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Sample records for diamond based composites

  1. Thermodynamic and kinetic study on interfacial reaction and diamond graphitization of Cu—Fe-based diamond composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Sheng; Zhang, Jie; Dong, Hong-Feng; Chu, Ke; Wang, Shun-Cai; Liu, Yi; Li, Ya-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cu—Fe based diamond composites used for saw-blade segments are directly fabricated by vacuum and pressure-assisted sintering. The carbide forming elements Cr and Ti are added to improve interfacial bonding between diamond and the Cu—Fe matrix. The interfacial reactions between diamond/graphite and Cr or Ti, and diamond graphitization are investigated by thermodynamics/kinetics analyses and experimental methods. The results show that interfacial reactions and graphitization of diamond can automatically proceed thermodynamically. The Cr3C2, Cr7C3, Cr23C6, and TiC are formed at the interfaces of composites by reactions between diamond and Cr or Ti; diamond graphitization does not occur because of the kinetic difficulty at 1093 K under the pressure of 13 MPa.

  2. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Composites

    PubMed Central

    Kidalov, Sergey V.; Shakhov, Fedor M.

    2009-01-01

    A major problem challenging specialists in present-day materials sciences is the development of compact, cheap to fabricate heat sinks for electronic devices, primarily for computer processors, semiconductor lasers, high-power microchips, and electronics components. The materials currently used for heat sinks of such devices are aluminum and copper, with thermal conductivities of about 250 W/(m·K) and 400 W/(m·K), respectively. Significantly, the thermal expansion coefficient of metals differs markedly from those of the materials employed in semiconductor electronics (mostly silicon); one should add here the low electrical resistivity metals possess. By contrast, natural single-crystal diamond is known to feature the highest thermal conductivity of all the bulk materials studied thus far, as high as 2,200 W/(m·K). Needless to say, it cannot be applied in heat removal technology because of high cost. Recently, SiC- and AlN-based ceramics have started enjoying wide use as heat sink materials; the thermal conductivity of such composites, however, is inferior to that of metals by nearly a factor two. This prompts a challenging scientific problem to develop diamond-based composites with thermal characteristics superior to those of aluminum and copper, adjustable thermal expansion coefficient, low electrical conductivity and a moderate cost, below that of the natural single-crystal diamond. The present review addresses this problem and appraises the results reached by now in studying the possibility of developing composites in diamond-containing systems with a view of obtaining materials with a high thermal conductivity.

  3. Copper-micrometer-sized diamond nanostructured composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, D.; Livramento, V.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Reinforcement of a copper matrix with diamond enables tailoring the properties demanded for thermal management applications at high temperature, such as the ones required for heat sink materials in low activated nuclear fusion reactors. For an optimum compromise between thermal conductivity and mechanical properties, a novel approach based on multiscale diamond dispersions is proposed: a Cu-nanodiamond composite produced by milling is used as a nanostructured matrix for further dispersion of micrometer-sized diamondDiamond). A series of Cu-nanodiamond mixtures have been milled to establish a suitable nanodiamond fraction. A refined matrix with homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles was obtained with 4 at.% μDiamond for posterior mixture with microdiamond and subsequent consolidation. Preliminary consolidation by hot extrusion of a mixture of pure copper and μDiamond has been carried out to define optimal processing parameters. The materials produced were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements.

  4. Diamond-Fluoroplastic Composites for Abrasive Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrianova, O. A.; Kirillin, A. D.; Chersky, I. N.

    2001-07-01

    Composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and natural technical diamond powders from Yakutia diamond deposits are developed. It is shown that the compositions based on PTFE and a technical diamond powder at a content of up to 60 wt.%, due to their good physicomechanical characteristics, low friction coefficient, and good wetting of diamond particles by polymer, make is possible to create abrasive tools for polishing and grinding hard metals and semiprecious and precious stones with high serviceability and operational life combined with a considerable increase in the quality of treated surfaces and operational stability of the tools. It is found that PTFE, being a more elastic and softer matrix than the traditional ones, exhibits a self-sharpening effect of diamond grains upon grinding hard surfaces, when the grains go deep into the elastic matrix, the matrix wears out, and the working part of the tool becomes enriched with the diamond powder. These conclusions are confirmed by electron microscopic investigations. It is shown that the introduction of ultradisperse fillings (up to 2 wt.%) into such compositions allows us to improve the characteristics of abrasive tools considerably, especially for grinding hard semiprecious stones. The physicomechanical and frictional characteristics of the compositions and specific examples of their application in the jewelry industry and in stone working are discussed.

  5. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  6. The Effect of ZrO₂ Nanoparticles on the Microstructure and Properties of Sintered WC-Bronze-Based Diamond Composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; Wu, Haidong; Li, Meng; Meng, Qingnan; Gao, Ke; Lü, Xiaoshu; Liu, Baochang

    2016-05-06

    Metal matrix-impregnated diamond composites are widely used in diamond tool manufacturing. In order to satisfy the increasing engineering requirements, researchers have paid more and more attention to enhancing conventional metal matrices by applying novel methods. In this work, ZrO₂ nanoparticles were introduced into the WC-bronze matrix with and without diamond grits via hot pressing to improve the performance of conventional diamond composites. The effects of ZrO₂ nanoparticles on the microstructure, density, hardness, bending strength, and wear resistance of diamond composites were investigated. The results indicated that the hardness and relative density increased, while the bending strength decreased when the content of ZrO₂ nanoparticles increased. The grinding ratio of diamond composites increased significantly by 60% as a result of nano-ZrO₂ addition. The enhancement mechanism was discussed. Diamond composites showed the best overall properties with the addition of 1 wt % ZrO₂ nanoparticles, thus paving the way for further applications.

  7. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  8. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-08

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E{sub 0} = 4.06 V/μm and J{sub e} = 3.18 mA/cm{sup 2}) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm{sup 2}). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  9. Low temperature synthesis of diamond-based nano-carbon composite materials with high electron field emission properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, A.; Huang, B. R.; Yeh, C. J.; Leou, K. C.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-06-01

    A diamond-based nano-carbon composite (d/NCC) material, which contains needle-like diamond grains encased with the nano-graphite layers, was synthesized at low substrate temperature via a bias enhanced growth process using CH4/N2 plasma. Such a unique granular structure renders the d/NCC material very conductive (σ = 714.8 S/cm), along with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties (E0 = 4.06 V/μm and Je = 3.18 mA/cm2) and long lifetime (τ = 842 min at 2.41 mA/cm2). Moreover, the electrical conductivity and EFE behavior of d/NCC material can be tuned in a wide range that is especially useful for different kind of applications.

  10. Mo2C coating on diamond: Different effects on thermal conductivity of diamond/Al and diamond/Cu composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songdi; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Ma, Liying

    2017-04-01

    Mo2C submicron layer coated diamond particles prepared by a molten salts route with Mo powder as the starting material were used as the filler in Cu- and Al- matrix composites. The microstructure and thermal property of the composites prepared by a vacuum pressure infiltration method were investigated. When introducing a 500 nm thick Mo2C layer, the thermal conductivity of the composites with different matrix presented different performance. A high thermal conductivity (657 W m-1 K-1) was obtained in diamond/Cu composites owing to the improved interfacial bonding and lower interfacial thermal resistance, while the thermal conductivity of diamond/Al composites decreased from 553 W m-1 K-1 to 218 W m-1 K-1 when introducing the Mo2C layer, which can be attributed to the formation of harmful granule-phase (Al12Mo) at the interface of diamond and aluminum. This work provides a promising approach to improve performance of diamond reinforced metal matrix composites by selecting carbide as an interface modifier.

  11. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  12. Microstructure and thermal properties of copper–diamond composites with tungsten carbide coating on diamond particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Qiping; He, Xinbo Ren, Shubin; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Qian; Wu, Mao; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-07-15

    An effective method for preparing tungsten carbide coating on diamond surfaces was proposed to improve the interface bonding between diamond and copper. The WC coating was formed on the diamond surfaces with a reaction medium of WO{sub 3} in mixed molten NaCl–KCl salts and the copper–diamond composites were obtained by vacuum pressure infiltration of WC-coated diamond particles with pure copper. The microstructure of interface bonding between diamond and copper was discussed. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the obtained copper–diamond composites were investigated. Results indicated that the thermal conductivity of as-fabricated composite reached 658 W m{sup −} {sup 1} K{sup −} {sup 1}. Significant reduction in coefficient of thermal expansion of the composite compared with that of pure copper was obtained. - Highlights: • WC coating was successfully synthesized on diamond particles in molten salts. • WC coating obviously promoted the wettability of diamond and copper matrix. • WC coating greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of Cu–diamond composite. • The composites are suitable candidates for heat sink applications.

  13. Diamond-Reinforced Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-10

    stainless steel retorts and evacuated to a level 17 of -40 mTorr. Samples were HIPped to full density at 600"C at 18 30 Ksi for 30 minutes. These...composite bulk 12 materials and composite coatings) having high strength and 13 stiffness. These articles can be used, for example, in dental 14 materials...fabricated using standard powder metallurgy 8 techniques. The materials used to synthesize the DRCs were -230 9 mesh , 1100 aluminum powder and 30 jim

  14. Tiny radio is based on diamond effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-02-01

    You could soon be tuning into “Diamond FM”, thanks to a new radio receiver based on atomic-scale defects in diamond, unveiled by physicists at Harvard University in the US and Element Six in the UK.

  15. Structure and Properties of Teflon Composites with Natural Diamond Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhlopkova, A. A.; Shits, E. Yu.

    2004-03-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the structure and properties of composites based on polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) containing natural diamond powders (NDP) of different dispersity are presented. To obtain diamond-containing compositions for antifrictional applications, we used a preliminary mechanical treatment of NDP (40 μm) in a planetary mill. It was stated that the formation of the maximum ordered small-spherulite structure of PTFE after injection of NDP significantly increased the wear resistance and deformational and strength characteristics of the polymer composite materials. To produce abrasive materials, PTFE was filled with NDP having a larger graininess (from 40 to 125 μm). It was found that the injection of NDP did not cause evident morphological changes in the binder — the bonds between diamond grains and the polymer are created by physicomechanical forces. To strengthen the adhesion interaction at the interface between the binder and diamond grains and to raise the wear resistance of the material, a complex modification of the polymer with inorganic and organic fillers was carried out. It is shown that the injection of the complex filler significantly improves the tribotechnical and operational properties of the diamond-containing composite material. The general laws of the influence of NDP on the formation of the supermolecular structure of PTFE are revealed. It is shown that, by varying the degree of dispersity and the content of NDP in PTFE, and by applying different methods of their injection into the polymer matrix, it is possible to control the operational properties of the composites and to produce materials of different functional application, from antifrictional to abrasive ones.

  16. Bases of the Mantle-Carbonatite Conception of Diamond Genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Spivak, Anna; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    In the mantle-carbonatite conception of diamond genesis, the results of physic-chemical experiments are coordinated with the data of analytic mineralogy of primary inclusions in natural diamonds. Generalization of the solutions of principal genetic problems constitutes the bases of the conception. The solutions are following: (1) it is grounded that diamond-parental melts of the upper mantle have peridotite/eclogite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, of the transition zone - (wadsleite↔ringwoodite) - majorite - stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions, and of the lower mantle - periclase/wustite - bridgmanite - Ca-perovskite -stishovite - carbonatite - carbon compositions; (2) a construction of generalized diagrams for the diamond-parental media, which reveal changeable compositions of the growth melts of diamonds and associated phases, their genetic relations to the mantle substance, and classification connections of the primary inclusions in natural diamonds; (3) experimental equilibrium phase diagrams of syngenesis of diamonds and primary inclusions, which characterize the nucleation and growth conditions of diamonds and a capture of paragenetic and xenogenetic minerals by the growing diamonds; (4) a determination of the phase diagrams of diamonds and inclusions syngenesis under the regime of fractional crystallization, which discover the regularities of ultrabasic-basic evolution and paragenesis transitions in the diamond-forming systems of the upper and lower mantle. The evidence of the physic-chemically united mode of diamond genesis at the mantle depths with different mineralogy is obtained. References. Litvin Yu.A. (2007). High-pressure mineralogy of diamond genesis. In: Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy (edited by Eiji Ohtani), Geological Society of America Special paper 421, 83-103. Litvin Yu.A. (2012). Experimental study of physic-chemical conditions of natural diamond formation on an example of the eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-diamond

  17. Triple ion beam cutting of diamond/Al composites for interface characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Gang; Tan, Zhanqiu; Shabadi, Rajashekhara; Li, Zhiqiang; Grünewald, Wolfgang; Addad, Ahmed; Schryvers, Dominique; Zhang, Di

    2014-03-01

    A novel triple ion beam cutting technique was employed to prepare high-quality surfaces of diamond/Al composites for interfacial characterization, which has been unachievable so far. Near-perfect and artifact-free surfaces were obtained without mechanical pre-polishing. Hence, the as-prepared surfaces are readily available for further study and also, ready to be employed in a focus ion beam system for preferential selection of transmission electron microscopy samples. Dramatically different diamond/Al interface configurations — sub-micrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and clean interfaces were unambiguously revealed. - Highlights: • A new triple ion beam technique was employed to prepare diamond/Al composites. • Near-perfect and artifact-free surfaces were obtained for interface characterization. • Sub-micrometer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles and clean interfaces were unambiguously revealed.

  18. Fabrication of single crystalline diamond reinforced aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Silvain, Jean-François; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated highly densified aluminum (Al)-diamond composite materials by a simple hot press method. The thermal conductivity of the Al-diamond composite materials was measured. These materials had different types, sizes and fractions of diamond. These obtained values were discussed based on theoretically calculated values. The thermal conductivity of the composite materials, measured by Laser-Flash method, was found to have slightly increased compared to that of pure bulk Al. The obtained microstructures of the composite materials showed a lot of cleavage existing in the interface between the Al matrix and the diamond particles, which led to the low increment of the thermal conductivity. Moreover, Al-diamond bulk materials with different sintering temperatures in solid state, liquid phase, and transient region between solid and liquid of Al, have been synthesized.

  19. Investigation of the diamond based detectors characteristics with different thickness of the sensor element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladchenkov, E. V.; Ibragimov, R. F.; Kolyubin, V. A.; Nedosekin, P. G.; Tyurin, E. M.; Zaharchenko, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    This work is devoted to study of the diamond based radiation detectors. Experiments were carried out with two types of detectors: based on a thin diamond film and on a composite diamond plate. The following types of ionizing radiation has been used in experiments: beta radiation of 90Sr - 90Y, fission fragments and alpha particles of 252Cf, and Kr ions obtained at the particle accelerator. It is shown that the developed thin-film diamond based detector effectively registers heavy charged particles, whereas beta, neutron and gamma radiation does not give a significant contribution to the detector signals. Those type of detectors are proposed for measurement of heavy charged particles linear energy transfer in diamond. The multilayer diamond based detector (detector with a composite diamond plate) showed improved charge collection efficiency values in compare with the detection with a single diamond plate.

  20. Thermal characterization and properties of a copper-diamond composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pin; Chavez, Thomas P.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Coker, Eric Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The thermal properties of a commercial copper-diamond composite were measured from below -50°C to above 200°C. The results of thermal expansion, heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity were reported. These data were used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the composite as a function of temperature in the thickness direction. These results are compared with estimated values based on a simple mixing rule and the temperature dependence of these physical properties is represented by curve fitting equations. These fitting equations can be used for thermal modeling of practical devices/systems at their operation temperatures. The results of the mixing rule showed a consistent correlation between the amount of copper and diamond in the composite, based on density, thermal expansion, and heat capacity measurements. However, there was a disparity between measured and estimated thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. These discrepancies can be caused by many intrinsic material issues such as lattice defects and impurities, but the dominant factor is attributed to the large uncertainty of the interfacial thermal conductance between diamond and copper.

  1. The carbon isotopic composition of Novo Urei diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Semjenova, L. F.; Verchovsky, A. B.; Russell, S. S.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of diamond grains isolated from the Novo Urei meteorite are discussed. A diamond separate was obtained from 2g of whole rock using the chemical treatments described aimed at obtaining very pure diamond. X ray diffraction of the residue, which represented 5000 ppm of the parent mass, indicated only the presence of the desired mineral. The diamond crystals were 1-30 microns in diameter, and some grains had a yellow color. The chemical treatments were followed by a size separation to give a 1-10 microns and a 5-30 microns fraction, which were named DNU-1 and DNU-2, respectively.

  2. Raman spectroscopic investigation of graphitization of diamond during spark plasma sintering of UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhichao; Subhash, Ghatu; Tulenko, James S.

