. Radiographs were analysed by computer software (CAD4TB) and specialist readers, and abnormality scores were allocated. A triage algorithm was simulated in which subjects with a score above a threshold underwent Xpert. We computed sensitivity, specificity, cost per screened subject (CSS), cost per notified TB case (CNTBC) and throughput for different diagnostic thresholds. 18.3% of subjects had culture positive TB. For Xpert alone, sensitivity was 78.9%, specificity 98.1%, CSS $13.09 and CNTBC $90.70. In a pre-screening setting where 40% of subjects would undergo Xpert, CSS decreased to $6.72 and CNTBC to $54.34, with eight TB cases missed and throughput increased from 45 to 113 patients/day. Specialists, on average, read 57% of radiographs as abnormal, reducing CSS ($8.95) and CNTBC ($64.84). ACR pre-screening could substantially reduce costs, and increase daily throughput with few TB cases missed. These data inform public health policy in resource-constrained settings.

  9. Accuracy of direct digital radiography for detecting occlusal caries in primary teeth compared with conventional radiography and visual inspection: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Dias da Silva, P R; Martins Marques, M; Steagall, W; Medeiros Mendes, F; Lascala, C A

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of caries lesions is still a matter of concern in dentistry. The diagnosis of dental caries by digital radiography has a number of advantages over conventional radiography; however, this method has not been explored fully in the field of paediatric dentistry. This in vitro research evaluated the accuracy of direct digital radiography compared with visual inspection and conventional radiography in the diagnosis of occlusal caries lesions in primary molars. Methods 50 molars were selected and evaluated under standardized conditions by 2 previously calibrated examiners according to 3 diagnostic methods (visual inspection, conventional radiography and direct digital radiography). Direct digital radiographs were obtained with the Dixi3 system (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and the conventional radiographs with InSight film (Kodak Eastman Co., Rochester, NY). The images were scored and a reference standard was obtained histologically. The interexaminer reliability was calculated using Cohen's kappa test and the specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of the methods were calculated. Results Examiner reliability was good. For lesions limited to the enamel, visual inspection showed significantly higher sensitivity and accuracy than both radiographic methods, but no significant difference was found in specificity. For teeth with dentinal caries, no significant differences were found for any parameter when comparing visual and radiographic evaluation. Conclusions Although less accurate than the visual method for detecting caries lesions confined to the enamel, the direct digital radiographic method is as effective as conventional radiographic examination and visual inspection of primary teeth with occlusal caries when the dentine is involved. PMID:20729186

  10. Neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, H.; Iddings, F.

    1998-08-01

    Neutron radiography is becoming a well established nondestructive testing (NDT) method. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing (ASNT) has recognized the method through its recommended practice SNT-TCIA which outlines training, knowledge, and experience necessary to obtain levels of competency in the method. Certification of nondestructive testing personnel is also covered in a military standard. Technical publications in the field of NDT and nuclear technology carry articles on neutron radiography and technical meetings include papers or even entire sessions on neutron radiography. There is an on-going series of international conferences on neutron radiography. Many books are available to provide introductory and advanced material on neutron radiographic techniques and applications. Neutron radiography as a service for hire is available, similar to that offered for other NDT services. The method is being adopted to solve NDT problems in specialty areas. The objective of this report is to provide a brief survey of the current state of the art in the use of neutron radiography. The survey will include information on the technique including principles of the method, sources of neutrons, detection methodology, standards and image quality indicators, and representative applications. An extensive reference list provides additional information for those who wish to investigate further and a Glossary is included which provides definitions for terms used in Neutron Radiography.

  11. Radiation absorbed from dental implant radiography: a comparison of linear tomography, CT scan, and panoramic and intra-oral techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Danforth, R.A.; Barnes, R.W.; Burtch, M.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Absorbed radiation dose in bone marrow, thyroid, salivary gland, eye, and skin entrance was determined by placement of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD's) at selected anatomical sites within and on a human-like x-ray phantom. The phantom was exposed to radiation from linear tomographic and computer-assisted tomographic (CT) simulated dental implant radiographic examinations. The mean dose was determined for each anatomical site. Resulting dose measurements from linear tomography and computer-assisted tomography are compared with reported panoramic and intra-oral doses. CT examination delivered the greatest dose, while linear tomography was generally lowest. Panoramic and intra-oral doses were similar to those of linear tomography.

  12. Provision of diagnostic and preventive services in general dental practice.

    PubMed

    Brennan, D S; Spencer, A J

    2003-03-01

    Diagnosis and prevention are among the most frequently provided services in Australian private general dental practice, and have increased over recent times. The aims of this study were to examine the provision of examinations, radiographs, prophylaxis and topical fluoride, and to assess whether these services varied by patient, visit and oral health characteristics. Data were collected by a mailed survey of a random sample of dentists from each State/Territory in Australia in 1998-99 with a response rate of 71%. Data were collected from a log of service items provided on a typical day. Multivariate analyses of services showed that emergency visits were associated with higher rates [RR = Rate ratio, 95%CI] of radiographs (RR = 1.32, 1.06-1.66) but lower rates of prophylaxis (RR = 0.37, 0.29-0.48) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.20, 0.08-0.47) compared to non-emergency visits. Capital city patients had a higher rate of topical fluoride (RR = 2.06, 1.17-3.64) services than non-capital city patients. Patients with decayed teeth had a lower rate of prophylaxis services (RR = 0.82, 0.68-0.99) than patients with no decay. Compared to the reference of caries, patients with aesthetic problems had lower rates of radiographs (RR = 0. 19, 0.08-0.47) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.24, 0.08-0.71), those with cuspal fracture/failed restoration also had lower rates of radiographs (RR = 0.54, 0.37-0.80) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.52, 0.28-0.95), those with denture problems had lower rates of examinations (RR = 0.53, 0.32-0.87), radiographs (RR = 0.05, 0.01-0.28), prophylaxis (RR = 0.13, 0.04-0.37) and topical fluoride (RR = 0.04, 0.01-0.32), those with periodontal disease had higher rates of examinations (RR = 1.45, 1.13-1.85) and prophylaxis (RR = 2.39, 1.79-3.19), those with pulpal/periapical infection had lower rates of examination (RR = 0.55, 0.42-0.74) and prophylaxis (RR = 0.36, 0.19-0.66), but higher rates of radiographs (RR = 1.92, 1.48-2.50), those with recall

  13. An in vitro radiographic analysis of the density of dental luting cements as measured by CCD-based digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Jevremovic, Danimir; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Obradovic-Djuricic, Kosovka

    2012-05-01

    According to the ISO, the radiopacity of luting cements should be equal to or greater than that of aluminum. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the radiopacity of 13 commercially available dental luting cements and compare them with human enamel and dentin. Five classes of luting cements were evaluated: zinc phosphate (Cegal N and Harvard Zinc Phosphate), zinc polycarboxylate (Harvard Polycarboxylate and Hoffmann's Carboxylate), glass ionomers (Ketac Cem Easymix, Ketac Cem Radiopaque, and Fuji I), resin-modified glass ionomer (Rely X Luting), and resin cements (Multilink Automix, Variolink II, Speed CEM, Rely X Unicem Automix, and three shades of Variolink Veneer). Tooth slices served as controls. Five specimens of each material measuring 8 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick were prepared and radiographed alongside tooth slices and an aluminum stepwedge using a Trophy RVG sensor. The radiopacity values were expressed in mm Al and analyzed by the ANOVA and Tukey tests (P < .05). All the cements examined except Variolink Veneer had significantly higher radiopacities than that of dentin. Rely X Unicem Automix, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements demonstrated radiopacities that were not significantly different with respect to enamel. Zinc phosphate, zinc polycarboxylate, and three of the resin cements presented radiopacity values that were significantly greater than that of enamel. Almost all the investigated materials presented an acceptable radiopacity. Radiopacity of dental cements seems to depend more on the presence of elements with high atomic numbers than on the type of the material.

  14. Diagnostic performance of dental maturity for identification of skeletal maturation phase.

    PubMed

    Perinetti, G; Contardo, L; Gabrieli, P; Baccetti, T; Di Lenarda, R

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse the diagnostic performance of the circumpubertal dental maturation phases for the identification of individual-specific skeletal maturation phases. A total of 354 healthy subjects, 208 females and 146 males (mean age, 11.1 ± 2.4 years; range, 6.8-17.1 years), were enrolled in the study. Dental maturity was assessed through the calcification stages from panoramic radiographs of the mandibular canine, the first and second premolars, and the second molar. Determination of skeletal maturity was according to the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method on lateral cephalograms. Diagnostic performances were evaluated according to the dental maturation stages for each tooth for the identification of the CVM stages and growth phases (as pre-pubertal, pubertal, and post-pubertal) using positive likelihood ratios (LHRs). A positive LHR threshold of 10 or more was considered for satisfactory reliability of any dental maturation stage for the identification of any of the CVM stages or growth phases. The positive LHRs were generally less than 2.0, with a few exceptions. These four teeth showed positive LHRs greater than 10 only for the identification of the pre-pubertal growth phase, with values from 10.8 for the second molar (stage E) to 39.3 for the first premolar (stage E). Dental maturation assessment is only useful for diagnosis of the pre-pubertal growth phase, and thus, precise information in relation to the timing of the onset of the growth spurt is not provided by these indices.

  15. Suresh K. AggarwalQuantified Analysis of a Production Diesel Injector Using X-Ray Radiography and Engine Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Anita I.

    The work presented in this thesis pursues further the understanding of fuel spray, combustion, performance, and emissions in an internal combustion engine. Various experimental techniques including x-ray radiography, injection rate measurement, and in-cylinder endoscopy are employed in this work to characterize the effects of various upstream conditions such as injection rate profile and fuel physical properties. A single non-evaporating spray from a 6-hole full-production Hydraulically Actuated Electronically Controlled Unit Injector (HEUI) nozzle is studied under engine-like ambient densities with x-ray radiography at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Two different injection pressures were investigated and parameters such as fuel mass distribution, spray penetration, cone angle, and spray velocity were obtained. The data acquired with x-ray radiography is used for the development and validation of improved Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. Rate of injection is studied using the same HEUI in a single cylinder Caterpillar test engine. The injection rate profile is altered to have three levels of initial injection pressure rise. Combustion behavior, engine performance, and emissions information was acquired for three rate profile variations. It is found that NOx emission reduction is achieved when the SOI timing is constant at the penalty of lower power generated in the cycle. However, if CA50 is aligned amongst the three profiles, the NOx emissions and power are constant with a slight penalty in CO emissions. The influence of physical and chemical parameters of fuel is examined in a study of the heavy alcohol, phytol (C20H40O), in internal combustion engine application. Phytol is blended with diesel in 5%, 10%, and 20% by volume. Combustion behavior is similar between pure diesel and the phytol/diesel blends with small differences noted in peak cylinder pressure, ignition delay, and heat release rate in the premix burn

  16. Using GafChromic film to estimate the effective dose from dental cone beam CT and panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Al-Okshi, A; Nilsson, M; Petersson, A; Wiese, M; Lindh, C

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of GafChromic(®) XR-QA2 (ISP Corp., Wayne, NJ) as a dosemeter when performing measurements of the effective dose from three cone beam CT (CBCT) units and to compare the doses from examinations of three common dental clinical situations. A second aim was to compare the radiation doses for three digital panoramic units with the doses for the CBCT units. The CBCT units used were Veraviewepocs 3De(®) (J Morita MFG Corp., Kyoto, Japan), ProMax(®) 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) and NewTom VGi(®) (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy). GafChromic XR-QA2 films were placed between the selected layers of the head and neck of a tissue-equivalent human skull (RANDO(®) phantom; The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY). The exposure parameters were set using the automatic exposure control function of the units. Depending on the availability, medium and smaller field of view (FOV) scanning modes were used. The effective dose was estimated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection formalism. The lowest effective dose of a CBCT unit was observed for ProMax 3D, FOV 4 × 5 cm (10 μSv), the highest for NewTom VGi, FOV 8 × 8 cm-high resolution (129 μSv). The range of effective doses for digital panoramic machines measured was 8-14 μSv. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using radiochromic films for dental CBCT and panoramic dosimetry.

  17. Diagnostic Dental Radiation Risk during Pregnancy: Awareness among General Dentists in Tabriz.

    PubMed

    Razi, Tahmineh; Bazvand, Leila; Ghojazadeh, Morteza

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant women often do not receive proper dental care in emergency visits due to a lack of awareness of the effect of radiation doses and the involved risks for the fetus. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness of general dentists practicing in Tabriz, Iran, of the risks involved during exposure to diagnostic dental radiation in pregnant women. In this descriptive/cross-sectional study, 250 general dentists, who had attended continuing education courses under the supervision of the Faculty of Dentistry, filled out questionnaires on their awareness of radiation risks. Data was analyzed by Spearman's correlation coefficient test. The mean of correct answers was 6.47±1.66, with the least and highest correct answers of 2 and 10, respectively. The highest and the lowest levels of awareness were related to the use of a lead apron (92%) and a long rectangular collimator (3.2%), respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of practitioners and awareness of radiation risks (P=0.02). However, no statistically significant correlation was observed between job experience (P=0.25) and the number of continuing education courses attended (P=0.16) and awareness of radiation risks. The studied population of dentists does not seem to have the sufficient knowledge regarding the diagnostic dental radiation risk during pregnancy. Further educational courses and pamphlets are recommended for increasing their awareness of this subject.

  18. Polarization sensitive camera for the in vitro diagnostic and monitoring of dental erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossen, Anke; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Lussi, Adrian; Meier, Christoph

    Due to a frequent consumption of acidic food and beverages, the prevalence of dental erosion increases worldwide. In an initial erosion stage, the hard dental tissue is softened due to acidic demineralization. As erosion progresses, a gradual tissue wear occurs resulting in thinning of the enamel. Complete loss of the enamel tissue can be observed in severe clinical cases. Therefore, it is essential to provide a diagnosis tool for an accurate detection and monitoring of dental erosion already at early stages. In this manuscript, we present the development of a polarization sensitive imaging camera for the visualization and quantification of dental erosion. The system consists of two CMOS cameras mounted on two sides of a polarizing beamsplitter. A horizontal linearly polarized light source is positioned orthogonal to the camera to ensure an incidence illumination and detection angles of 45°. The specular reflected light from the enamel surface is collected with an objective lens mounted on the beam splitter and divided into horizontal (H) and vertical (V) components on each associate camera. Images of non-eroded and eroded enamel surfaces at different erosion degrees were recorded and assessed with diagnostic software. The software was designed to generate and display two types of images: distribution of the reflection intensity (V) and a polarization ratio (H-V)/(H+V) throughout the analyzed tissue area. The measurements and visualization of these two optical parameters, i.e. specular reflection intensity and the polarization ratio, allowed detection and quantification of enamel erosion at early stages in vitro.

  19. Digital radiography: a survey of dentists in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Brady, Daniel T

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of digital radiography among dentists in Hawai'i and report their experiences using it. A 20-question survey was developed and used to interview dentists in Hawai'i. Approximately 500 dentists were contacted. The survey asked whether or not the dentist uses digital radiography. For those not using digital equipment, reasons were given as well as proposed future use. For users of digital equipment, further information was requested: group or solo practice, length of time with digital equipment, length of time to decide, brand of dental software, brand and type of digital equipment, how many different systems, satisfaction, would they do it again, financially worth it, advantages, disadvantages, diagnostic or not, use of special features, sensor replacement and maintenance costs, and any other comments about digital radiography. 102 dentists responded to the survey. 36 percent utilize digital radiography. Only 40 percent of nonusers have any inclination of converting to digital, cost being the most common reason not to convert. Average length of time with digital was 3.4 years and about 2 years to make the decision. Dentrix was the most popular software and Dexis the most popular equipment. The overwhelming majority are satisfied with systems, feel they are financially worth it, feel it is diagnostic, and would purchase them again. Advantages included things such as speed, no use of chemicals, and lower radiation. Disadvantages included cost, sensor-related issues, and computer issues. Digital users find special features helpful and utilize them regularly. Maintenance costs include annual software upgrades, sensor replacement, and barriers and bitetabs. Digital radiography is becoming more prevalent in Hawai'i. The big obstacle seems to be cost for most dentists, although users believe it is a good financial investment.

  20. Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, A. K.; Brenizer, J. S.

    Neutron radiography and its related two-dimensional (2D) neutron imaging techniques have been established as invaluable nondestructive inspection methods and quantitative measurement tools. They have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from inspection of aircraft engine turbine blades to study of two-phase fluid flow in operating proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Neutron radiography is similar to X-ray radiography in that the method produces a 2D attenuation map of neutron radiation that has penetrated the object being examined. However, the images produced differ and are often complementary due to the differences between X-ray and neutron interaction mechanisms. The uses and types of 2D neutron imaging have expanded over the past 15 years as a result of advances in imaging technology and improvements in neutron generators/sources and computers. Still, high-intensity sources such as those from reactors and spallation neutron sources, together with conventional film radiography, remain the mainstay of high-resolution, large field-of-view neutron imaging. This chapter presents a summary of the history, methods, and related variations of neutron radiography techniques.

  1. Diagnostic methods for assessing maxillary skeletal and dental transverse deficiencies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Dena; Currie, Kris; Vich, Manuel Lagravere; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the diagnostic tools available for assessing maxillary transverse deficiencies. Methods An electronic search of three databases was performed from their date of establishment to April 2015, with manual searching of reference lists of relevant articles. Articles were considered for inclusion if they reported the accuracy or reliability of a diagnostic method or evaluation technique for maxillary transverse dimensions in mixed or permanent dentitions. Risk of bias was assessed in the included articles, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool-2. Results Nine articles were selected. The studies were heterogeneous, with moderate to low methodological quality, and all had a high risk of bias. Four suggested that the use of arch width prediction indices with dental cast measurements is unreliable for use in diagnosis. Frontal cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reportedly more reliable for assessing intermaxillary transverse discrepancies than posteroanterior cephalograms. Two studies proposed new three-dimensional transverse analyses with CBCT images that were reportedly reliable, but have not been validated for clinical sensitivity or specificity. No studies reported sensitivity, specificity, positive or negative predictive values or likelihood ratios, or ROC curves of the methods for the diagnosis of transverse deficiencies. Conclusions Current evidence does not enable solid conclusions to be drawn, owing to a lack of reliable high quality diagnostic studies evaluating maxillary transverse deficiencies. CBCT images are reportedly more reliable for diagnosis, but further validation is required to confirm CBCT's accuracy and diagnostic superiority. PMID:27668196

  2. Single source dual-energy computed tomography in the diagnosis of gout: Diagnostic reliability in comparison to digital radiography and conventional computed tomography of the feet.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Tobias; Diekhoff, Torsten; Hermann, Sandra; Stroux, Andrea; Mews, Jürgen; Blobel, Jörg; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the diagnostic value of single-source dual-energy computed tomography (SDECT) in gouty arthritis and to compare its capability to detect urate depositions with digital radiography (DR) and conventional computed tomography (CT). Forty-four patients who underwent SDECT volume scans of the feet for suspected gouty arthritis were retrospectively analyzed. SDECT, CT (both n=44) and DR (n=36) were scored by three blinded readers for presence of osteoarthritis, erosions, and tophi. A diagnosis was made for each imaging modality. Results were compared to the clinical diagnosis using the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria. The patient population was divided into a gout (n=21) and control (n=23) group based on final clinical diagnosis. Osteoarthritis was evident in 15 joints using CT and 30 joints using DR (p=0.165). There were 134 erosions detected by CT compared to 38 erosions detected by DR (p<0.001). In total 119 tophi were detected by SDECT, compared to 85 tophi by CT (p=0.182) and 25 tophi by DR (p<0.001). SDECT had best diagnostic value for diagnosis of gout compared to DR and conventional CT (sensitivity and specificity for SDECT: 71.4% and 95.7%, CT: 71.4% and 91.3% and DR: 44.4% and 83.3%, respectively). For all three readers, Cohen's kappa for DR and conventional CT were substantial for all scoring items and ranged from 0.75 to 0.77 and 0.72-0.76, respectively. For SDECT Cohen's kappa was good to almost perfect with 0.77-0.84. SDECT is capable to detect uric acid depositions with good sensitivity and high specificity in feet, therefore diagnostic confidence is improved. Using SDECT, inter-reader variance can be markedly reduced for the detection of gouty tophi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Image post-processing in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Gormez, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Hasan Huseyin

    2009-10-01

    Image post-processing of dental digital radiographs, a function which used commonly in dental practice is presented in this article. Digital radiography has been available in dentistry for more than 25 years and its use by dental practitioners is steadily increasing. Digital acquisition of radiographs enables computer-based image post-processing to enhance image quality and increase the accuracy of interpretation. Image post-processing applications can easily be practiced in dental office by a computer and image processing programs. In this article, image post-processing operations such as image restoration, image enhancement, image analysis, image synthesis, and image compression, and their diagnostic efficacy is described. In addition this article provides general dental practitioners with a broad overview of the benefits of the different image post-processing operations to help them understand the role of that the technology can play in their practices.

  4. Pre-operative diagnostic radiograph interpretation by general dental practitioners for root canal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, I Anand

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate which radicular radiographic features general dentists want to interpret, determine which of the radicular radiographic features general dentists interpret and which ones they miss in a diagnostic radiograph and correlate how accurately general dentists are able to interpret radiographic features. Methods 20 general dental practitioners were selected and given 2 sets of questionnaires. The first set asked them to fill out the findings they would elucidate in a diagnostic radiograph while the second set consisted of 30 randomly selected intraoral radiographs to interpret. Results In the first set of questionnaires, more than 50% of dentists said they would interpret periapical changes, calcification, root curvature and the number of root canals. Less than 50% said they would interpret canal morphology, open apex, resorption, fracture, number of roots and lamina dura. In the second set of questionnaires, more than 90% missed grade 1 or 2 periapical changes (according to periapical index scoring), resorption and canal calcification. More than 80% of dentists missed extra roots and root curvature buccally while no dentists were able to interpret the periodontal ligament width changes, lamina dura and canal variation (C-shape). Using a paired t-test, there was significant variation in answers between the first set and second set of questionnaires. Conclusion It is concluded from this study that general dental practitioners are able to detect radiographic changes when they are extensive but they miss periodontal ligament width and lamina dura changes. PMID:22074878

  5. Practice characteristics associated with patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Weems, Richard A; Litaker, Mark S; Shelton, Brent J

    2006-10-01

    To quantify the role of practice characteristics in patient-specific receipt of dental diagnostic radiographic services. Florida Dental Care Study (FDCS). Study Design. The FDCS was a 48-month prospective observational cohort study of community-dwelling adults. Participants' dentists were asked to complete a questionnaire about their practice characteristics. In-person interviews and clinical examinations were conducted at baseline, 24, and 48 months, with 6-monthly telephone interviews in between. A single multivariate (four radiographic service outcomes) multivariable (multiple explanatory covariates) logistic regression was used to model service receipts. These practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of radiographic services: number of different practices attended during follow-up; dentist's rating of how busy the practice was; typical waiting time for a new patient examination; practice size; percentage of patients that the dentist reported as interested in details about the condition of their mouths; percentage of African American patients in the practice; percentage of patients in the practice who do not have dental insurance; and dentist's agreement with a statement regarding whether patients should be dismissed from the practice. Effects had differential magnitudes and directions of effect, depending upon radiograph type. Practice characteristics were significantly associated with patient-specific receipt of services. These effects were independent of patient-specific disease level and patient-specific sociodemographic characteristics, suggesting that practitioners do influence receipt of these diagnostic services. These findings are consistent with the conclusion that practitioners act in response to a mix of patients' interests, economic self-interests, and their own treatment preferences.

  6. Evaluation of the effects of diagnostic radiation on titanium dental implant osseointegration in the micropig.

    PubMed

    Basquill, P J; Steflik, D E; Brennan, W A; Horner, J; Van Dyke, T E

    1994-09-01

    The effect that diagnostic radiation may have on peri-implant supporting alveolar tissues is not well understood. Fifty-four (54) titanium dental implants were inserted into the posterior mandible of nine micropigs. At implant placement surgery, 18 implants were exposed to either 2 (diagnostic) or 10 (excessive) doses of diagnostic radiation; the remaining 36 implants served as controls. Fourteen weeks after implant placement, standardized clinical radiographs were taken, pigs were euthanized, and implants with supporting alveolar tissues were prepared and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ninety-seven sections were evaluated by SEM for morphometric and morphologic analyses. The mean percent of implant length in contact with bone was 47% for the controls and 53% for the implants receiving radiation. Five implants were lost during the initial healing phase and four implants were clinically mobile at time of euthanasia, giving a success rate of 83% (45/54). Correlative light microscopy of peri-implant supporting tissues revealed no distinct differences between the microvasculature of controls versus implants exposed to radiation. Standardized clinical radiographs revealed crestal saucerization in both control and radiated implants. This study revealed no statistically significant difference for the percent of implant length in contact with alveolar bone for controls or implants exposed to 2 or 10 doses of diagnostic radiation at implant placement time.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and its role in the detection of latent TB infection: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Piccazzo, Riccardo; Paparo, Francesco; Garlaschi, Giacomo

    2014-05-01

    In this systematic review we evaluate the role of chest radiography (CXR) in the diagnostic flow chart for tuberculosis (TB) infection, focusing on latent TB infection (LTBI) in patients requiring medical treatment with biological drugs. In recent findings, patients scheduled for immunomodulatory therapy with biologic drugs are a group at risk of TB reactivation and, in such patients, detection of LTBI is of great importance. CXR for diagnosis of pulmonary TB has good sensitivity, but poor specificity. Radiographic diagnosis of active disease can only be reliably made on the basis of temporal evolution of pulmonary lesions. In vivo tuberculin skin test and ex vivo interferon-γ release assays are designed to identify development of an adaptive immune response, but not necessarily LTBI. Computed tomography (CT) is able to distinguish active from inactive disease. CT is considered a complementary imaging modality to CXR in the screening procedure to detect past and LTBI infection in specific subgroups of patients who have increased risk for TB reactivation, including those scheduled for medical treatment with biological drugs.

  8. Diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of periosteal reactions in bone sarcomas using conventional radiography as the reference

    PubMed Central

    de Sá Neto, José Luiz; Simão, Marcelo Novelino; Crema, Michel Daoud; Engel, Edgard Eduard; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting periosteal reactions and to compare MRI and conventional radiography (CR) in terms of the classification of periosteal reactions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study of 42 consecutive patients (mean age, 22 years; 20 men) with a confirmed diagnosis of osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma, MRI and CR images having been acquired pretreatment. Three blinded radiologists detected periosteal reactions and evaluated each periosteal reaction subtype in CR and MRI images: Codman's triangle; laminated; and spiculated. The CR was used as a benchmark to calculate the diagnostic performance. We used the kappa coefficient to assess interobserver reproducibility. A two-tailed Fisher's exact test was used in order to assess contingency between CR and MRI classifications. Results: In the detection of periosteal reactions, MRI showed high specificity, a high negative predictive value, and low-to-moderate sensitivity. For CR and for MRI, the interobserver agreement for periosteal reaction was almost perfect, whereas, for the classification of different subtypes of periosteal reaction, it was higher for the Codman's triangle subtype and lower for the spiculated subtype. There was no significant difference between MRI and CR in terms of the classifications (p < 0.05). Conclusion: We found no difference between MRI and CR in terms of their ability to classify periosteal reactions. MRI showed high specificity and almost perfect interobserver agreement for the detection of periosteal reactions. The interobserver agreement was variable for the different subtypes of periosteal reaction. PMID:28670029

  9. Radiological protection in equine radiography and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoxall, A T

    1977-10-01

    The principles of radiological protection are summarised and consideration is then given to problems, which may confront the equine practitioner, in the fulfillment of these principles during diagnostic radiography of the limbs, head, and spine of the horse. The place of anaesthesia in such procedures is discussed and the special problems associated with therapeutic radiography of the horse are considered.

  10. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  11. Improved Diagnostics by Assessing the Micromorphology of Breast Calcifications via X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, Kai; Braig, Eva; Ehn, Sebastian; Schock, Jonathan; Wolf, Johannes; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-11-01

    Breast microcalcifications play an essential role in the detection and evaluation of early breast cancer in clinical diagnostics. However, in digital mammography, microcalcifications are merely graded with respect to their global appearance within the mammogram, while their interior microstructure remains spatially unresolved and therefore not considered in cancer risk stratification. In this article, we exploit the sub-pixel resolution sensitivity of X-ray dark-field contrast for clinical microcalcification assessment. We demonstrate that the micromorphology, rather than chemical composition of microcalcification clusters (as hypothesised by recent literature), determines their absorption and small-angle scattering characteristics. We show that a quantitative classification of the inherent microstructure as ultra-fine, fine, pleomorphic and coarse textured is possible. Insights underlying the micromorphological nature of breast calcifications are verified by comprehensive high-resolution micro-CT measurements. We test the determined microtexture of microcalcifications as an indicator for malignancy and demonstrate its potential to improve breast cancer diagnosis, by providing a non-invasive tool for sub-resolution microcalcification assessment. Our results indicate that dark-field imaging of microcalcifications may enhance the diagnostic validity of current microcalcification analysis and reduce the number of invasive procedures.

  12. Improved Diagnostics by Assessing the Micromorphology of Breast Calcifications via X-Ray Dark-Field Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Kai; Braig, Eva; Ehn, Sebastian; Schock, Jonathan; Wolf, Johannes; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Chabior, Michael; Herzen, Julia; Mayr, Doris; Grandl, Susanne; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Hellerhoff, Karin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Breast microcalcifications play an essential role in the detection and evaluation of early breast cancer in clinical diagnostics. However, in digital mammography, microcalcifications are merely graded with respect to their global appearance within the mammogram, while their interior microstructure remains spatially unresolved and therefore not considered in cancer risk stratification. In this article, we exploit the sub-pixel resolution sensitivity of X-ray dark-field contrast for clinical microcalcification assessment. We demonstrate that the micromorphology, rather than chemical composition of microcalcification clusters (as hypothesised by recent literature), determines their absorption and small-angle scattering characteristics. We show that a quantitative classification of the inherent microstructure as ultra-fine, fine, pleomorphic and coarse textured is possible. Insights underlying the micromorphological nature of breast calcifications are verified by comprehensive high-resolution micro-CT measurements. We test the determined microtexture of microcalcifications as an indicator for malignancy and demonstrate its potential to improve breast cancer diagnosis, by providing a non-invasive tool for sub-resolution microcalcification assessment. Our results indicate that dark-field imaging of microcalcifications may enhance the diagnostic validity of current microcalcification analysis and reduce the number of invasive procedures. PMID:27841341

  13. Impact of iterative metal artifact reduction on diagnostic image quality in patients with dental hardware.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Jakob; Schabel, Christoph; Bongers, Malte; Raupach, Rainer; Clasen, Stephan; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2017-03-01

    Background Metal artifacts often impair diagnostic accuracy in computed tomography (CT) imaging. Therefore, effective and workflow implemented metal artifact reduction algorithms are crucial to gain higher diagnostic image quality in patients with metallic hardware. Purpose To assess the clinical performance of a novel iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR) algorithm for CT in patients with dental fillings. Material and Methods Thirty consecutive patients scheduled for CT imaging and dental fillings were included in the analysis. All patients underwent CT imaging using a second generation dual-source CT scanner (120 kV single-energy; 100/Sn140 kV in dual-energy, 219 mAs, gantry rotation time 0.28-1/s, collimation 0.6 mm) as part of their clinical work-up. Post-processing included standard kernel (B49) and an iterative MAR algorithm. Image quality and diagnostic value were assessed qualitatively (Likert scale) and quantitatively (HU ± SD) by two reviewers independently. Results All 30 patients were included in the analysis, with equal reconstruction times for iMAR and standard reconstruction (17 s ± 0.5 vs. 19 s ± 0.5; P > 0.05). Visual image quality was significantly higher for iMAR as compared with standard reconstruction (3.8 ± 0.5 vs. 2.6 ± 0.5; P < 0.0001, respectively) and showed improved evaluation of adjacent anatomical structures. Similarly, HU-based measurements of degree of artifacts were significantly lower in the iMAR reconstructions as compared with the standard reconstruction (0.9 ± 1.6 vs. -20 ± 47; P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion The tested iterative, raw-data based reconstruction MAR algorithm allows for a significant reduction of metal artifacts and improved evaluation of adjacent anatomical structures in the head and neck area in patients with dental hardware.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital radiography for detecting misfit between the tooth and restoration in metal-restored teeth.