    2016-07-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy (MRS) was utilized to investigate the graphitization of diamond particles within a UO2-diamond composite processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). While pure diamond gives a sharp Raman peak at 1331.6 cm-1, the graphitized diamond shows broad peaks either at 1350 cm-1 (G-peak) or 1580 cm-1 (D-peak). The degree of graphitization was quantified by calculating the area beneath the diamond and graphite peaks. It was found that more than 20% of diamond was graphitized on the surface of the UO2-diamond pellet and only around 10% diamond was graphitized in the interior regions of the pellet. This current study highlights the necessity to review the implications of these results carefully while implementing UO2-diamond composite nuclear fuel.

  3. Understanding the source: The nitrogen isotope composition of Type II mantle diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Sami; Howell, Dan; Jones, Adrian; Milledge, Judith; Verchovsky, Sasha

    2010-05-01

    Diamonds can be broadly subdivided into 2 groups based on their nitrogen content; type I with > 10ppm nitrogen and type II with < 10ppm (1). Roughly 98 % of upper mantle diamonds are classified as type I, interestingly nearly all lower mantle diamonds are of type II (2). This study aims to identify the processes involved or source of type II diamonds from several localities by measuring their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope compositions simultaneously for the first time. Samples have been categorised as type II using Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis. The carbon and nitrogen isotopes as well as additional nitrogen content data have been acquired using a custom made a hi-sensitivity gas sourced mass spectrometer built and housed at the Open University, UK. There are two ways in which we can model the petrogenesis of type II diamonds. 1- During diamond growth nitrogen can be incorporated into diamond as a compatible element in a closed system and therefore the N/C ratio in the source can be depleted by Rayleigh fractionation as the first diamonds to crystallise will partition nitrogen atoms into their lattice as a 1:1 substitution for carbon atoms (type I diamonds). However nitrogen may behave as an incompatible element in diamond (and be a compatible element in the metasomatic fluid), this coupled with an open system would lead to the removal of nitrogen by the metasomatic fluids, thus causing the source to progressively become depleted in nitrogen. Continued diamond crystallization in either system will produce diamonds with ever decreasing nitrogen concentrations with time, possibly to the point of them being almost nitrogen free. 2- It is conceivable that type I & II diamonds found in the same deposit and sharing a common paragenesis (eclogitic or peridotitic) may have formed from different metasomatic fluids in separate diamond forming events. The latter has been proposed for samples from the Cullinan mine (South Africa) based on their carbon

  4. Single-step route to diamond-nanotube composite.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Deepak; Ahmadi, Majid; Guinel, Maxime J-F; Weiner, Brad R; Morell, Gerardo

    2012-09-27

    Candle wax was used as a precursor for the production of a diamond-nanotube composite in a single step. The composite films were fabricated by sulfur-assisted hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique. The morphology of the composite films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectra of the films show characteristic diamond band at 1,332 cm-1, D-band around 1,342 cm-1, and graphitic G-band around 1,582 cm-1. The electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region shows signature features of diamond and carbon nanotube in the fabricated material. The ability to synthesize diamond-nanotube composites at relatively low temperatures by a single-step process opens up new possibilities for the fabrication of nanoelectronic devices.

  5. Single-step route to diamond-nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Deepak; Ahmadi, Majid; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2012-09-01

    Candle wax was used as a precursor for the production of a diamond-nanotube composite in a single step. The composite films were fabricated by sulfur-assisted hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique. The morphology of the composite films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectra of the films show characteristic diamond band at 1,332 cm-1, D-band around 1,342 cm-1, and graphitic G-band around 1,582 cm-1. The electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region shows signature features of diamond and carbon nanotube in the fabricated material. The ability to synthesize diamond-nanotube composites at relatively low temperatures by a single-step process opens up new possibilities for the fabrication of nanoelectronic devices.

  6. Single-step route to diamond-nanotube composite

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Candle wax was used as a precursor for the production of a diamond-nanotube composite in a single step. The composite films were fabricated by sulfur-assisted hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique. The morphology of the composite films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectra of the films show characteristic diamond band at 1,332 cm−1, D-band around 1,342 cm−1, and graphitic G-band around 1,582 cm−1. The electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region shows signature features of diamond and carbon nanotube in the fabricated material. The ability to synthesize diamond-nanotube composites at relatively low temperatures by a single-step process opens up new possibilities for the fabrication of nanoelectronic devices. PMID:23013660

  7. Diamond growth on copper rods from polymer composite nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, M.; Potocky, S.; Tesarek, P.; Babchenko, O.; Davydova, M.; Kromka, A.

    2014-09-01

    The potential uses of diamond films can be found in a diverse range of industrial applications. However, deposition of diamond films onto some foreign materials is still not a simple task. Here we present the growth of adherent diamond films on copper rods with the focus on substrate pre-treatment by polyvinyl alcohol composite nanofibres. The primary role of the polymer fibres substantially act as a carbon source which enhances the diamond nucleation and accelerates a homogenous CVD growth. Diamond growth was carried out in pulsed linear antenna microwave chemical vapour deposition system, which is characterized by cold plasma due to larger distance of hot plasma region from the substrate, at various gas compositions. The large distance between plasma source and the substrate holder also allows the uniform deposition of diamond on a large number of substrates with complex geometry (3D objects) as well as for the vertically positioned substrates. Moreover, the inhomogeneity in diamond film thickness deposited on vertically positioned substrates was suppressed by using polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre textile. Combination of PVA polymer fibres use together with this unique deposition system leads to a successful overcoating of the copper rods by continuous diamond film without the film cracking or delamination. We propose that the sequence of plasma-chemical reactions enhances the transformation of certain number of carbon atoms into the sp3-bonded form which further are stabilized by atomic hydrogen coming from plasma.

  8. Microstructural Characterisation and Wear Behaviour of Diamond Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Boland, James N.; Li, Xing S.

    2010-01-01

    Since the initial research leading to the production of diamond composite materials, there have been several important developments leading to significant improvements in the properties of these superhard composite materials. Apart from the fact that diamonds, whether originating from natural resources or synthesised commercially, are the hardest and most wear-resistant materials commonly available, there are other mechanical properties that limit their industrial application. These include the low fracture toughness and low impact strength of diamond. By incorporating a range of binder phases into the sintering production process of these composites, these critically important properties have been radically improved. These new composites can withstand much higher operating temperatures without markedly reducing their strength and wear resistance. Further innovative steps are now being made to improve the properties of diamond composites by reducing grain and particle sizes into the nano range. This review will cover recent developments in diamond composite materials with special emphasis on microstructural characterisation. The results of such studies should assist in the design of new, innovative diamond tools as well as leading to radical improvements in the productivity of cutting, drilling and sawing operations in the exploration, mining, civil construction and manufacturing industries.

  9. Effect of added dispersants on diamond particles in Ni-diamond composites fabricated with electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongje; Kim, Donghyun; Son, Kyungsik; Lee, Sanghyuk; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-11-01

    The electrodeposition of Ni-diamond composites was investigated to improve the dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles, and thus, increase the performance of cutting tools. The additives, so called firstclass brighteners, benzoic sulfimide, benzene sulfonamide, and benzene sulfonic acid were used as dispersants to enhance the dispersivity of diamond particles. The dispersivity was analyzed with Image-Pro software, which was used to asses optical microscopy images, and the number of individual diamond particles and area fraction were calculated. In addition, electrochemical tests were performed, including zeta potential and galvanostatic measurements, and the adhesion strengths was tested by evaluating the wear resistance using ball-on-disk tester. The dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles were improved when benzoic sulfimide was added to the composite plating bath at a concentration of 0.06 g/L. The number of individual diamond particles was 56 EA/mm2, and the weight loss of alumina ball and specimen was 2.88 mg and 0.80 mg, respectively.

  10. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  11. Phonon conduction in GaN-diamond composite substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jungwan; Francis, Daniel; Altman, David H.; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2017-02-01

    The integration of strongly contrasting materials can enable performance benefits for semiconductor devices. One example is composite substrates of gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond, which promise dramatically improved conduction cooling of high-power GaN transistors. Here, we examine phonon conduction in GaN-diamond composite substrates fabricated using a GaN epilayer transfer process through transmission electron microscopy, measurements using time-domain thermoreflectance, and semiclassical transport theory for phonons interacting with interfaces and defects. Thermoreflectance amplitude and ratio signals are analyzed at multiple modulation frequencies to simultaneously extract the thermal conductivity of GaN layers and the thermal boundary resistance across GaN-diamond interfaces at room temperature. Uncertainties in the measurement of these two properties are estimated considering those of parameters, including the thickness of a topmost metal transducer layer, given as an input to a multilayer thermal model, as well as those associated with simultaneously fitting the two properties. The volume resistance of an intermediate, disordered SiN layer between the GaN and diamond, as well as a presence of near-interfacial defects in the GaN and diamond, dominates the measured GaN-diamond thermal boundary resistances as low as 17 m2 K GW-1. The GaN thermal conductivity data are consistent with the semiclassical phonon thermal conductivity integral model that accounts for the size effect as well as phonon scattering on point defects at concentrations near 3 × 1018 cm-3.

  12. Low Energy Sputter Yields for Diamond, Carbon-Carbon Composite, and Molybdenum Subject to Xenon Ion Nombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, J.; Goodwin, D.; Garner, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter yields have been measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to bombardment with xenon. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150 - 750 eV and profilometry based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material.

  13. Low Energy Sputter Yields for Diamond, Carbon-Carbon Composite, and Molybdenum Subject to Xenon Ion Nombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blandino, J.; Goodwin, D.; Garner, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sputter yields have been measured for polycrystalline diamond, single crystal diamond, a carbon-carbon composite, and molybdenum subject to bombardment with xenon. The tests were performed using a 3 cm Kaufman ion source to produce incident ions with energy in the range of 150 - 750 eV and profilometry based technique to measure the amount of sputtered material.

  14. The composition of Yakutian diamond-forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shatsky, V. S.; Araujo, D.; Griffin, W. L.; Ragozin, A. L.

    2009-04-01

    Microinclusions in natural diamonds represent a bulk sample of fluids/melts from which they crystallized [e.g. Navon et al., 1988], and provide a unique opportunity to characterize diamond-forming liquids and to understand their origin and evolution within the mantle. Here we report the composition of microinclusions in Yakutian diamonds (fibrous, cloudy, coated). Diamonds were recovered from several major industrial kimberlite pipes (Udachnaya, Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, Sytyksnskaya, Aikhal) and alluvial deposits (Ebelyakh area). The major-element compositions of the subsurface microinclusions have been determined using EDS. All analyses are normalized to 100% on a carbon free basis (with excess oxygen for chlorine). Major- and trace-element compositions of the bulk microinclusion populations have been quantitatively analyzed by LA-ICP-MS. The abundances of carbonates, water and silicates in the diamonds were determined by FTIR. The major-element composition of microinclusions in Yakutian diamonds shows wide variations. Some important inter-element correlations between silica and chlorine content and the water/carbonate ratio of microinclusions are observed. In comparison with the worldwide database, the fluids in most of the studied diamonds define a continuous range of carbonatitic to silicic compositions and only a few fall into the starting interval of the carbonatitic to saline range. The silicic microinclusions are rich in water, SiO2, Al2O3, K2O and P2O5. The silicic end-member, constrained from combined EDS and FTIR data, carries ~80 wt % silicates, 11 wt % water, 6 wt % carbonates and 3 wt % apatite. Carbonatitic microinclusions are rich in carbonate, CaO, MgO and FeO. The carbonatitic end-member comprises 82 wt% carbonates, 12 wt% silicates, 2 wt% water, 2 wt% apatite and 1 wt% halides. Samples with saline components are slightly enriched in water, K2O, Na2O and Cl. The most saline inclusions in Yakutian diamonds consist of 49 wt% carbonates, 25

  15. Diamond and Carbon Nanotube Composites for Supercapacitor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; May, Paul William; Corat, Evaldo José; Peterlevitz, Alfredo Carlos; Pinheiro, Romário Araújo; Zanin, Hudson

    2017-02-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of diamond grown onto vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with high surface areas as a template, resulting in a composite material exhibiting high double-layer capacitance as well as low electrochemical impedance electrodes suitable for applications as supercapacitor devices. We contrast results from devices fabricated with samples which differ in both their initial substrates (Si and Ti) and their final diamond coatings, such as boron-doped diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC). We present for first time a conducting model for non-doped DLC thin-films. All samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show specific capacitance as high as 8.25 F g-1 (˜1 F cm-2) and gravimetric specific energy and power as high as 0.7 W h kg-1 and 176.4 W kg-1, respectively, which suggest that these diamond/carbon nanotube composite electrodes are excellent candidates for supercapacitor fabrication.

  16. Properties of Diamond Composite Films Grown on Iron Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-22

    surface area is designed to be approximately 50 -75 % of the total substrate surface . Figure 2 depicts a cross sectional view of the diamond and 3...in OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Grant # N0001489Jl848 R&T Code 413n003 Technical Report No. 2 Properties of Diamond Composite Films grown on Iron... Surfaces bv T.P. Ona ano k.P.H. Chanq Preoared tor DIuoiicatlon in the Applied Physics Letters D TIC 0% ELECTE Northwestern University FEBO41991 Department

  17. Nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haikuo; He, Duanwei; Xu, Chao; Tang, Mingjun; Li, Yu; Dong, Haini; Meng, Chuanmin; Wang, Zhigang; Zhu, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    We report the preparation of nanostructured diamond-TiC composites with high fracture toughness and high hardness starting from a ball-milled mixture of nano-sized Ti3SiC2 and submicron-sized diamond by simultaneously tuning the pressure-temperature conditions. The phase segregation of Ti3SiC2 at pressure of 5.5 GPa were investigated by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that the Ti3SiC2 could decompose into nanosized TiC and amorphous Ti-Si at 600-700 °C. The subsequent reaction between diamond and Ti-Si led to an amorphous Ti-Si-C matrix in which diamond and TiC crystals are embedded. With a loading force of 98 N, the measured fracture toughness KIC and Vicker's hardness HV of the synthesized composites reach up to 14 MPa m1/2 and 45.5 GPa, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the nanocrystalline/amorphous bonding matrix could largely enhance the toughness of the brittle composites.

  18. Relationship between carbon isotope composition and crystal morphology of coated and polycrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janson, G. F.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Stachel, T.

    2009-12-01

    The carbon isotope composition of diamond coats from Diavik Mine, Canada was measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In most cases, carbon isotope ratio increases outwards from approximately -8.5 to approximately -6.5‰. Although it has not been widely noted in the literature due to sparse data coverage, this trend is consistent with measurements by other researchers at other sampling localities and therefore represents a unique insight into fluid evolution during the formation of diamond coat. We model the outwards increase in carbon isotope ratio by Rayleigh fractionation during growth of diamond coat in a closed system from an oxidized, carbon supersaturated fluid with a mantle-like carbon isotope signature. The carbon may have been exsolved as a volatile-rich fluid from upwelling kimberlite magma at depths greater than 120 km. The fluid either encountered preexisting diamond ‘seed’ crystals which served as nuclei for the coats or, in the absence of such seeds, precipitated opaque cuboid crystals. Reduction of oxidized carbon to diamond would be driven by the reduced character of the depleted lithosphere (Haggerty and Tompkins, 1983). Several polycrystalline diamonds were also studied by SIMS. These are homogeneous with respect to δ13C and therefore show no isotopic evidence of fluid evolution during their growth. The degree of supersaturation of a fluid commonly determines the crystal habit of minerals precipitated from the fluid. In the case of diamonds, dendritic coat is interpreted as a product of conditions intermediate between the low degree carbon supersaturation that produces polyhedral and hopper morphologies, and the very high supersaturation responsible for the growth of polycrystalline diamond. During closed system growth, precipitation of diamond depletes the fluid reservoir of carbon, resulting in isotopic profiles consistent with Rayleigh fractionation. This depletion necessarily reduces the chemical potential between fluid and

  19. Effect of Diamond Bur Grit Size on Composite Repair.

    PubMed

    Valente, Lisia L; Silva, Manuela F; Fonseca, Andrea S; Münchow, Eliseu A; Isolan, Cristina P; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of diamond bur grit size on the repair bond strength of fresh and aged resin composites. Blocks of microhybrid composite (Opallis, FGM) were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h (fresh composite) or subjected to 5000 thermal cycles (aged composite). The surfaces were roughened using diamond-coated, flame-shaped carbide burs with medium grit (#3168), fine grit (#3168F), or extra-fine grit (#3168FF). The control group underwent no surface treatment. Surface roughness, water contact angle, and surface topography by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were evaluated (n = 3). Samples were restored with resin composite and sectioned into beam-shaped specimens, which were subjected to microtensile bond testing. Failure modes were classified using a stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed using the Student- Newman-Keuls test and two-way ANOVA, with significance set at p < 0.05. Higher surface roughness was observed for groups treated with the medium- and fine-grit burs; aged composites were rougher than fresh composites. The water contact angle formed on the aged composite was lower than that on the fresh composite. The highest repair bond strength was observed for the fine-grit bur group, and the lowest was recorded for control. Interfacial failures were more predominant. SEM images showed that the surfaces treated with fine- and extra-fine-grit burs had a more irregular topography. Surface roughening of fresh or aged resin composites with diamond burs improved retention of the repair material. Fine-grit burs generally performed better than medium- and extra-fine-grit burs.

  20. [Relation of surface texture of fine finishing diamond point for composite resin and polished surface of composite resin].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, A; Yamauchi, M; Yamamoto, K; Sakai, M; Noda, S; Yamaguchi, S; Kawano, J; Kimura, K

    1989-05-01

    Distribution of diamond grain size of seven fine finishing diamond points was measured by a digital image analyzer. Also influence of diamond grain size of fine finishing diamond points on finished surface of two types of visible light cured composite resins (semihybrid type and submicron filler type) were investigated. Diamond grain size was almost from 10 to 100 microns 2 in area. Diamond grain size was closely related to the surface roughness of semihybrid type composite resin, although it was not related to that of submicron filler type composite resin. Surface roughness of a submicron filler type composite resin finished at a low speed was less than that at a high speed. Grain size of diamond point and revolution speed may play an important role in surface texture of composite resin.

  1. An assessment of radiotherapy dosimeters based on CVD grown diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramkumar, S.; Buttar, C. M.; Conway, J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Sussman, R. S.; Hill, G.; Walker, S.

    2001-03-01

    Diamond is potentially a very suitable material for use as a dosimeter for radiotherapy. Its radiation hardness, the near tissue equivalence and chemical inertness are some of the characteristics of diamond, which make it well suited for its application as a dosimeter. Recent advances in the synthesis of diamond by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology have resulted in the improvement in the quality of material and increased its suitability for radiotherapy applications. We report in this paper, the response of prototype dosimeters based on two different types (CVD1 and CVD2) of CVD diamond to X-rays. The diamond devices were assessed for sensitivity, dependence of response on dose and dose rate, and compared with a Scanditronix silicon photon diode and a PTW natural diamond dosimeter. The diamond devices of CVD1 type showed an initial increase in response with dose, which saturates after ≈6 Gy. The diamond devices of CVD2 type had a response at low fields (<1162.8 V/cm) that was linear with dose and dose rate. At high fields (>1162.8 V/cm), the CVD2-type devices showed polarisation and dose-rate dependence. The sensitivity of the CVD diamond devices varied between 82 and 1300 nC/Gy depending upon the sample type and the applied voltage. The sensitivity of CVD diamond devices was significantly higher than that of natural diamond and silicon dosimeters. The results suggest that CVD diamond devices can be fabricated for successful use in radiotherapy applications.

  2. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  3. Machining graphite composites with polycrystalline diamond end mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohkonen, Kent E.; Anderson, Scott; Strong, A. B.

    One area of focus in developing light-strong materials has been the development of graphite/epoxy composites. The graphite/epoxy materials have created challenges in the area of fabrication and machining. The research objective was to determine if cutting tool material and style of cutting edge showed any significant differences in tool life. The cutting tool materials and cutter styles included helical carbide-end mills and straight and helical polycrystalline diamond-end mill cutters. The experimental design was developed using a fractional factorial design running twelve tests. Results were taken from cutting tool flank edge wear, composite part surface finish, and visual delamination of the part.

  4. Potential for diamond in kimberlites from Michigan and Montana as indicated by garnet xenocryst compositions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Williams kimberlite in north-central Montana and the Lake Ellen kimberlite in northern Michigan contain diagnostic xenoliths and xenocrysts which indicate that diamonds may be present. To date, however, no diamonds have been reported from either locality. In this study, particular compositions of garnet xenocrysts which are associated with diamond elsewhere were sought as an indication of the potential for diamond in the Williams and Lake Ellen kimberlites. For this study, garnets were carefully selected for purple color in order to increase the chance of finding the subcalcic chrome-rich compositions that are associated with the presence of diamond. -Author

  5. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping E-mail: wxpchina@sohu.com; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-09

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8–17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9–5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm{sup 2} at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  6. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8-17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9-5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

    2003-01-01

    The microwave processing of materials is a new emerging technology with many attractive advantages over the conventional methods. The advantages of microwave technology for various ceramic systems has already been demonstrated and proven. The recent developments at Penn State have succeeded in applying the microwave technology for the commercialization of WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools, effectively sintering of metallic materials, and fabrication of transparent ceramics for advanced applications. In recent years, the Microwave Processing and Engineering Center at Penn State University in collaboration with our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. has succeeded in commercializing the developed microwave technology partially funded by DOE for WC/Co and diamond based cutting and drilling tools for gas and oil exploration operations. In this program we have further developed this technology to make diamond-carbide composites and metal-carbide-diamond functionally graded materials. Several actual product of diamond-carbide composites have been processed in microwave with better performance than the conventional product. The functionally graded composites with diamond as one of the components has been for the first time successfully developed. These are the highlights of the project.

  8. Enhanced tensile strength and thermal conductivity in copper diamond composites with B4C coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, Youhong; He, Linkai; Zhang, Chi; Meng, Qingnan; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2017-09-06

    Boron carbide (B4C) coating on diamond particle is synthesized by heating diamond particles in a powder mix of H3BO3 and B in Ar atmosphere. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of boron carbide coating on diamond particles are investigated. The boron carbide coating favors to grow on diamond (100) surface rather than on diamond (111) surface. Cu matrix composites reinforced with B4C-coated diamond particles were made by powder metallurgy. The addition of B4C coating gave rise to a dense composite. The influence of B4C coating on both tensile strength and thermal conductivity of the composite were investigated. When the B4C fully covered on diamond particles, the composite exhibited a greatly increase in tensile strength (115 MPa) which was much higher than that for uncoated-diamond/Cu (60 MPa) composites. Meanwhile, a high thermal conductivity of 687 W/mK was achieved in the B4C-coated-diamond/Cu composites.

  9. Diamond-based heat spreaders for power electronic packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemet, Thomas

    As any semiconductor-based devices, power electronic packages are driven by the constant increase of operating speed (higher frequency), integration level (higher power), and decrease in feature size (higher packing density). Although research and innovation efforts have kept these trends continuous for now more than fifty years, the electronic packaging technology is currently facing a challenge that must be addressed in order to move toward any further improvements in terms of performances or miniaturization: thermal management. Thermal issues in high-power packages strongly affect their reliability and lifetime and have now become one of the major limiting factors of power modules development. Thus, there is a strong need for materials that can sustain higher heat flux levels while safely integrating into the electronic package architecture. In such context, diamond is an attractive candidate because of its outstanding thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and high electrical resistivity. Its low heat capacity relative to metals such as aluminum or copper makes it however preferable for heat spreading applications (as a heat-spreader) rather than for dissipating the heat flux itself (as a heat sink). In this study, a dual diamond-based heat-spreading solution is proposed. Polycrystalline diamond films were grown through laser-assisted combustion synthesis on electronic substrates (in the U.S) while, in parallel, diamond-reinforced copper-matrix composite films were fabricated through tape casting and hot pressing (in France). These two types of diamond-based heat-spreading films were characterized and their microstructure and chemical composition were related to their thermal performances. Particular emphasize was put on the influence of interfaces on the thermal properties of the materials, either inside a single material (grain boundaries) or between dissimilar materials (film/substrate interface, matrix/reinforcement interface). Finally, the packaging

  10. The investigation of the C-Si interface structure in diamond/Si nano-composite films with first principle method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuejie; Yin, Yongjie; Ren, Yuan; Wei, Huai

    2014-12-01

    In order to improve the quality of nano-diamond films, a new type of diamond/Si nano-composite films was proposed. The monolayer Si interface and monolayer SiC interface were studied in this paper. The system total energies and adsorption energies of monolayer Si and monolayer SiC on diamond (001) surface were calculated with first principle method based on the density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the stability of the two kinds of interface structures in the Diamond/Si nano-composite films. Moreover, the variation of the configuration energy and structures when the hydrogen atom and CH2 radical adsorbed on the two kinds of interfaces were researched to verify whether the diamond phase was able to nucleate and grow or not in the process of diamond/Si nano-composite films deposition. It turned out that (1) the diamond surface structure which is terminated by monolayer silicon atoms is not very stable. It is difficult to form the stable monolayer Si interface in diamond/Si nano-composite films; (2) the monolayer SiC interface with the carbon and silicon atomic ratio of 1:1in which the carbon and silicon atoms are located in the same row respectively is a more stable structure. The interface is conductive to the second nucleation in the process of diamond growth.

  11. Diamond growth history from in situ measurement of Pb and S isotopic compositions of sulfide inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnick, Roberta L.; Eldridge, C. Stewart; Bulanova, Galina P.

    1993-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand crust-mantle dynamics, we have determined the S and Pb isotopic compositions of mantle sulfides encapsulated within diamonds from under the Siberian craton and compared these results to those of previously investigated African counterparts. Because diamond inclusions are isolated from exchange with surrounding mantle, they may preserve the history of diamond growth and act as direct tracers of the origins of mantle materials. Study of these inclusions may thus offer the best chance of recognizing global-scale interaction between Earth's crust and mantle. Although δ34S values of the Siberian sulfides do not deviate significantly from the mantle value of 0‰ ± 3‰, Pb isotopic compositions are highly variable. Pb isotopic compositions of sulfides from peridotitic suite diamonds generally plot near the terrestrial Pb growth curve, with model ages ranging between 0 and 2 Ga, whereas sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds have radiogenic compositions, plotting beyond the growth curve. These results, which are similar to those for sulfides in African diamonds, suggest that the sulfides from eclogitic suite diamonds were derived from a source with an unusually high U/Pb ratio and may indicate a common process (such as subduction of crystal materials into the mantle) operating beneath Africa and Siberia. The absence of extremely radiogenic Pb in sulfides from eclogite xenoliths suggests that the radiogenic material from which eclogitic suite diamonds grew was a transient feature of the mantle, associated with diamond growth. The ultimate origin of this high U/Pb signature, however, remains enigmatic. Large variations in Pb isotopic composition of sulfides from different zones in a single peridotitic suite diamond document (1) crystallization of the diamond's core near 2.0 Ga, (2) growth of its outer zone in an environment with a high U/Pb ratio similar to the growth environment of eclogitic suite diamonds, and (3) growth of the

  12. Diamond based adsorbents and their application in chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peristyy, Anton A; Fedyanina, Olga N; Paull, Brett; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2014-08-29

    The idea of using diamond and diamond containing materials in separation sciences has attracted a strong interest in the past decade. The combination of a unique range of properties, such as chemical inertness, mechanical, thermal and hydrolytic stability, excellent thermal conductivity with minimal thermal expansion and intriguing adsorption properties makes diamond a promising material for use in various modes of chromatography. This review summarises the recent research on the preparation of diamond and diamond based stationary phases, their properties and chromatographic performance. Special attention is devoted to the dominant retention mechanisms evident for particular diamond containing phases, and their subsequent applicability to various modes of chromatography, including chromatography carried out under conditions of high temperature and pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Origin of sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite (Brazil): constraints from carbon isotopes and inclusion compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Forty-one diamonds sourced from the Juina-5 kimberlite pipe in Southern Brazil, which contain optically identifiable inclusions, have been studied using an integrated approach. The diamonds contain <20 ppm nitrogen (N) that is fully aggregated as B centres. Internal structures in several diamonds revealed using cathodoluminescence (CL) are unlike those normally observed in lithospheric samples. The majority of the diamonds are composed of isotopically light carbon, and the collection has a unimodal distribution heavily skewed towards δ13C ~ -25 ‰. Individual diamonds can display large carbon isotope heterogeneity of up to ~15 ‰ and predominantly have isotopically lighter cores displaying blue CL, and heavier rims with green CL. The light carbon isotopic compositions are interpreted as evidence of diamond growth from abiotic organic carbon added to the oceanic crust during hydrothermal alteration. The bulk isotopic composition of the oceanic crust, carbonates plus organics, is equal to the composition of mantle carbon (-5 ‰), and we suggest that recycling/mixing of subducted material will replenish this reservoir over geological time. Several exposed, syngenetic inclusions have bulk compositions consistent with former eclogitic magnesium silicate perovskite, calcium silicate perovskite and NAL or CF phases that have re-equilibrated during their exhumation to the surface. There are multiple occurrences of majoritic garnet with pyroxene exsolution, coesite with and without kyanite exsolution, clinopyroxene, Fe or Fe-carbide and sulphide minerals alongside single occurrences of olivine and ferropericlase. As a group, the inclusions have eclogitic affinity and provide evidence for diamond formation at pressures extending to Earth's deep transition zone and possibly the lower mantle. It is observed that the major element composition of inclusions and isotopic compositions of host Juina-5 diamonds are not correlated. The diamond and inclusion compositions are

  14. Influence of Interfacial Carbide Layer Characteristics on Thermal Properties of Copper-Diamond Composites (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Cr3C2 diamond composites, a mixture of pre-alloyed Cu Cr powder and diamond particles was hot pressed for sufficient time at a high enough temperature ...done by AM2T, LLC (formerly Ceracon, Inc., Sacramento, CA) at a pressure of 345 MPa and a temperature of 850 C (the forging time was *10 s). The...suggests that deformation during temperature excursions involves shear. 15. SUBJECT TERMS thermal management, copper-diamond substrates, low

  15. Fabrication of diamond based sensors for use in extreme environments

    SciTech Connect

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-04-23

    Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This method can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. Here, we demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.

  16. Fabrication of diamond based sensors for use in extreme environments

    DOE PAGES

    Samudrala, Gopi K.; Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-04-23

    Electrical and magnetic sensors can be lithographically fabricated on top of diamond substrates and encapsulated in a protective layer of chemical vapor deposited single crystalline diamond. This process when carried out on single crystal diamond anvils employed in high pressure research is termed as designer diamond anvil fabrication. These designer diamond anvils allow researchers to study electrical and magnetic properties of materials under extreme conditions without any possibility of damaging the sensing elements. We describe a novel method for the fabrication of designer diamond anvils with the use of maskless lithography and chemical vapor deposition in this paper. This methodmore » can be utilized to produce diamond based sensors which can function in extreme environments of high pressures, high and low temperatures, corrosive and high radiation conditions. Here, we demonstrate applicability of these diamonds under extreme environments by performing electrical resistance measurements during superconducting transition in rare earth doped iron-based compounds under high pressures to 12 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K.« less

  17. Stress and Dislocations in Diamond-SiC Composites Sintered at High Pressure, High Temperature Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nauyoks, S.; Wieligor, M; Zerda, T; Balogh, L; Ungar, T; Stephens, P

    2009-01-01

    Diamond-silicon carbide composites were sintered at 10 GPa and three different temperatures: 1600, 1800, and 2000 C. Distributions of residual surface stresses in diamond crystals were obtained by the analysis of Raman band shifts and splitting. It was noted that stresses concentrate around points of contacts between diamond crystals. Average stress increase with increasing sintering temperature. Complementary information on average sizes of crystallites, concentration of stacking faults, and population of dislocations in both diamond and SiC were obtained from X-ray diffraction profile analysis. It was observed that for both diamond and silicon carbide phases the average crystallite sizes decrease. The population of dislocations in the diamond phase increases with increasing sintering temperature and the population fluctuates in the SiC phase. Concentration of stacking faults was significant only in SiC.