    PubMed

    Liedke, Gabriela Salatino; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Vizzotto, Mariana Boessio; Da Silveira, Priscila Fernanda; Silveira, Heloisa Emilia Dias; Wenzel, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Although the postprocessing of digital images with enhancement filters could lead to the presence of artifacts and result in false-positive diagnoses, no study has analyzed whether the use of digital radiographs and/or postprocessing of digital images interferes with the diagnosis of marginal adaptation in metal-restored teeth. The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of conventional and digital radiographic images with and without filters for detecting a misfit between the tooth and restoration in metal-restored teeth. Forty teeth with mesial-occlusal-distal inlays and 40 with complete crowns (each with a perfect fit, 20 with a 0.2-mm gap and 20 with a 0.4-mm gap) were imaged with conventional film and digital phosphor plate systems. Digital radiographs were exported as original images and with edge enhancement (high and low), inversion, and pseudo-3-dimensional filters. Four examiners assessed the presence of gaps by using a categorical scale (fit, misfit, cannot decide). Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were calculated for each variable. In addition, time spent scoring the images was recorded. A multivariate logistic regression was performed with accuracy as the dependent variable. Of the images, 6.2% received the score "cannot decide," most of them with a high edge enhancement filter and in the crown group. A tendency for higher sensitivity (range 0.67-0.83), specificity (range 0.81-0.92), and accuracy (range 0.73-0.86) values was found in conventional and digital original images. Results of a logistic regression found that restoration type, gap size, and high enhancement and inversion filters had a statistically significant impact on accuracy (P<.05). Original nonfiltered images should be used to assess teeth with metal restorations. High enhancement filters and image inversion should be avoided, especially when metal crowns are present. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published

  15. Evaluation of a Computer-Assisted Dental Diagnostic System by Navy Hospital Corpsmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-23

    computer-assisted dental program valuable to the diagnosis and management of patients with dental pain . They would use the dental program in their...A computer-assisted dental program to assist independent duty corpsmen in the diagnosis and management of patients who are present at sea with dental ... pain produced diagnosis which were exact or logically consistent with the diagnosis made by the dentists 83% of the time. The corpsmen found the

  16. Bedside lung ultrasound, mobile radiography and physical examination: a comparative analysis of diagnostic tools in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Andrew J; Nalos, Marek; Sue, Kwan-Hing; Hruby, Jan; Campbell, Daniel M; Braham, Rachel M; Orde, Sam R

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung ultrasonography (LUS), chest xray (CXR) and physical examination (Ex) for the detection of pathological abnormalities in the lungs of critically ill patients. A prospective cohort study of 145 patients in the intensive care unit of a tertiary teaching hospital who were undergoing echocardiography for a clinical indication. Each patient was independently assessed by Ex, CXR and LUS on the same day. Examiners were asked to comment on the presence or absence and severity of pleural effusion, lung consolidation and alveolar interstitial syndrome (AIS). Independent expert examiners performed the LUS and an independent radiologist reported on the CXR. Ex, CXR and LUS were in fair agreement with each other in detecting a pulmonary abnormality (CXR v LUS, κ = 0.31; CXR v Ex, κ = 0.29; LUS v Ex, κ = 0.22). LUS detected more abnormalities than did CXR (16.2%; χ(2) = 64.1; P < 0.001) or Ex (23.5%; χ(2) = 121.9; P < 0.001). CXR detected more pleural effusions than LUS (9.3%; χ(2) = 7.6; κ = 0.39), but LUS detected more pleural effusions than Ex (22.8%; χ(2) = 36.4; κ = 0.18). There was no significant difference in the performance of LUS and CXR in quantifying the size of a pleural effusion (Z = -1.2; P = 0.23). Ex underestimated size compared with CXR or LUS. LUS detected more consolidation than CXR (17%; χ(2) = 115.9; P < 0.001) and Ex (16.2%; χ(2) = 90.3; P < 0.001). We saw no difference in performance between CXR and Ex in detecting lung consolidation (0.9%; χ(2) = 0.51; P < 0.48). LUS detected more cases of AIS than CXR (5.5%; χ(2) = 7.9; P = 0.005) and Ex (13%; χ(2) = 25.8; P < 0.001). There was only fair-to-moderate agreement between LUS, CXR and Ex in detecting pulmonary abnormalities, including pleural effusion, lung consolidation and AIS. The higher rate of detection from LUS, combined with its ease of use and increasing accessibility, makes for a powerful diagnostic tool in the ICU.

  17. Digital radiography in space.

    PubMed

    Hart, Rob; Campbell, Mark R

    2002-06-01

    With the permanent habitation of the International Space Station, the planning of longer duration exploration missions, and the possibility of space tourism, it is likely that digital radiography will be needed in the future to support medical care in space. Ultrasound is currently the medical imaging modality of choice for spaceflight. Digital radiography in space is limited because of prohibitive launch costs (in the region of $20,000/kg) that severely restrict the volume, weight, and power requirements of medical care hardware. Technological increases in radiography, a predicted ten-fold decrease in future launch costs, and an increasing clinical need for definitive medical care in space will drive efforts to expand the ability to provide medical care in space including diagnostic imaging. Normal physiological responses to microgravity, in conjunction with the high-risk environment of spaceflight, increase the risk of injury and could imply an extended recovery period for common injuries. The advantages of gravity on Earth, such as the stabilization of patients undergoing radiography and the drainage of fluids, which provide radiographic contrast, are unavailable in space. This creates significant difficulties in patient immobilization and radiographic positioning. Gravity-dependent radiological signs, such as lipohemarthrosis in knee and shoulder trauma, air or fluid levels in pneumoperitoneum, pleural effusion, or bowel obstruction, and the apical pleural edge in pneumothorax become unavailable. Impaired healing processes such as delayed callus formation following fracture will have implications on imaging, and recovery time lines are unknown. The confined nature of spacecraft and the economic impossibility of launching lead-based personal protective equipment present significant challenges to crew radiation safety. A modified, free-floating radiographic C-arm device equipped with a digital detector and utilizing teleradiology support is proposed as a

  18. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  19. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  20. Dental flossing as a diagnostic method for proximal gingivitis: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Grellmann, Alessandra Pascotini; Kantorski, Karla Zanini; Ardenghi, Thiago Machado; Moreira, Carlos Heitor Cunha; Danesi, Cristiane Cademartori; Zanatta, Fabricio Batistin

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the clinical diagnosis of proximal gingivitis by comparing two methods: dental flossing and the gingival bleeding index (GBI). One hundred subjects (aged at least 18 years, with 15% of positive proximal sites for GBI, without proximal attachment loss) were randomized into five evaluation protocols. Each protocol consisted of two assessments with a 10-minute interval between them: first GBI/second floss, first floss/second GBI, first GBI/second GBI, first tooth floss/second floss, and first gum floss-second floss. The dental floss was slid against the tooth surface (TF) and the gingival tissue (GF). The evaluated proximal sites should present teeth with established point of contact and probing depth ≤ 3mm. One trained and calibrated examiner performed all the assessments. The mean percentages of agreement and disagreement were calculated for the sites with gingival bleeding in both evaluation methods (GBI and flossing). The primary outcome was the percentage of disagreement between the assessments in the different protocols. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, McNemar, chi-square and Tukey's post hoc tests, with a 5% significance level. When gingivitis was absent in the first assessment (negative GBI), bleeding was detected in the second assessment by TF and GF in 41.7% (p < 0.001) and 50.7% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. In the absence of gingivitis in the second assessment (negative GBI), TF and GF detected bleeding in the first assessment in 38.9% (p = 0.004) and 58.3% (p < 0.001) of the sites, respectively. TF and GF appears to be a better diagnostic indicator of proximal gingivitis than GBI.

  1. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  2. Dental flat panel conebeam CT in the evaluation of patients with inflammatory sinonasal disease: Diagnostic efficacy and radiation dose savings.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Salinas, C; Flors, L; Gras, P; Más-Estellés, F; Lemercier, P; Patrie, J T; Wintermark, M; Martí-Bonmatí, L

    2014-01-01

    CT is the imaging modality of choice to study the paranasal sinuses; unfortunately, it involves significant radiation dose. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic validity, image quality, and radiation-dose savings of dental conebeam CT in the evaluation of patients with suspected inflammatory disorders of the paranasal sinuses. We prospectively studied 40 patients with suspected inflammatory disorders of the sinuses with dental conebeam CT and standard CT. Two radiologists analyzed the images independently, blinded to clinical information. The image quality of both techniques and the diagnostic validity of dental conebeam CT compared with the reference standard CT were assessed by using 3 different scoring systems. Image noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and contrast-to-noise ratio were calculated for both techniques. The absorbed radiation dose to the lenses and thyroid and parotid glands was measured by using a phantom and dosimeter chips. The effective radiation dose for CT was calculated. All dental conebeam CT scans were judged of diagnostic quality. Compared with CT, the conebeam CT image noise was 37.3% higher (P < .001) and the SNR of the bone was 75% lower (P < .001). The effective dose of our conebeam CT protocol was 23 μSv. Compared with CT, the absorbed radiation dose to the lenses and parotid and thyroid glands with conebeam CT was 4%, 7.8%, and 7.3% of the dose delivered to the same organs by conventional CT (P < .001). Dental conebeam CT is a valid imaging procedure for the evaluation of patients with inflammatory sinonasal disorders. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Dental biothermophotonics: How photothermal methods are winning the race with X-rays for dental caries diagnostic needs of clinical dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, A.; Jeon, R.; Matvienko, A.; Abrams, S. H.; Amaechi, B. T.

    2008-01-01

    Recent trends in biothermophotonics of teeth are presented. The presentation is centered on the development of clinical-level frequency-domain photothermal radiometry and modulated luminescence to address issues associated with the early diagnosis of demineralization caries in human teeth. Biothermophotonic principles and applications to the detection of the carious state in human teeth as embodied by laser photothermal radiometry are presented and further supported by modulated luminescence. The emphasis is on recent developments with regard to abilities of these techniques to diagnose interproximal lesions between teeth, etching with phosphoric acid and with an artificial demineralization gel in order to simulate early demineralization, as well as demineralization and remineralization of dental crown enamel and root dentin. These are lesions which normally go undetected by X-ray radiographs. Comparisons with X rays, Micro-Computed Tomography (μ-CT) and Transverse Micro-Radiography (TMR) are discussed. A theoretical model involving coupled diffuse photon density and thermal-wave fields is developed and applied to frequency scans from demineralized artificial lesions to produce quantitative values for optical and thermophysical parameters of teeth as well as the thickness of the induced lesion.

  4. Dental anomalies in the primary dentition and their repetition in the permanent dentition: a diagnostic performance study.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Andrea; Giuntini, Veronica; Franchi, Lorenzo; Tollaro, Isabella; Baccetti, Tiziano; Defraia, Efisio

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the recurrence in the permanent dentition of dental anomalies of the primary dentition. A sample of 189 subjects (100 males, 89 females, mean age of 5 years and 7 months) with anomalies of primary teeth (tooth hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, geminated teeth, and fused teeth) was selected and re-analyzed at a mean age of 11 years and 2 months for the recurrence of the dental anomalies in the permanent dentition. As a control group, 271 subjects (123 males, 148 females) without dental anomalies in the primary dentition were selected. The recurrence in the permanent dentition of the dental anomalies in the primary dentition was evaluated by measures of diagnostic performance. The results showed high values for the repetition of hypodontia (positive likelihood ratio = 102.0); low score for the repetition of hyperdontia (positive likelihood ratio = 6.5); low positive likelihood ratio (9.1) for gemination of primary teeth resulting in supernumerary permanent teeth; high positive likelihood ratio (47.0) for fusion of primary teeth followed by missing permanent teeth. Dental anomalies in the primary dentition are associated with an increased likelihood of anomalies of the succedaneous permanent.

  5. Stationary intraoral tomosynthesis for dental imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inscoe, Christina R.; Wu, Gongting; Soulioti, Danai E.; Platin, Enrique; Mol, Andre; Gaalaas, Laurence R.; Anderson, Michael R.; Tucker, Andrew W.; Boyce, Sarah; Shan, Jing; Gonzales, Brian; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2017-03-01

    Despite recent advances in dental radiography, the diagnostic accuracies for some of the most common dental diseases have not improved significantly, and in some cases remain low. Intraoral x-ray is the most commonly used x-ray diagnostic tool in dental clinics. It however suffers from the typical limitations of a 2D imaging modality including structure overlap. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) uses high radiation dose and suffers from image artifacts and relatively low resolution. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of developing a stationary intraoral tomosynthesis (s-IOT) using spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray array technology, and to evaluate its diagnostic accuracy compared to conventional 2D intraoral x-ray. A bench-top s-IOT device was constructed using a linear CNT based X-ray source array and a digital intraoral detector. Image reconstruction was performed using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Studies were performed to optimize the imaging configuration. For evaluation of s-IOT's diagnostic accuracy, images of a dental quality assurance phantom, and extracted human tooth specimens were acquired. Results show s-IOT increases the diagnostic sensitivity for caries compared to intraoral x-ray at a comparable dose level.

  6. Acquired Wharton's duct stenosis after dental radiographs treated with sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kieliszak, Christopher R; Shokri, Tom; Joshi, Arjun S

    2015-04-26

    Salivary gland trauma may result in ductal stenosis and chronic sialadenitis. We describe a case of an 81-year-old woman with a history of intermittent left submandibular swelling that began after recent dental examination and radiographs. Diagnostic sialendoscopy was performed and demonstrated a near complete distal stenosis. It was determined that trauma experienced during dental radiography may have resulted in the patient's ductal obstruction and subsequent sialadenitis. This case illustrates an unusual presentation of non-sialolith-related ductal obstruction in the submandibular gland, treated with sialendoscopic-assisted sialodochoplasty.

  7. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

  8. Accuracy of digital subtraction radiography in combination with a contrast media in assessment of proximal caries depth.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, Solmaz; Ehsani, Sara; Esmaeili, Farzad; Tavakoli, Mohammad Amin

    2008-01-01

    Radiography is used to diagnose the demineralization process and carious lesions; however, conventional radiography and direct digital images do not show these lesions when the amount of demineralization is less than 40%. Digital subtraction radiography has recently been used to improve the diagnostic quality of these le-sions. The purpose of this study was to compare the caries depth estimated by digital subtraction radiog-raphy in combination with barium sulfate in diag-nosing proximal dental caries with histopathologic evaluation. In this study 30 molars and premolars (24 demineralized lesions with cavity, 8 without cavity) were studied. Direct digital images were taken (kVp: 68, mA: 8; t: 0.12 for premolars and t: 0.16 for molars) whereas the position of X-ray tube and CCD receptor and teeth was fixed. To prepare the second images 135 gr/L barium sulfate was used. The images obtained with the same exposure and geometry and then subtracted. The depth of the lesions in direct digital and subtracted images were assessed and compared with the depth measured in histopathologic assessments. The mean depths (± SD) of the lesions were 1.80 ± 0.77 mm in direct digital radiography, 2.32 ± 0.76 mm in subtracted images after barium sulfate treatment, and 2.51 ± 0.43 mm in histopathologic sections. The statistical difference between direct digital radiography and the other methods was significant (P < 0.05). However, the differences were not statistically significant between subtracted images and histopathologic sections. The average intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.7241 (CI: 95%). The present study has demonstrated that digital subtraction radiography images have the potential to measure the depth of proximal caries with no significant difference with histopathologic evaluation.

  9. Patient dosimetry and a novel approach to establishing Diagnostic Reference Levels in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher; van der Putten, Wil

    2012-01-01

    Diagnostic Reference Levels provide a method of ensuring that patient doses in medical procedures are kept at acceptable levels. Their application in dentistry can provide an indication of current dose levels and can assist in potentially significant dose reduction in Ireland given the number of patients screened annually. This study involved retrospective analyses of entrance surface dose and dose-width-product measurements obtained in Irish Dental Practices for both Intra-Oral and Panoramic units respectively, followed by comparisons with Monte-Carlo generated computer models of these procedures. Analysis was performed on data from 33 Intra-Oral units for an Adult Mandibular Molar entrance surface dose, 198 readings for a proposed mGy/mAs reference level and 50 Panoramic machines for a dose-width product investigation. The third quartile value of the entrance surface dose for a standard Adult Mandibular Molar Intra-Oral radiograph is (2.40 ± 0.92)mGy, compared to a computer-modelled value of 2.60 mGy. The third quartile mGy/mAs value for Intra-Oral procedures is (1.03 ± 0.38)mGy/mAs, compared to a computer-modelled value of 0.75 mGy/mAs. The third quartile dose width product for an Adult Panoramic radiograph is (59.89 ± 20.97)mGymm, compared to a computer-modeled value of 62.40 mGymm. It is proposed to introduce Diagnostic Reference Levels of 2.4 mGy for an Adult Mandibular Molar Intra-Oral radiograph and 60 mGymm for an Adult Panoramic radiograph. The use of a new reference quantity in Intra-Oral radiology is also suggested. This has a value of 1 mGy/mAs and may be introduced alongside established procedures. These levels can be taken as guides to acceptable doses, but it should be noted that further reductions are practical under ALARA principles. Copyright © 2010 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Non-Destructive Measurement Methods (Neutron-, X-ray Radiography, Vibration Diagnostics and Ultrasound) in the Inspection of Helicopter Rotor Blades

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    the radiography gauging. In addition to the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) measurement a small exciter table (BK4810) and impedance head (BK 8000... Statistical Energy Analysis ; 7th Conf. on Vehicle System Dynamics, Identification and Anomalies (VSDIA2000), 6-8 Nov. 2000 Budapest, Proc. pp. 491-493... Energy Analysis (SEA) and Ultrasound Test. (UT) were concurrently applied. These methods collect accessory information on the objects under inspection

  11. Patient risk from interproximal radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, S.J.; Pujol, A. Jr.; Chen, T.S.; Malcolm, A.W.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1984-09-01

    Computer simulation methods for determining patient dose from dental radiography have demonstrated that patient risk from a two-film interproximal examination ranges from 1.1 X 10(-8) to 3.4 X 10(-7) using 90-kVp beams, depending on film speed, projection technique, and age and sex of the patient. Further, changing from a short-cone round-beam to a long-cone technique with rectangular collimation reduces risk by a factor of 2.9, independent of other factors.

  12. Oro-facio-dental findings of rubinstein-taybi syndrome as a useful diagnostic feature.

    PubMed

    Tirali, R Ebru; Sar, Cagla; Cehreli, S Burcak

    2014-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized by distinctive facial features, mental and growth retardation, broad thumbs and great toes. This case report describes the oro-dental manifestations, as well as, orthodontic evaluation of a 9-year-old male patient who had RTS. The remarkable oro-dental features were talon-like cingulum on maxillary central incisors, unerupted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computerized tomography was taken in order to identify his skeletal anomalies, bilateral cross-bite and a narrow maxilla were diagnosed. Dental treatments were completed under i.v sedation due to the patient's inability to cooperate during dental treatment. Perioparetive and postoperative courses were uneventful. Following dental treatments, orthodontic therapy was initiated with a fixed rapid maxillary expansion appliance.

  13. Digital Radiography: A Technology Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Ben A.

    1982-12-01

    Digital radiography, a term hardly recognized two years ago, has grown to become the talk of the radiology community and the excitement of many commercial companies. M2st of this attention has been directed toward digital subtraction intravenous angiography), although during this same time period, a variety of digital radiography apparatus and image processing techniques have been under development. In November of 1980 at the RSNA Conference in Chicago, three commercial digital angiography systems were announced by Philips, Technicare and ADAC Corporations. During this same time period, the University of Arizona was discussing the concept of a photo electronic radiology department2, the University of Pittsburg and Stanford University were investigating line scan radiography3,4 and approximately five laboratories were carrying out clinical IV angiography with digital video systems.5-9 These developments followed basic research programs in digital electronic and computerized imaging at various locations around the world. 10-18 In the spring of 1981 we attempted to review the state of digital radiography, focusing on the various detector systems and image acquisition approaches.19 Since that time, rapid advancements in digital radiography have occurred. A major conference was held on digital radiography at Stanford UniversityzO, a new area detector system for digital radiography was announced by Fuji Film Corporation, clinical testing began on the Picker line scan digital chest unit21, and improvements were made in selenium detectors for digital radiography. Several additional companies announced digital video angiography systems, bringing the total now to approximately 15 companies worldwide. Digital video subtraction angiography is now well established as an important clinical diagnostic procedure and a variety of improvements and extensions of digital angiography systems are now ongoing. Digital acquisition and storage systems are increasing in both speed and

  14. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS LABORATORY GUIDE WAS DEVELOPED FOR AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES TRAINING TO BECOME BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS. IT IS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH TWO OTHER VOLUMES--(1) INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, AND (2) INUDSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY MANUAL. THE PROGRAM WAS DEVELOPED BY A COMMITTEE OF REPRESENTATIVES…

  15. Increasing mobile radiography productivity.

    PubMed

    Wong, Edward; Lung, Ngan Tsz; Ng, Kris; Jeor, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Mobile radiography using computed radiography (CR) cassettes is a common equipment combination with a workflow bottleneck limited by location of CR readers. Advent of direct digital radiography (DDR) mobile x-ray machines removes this limitation by immediate image review and quality control. Through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs), the increase in efficiency can be quantified.

  16. Diagnostic thinking and information used in clinical decision-making: a qualitative study of expert and student dental clinicians

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is uncertain whether the range and frequency of Diagnostic Thinking Processes (DTP) and pieces of information (concepts) involved in dental restorative treatment planning are different between students and expert clinicians. Methods We video-recorded dental visits with one standardized patient. Clinicians were subsequently interviewed and their cognitive strategies explored using guide questions; interviews were also recorded. Both visit and interview were content-analyzed, following the Gale and Marsden model for clinical decision-making. Limited tests used to contrast data were t, χ2, and Fisher's. Scott's π was used to determine inter-coder reliability. Results Fifteen dentists and 17 senior dental students participated in visits lasting 32.0 minutes (± 12.9) among experts, and 29.9 ± 7.1 among students; contact time with patient was 26.4 ± 13.9 minutes (experts), and 22.2 ± 7.5 (students). The time elapsed between the first and the last instances of the clinician looking in the mouth was similar between experts and students. Ninety eight types of pieces of information were used in combinations with 12 DTPs. The main differences found in DTP utilization had dentists conducting diagnostic interpretations of findings with sufficient certainty to be considered definitive twice as often as students. Students resorted more often to more general or clarifying enquiry in their search for information than dentists. Conclusions Differences in diagnostic strategies and concepts existed within clearly delimited types of cognitive processes; such processes were largely compatible with the analytic and (in particular) non-analytic approaches to clinical decision-making identified in the medical field. Because we were focused on a clinical presentation primarily made up of non-emergency treatment needs, use of other DTPs and concepts might occur when clinicians evaluate emergency treatment needs, complex rehabilitative cases, and/or medically compromised

  17. Enterprise-wide implementation of digital radiography in oral and maxillofacial imaging: the University of Florida Dentistry System.

    PubMed

    Nair, Madhu K; Pettigrew, James C; Loomis, Jeffrey S; Bates, Robert E; Kostewicz, Stephen; Robinson, Boyd; Sweitzer, Jean; Dolan, Teresa A

    2009-06-01

    The implementation of digital radiography in dentistry in a large healthcare enterprise setting is discussed. A distinct need for a dedicated dental picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) exists for seamless integration of different vendor products across the system. Complex issues are contended with as each clinical department migrated to a digital environment with unique needs and workflow patterns. The University of Florida has had a dental PACS installed over 2 years ago. This paper describes the process of conversion from film-based imaging from the planning stages through clinical implementation. Dentistry poses many unique challenges as it strives to achieve better integration with systems primarily designed for imaging; however, the technical requirements for high-resolution image capture in dentistry far exceed those in medicine, as most routine dental diagnostic tasks are challenging. The significance of specification, evaluation, vendor selection, installation, trial runs, training, and phased clinical implementation is emphasized.

  18. Genotoxicity of digital panoramic radiography on oral epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Soheyl; Pallagatti, Shambulingappa; Grewal, Harshaminder; Kalucha, Aman; Kaur, Harkamal

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic effects of x-rays on gingival and buccal epithelial cells during panoramic dental radiography using the micronucleus test. Eighty otherwise healthy subjects who required a diagnostic panoramic radiograph and met the selection criteria were included in the study. Epithelial cells were obtained from the maxillary anterior gingiva and buccal mucosa by gentle scraping with a wooden spatula immediately before exposure and again 10 days after exposure. Cytologic preparations were made according to the Papanicolaou staining method and analyzed under a light microscope for micronucleus count. The mean ± SD micronucleus count of gingival epithelial cells was 1.08 ± 0.76 before radiographic exposure and 1.6 ± 0.93 after exposure. This increase was statistically significant (P < .05). Similarly, there was an increase in the postexposure micronucleus count in the buccal mucosa, but this increase was not significant (P > .05). A significant correlation was observed between the age of subjects and micronucleus count, although no such correlation was found between sex and micronucleus count. Although radiation-related effects from panoramic radiography were reduced compared with full-mouth intraoral periapical radiographs or radiotherapy, the results of this study show that genotoxic effects do take place. Thus, radiographs should be taken with adequate protection measures and only when the potential benefit outweighs the potential risk.

  19. Paroxysmal neuralgia in pediatric population--a diagnostic dilemma for physicians and dental practioners.

    PubMed

    Dubey, A; Mujoo, S; Sakarde, S B; Dubey, A K

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal neuralgia is relatively uncommon in children. Neuropathic orofacial pain is a challenge for the clinician, as no obvious dental pathology exists either clinically or radiographically. Dentist and physician should be able to recognize the characteristics of neuropathic pain so as to correctly diagnose these conditions hence avoid unnecessary dental intervention. This article reviews the conditions with paroxysmal neuralgia in children and available treatment strategies.

  20. Wireless networking for the dental office: current wireless standards and security protocols.

    PubMed

    Mupparapu, Muralidhar; Arora, Sarika

    2004-11-15

    Digital radiography has gained immense popularity in dentistry today in spite of the early difficulty for the profession to embrace the technology. The transition from film to digital has been happening at a faster pace in the fields of Orthodontics, Oral Surgery, Endodontics, Periodontics, and other specialties where the radiographic images (periapical, bitewing, panoramic, cephalometric, and skull radiographs) are being acquired digitally, stored within a server locally, and eventually accessed for diagnostic purposes, along with the rest of the patient data via the patient management software (PMS). A review of the literature shows the diagnostic performance of digital radiography is at least comparable to or even better than that of conventional radiography. Similarly, other digital diagnostic tools like caries detectors, cephalometric analysis software, and digital scanners were used for many years for the diagnosis and treatment planning purposes. The introduction of wireless charged-coupled device (CCD) sensors in early 2004 (Schick Technologies, Long Island City, NY) has moved digital radiography a step further into the wireless era. As with any emerging technology, there are concerns that should be looked into before adapting to the wireless environment. Foremost is the network security involved in the installation and usage of these wireless networks. This article deals with the existing standards and choices in wireless technologies that are available for implementation within a contemporary dental office. The network security protocols that protect the patient data and boost the efficiency of modern day dental clinics are enumerated.

  1. Calcification of the stylohyoid ligament in panoramic radiography and cone beam computed tomography among patients referred for dental implant treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Mahdian, Mina; Moghaddam, Elnaz Jalali; Alzahrani, Adel; Rengasamy, Kandasamy; Tadinada, Aditya

    2014-08-01

    Calcification of the stylohyoid ligament (SHL) is a common condition noted as an incidental finding in routine radiographic examination. Due to proximity with important neurovascular structures, elongation and calcification may sometimes lead to dysphagia and pain. The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence of calcified SHL detected on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and panoramic radiographs (PR) in patients referred for dental implant therapy. Retrospective analysis of 30 patients referred for dental implants to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology at the University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine was done. Patients were imaged using Hitachi CB MercuRay CBCT machine, and PRs were obtained using Planmeca panoramic machine. CBCT reconstructions and panoramic images were evaluated for the incidence and pattern of SHL calcification. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had calcified SHLs, 16 of whom were reported to have bilateral involvement. PR was unable to show complete calcification of the ligament in any of the cases, whereas CBCT showed evidence of complete calcification when present (14 cases). CBCT was more accurate in determining the pattern and extent of calcification of the SHL in patients undergoing implant treatment planning.

  2. Building And Using A Data Base To Identify Parameters To Further Improve Diagnostic Performance On The Toshiba Computed Radiography System Model 201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeley, George W.; Roehrig, Hans; Mockbee, Brent; Hunter, Tim B.; Ovitt, Theron; Claypool, H. R.; Bielland, John C.; Scott, Anne; Yang, Peter; Dallas, William J.

    1987-01-01

    The digital imaging group at the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center Radiology Department is vigorously pursuing the development of a total digital radiology department (TDRD). One avenue of research being conducted is to define the needed resolutions and capabilities of TDRD systems. Parts of that effort are described in these proceedings and elsewhere. One of these investigations is to assess the general application of computed r adiography (CR) in clinical imaging. Specifically we are comparing images produced by the Toshiba computed radiography system (Model 201) to those produced by conventional imaging techniques. This paper describes one aspect of that work.

  3. Fraudulent use of digital radiography: methods to detect and protect digital radiographs.

    PubMed

    Calberson, Filip L G; Hommez, Geert M; De Moor, Roeland J

    2008-05-01

    Digital radiography has become an indispensable diagnostic tool in dentistry today. To improve vision and diagnosis, dental x-ray software allows image enhancement (eg, adjusting color, density, sharpness, brightness, or contrast). Exporting digital radiographs to a file format compatible with commercial graphic software increases chances that information can be altered, added, or removed in an unethical manner. Dental radiographs are easily duplicated, stored, or distributed in digital format. It is difficult to guarantee the authenticity of digital images, which is especially important in insurance or juridic cases. Image-enhancement features applied to digital radiographs allow mishandling or potential abuse. This has been illustrated by several recently published studies. A standard authentication procedure for digital radiographs is needed. A number of manipulated radiographic images are presented to show concerns about security, reliability, and the potential for fraud. Antitampering techniques and methods of detecting manipulations in digital medical images are discussed.

  4. An investigation of potential applications of intensifying screens in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.G.; Kogon, S.L.; Reid, J.A.

    1982-11-01

    In medicine, the somewhat degraded image from the screen/film system is accepted for most diagnostic purposes in the interest of radiation thrift. In dentistry, however, the superb image resolution and sharpness of the radiation-intensive, direct-exposure film is the standard for intraoral radiography. There may be occasions in dental practice where such quality is not necessary, thus making the high level of exposure difficult to justify. In a laboratory study, screen-type radiographs were effectively substituted for ultraspeed film in the monitoring stages of endodontic therapy and as posttreatment films in operative dentistry. Even with a slow system, the radiation exposure was one sixteenth of the usual periapical dose. If clinical trials support these conclusions, only the lack of a practical periapical cassette limits the application of this significant method of radiation reduction to dental practice.

  5. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  6. Digital radiography in dentistry: a survey of Indiana dentists.

    PubMed

    Brian, J N; Williamson, G F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the number of Indiana dental practices that utilize digital radiography and to identify the reasons for using or not using digital radiography. A questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 300 licensed dentists in the State of Indiana. Demographic, clinical and digital technology responses were obtained. The data were analysed using SPSS 12.0 (Statistical Package Social Sciences) software; t-tests and Pearson's chi(2) test were performed on several variables with significance levels set at P< 0.05. One hundred and fifty-two dental practices (51%) responded to the survey. Thirty dental practices (19.7%) used digital radiography in their office. Twenty-two (73%) of the dentists using digital radiography were general practitioners. The number of dentists in a practice was a significant factor in predicting the use of digital radiography (t=2.57, P=0.011). The results of this study indicate that digital radiography is more commonly used by general dentists in group practices.