  18. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  19. Nanoscale Probe of Magnetism Based on Artificial Atoms in Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0165 (YIP 11) Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond Ania Bleszynski Jayich UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...06-30-2014 Final Report 04-01-2011 To 03-31-2014 Nanoscale probe of magnetism based on artificial atoms in diamond FA9550-11-1-0013 AFOSR-BAA-2010-3...sensing using a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond . Significant accomplishments funded by this award include 1) characterization of the surface

  20. Crystallization of diamond from a silicate melt of kimberlite composition in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Arima, Makoto; Nakayama, Kazuhiro ); Akaishi, Minoru; Yamaoka, Shinobu; Kanda, Hisao )

    1993-11-01

    In high-pressure and high-temperature experiments (1800-2200[degrees]C and 7.0-7.7 GPa), diamond crystallized and grew in a volatile-rich silicate melt of kimberlite composition. This diamond has well-developed [111] faces, and its morphologic characteristics resemble those of natural diamond but differ from those of synthetic diamond grown from metallic solvent-catalysts. The kimberlite melt has a strong solvent-catalytic effect on diamond formation, supporting the view that some natural diamonds crystallized from volatile-rich melts in the upper mantle. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Thermal Stability and Coefficient of Friction of the Diamond Composites with the Titanium Compound Bonding Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, S.; Jaworska, L.; Putyra, P.; Ratuszek, W.; Cyboron, J.; Klimczyk, P.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, processes occurring during heat treatment of the diamond-Ti compound composites without Co addition were investigated and compared with commercial PCD. Three types of materials were prepared. The first material was sintered using the mixture containing diamond and 10 mass% of TiC, the second material was prepared using diamond powder and 10 mass% of Ti-Si-C, and the third composite was sintered using the addition of 10 mass% of TiB2. During the research, it was proved that TiO2 formation contributes to material swelling and WO3 (W is present from the milling process) causes a significant increase in coefficient of friction. TiC and Ti-Si-C bonded materials are very susceptible to this process of oxidation; their hardness drops absolutely after wear test at 600 °C. The diamond composite with TiB2 is the most resistant to oxidation from investigated materials.

  2. Fabrication of Hierarchical Layer-by-Layer Assembled Diamond-based Core-Shell Nanocomposites as Highly Efficient Dye Absorbents for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinna; Ma, Kai; Jiao, Tifeng; Xing, Ruirui; Ma, Xilong; Hu, Jie; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lexin; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-03-01

    The effective chemical modification and self-assembly of diamond-based hierarchical composite materials are of key importance for a broad range of diamond applications. Herein, we report the preparation of novel core-shell diamond-based nanocomposites for dye adsorption toward wastewater treatment through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled strategy. The synthesis of the reported composites began with the carboxyl functionalization of microdiamond by the chemical modification of diamond@graphene oxide composite through the oxidation of diamond@graphite. The carboxyl-terminated microdiamond was then alternatively immersed in the aqueous solution of amine-containing polyethylenimine and carboxyl-containing poly acrylic acid, which led to the formation of adsorption layer on diamond surface. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing and carboxyl-containing polymers were continued until the desired number of shell layers were formed around the microdiamond. The obtained core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized and characterized by morphological and spectral techniques, demonstrating higher surface areas and mesoporous structures for good dye adsorption capacities than nonporous solid diamond particles. The LbL-assembled core-shell nanocomposites thus obtained demonstrated great adsorption capacity by using two model dyes as pollutants for wastewater treatment. Therefore, the present work on LbL-assembled diamond-based composites provides new alternatives for developing diamond hybrids as well as nanomaterials towards wastewater treatment applications.

  3. Fabrication of Hierarchical Layer-by-Layer Assembled Diamond-based Core-Shell Nanocomposites as Highly Efficient Dye Absorbents for Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinna; Ma, Kai; Jiao, Tifeng; Xing, Ruirui; Ma, Xilong; Hu, Jie; Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lexin; Yan, Xuehai

    2017-01-01

    The effective chemical modification and self-assembly of diamond-based hierarchical composite materials are of key importance for a broad range of diamond applications. Herein, we report the preparation of novel core-shell diamond-based nanocomposites for dye adsorption toward wastewater treatment through a layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled strategy. The synthesis of the reported composites began with the carboxyl functionalization of microdiamond by the chemical modification of diamond@graphene oxide composite through the oxidation of diamond@graphite. The carboxyl-terminated microdiamond was then alternatively immersed in the aqueous solution of amine-containing polyethylenimine and carboxyl-containing poly acrylic acid, which led to the formation of adsorption layer on diamond surface. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing and carboxyl-containing polymers were continued until the desired number of shell layers were formed around the microdiamond. The obtained core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized and characterized by morphological and spectral techniques, demonstrating higher surface areas and mesoporous structures for good dye adsorption capacities than nonporous solid diamond particles. The LbL-assembled core-shell nanocomposites thus obtained demonstrated great adsorption capacity by using two model dyes as pollutants for wastewater treatment. Therefore, the present work on LbL-assembled diamond-based composites provides new alternatives for developing diamond hybrids as well as nanomaterials towards wastewater treatment applications. PMID:28272452

  4. Charge transport across high surface area metal/diamond nanostructured composites.

    PubMed

    Plana, D; Humphrey, J J L; Bradley, K A; Celorrio, V; Fermín, D J

    2013-04-24

    High surface area composites featuring metal nanostructures and diamond particles have generated a lot of interest in the fields of heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and sensors. Diamond surfaces provide a chemically robust framework for active nanostructures in comparison with sp(2) carbon supports. The present paper investigates the charge transport properties of high surface area films of high-pressure, high-temperature diamond particles in the presence and absence of metal nanostructures, employing electrochemical field-effect transistors. Oxygen- and hydrogen-terminated surfaces were generated on 500 nm diamond powders. Homogeneously distributed metal nanostructures, with metal volume fractions between ca. 5 and 20%, were either nucleated at the diamond particles by impregnation or incorporated from colloidal solution. Electrochemical field-effect transistor measurements, employing interdigitated electrodes, allowed the determination of composite conductivity as a function of electrode potential, as well as in air. In the absence of metal nanostructures, the lateral conductivity of the diamond assemblies in air is increased by over one order of magnitude upon hydrogenation of the particle surface. This observation is consistent with studies at diamond single crystals, although the somewhat modest change in conductivity suggests that charge transport is not only determined by the intrinsic surface conductivity of individual diamond particles but also by particle-to-particle charge transfer. Interestingly, the latter contribution effectively controls the assembly conductivity in the presence of an electrolyte solution as the difference between hydrogenated and oxygenated particles vanishes. The conductivity in the presence of metal nanoparticles is mainly determined by the metal volume fraction, while diamond surface termination and the presence of electrolyte solutions exert only minor effects. The experimental trends are discussed in terms of the

  5. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-27

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  6. Progress on Diamond-Based Cylindrical Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanareykin, A.; Schoessow, P.; Conde, M.; Gai, W.

    2006-11-01

    The development of a high gradient diamond-based cylindrical dielectric loaded accelerator (DLA) is presented. A diamond-loaded DLA can potentially sustain accelerating gradients far in excess of the limits experimentally observed for conventional metallic accelerating structures. The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerators: high rf breakdown level, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. We used the hot-filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process to produce high quality 5-10 cm long cylindrical diamond layers. Our collaboration has also been developing a new method of CVD diamond surface preparation that reduces the secondary electron emission coefficient below unity. Special attention was paid to the numerical optimization of the waveguide to structure rf coupling section, where the surface magnetic and electric fields were minimized relative to the accelerating gradient and within known metal surface breakdown limits. We conclude with a brief overview of the use of diamond microstructures for use in compact rf sources.

  7. X-ray diffraction characterization of epitaxial CVD diamond films with natural and isotopically modified compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Voloshin, A. E.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Romanov, D. A.; Khomich, A. A.; Sozontov, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Comparative investigations of homoepitaxial diamond films with natural and modified isotopic compositions, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on type-Ib diamond substrates, are carried out using double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and topography. The lattice mismatch between the substrate and film is precisely measured. A decrease in the lattice constant on the order of (Δ a/ a)relax ˜ (1.1-1.2) × 10-4 is recorded in isotopically modified 13C (99.96%) films. The critical thicknesses of pseudomorphic diamond films is calculated. A significant increase in the dislocation density due to the elastic stress relaxation is revealed by X-ray topography.

  8. Diamond Composite Films for Protective Coatings on Metals and Method of Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P. (Inventor); Shing, Yuh-Han (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Composite films consisting of diamond crystallites and hard amorphous films such as diamond-like carbon, titanium nitride, and titanium oxide are provided as protective coatings for metal substrates against extremely harsh environments. A composite layer having diamond crystallites and a hard amorphous film is affixed to a metal substrate via an interlayer including a bottom metal silicide film and a top silicon carbide film. The interlayer is formed either by depositing metal silicide and silicon carbide directly onto the metal substrate, or by first depositing an amorphous silicon film, then allowing top and bottom portions of the amorphous silicon to react during deposition of the diamond crystallites, to yield the desired interlayer structure.

  9. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Interfacial Debonding in Copper/Diamond Composites for Thermal Management Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zain-ul-abdein, Muhammad; Raza, Kabeer; Salmeen Bin Mahfouz, Abdullah; Mabrouki, Tarek

    2017-01-01

    Copper/diamond (Cu/D) composites are famous in thermal management applications for their high thermal conductivity values. They, however, offer some interface related problems like high thermal boundary resistance and excessive debonding. This paper investigates interfacial debonding in Cu/D composites subjected to steady-state and transient thermal cyclic loading. A micro-scale finite element (FE) model was developed from a SEM image of the Cu/20 vol % D composite sample. Several test cases were assumed with respect to the direction of heat flow and the boundary interactions between Cu/uncoated diamonds and Cu/Cr-coated diamonds. It was observed that the debonding behavior varied as a result of the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansions (CTEs) among Cu, diamond, and Cr. Moreover, the separation of interfaces had a direct influence upon the equivalent stress state of the Cu-matrix, since diamond particles only deformed elastically. It was revealed through a fully coupled thermo-mechanical FE analysis that repeated heating and cooling cycles resulted in an extremely high stress state within the Cu-matrix along the diamond interface. Since these stresses lead to interfacial debonding, their computation through numerical means may help in determining the service life of heat sinks for a given application beforehand. PMID:28773098

  11. Finite Element Analysis of Interfacial Debonding in Copper/Diamond Composites for Thermal Management Applications.

    PubMed

    Zain-Ul-Abdein, Muhammad; Ijaz, Hassan; Saleem, Waqas; Raza, Kabeer; Mahfouz, Abdullah Salmeen Bin; Mabrouki, Tarek

    2017-07-02

    Copper/diamond (Cu/D) composites are famous in thermal management applications for their high thermal conductivity values. They, however, offer some interface related problems like high thermal boundary resistance and excessive debonding. This paper investigates interfacial debonding in Cu/D composites subjected to steady-state and transient thermal cyclic loading. A micro-scale finite element (FE) model was developed from a SEM image of the Cu/20 vol % D composite sample. Several test cases were assumed with respect to the direction of heat flow and the boundary interactions between Cu/uncoated diamonds and Cu/Cr-coated diamonds. It was observed that the debonding behavior varied as a result of the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansions (CTEs) among Cu, diamond, and Cr. Moreover, the separation of interfaces had a direct influence upon the equivalent stress state of the Cu-matrix, since diamond particles only deformed elastically. It was revealed through a fully coupled thermo-mechanical FE analysis that repeated heating and cooling cycles resulted in an extremely high stress state within the Cu-matrix along the diamond interface. Since these stresses lead to interfacial debonding, their computation through numerical means may help in determining the service life of heat sinks for a given application beforehand.

  12. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    PubMed

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  13. Synthesis and field emission properties of nanocrystalline diamond/carbon nanowall composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Teii, Kungen; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2010-01-11

    Nanostructured composite films consisting of almost vertically aligned graphene layers, so-called 'carbon nanowalls' (CNWs), and nanocrystalline diamond films are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The space between the walls for the composite films is widened compared to simple CNWs by interception of in-plane continuity of the wall structures. The nucleation density of diamond is responsible for the spacing and arrangement of the walls. Field emission measurements show that the composite films have lower turn-on fields (approx1 V/mum) and larger field enhancement factors (approx4000) than simple CNWs. The results indicate that electric field screening between neighboring walls is well suppressed.

  14. High-frequency SAW filters based on diamond films.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Satoshi; Jian, Chunyun

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a diamond SAW resonator capable of operating at frequencies over 3 GHz using a SiO(2)/ interdigital transducer (IDT)/AlN/diamond structure. This structure is expected to have a high Q value and a zero temperature coefficient of frequency (TCF) over 3 GHz, based on the high acoustic velocity of AlN. The SAW characteristics of various layered structures composed of SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrates were studied both theoretically and experimentally. The SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrate structure allows for a thicker IDT metal layer compared with other SAW device designs, such as the SiO(2)/IDT/ZnO/diamond structure. The thicker metal IDT in the present design leads to a lower series resistance and, in turn, a low insertion loss for SAW devices over 3 GHz. Using a second-mode (Sezawa-mode) SAW, the phase velocity and electromechanical coupling coefficient of the SiO(2)/IDT/AlN/diamond substrate reached the larger values of 11 150 m/s and 0.5%, respectively, and a zero TCF characteristic at 25°C was achieved. One-port SAW resonators fabricated from diamond substrates showed a high Q of 660 at 5.4 GHz. The frequency drift over a temperature range of -25°C to 80°C was about 90 ppm, even less than that for ST-quartz SAW substrates. A two-port resonator showed a low insertion loss of 8 dB at 5.4 GHz. Finally, we designed a 5-GHz band-stop SAW filter. A 30-MHz-wide stopband at a -6-dB rejection level was achieved while keeping the passband insertion loss to 0.76 dB. These characteristics of these filters show good potential for SHF-band filters.

  15. Fabry-Perot microcavity for diamond-based photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janitz, Erika; Ruf, Maximilian; Dimock, Mark; Bourassa, Alexandre; Sankey, Jack; Childress, Lilian

    2015-10-01

    Open Fabry-Perot microcavities represent a promising route for achieving a quantum electrodynamics (cavity-QED) platform with diamond-based emitters. In particular, they offer the opportunity to introduce high-purity, minimally fabricated material into a tunable, high quality factor optical resonator. Here, we demonstrate a fiber-based microcavity incorporating a thick (>10 μ m ) diamond membrane with a finesse of 17 000, corresponding to a quality factor Q ˜106 . Such minimally fabricated thick samples can contain optically stable emitters similar to those found in bulk diamond. We observe modified microcavity spectra in the presence of the membrane, and we develop analytic and numerical models to describe the effect of the membrane on cavity modes, including loss and coupling to higher-order transverse modes. We estimate that a Purcell enhancement of approximately 20 should be possible for emitters within the diamond in this device, and we provide evidence that better diamond surface treatments and mirror coatings could increase this value to 200 in a realistic system.

  16. Diamond-Dispersed Fiber-Reinforced Composite for Superior Friction and Wear Properties in Extreme Environments and Method for Fabricating the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth (Inventor); Voronov, Oleg A (Inventor); Kear, Bernard H (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems, methods, and articles of manufacture related to composite materials are discussed herein. These materials can be based on a mixture of diamond particles with a matrix and fibers or fabrics. The matrix can be formed into the composite material through optional pressurization and via heat treatment. These materials display exceptionally low friction coefficient and superior wear resistance in extreme environments.

  17. Spectroscopy of composite solid-state spin environments in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Gill, Nir; Linh Pham, My; Belthangady, Chinmay; Le Sage, David; Lukin, Mikhail; Yacoby, Amir; Cappellaro, Paola; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-06-01

    We apply dynamical decoupling pulse sequences to nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond in order to spectrally decompose the dynamics of their spin environment, which consists of nuclear and electronic spin impurities. We study a variety of diamond samples to identify the dynamics of the different spin baths and the interplay between them. These results are useful for the basic understanding of spin dynamics in solid-state systems and the central spin problem and could inform efforts in engineering optimized samples for collective quantum information processing and quantum metrology.

  18. Isotopic composition of argon included in an Arkansas diamond and its significance

    SciTech Connect

    Melton, C.E.; Giardini, A.A.

    1980-06-01

    The isotopic composition of argon entrapped in a 6.3 carat, Type I, Arkansas, U. S. A. diamond (emplacement data 106 +- 3 m.y. ago) has been determined by mass spectrometric techniques. This was done by crushing the stone in a diamond crusher attached to the high vacuum inlet system of a high-sensitivity research mass spectrometer. The results show an /sup 40/Ar//sup 36/Ar value of 189 compared to a ratio of 294 for atmospheric argon, and an /sup 38/Ar//sup 36/Ar value of 0.18 almost identical to that for atmospheric argon (0.19). The isotopic data have been applied to a model of the outer Earth to test the crystallization age of the diamond. The results may be interpreted in terms of diamond crystallization about 3.1 billion years ago.

  19. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  20. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  1. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2012-09-04

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  2. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Longtao; Wang, Pingping; Xiu, Ziyang; Chen, Guoqin; Lin, Xiu; Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  3. Beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the deposition process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating with cold spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Yang, Lijing; Li, Bo; Li, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Although cold spray process has many unique advantages over other coating techniques, it has difficulties in depositing hard materials. This article presents a study in the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the fabrication process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating using cold spray. The focus of this research is on the comparison between the composite coatings produced with laser cladding (LC) and with supersonic laser deposition (SLD), with respect to diamond graphitization and tribological properties, thus to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the cold spray process. The influence of deposition temperature on the coating characteristics, such as deposition efficiency, diamond volume fraction, microstructure and phase is also investigated. The tribological properties of the diamond/Ni60 composite coating produced with SLD are determined using a pin-on-disc tribometer, along with the diamond/Ni60 coating produced using LC with the optimal process parameters for comparison. The experimental results show that with the assistance of laser irradiation, diamond/Ni60 composite coating can be successfully deposited using cold spray; the obtained coating is superior to that processed with LC, because SLD can suppress the graphitization of the diamond particles. The diamond/Ni60 composite coating fabricated with SLD has much better tribological properties than the LC coating.

  4. Vacuum Brazing Diamond Grits with Cu-based or Ni-based Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenchun; Lu, Jinbin; Li, Yang; Xu, Shuai; Zhong, Sujuan; Wang, Bangfu; Qiu, Xinkai

    2017-08-01

    Diamond grits were brazed using Cu-Sn-Cr and Ni-Cr-B-Si filler metals, and the brazed grits were examined for microstructure (SEM, EDS, XRD), microhardness, and compression strength. Results showed that the microstructure of the Cu-based filler metal was uniform and consisted of α-Cu + (α-Cu + δ). Its wettability to the diamond was better than Ni-based filler due to the formation of a thin carbide reaction layer that improved the bond strength between the diamond and steel. The Cu-based filler led to reduced thermal damage to the diamond. The Cr in the filler metal diffused to the steel substrate to form a reaction layer at the filler/steel substrate interface. The microhardness of the Ni filler metal (810-830 HV0.3) was significantly higher than that of Cu filler metal (170-230 HV0.3). The compressive load values of the diamond grits brazed with Cu-based or Ni-based filler metal were 93.7 and 49.2% of the original diamond, and the TI values were 83.7 and 59.8% of the original diamond. Grinding experiments for failure mode in monolayer tools revealed that the tools brazed with Cu-based filler metal had a lower macro-fracture ratio than those brazed using the Ni-based filler.

  5. Vacuum Brazing Diamond Grits with Cu-based or Ni-based Filler Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenchun; Lu, Jinbin; Li, Yang; Xu, Shuai; Zhong, Sujuan; Wang, Bangfu; Qiu, Xinkai

    2017-06-01

    Diamond grits were brazed using Cu-Sn-Cr and Ni-Cr-B-Si filler metals, and the brazed grits were examined for microstructure (SEM, EDS, XRD), microhardness, and compression strength. Results showed that the microstructure of the Cu-based filler metal was uniform and consisted of α-Cu + (α-Cu + δ). Its wettability to the diamond was better than Ni-based filler due to the formation of a thin carbide reaction layer that improved the bond strength between the diamond and steel. The Cu-based filler led to reduced thermal damage to the diamond. The Cr in the filler metal diffused to the steel substrate to form a reaction layer at the filler/steel substrate interface. The microhardness of the Ni filler metal (810-830 HV0.3) was significantly higher than that of Cu filler metal (170-230 HV0.3). The compressive load values of the diamond grits brazed with Cu-based or Ni-based filler metal were 93.7 and 49.2% of the original diamond, and the TI values were 83.7 and 59.8% of the original diamond. Grinding experiments for failure mode in monolayer tools revealed that the tools brazed with Cu-based filler metal had a lower macro-fracture ratio than those brazed using the Ni-based filler.

  6. Lamb waves dispersion curves for diamond based piezoelectric layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, B. P.; Kvashnin, G. M.; Telichko, A. V.; Novoselov, A. S.; Burkov, S. I.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of spurious peaks in the amplitude-frequency response of diamond based piezoelectric layered structure was shown. Excitation of such peaks results in deterioration of an useful acoustical signal. It was shown that such spurious peaks should be associated with Lamb waves in a layered structure. By means of FEM analysis, the propagation of acoustic waves of different types in the piezoelectric layered structure "Al/AlN/Mo/(100) diamond" has been investigated in detail. By analyzing the elastic displacement patterns at frequencies from 0 up to 250 MHz, a set of all the possible acoustic waves, especially Lamb modes, have been studied, and dispersive curves of phase velocity have been plotted. A revised classification of Lamb modes has been introduced.

  7. Two- and three-dimensional ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) structures for a high resolution diamond-based MEMS technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.; Tucek, J.; Sumant, A.; Jayatissa, A.; Moldovan, N.; Mancini, D. C.; Gardos, M. N.

    2000-01-17

    Silicon is currently the most commonly used material for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, silicon-based MEMS will not be suitable for long-endurance devices involving components rotating at high speed, where friction and wear need to be minimized, components such as 2-D cantilevers that may be subjected to very large flexural displacements, where stiction is a problem, or components that will be exposed to corrosive environments. The mechanical, thermal, chemical, and tribological properties of diamond make it an ideal material for the fabrication of long-endurance MEMS components. Cost-effective fabrication of these components could in principle be achieved by coating Si with diamond films and using conventional lithographic patterning methods in conjunction with e. g. sacrificial Ti or SiO{sub 2} layers. However, diamond coatings grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods exhibit a coarse-grained structure that prevents high-resolution patterning, or a fine-grained microstructure with a significant amount of intergranular non-diamond carbon. The authors demonstrate here the fabrication of 2-D and 3-D phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) MEMS components by coating Si with UNCD films, coupled with lithographic patterning methods involving sacrificial release layers. UNCD films are grown by microwave plasma CVD using C{sub 60}-Ar or CH{sub 4}-Ar gas mixtures, which result in films that have 3--5 nm grain size, are 10--20 times smoother than conventionally grown diamond films, are extremely resistant to corrosive environments, and are predicted to have a brittle fracture strength similar to that of single crystal diamond.

  8. Picosecond pulsed laser processing of polycrystalline diamond and cubic boron nitride composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warhanek, Maximilian G.; Pfaff, Josquin; Meier, Linus; Walter, Christian; Wegener, Konrad

    2016-03-01

    Capabilities and advantages of laser ablation processes utilizing ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated in various applications of scientific and industrial nature. Of particular interest are applications that require high geometrical accuracy, excellent surface integrity and thus tolerate only a negligible heat-affected zone in the processed area. In this context, this work presents a detailed study of the ablation characteristics of common ultrahard composite materials utilized in the cutting tool industry, namely polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride composite (PCBN). Due to the high hardness of these materials, conventional mechanical processing is time consuming and costly. Herein, laser ablation is an appealing solution, since no process forces and no wear have to be taken into consideration. However, an industrially viable process requires a detailed understanding of the ablation characteristics of each material. Therefore, the influence of various process parameters on material removal and processing quality at 10 ps pulse duration are investigated for several PCD and PCBN grades. The main focus of this study examines the effect of different laser energy input distributions, such as pulse frequency and burst pulses, on the processing conditions in deep cutting kerfs and the resulting processing speed. Based on these results, recommendations for efficient processing of such materials are derived.

  9. Trace element composition of silicate inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite: Evidence for diamond growth from slab melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, A. R.; Kohn, S. C.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D.; Walter, M. J.

    2016-11-01

    The trace element compositions of inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 kimberlite, Brazil, are presented. Literature data for mineral/melt partition coefficients were collated, refitted and employed to interpret inclusion compositions. As part of this process an updated empirical model for predicting the partitioning behaviour of trivalent cations for garnet-melt equilibrium calibrated using data from 73 garnet-melt pairs is presented. High levels of trace element enrichment in inclusions interpreted as former calcium silicate perovskite and majoritic garnet preclude their origin as fragments of an ambient deep mantle assemblage. Inclusions believed to represent former bridgmanite minerals also display a modest degree of enrichment relative to mantle phases. The trace element compositions of 'NAL' and 'CF phase' minerals are also reported. Negative Eu, Ce, and Y/Ho anomalies alongside depletions of Sr, Hf and Zr in many inclusions are suggestive of formation from a low-degree carbonatitic melt of subducted oceanic crust. Observed enrichments in garnet and 'calcium perovskite' inclusions limit depths of melting to less than 600 km, prior to calcium perovskite saturation in subducting assemblages. Less enriched inclusions in sub-lithospheric diamonds from other global localities may represent deeper diamond formation. Modelled source rock compositions that are capable of producing melts in equilibrium with Juina-5 'calcium perovskite' and majorite inclusions are consistent with subducted MORB. Global majorite inclusion compositions suggest a common process is responsible for the formation of many superdeep diamonds, irrespective of geographic locality. Global transition zone inclusion compositions are reproduced by fractional crystallisation from a single parent melt, suggesting that they record the crystallisation sequence and melt evolution during this interaction of slab melts with ambient mantle. All observations are consistent with the

  10. Reduced thermal resistance of the silicon-synthetic diamond composite substrates at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, V.; Subrina, S.; Nika, D. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2010-07-01

    The authors report results of experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of synthetic diamond-silicon composite substrates. Although composite substrates are more thermally resistive than silicon at room temperature they outperform conventional wafers at elevated temperatures owing to different thermal conductivity dependence on temperature. The crossover point is reached near ˜360 K and can be made even lower by tuning the polycrystalline-grain size, film thickness, and interface quality. The reduction of thermal resistance of composite wafers at temperatures, typical for operation of electronic chips, may lead to better thermal management and new phonon-engineered methods for the electron mobility enhancement.

  11. First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2013-12-14

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0 μ{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33 meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

  12. Advanced Diamond Anvil Techniques (Customized Diamond Anvils)

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    A complete set of diamond-based fabrication tools now exists for making a wide range of different types of diamond anvils which are tailored for various high-P applications. Current tools include: CVD diamond deposition (making diamond); Diamond polishing, laser drilling, plasma etching (removal of diamond); and Lithography, 3D laser pantography (patterning features onto diamond); - Metal deposition (putting electrical circuits and metal masks onto diamond). Current applications include the following: Electrical Conductivity; Magnetic Susceptibility; and High-P/High-T. Future applications may include: NMR; Hall Effect; de Haas - Shubnikov (Fermi surface topology); Calorimetry; and thermal conductivity.

  13. Field emission from hybrid diamond-like carbon and carbon nanotube composite structures.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; May, P W; Hamanaka, M H M O; Corat, E J

    2013-12-11

    A thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) film was deposited onto a densely packed "forest" of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VACNT). DLC deposition caused the tips of the CNTs to clump together to form a microstructured surface. Field-emission tests of this new composite material show the typical low threshold voltages for carbon nanotube structures (2 V μm(-1)) but with greatly increased emission current, better stability, and longer lifetime.

  14. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar; Greene, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr) alloy is state-of-the-art combustion chamber liner material used in liquid propulsion engines such as the RS-68 and RS-25. The performance of future liquid propulsion systems can be improved significantly by increasing the heat transfer through the combustion chamber liner. Prior work1 done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has shown that the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z alloy can be improved significantly by embedding high thermal conductivity diamond particles in the alloy matrix to form NARloy-Z-diamond composite (fig. 1). NARloy-Z-diamond composite containing 40vol% diamond showed 69% higher thermal conductivity than NARloy-Z. It is 24% lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 120% better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. The research work consists of (a) developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) of NARloy-Z-D composite, (b) fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and (c) hot-fire testing of the liner to test performance. Initially, NARloy-Z-D composite slabs were made using the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) for the purpose of determining design properties. In the next step, a cylindrical shape was fabricated to demonstrate feasibility (fig. 3). The liner consists of six cylinders which are sintered separately and then stacked and diffusion bonded to make the liner (fig. 4). The liner will be heat treated, finish-machined, and assembled into a combustion chamber and hot-fire tested in the MSFC test facility (TF 115) to determine perform.

  15. Most diamonds were created equal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, Brooke Matat; Navon, Oded

    2016-06-01

    Diamonds crystallize deep in the mantle (>150 km), leaving their carbon sources and the mechanism of their crystallization debatable. They can form from elemental carbon, by oxidation of reduced species (e.g. methane) or reduction of oxidized ones (e.g. carbonate-bearing minerals or melts), in response to decreasing carbon solubility in melts or fluids or due to changes in pH. The mechanism of formation is clear for fibrous diamonds that grew from the carbonate-bearing fluids trapped in their microinclusions. However, these diamonds look different and, based on their lower level of nitrogen aggregation, are much younger than most monocrystalline (MC) diamonds. In the first systematic search for microinclusions in MC diamonds we examined twinned crystals (macles), assuming that during their growth, microinclusions were trapped along the twinning plane. Visible mineral inclusions (>10 μm) and nitrogen aggregation levels in these clear macles are similar to other MC diamonds. We found 32 microinclusions along the twinning planes in eight out of 30 diamonds. Eight inclusions are orthopyroxene; four contain >50% K2O (probably as K2(Mg, Ca)(CO3)2); but the major element compositions of the remaining 20 are similar to those of carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) found in fibrous diamonds. We conclude that the source of carbon for these macles and for most diamonds is carbonate-bearing HDFs similar to those found here and in fibrous diamonds. Combined with the old ages of MC diamonds (up to 3.5 Ga), our new findings suggest that carbonates have been introduced into the reduced lithospheric mantle since the Archaean and that the mechanism of diamond formation is the same for most diamonds.

  16. Paragenesis of Diamond and Minerals of Peridotites and Carbonatites in the Mantle Magma Chambers Based on Experiments Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyura, Anastasia; Simonova, Dariya; Litvin, Yury

    2014-05-01

    It is considered that role of carbonate melts is important in processes of mantle metasomatism; according to other representations, it is also assumed that they could be formed at partial melting of carbonated peridotite. Dissolving of peridotite minerals and carbon in carbonate melts are responsible for formation of completely miscible carbonate-silicate-carbon magmas parental for diamonds. It can be expected that such carbonate magmas are capable to assimilate an form parental magama "chambers" within the hosting mantle peridotite. While natural cooling of the chambers dissolved in carbonate melts components of the peridotite crystallize forming minerals similar to these of the host mantle peridotite. The recrystallized peridotite minerals are fragmentarily included hermetically within growing diamonds and occur as syngenetic inclusions in them. Therefore experimental modeling of origin of the upper mantle carbonate-silicate diamond-forming melts, their consolidations in the magmatic chambers and evolutions at conditions of equilibrium and fractional crystallization are especially significant for understanding of processes of deep magmatic petrology and genetic mineralogy, including genesis of diamond. In the study at 6 GPa model approximations of mineral phases, significant in compositions of probable metasomatic agents, the upper mantle peridotites, and also syngenetic inclusions in diamonds were used: starting mixtures were model peridotite with composition Ol48Opx16Cpx16Grt20, close to model compositions of the primitive mantle and real mantle xenolithes, as well as multicomponent carbonate (CaCO3)20(Na2CO3)20(FeCO3)20(Na2CO3)20(K2CO3)20 modeling carbonatite inclusions in natural diamonds. Spectral pure graphite was used as a source of carbon in the system. Pressure and temperature were reached using apparatus of toroidal type 'anvil-with-hole'. Electron microprobe and SEM researches were carried out on the polished surfaces with carbon covering at IEM RAS

  17. Polycrystalline diamond based detector for Z-pinch plasma diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linyue; Ouyang, Xiaoping; Zhao, Jizhen; Chen, Liang; Wang, Lan

    2010-08-01

    A detector setup based on polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond film is developed with great characteristics: low dark current (lower than 60 pA within 3 V/mum), fast pulsed response time (rise time: 2-3 ns), flat spectral response (3-5 keV), easy acquisition, low cost, and relative large sensitive area. The characterizing data on Qiangguang-I accelerator show that this detector can satisfy the practical requirements in Z-pinch plasma diagnosis very well, which offers a promising prototype for the x-ray detection in Z-pinch diagnosis.

  18. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  19. Electron field emission from composite electrodes of carbon nanotubes-boron-doped diamond and carbon felts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolen, J. Mauricio; Tronto, Simone; Marchesin, Marcel S.; Almeida, Erica C.; Ferreira, Neidenei G.; Patrick Poá, C. H.; Silva, S. Ravi P.

    2006-02-01

    The electron field emission of carbon nanotube (CNT)/boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon felt electrodes (CNT/BDD/felt) have been investigated. The composite electrode was initially prepared with the growth of BDD on carbon felt and the subsequent growth of CNT by chemical decomposition of methanol. The composite electrodes were characterised using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. For the CNT/BDD/felt samples, the electron field emission was observed at macroscopic fields as low as 1.1Vμm-1. The emission current versus time plot shows significant potential for future field emission applications.