  7. The Use of Audiovisual Procedures in Evaluating Oral Diagnostic and Treatment Planning Skills of Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Stephen L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A new test developed by the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry that included videotape, visual aids, and relevant dental data as part of the exam is reported. The degree of student anxiety before, during, and after the examination was measured. A videotaped segment simulating a case history was used. (Author/MLW)

  8. The Use of Audiovisual Procedures in Evaluating Oral Diagnostic and Treatment Planning Skills of Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberman, Stephen L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A new test developed by the University of Mississippi School of Dentistry that included videotape, visual aids, and relevant dental data as part of the exam is reported. The degree of student anxiety before, during, and after the examination was measured. A videotaped segment simulating a case history was used. (Author/MLW)

  9. The Image Gently pediatric digital radiography safety checklist: tools for improving pediatric radiography.

    PubMed

    John, Susan D; Moore, Quentin T; Herrmann, Tracy; Don, Steven; Powers, Kevin; Smith, Susan N; Morrison, Greg; Charkot, Ellen; Mills, Thalia T; Rutz, Lois; Goske, Marilyn J

    2013-10-01

    Transition from film-screen to digital radiography requires changes in radiographic technique and workflow processes to ensure that the minimum radiation exposure is used while maintaining diagnostic image quality. Checklists have been demonstrated to be useful tools for decreasing errors and improving safety in several areas, including commercial aviation and surgical procedures. The Image Gently campaign, through a competitive grant from the FDA, developed a checklist for technologists to use during the performance of digital radiography in pediatric patients. The checklist outlines the critical steps in digital radiography workflow, with an emphasis on steps that affect radiation exposure and image quality. The checklist and its accompanying implementation manual and practice quality improvement project are open source and downloadable at www.imagegently.org. The authors describe the process of developing and testing the checklist and offer suggestions for using the checklist to minimize radiation exposure to children during radiography. Copyright © 2013 American College of Radiology. All rights reserved.

  10. A mini-OSCE for formative assessment of diagnostic and radiographic skills at a dental college in India.

    PubMed

    Lele, Shailesh M

    2011-12-01

    The objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is being widely used for assessment of skills in dental education around the world. In India, OSCE awareness is rising, and a few exploratory attempts have been made in its implementation. This article describes use of a five-station mini-OSCE for formative assessment of dental diagnostic and radiographic skills in an undergraduate curriculum. Besides gaining experience in OSCEs, the purpose of this project was to study their validity, objectivity, feasibility, acceptability to students and faculty, and impact on student performance. The mini-OSCE was found to be a fairly valid and reliable tool for formative assessment, though it required more planning, preparation, and resources than other means of assessment. A specially developed orientation module improved its feasibility. The nineteen students perceived it to be a meaningful examination and a fair method due to uniformity of tasks and time allocation; they found the scoring to be transparent and objective. The specific and immediate feedback received was appreciated by both students and faculty members.

  11. Using fiber-optic transillumination as a diagnostic aid in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Strassler, Howard E; Pitel, Mark L

    2014-02-01

    Fiber-optic transillumination (FOTI) is a well-accepted and valuable adjunctive diagnostic tool with a wide range of clinical applications. In dentistry, FOTI has been primarily associated with caries diagnosis and has been corroborated through research studies to be a valid indicator of the histological presence or absence of bacterially infected tooth structure. In this review, techniques for using FOTI for tooth evaluation are presented along with examples of how FOTI can be effectively used as a supplemental diagnostic aid.

  12. [The role of clinical laboratory diagnostics in dental caries prognosis in children].

    PubMed

    Skripkina, G I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify informative, in terms of predicting caries process, laboratory parameters of homeostasis of the oral cavity in children of different age groups. A total of 1158 children of preschool and school age with caries were screened to determine laboratory parameters of homeostasis of the oral cavity by examining of the oral fluid. Caries in children was characterized by certain age specific physico-chemical parameters shift in the oral fluid. Complex set of the most informative laboratory indices reflecting the resistance and susceptibility to dental caries in children of different age groups was revealed. The obtained data allowed creating mathematical models for prenosological prediction of caries in preschool and school age, which formed the basis of "Stop caries" software.

  13. Application of radiovisiography (digital radiology) in dental clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Dragan V; Stojanović, Ljiljana S

    2012-01-01

    Radiovisiography (RVG) as the latest imaging technique in dentistry with the minimal radiation exposure of the patient and numerous possibilities to process the images has many advantages over classic radiography. We presented an interesting clinical endodontic case of primary posted diagnosis of traumatic periodontitis of upper right canine upon orthodontics treatment. As the patient previously had been exposed to alleged high dose of radiation the patient agreed to minimal exposition using digital RVG. The options of the tool bar of RVG Trophy device enabled the solving of ethiologic factor of presented periodontitis. The enigma of the symptoms on the 'overfilled' root canal was solved zooming and 3-D analysis avoiding periapical surgery owing to the patience of the patient and the dentist in a couple of days. By applying RVG technique the time for diagnostic procedure is much shorter in comparison with traditional dental radiography enabling archiving and follow-up the presented case in the course of time.

  14. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  15. Phase-contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Gao, D; Pogany, A; Stevenson, A W; Wilkins, S W

    1998-01-01

    For the past 100 years, the paradigm for radiography has been premised on absorption as the sole means of contrast formation and on ray optics as the basis for image interpretation. A new conceptual approach to radiography has been developed that includes phase (ie, refractive) contrast and requires wave optics for proper treatment. This new approach greatly increases the amount of information that can be obtained with radiographic techniques and is particularly well suited to the imaging of soft tissue and of very small features in biologic samples. A key feature of the present technique of phase-contrast radiography is the use of a microfocus x-ray source about an order of magnitude (< or = 20 microm) smaller than that used in conventional radiography. Phase-contrast radiography offers a number of improvements over conventional radiography in a clinical setting, especially in soft-tissue imaging. These improvements include increased contrast resulting in improved visualization of anatomic detail, reduced absorbed dose to the patient, inherent image magnification and high spatial resolution, use of harder x rays, and relative ease of implementation. More technologically advanced detectors are currently being developed and commercialized, which will help fully realize the considerable potential of phase-contrast imaging.

  16. Free-focus radiography using conventional films: Radiation exposures in a simulated clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, T.W.; Randall, G.J.; Goldberg, A.J.

    1980-07-01

    This study compared air exposures during conventional dental and maxillofacial radiography and similar views using free-focus radiography with conventional image receptors. The results show that periapical type surveys on nonscreen film placed extraorally or in the buccal fold may be carried out with an exposure to the surface tissues, which is similar to or less than conventional dental radiography. Extraoral survey type radiographs of the jaws may be carried out with significantly less surface exposure than lateral oblique views of the jaws. The least exposure was required, when the film was placed in the buccla fold instead of against the face during free-focus radiography. The exposures with film screen combinations were reduced by an order of magnitude when compared to the nonscreen techniques. Proper filtration of the beam of the miniaturized x-ray machines radiography in dentistry may thus be desirable and applications in other parts of the body encouraged.

  17. Comparison of conventional radiography and MDCT in suspected scaphoid fractures

    PubMed Central

    Behzadi, Cyrus; Karul, Murat; Henes, Frank Oliver; Laqmani, Azien; Catala-Lehnen, Philipp; Lehmann, Wolfgang; Nagel, Hans-Dieter; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the diagnostic accuracy and radiation dose of conventional radiography and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in suspected scaphoid fractures. METHODS: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients were enrolled in our study who had suffered from a wrist trauma and showed typical clinical symptoms suspicious of an acute scaphoid fracture. All patients had initially undergone conventional radiography. Subsequent MDCT was performed within 10 d because of persisting clinical symptoms. Using the MDCT data as the reference standard, a fourfold table was used to classify the test results. The effective dose and impaired energy were assessed in order to compare the radiation burden of the two techniques. The Wilcoxon test was performed to compare the two diagnostic modalities. RESULTS: Conventional radiography showed 34 acute fractures of the scaphoid in 124 patients (42.2%). Subsequent MDCT revealed a total of 42 scaphoid fractures. The sensitivity of conventional radiography for scaphoid fracture detection was 42.8% and its specificity was 80% resulting in an overall accuracy of 59.6%. Conventional radiography was significantly inferior to MDCT (P < 0.01) concerning scaphoid fracture detection. The mean effective dose of MDCT was 0.1 mSv compared to 0.002 mSv of conventional radiography. CONCLUSION: Conventional radiography is insufficient for accurate scaphoid fracture detection. Regarding the almost negligible effective dose, MDCT should serve as the first imaging modality in wrist trauma. PMID:25628802

  18. Implementation of a PACS for radiography training and clinical service in a university setting through a multinational effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fuk-hay; Law, Yuen Y.; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Hai L.; Chang, Tony; Matsuda, Koyo; Cao, Fei

    2001-08-01

    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has a Radiography Division under the Development of Optometry and Radiography. The Division trains both diagnostic and therapeutic radiographers with 60 students/year and offers a B.Sc. degree. In addition the Division together with the University Health Service operates a radiography clinic with radiology consultation from radiologists from other hospitals and clinics. This paper describers the implementation of a PACS in the Division for radiography training, and for clinical service.

  19. Dental optical coherence tomography: new potential diagnostic system for cracked-tooth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Lee, Jong-Jin; Chung, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the reliability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting cracked teeth and its relative clinical effectiveness by comparing it with other diagnostic methods including conventional visual inspection, trans-illumination, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The reliability of swept source OCT (SS-OCT) was verified by comparing the number of detected crack lines on 109 surfaces of 61 teeth with those detected with other conventional methods. One to one comparison revealed that crack lines that were invisible with naked eyes could be found in SS-OCT images. The detection ability of SS-OCT was superior or similar to those of micro-CT (100.0 %) and trans-illumination. Crack lines shown in the SS-OCT images had distinct characteristics, and structural crack lines and craze lines could be distinguished in SS-OCT images. Thus, the detection ability of SS-OCT renders it an acceptable diagnostic device for cracked-tooth syndrome.

  20. Update of diagnostic medical and dental x-ray exposures in Romania.

    PubMed

    Sorop, Ioana; Mossang, Daniela; Iacob, Mihai Radu; Dadulescu, Elena; Iacob, Olga

    2008-12-01

    This national study, the third in the last 15 years, updates the magnitude of medical radiation exposure from conventional x-ray examinations, in order to optimise the radiological protection to the population in a cost-effective manner. Effective doses from diagnostic radiology were estimated for adult and paediatric patients undergoing the 20 most important types of x-ray examination. Data were collected from 179 x-ray departments, selected by their annual workload, throughout the country. Estimates were made using two dosimetric quantities: entrance surface dose, derived from the absorbed dose in air measured by simulation of radiographic examinations, and dose-area product, measured during fluoroscopic examinations performed on adult and paediatric patients. Conversion coefficients to effective dose of the UK National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) have been used in all calculations. The effective dose per patient from all medical x-ray examinations was 0.74 mSv and the resulting annual collective effective dose was 6930 man Sv, with annual effective dose per caput of 0.33 mSv. The current size of population exposure from diagnostic radiology is lower than the previous one by 40%, but could be about 30% higher by taking into account the estimated contribution from computed tomography (CT) procedures.

  1. The use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, W P; Drummond, B K; Brosnan, M G

    2015-12-01

    Radiography can serve as a useful aid in the diagnosis of numerous oral conditions, with a place in nearly all of the disciplines of dentistry. As such it can have a beneficial role in caring for the oral health of children and adolescents. The following review discusses the use of radiography in the diagnosis of oral conditions in children and adolescents, with particular reference to the diagnosis of dental caries, dental trauma, growth and development and in other dental scenarios, along with the importance of incidental findings. The risks associated with radiation exposure from the use of radiography are discussed, how these need to be balanced with the possible benefits associated with such use, as well as how risks could be minimised. Summary recommendations are also presented, providing an overview of the use of radiography for oral diagnosis in various clinical scenarios for children and adolescents.

  2. Digital radiography: a survey of pediatric dentists.

    PubMed

    Russo, Julie M; Russo, James A; Guelmann, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the popularity of digital radiography among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD); and (2) report the most common systems in use. An AAPD-approved, voluntary, and anonymous electronic survey was developed and sent to 923 board certified pediatric dentists. Years in practice and in-office x-ray technology (digital or conventional) were inquired about initially. If negative for the use of digital radiography, future consideration for converting to digital radiography was ascertained. For positive responses, more in-depth information was requested. Information on type of system (sensor or phosphor plate), user friendliness, diagnostic ability, patient's comfort, general costs, durability, and parental and overall satisfaction was collected. For most of the questions, a 5-point assessment scale was used. Opportunity for additional comments was provided upon survey completion. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 32% (296/923) response rate was obtained. Twenty-six percent of practitioners (78/296) implemented digital radiography in their practices, whereas 71% considered future acquisition. Similar distribution for sensor and phosphor plate users was found. Sensor technology was reported to produce faster images, but was less tolerable by young children due to size and thickness. Phosphor plates were considered more children friendly, less expensive, and less durable. Parental satisfaction was very high with great marketing value. Picture quality was comparable to conventional film. Overall, digital radiography users would recommend it to other pediatric dentists. Digital radiography is not yet popular among pediatric dentists. Cost reduction and technology advancement may enhance utilization.

  3. 8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF RADIOGRAPHY EQUIPMENT, TEST METHODS INCLUDED RADIOGRAPHY AND BETA BACKSCATTERING. (7/13/56) - Rocky Flats Plant, Non-Nuclear Production Facility, South of Cottonwood Avenue, west of Seventh Avenue & east of Building 460, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  4. Radiography of the Paranasal Sinuses

    MedlinePlus

    ... your back or over your lap. This head. Radiography of the paranasal sinuses apron will protect your ... face, especially when lowering his or her head. Radiography of sitting and others while you are standing. ...

  5. Real-time radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bossi, R.H.; Oien, C.T.

    1981-02-26

    Real-time radiography is used for imaging both dynamic events and static objects. Fluorescent screens play an important role in converting radiation to light, which is then observed directly or intensified and detected. The radiographic parameters for real-time radiography are similar to conventional film radiography with special emphasis on statistics and magnification. Direct-viewing fluoroscopy uses the human eye as a detector of fluorescent screen light or the light from an intensifier. Remote-viewing systems replace the human observer with a television camera. The remote-viewing systems have many advantages over the direct-viewing conditions such as safety, image enhancement, and the capability to produce permanent records. This report reviews real-time imaging system parameters and components.

  6. Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    AD-A142 726 SUBTRACTION RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF BONE • LESIONS IN DOGS (U) ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC M P RETHMRN ET AL. 31...11sk01 o -py- Rt one. Lesions in Dogs 11,4 -OG. 3(0?NUL AU THOR~q caraACT 0R GRANT NUMBER,&) * * __ M.P. Rethman, U.E. Ruttiman, R.B. O’Neal, R.I...research article titled "Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs " solely to the Journal of Periodontology for review and

  7. Phosphor plate radiography: an integral component of the filmless practice.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The federal government has mandated that all dental and medical patient records be electronic in 3 years. Practices using film radiography will be unable to comply with this mandate. PSP radiography is not only a surprisingly convenient way to transition from film to digital imaging, it can also greatly enhance the practice's productivity, profitability, and patient satisfaction. Modern, forward-thinking practices will want to take full advantage of PSP's superiority by making this transition now rather than waiting until they are forced to.

  8. Transitioning to digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Drost, Wm Tod

    2011-04-01

    To describe the different forms of digital radiography (DR), image file formats, supporting equipment and services required for DR, storage of digital images, and teleradiology. Purchasing a DR system is a major investment for a veterinary practice. Types of DR systems include computed radiography, charge coupled devices, and direct or indirect DR. Comparison of workflow for analog and DR is presented. On the surface, switching to DR involves the purchase of DR acquisition hardware. The X-ray machine, table and grids used in analog radiography are the same for DR. Realistically, a considerable infrastructure supports the image acquisition hardware. This infrastructure includes monitors, computer workstations, a robust computer network and internet connection, a plan for storage and back up of images, and service contracts. Advantages of DR compared with analog radiography include improved image quality (when used properly), ease of use (more forgiving to the errors of radiographic technique), speed of making a complete study (important for critically ill patients), fewer repeat radiographs, less time looking for imaging studies, less physical storage space, and the ability to easily send images for consultation. With an understanding of the infrastructure requirements, capabilities and limitations of DR, an informed veterinary practice should be better able to make a sound decision about transitioning to DR. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  9. Radiography and computed tomography in the diagnosis of nonneoplastic equine mandibular disease.

    PubMed

    Huggons, Nick A; Bell, Robin J W; Puchalski, Sarah M

    2011-01-01

    We compared the information gained from computed tomography (CT) vs. radiography in horses with nonneoplastic disease of the mandible. We hypothesized that CT would provide additional diagnostic information. Medical records, radiographs, and CT images of horses with nonneoplastic mandibular disease evaluated between 1994 and 2008 were reviewed. Nineteen horses were identified; 11 had a tooth root abscess and related disease, four had a fracture of the teeth and/or mandible, and four had a nonneoplastic mass. Both CT images and radiographs allowed identification of diseased teeth that appeared clinically normal otherwise. CT allowed identification of teeth that were clinically affected but appeared normal radiographically. Parameters such as tooth pulp involvement, lamina dura destruction, presence of bone fragments, lingual and buccal mandibular bone periosteal reaction, and cortical bone destruction were more conspicuous with CT. Performing radiography and CT in horses with nonneoplastic mandibular disease provides a more complete evaluation than either technique alone. CT contributes additional information that could otherwise be overlooked with radiographs alone in horses with a mandibular fracture. CT provides ancillary information to radiographs in horses with dental infection or a nonneoplastic mass of the mandible.

  10. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  11. Quantifying Appointments, Treatment Time, Impressions, and Diagnostic Data of Cases Staffed by General Dentists and Prosthodontists in a Dental School Clinic.

    PubMed

    Imbery, Terence A; Greenfield, Kristy; Diaz, Nicholas; Janus, Charles; Best, Al M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to quantify differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding appointments, treatment time, impressions, and preoperative diagnostic data in teaching predoctoral clinical fixed prosthodontics. Electronic dental records (n=356) of patients treated at one dental school in academic year 2012 were randomly selected for review to obtain the following data: faculty and student demographics, number of appointments and treatment time from preparation to cementation, number of impressions made, completion of oral disease control treatment (ODCT), and presence of preoperative periapical radiographs and diagnostic casts. The results showed that ODCT was completed in 78%, preoperative radiographs were present in 76%, and diagnostic casts made in 53% of the cases reviewed. There was no statistically significant difference in number of appointments, treatment time, or number of final impressions when students were staffed by general dentists or prosthodontists. When students were supervised by multiple faculty members, there was generally an increase in treatment time and number of appointments and final impressions. Although this study found no statistically significant differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding the criteria evaluated, the results suggest that faculty development and calibration are needed to ensure ODCT is completed and preoperative radiographs are present prior to initiating fixed prosthodontic procedures.

  12. Progress in thermal neutron radiography at LENS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jack; Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. An end station for thermal neutron radiography and tomography is in operation at the Indiana University LENS facility. Neutrons from proton-induced nuclear reactions in Beryllium are moderated and collimated into a beam which is attenuated by a scanned object on a remotely-controlled rotating table. Neutron signal is then converted to a light signal with a ZnS scintillating screen and recorded in a cooled CCD. The author has performed diagnostics on the radiography hardware and software and has tested the system's capabilities by imaging a stack of high density polyethylene cubes with diverse inlet holes and grooves on an 80/20 aluminum base. The resolution of the radiographs are seen to be less than 1mm and 3D rending software is capable of reconstructing the internal structure of the aluminum. NSF.

  13. Forensic radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2010-01-01

    Perhaps the first instance of forensic radiography occurred in the 1890s when Professor AW Wright of Yale University tested Wilhelm Roentgen's newly discovered x-ray photography on a deceased rabbit. Of interest were small, round objects inside the rabbit that appeared as dark spots on the positive film. The objects were extracted and identified as bullets, thereby helping to determine the cause of the rabbit's death. In the years since Roentgen's discovery, the use of radiography and other medical imaging specialties to aid in investigating civil and criminal matters has increased as investigators realize how radiologic technology can yield information that otherwise is unavailable. Radiologic technologists can play a key role in forensic investigations.

  14. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  15. Cosmic Ray Scattering Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Cosmic ray muons are ubiquitous, are highly penetrating, and can be used to measure material densities by either measuring the stopping rate or by measuring the scattering of transmitted muons. The Los Alamos team has studied scattering radiography for a number of applications. Some results will be shown of scattering imaging for a range of practical applications, and estimates will be made of the utility of scattering radiography for nondestructive assessments of large structures and for geological surveying. Results of imaging the core of the Toshiba Nuclear Critical Assembly (NCA) Reactor in Kawasaki, Japan and simulations of imaging the damaged cores of the Fukushima nuclear reactors will be presented. Below is an image made using muons of a core configuration for the NCA reactor.

  16. Biomedical radiography: radiation protection and safety. (latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the safety of biomedical radiography. Radiation protection methods and techniques are described for both patients and operators. Safety techniques for dental radiology, routine x-rays, radiotherapy, thoracic radiography and other radiology procedures are included. Radiation exposure limits for patients and healthcare workers are defined. (Contains a minimum of 247 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  18. Research on optical properties of dental enamel for early caries diagnostics using a He-Ne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Liu, Li; Li, Song-zhan

    2008-12-01

    A new and non-invasive method adapted for optical diagnosis of early caries is proposed by researching on the interaction mechanism of laser with dental tissue and relations of remitted light with optical properties of the tissue. This method is based on simultaneous analyses of the following parameters: probing radiation, backscattering and auto-fluorescence. Investigation was performed on 104 dental samples in vitro by using He-Ne laser (λ=632.8nm, 2.0+/-0.1mW) as the probing. Spectrums of all samples were obtained. Characteristic spectrums of dental caries in various stages (intact, initial, moderate and deep) were given. Using the back-reflected light to normalize the intensity of back-scattering and fluorescence, a quantitative diagnosis standard for different stages of caries is proposed. In order to verify the test, comparison research was conducted among artificial caries, morphological damaged enamel, dental calculus and intact tooth. Results show that variations in backscattering characteristic changes in bio-tissue morphological and the quantity of auto-fluorescence is correlated with concentration of anaerobic microflora in hearth of caries lesion. This method poses a high potential of diagnosing various stages of dental caries, and is more reliability to detect early caries, surface damage of health enamel and dental calculus.

  19. Panoramic radiography for temporomandibular joint arthrography: a description of arthropanoramograms.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, K; Langlais, R P; Dolwick, M F

    1989-06-01

    TMJ arthrograms done with panoramic radiography, i.e., arthropanoramography, can demonstrate intracapsular disk displacement and perforation pathoses. These views are very practical for inferior synovial cavity arthrograms performed in the dental operatory since panoramic radiographic machines have become common in modern dental practices. Specific advantages of arthropanoramography include the decreased financial cost and decreased radiation exposure to the patient. Arthropanoramography does not replace tomography or videofluoroscopy in TMJ arthrography. It is, however, described as a simple alternative to the more conventional forms of arthrography.

  20. Digital radiography: image quality and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2008-11-01

    Digital radiography devices, rapidly replacing analog screen-film detectors, are now common in diagnostic radiological imaging, where implementation has been accelerated by the commodity status of electronic imaging and display systems. The shift from narrow latitude, fixed-speed screen-film detectors to wide latitude, variable-speed digital detectors has created a flexible imaging system that can easily result in overexposures to the patient without the knowledge of the operator, thus potentially increasing the radiation burden of the patient population from radiographic examinations. In addition, image processing can be inappropriately applied causing inconsistent or artifactual appearance of anatomy, which can lead to misdiagnosis. On the other hand, many advantages can be obtained from the variable-speed digital detector, such as an ability to lower dose in many examinations, image post-processing for disease-specific conditions, display flexibility to change the appearance of the image and aid the physician in making a differential diagnosis, and easy access to digital images. An understanding of digital radiography is necessary to minimize the possibility of overexposures and inconsistent results, and to achieve the principle of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) for the safe and effective care of all patients. Thus many issues must be considered for optimal implementation of digital radiography, as reviewed in this article.

  1. First-time dental care and the most recent dental treatment in relation to utilisation of dental services among dentate elderly patients in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Vysniauskaité, Sonata; Vehkalahti, Miira M

    2006-09-01

    To describe the initial dental treatments of Lithuanian dentate elderly patients and the content of the most recent treatment in relation to their dentist-visiting behaviour. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was carried out at two public dental offices in Kédainiai, Lithuania, among dentate patients aged 60+ years. A self-administered questionnaire covered first-time dental care, the most recent dental treatment, check-up behaviour, interval since the most recent dental visit, and number of teeth. Age, gender and education served as background information. Statistical evaluation was by chi-squared test, anova and logistic regression for odds ratio (OR). In all, 174 dentate elderly responded, mean age being 69.2 (SD = 6.6) years. The mean age at the first visit was 16.3 years [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.9-17.6]. Regular dental check-ups were reported by 30%, and 36% had visited a dentist within the past 12 months. As to the content of the most recent treatment, 78% of the elderly reported filling therapy, 50% endodontics, 48% tooth extraction, 21% radiography, 10% cleaning or scaling and 6% polishing of fillings. Those going for check-ups were more likely to report diagnostic (OR 1.9; 95% CI 1.1-2.8; p = 0.01) and preventive (OR 4.8; 95% CI 2.5-9.0; p = 0.002) treatment when analysed by a logistic regression model, controlling for age, gender, education and number of teeth. Check-up-orientated utilisation of dental services should be encouraged among the Lithuanian elderly. Dentists and health officials should place greater emphasis on prevention.

  2. Effects of radiographic techniques on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of digital radiography systems.

    PubMed

    Alsleem, Haney; U, Paul; Mong, Kam Shan; Davidson, Robert

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the radiation exposure factors kilovolt peak and tube current time (milliampere seconds) on the low-contrast detail detectability performance of 3 types of planar digital radiography systems. Detectability performance of an imaging system refers to its ability to detect and present the low-contrast details of organs in the acquired image. The authors also compare detectability performance between computed radiography, indirect digital radiography, and direct digital radiography by evaluating low-contrast details of the obtained images. A low-contrast detail phantom was inserted within 10-cm thicknesses of Perspex plastic sheets. The images were obtained with various kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings for each of the 3 digital radiography systems. Artinis CDRAD Analyser software was used to score the images and calculate the inverse image quality figure (IQFinv). The higher milliampere second levels in each kilovolt peak selection resulted in higher IQFinv in computed radiography and indirect and direct digital radiography. IQFinv values significantly increased in indirect digital radiography with increasing kilovolt peak in only 1 and 2 mAs. There were insignificant differences in IQFinv values when altering kilovolt peak in each milliampere second level in direct digital radiography. The indirect digital radiography system generally demonstrated better detectability performance than computed radiography and direct digital radiography. However, direct digital radiography demonstrated better detectability performance than indirect digital radiography at lower kilovolt peak and milliampere second settings, as did computed radiography at lower kilovolt peak settings. Higher milliampere second settings increase photon count, which results in a higher signal-to-noise ratio and thus increased detectability. Lower milliampere second settings increase noise level on images, which increases the risk of diagnostic detail loss. Changing

  3. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease

    PubMed Central

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease. PMID:26483582

  4. Retrospective comparison of abdominal ultrasonography and radiography in the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

    PubMed

    Won, Wylen Wade; Sharma, Ajay; Wu, Wenbo

    2015-10-01

    Abdominal radiography and ultrasonography are commonly used as part of the initial diagnostic plan for cats with nonspecific signs of abdominal disease. This retrospective study compared the clinical usefulness of abdominal radiography and ultrasonography in 105 feline patients with signs of abdominal disease. The final diagnosis was determined more commonly with ultrasonography (59%) compared to radiography (25.7%). Ultrasonography was also able to provide additional clinically relevant information in 76% of cases, and changed or refined the diagnosis in 47% of cases. Based on these findings, ultrasonography may be sufficient as an initial diagnostic test for the investigation of feline abdominal disease.

  5. Comparison of ultrasonography and radiography in diagnosis of rib fractures.

    PubMed

    Pishbin, Elham; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Foogardi, Molood; Salehi, Maryam; Seilanian Toosi, Farrokh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2017-08-01

    Rib fractures are the most common skeletal thoracic injuries resulting from blunt chest trauma. Half of the rib fractures are not detected upon a precise physical evaluation and radiographs. Recently ultrasonography (USG) has been investigated to detect rib fractures. But based on literature the usefulness of USG varies widely. This study was conducted to investigate the role of USG in the detection of possible rib fractures in comparison with radiography. In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients with minor blunt chest trauma and suspected rib fractures presenting in Imam Reza Hospital located in Mashhad-Iran, between April 2013 and October 2013 were assessed by USG and radiography. The radiography was performed in a posteroanterior (PA) chest projection and oblique rib view centered over the area of trauma. The time duration spent in taking USG and radiography were recorded. The prevalence and location of fractures revealed by USG and radiography were compared. Sixty-one suspected patients were assessed. The male to female ratio was 2.4:1 (43 men and 18 women) with a mean ± SD age of (44.3 ± 19.7) years. There were totally 59 rib fractures in 38 (62.3%) patients based on radiography and USG, while 23 (37.7%) patients had no diagnostic evidence of rib lesions. USG revealed 58 rib fractures in 33 (54.1%) of 61 suspected patients and radiographs revealed 32 rib fractures in 20 (32.8%) of 61 patients. A total of 58 (98.3%) rib fractures were detected by USG, whereas oblique rib view and PA chest radiography showed 27 (45.8%) and 24 (40.7%) rib fractures, respectively. The average duration of USG was (12 ± 3) min (range 7-17 min), whereas the duration of radiography was (27 ± 6) min (range 15-37 min). The kappa coefficient showed a low level of agreement between both USG and PA chest radiography (kappa coefficient = 0.28), and between USG and oblique rib view (kappa coefficient = 0.32). USG discloses more fractures than radiography in

  6. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge involving a case of dysphagia in association with cervical osteophytosis and a dental pain

    PubMed Central

    Dable, Rajani A.; Wasnik, Pradnya B.; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L.; Ali, Mukkaram Faridi

    2013-01-01

    Herein, presenting a case of a 42-year-old female with the chief complaint of dysphagia. The problem was assumed to be of dental origin, due to the onset of dental pain followed by dysphagia. A cervical radiograph revealed the presence of osteophytic lipping which proved to be the cause of dysphagia. Confusing and overlapping disease entities showing similar symptoms need thorough investigation. Dysphagia related to cervical spondylosis may have a direct connection with the person's occupation. Dentistry is considered a potentially hazardous occupation with regard to musculoskeletal disorders. However, additional studies are required to understand the occupational hazards faced by dentists. PMID:24250178

  7. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge involving a case of dysphagia in association with cervical osteophytosis and a dental pain.

    PubMed

    Dable, Rajani A; Wasnik, Pradnya B; Nagmode, Sunilkumar L; Ali, Mukkaram Faridi

    2013-07-01

    Herein, presenting a case of a 42-year-old female with the chief complaint of dysphagia. The problem was assumed to be of dental origin, due to the onset of dental pain followed by dysphagia. A cervical radiograph revealed the presence of osteophytic lipping which proved to be the cause of dysphagia. Confusing and overlapping disease entities showing similar symptoms need thorough investigation. Dysphagia related to cervical spondylosis may have a direct connection with the person's occupation. Dentistry is considered a potentially hazardous occupation with regard to musculoskeletal disorders. However, additional studies are required to understand the occupational hazards faced by dentists.

  8. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  9. Neutron Induced Beta Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, A. M.; Shylaja, D.