  20. Diamond based detectors for high temperature, high radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, A.; Fern, G. R.; Hobson, P. R.; Smith, D. R.; Lefeuvre, G.; Saenger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties as a radiation detector; exceptional radiation hardness and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry and transmission mode applications), wide bandgap (high temperature operation with low noise and solar blind), an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. This combination of radiation hardness, temperature tolerance and ability to detect mixed radiation types with a single sensor makes diamond particularly attractive as a detector material for harsh environments such as nuclear power station monitoring (fission and fusion) and oil well logging. Effective exploitation of these properties requires the development of a metallisation scheme to give contacts that remain stable over extended periods at elevated temperatures (up to 250°C in this instance). Due to the cost of the primary detector material, computational modelling is essential to best utilise the available processing methods for optimising sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations and to fully interpret experimental data. Monte Carlo simulations of our diamond based sensor have been developed, using MCNP6 and FLUKA2011, assessing the sensor performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of the detector and converter geometry. Sensors with varying metallisation schemes for high temperature operation have been fabricated at Brunel University London and by Micron Semiconductor Limited. These sensors have been tested under a varied set of conditions including irradiation with fast neutrons and alpha particles at high temperatures. The presented study indicates that viable metallisation schemes for high temperature contacts have been successfully developed and the modelling results, supported by preliminary experimental data from partners, indicate that the simulations provide a reasonable representation of

  1. Transformation of polymer composite nanofibers to diamond fibers and films by microwave plasma-enhanced CVD process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potocký, Š.; Ižák, T.; Rezek, B.; Tesárek, P.; Kromka, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers were used as a polymer matrix containing ultra-dispersed diamond (UDD) nanoparticles. Growth of diamond fiber-like structures and films by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was studied as a function of UDD concentration in the PVA matrix. The influence of surface tension (fibers radii) for nucleation/seeding is discussed. Using a high UDD concentration in the polymer matrix lead to the formation of fiber-like structures. The composite PVA polymer nanofibers with the highest concentration of UDD nanoparticles resulted in the growth of nearly continuous diamond film at low thickness of 250 nm.

  2. Diamond-based field sensor for nEDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarvagya; Hovde, Chris; Beck, Douglas H.

    2016-02-01

    Ensembles of negatively charged nitrogen vacancy centers in diamonds are investigated as optical sensors for electric and magnetic fields in the interaction region of a neutron electric dipole moment experiment. As a first step towards measuring electric fields, the Stark shift is investigated in the ground electronic state, using optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) to measure hyperfine-resolved fine structure transitions. One detection approach is to modulate the electric field and demodulate the ODMR signal at the modulation frequency or its harmonic. Models indicate that the ratio of the amplitudes of these signals provides information about the magnitude of the electric field. Experiments show line shapes consistent with the models. Methods are considered for extending this technique to all-optical measurement of fields. Additionally, progress is reported towards an all-optical, fiberized sensor based on electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT), which may be suitable for measuring magnetic fields. The design uses total internal reflection to provide a long optical path through the diamond for both the 637 nm EIT laser and a green repump laser.

  3. Development of diamond-lanthanide metal oxide affinity composites for the selective capture of endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Dilshad; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Development of affinity materials for the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides has attracted attention during the last decade. In this work, diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide composites have been fabricated via the hydrothermal method. The composites are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The analyses confirm the size and composition of the nanocomposites. They have been applied to selectively capture phosphorylated peptides from standard proteins (β-casein and BSA). Selectivity is calculated as 1:3000 and 1:1500 while sensitivity down to 1 and 20 fmol for diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide nanocomposites, respectively. Enrichment efficiency has also been evaluated for non-fat milk digest where 18 phosphopeptides are enriched. Total of 213 and 187 phosphopeptides are captured from tryptic digest of HeLa cells extracted proteins by diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide, respectively. Finally, human serum, without any pre-treatment, is applied and nanocomposites capture the endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

  4. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  5. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  6. Diamond color measurement instrument based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, H.; Mandal, S.; Toosi, M.; Zeng, J.; Wang, W.

    2016-09-01

    Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has developed a diamond color measurement instrument that can provide accurate and reproducible color measurement results. The instrument uses uniform illumination by a daylight-approximating light source; observations from a high-resolution color-camera with nearly zero-distortion bi-telecentric lens, and image processing to calculate color parameters of diamonds. Experiments show the instrument can provide reproducible color measurement results and also identify subtle color differences in diamonds with high sensitivity. The experimental setup of the prototype instrument and the image processing method for calculating diamond color parameters are presented in this report.

  7. Re-Os dating of sulphide inclusions zonally distributed in single Yakutian diamonds: Evidence for multiple episodes of Proterozoic formation and protracted timescales of diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Pearson, D. G.; Bulanova, G. P.; Smelov, A. P.; Pavlushin, A. D.; Davies, G. R.

    2013-11-01

    The timing of diamond formation in the Siberian lithospheric mantle was investigated by Re-Os isotope dating of sulphide inclusions from eclogitic and lherzolitic diamonds from the Mir, 23rd Party Congress and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes in Yakutia. The diamonds contained multiple sulphide inclusions distributed over their core-to-rim zones. Cathodoluminescence, carbon isotope and nitrogen aggregation studies demonstrate that the diamonds are zoned and that the distinct zones are associated with different diamond growth episodes. There are coherent relationships between carbon isotope composition, nitrogen concentration and aggregation state of the diamond hosts, and major and trace element compositions, Re-Os compositions and initial Os isotope ratios of the included sulphides. This suggests that the different diamond and sulphide populations formed at different times from fluids/melts with different chemical compositions. Based on the Re-Os isochron ages and the nitrogen aggregation states we conclude that the sulphides are co-genetic with their diamond hosts.

  8. Diamond paste-based electrodes for determination of Cr(III) in pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Raluca-Ioana; Bairu, Semere Ghebru; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick

    2003-07-01

    A new class of monocrystalline diamond paste-based electrodes is proposed for the determination of chromium(III) at trace levels in vitamins. Three types of monocrystalline diamond-natural diamond 1mu (natural diamond), synthetic diamond 50mu (synthetic-1), and synthetic diamond 1mu (synthetic-2)-were used for electrode construction. The linear concentration ranges are between 10(-10) and 10(-8); 10(-9) and 10(-7), and 10(-10) to 10(-8) mol L(-1), with limits of detection of 10(-12), 10(-12), and 10(-11) mol L(-1), when natural diamond, synthetic-1, and synthetic-2, respectively, are used as electrode materials. For electrodes based on natural diamond and synthetic-1 it was found that Cr(III) yields a peak at about +0.275+/-0.015 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) within a predetermined positive potential range situated between +0.4 and +0.2 V, while for the electrode based on synthetic-2 the peaks are found at +0.300+/-0.015 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). The proposed method is reliable for the determination of chromium(III) at trace levels in two vitamin tablets (RSD<0.2%).

  9. Enhanced capacitance of composite TiO2 nanotube/boron-doped diamond electrodes studied by impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Siuzdak, K; Bogdanowicz, R; Sawczak, M; Sobaszek, M

    2015-01-14

    We report on novel composite nanostructures based on boron-doped diamond thin films grown on top of TiO2 nanotubes. The nanostructures made of BDD-modified titania nanotubes showed an increase in activity and performance when used as electrodes in electrochemical environments. The BDD thin films (∼200-500 nm) were deposited using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MW PA CVD) onto anodically fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays. The influence of boron-doping level, methane admixture and growth time on the performance of the Ti/TiO2/BDD electrode was studied in detail. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to investigate the surface morphology and grain size distribution. Moreover, the chemical composition of TiO2/BDD electrodes was investigated by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The composite electrodes TiO2/BDD are characterized by a significantly higher capacitive current compared to BDD films deposited directly onto a Ti substrate. The novel composite electrode of TiO2 nanotube arrays overgrown by boron-doped diamond (BDD) immersed in 0.1 M NaNO3 can deliver a specific capacitance of 2.10, 4.79, and 7.46 mF cm(-2) at a scan rate of 10 mV s(-1) for a [B]/[C] ratio of 2k, 5k and 10k, respectively. The substantial improvement of electrochemical performance and the excellent rate capability could be attributed to the synergistic effect of TiO2 treatment in CH4 : H2 plasma and the high electrical conductivity of BDD layers. The analysis of electrochemical impedance spectra using an electric equivalent circuit allowed us to determine the surface area on the basis of the value of constant phase element.

  10. Enhanced capacitance of composite TiO2 nanotube/boron-doped diamond electrodes studied by impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siuzdak, K.; Bogdanowicz, R.; Sawczak, M.; Sobaszek, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on novel composite nanostructures based on boron-doped diamond thin films grown on top of TiO2 nanotubes. The nanostructures made of BDD-modified titania nanotubes showed an increase in activity and performance when used as electrodes in electrochemical environments. The BDD thin films (~200-500 nm) were deposited using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (MW PA CVD) onto anodically fabricated TiO2 nanotube arrays. The influence of boron-doping level, methane admixture and growth time on the performance of the Ti/TiO2/BDD electrode was studied in detail. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to investigate the surface morphology and grain size distribution. Moreover, the chemical composition of TiO2/BDD electrodes was investigated by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The composite electrodes TiO2/BDD are characterized by a significantly higher capacitive current compared to BDD films deposited directly onto a Ti substrate. The novel composite electrode of TiO2 nanotube arrays overgrown by boron-doped diamond (BDD) immersed in 0.1 M NaNO3 can deliver a specific capacitance of 2.10, 4.79, and 7.46 mF cm-2 at a scan rate of 10 mV s-1 for a [B]/[C] ratio of 2k, 5k and 10k, respectively. The substantial improvement of electrochemical performance and the excellent rate capability could be attributed to the synergistic effect of TiO2 treatment in CH4 : H2 plasma and the high electrical conductivity of BDD layers. The analysis of electrochemical impedance spectra using an electric equivalent circuit allowed us to determine the surface area on the basis of the value of constant phase element.

  11. Electrically conductive polycrystalline diamond and particulate metal based electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg M.; Wang, Jian

    2005-04-26

    An electrically conducting and dimensionally stable diamond (12, 14) and metal particle (13) electrode produced by electrodepositing the metal on the diamond is described. The electrode is particularly useful in harsh chemical environments and at high current densities and potentials. The electrode is particularly useful for generating hydrogen, and for reducing oxygen and oxidizing methanol in reactions which are of importance in fuel cells.

  12. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  13. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Packed Electrospun PAN-Based Carbon Fibers Incorporated with Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Lu, Chunyuan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Jin, Chunzi; Yoon, Soo Jong; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2016-02-01

    Multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond are renowned as superlative material due to their relatively high thermal conductivity and hardness while comparing with any bulk materials. In this research, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) solution incorporated with MWCNTs at an alteration of mass fractions (0 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 1 wt%, 2 wt%) were fabricated via electrospinning under optimized parameters. Dried composite nanofibers were stabilized and carbonized, after which water base polytrafluorethylene (PTFE) mixed with nano diamond powder solution was spin coated on them. Scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray scattering and Laserflash thermal conductivity were used to characterize the composite nanofiber sheets. The result shows that the thermal conductivity increased to 4.825 W/m K from 2.061 W/mK. The improvement of thermal conductivities is suggesting the incorporation of MWCNTs.

  14. Thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotopic composition

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, L.

    1993-01-01

    The mirage-effect/thermal wave technique as a modern technique for thermal property characterization is described. The thermal diffusivity of a material is determined by measuring the time and space varying temperature distribution (thermal wave) in the material generated by an intensity modulated heating laser beam. These thermal waves are detected through the deflection of a probe laser beam due to modulation of gradient of the index of refraction (mirage effect) either in the air above the specimens (the in-air technique) or in the specimen itself (the in-solid technique). Three-dimensional theories, for both in-air and in-solid mirage techniques, are represented. In order to extract the material parameters by comparing the theory with experimental data, an extensive data analysis procedure based on multiparameter-least-squares has been developed. The experimental and data analysis details are discussed. Topics concerns with the quality and reliability of the measurements are addressed. This technique has been successfully applied to the thermal property characterization of single crystal diamond with varying isotope contents. The results showed a 50% enhancement in the thermal conductivity by removal of C[sup 13] content from 1.1% to 0.1% in diamond at room temperature. The technique has also been adapted to function in cryogenic temperatures. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity in the temperature range 80-378K for natural IIA specimen and 187-375K for isotopically enriched specimen are obtained, the former results agree with previous works and the latter results demonstrate the isotope effect on the thermal conductivity of single crystal diamond consistently in a large temperature range. The physical source of this enhancement in diffusivity due to the isotope effect in diamond is discussed. The discussion is based on the full Callaway's theory with emphasizing the role of N-processes in the phonon scattering mechanism.

  15. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  16. Optimization of chemical vapor deposition diamond films growth on steel: correlation between mechanical properties, structure, and composition.

    PubMed

    Laikhtman, A; Rapoport, L; Perfilyev, V; Moshkovich, A; Akhvlediani, R; Hoffman, A

    2011-09-01

    In the present work we perform optimization of mechanical and crystalline properties of CVD microcrystalline diamond films grown on steel substrates. A chromium-nitride (Cr-N) interlayer had been previously proposed to serve as a buffer for carbon and iron inter-diffusion and as a matching layer for the widely differing expansion coefficients of diamond and steel. However, adhesion and wear as well as crystalline perfection of diamond films are strongly affected by conditions of both Cr-N interlayer preparation and CVD diamond deposition. In this work we assess the effects of two parameters. The first one is the temperature of the Cr-N interlayer preparation: temperatures in the range of 500 degrees C-800 degrees C were used. The second one is diamond film thickness in the 0.5 microm-2 microm range monitored through variation of the deposition time from approximately 30 min to 2 hours. The mechanical properties of so deposited diamond films were investigated. For this purpose, scratch tests were performed at different indentation loads. The friction coefficient and wear loss were assessed. The mechanical and tribological properties were related to structure, composition, and crystalline perfection of diamond films which were extensively analyzed using different microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. It was found that relatively thick diamond film deposited on the Cr-N interlayer prepared at the temperature similar to that of the CVD process has the best mechanical and adhesion strength. This film was stable without visible cracks around the wear track during all scratch tests with different indentation loads. In other cases, cracking and delamination of the films took place at low to moderate indentation loads.

  17. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  18. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  19. Enhanced electron field emission properties of diamond/microcrystalline graphite composite films synthesized by thermal catalytic etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shasha; Ma, Li; Long, Hangyu; Yu, Xiaoying; Luo, Hao; Wang, Yijia; Zhu, Hekang; Yu, Zhiming; Ma, Mingyang; Wei, Qiuping

    2016-03-01

    Diamond/microcrystalline graphite composite films were synthesized by thermal catalytic etching method with nickel as the catalyst. The surface morphology and composition of the composite films were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the etching and graphitizing degree of diamond surface increased with the rising annealing temperature and the surface of as-grown diamonds were replaced by the tips of high aspect ratios and porous foam structure. The electron field emission (EFE) properties of composite films were improved compared to the as-grown diamond. The lowest turn-on field of 9.6 V/μm has been detected for the composite film annealed at 900 °C. The field emission current stability was influenced by graphite phase formed in the etching process. Gradual increase of emission currents along with time were observed for both samples annealed at 700 °C and 800 °C. However, there was a slightly decrease for the emission current of sample annealed at 900 °C.

  20. Volatile composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Canada: Implications for chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ray; Cartigny, Pierre; Harrison, Darrell; Hobson, Emily; Harris, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    In order to better investigate the compositions and the origins of fluids associated with diamond growth, we have carried-out combined noble gas (He and Ar), C and N isotope, K, Ca and halogen (Cl, Br, I) determinations on fragments of individual microinclusion-bearing diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, North West Territories, Canada. The fluid concentrations of halogens and noble gases in Panda diamonds are enriched by several orders of magnitude over typical upper mantle abundances. However, noble gas, C and N isotopic ratios ( 3He/ 4He = 4-6 Ra, 40Ar/ 36Ar = 20,000-30,000, δ 13C = -4.5‰ to -6.9‰ and δ 15N = -1.2‰ to -8.8‰) are within the worldwide range determined for fibrous diamonds and similar to the mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source value. The high 36Ar content of the diamonds (>1 × 10 -9 cm 3/g) is at least an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported mantle sample and enables the 36Ar content of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle to be estimated at ˜0.6 × 10 -12 cm 3/g, again similar to estimates for the MORB source. Three fluid types distinguished on the basis of Ca-K-Cl compositions are consistent with carbonatitic, silicic and saline end-members identified in previous studies of diamonds from worldwide sources. These fluid end-members also have distinct halogen ratios (Br/Cl and I/Cl). The role of subducted seawater-derived halogens, originally invoked to explain some of the halogen ratio variations in diamonds, is not considered an essential component in the formation of the fluids. In contrast, it is considered that large halogen fractionation of a primitive mantle ratio occurs during fluid-melt partitioning in forming silicic fluids, and during separation of an immiscible saline fluid.