    2011-07-15

    In the present paper we give a new methodology named, 'neutron induced beta radiography-NIBR' which makes use of neutron activated Dy or In foils as source of (3-radiation. Radiographs are obtained with an aluminium cassette containing image plate, a sample under inspection and the activated Dy or In foil kept in tight contact. The sensitivity of the technique to thickness was evaluated for different materials in the form of step wedges. Some radiographs are presented to demonstrate potential of method to inspect thin samples.

  10. Student Incivility in Radiography Education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin R

    2017-07-01

    To examine student incivility in radiography classrooms by exploring the prevalence of uncivil behaviors along with the classroom management strategies educators use to manage and prevent classroom disruptions. A survey was designed to collect data on the severity and frequency of uncivil student behaviors, classroom management strategies used to address minor and major behavioral issues, and techniques to prevent student incivility. The participants were educators in radiography programs accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. Findings indicated that severe uncivil student behaviors in radiography classrooms do not occur as often as behaviors classified as less severe. Radiography educators in this study used a variety of strategies and techniques to manage and prevent student incivility; however, radiography educators who received formal training in classroom management reported fewer incidents of student incivility than those who had not received formal training. The participants in this study took a proactive approach to addressing severe behavioral issues in the classroom. Many radiography educators transition from the clinical environment to the classroom setting with little to no formal training in classroom management. Radiography educators are encouraged to attend formal training sessions to learn how to manage the higher education classroom effectively. Student incivility is present in radiography classrooms. This study provides a foundation for future research on incivility. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  11. Predictability of Dental Emergencies by Panography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-30

    population (recruits with little or no prior dental care) demonstrate a high incidence of 1,2dental disease . Various epidemiologic studies have shown the...Medical Center, Washington, DC 20012 I Abstract: A study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of panoramic radiography for...dental complaints ranked second only to upper respiratory infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and reliability of

  12. Comparison of the diagnostic value of CBCT and Digital Panoramic Radiography with surgical findings to determine the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar to the inferior alveolar nerve canal

    PubMed Central

    Saraydar-Baser, R; Dehghani-Tafti, M; Navab-Azam, A; Ezoddini-Ardakani, F; Nayer, S; Safi, Y; Shamloo, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated and determined the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar (TMM) to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) by using CBCT and digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic research applied CBCT and panoramic radiographs for 60 subjects (28 men, 32 women). Subjects selected showed a close proximity about the TMM to the inferior nerve canal on panoramic radiographs; these subjects then received CBCT radiographs. The CBCT findings for the proximity of the TMM to inferior nerve canal used the outcomes of surgical findings as the standard of comparison. Results: Eight cases showed positive surgical findings indicating vicinity of the third molar and the mandibular nerve canal. Only 13.3% of the cases in which panoramic views showed the proximity of the TMM and the IAC were confirmed during surgery. The result for CBCT radiographic diagnosis was 95%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that CBCT is preferred over panoramic radiography to determine the proximity of the impacted TMM to the IAC. Narrowing of the mandibular canal or root canal, disconnection of root borders in panoramic radiography, and the inferior-lingual proximity of the tooth to the root in CBCT strongly indicated the close nearness of the impacted TMM to the IAC. PMID:28316671

  13. Comparison of the diagnostic value of CBCT and Digital Panoramic Radiography with surgical findings to determine the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar to the inferior alveolar nerve canal.

    PubMed

    Saraydar-Baser, R; Dehghani-Tafti, M; Navab-Azam, A; Ezoddini-Ardakani, F; Nayer, S; Safi, Y; Shamloo, N

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated and determined the proximity of an impacted third mandibular molar (TMM) to the inferior alveolar canal (IAC) by using CBCT and digital panoramic radiography. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic research applied CBCT and panoramic radiographs for 60 subjects (28 men, 32 women). Subjects selected showed a close proximity about the TMM to the inferior nerve canal on panoramic radiographs; these subjects then received CBCT radiographs. The CBCT findings for the proximity of the TMM to inferior nerve canal used the outcomes of surgical findings as the standard of comparison. Results: Eight cases showed positive surgical findings indicating vicinity of the third molar and the mandibular nerve canal. Only 13.3% of the cases in which panoramic views showed the proximity of the TMM and the IAC were confirmed during surgery. The result for CBCT radiographic diagnosis was 95%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that CBCT is preferred over panoramic radiography to determine the proximity of the impacted TMM to the IAC. Narrowing of the mandibular canal or root canal, disconnection of root borders in panoramic radiography, and the inferior-lingual proximity of the tooth to the root in CBCT strongly indicated the close nearness of the impacted TMM to the IAC.

  14. Diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners after lecture in identifying post-menopausal women with low bone mineral density by panoramic radiographs.

    PubMed

    Sutthiprapaporn, P; Taguchi, A; Nakamoto, T; Ohtsuka, M; Mallick, P C; Tsuda, M; Kodama, I; Kudo, Y; Suei, Y; Tanimoto, K

    2006-07-01

    Mandibular cortical erosion detected on panoramic radiographs may be useful for identifying post-menopausal women with low skeletal bone mineral density (BMD). The purposes of this study were to calculate the diagnostic performance of general dental practitioners (GDPs) who attended a lecture on identifying post-menopausal women with low BMD from findings on panoramic radiographs and to evaluate the influence of GDPs' age on diagnostic performance. After a 1 h lecture, 111 GDPs were asked to classify the mandibular cortex (normal or eroded) on panoramic radiographs obtained from 100 post-menopausal women who have had skeletal BMD assessment. Low BMD was defined as a BMD T score of -1.0 or less. Diagnostic performance was analysed by comparing two groups classified by mandibular cortex (women with normal cortex and women with any eroded cortex) with those classified by BMD (women with normal BMD and women with low BMD). The mean sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy and likelihood ratio for a positive risk result were 73.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]; 71.3 to 74.7%), 49.0% (95% CI; 46.4 to 51.5%), 66.9% (95% CI; 66.0 to 67.8%), 57.0% (95% CI; 55.8 to 58.2%), 62.9% (95% CI; 62.1 to 63.7%) and 1.51 (95% CI; 1.44 to 1.58), respectively. GDPs' age did not influence diagnostic performance. Our results suggest that 73.0% of women who had low skeletal BMD can be identified by GDPs after a lecture on the use of panoramic radiographs as an aid in diagnosing low BMD; however, the diagnostic performance may not be influenced by GDPs' age.

  15. Radiography students' clinical learning styles.

    PubMed

    Ward, Patti; Makela, Carole

    2010-01-01

    To examine the common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. Descriptive research methodology, using a single self-report questionnaire, helped to identify common learning styles of radiography students during clinical practice. The results indicated that 3 learning styles predominate among radiography students during clinical practice: task oriented, purposeful and tentative. Insight into clinical practice learning styles can help students understand how they learn and allow them to recognize ways to maximize learning. It also heightens awareness among clinical instructors and technologists of the different learning styles and their relevance to clinical practice education.

  16. Flemish general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiology

    PubMed Central

    Aps, J K M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess general dental practitioners' knowledge of dental radiography and radiation protection in order to alert the Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. Prior to attending a postgraduate course on intraoral radiology, general dental practitioners in Flanders, Belgium, were asked to fill in a questionnaire regarding the radiological equipment and the techniques they used for intraoral radiography. The availability and type of dental panoramic equipment were also assessed. A total of 374 questionnaires were available for this study. 15% of the attendants used radiographic equipment that was more than 27 years old and 43% reported equipment that operated with a clockwork timer. 32% and 75% respectively had no idea what the kV or mA settings were on their intraoral equipment. 5% were unaware which cone geometry or geometric technique (paralleling or bisecting angle technique) they were using. 81% claimed to be using a short cone technique. 47% did not know what collimation meant, whereas 40% stated that they were using circular collimation. 38% used digital intraoral image detectors (63% were photostimulable storage phosphorplate (PSPP)), but 16% were not sure about the type of sensor they were using (PSPP or solid-state sensors). 61% also had dental panoramic equipment available, 25% of which was digital (10% charge coupled device (CCD) and 15% PSPP). These results clearly indicate the need for continued education on this subject. The latter is an important signal to Belgian authorities and dental professional societies. PMID:20100924

  17. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  18. Advances in diagnostic imaging for pathologic conditions of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Benson, Byron W; Flint, Diane J; Liang, Hui; Opatowsky, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in dental and maxillofacial imaging are delineated along with the advantages and disadvantages of each imaging modality. The imaging modalities that are included are intraoral radiography, panoramic radiography, cone-beam computed tomography, multidetector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, and ultrasound.

  19. Clinical applications of digital 2-D and 3-D radiography for the periodontist.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Thomas; McAllister, Nicole; McAllister, Brad

    2012-09-01

    Although there has been rapid development of imaging technology within dentistry, there has been limited evidence-based research documenting the benefits of digital radiography. We searched MEDLINE for relevant studies and review papers demonstrating clinical applications, limitations, and advancements within digital radiography. Two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D digital radiography has become a powerful diagnostic tool for simple and complex procedures, including implant reconstruction. Recent advancements have reduced radiation exposure, increased resolution, and improved detection capabilities of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) sensors. The current review summarizes such advances and outlines advanced CBCT implant-planning techniques. While evidence-based research grows, the logistic, diagnostic, and planning improvements of 2-D and 3-D digital radiography are irrefutable with the potential to supplant conventional techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems.

    PubMed

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey.

  1. Dose audit for patients undergoing two common radiography examinations with digital radiology systems

    PubMed Central

    İnal, Tolga; Ataç, Gökçe

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to determine the radiation doses delivered to patients undergoing general examinations using computed or digital radiography systems in Turkey. MATERIALS AND METHODS Radiographs of 20 patients undergoing posteroanterior chest X-ray and of 20 patients undergoing anteroposterior kidney-ureter-bladder radiography were evaluated in five X-ray rooms at four local hospitals in the Ankara region. Currently, almost all radiology departments in Turkey have switched from conventional radiography systems to computed radiography or digital radiography systems. Patient dose was measured for both systems. The results were compared with published diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the European Union and International Atomic Energy Agency. RESULTS The average entrance surface doses (ESDs) for chest examinations exceeded established international DRLs at two of the X-ray rooms in a hospital with computed radiography. All of the other ESD measurements were approximately equal to or below the DRLs for both examinations in all of the remaining hospitals. Improper adjustment of the exposure parameters, uncalibrated automatic exposure control systems, and failure of the technologists to choose exposure parameters properly were problems we noticed during the study. CONCLUSION This study is an initial attempt at establishing local DRL values for digital radiography systems, and will provide a benchmark so that the authorities can establish reference dose levels for diagnostic radiology in Turkey. PMID:24317331

  2. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  3. Survey of radiographic requirements and techniques in United States dental assisting programs, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Grammer, S.; Hunter, N.; Baker, C.

    1983-10-01

    A survey of dental assisting programs revealed little standardization of student requirements for dental radiography in the United States. Areas for concern were: the high proportion of programs in which classmates exposed one another to ionizing radiation for training purposes; and the continued use of closed cones in some cases. Preclinical laboratories in radiography were, on average, of considerably longer duration than those previously reported for dental students. Conversely, clinical requirements in intraoral techniques were less for dental assisting students than is the case for dental students. Available methods of reducing patient exposure to ionizing radiation are not being fully implemented.

  4. Utility of thyroid collars in cephalometric radiography

    PubMed Central

    Sansare, KP; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-01-01

    Objective A study was carried out to investigate the rationale that use of a thyroid collar (TC) in cephalometric radiography hampers the diagnostic and descriptive quality of lateral cephalogram. Methods A randomized observer blinded study was designed. The study consisted of two groups. The first group data were retrieved from the oral radiology archival system having lateral cephalogram without a TC. The second group was selected from the oral radiology department of patients where lateral cephalogram was taken using a TC. Lateral cephalogram was taken on direct digital system, the Kodak 9000 unit (Eastman Kodak, Rochester, NY). 2 observers blinded about the aim of the study were appointed to identify 15 sets of landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. Interobserver variance was also analysed for the study. Results 50 lateral cephalograms in each group were studied. Out of 15 sets of landmarks, 12 were identified consistent with the TC group. Three landmarks, namely the hyoid bone, second cervical vertebra and third cervical vertebra could not be identified on the TC group. There was no significant difference in the interobserver markings on lateral cephalogram. Conclusions TCs do mask a few landmarks on the lateral cephalogram. These landmarks are mainly used for analysis of skeletal maturity index (SMI). Lead TCs are probably the most convenient and easily available means to protect the thyroid from unwanted radiation while taking lateral cephalogram. It is therefore encouraged to use a TC during routine cephalometric radiography where SMI information is not needed. PMID:22065795

  5. Pulmonary diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2017-08-01

    Term infants with respiratory distress may have extremely varied etiologies of their illnesses. These range from anatomical malformations to infectious or inflammatory conditions to genetic, metabolic, or neurological abnormalities. This article reviews the present array of diagnostic studies available to the clinician, including the physical examination, imaging (radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and nuclear scanning techniques), lung mechanics and function testing, evaluation of gas exchange (blood gases, pulse oximetry, transcutaneous monitoring, and end-tidal carbon monoxide measurements), and anatomical studies (bronchoscopy and lung biopsy). These tests and procedures are reviewed and a stepwise approach recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Proton Radiography of a Thermal Explosion in PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilowitz, Laura; Henson, Bryan; Romero, Jerry; Asay, Blaine; Sandstrom, Mary

    2007-06-01

    The understanding of thermal explosions and burn propagation lags that of detonations and shock propagation. Diagnostics such as high energy radiography have been used to image shocks, but have been previously precluded from use in thermal explosions due to their stringent timing requirements: shock propagation can be synchronized to an external diagnostic while thermal explosion can not. This issue is solved by following the evolution of the ignition volume in a thermal explosion and using a laser pulse to provide a temperature jump in that central volume during the final thermal runaway leading to ignition. Details of the laser heating which minimize the perturbation of the thermal explosion will be discussed with comparisons between auto-ignited and laser ignited tests. Thermal explosion experiments have been conducted at the Los Alamos Proton Radiography facility and have yielded images of the evolution of ignition, post-ignition burn propagation, and case failure in a radially confined cylinder of PBX 9501.

  7. Musculoskeletal injuries in a resource-constrained environment: comparing diagnostic accuracy of on-the-spot ultrasonography and conventional radiography for bone fracture screening during the Paris-Dakar rally raid.

    PubMed

    Dallaudière, Benjamin; Larbi, Ahmed; Lefere, Mathieu; Perozziello, Anne; Hauger, Olivier; Pommerie, Florence; Fraboulet, Bénédicte; Jacob, Denis

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a good first-line alternative for the diagnosis of bone fractures in adults as well as children. Our study shows that, compared to X-ray, in a resource-constrained environment, on-site US has a high sensitivity (98%) and specificity (96%) in the diagnosis of bone fractures. To compare the accuracy of on-the-spot US with conventional radiography in the screening for bone fractures during the Paris-Dakar rally raid. Eighty-three patients (81 men, 2 women) with clinically suspected bone fractures were included in 2013 and 2014. They underwent X-ray and US on the spot, blindly interpreted by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Using X-ray as gold standard, we calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US, for each anatomic location. The accuracy of US and radiography were also assessed, as were the number of fragments and their degree of displacement (Student's t-test). Compared with X-ray, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of on-site US were, respectively, for the presence (or absence) of fractures: 98%, 98%, 100%, and 95%. The accuracy of US was 99%. Only one radial styloid process fracture was misdiagnosed with US. There was no significant difference between US and X-ray (P > 0.93) concerning the number of fragments and their degree of displacement. Bedside musculoskeletal ultrasound performed by trained musculoskeletal radiologists is a useful method in determining and assessing bone fractures in a resource constrained environment.

  8. Musculoskeletal injuries in a resource-constrained environment: comparing diagnostic accuracy of on-the-spot ultrasonography and conventional radiography for bone fracture screening during the Paris–Dakar rally raid

    PubMed Central

    Larbi, Ahmed; Lefere, Mathieu; Perozziello, Anne; Hauger, Olivier; Pommerie, Florence; Fraboulet, Bénédicte; Jacob, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound (US) is a good first-line alternative for the diagnosis of bone fractures in adults as well as children. Our study shows that, compared to X-ray, in a resource-constrained environment, on-site US has a high sensitivity (98%) and specificity (96%) in the diagnosis of bone fractures. Purpose To compare the accuracy of on-the-spot US with conventional radiography in the screening for bone fractures during the Paris–Dakar rally raid. Material and Methods Eighty-three patients (81 men, 2 women) with clinically suspected bone fractures were included in 2013 and 2014. They underwent X-ray and US on the spot, blindly interpreted by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Using X-ray as gold standard, we calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US, for each anatomic location. The accuracy of US and radiography were also assessed, as were the number of fragments and their degree of displacement (Student’s t-test). Results Compared with X-ray, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of on-site US were, respectively, for the presence (or absence) of fractures: 98%, 98%, 100%, and 95%. The accuracy of US was 99%. Only one radial styloid process fracture was misdiagnosed with US. There was no significant difference between US and X-ray (P > 0.93) concerning the number of fragments and their degree of displacement. Conclusion Bedside musculoskeletal ultrasound performed by trained musculoskeletal radiologists is a useful method in determining and assessing bone fractures in a resource constrained environment. PMID:26034643

  9. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  10. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  11. A Taxonomy of Functions of Dental X-Ray Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Charles R.; And Others

    The taxonomy of the functions of dental x-ray technologists presented in this report resulted from a dental radiography curriculum development project undertaken at Middlesex County College (MCC) in 1981. After an introductory section citing arguments for creating taxonomies of objectives, the report explains the impetus for the curriculum…

  12. The implementation of digital sensors in maxillofacial radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Stelt, Paul F.

    2001-03-01

    Systems for intra-oral digital radiography in dentistry can be divided into two main groups: direct sensor systems and semi-direct or indirect sensor systems. Direct imaging is performed by a two-dimensional array of sensor elements. The size of a typical intra-oral CCD-sensor is approximately from 18 mm×24 mm to 30 mm×40 mm; the active area is somewhat smaller, because of the thickness of the packaging of the sensor. CCD-based imaging is now also available for panoramic and cephalometric radiography. Indirect (semi-direct) imaging is based on storage phosphor plates (SPP) imaging. The plate is positioned in the mouth of the patient behind the teeth, and exposed to radiation. The positioning of the sensor plate resembles very much the way conventional radiographic films are handled. SPP technology is also available for panoramic and cephalometric imaging. The purpose of radiography is to provide information to solve a particular diagnostic task. It is therefore very likely that the role of dedicated diagnostic software will become essential in the near future. The importance of dedicated software for diagnostic imaging will increase. As a result of worldwide research, more procedures will become available, for research as well as for use in general practice.

  13. Ionizing radiation regulations and the dental practitioner: 1. The nature of ionizing radiation and its use in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rout, John; Brown, Jackie

    2012-04-01

    Legislation governing the use of ionizing radiation in the workplace and in medical treatment first became law in 1985 and 1988, being superseded by the Ionizing Radiations Regulations 1999 (IRR99) and the Ionizing Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations 2000, (IR(ME)R 2000), respectively. This legislation ensures a safe environment in which to work and receive treatment and requires that those involved in the radiographic process must be appropriately trained for the type of radiographic practice they perform. A list of the topics required is detailed in Schedule 2 of IR(ME)R 2000 and is paraphrased in Table 1, with the extent and amount of knowledge required depending on the type of radiographic practice undertaken. Virtually all dental practitioners undertake radiography as part of their clinical practice. Legislation requires that users of radiation, including dentists and members of the dental team, understand the basic principles of radiation physics, hazards and protection, and are able to undertake dental radiography safely with the production of high quality, diagnostic images.

  14. Computed radiography for the radiological technologist.

    PubMed

    Artz, D S

    1997-01-01

    CR has emerged as a general imaging technology for successful imaging of the chest, abdominal, musculoskeletal, and pediatric anatomy. For the general radiographer, CR is both celebrated and scorned for its complex function, and requires thorough ongoing training for the technologists to produce consistently high image quality. Digital radiography's unique separation of detector, display, and archive add a flexibility over screen-film technology for moving, storing, printing, and viewing plain radiographic images. CR technology is now a viable solution for those wishing to embrace the electronic and digital revolution in medicine. Although the system has less spatial resolution than screen-film technology, the strength of postacquisition image processing to enhance pathology and view obscured anatomy makes CR imaging attractive to technologists and radiologists. CR is a new modality for the general radiographer that, when put into the hands of a well-trained technologist, produces images of beautiful diagnostic quality.

  15. Dental prosthesis aspiration: An uncommon cause of respiratory distress.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Belphine A L; Malfait, Thomas L; Bonte, Katrien; Malfait, Thomas L A

    2016-12-01

    We present a case of a 66-year-old Caucasian man with acute respiratory distress. The patient had a history of multiple cerebrovascular accidents which resulted in left hemiplegia, swallowing problems, and aphasia. He was tentatively diagnosed with aspiration pneumonia. However, because of clinical deterioration further investigations concluded to the aspiration of a dental prosthesis. After intubation and stabilization, the prosthesis could be manually extracted. However, the patient developed a Staphylococcus epidermidis sepsis and despite adequate antibiotic therapy, he eventually died. Dental prosthesis aspiration is a medical situation associated with a higher morbidity and mortality rate compared to ingested foreign bodies. It requires a high level of suspicion to ensure a timely diagnosis and life-saving treatment. Thorough history taking is of great importance in case of tracheobronchial aspiration, which is in the adult population mostly secondary to an underlying disorder. In impaired adults with missing dental prostheses there should be extra awareness for this problem. This case report illustrates the importance of a detailed history in case of tracheobronchial aspiration and shows the limitations in the diagnostic usefulness of bedside chest radiography.

  16. Industrial Radiography | Radiation Protection | US EPA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-12-09

    Manufacturers use a method called industrial radiography to check for cracks or flaws in materials. Radiation is used in industrial radiography to show problems not visible from the outside without damaging the material.

  17. Accelerator system for neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B; Hall, J

    2000-09-21

    The field of x-ray radiography is well established for doing non-destructive evaluation of a vast array of components, assemblies, and objects. While x-rays excel in many radiography applications, their effectiveness diminishes rapidly if the objects of interest are surrounded by thick, high-density materials that strongly attenuate photons. Due to the differences in interaction mechanisms, neutron radiography is highly effective in imaging details inside such objects. To obtain a high intensity neutron source suitable for neutron imaging a 9-MeV linear accelerator is being evaluated for putting a deuteron beam into a high-pressure deuterium gas cell. As a windowless aperture is needed to transport the beam into the gas cell, a low-emittance is needed to minimize losses along the high-energy beam transport (HEBT) and the end station. A description of the HEBT, the transport optics into the gas cell, and the requirements for the linac will be presented.

  18. Thyroid Radiation Dose to Patients From Diagnostic Radiology Procedures Over Eight Decades: 1930-2010.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lienard A; Miller, Donald L; Lee, Choonsik; Melo, Dunstana R; Villoing, Daphnée; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Thierry-Chef, Isabelle; Winters, Sarah J; Labrake, Michael; Myers, Charles F; Lim, Hyeyeun; Kitahara, Cari M; Linet, Martha S; Simon, Steven L

    2017-09-29

    This study summarizes and compares estimates of radiation absorbed dose to the thyroid gland for typical patients who underwent diagnostic radiology examinations in the years from 1930 to 2010. The authors estimated the thyroid dose for common examinations, including radiography, mammography, dental radiography, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, and computed tomography (CT). For the most part, a clear downward trend in thyroid dose over time for each procedure was observed. Historically, the highest thyroid doses came from the nuclear medicine thyroid scans in the 1960s (630 mGy), full-mouth series dental radiography (390 mGy) in the early years of the use of x rays in dentistry (1930s), and the barium swallow (esophagram) fluoroscopic exam also in the 1930s (140 mGy). Thyroid uptake nuclear medicine examinations and pancreatic scans also gave relatively high doses to the thyroid (64 mGy and 21 mGy, respectively, in the 1960s). In the 21st century, the highest thyroid doses still result from nuclear medicine thyroid scans (130 mGy), but high thyroid doses are also associated with chest/abdomen/pelvis CT scans (18 and 19 mGy for males and females, respectively). Thyroid doses from CT scans did not exhibit the same downward trend as observed for other examinations. The largest thyroid doses from conventional radiography came from cervical spine and skull examinations. Thyroid doses from mammography (which began in the 1960s) were generally a fraction of 1 mGy. The highest average doses to the thyroid from mammography were about 0.42 mGy, with modestly larger doses associated with imaging of breasts with large compressed thicknesses. Thyroid doses from dental radiographic procedures have decreased markedly throughout the decades, from an average of 390 mGy for a full-mouth series in the 1930s to an average of 0.31 mGy today. Upper GI series fluoroscopy examinations resulted in up to two orders of magnitude lower thyroid doses than the barium swallow. There are

  19. Image Acquisition and Quality in Digital Radiography.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Medical imaging has undergone dramatic changes and technological breakthroughs since the introduction of digital radiography. This article presents information on the development of digital radiography and types of digital radiography systems. Aspects of image quality and radiation exposure control are highlighted as well. In addition, the article includes related workplace changes and medicolegal considerations in the digital radiography environment. ©2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  20. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Demirturk Kocasarac, Husniye; Celenk, Peruze

    2017-06-01

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images.

  1. Chest X-Ray (Chest Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Chest Chest x-ray uses a very ... limitations of Chest Radiography? What is a Chest X-ray (Chest Radiography)? The chest x-ray is the ...

  2. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists

    PubMed Central

    Dölekoğlu, S; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. Methods The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ2 test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. Results 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20–63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Conclusion Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased. PMID:21831978

  3. The usage of digital radiography and cone beam computed tomography among Turkish dentists.

    PubMed

    Dölekoğlu, Semanur; Fişekçioğlu, E; İlgüy, M; İlgüy, D

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the use of digital radiography and report how it was used by Turkish dentists. The survey was based on 383 dentists who were present at the sixteenth International Congress organized by the Turkish Dental Association. A questionnaire which consisted of 19 questions was given to the dentists who participated in the study. Data were assessed according to frequency distribution and the χ(2) test was used to determine the significance of differences between two independent groups. 376 questionnaires were analysed. The mean age of the dentists who participated in the study was 37.14 ± 9.6 years (range: 20-63 years). The distribution of the dentists according to the 7 regions of Turkey were: Marmara 58%, Aegean 13% and Mediterranean 10%, Central Anatolia 8%, Black Sea 7%, Southeastern Anatolia 3%, Eastern Anatolia 1%. 124 dentists (33%) said they did not work with digital radiography. 95 dentists indicated that they did not use digital radiography owing to cost (60%). 252 dentists (67%) said they used digital radiography. 40% of the participants noted that the repetition of periapical radiographs was due to digital radiography. 166 dentists (55.9%) and 79.1% academicians had knowledge about cone beam CT (CBCT). Digital radiography users are increasing in Turkey and levels of knowledge of CBCT and awareness of radiation safety has also increased.

  4. Basic radiation protection considerations in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Michel, R; Zimmerman, T L

    1999-11-01

    This article provides basic guidance to radiation safety professionals unfamiliar with dental radiography on how to optimize the use of x-ray equipment and maintain occupational and non-occupational doses ALARA. Topics discussed in this article include basic protective measures commonly used to minimize the patient and operator's exposure to radiation, recommendations for the development of operating procedures, and the performance of compliance audits in dental practice.

  5. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 >= -0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 >= -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  6. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release.

    PubMed

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r(2) ≥ -0.86) as well as calcium release (r(2) ≥ -0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r(2) = 0.42-0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo.

  7. Application of the specular and diffuse reflection analysis for in vitro diagnostics of dental erosion: correlation with enamel softening, roughness, and calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Wang, Xiaojie; Beyeler, Barbara; Meier, Christoph; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    We present assembly and application of an optical reflectometer for the analysis of dental erosion. The erosive procedure involved acid-induced softening and initial substance loss phases, which are considered to be difficult for visual diagnosis in a clinic. Change of the specular reflection signal showed the highest sensitivity for the detection of the early softening phase of erosion among tested methods. The exponential decrease of the specular reflection intensity with erosive duration was compared to the increase of enamel roughness. Surface roughness was measured by optical analysis, and the observed tendency was correlated with scanning electron microscopy images of eroded enamel. A high correlation between specular reflection intensity and measurement of enamel softening (r2 ≥ −0.86) as well as calcium release (r2 ≥ −0.86) was found during erosion progression. Measurement of diffuse reflection revealed higher tooth-to-tooth deviation in contrast to the analysis of specular reflection intensity and lower correlation with other applied methods (r2 = 0.42–0.48). The proposed optical method allows simple and fast surface analysis and could be used for further optimization and construction of the first noncontact and cost-effective diagnostic tool for early erosion assessment in vivo. PMID:22029364

  8. IMPACT OF THE BITEWING RADIOGRAPHY EXAM INCLUSION ON THE PREVALENCE OF DENTAL CARIES IN 12-YEAR-OLD STUDENTS IN THE CITY OF FRANCA, SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Mestriner, Soraya Fernandes; Pardini, Luiz Carlos; Mestriner, Wilson

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The pattern of development of carious lesions has changed. The carious lesion has been progressive and reaches the dentin without showing alterations in the clinical aspects. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of caries in 12-year-old students in the city of Franca – São Paulo, Brazil, during the year of 2003, and to evaluate the additional value of bitewing radiograph to detect hidden carious lesions in permanent molar dentin. Materials and Methods: A probabilistic sample composed of two hundred and fifty six (256) students, from public and private schools, was submitted to a cross-sectional study through examination by a calibrated examiner, in order to detect the caries prevalence, using the methodology recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). For 66% of the sample, bitewing radiographs of the permanent molar region were obtained. The images were analyzed by a calibrated examiner, who established the presence of hidden caries in teeth with radiolucency in dentin, yet considered healthy in the epidemiological survey. Results: The prevalence of dental caries in epidemiological exam without (WHO) and with (WHO/R) the inclusion of hidden caries lesion was 54% and 64%, and the DMFT index was 1.73 and 1.92 respectively. Conclusion: Utilization of the method of bitewing radiographic diagnosis significantly increased (p<0.001) the prevalence of caries in the studied population. PMID:19089067

  9. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... of an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  10. Embossed radiography utilizing energy subtraction.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro; Abderyim, Purkhet; Aizawa, Katsuo; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ehara, Shigeru; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Currently, it is difficult to carry out refraction-contrast radiography by using a conventional X-ray generator. Thus, we developed an embossed radiography system utilizing dual-energy subtraction for decreasing the absorption contrast in unnecessary regions, and the contrast resolution of a target region was increased by use of image-shifting subtraction and a linear-contrast system in a flat panel detector (FPD). The X-ray generator had a 100-microm-focus tube. Energy subtraction was performed at tube voltages of 45 and 65 kV, a tube current of 0.50 mA, and an X-ray exposure time of 5.0 s. A 1.0-mm-thick aluminum filter was used for absorbing low-photon-energy bremsstrahlung X-rays. Embossed radiography was achieved with cohesion imaging by use of the FPD with pixel sizes of 48 x 48 microm, and the shifting dimension of an object in the horizontal direction ranged from 100 to 200 microm. At a shifting distance of 100 mum, the spatial resolutions in the horizontal and vertical directions measured with a lead test chart were both 83 microm. In embossed radiography of non-living animals, we obtained high-contrast embossed images of fine bones, gadolinium oxide particles in the kidney, and coronary arteries approximately 100 microm in diameter.

  11. Lasers In Dental Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everse, K. E.; Sinor, T. W.; Menzel, E. R.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the potential of lasers for real time in situ dental diagnosis via transillumination of teeth and gums and via fluorescence. Not surprisingly, absorption and/or scattering of light by teeth was found to be insensitive to light color. However, monochromatic transillumination revealed detail better than white light. Transillumination of gums was best performed with orange-red light because of tissue absorption. Illumination of oral structures by 488 nm Ar-laser light was effective in revealing diagnosis detail by fluorescence. Incipient caries and fine tooth fracture lines that are generally not revealed by radiography were observable by laser.