  1. Development of Innovative Accident Tolerant High Thermal Conductivity UO2-Diamond Composite Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Tulenko, James; Subhash, Ghatu

    2016-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) evaluated a composite fuel consisting of UO2 powder mixed with diamond micro particles as a candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel (ATF). The research group had previous extensive experience researching with diamond micro particles as an addition to reactor coolant for improved plant thermal performance. The purpose of this research work was to utilize diamond micro particles to develop UO2-Diamond composite fuel pellets with significantly enhanced thermal properties, beyond that already being measured in the previous UF research projects of UO2 – SiC and UO2 – Carbon Nanotube fuel pins. UF is proving with the current research results that the addition of diamond micro particles to UO2 may greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the UO2 pellets producing an accident-tolerant fuel. The Beginning of life benefits have been proven and fuel samples are being irradiated in the ATR reactor to confirm that the thermal conductivity improvements are still present under irradiation.

  2. Transmission photocathodes based on stainless steel mesh coated with deuterated diamond like carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Balalykin, N. I.; Feshchenko, A. A.; Kobzev, A. P.; Kleinová, A.; Sasinková, V.; Hrubčín, L.

    2014-07-01

    In this study we report on the dependence of electron emission properties on the transmission photocathodes DC gun based on stainless steel mesh coated with diamond like carbon films prepared at various technological conditions. Diamond like carbon films were deposited on the stainless steel mesh and silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from gas mixtures CH4+D2+Ar, CH4+H2+Ar and reactive magnetron sputtering using a carbon target and gas mixtures Ar+D2, Ar+H2. The concentration of elements in films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection (ERD) analytical methods simultaneously. Chemical compositions were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Raman spectroscopy at visible excitation wavelength was used for the intensity ratio determination of Gaussian fit D-peak and G-peak of Raman spectra. The quantum efficiency was calculated from the measured laser energy and the measured cathode charge. The quantum efficiency of a prepared transmission photocathode was increased with increasing intensity ratio of D-peak and G-peak, which was increased by adding deuterium to the gas mixture and using technology reactive magnetron sputtering.

  3. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  4. Stimulated Raman scattering-active isotopically pure 12C and 13C diamond crystals: A milestone in the development of diamond photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminskii, A. A.; Ral'chenko, V. G.; Yoneda, H.; Bol'shakov, A. P.; Inyushkin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Isotopically pure 12C and 13C diamonds are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition and impulsive stimulated Raman scattering in these crystals is investigated. The thermal conductivity of 12C isotopically pure damond and natC diamond with natural isotopic composition is measured. Phonon-nondegenerate Stokes lasing based on the χ(3) nonlinearity in the 12C, 13C, and natC diamond "triad" is attained, which opens a new stage in the development of diamond photonics.

  5. Diamond-based protective layer for optical biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majchrowicz, D.; Ficek, M.; Baran, T.; WÄ sowicz, M.; Struk, P.; Jedrzejewska-Szczerska, M.

    2016-09-01

    Optical biosensors have become a powerful alternative to the conventional ways of measurement owing to their great properties, such as high sensitivity, high dynamic range, cost effectiveness and small size. Choice of an optical biosensor's materials is an important factor and impacts the quality of the obtained spectra. Examined biological objects are placed on a cover layer which may react with samples in a chemical, biological and mechanical way, therefore having a negative impact on the measurement reliability. Diamond, a metastable allotrope of carbon with sp3 hybridization, shows outstanding properties such as: great chemical stability, bio-compatibility, high thermal conductivity, wide bandgap and optical transparency. Additionally it possesses great mechanical durability, which makes it a long-lasting material. The protective diamond thin films were deposited on the substrate using Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW PA CVD) system. The surface morphology and roughness was assessed with atomic force microscopy and profilometry. We have performed a series of measurements to assess the biocompatibility of diamond thin films with whole blood. The results show that thin diamond protective layer does not affect the red blood cells, while retaining the sensors high resolution and dynamic range of measurement. Therefore, we conclude that diamond thin films are a viable protective coating for optical biosensors, which allows to examine many biological elements. We project that it can be particularly useful not only for biological objects but also under extreme conditions like radioactive or chemically aggressive environments and high temperatures.

  6. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    NARloy-Z alloy (Cu-3 percent, Ag-0.5 percent, Zr) is a state of the art alloy currently used for fabricating rocket engine combustion chamber liners. Research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State – Applied Research Laboratory has shown that thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z can be increased significantly by adding diamonds to form a composite (NARloy-Z-D). NARloy-Z-D is also lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes make this advanced composite material an ideal candidate for fabricating combustion chamber liner for an advanced rocket engine. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. This paper describes the process development for fabricating a subscale high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D combustion chamber liner using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). The FAST process uses a mixture of NARloy-Z and diamond powders which is sintered under pressure at elevated temperatures. Several challenges were encountered, i.e., segregation of diamonds, machining the super hard NARloy-Z-D composite, net shape fabrication and nondestructive examination. The paper describes how these challenges were addressed. Diamonds coated with copper (CuD) appear to give the best results. A near net shape subscale combustion chamber liner is being fabricated by diffusion bonding cylindrical rings of NARloy-Z-CuD using the FAST process.

  7. Nano-manipulation of diamond-based single photon sources.

    PubMed

    Ampem-Lassen, E; Simpson, D A; Gibson, B C; Trpkovski, S; Hossain, F M; Huntington, S T; Ganesan, K; Hollenberg, L C L; Prawer, S

    2009-07-06

    The ability to manipulate nano-particles at the nano-scale is critical for the development of active quantum systems. This paper presents a technique to manipulate diamond nano-crystals at the nano-scale using a scanning electron microscope, nano-manipulator and custom tapered optical fibre probes. The manipulation of a approximately 300 nm diamond crystal, containing a single nitrogen-vacancy centre, onto the endface of an optical fibre is demonstrated. The emission properties of the single photon source post manipulation are in excellent agreement with those observed on the original substrate.

  8. Silica based polishing of {100} and {111} single crystal diamond

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Evan L H; Mandal, Soumen; Brousseau, Emmanuel B; Williams, Oliver A

    2014-01-01

    Diamond is one of the hardest and most difficult to polish materials. In this paper, the polishing of {111} and {100} single crystal diamond surfaces by standard chemical mechanical polishing, as used in the silicon industry, is demonstrated. A Logitech Tribo Chemical Mechanical Polishing system with Logitech SF1 Syton and a polyurethane/polyester polishing pad was used. A reduction in roughness from 0.92 to 0.23 nm root mean square and 0.31 to 0.09 nm rms for {100} and {111} samples respectively was observed. PMID:27877689

  9. Direct coating adherent diamond films on Fe-based alloy substrate: the roles of Al, Cr in enhancing interfacial adhesion and promoting diamond growth.

    PubMed

    Li, X J; He, L L; Li, Y S; Yang, Q; Hirose, A

    2013-08-14

    Direct CVD deposition of dense, continuous, and adherent diamond films on conventional Fe-based alloys has long been considered impossible. The current study demonstrates that such a deposition can be realized on Al, Cr-modified Fe-based alloy substrate (FeAl or FeCrAl). To clarify the fundamental mechanism of Al, Cr in promoting diamond growth and enhancing interfacial adhesion, fine structure and chemical analysis around the diamond film-substrate interface have been comprehensively characterized by transmission electron microscopy. An intermediate graphite layer forms on those Al-free substrates such as pure Fe and FeCr, which significantly deteriorates the interfacial adhesion of diamond. In contrast, such a graphite layer is absent on the FeAl and FeCrAl substrates, whereas a very thin Al-rich amorphous oxide sublayer is always identified between the diamond film and substrate interface. These comparative results indicate that the Al-rich interfacial oxide layer acts as an effective barrier to prevent the formation of graphite phase and consequently enhance diamond growth and adhesion. The adhesion of diamond film formed on FeCrAl is especially superior to that formed on FeAl substrate. This can be further attributed to a synergetic effect including the reduced fraction of Al and the decreased substrate thermal-expansion coefficient on FeCrAl in comparison with FeAl, and a mechanical interlocking effect due to the formation of interfacial chromium carbides. Accordingly, a mechanism model is proposed to account for the different interfacial adhesion of diamond grown on the various Fe-based substrates.

  10. Diamond nanophotonics.

    PubMed

    Beha, Katja; Fedder, Helmut; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition.

  11. Diamond nanophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Beha, Katja; Wolfer, Marco; Becker, Merle C; Siyushev, Petr; Jamali, Mohammad; Batalov, Anton; Hinz, Christopher; Hees, Jakob; Kirste, Lutz; Obloh, Harald; Gheeraert, Etienne; Naydenov, Boris; Jakobi, Ingmar; Dolde, Florian; Pezzagna, Sébastien; Twittchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Dregely, Daniel; Giessen, Harald; Meijer, Jan; Jelezko, Fedor; Nebel, Christoph E; Bratschitsch, Rudolf; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition. PMID:23365803

  12. Diamond nanoparticles based biosensors for efficient glucose and lactate determination.

    PubMed

    Briones, M; Casero, E; Petit-Domínguez, M D; Ruiz, M A; Parra-Alfambra, A M; Pariente, F; Lorenzo, E; Vázquez, L

    2015-06-15

    In this work, we report the modification of a gold electrode with undoped diamond nanoparticles (DNPs) and its applicability to the fabrication of electrochemical biosensing platforms. DNPs were immobilized onto a gold electrode by direct adsorption and the electrochemical behavior of the resulting DNPs/Au platform was studied. Four well-defined peaks were observed corresponding to the DNPs oxidation/reduction at the underlying gold electrode, which demonstrate that, although undoped DNPs have an insulating character, they show electrochemical activity as a consequence of the presence of different functionalities with unsaturated bonding on their surface. In order to develop a DNPs-based biosensing platform, we have selected glucose oxidase (GOx), as a model enzyme. We have performed an exhaustive study of the different steps involved in the biosensing platform preparation (DNPs/Au and GOx/DNPs/Au systems) by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The glucose biosensor shows a good electrocatalytic response in the presence of (hydroxymethyl)ferrocene as redox mediator. Once the suitability of the prototype system to determine glucose was verified, in a second step, we prepared a similar biosensor, but employing the enzyme lactate oxidase (LOx/DNPs/Au). As far as we know, this is the first electrochemical biosensor for lactate determination that includes DNPs as nanomaterial. A linear concentration range from 0.05 mM to 0.7 mM, a sensitivity of 4.0 µA mM(-1) and a detection limit of 15 µM were obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of a diamond coating on tool wear behaviour during dry machining of a multidirectional composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, D.; Géhin, D.; Nouari, M.; Girot, F.

    2006-08-01

    High mechanical performances and lightweight are the principal characteristics of composite materials. However, the main problems encountered when machining these materials are their poor machinability and the short timelife of the tools. Hard diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. In the current study, damage mechanisms of the uncoated tungsten carbide are compared to the coated one. Tool wear behaviour was investigated at different cutting conditions when dry machining the multidirectional carbon/epoxy composite T300/914. The purpose is to determine the effect of the cutting parameters (cutting conditions, forces, temperature, etc.) on the tool-workpiece interface (surface integrity, roughness). The experiments have been carried out under orthogonal cutting configuration for both tools: uncoated and coated cemented carbide WC-Co. Different coatings have been tested: diamond coating (thin and thick diamond layer), and Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC coating). Three rake angles of 0circ, 15circ and 30circ, two cutting speeds of 6 and 60 m/min and three feeds rates of 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 mm were tested. The tool surface topography was analyzed using complementary techniques such as white light interferometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

  14. Diamond-bearing Rocks among Mantle Xenoliths in Kimberlites as Indicatory for the Chambers of Diamond-parental Carbonatite Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy; Kuzyura, Anastasia

    2014-05-01

    Origin of diamond-bearing peridotite and eclogite rocks in kimberlites is cleared up using mantle-carbonatite model of diamond genesis (Litvin, 2007, 2009, 2013). Data of analytical mineralogy of primary inclusions in diamonds and results of physicochemical experiments on syngenetic diamond and inclusion phase relations are co-ordinated in this model (Litvin et al., 2012). It proved that diamond-parental media are presented by changeable carbon-saturated peridotite-carbonatite and eclogite-carbonatite melts. The melts are capable to form not diamonds only but their major and minor inclusions. The upper mantle is mainly composed of diamond-free peridotites which dominate over eclogites as 9 to 5 % (Mathias et al., 1970). Howewer diamond-bearing peridotites and eclogites occur rarely as demonstrated for S.Africa and Yakutia (Sobolev N., 1977). Nevertheless, origin of diamond-bearing rocks belongs to key problems of genetic mineralogy of diamond and mantle petrology due to dissimilar physicochemical and environmental conditions of formation of comparatively diamond-free rocks. Symptomatic that garnets included in diamond and these of diamond-bearing eclogite are compositionally similar (Sobolev V. et al., 1972). Garnets of diamond-bearing eclogites, inclusions in diamonds and intergrowths with them are marked by increased Na2O content (0.10-0.22%) because of Na-majorite component Na2MgSi5O12 (Bobrov & Litvin, 2011). Peridotitic garnets of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths are indicated by high Cr2O3 and low CaO content over diamond-free ones. This compositional dissimilarity is compatible with formation of diamond-bearing rocks, inclusions and intergrowths in chambers of partially melted peridotite-eclogite-carbonatite-sulphide-carbon system of changeable composition. However, diamond-free rocks are products of upper-mantle magmatism based on carbonatite-free peridotite-eclogite-sulphide-carbon system. Chambers of diamond-parental carbonatite magma

  15. Investigations on diamond nanostructuring of different morphologies by the reactive-ion etching process and their potential applications.

    PubMed

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan

    2013-08-14

    We report the systematic studies on the fabrication of aligned, uniform, and highly dense diamond nanostructures from diamond films of various granular structures. Self-assembled Au nanodots are used as a mask in the self-biased reactive-ion etching (RIE) process, using an O2/CF4 process plasma. The morphology of diamond nanostructures is a close function of the initial phase composition of diamond. Cone-shaped and tip-shaped diamond nanostructures result for microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, whereas pillarlike and grasslike diamond nanostructures are obtained for Ar-plasma-based and N2-plasma-based ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, respectively. While the nitrogen-incorporated UNCD (N-UNCD) nanograss shows the most-superior electron-field-emission properties, the NCD nanotips exhibit the best photoluminescence properties, viz, different applications need different morphology of diamond nanostructures to optimize the respective characteristics. The optimum diamond nanostructure can be achieved by proper choice of granular structure of the initial diamond film. The etching mechanism is explained by in situ observation of optical emission spectrum of RIE plasma. The preferential etching of sp(2)-bonded carbon contained in the diamond films is the prime factor, which forms the unique diamond nanostructures from each type of diamond films. However, the excited oxygen atoms (O*) are the main etching species of diamond film.

  16. An insight into what superconducts in polycrystalline boron-doped diamonds based on investigations of microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovinskaia, N.; Wirth, R.; Wosnitza, J.; Papageorgiou, T.; Braun, H. F.; Miyajima, N.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of superconductivity in polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) synthesized under high pressure and high temperatures [Ekimov, et al. (2004) Nature 428:542–545] has raised a number of questions on the origin of the superconducting state. It was suggested that the heavy boron doping of diamond eventually leads to superconductivity. To justify such statements more detailed information on the microstructure of the composite materials and on the exact boron content in the diamond grains is needed. For that we used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. For the studied superconducting BDD samples synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures the diamond grain sizes are ≈1–2 μm with a boron content between 0.2 (2) and 0.5 (1) at %. The grains are separated by 10- to 20-nm-thick layers and triangular-shaped pockets of predominantly (at least 95 at %) amorphous boron. These results render superconductivity caused by the heavy boron doping in diamond highly unlikely. PMID:18697937

  17. Study of diamond film growth and properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, Sacharial

    1990-01-01

    The objective was to study diamond film growth and its properties in order to enhance the laser damage threshold of substrate materials. Calculations were performed to evaluate laser induced thermal stress parameter, R(sub T) of diamond. It is found that diamond has several orders of magnitude higher in value for R(sub T) compared to other materials. Thus, the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) of diamond is much higher. Diamond films were grown using a microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) system at various conditions of gas composition, pressure, temperature, and substrate materials. A 0.5 percent CH4 in H2 at 20 torr were ideal conditions for growing of high quality diamond films on substrates maintained at 900 C. The diamond films were polycrystalline which were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The top surface of the growing film is always rough due to the facets of polycrystalline film while the back surface of the film replicates the substrate surface. An analytical model based on two dimensional periodic heat flow was developed to calculate the effective in-plane (face parallel) diffusivity of a two layer system. The effective diffusivity of diamond/silicon samples was measured using a laser pulse technique. The thermal conductivity of the films was measured to be 13.5 W/cm K, which is better than that of a type Ia natural diamond. Laser induced damage experiments were performed on bare Si substrates, diamond film coated Si, and diamond film windows. Significant improvements in the LIDT were obtained for diamond film coated Si compared to the bare Si.