  12. A sign of the times: contemporary dental imaging artifacts.

    PubMed

    Frommer, Herbert H; Stabulas-Savage, Jeanine J

    2008-11-01

    There have been new findings evident in dental imaging that reflect changes in society over time. Although we may interpret these findings as "artifacts," they could simply be images that we cannot readily identify. The following article is presented to notify dental professionals of the presence of these images, which are truly "signs of the times," and to assist clinicians in recognizing these images in dental radiography.

  13. Dental x-rays and the risk of thyroid cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Memon, Anjum; Godward, Sara; Williams, Dillwyn; Siddique, Iqbal; Al-Saleh, Khalid

    2010-05-01

    The thyroid gland is highly susceptible to radiation carcinogenesis and exposure to high-dose ionising radiation is the only established cause of thyroid cancer. Dental radiography, a common source of low-dose diagnostic radiation exposure in the general population, is often overlooked as a radiation hazard to the gland and may be associated with the risk of thyroid cancer. An increased risk of thyroid cancer has been reported in dentists, dental assistants, and x-ray workers; and exposure to dental x-rays has been associated with an increased risk of meningiomas and salivary tumours. To examine whether exposure to dental x-rays was associated with the risk of thyroid cancer, we conducted a population-based case-control interview study among 313 patients with thyroid cancer and a similar number of individually matched (year of birth +/- three years, gender, nationality, district of residence) control subjects in Kuwait. Conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for other upper-body x-rays, showed that exposure to dental x-rays was significantly associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer (odds ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 3.1) (p=0.001) with a dose-response pattern (p for trend <0.0001). The association did not vary appreciably by age, gender, nationality, level of education, or parity. These findings, based on self-report by cases/controls, provide some support to the hypothesis that exposure to dental x-rays, particularly multiple exposures, may be associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer; and warrant further study in settings where historical dental x-ray records may be available.

  14. [The place of radiography in endodontic treatment carried out in general practice in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Gaye, F; Mbaye, M; Faye, B; Diallo, B

    2002-03-01

    An investigation conducted over dental surgeons of 52 dental offices in Dakar and it's near suburb (40 from private sector and 12 from public and quasi-public) has shown that the use of retro-alveolar radiography during endodontic treatment was not systematic, due to the price of retro-alveolar film, waste of time and relative facility of the endodontic treatment of monoradicular teeth. The preparatory negative is favored (32.70%) particularly by private dental surgeons, who use two retro-alveolar films for endodontic treatment: pre and post operative radiography (30%). The immediate post operator control is executed only in case of post-operator pains by public and quasi-public dental surgeons (16.67%) with one retro-alveolar film on average for the endodontic treatment; at term any radiographic control is done. Three retro-alveolar films per endodontic treatment were exceptionally used (9.61%) and offset incidences (15%) are not much used as well as support-films (angulators). The retro-alveolar radiography is still a reliable guide for a clinical success in endodontic treatment with a minimum of three retro-alveolar films and offset incidences.

  15. Reducing an already low dental diagnostic X-ray dose: does it make sense? Comparison of three cost-utility analysis methods used to assess two dental dose-reduction measures.

    PubMed

    Hoogeveen, R C; Sanderink, G C H; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    To find a method that is suitable for providing an objective assessment of the cost effectiveness of a dose-reducing measure used for diagnostic dental X-ray exposures. Three cost-utility analysis (CUA) methods were evaluated by comparing their assessments of two dose-reduction measures, a rectangular collimator and the combination of two devices that reduce the radiation dose received during orthodontic lateral cephalography. The following CUA methods were used: (1) the alpha value (AV), a monetary valuation of dose reduction used in the nuclear industry; (2) the value of a statistical life for valuation of the reduction in stochastic adverse effects; and (3) the time-for-time method, based on the postulate that risk reduction is effective when the number of years of life gained is more than the years that an average worker must work to earn the costs of the risk-reducing measure. The CUA methods were used to determine the minimum number of uses that was required for the dose-reducing device to be cost effective. The methods were assessed for coherence (are comparable results achieved for comparable countries?) and adaptability (can the method be adjusted for age and gender of specific patient groups?). The performance of the time-for-time method was superior to the other methods. Both types of dose-reduction devices tested were assessed as cost effective after a realistic number of uses with all three methods except low AVs. CUA for the methods of X-ray dose reduction can be performed to determine if investment in low dose reduction is cost effective. The time-for-time method proved to be a coherent and versatile method for performing CUA.

  16. Reducing an already low dental diagnostic X-ray dose: does it make sense? Comparison of three cost-utility analysis methods used to assess two dental dose-reduction measures

    PubMed Central

    Sanderink, G C H; van der Stelt, P F; Berkhout, W E R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To find a method that is suitable for providing an objective assessment of the cost effectiveness of a dose-reducing measure used for diagnostic dental X-ray exposures. Methods: Three cost–utility analysis (CUA) methods were evaluated by comparing their assessments of two dose-reduction measures, a rectangular collimator and the combination of two devices that reduce the radiation dose received during orthodontic lateral cephalography. The following CUA methods were used: (1) the alpha value (AV), a monetary valuation of dose reduction used in the nuclear industry; (2) the value of a statistical life for valuation of the reduction in stochastic adverse effects; and (3) the time-for-time method, based on the postulate that risk reduction is effective when the number of years of life gained is more than the years that an average worker must work to earn the costs of the risk-reducing measure. The CUA methods were used to determine the minimum number of uses that was required for the dose-reducing device to be cost effective. The methods were assessed for coherence (are comparable results achieved for comparable countries?) and adaptability (can the method be adjusted for age and gender of specific patient groups?). Results: The performance of the time-for-time method was superior to the other methods. Both types of dose-reduction devices tested were assessed as cost effective after a realistic number of uses with all three methods except low AVs. Conclusions: CUA for the methods of X-ray dose reduction can be performed to determine if investment in low dose reduction is cost effective. The time-for-time method proved to be a coherent and versatile method for performing CUA. PMID:26119214

  17. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is used to fill cavities caused by ... tooth structure. Dental amalgam is one type of dental filling material used to repair tooth structure that has been ...

  18. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G. N. Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.

    2016-11-15

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40–200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  19. Spatial resolution measurements of the advanced radiographic capability x-ray imaging system at energies relevant to Compton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Holder, J. P.; Hargrove, D.; Bradley, D. K.; Lumbard, A.; Cruz, J. G.; Piston, K.; Lee, J. J.; Romano, E.; Bell, P. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Felker, B.; Rekow, V.; Allen, F. V.

    2016-11-01

    Compton radiography provides a means to measure the integrity, ρR and symmetry of the DT fuel in an inertial confinement fusion implosion near peak compression. Upcoming experiments at the National Ignition Facility will use the ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) laser to drive backlighter sources for Compton radiography experiments and will use the newly commissioned AXIS (ARC X-ray Imaging System) instrument as the detector. AXIS uses a dual-MCP (micro-channel plate) to provide gating and high DQE at the 40-200 keV x-ray range required for Compton radiography, but introduces many effects that contribute to the spatial resolution. Experiments were performed at energies relevant to Compton radiography to begin characterization of the spatial resolution of the AXIS diagnostic.

  20. Hardware Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-04-12

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32 bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain validated solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedra that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester. We show that the hardware accelerated solution is faster than the current technique used by scientists.

  1. Accidental aspiration of foreign bodies in dental practice: clinical management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Cossellu, Gianguido; Farronato, Giampietro; Carrassi, Antonio; Angiero, Francesca

    2015-09-01

    Foreign body aspiration is a possible complication of dental treatment that may result in a life-threatening situation. The foreign body is often spontaneously ejected from the airway, but in other cases, surgical intervention is needed. Prevention, diagnostic procedures, treatment and complications are discussed. Three cases of aspiration of dental instruments are described: the piece was localised in the right main bronchus in two cases and in the left main bronchus in one case. All three cases underwent surgery (resection and bronchoscopy); in one case, the surgical attempt failed, and the foreign body was not located by radiography; it was assumed to have been expelled spontaneously. The management of dental materials and instruments requires particular care, especially if the patient is supine or semi-recumbent. The dentist must be able to manage emergency situations in which patients accidentally inspire or swallow dental instruments or materials during treatment. Preventive techniques must be put in place because these incidents are preventable if the correct precautions are taken. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Proton radiography of a shock-compressed target

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Loupias, B.; Ozaki, N.; Vinci, T.; Koenig, M.; Romagnani, L.; Cecchetti, C.; Borghesi, M.; Le Pape, S.; Hicks, D.; MacKinnon, A.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Boehly, T.; Gremillet, L.; Henry, E.; Schiavi, A.

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we report on the radiography of a shock-compressed target using laser produced proton beams. A low-density carbon foam target was shock compressed by long pulse high-energy laser beams. The shock front was transversally probed with a proton beam produced in the interaction of a high intensity laser beam with a gold foil. We show that from radiography data, the density profile in the shocked target can be deduced using Monte Carlo simulations. By changing the delay between long and short pulse beams, we could probe different plasma conditions and structures, demonstrating that the details of the steep density gradient can be resolved. This technique is validated as a diagnostic for the investigation of warm dense plasmas, allowing an in situ characterization of high-density contrasted plasmas.

  3. Development of Compton radiography of inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasini, R.; Hatchett, S. P.; Hey, D. S.; Iglesias, C.; Izumi, N.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Sorce, C.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2011-05-15

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60 to 200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {mu}m and {approx}10 ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D nonuniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  4. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. Purpose To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. Material and Methods All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Results Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. Conclusion The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality. PMID:26500784

  5. Image rejects in general direct digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Bjørn; Rosanowsky, Tine Blomberg; Jensen, Camilla; Wah, Kenneth Hong Ching

    2015-10-01

    The number of rejected images is an indicator of image quality and unnecessary imaging at a radiology department. Image reject analysis was frequent in the film era, but comparably few and small studies have been published after converting to digital radiography. One reason may be a belief that rejects have been eliminated with digitalization. To measure the extension of deleted images in direct digital radiography (DR), in order to assess the rates of rejects and unnecessary imaging and to analyze reasons for deletions, in order to improve the radiological services. All exposed images at two direct digital laboratories at a hospital in Norway were reviewed in January 2014. Type of examination, number of exposed images, and number of deleted images were registered. Each deleted image was analyzed separately and the reason for deleting the image was recorded. Out of 5417 exposed images, 596 were deleted, giving a deletion rate of 11%. A total of 51.3% were deleted due to positioning errors and 31.0% due to error in centering. The examinations with the highest percentage of deleted images were the knee, hip, and ankle, 20.6%, 18.5%, and 13.8% respectively. The reject rate is at least as high as the deletion rate and is comparable with previous film-based imaging systems. The reasons for rejection are quite different in digital systems. This falsifies the hypothesis that digitalization would eliminates rejects. A deleted image does not contribute to diagnostics, and therefore is an unnecessary image. Hence, the high rates of deleted images have implications for management, training, education, as well as for quality.

  6. A comparison of digital tomosynthesis and chest radiography in evaluating airway lesions using computed tomography as a reference.

    PubMed

    Choo, Ji Yung; Lee, Ki Yeol; Yu, Ami; Kim, Je-Hyeong; Lee, Seung Heon; Choi, Jung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Oh, Yu Whan

    2016-09-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis (DTS) and chest radiography for detecting airway abnormalities, using computed tomography (CT) as a reference. We evaluated 161 data sets from 149 patients (91 with and 70 without airway abnormalities) who had undergone radiography, DTS, and CT to detect airway problems. Radiographs and DTS were evaluated to localize and score the severity of the airway abnormalities, and to score the image quality using CT as a reference. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC), McNemar's test, weighted kappa, and the paired t-test were used for statistical analysis. The sensitivity of DTS was higher (reader 1, 93.51 %; reader 2, 94.29 %) than chest radiography (68.83 %; 71.43 %) in detecting airway lesions. The diagnostic accuracy of DTS (90.91 %; 94.70 %) was also significantly better than that of radiography (78.03 %; 82.58 %, all p < 0.05). DTS image quality was significantly better than chest radiography (1.83, 2.74; p < 0.05) in the results of both readers. The inter-observer agreement with respect to DTS findings was moderate and superior when compared to radiography findings. DTS is a more accurate and sensitive modality than radiography for detecting airway lesions that are easily obscured by soft tissue structures in the mediastinum. • Digital tomosynthesis offers new diagnostic options for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis is more sensitive and accurate than radiography for airway lesions. • Digital tomosynthesis shows better image quality than radiography. • Assessment of lesion severity, via tomosynthesis is comparable to computed tomography.

  7. System for uncollimated digital radiography

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Han; Hall, James M.; McCarrick, James F.; Tang, Vincent

    2015-08-11

    The inversion algorithm based on the maximum entropy method (MEM) removes unwanted effects in high energy imaging resulting from an uncollimated source interacting with a finitely thick scintillator. The algorithm takes as input the image from the thick scintillator (TS) and the radiography setup geometry. The algorithm then outputs a restored image which appears as if taken with an infinitesimally thin scintillator (ITS). Inversion is accomplished by numerically generating a probabilistic model relating the ITS image to the TS image and then inverting this model on the TS image through MEM. This reconstruction technique can reduce the exposure time or the required source intensity without undesirable object blurring on the image by allowing the use of both thicker scintillators with higher efficiencies and closer source-to-detector distances to maximize incident radiation flux. The technique is applicable in radiographic applications including fast neutron, high-energy gamma and x-ray radiography using thick scintillators.

  8. On the sensitivity of thermophotonic lock-in imaging and polarized Raman spectroscopy to early dental caries diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Dehghany, Mehdi; Michaelian, Kirk H.; Amaechi, Bennet T.

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the leading cause of tooth loss, which can promptly be prevented if detected in early stages of progression. Unfortunately, conventional diagnostic modalities currently used in dentistry lack the sensitivity to detect early caries. The authors' intention is to compare the ability of polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging to make early caries diagnosis. Extracted human teeth with no visible stain or defects were artificially demineralized in accordance to a well-known protocol in dentistry for simulated early caries development at several demineralization stages. Samples were then inspected using polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging. The sensitivities of these two diagnostic modalities are compared, and the results are verified using transverse micro-radiography. It was found that compared to polarized Raman spectroscopy, thermophotonic imaging exhibits superior sensitivity to very early stages of demineralization.

  9. On the sensitivity of thermophotonic lock-in imaging and polarized Raman spectroscopy to early dental caries diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaei, Nima; Mandelis, Andreas; Dehghany, Mehdi; Michaelian, Kirk H; Amaechi, Bennet T

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the leading cause of tooth loss, which can promptly be prevented if detected in early stages of progression. Unfortunately, conventional diagnostic modalities currently used in dentistry lack the sensitivity to detect early caries. The authors' intention is to compare the ability of polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging to make early caries diagnosis. Extracted human teeth with no visible stain or defects were artificially demineralized in accordance to a well-known protocol in dentistry for simulated early caries development at several demineralization stages. Samples were then inspected using polarized Raman spectroscopy and thermophotonic imaging. The sensitivities of these two diagnostic modalities are compared, and the results are verified using transverse micro-radiography. It was found that compared to polarized Raman spectroscopy, thermophotonic imaging exhibits superior sensitivity to very early stages of demineralization.

  10. Clinical radiography education across Europe.

    PubMed

    England, A; Geers-van Gemeren, S; Henner, A; Kukkes, T; Pronk-Larive, D; Rainford, L; McNulty, J P

    2017-09-01

    To establish a picture of clinical education models within radiography programmes across Europe by surveying higher education institutions registered as affiliate members of the European Federation of Radiography Societies (EFRS). An online survey was developed to ascertain data on: practical training, supervisory arrangements, placement logistics, quality assurance processes, and the assessment of clinical competencies. Responses were identifiable in terms of educational institution and country. All educational institutions who were affiliate members at the time of the study were invited to participate (n = 46). Descriptive and thematic analyses are reported. A response rate of 82.6% (n = 38) was achieved from educational institutions representing 21 countries. Over half of responding institutions (n = 21) allocated in excess of 60 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits to practical training. In nearly three-quarters of clinical placements there was a dedicated clinical practice supervisor in place; two-thirds of these were employed directly by the hospital. Clinical practice supervisors were typically state registered radiographers, who had a number of years of clinical experience and had received specific training for the role. Typical responsibilities included monitoring student progress, providing feedback and completing paperwork, this did however vary between respondents. In almost all institutions there were support systems in place for clinical placement supervisors within their roles. Similarities exist in the provision of clinical radiography education across Europe. Clinical placements are a core component of radiography education and are supported by experienced clinical practice supervisors. Mechanisms are in place for the selection, training and support of clinical practice supervisors. Professional societies should work collaboratively to establish guidelines for effective clinical placements. Copyright © 2017 The

  11. Exposure reduction of 96% in intraoral radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kircos, L.T.; Vandre, R.H.; Lorton, L.

    1986-11-01

    This study compared the diagnostic quality of E-speed film, xeroradiographic cassettes, and a screen-film imaging system used in medical radiology. The surfaces of defects simulating caries were scored for the presence and depth of the defects under ideal viewing conditions by independent observers. Receiver Operator Characteristics analysis of the data showed no significant differences regarding diagnostic potential among the three systems. The true-positive fraction was 1.00 for all systems and all operators, and the false-positive fraction was .011, .011, and .007, respectively. An exposure of 5.5 mR was used to produce images with the screen-film combination, and 150 mR was used for standard dental systems. This study showed that an exposure reduction of 96% is possible while maintaining high-quality radiographs for the diagnosis of caries.

  12. Investigating the use of an antiscatter grid in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Avery, G; Balcam, S; Needler, L; Smith, A; Saunderson, J R; Beavis, A W

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate via simulation a proposed change to clinical practice for chest radiography. The validity of using a scatter rejection grid across the diagnostic energy range (60–125 kVp), in conjunction with appropriate tube current–time product (mAs) for imaging with a computed radiography (CR) system was investigated. Methods: A digitally reconstructed radiograph algorithm was used, which was capable of simulating CR chest radiographs with various tube voltages, receptor doses and scatter rejection methods. Four experienced image evaluators graded images with a grid (n = 80) at tube voltages across the diagnostic energy range and varying detector air kermas. These were scored against corresponding images reconstructed without a grid, as per current clinical protocol. Results: For all patients, diagnostic image quality improved with the use of a grid, without the need to increase tube mAs (and therefore patient dose), irrespective of the tube voltage used. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor made little difference to image quality. Conclusion: A virtual clinical trial has been performed with simulated chest CR images. Results indicate that the use of a grid improves diagnostic image quality for average adults, without the need to increase tube mAs, even at low tube voltages. Advances in knowledge: Validated with images containing realistic anatomical noise, it is possible to improve image quality by utilizing grids for chest radiography with CR systems without increasing patient exposure. Increasing tube mAs by an amount determined by the Bucky factor is not justified. PMID:25571914

  13. Image gently campaign back to basics initiative: ten steps to help manage radiation dose in pediatric digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Don, Steven; Macdougall, Robert; Strauss, Keith; Moore, Quentin T; Goske, Marilyn J; Cohen, Mervyn; Herrmann, Tracy; John, Susan D; Noble, Lauren; Morrison, Greg; Lehman, Lois; Whiting, Bruce R

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize 10 steps a practice can take to manage radiation exposure in pediatric digital radiography. The Image Gently campaign raises awareness of opportunities for lowering radiation dose while maintaining diagnostic quality of images of children. The newest initiative in the campaign, Back to Basics, addresses methods for standardizing the approach to pediatric digital radiography, highlighting challenges related to the technology in imaging of patients of widely varying body sizes.

  14. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography.

  15. Radiographic signs and diagnosis of dental disease.

    PubMed

    Bellows, J

    1993-08-01

    Dental radiographs are critical for the complete assessment and treatment of dental diseases. Dental radiography is commonly used to evaluate congenital dental defects, periodontal disease, orthodontic manipulations, oral tumors, endodontic treatments, oral trauma, and any situation where an abnormality is suspected. Although standard radiographic equipment and film can be used to produce dental radiographs, dental X-ray equipment and film provide superior quality images and greater convenience of animal patient positioning. An understanding of normal dental radiographic anatomy is important when interpreting dental radiographs. Stage III periodontitis is the earliest stage of periodontal disease at which radiographic abnormalities become apparent. Bone loss associated with periodontal disease can be classified as either horizontal or vertical. Periapical radiolucencies can represent granulomas, cysts, or abscesses, whereas periapical radiodensities may represent sclerotic bone or condensing osteitis. Lytic lesions of the bone of the jaw often represent oral neoplasms. Neoplasms also can displace or disrupt teeth in the dental arch. Resorptive lesions can be external or internal and appear as radiolucent areas involving the external surface of the root or the pulp cavity, respectively. Feline dental resorptive lesions, also known as odontoclastic resorptions, are a specific form of dental resorptive lesions unique to cats.

  16. Comparison of radiography and ultrasonography for the diagnosis of osteochondritis dissecans in the equine femoropatellar joint.

    PubMed

    Bourzac, C; Alexander, K; Rossier, Y; Laverty, S

    2009-09-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) lesions of the femoropatellar (FP) joint are diagnosed routinely by radiography, but lesions located in the trochlear groove or without accompanying subchondral bone changes can be difficult to visualise. Ultrasonography allows evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone in the FPjoint. To document the radiographic and ultrasonographic appearance of OCD lesions in the equine FP joint, grade ultrasonographic lesions and compare their accuracy in the diagnosis of these lesions. The medical records of all horses diagnosed with FP OCD between 1995 and 2006 were assessed. Inclusion criteria included availability of both radiographic and ultrasonographic images. Lesion characteristics were evaluated in each trochlear ridge and trochlear groove. For assessment of the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of both imaging techniques in the diagnosis of OCD, only cases with an arthroscopic or necropsy examination were studied. Twenty-one horses were included. OCD lesions were diagnosed by radiography (30/32 joints) and ultrasound (32/32 joints). The lateral trochlear ridge (LTR, 91%) and the medial trochlear ridge (MTR, 17%) were involved on radiography. The localisation on ultrasound examination was similar (97% LTR, 25% MTR). All but one lesion seen on radiography were also detected with ultrasound; 2 LTR and 3 MTR lesions, not seen on radiography were diagnosed by ultrasound and confirmed at arthroscopy or necropsy. The specificity was 100% regardless of the site and imaging procedure except for the distal third of the MTR (94% for ultrasound). The sensitivity varied, depending on lesion site. Ultrasonography is a valuable diagnostic tool to diagnose OCD lesions in the FP joint and more sensitive than radiography for lesions affecting the MTR of the distal femur. Ultrasound should be considered as a useful adjunct to radiography for diagnosing equine FP OCD, especially in cases of high clinical suspicion but equivocal

  17. Thoracic radiography in the cat: Identification of cardiomegaly and congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Guglielmini, Carlo; Diana, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic radiography is one of the most commonly employed diagnostic tools for the clinical evaluation of cats with suspected heart disease and is the standard diagnostic method in the confirmation of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. In the past, interpretation of feline radiographs focused on a description of the qualitative radiographic features of feline heart disease or the measurement of the cardiac silhouette in healthy cats and cats with different cardiovascular disorders. More recently, studies have begun to critically address the issue of the diagnostic accuracy of thoracic radiography in the diagnostic work-up of cats with heart disease. In these studies, qualitative and quantitative radiographic parameters were compared to echocardiographic findings to evaluate the usefulness of thoracic radiography for the identification of cardiac enlargement and pulmonary edema in the cat. Thoracic radiography is reasonably specific but has a low sensitivity when identifying cardiomegaly in cats with mild structural heart disease. Feline cardiogenic pulmonary edema has a variable radiographic presentation and several specific radiographic findings (i.e., enlargement of the left atrium and the pulmonary veins) can be absent or non-recognizable in affected cats.

  18. [Information technologies for scanning X-ray radiography].

    PubMed

    Kretov, V V; Ukraintsev, Iu G

    2005-01-01

    Digital technologies have been widely used in X-rays diagnostics, including computer tomography, magnetic-resonance tomography, digital radiography etc. Digital technologies for image analysis essentially change all arrangements and procedures of preventive examinations made at patient-care facilities. As for digital fluorography, the basic principles of fluorography diagnostic room are standard but for one arrangement-the unit is controlled via a computer-assisted working place (CAWP) by the radiologist assistant; the room of radiologist is also equipped with CAWP. Admittedly, a key issue in general fluorographic examinations is registration of patients and preparation of them for the procedure. Contemplated in the paper are new potentialities of digital fluorography of big number of patients by low-dose fluorography (LDF, equipment manufacturer/Orel, Russia) which enhance the rate and quality of diagnostics.

  19. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... diagnostic tests—(1) Basic rule. Except as indicated in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all diagnostic x... diagnostic tests payable under the physician fee schedule are excluded from the basic rule set forth in... a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, podiatric medicine, dental surgery, or dental medicine. (iv)...

  20. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... diagnostic tests—(1) Basic rule. Except as indicated in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all diagnostic x... diagnostic tests payable under the physician fee schedule are excluded from the basic rule set forth in..., osteopathy, podiatric medicine, dental surgery, or dental medicine. (iv) An RHC. (v) A laboratory, if...

  1. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... diagnostic tests—(1) Basic rule. Except as indicated in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all diagnostic x... diagnostic tests payable under the physician fee schedule are excluded from the basic rule set forth in... a doctor of medicine, osteopathy, podiatric medicine, dental surgery, or dental medicine. (iv)...

  2. 42 CFR 410.32 - Diagnostic x-ray tests, diagnostic laboratory tests, and other diagnostic tests: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... diagnostic tests—(1) Basic rule. Except as indicated in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, all diagnostic x... diagnostic tests payable under the physician fee schedule are excluded from the basic rule set forth in..., osteopathy, podiatric medicine, dental surgery, or dental medicine. (iv) An RHC. (v) A laboratory, if...

  3. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Schaetzing, R

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment.

  4. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  5. X-ray vector radiography imaging for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Potdevin, Guillaume; Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-31

    The non-invasive estimation of fracture risk in osteoporosis remains a challenge in the clinical routine and is mainly based on an assessment of bone density by dual X-ray absorption (DXA) although bone micro-architecture is known to play an important role for bone fragility. Here we report on 'X-ray vector Radiography' measurements able to provide a direct bone microstructure diagnostics on human bone samples, which we compare qualitatively and quantitatively with numerical analysis of high resolution radiographs.

  6. Dosimetric considerations in dental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goble, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The integration of the Lixiscope into dental procedures was studied and compared with conventional dental radiographic techniques. It was found that through the use of intraoral sealed sources in conjunction with microchannel plate technology, the Lixiscope gives increased diagnostic information with decreased radiation dosage.

  7. Radiography on wheels arrives to nursing homes - an economic assessment of a new health care technology in southern Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dozet, Alexander; Ivarsson, Bodil; Eklund, Karin; Klefsgård, Rosemarie; Geijer, Mats

    2016-12-01

    The process of transferring older, vulnerable adults from an elder care facility to the hospital for medical care can be an emotionally and physically stressful experience. The recent development of modern mobile radiography may help to ease this anxiety by allowing for evaluation in the nursing home itself. Up until this point, no health economic evaluation of the technology has been attempted in a Swedish setting. The objective of this study was to determine whether examinations of patients in elder care facilities with mobile radiography were cost-effective from a societal perspective compared with hospital-based radiological examinations. This prospective study included two groups of nursing home residents in two different areas in southern Sweden. All residents in the nursing homes were targeted for the study. Seventy-one patients were examined with hospital-based radiography at two hospitals, and 312 patients were examined using mobile radiography in nursing homes. Given that the diagnostic effects are regarded as equivalent, a cost minimization method was applied. Direct costs were estimated using prices from the county council, Region Skåne, Sweden. From a societal perspective, mobile radiography was shown to have significantly lower costs per examination compared with hospital-based radiography. The difference in health care-related costs was also significant in favour of mobile radiography. Mobile radiography can be used to examine patients in nursing homes at a lower cost than hospital-based radiography. Patients benefit from not having to transfer to a hospital for radiography, resulting in reduced anxiety for patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Radiography of Chaotically Moving Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Vavrik, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Dammer, Jiri; Holy, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jakubek, Martin

    2007-11-26

    Radiography of moving objects is an advanced problem when the dynamic range of acquired radiograms is restricted by a limited exposition time. Exposition time has to be short to avoid image blurring due to object moving. It is possible to increase the dynamic range by summing short time radiograms set when the periodical object movement is presented as in the case of heart beating for instance. On the other hand a non periodical movement can be studied using tools of X-ray Digital Image Correlation technique. Short time radiograms are fitted into corresponding positions and consequently summed for higher data statistics as it is presented in this work.

  9. Lesion detectability in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Robert M.; Boswell, Jonathan S.; Myers, Kyle J.; Peter, Guillaume

    2001-06-01

    The usefulness of Fourier-based measures of imaging performance has come into question for the evaluation of digital imaging systems. Figures of merit such as detective quantum efficiency are relevant for linear, shift-invariant systems with stationary noise. However, no digital imaging system is shift invariant, and realistic images do not satisfy the stationarity condition. Our methods for task- based evaluation of imaging systems, based on lesion detectability, do not require such assumptions. We have computed the performance of Hotelling and nonprewhitening matched-filter observers for the task of lesion detection in digital radiography.

  10. PROTON RADIOGRAPHY FOR AN ADVANCED HYDROTEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    C. MORRIS

    2000-11-01

    Analysis of data from BNL experiment 933 is presented. Results demonstrate that proton radiography can meet many of the requirements for an Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF). Results for background, position resolution, metrology, quantitative radiography, material identification, and edge resolution are presented.

  11. ARG portable neutron radiography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    In this report all available neutron radiographic data, including results of tests run at LANL, McClellan AFB, and University of Virginia, will be combined to outline specific transportable neutron radiography systems that could achieve the desired results as a complement to x-radiography capabilities for the Accident Response Group (ARG).

  12. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE TO AN 80-HOUR COURSE IN INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY IS COORDINATED WITH LESSONS IN THE STUDENT GUIDE AND LABORATORY EXERCISES AND IS BASED ON MATERIAL IN THE COURSE MANUAL, INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY. THE COURSE IS INTENDED TO TRAIN HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AS BEGINNING RADIOGRAPHERS WHO ARE EXPECTED TO BE ABLE TO EXTEND THEIR…

  13. Process waste assessment for the Radiography Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.M.

    1994-07-01

    This Process Waste Assessment was conducted to evaluate the Radiography Laboratory, located in Building 923. It documents the processes, identifies the hazardous chemical waste streams generated by these processes, recommends possible ways to minimize waste, and serves as a reference for future assessments of this facility. The Radiography Laboratory provides film radiography or radioscopy (electronic imaging) of weapon and nonweapon components. The Radiography Laboratory has six x-ray machines and one gamma ray source. It also has several other sealed beta- and gamma-ray isotope sources of low microcurie ({mu}Ci) activity. The photochemical processes generate most of the Radiography Laboratory`s routinely generated hazardous waste, and most of that is generated by the DuPont film processor. Because the DuPont film processor generates the most photochemical waste, it was selected for an estimated material balance.

  14. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  15. Quality assurance in film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bellegem, L.; Vaessen, B.

    1993-12-31

    The ISO 9000 standards were originally developed during the 1980`s to provide uniform, worldwide quality assurance requirements. The EC (European Communities) adopted these standards as part of their modular approach to ``conformity assessment`` procedures, for several product categories. This includes the development of standards (specifications) which define what the purchaser wants and what the supplier agrees to provide, as well as quality system registration (certification) which increases confidence in the supplier`s ability to produce consistently. The requirements are typically most rigorous for regulated products that have a major impact on health and safety i.e film radiographic systems. This is the main reason for making available the necessary Q.C. tools in film radiography to comply with Q.A. specifications and guarantee the required consistent performance. These tools can only give satisfying support if they are dedicated, easy to use, precise and cost effective at the user`s level. The main topics for such a Q.A. package are: (1) standard for Film System classification for industrial radiography; (2) film system certification; and (3) standard for control of film processing by means of reference values i.e. pre-exposed film wedges and archiving quality control method.

  16. Clinical utility of dental cone-beam computed tomography: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jaju, Prashant P; Jaju, Sushma P

    2014-01-01

    Panoramic radiography and computed tomography were the pillars of maxillofacial diagnosis. With the advent of cone-beam computed tomography, dental practice has seen a paradigm shift. This review article highlights the potential applications of cone-beam computed tomography in the fields of dental implantology and forensic dentistry, and its limitations in maxillofacial diagnosis. PMID:24729729

  17. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  18. Clinical validation of the use of fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stookey, George K.; Isaacs, Roger L.; Ferreira Zandona, Andrea G.; Ando, Masatoshi; Gonzalez, Carlos; Mau, Melissa S.; Kelly, Sue A.; Analoui, Mostafa

    1999-05-01

    A clinical investigation was conducted in children to validate the use of fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries. A total of 150 children were examined for the presence of dental caries at baseline and at 4-month intervals for one year using conventional visual-tactile with and without a dental explorer, electrical conductivity and light fluorescence methods on the occlusal, buccal and lingual tooth surfaces. Interproximal tooth surfaces were examined using conventional film and direct digital radiography at baseline and 12 months. Validation of the clinical methods was performed by the histologic examination of exfoliated primary teeth. The results indicate that visual-tactile examinations with an explorer detected more carious lesions than similar examinations without an explorer. The use of quantitative light fluorescence permitted the detection of a substantially greater number of enamel lesions or demineralized areas than the conventional visual-tactile-radiographic diagnostic procedure. Further, the use of the quantitative light fluorescence permitted the monitoring of both the progression of regression of early carious lesions.

  19. Use of laser fluorescence for the early detection of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stookey, George K.; Analoui, Mostafa

    1998-04-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent oral disease in spite of remarkable progress made during the past half- century to reduce its prevalence. Conventional procedures for caries detection are unable to detect the lesions until they are well advanced and involve about one-third of the thickness of enamel. Laboratory research on alternative caries detection methods based upon alterations in the conductance and optical properties associated with enamel demineralization has shown significant promise in recent years. Of these alternative measures, quantitative laser/light fluorescence appears to show the greatest promise for the detection of dental caries at a much earlier stage of development than is currently possible. A clinical trial was initiated in 150 children to evaluate, compare and validate several caries detection methods; in addition to the conventional diagnostic procedure, these detection methods involved quantitative light fluorescence, electrical conductivity, and direct digital radiography. Although the clinical trial is not yet complete, early results suggest the possibility for the earlier detection of dental caries with these alternative methods.

  20. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio

    1995-12-31

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 {micro}F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 {micro}F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 {micro}s, and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 {micro}C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charging voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed by using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  1. Plasma-flash radiography utilizing a molybdenum target in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Sato, Eiichi; Takahashi, Kei; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Hayasi, Yasuomi; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The construction and the radiographic characteristics of a plasma flash x-ray generator having a molybdenum-target (anode tip) triode are described. This generator was primarily designed in order to perform soft radiography in dental medicine and employed the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a low-impedance coaxial transmission line with a gap switch, a coaxial oil condenser of 0.2 (mu) F, a turbo-molecular pump, a Krytron pulser as a trigger device, and a flash x-ray tube. The high-voltage main condenser of 0.2 (mu) F was charged from 40 to 60 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the tube after closing the gap switch. Because this tube employed a long target, the plasma x-ray source which consists of molybdenum ions and electrons was easily produced by the target evaporating. The maximum tube voltage was nearly equivalent to the initial charge voltage of the main condenser, and the maximum current had a value of about 25 kA with a charging voltage of 60 kV. The average width of flash x rays was less than 1 microsecond(s) , and the time-integrated x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 60 kV was approximately 20 (mu) C/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. The characteristic K-series intensity substantially increased according to increases in the charged voltage. High-speed dental radiography was performed using a laser timing switch and a trigger-delay device.

  2. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  3. Dental Assistants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the direction of a dentist . They may prepare materials for dental impressions or to create temporary crowns. All dental ... Nursing assistants, sometimes called nursing aides , help provide basic care for patients in hospitals and residents of ... more information about becoming a dental assistant and for a list of accredited dental ...

  4. Digital Tomosynthesis to Evaluate Fracture Healing: Prospective Comparison With Radiography and CT.

    PubMed

    Ha, Alice S; Lee, Amie Y; Hippe, Daniel S; Chou, Shinn-Huey S; Chew, Felix S

    2015-07-01

    Radiography, currently the standard for postoperative fracture imaging, is limited by overlapping bone and hardware. Tomosynthesis has the benefit of level-by-level imaging without the disadvantages of metal artifacts, increased radiation, and higher costs of CT, the current problem-solving tool. The purpose of this study was to compare tomosynthesis with radiography for evaluating fracture healing. In a prospective study, patients within 1 year of wrist hardware fixation underwent radiography, tomosynthesis, and CT, and the images were interpreted by three readers. The diagnostic accuracy of radiology and tomosynthesis was assessed with ROC curves, and interreader agreement was assessed with Cohen kappa. Fracture scores were correlated with Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and pain scores. The study participants were 49 patients with 51 fractures. The most common fracture sites were distal radius (43%), scaphoid (18%), and metacarpals (18%). Rates of cortex obscuration by hardware were 2% for CT, 8% for tomosynthesis, and 15% for radiography (p < 0.01 between one modality and another). Detection of cortical fracture lines was significantly better with tomosynthesis than with radiography (AUC, 0.84 vs 0.76, p = 0.01). Inter-reader agreement was moderate for both radiography and tomosynthesis (κ = 0.44 vs 0.55, p = 0.051). There was no significant correlation between fracture scores and DASH scores. There was significant correlation between reported pain levels and both tomosynthesis (r = 0.28, p = 0.03) and CT (r = 0.29, p = 0.04) fracture scores. Tomosynthesis provides diagnostic information superior to that of ra diography in postoperative evaluation of wrist fractures with lower cost and radiation than CT and should be considered in fracture follow-up imaging of other bones.

  5. Image enhancement for radiography inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Wong, Brian Stephen; Guan, Tui Chen

    2005-04-01

    The x-ray radiographic testing method is often used for detecting defects as a non-destructive testing method (NDT). In many cases, NDT is used for aircraft components, welds, etc. Hence, the backgrounds are always more complex than a piece of steel. Radiographic images are low contrast, dark and high noise image. It is difficult to detect defects directly. So, image enhancement is a significant part of automated radiography inspection system. Histogram equalization and median filter are the most frequently used techniques to enhance the radiographic images. In this paper, the adaptive histogram equalization and contrast limited histogram equalization are compared with histogram equalization. The adaptive wavelet thresholding is compared with median filter. Through comparative analysis, the contrast limited histogram equalization and adaptive wavelet thresholding can enhance perception of defects better.

  6. Intramodality and intermodality agreement in radiography and computed tomography of equine distal limb fractures.

    PubMed

    Crijns, C P; Martens, A; Bergman, H-J; van der Veen, H; Duchateau, L; van Bree, H J J; Gielen, I M V L

    2014-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is increasingly accessible in equine referral hospitals. To document the level of agreement within and between radiography and CT in characterising equine distal limb fractures. Retrospective descriptive study. Images from horses that underwent radiographic and CT evaluation for suspected distal limb fractures were reviewed, including 27 horses and 3 negative controls. Using Cohen's kappa and weighted kappa analysis, the level of agreement among 4 observers for a predefined set of diagnostic characteristics for radiography and CT separately and for the level of agreement between the 2 imaging modalities were documented. Both CT and radiography had very good intramodality agreement in identifying fractures, but intermodality agreement was lower. There was good intermodality and intramodality agreement for anatomical localisation and the identification of fracture displacement. Agreement for articular involvement, fracture comminution and fracture fragment number was towards the lower limit of good agreement. There was poor to fair intermodality agreement regarding fracture orientation, fracture width and coalescing cracks; intramodality agreement was higher for CT than for radiography for these features. Further studies, including comparisons with surgical and/or post mortem findings, are required to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography in the diagnosis and characterisation of equine distal limb fractures. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  7. Multi-purpose neutron radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.P.; Bryant, L.E.; Berry, P.

    1996-07-01

    A conceptual design is given for a low cost, multipurpose radiography system suited for the needs of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The proposed neutron source is californium-252. One purpose is to provide an in-house capability for occasional, reactor quality, neutron radiography thus replacing the recently closed Omega-West Reactor. A second purpose is to provide a highly reliable standby transportable neutron radiography system. A third purpose is to provide for transportable neutron probe gamma spectroscopy techniques. The cost is minimized by shared use of an existing x-ray facility, and by use of an existing transport cask. The achievable neutron radiography and radioscopy performance characteristics have been verified. The demonstrated image qualities range from high resolution gadolinium - SR film, with L:D = 100:1, to radioscopy using a LIXI image with L:D = 30:1 and neutron fluence 3.4 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Information extraction from muon radiography data

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Asaki, T. J.; Chartrand, R.; Hengartner, N. W.; Hogan, G. E.; Morris, C. L.; Priedhorsky, W. C.; Schirato, R.C.; Schultz, L. J.; Sottile, M. J.; Vixie, K. R.; Wohlberg, B. E.; Blanpied, G.

    2004-01-01

    Scattering muon radiography was proposed recently as a technique of detection and 3-d imaging for dense high-Z objects. High-energy cosmic ray muons are deflected in matter in the process of multiple Coulomb scattering. By measuring the deflection angles we are able to reconstruct the configuration of high-Z material in the object. We discuss the methods for information extraction from muon radiography data. Tomographic methods widely used in medical images have been applied to a specific muon radiography information source. Alternative simple technique based on the counting of high-scattered muons in the voxels seems to be efficient in many simulated scenes. SVM-based classifiers and clustering algorithms may allow detection of compact high-Z object without full image reconstruction. The efficiency of muon radiography can be increased using additional informational sources, such as momentum estimation, stopping power measurement, and detection of muonic atom emission.

  9. Corrosion Inhibitors as Penetrant Dyes for Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Howard L.; Hall, Phillip B.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid/vapor-phase corrosion inhibitors (LVCIs) have been found to be additionally useful as penetrant dyes for neutron radiography (and perhaps also x-radiography). Enhancement of radiographic contrasts by use of LVCIs can reveal cracks, corrosion, and other defects that may be undetectable by ultrasonic inspection, that are hidden from direct optical inspection, and/or that are difficult or impossible to detect in radiographs made without dyes.

  10. Motivations for muon radiography of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Martini, M.

    2010-02-01

    Muon radiography represents an innovative tool for investigating the interior of active volcanoes. This method integrates the conventional geophysical techniques and provides an independent way to estimate the density of the volcano structure and reveal the presence of magma conduits. The experience from the pioneer experiments performed at Mt. Asama, Mt. West Iwate, and Showa-Shinzan (Japan) are very encouraging. Muon radiography could be applied, in principle, at any stratovolcano. Here we focus our attention on Vesuvius and Stromboli (Italy).

  11. Design of a streaked radiography instrument for ICF ablator tuning measurements.

    PubMed

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Spears, B K; Celliers, P M; Holder, J P; Landen, O L; Geissel, M; Kellogg, J W; Bennett, G R; Edens, A D; Atherton, B W; Leeper, R J

    2008-10-01

    A streaked radiography diagnostic has been proposed as a technique to determine the ablator mass remaining in an inertial confinement fusion ignition capsule at peak velocity. This instrument, the "HXRI-5," has been designed to fit within a National Ignition Facility Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator. The HXRI-5 will be built at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and initial testing will be done at the SNL Z-Beamlet Facility. In this paper, we will describe the National Ignition Campaign requirements for this diagnostic, the instrument design, and the planned test experiments.

  12. Digital radiography image quality: image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark B; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Strauss, Keith J; Breeden, William K; Rzeszotarski, Mark S; Applegate, Kimberly; Wyatt, Margaret; Bjork, Sandra; Seibert, J Anthony

    2007-06-01

    This article on digital radiography image acquisition is the first of two articles written as part of an intersociety effort to establish image quality standards for digital and computed radiography. The topic of the other paper is digital radiography image processing and display. The articles were developed collaboratively by the ACR, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine. Increasingly, medical imaging and patient information are being managed using digital data during acquisition, transmission, storage, display, interpretation, and consultation. Data management during each of these operations has a direct impact on the quality of patient care. These articles describe what is known to improve image quality for digital and computed radiography and make recommendations on optimal acquisition, processing, and display. The practice of digital radiography is a rapidly evolving technology that will require the timely revision of any guidelines and standards. This document provides a basis for the technologies available today in clinical practice and may be useful in guiding the future clinical practice of digital radiography.

  13. Diagnostic yield of ink-jet prints from digital radiographs for the assessment of approximal carious lesions: ROC-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Ralf K W; Grimm, Stefanie; Schulze, Dirk; Voss, Kai; Keller, Hans-Peter; Wedel, Matthias

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the diagnostic quality of different quality, individually calibrated ink-jet printers for the very challenging dental radiographic task of approximal carious lesion detection. A test-pattern evaluating resolution, contrast and homogeneity of the ink-jet prints was developed. 50 standardized dental radiographs each showing two neighbouring teeth in natural contact were printed on glossy paper with calibrated, randomly selected ink-jet printers (Canon S520 and iP4500, Epson Stylus Photo R2400). Printing size equalled the viewing size on a 17″ cathode-ray-tube monitor daily quality-tested according to German regulations. The true caries status was determined from serial sectioning and microscopic evaluation. 16 experienced observers evaluated the radiographs on a five-point confidence scale on all prints plus the viewing monitor with respect to the visibility of a carious lesion. A non-parametric Receiver-Operating Characteristics (ROC-) analysis was performed explicitly designed for the evaluation of readings stemming from identical samples but different modality. Significant differences are expressed by a critical ratio z exceeding ±2. Diagnostic accuracy was determined by the area (Az) underneath the ROC-curves. Average Az-values ranged between 0.62 (S520 and R2400) and 0.64 (monitor, iP4500), with no significant difference between modalities (P=0.172). Neither significant (range mean z: -0.40 (S520) and -0.11 (iP4500)) nor clinically relevant differences were found between printers and viewing monitor. Our results for a challenging task in dental radiography indicate that calibrated, off-the-shelf ink-jet printers are able to reproduce (dental) radiographs at quality levels sufficient for radiographic diagnosis in a typical dental working environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  15. Validation of a computed radiography device to monitor the HIV-1 RNase H activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, F.; Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.; Tramontano, E.; Zinzula, L.

    2009-08-01

    A commercially available computed radiography (CR) system for dental radiography was used to produce images from radiolabeled polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) assays. Typically, similar investigations require specific and expensive autoradiography devices. The CR unit was characterized in terms of sensitivity and fading by means of a 90Sr source that well simulates the experimental conditions, and then used for quantitative analyses of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) polymerase-independent ribonuclease H (RNase H) activity monitored by PAGE analysis. The results showed that the present methodology allows quantifying effectively the RNase H catalyses and that the obtained data are in good agreement with previous reference works. Finally, in order to further validate the present method in terms of relationship between enzyme activity, the rate of products formation and signal intensity, a PAGE analyses of the HIV-1 RNase H inhibition by the known diketo acid derivative RDS1643 was carried out.

  16. Effective exposure level and diagnostic performance in endodontic radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, T.; Wiebe, J.D.; Webber, R.L.; Wagner, R.F.

    1983-05-01

    Image quality is limited by the information capacity of the image-forming system and can be computed from three parameters: contrast, resolution, and noise. These parameters can be combined to yield a single measure which determines the maximum amount of information obtainable from any x-ray system and is called the noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area. The effects of image quality, expressed as noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) per unit area, on the radiographic performance by dentists reading the position of an endodontic file in a root canal were studied. Three different speed films were used in conjunction with a fixed screen. Components of variance associated with the position of the tooth apex and the tip of an endodontic file in a root canal were compared for the effect of different NEQs and observers. Results show that the standard deviation in locating a file tip and tooth apex may be a linear function of log NEQ. These findings indicate that a significant reduction in exposure would have a relatively small effect on the precision of endodontic distance measurements.

  17. The Use of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Management of Patients Requiring Dental Implants: An American Academy of Periodontology Best Evidence Review.

    PubMed

    Rios, Hector F; Borgnakke, Wenche S; Benavides, Erika

    2017-10-01

    Application of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has grown exponentially across dentistry with a clear impact in implant dentistry. This review aims at providing the scientific context to understand if CBCT imaging should become the standard of care for patients requiring dental implants. A literature search for CBCT applications in implant dentistry was performed using the PubMed database that included studies published between January 1, 2000, and June 24, 2017. Of 559 citations identified and manually screened, 161 were selected as suitable for the purpose of the review. The selected studies belonged to three distinct categories: 1) diagnosis and treatment outcome assessment, 2) implant treatment planning, and 3) anatomic characterization. The current available literature reflects an increased optimization of emerging CBCT imaging protocols and further highlights its diverse applications for dental implant therapy. This technology continues to be considered an advanced point-of-care imaging modality and should be used selectively as an adjunct to two-dimensional dental radiography. As with other ionizing radiation imaging modalities, CBCT imaging should be used only when the potential benefits to the patient outweigh the risks. Dental health care professionals should consider CBCT imaging only when they expect the diagnostic information yielded will lead to better patient care, enhanced patient safety, and ultimately facilitate a more predictable, optimal treatment outcome.

  18. Advances in equine dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Baratt, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Although diagnostic images can be obtained with traditional rare-earth film-screen combinations, digital radiography (DR) has enhanced the ability of the general practitioner to obtain diagnostic radiographs of the equine head. With the widespread availability of DR in equine practices, the practitioner can more readily learn the correct positioning for the various projections of the equine head that are used to evaluate the dentition and sinuses. Digital systems provide rapid processing of the image, enabling the practitioner to correct positioning errors and retake the image without significant delay.

  19. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  20. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talamonti, C.; Reggioli, V.; Bruzzi, M.; Bucciolini, M.; Civinini, C.; Marrazzo, L.; Menichelli, D.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Petterson, M.; Blumenkrantz, N.; Feldt, J.; Heimann, J.; Lucia, D.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Bashkirov, V.; Schulte, R.

    2010-01-01

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  1. Mobile real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.

    1997-11-01

    A 450-keV Mobile Real Time Radiography (RTR) System was delivered to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in January 1996. It was purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at (LANL). Since its delivery it has been used to radiograph more than 600 drums of radioactive waste at various LANL sites. It has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from <1-gal. buckets up to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). It has three independent x-ray acquisition formats. The primary system used is a 12- in. image intensifier, the second is a 36-in. linear diode array (LDA) and the last is an open system. It is fully self contained with on board generator, HVAC, and a fire suppression system. It is on a 53-ft long x 8-ft. wide x 14-ft. high trailer that can be moved over any highway requiring only an easily obtainable overweight permit because it weights {approximately}38 tons. It was built to conform to industry standards for a cabinet system which does not require an exclusion zone. The fact that this unit is mobile has allowed us to operate where the waste is stored, rather than having to move the waste to a fixed facility.

  2. Thorium-uranium fission radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, E. L.; Weiss, J. R.; Burnett, D. S.; Woolum, D. S.

    1976-01-01

    Results are described for studies designed to develop routine methods for in-situ measurement of the abundance of Th and U on a microscale in heterogeneous samples, especially rocks, using the secondary high-energy neutron flux developed when the 650 MeV proton beam of an accelerator is stopped in a 42 x 42 cm diam Cu cylinder. Irradiations were performed at three different locations in a rabbit tube in the beam stop area, and thick metal foils of Bi, Th, and natural U as well as polished silicate glasses of known U and Th contents were used as targets and were placed in contact with mica which served as a fission track detector. In many cases both bare and Cd-covered detectors were exposed. The exposed mica samples were etched in 48% HF and the fission tracks counted by conventional transmitted light microscopy. Relative fission cross sections are examined, along with absolute Th track production rates, interaction tracks, and a comparison of measured and calculated fission rates. The practicality of fast neutron radiography revealed by experiments to data is discussed primarily for Th/U measurements, and mixtures of other fissionable nuclei are briefly considered.

  3. Patient dose monitoring in Dubai in radiography and interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    AlSuwaidi, J S; AlMazrouei, N K; Pottybindu, S; Siraj, M; Mathew, D; Al Blooshi, A A; Kuriakose, V P

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents ongoing actions in Dubai on patient dose monitoring in digital radiographic examinations, mammography, interventional procedures, and dental radiological procedures. The aim of Dubai Health Authority (DHA) is to move towards the establishment of local diagnostic reference levels. DHA has participated in national and regional projects under the umbrella of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The need for local radiation protection educational programmes and wider patient dosimetry monitoring and recording emerged from this work.

  4. A comparison of computed tomography, computed radiography, and film-screen radiography for the detection of canine pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kate; Joly, Hugo; Blond, Laurent; D'Anjou, Marc-André; Nadeau, Marie-Ève; Olive, Julien; Beauchamp, Guy

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become more widely available and computed radiography (CR) has replaced film-screen radiography for canine thoracic imaging in many veterinary practices. There are limited data comparing these modalities in a veterinary clinical setting to detect pulmonary nodules. We compared CT, CR, and film-screen radiography for detecting the presence, number, and characteristics of pulmonary nodules in dogs. Observer performance for a variety of experience levels was also evaluated. Twenty-one client-owned dogs with a primary neoplastic process underwent CT and CR; nine also received film-screen radiographs. Positive/negative classification by consensus agreed between the three modalities in 8/9 dogs and between CR and CT in the remaining 12. CT detected the greatest (P = 0.002) total number of nodules and no difference was seen between CR and films. The greatest number of nodules was seen in the right middle and both caudal regions, but only using CT (P < 0.0001). Significantly smaller nodules were detected with CT (P = 0.0007) and no difference in minimum size was detected between CR and films. Observer accuracy was high for all modalities; particularly for CT (90.5-100%) and for the senior radiologist (90.5-100%). CT was also characterized by the least interobserver variability. Although CT, CR, and film-screen performed similarly in determining the presence or absence of pulmonary nodules, a greater number of smaller nodules was detected with CT, and CT was associated with greater diagnostic confidence and observer accuracy and agreement. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  5. Correlation of the clinical and physical image quality in chest radiography for average adults with a computed radiography imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T J; Beavis, A W; Saunderson, J R

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the quality of visually graded patient (clinical) chest images and a quantitative assessment of chest phantom (physical) images acquired with a computed radiography (CR) imaging system. Methods: The results of a previously published study, in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer-simulated postero-anterior chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme, were used for the clinical image quality measurement. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and effective dose efficiency (eDE) were used as physical image quality metrics measured in a uniform chest phantom. Although optimal values of these physical metrics for chest radiography were not derived in this work, their correlation with VGAS in images acquired without an antiscatter grid across the diagnostic range of X-ray tube voltages was determined using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Clinical and physical image quality metrics increased with decreasing tube voltage. Statistically significant correlations between VGAS and CNR (R=0.87, p<0.033) and eDE (R=0.77, p<0.008) were observed. Conclusion: Medical physics experts may use the physical image quality metrics described here in quality assurance programmes and optimisation studies with a degree of confidence that they reflect the clinical image quality in chest CR images acquired without an antiscatter grid. Advances in knowledge: A statistically significant correlation has been found between the clinical and physical image quality in CR chest imaging. The results support the value of using CNR and eDE in the evaluation of quality in clinical thorax radiography. PMID:23568362

  6. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, R.M.; Coulam, C.M.; Allen, J.H.; Fleischer, A.; Lee, G.S.; Kirchner, S.G.; James A.E. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.

  7. Plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in Sweden in 2025.

    PubMed

    Björkman, B; Fridell, K; Tavakol Olofsson, P

    2017-11-01

    Radiography is a healthcare speciality with many technical challenges. Advances in engineering and information technology applications may continue to drive and be driven by radiographers. The world of diagnostic imaging is changing rapidly and radiographers must be proactive in order to survive. To ensure sustainable development, organisations have to identify future opportunities and threats in a timely manner and incorporate them into their strategic planning. Hence, the aim of this study was to analyse and describe plausible scenarios for the radiography profession in 2025. The study has a qualitative design with an inductive approach based on focus group interviews. The interviews were inspired by the Scenario-Planning method. Of the seven trends identified in a previous study, the radiographers considered two as the most uncertain scenarios that would have the greatest impact on the profession should they occur. These trends, labelled "Access to career advancement" and "A sufficient number of radiographers", were inserted into the scenario cross. The resulting four plausible future scenarios were: The happy radiographer, the specialist radiographer, the dying profession and the assembly line. It is suggested that "The dying profession" scenario could probably be turned in the opposite direction by facilitating career development opportunities for radiographers within the profession. Changing the direction would probably lead to a profession composed of "happy radiographers" who are specialists, proud of their profession and competent to carry out advanced tasks, in contrast to being solely occupied by "the assembly line". Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensitivity of plain radiography for pediatric cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li W; Probst, Marc A; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injuries (CSI) often receive a computed tomography (CT) scan as an initial diagnostic imaging test. While sensitive, CT of the cervical spine carries significant radiation and risk of lethal malignant transformation later in life. Plain radiographs carry significantly less radiation and could serve as the preferred screening tool, provided they have a high functional sensitivity in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We hypothesize that plain cervical spine radiographs can reliably detect pediatric patients with CSI and seek to quantify the functional sensitivity of plain radiography as compared to CT. We analyzed data from the NEXUS cervical spine study to assess the sensitivity of plain radiographs in the evaluation of CSI. We identified all pediatric patients who underwent plain radiographic imaging, and all pediatric patients found to have CSI. We then determined the sensitivity of plain radiographs in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We identified 44 pediatric patients with CSI in the dataset with age ranging from 2 to 18 years old. Thirty-two of the 44 pediatric patients received cervical spine plain films as a part of their workup. Plain films were able to identify all 32 pediatric patients with CSI to yield a sensitivity of 100 % in detecting injury victims (95 % confidence interval 89.1-100.0 %). Plain radiography was highly sensitive for the identification of CSI in our cohort of pediatric patients and is useful as a screening tool in the evaluation of pediatric CSI.

  9. The need for skull radiography in patients presenting for CT

    SciTech Connect

    Tress, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    One thousand patients had both CT of the head and a conventional skull series of radiographs. Radiographic findings were abnormal in 250 patients (25%), but only 64 patients (6.4%) had diagnostically significant abnormalities at radiography that were not detected by CT. If the 163 patients who presented after acute trauma were excluded from the series, only 39 (4.7%) of the remaining patients had radiographically significant abnormal findings that were not seen at CT, and only two (0.2%) of these abnormalities could not be diagnosed by a lateral skull radiograph alone. In only five patients (0.5%) was the management actively changed because an abnormaltiy that was detected at skull radiography was not detected at CT. Thus, in nontrauma patients who have stroke, epilepsy, dementia, or non-specific symptoms without focal signs, or have recently undergone craniotomy, and who have been referred for CT, skull radiographs are not justified. In the patient with a history and findings that are strongly suggestive of a pathological disorder anywhere other than in the sella turcica, cerebello-pontine angle, and paranasal sinuses, only the lateral skull radiograph should be obtained after CT, and only if CT is equivocal.

  10. Hard x-ray radiography for density measurement in shock compressed matter

    SciTech Connect

    Ravasio, A.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Ozaki, N.; Loupias, B.; Vinci, T.; Le Pape, S.; Park, H. S.; Patel, P.; Mackinnon, A.; Cecchetti, C.; Borghesi, M.; Schiavi, A.; Batani, D.; Dezulian, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, E.; Notley, M.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Clarke, R.

    2008-06-15

    In this letter we report on the direct density measurement in a shock compressed aluminum target using hard x-ray radiography. Experimental data employing a molybdenum K{alpha} source at 17.5 keV, generated with a short pulse laser are presented. High spatial resolution was obtained thanks to a new design for the backlighter geometry. Density values deduced from radiography are compared to predictions from hydrodynamic simulations, which have been calibrated in order to reproduce shock velocities measured from a rear-side self-emission diagnostic. Our results reveal the great potential of this technique as a diagnostic tool for direct density measurements in dense high-Z opaque materials.

  11. Comparison of Conventional Radiography and Digital Computerized Radiography in Patients Presenting to Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ozcete, Enver; Boydak, Bahar; Ersel, Murat; Kiyan, Selahattin; Uz, Ilhan; Cevrim, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    To compare the differences between conventional radiography and digital computerized radiography (CR) in patients presenting to the emergency department. The study enrolled consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department who needed chest radiography. Quality score of the radiogram was assessed with visual analogue score (VAS-100 mm), measured in terms of millimeters and recorded at the end of study. Examination time, interpretation time, total time, and cost of radiograms were calculated. There were significant differences between conventional radiography and digital CR groups in terms of location unit (Care Unit, Trauma, Resuscitation), hour of presentation, diagnosis group, examination time, interpretation time, and examination quality. Examination times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 45.2 and 34.2 minutes, respectively. Interpretation times for conventional radiography and digital CR were 25.2 and 39.7 minutes, respectively. Mean radiography quality scores for conventional radiography and digital CR were 69.1 mm and 82.0 mm. Digital CR had a 1.05 TL cheaper cost per radiogram compared to conventional radiography. Since interpretation of digital radiograms is performed via terminals inside the emergency department, the patient has to be left in order to interpret the digital radiograms, which prolongs interpretation times. We think that interpretation of digital radiograms with the help of a mobile device would eliminate these difficulties. Although the initial cost of setup of digital CR and PACS service is high at the emergency department, we think that Digital CR is more cost-effective than conventional radiography for emergency departments in the long-term.

  12. DENTAL MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The study deals with the determination of characteristic physical and mechanical properties of restorative dental materials, and effect of...manipulative variables on these properties. From the study an entirely new dental gold inlay casting technic was developed, based on the principle of...controlled water added hygroscopic technic. The method has had successful dental applications and is a recognized method of dental inlay casting procedure

  13. Screening of illegal intracorporeal containers ("body packing"): is abdominal radiography sufficiently accurate? A comparative study with low-dose CT.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Canel, Laurent; Becker, Christoph D; Wolff, Hans; Elger, Bernice; Lock, Eric; Sarasin, François; Bonfanti, Monica S; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Perneger, Thomas; Platon, Alexandra

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of abdominal radiography in the detection of illegal intracorporeal containers (hereafter, packets), with low-dose computed tomography (CT) as the reference standard. This study was approved by the institutional ethical review board, with written informed consent. From July 2007 to July 2010, 330 people (296 men, 34 women; mean age, 32 years [range, 18-55 years]) suspected of having ingested drug packets underwent supine abdominal radiography and low-dose CT. The presence or absence of packets at abdominal radiography was reported, with low-dose CT as the reference standard. The density and number of packets (≤ 12 or >12) at low-dose CT were recorded and analyzed to determine whether those variables influence interpretation of results at abdominal radiography. Packets were detected at low-dose CT in 53 (16%) suspects. Sensitivity of abdominal radiography for depiction of packets was 0.77 (41 of 53), and specificity was 0.96 (267 of 277). The packets appeared isoattenuated to the bowel contents at low-dose CT in 16 (30%) of the 53 suspects with positive results. Nineteen (36%) of the 53 suspects with positive low-dose CT results had fewer than 12 packets. Packets that were isoattenuated at low-dose CT and a low number of packets (≤12) were both significantly associated with false-negative results at abdominal radiography (P = .004 and P = .016, respectively). Abdominal radiography is mainly limited by low sensitivity when compared with low-dose CT in the screening of people suspected of carrying drug packets. Low-dose CT is an effective imaging alternative to abdominal radiography. © RSNA, 2012.

  14. Use of digital abdominal radiography for the diagnosis of enterolithiasis in equids: 238 cases (2008-2011).

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Maureen E; Puchalski, Sarah M; Drake, Christiana; le Jeune, Sarah S

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of direct digital abdominal radiography for the diagnosis of enterolithiasis in equids and to assess the effect of the number and anatomic location of enteroliths and gas distention of the gastrointestinal tract on diagnostic sensitivity of the technique. Retrospective case series. 238 horses and ponies ≥ 1 year old that underwent digital abdominal radiography with subsequent exploratory celiotomy or postmortem examination. For each case, 3 reviewers independently evaluated radiographic views. Radiographic images were evaluated for presence or absence and location of enteroliths and the degree of gas distention. Signalment, definitive diagnosis based on exploratory celiotomy or postmortem examination findings, and number and anatomic location of enteroliths were obtained from the medical records. 70 of the 238 (29.4%) equids had confirmed enterolithiasis. With regard to diagnosis of enterolithiasis via digital radiography, overall sensitivity and specificity for the 3 reviewers were 84% and 96%, respectively. Sensitivity was lower for small colon enteroliths (61.5%) than for large colon enteroliths (88.9%) and was negatively affected by gas distention of the gastrointestinal tract. Sensitivity was not affected by the number of enteroliths. Sensitivity and specificity of digital radiography for the diagnosis of large colon enterolithiasis in equids was high. Sensitivity of digital radiography for detection of small colon enteroliths was lower than that for large colon enteroliths, but was higher than that typically associated with computed radiography. In geographic regions in which enterolithiasis in equids is endemic, digital abdominal radiography could be used as a diagnostic test for equids with colic.

  15. Comparison of digital direct readout radiography with conventional film-screen radiography for the recognition of pneumoconiosis in dust-exposed Chinese workers.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling; Laney, A Scott; Wang, Mei Lin; Sun, Xiwen; Zhou, Shaowei; Shi, Jin; Shi, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    Pneumoconiosis in China remains a disease with substantial public health significance. Diagnostic standards for the pneumoconioses are based on traditional film-screen radiography (FSR). However, FSR is increasingly being replaced with digital radiographic imaging, which has become the predominant technology available in Chinese clinical practice. To evaluate the applicability of digital direct readout radiography (DR) images in the recognition of pneumoconioses, we compared the profusion of small opacities and large opacities between FSR and DR radiographs. We enrolled 161 pneumoconioses patients and 31 dust-exposed workers during the course of the study, with FSR and DR images obtained from all participants. Each chest film was interpreted by five readers using the Chinese Diagnostic Criteria classification of radiographs of pneumoconiosis, as were DR images displayed on medical-grade computer monitors. No statistically significant differences were observed when the data were analyzed by small opacity profusion subcategory except for 1/1. The overall intermodality agreement of small opacities was good, with a weighted kappa (κ) of 0.77. DR images with soft copy display are equivalent with respect to image quality and the recognition and classification of small parenchymal lung opacities. Additionally, we observed likeness between modalities with respect to the classification of large opacities. Overall, our study findings demonstrate that in a population of Chinese workers with pneumoconiosis, direct readout digital systems are equivalent to traditional film-screen radiography in the recognition and classification of small pneumoconiotic opacities.

  16. Subtraction radiography for the diagnosis of bone lesions in dogs. Report for 1982-1984

    SciTech Connect

    Rethman, M.P.; Ruttiman, U.E.; O'Neal, R.B.; Webber, R.L.; Davis, A.A.

    1984-05-31

    Resolution of osseous wounds utilizing conventional radiographic techniques is dependent upon favorable angulation without superimposition of dense anatomical structures. A technique of computer subtraction utilizing sequential radiographs has been demonstrated to enhance visualization of such defects in dry skulls, but usefulness in live animals had heretofore not been demonstrated. This investigation demonstrated the usefulness of computer subtraction radiography in live animals, both error rate and diagnostic time being reduced significantly.

  17. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2013-06-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large-scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  18. Muon radiography for exploration of Mars geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, S.; Tanaka, H. K. M.; Naudet, C. J.; Jones, C. E.; Plaut, J. P.; Webb, F. H.

    2012-10-01

    Muon radiography is a technique that uses naturally occurring showers of muons (penetrating particles generated by cosmic rays) to image the interior of large scale geological structures in much the same way as standard X-ray radiography is used to image the interior of smaller objects. Recent developments and application of the technique to terrestrial volcanoes have demonstrated that a low-power, passive muon detector can peer deep into geological structures up to several kilometers in size, and provide crisp density profile images of their interior at ten meter scale resolution. Preliminary estimates of muon production on Mars indicate that the near horizontal Martian muon flux, which could be used for muon radiography, is as strong or stronger than that on Earth, making the technique suitable for exploration of numerous high priority geological targets on Mars. The high spatial resolution of muon radiography also makes the technique particularly suited for the discovery and delineation of Martian caverns, the most likely planetary environment for biological activity. As a passive imaging technique, muon radiography uses the perpetually present background cosmic ray radiation as the energy source for probing the interior of structures from the surface of the planet. The passive nature of the measurements provides an opportunity for a low power and low data rate instrument for planetary exploration that could operate as a scientifically valuable primary or secondary instrument in a variety of settings, with minimal impact on the mission's other instruments and operation.

  19. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  20. Quality assurance in digital dental imaging: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Metsälä, Eija; Henner, Anja; Ekholm, Marja

    2014-07-01

    Doses induced by individual dental examinations are low. However, dental radiography accounts for nearly one third of the total number of radiological examinations in the European Union. Therefore, special attention is needed with regard to radiation protection. In order to lower patient doses, the staff performing dental examinations must have competence in imaging as well as in radiation protection issues. This paper presents a systematic review about the core competencies needed by the healthcare staff in performing digital dental radiological imaging quality assurance. The following databases were searched: Pubmed, Cinahl, Pro Quest and IEEXplore digital library. Also volumes of some dental imaging journals and doctoral theses of the Finnish universities educating dentists were searched. The search was performed using both MeSH terms and keywords using the option 'search all text'. The original keywords were: dental imaging, digital, x-ray, panoramic, quality, assurance, competence, competency, skills, knowledge, radiographer, radiologist technician, dentist, oral hygienist, radiation protection and their Finnish synonyms. Core competencies needed by the healthcare staff performing digital dental radiological imaging quality assurance described in the selected studies were: management of dental imaging equipment, competence in image quality and factors associated with it, dose optimization and quality assurance. In the future there will be higher doses in dental imaging due to increasing use of CBCT and digital imaging. The staff performing dental imaging must have competence in dental imaging quality assurance issues found in this review. They also have to practice ethical radiation safety culture in clinical practice.

  1. The Delphi technique in radiography education research.

    PubMed

    John-Matthews, J St; Wallace, M J; Robinson, L

    2017-09-01

    To describe and review the Delphi technique as a tool for radiographers engaged in mixed-methods research whereby agreement is required on the proficiencies needed by educational programmes for pre- and post- registration radiographers. This is achieved through a description offering a brief history of the technique. Through a literature search, radiography education research using this technique is identified. A protocol for a research project using the technique is presented. Using this worked example, advantages and disadvantages of the method are explored including sampling of participants, sample size, number of rounds and methods of feedback. There are limited examples of the use of the Delphi technique in radiography literature including considerations on how to select experts and panel size. The Delphi technique is a suitable method for establishing collective agreement in the design of radiography educational interventions. Additional research is needed to deepen this evidence-based knowledge. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiation dose in dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Cohnen, M; Kemper, J; Möbes, O; Pawelzik, J; Mödder, U

    2002-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare radiation exposure in panoramic radiography (PR), dental CT, and digital volume tomography (DVT). An anthropomorphic Alderson-Rando phantom and two anatomical head phantoms with thermoluminescent dosimeters fixed at appropriate locations were exposed as in a dental examination. In PR and DVT, standard parameters were used while variables in CT included mA, pitch, and rotation time. Image noise was assessed in dental CT and DVT. Radiation doses to the skin and internal organs within the primary beam and resulting from scatter radiation were measured and expressed as maximum doses in mGy. For PR, DVT, and CT, these maximum doses were 0.65, 4.2, and 23 mGy. In dose-reduced CT protocols, radiation doses ranged from 10.9 to 6.1 mGy. Effective doses calculated on this basis showed values below 0.1 mSv for PR, DVT, and dose-reduced CT. Image noise was similar in DVT and low-dose CT. As radiation exposure and image noise of DVT is similar to low-dose CT, this imaging technique cannot be recommended as a general alternative to replace PR in dental radiology.

  3. Comparison of the accuracy of radiography and ultrasonography for detection of articular lesions in horses.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Antje; Fischer, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    To compare the accuracy of ultrasonographic and radiographic examination for evaluation of articular lesions in horses. Cross-sectional study. Horses (n = 137) with articular lesions. Radiographic and ultrasonographic examinations of the affected joint(s) were performed before diagnostic or therapeutic arthroscopic surgery. Findings were recorded and compared to lesions identified during arthroscopy. In 254 joints, 432 lesions were identified by arthroscopy. The overall accuracy was 82.9% for ultrasonography and 62.2% for radiography (P < .0001) with a sensitivity of 91.4% for ultrasonography and 66.7% for radiography (P < .0001). The difference in specificity was not statistically significant (P = .2628). The negative predictive value for ultrasonography was 31.5% and 13.2% for radiography (P = .0022), the difference for the positive predictive value was not statistically significant (P = .3898). The accuracy for ultrasonography and radiography for left versus right joints was equal and corresponded with the overall results. Ultrasonographic evaluation of articular lesions was more accurate than radiographic evaluation. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Statistical uncertainty in quantitative neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegsa, Florian M.; Kaestner, Anders; Antognini, Aldo; Eggenberger, Andreas; Kirch, Klaus; Wichmann, Gunther

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel procedure to calibrate neutron detection systems commonly used in standard neutron radiography. This calibration allows determining the uncertainties due to Poisson-like neutron counting statistics for each individual pixel of a radiographic image. The obtained statistical errors are necessary in order to perform a correct quantitative analysis. This fast and convenient method is applied to data measured at the cold neutron radiography facility ICON at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Moreover, from the results the effective neutron flux at the beam line is determined.

  5. Proton Radiography: Its uses and Resolution Scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mariam, Fesseha G.

    2012-08-09

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has used high energy protons as a probe in flash radiography for over a decade. In this time the proton radiography project has used 800 MeV protons, provided by the LANSCE accelerator facility at LANL, to diagnose over five-hundred dynamic experiments in support of stockpile stewardship programs as well as basic materials science. Through this effort significant experience has been gained in using charged particles as direct radiographic probes to diagnose transient systems. The results of this experience will be discussed through the presentation of data from experiments recently performed at the LANL pRad.

  6. Mobile waste inspection real time radiography system

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.; Taggart, D.; Betts, S.; Rael, C.; Martinez, F.; Mendez, J.

    1995-10-01

    The 450-KeV Mobile Real Time Radiography System was designed and purchased to inspect containers of radioactive waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The Mobile Real Time Radiography System has the capability of inspecting waste containers of various sizes from 5-gal. buckets to standard waste boxes (SWB, dimensions 54.5 in. x 71 in. x 37 in.). The fact that this unit is mobile makes it an attractive alternative to the costly road closures associated with moving waste from the waste generator to storage or disposal facilities.

  7. New developments in proton radiography at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Christopher; Proton Radiography Team

    2014-09-01

    In a new application of nuclear physics, a facility for using proton for flash radiography has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials, and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons will be discussed and data from some of the recent experiments will be presented.

  8. [Niobium filtration in dental radiology. Effects on image quality and on dosage].

    PubMed

    Bianchi, S D; Giovannetti, P; Albrito, F

    1997-06-01

    The necessity of reducing the radiation dose to the patient in diagnostic radiology according to the ALARA guideline established by the ICRP has stimulated the research on additional filtration systems capable of removing the low-energy photons increasing the dose and worsening image quality. Very few literature studies deal with the effects of niobium filtration on image quality in dental radiography with the use of modulation transfer function (MTF) and square wave response function (SWRF). Only one study has considered those effects measuring dose absorption in an anthropomorphic phantom. 1) to study the effects of a 30 microns additional niobium filter on image quality using the SWRF; 2) to compare the doses absorbed in vivo during a complete radiographic survey of the mouth, both with and without niobium filtration. Qualitative studies led us to conclude that niobium filtration does not significantly worsen radiographic image quality. The following doses were measured in the exposures with niobium filtration: 1678 microGy to 6000 microGy (intraoral doses) and 75 microGy to 3643 microGy (skin doses). The comparison with the doses measured during the exposures made with conventional filtration indicates that dose reduction is not significantly advantageous relative to risk reduction. In conclusion, additional niobium filtration is not advisable in dental radiology, also because of the filter cost and of the increased wear of the unit.

  9. 3D imaging of dental hard tissues with Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yueli L.; Yang, Yi; Ma, Jing; Yan, Jun; Shou, Yuanxin; Wang, Tianheng; Ramesh, Aruna; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Quing

    2011-03-01

    A fiber optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe is used for three dimensional dental imaging. The probe has a lightweight miniaturized design with a size of a pen to facilitate clinic in vivo diagnostics. The probe is interfaced with a swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography at 20K axial scanning rate. The tooth samples were scanned from occlusal, buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal orientations. Three dimensional imaging covers tooth surface area up to 10 mm x 10 mm with a depth about 5 mm, where a majority of caries affection occurs. OCT image provides better resolution and contrast compared to gold standard dental radiography (X-ray). In particular, the technology is well suited for occlusal caries detection. This is complementary to X-ray as occlusal caries affection is difficult to be detected due to the X-ray projectile scan geometry. The 3D topology of occlusal surface as well as the dentin-enamel junction (DEJ) surface inside the tooth can be visualized. The lesion area appears with much stronger back scattering signal intensity.

  10. Assessment of cavitation in artificial approximal dental lesions with near-IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Bitewing radiography is still considered state-of-the-art diagnostic technology for assessing cavitation within approximal carious dental lesions, even though radiographs cannot resolve cavitated surfaces but instead are used to measure lesion depth in order to predict cavitation. Clinicians need new technologies capable of determining whether approximal carious lesions have become cavitated because not all lesions progress to cavitation. Assessing lesion cavitation from near-infrared (NIR) imaging methods holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel in the NIR region from λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. The objective of this study was to measure the change in lesion appearance between non-cavitated and cavitated lesions in artificially generated lesions using NIR imaging modalities (two-dimensional) at λ=1300-nm and λ=1450-nm and cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) (thee-dimensional) λ=1300-nm. Extracted human posterior teeth with sound proximal surfaces were chosen for this study and imaged before and after artificial lesions were made. A high speed dental hand piece was used to create artificial cavitated proximal lesions in sound samples and imaged. The cavitated artificial lesions were then filled with hydroxyapatite powder to simulate non-cavitated proximal lesions.

  11. Assessment of cavitation in artificial approximal dental lesions with near-IR imaging.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jacob C; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2017-01-28

    Bitewing radiography is still considered state-of-the-art diagnostic technology for assessing cavitation within approximal carious dental lesions, even though radiographs cannot resolve cavitated surfaces but instead are used to measure lesion depth in order to predict cavitation. Clinicians need new technologies capable of determining whether approximal carious lesions have become cavitated because not all lesions progress to cavitation. Assessing lesion cavitation from near-infrared (NIR) imaging methods holds great potential due to the high transparency of enamel in the NIR region from λ=1300-1700-nm, which allows direct visualization and quantified measurements of enamel demineralization. The objective of this study was to measure the change in lesion appearance between non-cavitated and cavitated lesions in artificially generated lesions using NIR imaging modalities (two-dimensional) at λ =1300-nm and λ=1450-nm and cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) (thee-dimensional) λ =1300-nm. Extracted human posterior teeth with sound proximal surfaces were chosen for this study and imaged before and after artificial lesions were made. A high speed dental hand piece was used to create artificial cavitated proximal lesions in sound samples and imaged. The cavitated artificial lesions were then filled with hydroxyapatite powder to simulate non-cavitated proximal lesions.

  12. Californium-252: A New Isotopic Source for Neutron Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Reinig, W.C.

    2001-08-29

    This report discusses a new isotopic source for neutron radiography, Californium-252. Nuclear reactors are the usual source of neutrons for radiography, primarily because of their intense neutron beams. If neutron radiography is to have widespread use, intense transportable neutron sources are required that can be used in plants, in laboratories and in the field.

  13. Digital radiography. A comparison with modern conventional imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, G J

    2006-01-01

    The development of computed radiography over the past two decades has transformed radiological imaging. The radiology departments in the 21st century will look very different from those in the preceding period. In this review, the development of digital radiography is presented with a description of its various forms and a comparison with screen film radiography. PMID:16822918

  14. Veterinary nurse to medical diagnostic radiographer.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas

    2017-08-19

    Nicholas Taylor is senior diagnostic radiographer at the Great Western Hospital, Swindon, having initially qualified as a veterinary nurse. It was a college lecture that initially sparked his interest in radiography - little did he know where it would lead. British Veterinary Association.

  15. Comparison of digital radiography, ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography for determining reproductive status of female cats.

    PubMed

    Woodland, Meghan; Pack, LeeAnn; Rist, Paul; Crane, Bronwyn

    2014-01-01

    It is not always possible to identify female cats that have undergone previous ovariohysterectomy based on physical examination alone. An easy, cost-effective method for screening female cats for reproductive status would be helpful for avoiding unnecessary exploratory laparotomies. The purpose of this prospective study was to compare diagnostic sensitivities of digital radiography, ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography for determining reproductive status in female cats. Sixty-seven recently euthanized female cats of unknown medical history and reproductive status were randomly selected and included in the study. Digital abdominal radiography, digital abdominal radiography with compression, abdominal ultrasonography, and positive contrast vaginourethrography were performed in sequence by a board-certified veterinary radiologist and a second-year radiology resident. Immediately following diagnostic imaging procedures, necropsy was performed. Ultrasonography of the uterus had the highest sensitivity (86%) for determining reproductive status of all the imaging modalities tested. The specificity was 88%, and the positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 96% and 68%, respectively. The calculated sensitivities and specificities of other modalities were as follows: digital radiographs (28%, 100%), digital compression radiographs (58%, 100%), and vaginourethrography (32%, 100%). Based on McNemar's test statistic, there was a significant difference in the sensitivity of ultrasound compared to digital radiographs (P ≤ 0.05), compression radiographs (P ≤ 0.05), and vaginourethrogram (P ≤ 0.05). Findings from the current study indicated that ultrasonography is a sensitive diagnostic test for determining reproductive status in female cats. Although more readily available in private practice and shelters, digital radiography and vaginourethrography are not reliable predictors of reproductive status. © 2013 American College of

  16. The effects of noise reduction, sharpening, enhancement, and image magnification on diagnostic accuracy of a photostimulable phosphor system in the detection of non-cavitated approximal dental caries.

    PubMed

    Kajan, Zahra Dalili; Tayefeh Davalloo, Reza; Tavangar, Mayam; Valizade, Fatemeh

    2015-06-01

    Contrast, sharpness, enhancement, and density can be changed in digital systems. The important question is to what extent the changes in these variables affect the accuracy of caries detection. Forty eight extracted human posterior teeth with healthy or proximal caries surfaces were imaged using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) sensor. All original images were processed using a six-step method: (1) applying "Sharpening 2" and "Noise Reduction" processing options to the original images; (2) applying the "Magnification 1:3" option to the image obtained in the first step; (3) enhancing the original images by using the "Diagonal/" option; (4) reviewing the changes brought about by the third step of image processing and then, applying "Magnification 1:3"; (5) applying "Sharpening UM" to the original images; and (6) analyzing the changes brought about by the fifth step of image processing, and finally, applying "Magnification 1:3." Three observers evaluated the images. The tooth sections were evaluated histologically as the gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the observers was compared using a chi-squared test. The accuracy levels irrespective of the image processing method ranged from weak (18.8%) to intermediate (54.2%), but the highest accuracy was achieved at the sixth image processing step. The overall diagnostic accuracy level showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.0001). This study shows that the application of "Sharpening UM" along with the "Magnification 1:3" processing option improved the diagnostic accuracy and the observer agreement more effectively than the other processing procedures.

  17. Comparison between DICOM-calibrated and uncalibrated consumer grade and 6-MP displays under different lighting conditions in panoramic radiography

    PubMed Central

    Haapea, M; Liukkonen, E; Huumonen, S; Tervonen, O; Nieminen, M T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare observer performance in the detection of anatomical structures and pathology in panoramic radiographs using consumer grade with and without digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-calibration and 6-megapixel (6-MP) displays under different lighting conditions. Methods: 30 panoramic radiographs were randomly evaluated on three displays under bright (510 lx) and dim (16 lx) ambient lighting by two observers with different years of experience. Dentinoenamel junction, dentinal caries and periapical inflammatory lesions, visibility of cortical border of the floor and pathological lesions in maxillary sinus were evaluated. Consensus between the observers was considered as reference. Intraobserver agreement was determined. Proportion of equivalent ratings and weighted kappa were used to assess reliability. The level of significance was set to p < 0.05. Results: The proportion of equivalent ratings with consensus differed between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in the lower molar in dim lighting (p = 0.021) and between DICOM-calibrated consumer grade and 6-MP display in bright lighting (p = 0.038) for an experienced observer. Significant differences were found between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in bright lighting (p = 0.044) and periapical lesions in the upper molar in dim lighting (p = 0.008) for a less experienced observer. Intraobserver reliability was better at detecting dentinal caries than at detecting periapical and maxillary sinus pathology. Conclusions: DICOM calibration may improve observer performance in panoramic radiography in different lighting conditions. Therefore, a DICOM-calibrated consumer grade display can be used instead of a medical display in dental practice without compromising the diagnostic quality. PMID:25564888

  18. Comparison between DICOM-calibrated and uncalibrated consumer grade and 6-MP displays under different lighting conditions in panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Pulkkinen, S; Haapea, M; Liukkonen, E; Huumonen, S; Tervonen, O; Nieminen, M T

    2015-01-01

    To compare observer performance in the detection of anatomical structures and pathology in panoramic radiographs using consumer grade with and without digital imaging and communication in medicine (DICOM)-calibration and 6-megapixel (6-MP) displays under different lighting conditions. 30 panoramic radiographs were randomly evaluated on three displays under bright (510 lx) and dim (16 lx) ambient lighting by two observers with different years of experience. Dentinoenamel junction, dentinal caries and periapical inflammatory lesions, visibility of cortical border of the floor and pathological lesions in maxillary sinus were evaluated. Consensus between the observers was considered as reference. Intraobserver agreement was determined. Proportion of equivalent ratings and weighted kappa were used to assess reliability. The level of significance was set to p < 0.05. The proportion of equivalent ratings with consensus differed between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in the lower molar in dim lighting (p = 0.021) and between DICOM-calibrated consumer grade and 6-MP display in bright lighting (p = 0.038) for an experienced observer. Significant differences were found between uncalibrated and DICOM-calibrated consumer grade displays in dentinal caries in bright lighting (p = 0.044) and periapical lesions in the upper molar in dim lighting (p = 0.008) for a less experienced observer. Intraobserver reliability was better at detecting dentinal caries than at detecting periapical and maxillary sinus pathology. DICOM calibration may improve observer performance in panoramic radiography in different lighting conditions. Therefore, a DICOM-calibrated consumer grade display can be used instead of a medical display in dental practice without compromising the diagnostic quality.

  19. Safety Testing of Industrial Radiography Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Trapp, D.J.

    1999-09-29

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission contracted the Savannah River Technology Center to verify the relevancy of the 10 CFR Part 34 requirements for the normal use of portable gamma radiography systems and to propose recommendations for changes or modifications to the requirements.

  20. Technique and interpretation in tree seed radiography

    Treesearch

    Howard B. Kriebel

    1966-01-01

    The study of internal seed structure by radiography requires techniques which will give good definition. To establish the best procedures, we conducted a series of experiments in which we manipulated the principal controllable variables affecting the quality of X-radiographs: namely, focus-to-film distance, film speed (grain), exposure time, kilovoltage, and...

  1. Satisfaction of Search in Chest Radiography 2015.

    PubMed

    Berbaum, Kevin S; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Schartz, Kevin M; Caldwell, Robert T; Madsen, Mark T; Hur, Seung; Laroia, Archana T; Thompson, Brad H; Mullan, Brian F; Franken, Edmund A

    2015-11-01

    Two decades have passed since the publication of laboratory studies of satisfaction of search (SOS) in chest radiography. Those studies were performed using film. The current investigation tests for SOS effects in computed radiography of the chest. Sixty-four chest computed radiographs half demonstrating various "test" abnormalities were read twice by 20 radiologists, once with and once without the addition of a simulated pulmonary nodule. Receiver-operating characteristic detection accuracy and decision thresholds were analyzed to study the effects of adding the nodule on detecting the test abnormalities. Results of previous studies were reanalyzed using similar modern techniques. In the present study, adding nodules did not influence detection accuracy for the other abnormalities (P = .93), but did induce a reluctance to report them (P < .001). Adding nodules did not affect inspection time (P = .58) so the reluctance to report was not associated with reduced search. Reanalysis revealed a similar decision threshold shift that had not been recognized in the early studies of SOS in chest radiography (P < .01) in addition to reduced detection accuracy (P < .01). The nature of SOS in chest radiography has changed, but it is not clear why. SOS may be changing as a function of changes in radiology education and practice. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Film radiography -- The lone star of quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kochakian, R.

    1995-12-31

    In this year of 1995, 100 years of x-ray photography are being celebrated. The reason film radiography is still the number one NDT technique is because of its quality. In this paper the author discusses: (1) fundamentals of image quality and (2) status of new draft ASRM film system classification standard.

  3. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    PubMed

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  4. INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTORS' GUIDE. VOLUME 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Engineering Extension Service.

    INFORMATION RELATIVE TO THE LESSON PLANS IN "INDUSTRIAL RADIOGRAPHY COURSE, INSTRUCTOR'S GUIDE, VOLUME I" (VT 003 565) IS PRESENTED ON 52 INFORMATION SHEETS INCLUDING THE SUBJECTS SHIELDING EQUATIONS AND LOGARITHMS, METAL PROPERTIES, FIELD TRIP INSTRUCTIONS FOR STUDENTS, WELDING SYMBOLS AND SIZES, SAMPLE REPORT FORMS, AND TYPICAL SHIPPING…

  5. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Inubushi, Yuichi

    2010-10-15

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 {mu}m and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  6. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Inubushi, Yuichi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 μm and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  7. Comparison of computed radiography and conventional radiography in detection of small volume pneumoperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Marolf, Angela; Blaik, Margaret; Ackerman, Norman; Watson, Elizabeth; Gibson, Nicole; Thompson, Margret

    2008-01-01

    The role of digital imaging is increasing as these systems are becoming more affordable and accessible. Advantages of computed radiography compared with conventional film/screen combinations include improved contrast resolution and postprocessing capabilities. Computed radiography's spatial resolution is inferior to conventional radiography; however, this limitation is considered clinically insignificant. This study prospectively compared digital imaging and conventional radiography in detecting small volume pneumoperitoneum. Twenty cadaver dogs (15-30 kg) were injected with 0.25, 0.25, and 0.5 ml for 1 ml total of air intra-abdominally, and radiographed sequentially using computed and conventional radiographic technologies. Three radiologists independently evaluated the images, and receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis compared the two imaging modalities. There was no statistical difference between computed and conventional radiography in detecting free abdominal air, but overall computed radiography was relatively more sensitive based on ROC analysis. Computed radiographic images consistently and significantly demonstrated a minimal amount of 0.5 ml of free air based on ROC analysis. However, no minimal air amount was consistently or significantly detected with conventional film. Readers were more likely to detect free air on lateral computed images than the other projections, with no significant increased sensitivity between film/screen projections. Further studies are indicated to determine the differences or lack thereof between various digital imaging systems and conventional film/screen systems.

  8. Dental sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, P O; Lowder, M Q

    1998-08-01

    Dental sepsis or periapical abscess formation constitutes a large percentage of dental conditions that afflict horses. Dental sepsis occurs when the pulp chamber of the tooth is exposed to the oral cavity or external environment, allowing bacterial localization with resulting infection. Although acute, primary, septic pulpitis in horses is rare, dental sepsis often results from colonization of the pulp chamber with pathogenic bacteria secondary to maleruption or impaction of teeth with secondary alveolar bone lysis, primary fractures of the tooth, mandible, or maxilla, periodontal disease, or infundibular necrosis. The sequela to pulpal infection are extensions into the periradicular tissues and mandibular or maxillary periapical abscess formation.

  9. MRI versus radiography of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ursula; Oberleitner, Gerhard; Nemec, Stefan F; Gruber, Michael; Weber, Michael; Czerny, Christian; Krestan, Christian R

    2011-10-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are usually diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. In view of the implementation of MRI for visualization of the acromioclavicular joint, the purpose of this study was to describe the MRI findings of acromioclavicular joint dislocation in comparison with the radiographic findings. Forty-four patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocation after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography and 1-T MRI with a surface phased-array coil. MRI included coronal proton density-weighted turbo spin-echo and coronal 3D T1-weighted fast field-echo water-selective sequences. The Rockwood classification was used to assess acromioclavicular joint injuries at radiography and MRI. An adapted Rockwood classification was used for MRI evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint dislocations diagnosed with radiography and MRI were compared. Among 44 patients with Rockwood type I-IV injuries on radiographs, classification on radiographs and MR images was concordant in 23 (52.2%) patients. At MRI, the injury was reclassified to a less severe type in 16 (36.4%) patients and to a more severe type in five (11.4%) patients. Compared with the findings according to the original Rockwood system, with the adapted system that included MRI findings, additional ligamentous lesions were found in 11 (25%) patients. In a considerable number of patients, the MRI findings change the Rockwood type determined with radiography. In addition to clinical assessment and radiography, MRI may yield important findings on ligaments that may influence management.

  10. The effects of noise reduction, sharpening, enhancement, and image magnification on diagnostic accuracy of a photostimulable phosphor system in the detection of non-cavitated approximal dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Tayefeh Davalloo, Reza; Tavangar, Mayam; Valizade, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Contrast, sharpness, enhancement, and density can be changed in digital systems. The important question is to what extent the changes in these variables affect the accuracy of caries detection. Materials and Methods Forty eight extracted human posterior teeth with healthy or proximal caries surfaces were imaged using a photostimulable phosphor (PSP) sensor. All original images were processed using a six-step method: (1) applying "Sharpening 2" and "Noise Reduction" processing options to the original images; (2) applying the "Magnification 1:3" option to the image obtained in the first step; (3) enhancing the original images by using the "Diagonal/" option; (4) reviewing the changes brought about by the third step of image processing and then, applying "Magnification 1:3"; (5) applying "Sharpening UM" to the original images; and (6) analyzing the changes brought about by the fifth step of image processing, and finally, applying "Magnification 1:3." Three observers evaluated the images. The tooth sections were evaluated histologically as the gold standard. The diagnostic accuracy of the observers was compared using a chi-squared test. Results The accuracy levels irrespective of the image processing method ranged from weak (18.8%) to intermediate (54.2%), but the highest accuracy was achieved at the sixth image processing step. The overall diagnostic accuracy level showed a statistically significant difference (p=0.0001). Conclusion This study shows that the application of "Sharpening UM" along with the "Magnification 1:3" processing option improved the diagnostic accuracy and the observer agreement more effectively than the other processing procedures. PMID:26125002

  11. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-15

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be {approx}16% and {approx}26% of the mean for DD and D{sup 3}He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 50 rad{sup -1} contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  12. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)], 10.1016/S0030-4018(96)00325-2 laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ˜16% and ˜26% of the mean for DD and D3He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad-1 contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)], 10.1016/S0168-9002(03)01368-8 framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  13. Comparative Sensitivity Assessment of Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Digital Radiography for detecting Foreign Bodies.

    PubMed

    Lari, Sima Sadat; Shokri, Abbas; Hosseinipanah, Seyyed Mohammad; Rostami, Shahin; Sabounchi, Shabnam Seyedzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Foreign body detection and determining whether it is adjacent to critical organs has a significant role in its removal. Various imaging techniques have been used to locate foreign bodies. This study aimed to compare cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital radiography for detecting foreign bodies in an in vitro model. Foreign bodies composed of normal glass, barium glass, wood, and stone with two sizes were placed into three different locations of two sheep heads. Digital radiography [lateral cephalometric, submentovertex (SMV)] and CBCT were compared to investigate their sensitivity for detecting foreign bodies. Diagnostic sensitivity of digital radiography in lateral cephalometric view, SMV view, and CBCT for detecting all types of foreign bodies was 67.2, 32.3, and 76.6% respectively. None of these techniques were successful in detecting wood satisfactory. Stone was detected relatively higher than other foreign bodies (82.6%). Diagnostic sensitivity of CBCT in detecting foreign bodies was 100%, except for wood. Accuracy of imaging techniques in detecting foreign bodies according to locations in descending order was lip, mandibular angle, and maxillary sinus. It can be concluded that appropriate amount of radiopacity is enough for CBCT to exactly detect foreign body, regardless of its location or size. In maxillofacial traumatic patients, CBCT seems to be a better and cost-effective technique for detecting hidden foreign bodies than other routine techniques.

  14. A computer-assisted systematic quality monitoring method for cervical hip fracture radiography

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Olof; Johnsson, Ragnar; Laurin, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Background A thorough quality analysis of radiologic performance is cumbersome. Instead, the prevalence of missed cervical hip fractures might be used as a quality indicator. Purpose To validate a computer-based quality study of cervical hip fracture radiography. Material and Methods True and false negative and positive hip trauma radiography during 6 years was assessed manually. Patients with two or more radiologic hip examinations before surgery were selected by computer analysis of the databases. The first of two preoperative examinations might constitute a missed fracture. These cases were reviewed. Results Out of 1621 cervical hip fractures, manual perusal found 51 (3.1%) false negative radiographic diagnoses. Among approximately 14,000 radiographic hip examinations, there were 27 (0.2%) false positive diagnoses. Fifty-seven percent of false negative reports were occult fractures, the other diagnostic mistakes. There were no significant differences over the years. Diagnostic sensitivity was 96.9% and specificity 99.8%. Computer-assisted analysis with a time interval of at least 120 days between the first and the second radiographic examination discovered 39 of the 51 false negative reports. Conclusion Cervical hip trauma radiography has high sensitivity and specificity. With computer-assisted analysis, 76% of false negative reports were found. PMID:27994880

  15. Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Manuel, M J-E; Zylstra, A B; Rinderknecht, H G; Casey, D T; Rosenberg, M J; Sinenian, N; Li, C K; Frenje, J A; Séguin, F H; Petrasso, R D

    2012-06-01

    A monoenergetic proton source has been characterized and a modeling tool developed for proton radiography experiments at the OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Comm. 133, 495 (1997)] laser facility. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to measure global isotropy levels in proton fluence and images of the proton source itself provided information on local uniformity relevant to proton radiography experiments. Global fluence uniformity was assessed by multiple yield diagnostics and deviations were calculated to be ∼16% and ∼26% of the mean for DD and D(3)He fusion protons, respectively. From individual fluence images, it was found that the angular frequencies of ≳50 rad(-1) contributed less than a few percent to local nonuniformity levels. A model was constructed using the Geant4 [S. Agostinelli et al., Nuc. Inst. Meth. A 506, 250 (2003)] framework to simulate proton radiography experiments. The simulation implements realistic source parameters and various target geometries. The model was benchmarked with the radiographs of cold-matter targets to within experimental accuracy. To validate the use of this code, the cold-matter approximation for the scattering of fusion protons in plasma is discussed using a typical laser-foil experiment as an example case. It is shown that an analytic cold-matter approximation is accurate to within ≲10% of the analytic plasma model in the example scenario.

  16. First experience with x-ray dark-field radiography for human chest imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willer, Konstantin; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Gromann, Lukas B.; De Marco, Fabio; Scherer, Kai H.; Herzen, Julia; Achterhold, Klaus; Gleich, Bernhard; Münzel, Daniela; Renz, Martin; Renger, Bernhard C.; Fischer, Florian; Braun, Christian; Auweter, Sigrid; Hellbach, Katharina; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schröter, Tobias; Mohr, Jürgen; Yaroshenko, Andre; Maack, Hanns-Ingo; Pralow, Thomas; van der Heijden, Hendrik; Proksa, Roland; Köhler, Thomas; Wieberneit, Nataly; Rindt, Karsten; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2017-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of an experimental X-ray dark-field radiography system for chest imaging in humans and to compare with conventional diagnostic imaging. Materials and Methods: The study was institutional review board (IRB) approved. A single human cadaver (52 years, female, height: 173 cm, weight: 84 kg, chest circumference: 97 cm) was imaged within 24 hours post mortem on the experimental x-ray dark-field system. In addition, the cadaver was imaged on a clinical CT system to obtain a reference scan. The grating-based dark-field radiography setup was equipped with a set of three gratings to enable grating-based dark-field contrast x-ray imaging. The prototype operates at an acceleration voltage of up to 70 kVp and with a field-of-view large enough for clinical chest x-ray (>35 x 35 cm2). Results: It was feasible to extract x-ray dark-field signal of the whole human thorax, clearly demonstrating that human x-ray dark-field chest radiography is feasible. Lung tissue produced strong scattering, reflected in a pronounced x-ray dark-field signal. The ribcage and the backbone are less prominent than the lung but are also distinguishable. Finally, the soft tissue is not present in the dark-field radiography. The regions of the lungs affected by edema, as verified by CT, showed less dark-field signal compared to healthy lung tissue. Conclusion: Our results reveal the current status of translating dark-field imaging from a micro (small animal) scale to a macro (patient) scale. The performance of the experimental x-ray dark-field radiography setup offers, for the first time, obtaining multi-contrast chest x-ray images (attenuation and dark-field signal) from a human cadaver.

  17. Conventional Versus Digital Radiography in Detecting Root Canal Type in Maxillary Premolars: An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Moshfeghi, Mahkameh; Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Sajadi, Sepideh; Shahbazian, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Successful endodontic therapy depends on adequate mechanical and chemical debridement of the canal which requires knowledge of the canal morphology. Conventional radiography has been used to evaluate the canal type; however, direct digital radiography has recently been practiced for this purpose due to the shortcomings of conventional radiography. The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of digital and conventional radiography taken at 0° and 30° angles in the diagnosis of the canal type of extracted maxillary premolars. Materials and Methods: This diagnostic study was performed on 90 extracted maxillary premolars. Conventional and digital radiographies were taken of all teeth at 0° and 30° horizontal angles. The images were assessed by an oral and maxillofacial radiologist. The clearing technique was used as the gold standard. The canal type was determined using Weine classification. The agreement between each one of the 4 radiographic modalities and gold standard was determined by kappa statistics. Results: The kappa values for the agreement of parallel conventional, 30° conventional, parallel digital and 30° digital modalities with the clearing technique were 0.059, 0.215, 0.043 and 0.391, respectively. Parallel modalities were unable to determine the tooth canal type. Radiographic images taken at 30° significantly determined the canal type, although only a poor level of agreement was noted between the two modalities and the clearing technique. Conclusion: All modalities had limited value to determine the root canal type in maxillary premolars. However, direct digital imaging taken at 30° angle showed the highest accuracy for canal type assessment. PMID:23724205

  18. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  19. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  20. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  1. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  2. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  3. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  4. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position...

  5. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a...

  6. 21 CFR 872.1820 - Dental x-ray exposure alignment device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. 872.1820... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1820 Dental x-ray exposure alignment device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray exposure alignment device is a device intended to position x...

  7. 21 CFR 872.1840 - Dental x-ray position indicating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental x-ray position indicating device. 872.1840... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1840 Dental x-ray position indicating device. (a) Identification. A dental x-ray position indicating device is a device, such as a collimator...

  8. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250•250•500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging.

  9. Dental MRI using wireless intraoral coils

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Ute; Eisenbeiss, Anne-Katrin; Scheifele, Christian; Nelson, Katja; Bock, Michael; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Herdt, Olga; Flügge, Tabea; Hövener, Jan-Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the gold standard for dental imaging is projection radiography or cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). These methods are fast and cost-efficient, but exhibit poor soft tissue contrast and expose the patient to ionizing radiation (X-rays). The need for an alternative imaging modality e.g. for soft tissue management has stimulated a rising interest in dental magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which provides superior soft tissue contrast. Compared to X-ray imaging, however, so far the spatial resolution of MRI is lower and the scan time is longer. In this contribution, we describe wireless, inductively-coupled intraoral coils whose local sensitivity enables high resolution MRI of dental soft tissue. In comparison to CBCT, a similar image quality with complementary contrast was obtained ex vivo. In-vivo, a voxel size of the order of 250∙250∙500 μm3 was achieved in 4 min only. Compared to dental MRI acquired with clinical equipment, the quality of the images was superior in the sensitive volume of the coils and is expected to improve the planning of interventions and monitoring thereafter. This method may enable a more accurate dental diagnosis and avoid unnecessary interventions, improving patient welfare and bringing MRI a step closer to becoming a radiation-free alternative for dental imaging. PMID:27021387

  10. Problem-based learning for radiological technologists: a comparison of student attitudes toward plain radiography.

    PubMed

    Terashita, Takayoshi; Tamura, Naomi; Kisa, Kengo; Kawabata, Hidenobu; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-05

    Knowledge and skill expected of healthcare providers continues to increase alongside developments in medicine and healthcare. Problem-based learning (PBL) is therefore increasingly necessary in training courses for radiological technologists. However, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of PBL to completely introduce it in our education programs. As a Hypothesis, it seems that a change occurs in the student's attitudes by participating in PBL practical training. There is the Semantic Differential (SeD) technique as a method to identify student's attitudes. We conceived that PBL could be appropriately evaluated by using SeD technique. In this paper, we evaluated PBL for plain radiography practical training using the SeD technique. Thirty-eight third-year students studying radiological technology participated. PBL was introduced to practical training in plain radiography positioning techniques. Five sessions lasting 5 h each were delivered over a 5-week period during November to December 2012. The clinical scenario was an emergency case with multiple trauma requiring plain radiography. Groups comprising approximately eight students created workflows for trauma radiography with consideration of diagnostic accuracy and patient safety. Furthermore, students groups conducted plain radiography on a patient phantom according to created workflows and were then guided by feedback from professional radiologists. All students answered SeD questionnaires to assess views on plain radiography before instruction to provide preliminary practical training reports and after completing practical training. The factors were identified using factor analysis of the questionnaires, which were answered before and after each practical training session. On evaluation of the relationships between factors and question items according to factor loading, we identified "reluctance", "confidence", and "exhaustion" as the predominant attitudes before practical training. Similarly, we identified

  11. Hardware-Accelerated Simulated Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D; Callahan, S; Max, N; Silva, C; Langer, S; Frank, R

    2005-08-04

    We present the application of hardware accelerated volume rendering algorithms to the simulation of radiographs as an aid to scientists designing experiments, validating simulation codes, and understanding experimental data. The techniques presented take advantage of 32-bit floating point texture capabilities to obtain solutions to the radiative transport equation for X-rays. The hardware accelerated solutions are accurate enough to enable scientists to explore the experimental design space with greater efficiency than the methods currently in use. An unsorted hexahedron projection algorithm is presented for curvilinear hexahedral meshes that produces simulated radiographs in the absorption-only regime. A sorted tetrahedral projection algorithm is presented that simulates radiographs of emissive materials. We apply the tetrahedral projection algorithm to the simulation of experimental diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion experiments on a laser at the University of Rochester.

  12. Comparison of Radiography and Ultrasonography for Diagnosis of Diaphragmatic Hernia in Bovines

    PubMed Central

    Athar, Hakim; Mohindroo, Jitender; Singh, Kiranjeet; Kumar, Ashwani; Raghunath, Mulinti

    2010-01-01

    The present study was conducted on 101 animals suffering from thoracoabdominal disorders; out of which twenty seven animals (twenty six buffaloes and one cow) were diagnosed with diaphragmatic hernia based on clinical signs, radiography, ultrasonography, and left flank laparorumenotomy. Radiography alone confirmed diaphragmatic hernia in 18 cases (66.67%) with a sac-like structure cranial to the diaphragm. In 15 animals the sac contained metallic densities while in three cases a sac-like structure with no metallic densities was present. Ultrasonography was helpful in confirming diaphragmatic hernia in 23 cases (85.18%) and ultrasonographically reticular motility was evident at the level of 4th/5th intercostal space in all the animals. B+M mode ultrasonography was used for the first time for diagnosis of diaphragmatic hernia in bovines and the results suggested that ultrasonography was a reliable diagnostic modality for diaphragmatic hernia in bovines. PMID:20445795

  13. Portable radiography: a reality and necessity for ISS and explorer-class missions.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J

    2015-02-01

    On ISS missions and explorer class missions, unexpected medical and surgical emergencies could be disastrous. Lack of ability to rapidly assess and make critical decisions affects mission capability. Current imaging modalities on ISS consist only of ultrasound. There are many acute diagnoses which ultrasound alone cannot diagnose. Portable X-Ray imaging (radiography) technology has advanced far enough to where it is now small enough, cheap enough, and accurate enough to give diagnostic quality images sent wirelessly to the onboard computer and on Earth for interpretation while fitting in something the size of a briefcase. Although further research is warranted, Portable Radiography is an important addition to have on ISS and future Explorer Class Missions while maintaining a very small footprint.

  14. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  15. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  16. Salivary diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J.M.; Garon, E.; Wong, D.T.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to monitor health status, disease onset and progression, and treatment outcome through non-invasive means is a most desirable goal in the health care promotion and delivery. There are three prerequisites to materialize this goal: specific biomarkers associated with a health or disease state; a non-invasive approach to detect and monitor the biomarkers; and the technologies to discriminate the biomarkers. A national initiative catalyzed by the National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) has created a roadmap to achieve these goals through the use of oral fluids as the diagnostic medium to scrutinize the health and/or disease status of individuals. Progress has shown this is an ideal opportunity to bridge state of the art saliva-based biosensors, optimized to disease discriminatory salivary biomarkers, for diagnostic applications. Oral fluid being the ‘mirror of body’ is a perfect medium to be explored for health and disease surveillance. The translational applications and opportunities are enormous. PMID:19627522

  17. Mosquitoes, flies and dental cavities: Dr. Howard Riley Raper's public campaign to prevent toothache.

    PubMed

    Christen, Arden G; Christen, Joan A

    2010-01-01

    Dr. Howard Riley Raper (1886-1978) was an early oral health pioneer and dental roentgenology faculty member of the Indiana Dental College (IDC) who single-handedly introduced key concepts in radiology to dentistry. Due to his efforts, IDC became in 1910-11 the first dental school to have a regular course in dental radiology. Virtually all American dental schools soon added this subject to their regular curriculum. Raper's text, Elementary and Dental Radiography (1913) became the first comprehensive student textbook of dental X-ray diagnosis. In his 1933 Blue Book entitled, The New Aim in the Care of the Teeth, Raper elaborated upon his mission to prevent caries, by comparing the insidious damages of tooth decay with the threat of insect-borne disease.

  18. Fast Gate: Subnanosecond Gate Detectors for Laser Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Feit, M.; Hatchett, S.; Key, M.; Phillips, T.; Sefcik, J.; Snavely, R.; Weber, M.

    2000-02-25

    X-ray radiography is used as a principal diagnostic in a wide range of hydrodynamic tests relevant to the weapons program and also for basic materials and equation-of-state science studies. The quality of the x-ray radiograph can be significantly degraded by the scattering of x-rays within the object and by components of the test system itself. Elimination of these scattered x-rays from the recorded images can either substantially improve the image contrast and signal-to-noise or allow smaller, lower-cost x-ray sources to be used. The scattered x-rays could be minimized through the use of a much shorter-duration x-ray pulse and a fast, gated detector. The short duration x-ray pulse and the fast gated detector allow detection of only those x-rays which pass through the object being radiographed. X-rays which are the result of scattering have longer path lengths and take longer to reach the target. Most of these can be eliminated if the detector if gated off before they arrive at the detector. Until recently there were no sources of high energy x-rays (1-10 MeV) with short duration (sub 100 picosecond) pulses. Now the Petawatt Laser Facility (ref 1) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been able to produce 0.1 rads at 1 meter of MeV energy x-rays in 1-0 picoseconds. Efforts are underway to significantly increase this x-ray output. The combination of the existing short-duration, Petawatt-produced x-ray pulses and an x-ray detector with sub-100-ps gate times could eliminate most of the scattered x-rays from the radiograph image and allow highly improved radiography particularly for larger, high density test objects.

  19. EOS imaging versus current radiography: A health technology assessment study.

    PubMed

    Mahboub-Ahari, Alireza; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Yusefi, Mahmoud; Velayati, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    EOS is a 2D/3D muscle skeletal diagnostic imaging system. The device has been developed to produce a high quality 2D, full body radiographs in standing, sitting and squatting positions. Three dimensional images can be reconstructed via sterEOS software. This Health Technology Assessment study aimed to investigate efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of new emerged EOS imaging system in comparison with conventional x-ray radiographic techniques. All cost and outcome data were assessed from Iran's Ministry of Health Perspective. Data for clinical effectiveness was extracted using a rigorous systematic review. As clinical outcomes the rate of x-ray emission and related quality of life were compared with Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR). Standard costing method was conducted to find related direct medical costs. In order to examine robustness of the calculated Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratios (ICERs) we used two-way sensitivity analysis. GDP Per capita of Islamic Republic of Iran (2012) adopted as cost-effectiveness threshold. Review of related literature highlighted the lack of rigorous evidence for clinical outcomes. Ultra low dose EOS imaging device is known as a safe intervention because of FDA, CE and CSA certificates. The rate of emitted X-ray was 2 to 18 fold lower for EOS compared to the conventional techniques (p<0.001). The Incremental Cost Effectiveness Ratio for EOS relative to CR calculated $50706 in baseline analysis (the first scenario) and $50714, $9446 respectively for the second and third scenarios. Considering the value of neither $42146 as upper limit, nor the first neither the second scenario could pass the cost-effectiveness threshold for Iran. EOS imaging technique might not be considered as a cost-effective intervention in routine practice of health system, especially within in-patient wards. Scenario analysis shows that, only in an optimum condition such as lower assembling costs and higher utilization rates

  20. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  1. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  2. Longitudinal trends in the use of individualized radiographic examinations at dental schools in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Mel L

    2006-02-01

    In the spring of 2002, a mail survey was conducted to determine the use of individualized radiographic examinations (selective radiography) for comprehensive care patients at all sixty-four U.S. and Canadian dental schools. Results from previous surveys were used to evaluate the long-term longitudinal trends. Among sixty-two schools (97 percent response rate), selective radiography was used by 34 percent of schools for dentulous adult patients, by 100 percent for edentulous adults, and by 28 percent for children. Having a credentialed chief of service increased the likelihood that selective radiography would be used for dentulous adults (odd ratio[OR]=2.36) and for children (OR=2.33). Selective radiography for dentulous adults increased from 2 percent of schools in 1977 to 36 percent in 1997 and leveled off thereafter. Between 1987 and 2002, selective radiography for edentulous adults was used at nearly all schools (96-100 percent) and for children at about a quarter of dental schools (22-28 percent). Among the sixty-one schools for which there are complete data since 1987, the continuous use of routine radiography was most common (39 percent of schools) for dentulous adult patients, whereas the continuous use of selective radiography was uncommon (7 percent).

  3. PARAMETERS IN PANORAMIC RADIOGRAPHY FOR DIFFERENTIATION OF RADIOLUCENT LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Raitz, Ricardo; Assunção, José Narciso Rosa; Correa, Luciana; Fenyo-Pereira, Marlene

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to establish parameters in panoramic radiography for interpretation of unilocular radiolucent lesions, and to compare the accuracy of diagnoses given by examiners before and after using these parameters. Material and Methods: In Part I, 12 specialists analyzed 24 images and the diagnostic criteria used by each examiner to make correct diagnoses were used to build a list of basic radiographic parameters for each pathology (ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and idiopathic bone cavity). In Part II, this list was used by 6 undergraduate students (Un), 8 recently graduated dentists (D), 3 oral pathologists, 3 stomatologists, 3 oral radiologists, and 3 oral surgeons to diagnose the corresponding pathologies in the other set of 24 panoramic radiographs (T2). The same analysis occurred without using this list (T1). The method of generalized estimating equations (GEE) was used in order to estimate the probability of making a correct diagnosis depending on the specialty of the examiner, type of lesion, and moment of the evaluation, T1 or T2 (before or after they had access to the list of parameters, respectively). Results: Higher values were obtained for the probability (GEE) of making a correct diagnosis on T2; the group Un presented the highest improvement (14.6 %); no differences between the probabilities were observed either between Un and D, or among the different groups of specialists. Conclusions: The use of panoramic radiographic parameters did allow improving the diagnostic accuracy for all groups of examiners. PMID:19936512

  4. Abdominal radiography is not necessary in children with intussusception.

    PubMed

    Tareen, Farhan; Mc Laughlin, Danielle; Cianci, Fiona; Hoare, Siobhan M; Sweeney, Brian; Mortell, Alan; Puri, Prem

    2016-01-01

    Children with intussusception require rapid and accurate diagnosis to enable timely intervention for satisfactory outcome. Ultrasonography is the recommended standard diagnostic modality; however, abdominal radiography (AR) is still used as an initial investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the benefit of AR in intussusception by determining diagnostic accuracy and analysing correlation of AR findings with outcome. Index cases of intussusception presenting over 15 years (1998-2013) were analysed. Those who had AR performed were allocated into groups with positive or normal findings. Outcome of pneumatic reduction of intussusception (PRI) between these groups was compared. Six hundred and forty-four cases of intussusception treated with PRI were identified, 412 (64 %) had AR performed and 232 (36 %) did not. 303 (74 %) radiographs had positive findings and 109 (26 %) were normal. The success rate of PRI did not differ between AR positive (82 %) and AR normal (84 %). Occult pneumoperitoneum was not detected in any patient by AR in our cohort. AR is not recommended for the diagnosis of intussusception in children, for the prediction of the outcome of PRI or for the detection of occult pneumoperitoneum. AR should always be performed when clinical peritonism is present but is not otherwise necessary in children with suspected or confirmed intussusception.

  5. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice.

  6. Sensitometric characteristics of dental xeroradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gratt, B.M.; Sickles, E.A.

    1983-11-01

    Dental xeroradiography is a high-quality intraoral imaging system which provides a potentially convenient, rapid, low-dose alternative to conventional film radiography. In this study the sensitometric properties of dental xeroradiography were investigated via assessment of high- and low-contrast xeroradiographic processor settings, transmission versus reflection densitometry, reciprocity-law failure, and kVp (tube voltage) plate dependence. Findings of the study indicated that imaging at high-contrast processor settings results in greater dynamic range but less exposure latitude than imaging at low-contrast processor settings. Determination of characteristic curves demonstrated greater contrast in reflection mode than imaging by transillumination for all but the very densest of images (greater than 1.6 O.D.). There was also little difference in characteristic curves produced from 50 to 90 kVp, indicating that the xeroradiographic plate exhibits a relatively constant sensitivity over the tube voltages tested if exposure is expressed in roentgens. Finally, no substantial reciprocity-law failure was observed for dental xeroradiography over a clinically relevant range of exposure times.

  7. Shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography.

    PubMed

    Han, G-S; Cheng, J-G; Li, G; Ma, X-C

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the shielding effect of thyroid collar for digital panoramic radiography. 4 machines [Orthopantomograph(®) OP200 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland), Orthophos CD (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim, Germany), Orthophos XG Plus (Sirona Dental Systems GmbH) and ProMax(®) (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland)] were used in this study. Average tissue-absorbed doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in an anthropomorphic phantom. Effective organ and total effective doses were derived according to the International Commission of Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. The shielding effect of one collar in front and two collars both in front and at the back of the neck was measured. The effective organ doses of the thyroid gland obtained from the 4 panoramic machines were 1.12 μSv for OP200, 2.71 μSv for Orthophos CD, 2.18 μSv for Orthophos XG plus and 2.20 μSv for ProMax, when no thyroid collar was used. When 1 collar was used in front of the neck, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were 1.01 μSv (9.8% reduction), 2.45 μSv (9.6% reduction), 1.76 μSv (19.3% reduction) and 1.70 μSv (22.7% reduction), respectively. Significant differences in dose reduction were found for Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. When two collars were used, the effective organ doses of the thyroid gland were also significantly reduced for the two machines Orthophos XG Plus and ProMax. The same trend was observed in the total effective doses for the four machines. Wearing a thyroid collar was helpful when the direct digital panoramic imaging systems were in use, whereas for the indirect digital panoramic imaging systems, the thyroid collar did not have an extra protective effect on the thyroid gland and whole body.

  8. Diagnosis of simulated condylar bone defects using panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography: A comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Salemi, Fatemeh; Shokri, Abbas; Baharvand, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Radiographic examination is one of the most important parts of the clinical assessment routine for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) with panoramic radiography and spiral computed tomography for the detection of the simulated mandibular condyle bone lesions. Study Design: The sample consisted of 10 TMJs from 5 dried human skulls. Simulated erosive and osteophytic lesions were created in 3 different sizes using round diamond bur and bone chips, respectively. Panoramic radiography, spiral tomography and cone-beam computed tomography were used in defect detection. Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. The reliability and degrees of agreement between two observers were also determined by the mean of Cohen’s Kappa analysis. Results: CBCT had a statistically significant superiority than other studied techniques in detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with different sizes. There were significant differences between tomography and panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 1mm and 1.5 mm in size. However, there were no significant differences between Tomography and Panoramic in correct detection of both erosive and osteophytic lesions with 0.5 mm in size. Conclusions: CBCT images provide a greater diagnostic accuracy than spiral tomography and panoramic radiography in the detection of condylar bone erosions and osteophytes. Key words:Bone defect, Condyle, CBCT, Panoramic, radiography. PMID:25810839

  9. Radiography Students' Learning: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Anneli; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari

    2016-01-01

    To describe research methodology and findings concerning radiography students' learning. Health sciences databases were searched to perform a traditional narrative literature review. Thirty-five peer-reviewed articles published between 2000 and 2014 were analyzed using thematic analysis. Specific methods of learning were found to be of the most interest. The studies focused primarily on the use and usability of a method or the students' general experiences of it. The most commonly studied methods were e-learning and interprofessional learning, which students perceived as positive methods for theoretical studies and clinical training. Students' learning regarding research was the focus of only one article reporting a wide variety of students' research interests. Most studies reported quantitative research gathered from questionnaires and surveys. Additional research, especially from a qualitative point of view, is needed to deepen the evidence-based knowledge of radiography student learning.

  10. Monte Carlo calculation for microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    2000-09-01

    In radiography the scattered radiation from the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. We propose that a bundle of collimated, closely spaced, microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and eliminate the effect of secondary electron dose, thus increasing the image dose contrast in the detector. The lateral and depth dose distributions of 20-200 keV microplanar beams are investigated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code to calculate the depth doses and dose profiles in a 6 cm x 6 cm x 6 cm tissue phantom. The maximum dose on the primary beam axis (peak) and the minimum inter-beam scattered dose (valley) are compared at different photon energies and the optimum energy range for microbeam radiography is found. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can give superior contrast imaging to a single macrobeam of the same overall area.

  11. Contrast enhancement in microplanar beam radiography.

    PubMed

    Company, F Z; Allen, B J; Mino, C

    1999-12-01

    In x-ray radiography, the target produces a useful shadow from absorption of the primary beam, while the scattered radiation into the off-target region decreases the contrast of the target image. A bundle of closely spaced microplanar beams can reduce the scattered radiation and give superior image contrast compared with a single macrobeam of the same dimensions. To further reduce the scattered radiation and increase the image contrast, we place an air gap between the tissue phantom and the detector. The primary and scattered photon flux of a single microplanar beam is measured as a function of thickness inside the phantom and in the air gap. Results show that a bundle of closely spaced, microplanar beams increase the image contrast by 22% and a 2 cm air gap decreases the scattered photon flux by about half, improving the contrast by an additional 16%. Thus an overall improvement of 41% in contrast can be achieved with microplanar beam radiography.

  12. A system for fast neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Klann, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    A system has been designed and a neutron generator installed to perform fast neutron radiography. With this sytem, objects as small as a coin or as large as a waste drum can be radiographed. The neutron source is an MF Physics A-711 neutron generator which produces 3x10{sup 10} neutrons/second with an average energy of 14.5 MeV. The radiography system uses x-ray scintillation screens and film in commercially available cassettes. The cassettes have been modified to include a thin sheet of plastic to convert neutrons to protons through elastic scattering from hydrogen and other low Z materials in the plastic. For film densities from 1.8 to 3.0, exposures range from 1.9x10{sup 7} to 3.8x10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2} depending on the type of screen and film.

  13. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  15. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabler, S.; Rack, T.; Rack, A.; Nelson, K.

    2010-10-01

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ˜14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  16. Dual energy scanning beam X-radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Randolph Frank

    Dual energy X-radiography is a method first developed in the mid-1970's by which one uses the information contained in the energy spectrum of the transmitted X-ray flux through an object. With this information one can distinguish the types of materials present in a radiograph and thus allow a computer to subtract them from the image enhancing the contrast of the remaining materials. Using this method, one can see details, which would have been hidden by overlying structures of other materials such as seen in radiographs of parts, made up of mixtures of metals and composites. There is also great interest in this technique for medical imaging of the chest where images of the organs are significantly improved by subtracting the bones. However, even with the enhanced capabilities realized with this technique, the majority of X-radiography systems only measures the bulk transmitted X-ray intensity and ignores the information contained in the energy spectrum. This is due to the added expense, time requirements, and registration problems incurred using standard radiographic methods to obtain dual energy radiographs. This dissertation describes a novel method which overcomes these problems and allows one to perform inexpensive, near real time, single shot dual energy X-radiography. The work of this thesis resulted in US patent #5,742,660.

  17. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  18. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Amy; Imhoff, Seth; Gibbs, Paul; Cooley, Jason; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank; Hollander, Brian; Mariam, Fesseha; Ott, Thomas; Barker, Martha; Tucker, Tim; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian; Clarke, Kester; Montalvo, Joel; Field, Robert; Thoma, Dan; Smith, James; Teter, David

    2013-01-01

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. Here we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1 mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. Real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models. PMID:23779063

  19. Assessment of cold neutron radiography capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.E. Jr.; Roberts, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors goals were to demonstrate and assess cold neutron radiography techniques at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Manual Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center), and to investigate potential applications of the capability. The authors have obtained images using film and an amorphous silicon detector. In addition, a new technique they have developed allows neutron radiographs to be made using only a narrow range of neutron energies. Employing this approach and the Bragg cut-off phenomena in certain materials, they have demonstrated material discrimination in radiography. They also demonstrated the imaging of cracks in a sample of a fire-set case that was supplied by Sandia National Laboratory, and they investigated whether the capability could be used to determine the extent of coking in jet engine nozzles. The LANSCE neutron radiography capability appears to have applications in the DOE stockpile maintenance and science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) programs, and in industry.

  20. Newer imaging methods in chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Wandtke, J C

    1990-01-01

    In recent years the application of computers to chest radiography has resulted in a wide variety of innovative research. Major research efforts have resulted in the development of new types of x-ray detectors, such as storage phosphor technology, for use with computers. Storage phosphor imaging is one of the most promising new techniques, and almost 100 systems have been installed worldwide. Radiologists are quickly evaluating the image quality provided by this new detector system, which has the potential to improve image quality. It has wide latitude and is coupled with a computer to perform image processing. Another promising technology, originally studied in the form of scan equalization radiography, is now commercially available in the form of advanced multiple-beam equalization radiography. This film technique uses computers to modulate the x-ray exposure to take maximum advantage of the imaging capabilities of radiographic film. Digital solid-state detectors have been studied in conjunction with computerized image enhancement systems. These currently show improvement in nodule detection and quantification of the calcium content of a lesion. Application of large image intensifiers to a digital image system is being studied, but there are currently limitations on spatial resolution.