  18. Influence of Diamond Particles Coated with TiO2 Film on Wettability of Vitrified Bond and Transverse Rupture Strength (TRS) of Vitrified Bond Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dongdong; Wan, Long; Liu, Xiaopan; Hu, Weida; Li, Jianwei

    2016-06-01

    TiO2 films were prepared on the surface of the diamond particles using a classical sol-gel method. The results showed that the TiO2 covered on the diamond surface as a rough and dense film with anatase phase, and tightly combined with the diamond substrates via the Ti-O-C bond. The initial oxidation temperature and compression strength of diamond were improved to 725 °C and 23.8 N with TiO2 film coated. TiO2 film increased the roughness of the diamond surface, promoted its mutual solubility, and formed the chemical bonding (Ti-O-Si) between the vitrified bond and the diamond. Therefore, the TiO2 film decreased the interface energy of the diamond, and promoted the wetting angle of vitrified bond with diamond to 36.7°. As a result, the TRS of vitrified bond diamond composites was increased to 76.3 MPa.

  19. Potentiality of semiconducting diamond as the base material of millimeter-wave and terahertz IMPATT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Aritra; Banerjee, Suranjana; Banerjee, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    An attempt is made in this paper to explore the potentiality of semiconducting type-IIb diamond as the base material of double-drift region (DDR) impact avalanche transit time (IMPATT) devices operating at both millimetre-wave (mm-wave) and terahertz (THz) frequencies. A rigorous large-signal (L-S) simulation based on the non-sinusoidal voltage excitation (NSVE) model developed earlier by the authors is used in this study. At first, a simulation study based on avalanche response time reveals that the upper cut-off frequency for DDR diamond IMPATTs is 1.5 THz, while the same for conventional DDR Si IMPATTs is much smaller, i.e. 0.5 THz. The L-S simulation results show that the DDR diamond IMPATT device delivers a peak RF power of 7.79 W with an 18.17% conversion efficiency at 94 GHz; while at 1.5 THz, the peak power output and conversion efficiency decrease to 6.19 mW and 8.17% respectively, taking 50% voltage modulation. A comparative study of DDR IMPATTs based on diamond and Si shows that the former excels over the later as regards high frequency and high power performance at both mm-wave and THz frequency bands. The effect of band to band tunneling on the L-S properties of DDR diamond and Si IMPATTs has also been studied at different mm-wave and THz frequencies.

  20. Effect of electric field to infrared absorption properties of sodium nitrate on silver/diamond powder (Ag/DP) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mingchan; Wang, Jiesheng; Li, Chun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yufang; Yuan, Guang

    2014-10-01

    Silver/diamond powder (Ag/DP) composites have been prepared via pyrolysis of silver nitrate (AgNO3) on silicon substrate. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectra shows that the infrared absorption of nitrate (NO3-) is enhanced by the as-grown composites and increased further by the employment of an external electric field, which not only makes the Ag/DP composites improve the NO3- vibration strength considerably, but also induces significant differences in absorption intensity and frequency between the two individual antisymmetric stretching modes of NO3-. These features will expand the reach of infrared spectroscopy to a new class of nitrate salt detections.

  1. A neutron sensor based on synthetic single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Lerche, R A; Moran, M J

    2003-10-17

    We report the first neutron data for a single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond sensor. Results are presented for 2.5, 14.1, and 14.9 MeV incident neutrons. We show that the energy resolution for 14.1 MeV neutrons is at least 2.9% (as limited by the energy spread of the incident neutrons), and perhaps as good as 0.4% (as extrapolated from high resolution {alpha} particle data). This result could be relevant to fusion neutron spectroscopy at machines like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). We also show that our sensor has a high neutron linear attenuation coefficient, due to the high atomic density of diamond, and this could lead to applications in fission neutron detection.

  2. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part II: roughness with diamond finishing and differences between enamel composite vs body composite.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The following study asks three principle questions relative to composite finishing and composite polishing: 1) Will the superficial roughness of different restoration surfaces have different values, utilizing the same polishing system (multistep), after finishing with the tungsten carbide or diamond bur? 2) Under the same conditions of finishing and polishing sequences, will the composite surfaces (C), the composite-enamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces show different roughness values? 3) Will the surface roughness of composites of different translucency in the various phases of finishing and polishing, and on different interfaces, have different results? The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations when polishing, after finishing with tungsten carbide or diamond burs. Furthermore, the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between polishing on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin interfaces, and finally there are no differences on roughness after finishing and polishing of two composite with different translucency. For the study, 56 class V cavities were prepared on extracted teeth. Restorations were done in nanofilled composite Filtek XTE (3M Espe) in a standard fashion, and then finished and polished. The 28 buccal cavities were restored on the surface with composite enamel and the 28 palatals with composite body. Finishing was done with fine toothing burs in tungsten carbide (16 blades) or fine grit diamond burs (46 μm), and made by the same manufacturer (Komet). The second phase of finishing was done with burs (with the same form as already mentioned) ultrafine toothing tungsten carbide (30 blades) or with extra and ultrafine grit diamond (25 and 8 μm). The polishing phase for both of the earlier sequences was done with the application of three rubber tips with decreasing abrasiveness and an application with a

  3. Excimer Laser Beam Analyzer Based on CVD Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girolami, Marco; Salvatori, Stefano; Conte, Gennaro

    2010-11-01

    1-D and 2-D detector arrays have been realized on CVD-diamond. The relatively high resistivity of diamond in the dark allowed the fabrication of photoconductive "sandwich" strip (1D) or pixel (2D) detectors: a semitransparent light-receiving back-side contact was used for detector biasing. Cross-talk between pixels was limited by using intermediate guard contacts connected at the same ground potential of the pixels. Each pixel photocurrent was conditioned by a read-out electronics composed by a high sensitive integrator and a Σ-Δ ADC converter. The overall 500 μs conversion time allowed a data acquisition rate up to 2 kSPS. The measured fast photoresponse of the samples in the ns time regime suggests to use the proposed devices for fine tuning feedback of high-power pulsed-laser cavities, whereas solar-blindness guarantees high performance in UV beam diagnostics also under high intensity background illumination. Offering unique properties in terms of thermal conductivity and visible-light transparency, diamond represents one of the most suitable candidate for the detection of high-power UV laser emission. The technology of laser beam profiling is evolving with the increase of excimer lasers applications that span from laser-cutting to VLSI and MEMS technologies. Indeed, to improve emission performances, fine tuning of the laser cavity is required. In such a view, the development of a beam-profiler, able to work in real-time between each laser pulse, is mandatory.

  4. Volatile Composition and Odour-Activity Value of Thornless 'Black Diamond' and 'Marion' Blackberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    'Black Diamond' is a recently developed thornless blackberry cultivar with large fruit size, high yield, and good processed fruit quality that has rapidly become an industry standard. The flavour of 'Black Diamond' fruit is not the same as 'Marion', which is regarded by the industry as having the id...

  5. The Science of Diamonds and Their Inclusions: Can such Data be Used to Establish Diamond Provenance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Sobolev, N. V.; Ghazi, M.; Anand, M.; Bodner, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    The physics and chemistry of diamonds and their mineral inclusions can be used to determine the geographic source of rough diamonds. The science of diamonds includes their morphology and external features, N aggregation states and zonations, δ 13C, δ 15N, trace-element chemistry, and the nature of their rims and coatings. The science of the diamond inclusions (DIs) includes their mineralogy and chemical/isotopic compositions, the variation of mineral chemistry between diamonds and as multiple DIs within a single diamond, and the relations of DIs to geologic locales. For example, the exotic DIs in Brazilian diamonds appear to be unique and world famous; but are they really? The δ 34S values of the sulfide DIs are yet another type of data that may prove useful for paragenetic identification, but the requisite data are not presently available. A recently attempted method for discerning the locale of a diamond's origin involves the combined use of laser-ablation, high-resolution, inductively-coupled-plasma, mass spectrometry (LA-HR-ICPMS) and Raman spectroscopy. These sophisticated instruments are combined in a study of the outermost rims of coated diamonds. The premise to this endeavor is that these coatings contain the signatures of the very latest stages of diamond formation, within the kimberlite, as the diamonds are carried to the Earth's surface. Based upon xenolith and DI studies, the mantle of the Earth at a depth of 150 km, although heterogeneous on a small scale, is actually quite similar worldwide. Diamonds grown in the mantle may also have similar characteristics worldwide. However, the chemistry of kimberlite magmas, as they traverse the upper mantle and lower crust, on their way to the surface, can pick up late-stage characteristics that differ from place to place. Some of these definitive signatures may be preserved in the outermost coated regions of the diamonds. The bottom line to the question of provenance for rough diamonds, as addressed at the

  6. Raman study of diamond-based abrasives, and possible artefacts in detecting UHP microdiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Steger, Simon; Reissner, Claudia

    2016-11-01

    Raman spectral characteristics of a range of diamond-based abrasives (powders and sprays) and drilling and cutting tools, originating from preparation laboratories worldwide, are presented. Some abrasives show strong broadening of the main diamond band [FWHM (full width at half band-maximum) > 5 cm- 1] accompanied by strong band-downshift (ν˜ = 1316-1330 cm- 1). Others are characterised by moderate band broadening (FWHM = 1.8-5 cm- 1) at rather regular band position (ν˜ = 1331-1333 cm- 1). In addition we found that a ;fresh; abrasive and its used analogue may in some cases show vast differences in their Raman spectra. The Raman parameters of diamond-based abrasives overlap widely with Raman parameters of UHP (ultra-high pressure) microdiamond. It is hence impossible to assign diamond detected in a geological specimen to either an introduced artefact or a genuine UHP relict, from the Raman spectrum alone. Raman is an excellent technique for the detection of minute amounts of diamond; however it does not provide conclusive evidence for the identification of UHP microdiamond. The latter requires thorough verification, for instance by optical microscopy or, if doubts cannot be dispelled, transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Inclusions in diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlites (Slave Craton, Canada): Geochemical features of crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, O. A.; Logvinova, A. M.; Pokhilenko, N. P.

    2017-05-01

    The results of integrated studies of inclusion-containing diamonds from kimberlites of the Snap Lake dike complex (Canada) are presented. Features of the morphology, defect-impurity composition, and internal structure of the diamonds were determined by optic and scanning microscopy. The chemical composition of crystalline inclusions (olivine, garnet, and pyroxene) in diamonds was studied using a microanalyzer with an electronic probe. The inclusions of ultramafic paragenesis in the diamond (87%) are predominant. Carbonates, sulfide and hydrated silicate phases were found only in multiphase microinclusions. The large phlogopite inclusion studied was similar in composition to earlier studied nanosize inclusions of high-silica mica in diamonds from Snap Lake kimberlites. Revealed features of studied diamonds and presence of high-silica mica suggest that diamonds from Snap Lake have formed as the result of interaction between enriched in volatile and titanium high-potassium carbonate-silicate melts and peridotitic substrate at the base of thick lithospheric mantle.

  8. Triphasic Tooling with Small Oriented Diamond Tip for Turning and Smoothing Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, O. A.; Tompa, G. S.; Kear, B. H.; Veress, V.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing a new method for the growth of small diamond crystals at very high temperatures and pressures directly from a carbon melt. A prototype "Supercell" has been developed for this purpose. This system is capable of high rate crystal growth in relatively large working volumes. The resulting high quality diamond crystals will be incorporated into a triphasic diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool, with an oriented diamond crystal at its tip. High pressure is needed to prevent degradation of diamond at high temperature, and to ensure the formation of a crack & composite structure. After grinding and polishing, the composite material will be joined to a steel holder, thus forming a diamond-tipped tool for turning and smoothing of a mirror surface. A properly oriented single-crystal diamond cuts and smoothes much better than a conventional polycrystalline diamond crystal. This is because the hardness depends on crystallographic orientation-the difference corresponds to 60-100 GPa on the Knoop scale. Our goal is to achieve surface roughness of about 1 nm, which will be accomplished by precision cutting and smoothing. The hardness of the functionally-graded diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool varies from 100 GPa at its tip to 15 GPa at its base. Previous work has shown that the mass of machined material using an oriented-diamond tool is much larger than that for a standard diamond-metal composite tool.

  9. Triphasic Tooling with Small Oriented Diamond Tip for Turning and Smoothing Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, O. A.; Tompa, G. S.; Kear, B. H.; Veress, V.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing a new method for the growth of small diamond crystals at very high temperatures and pressures directly from a carbon melt. A prototype "Supercell" has been developed for this purpose. This system is capable of high rate crystal growth in relatively large working volumes. The resulting high quality diamond crystals will be incorporated into a triphasic diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool, with an oriented diamond crystal at its tip. High pressure is needed to prevent degradation of diamond at high temperature, and to ensure the formation of a crack & composite structure. After grinding and polishing, the composite material will be joined to a steel holder, thus forming a diamond-tipped tool for turning and smoothing of a mirror surface. A properly oriented single-crystal diamond cuts and smoothes much better than a conventional polycrystalline diamond crystal. This is because the hardness depends on crystallographic orientation-the difference corresponds to 60-100 GPa on the Knoop scale. Our goal is to achieve surface roughness of about 1 nm, which will be accomplished by precision cutting and smoothing. The hardness of the functionally-graded diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool varies from 100 GPa at its tip to 15 GPa at its base. Previous work has shown that the mass of machined material using an oriented-diamond tool is much larger than that for a standard diamond-metal composite tool.

  10. Effect of reinforcement particle size on the tribological properties of nano-diamond filled polytetrafluoroethylene based coating.

    PubMed

    Lim, D P; Lee, J Y; Lim, D S; Ahn, S G; Lyo, I W

    2009-07-01

    The tribological properties of PTFE composite coatings reinforced by nano-diamonds were investigated. Mechanical particle size reduction and dispersion of nano-diamond aggregates were performed by milling with ceramic beads in an organic solvent. Particle size was controlled by the milling time. Pastes comprising a PTFE solution mixed with nano-diamond having various sizes were coated on the aluminum substrate. Ball-on-plate type wear test was performed to investigate the friction and wear behavior. The results indicated that the addition of nano-diamonds effectively improved tribological performance of the PTFE coating. The reduction in nano-diamond sizes were not always improved the wear resistance of PTFE coating. This unexpected behavior was explained by observation on the worn surfaces and wear debris.

  11. Composition and properties of the so-called 'diamond-like' amorphous carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, J. C.; Stultz, J. E.; Shiller, P. J.; Macdonald, J. R.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The composition of amorphous 'diamond-like' films made by direct low energy ion beam deposition, R.F. discharge and sputtering was determined by nuclear reaction analysis, IR spectroscopy and microcombustion chemical analysis. The nuclear reaction analysis showed very similar hydrogen depth profiles for all three types of samples. The atomic ratio of hydrogen to carbon was approximately 0.2 at the film surface and rose to approximately 1.0 at a depth of 500 A. The integrated intensity of the C-H stretching band at about 2900 per cm indicates that the amount of chemically bonded hydrogen is less than the total hydrogen content. Combustion analysis confirmed the overall atomic ratio of hydrogen to carbon determined by nuclear reaction analysis. The chemical state of the non-bonded hydrogen was not determined; however, the effective diffusion coefficient computed from the hydrogen depth profile was extremely low. This indicates either that the films are exceedingly impermeable or that the non-bonded hydrogen requires an additional activated step to leave the films, e.g., desorption or chemical reaction.

  12. Composition and properties of the so-called 'diamond-like' amorphous carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, J. C.; Stultz, J. E.; Shiller, P. J.; Macdonald, J. R.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The composition of amorphous 'diamond-like' films made by direct low energy ion beam deposition, R.F. discharge and sputtering was determined by nuclear reaction analysis, IR spectroscopy and microcombustion chemical analysis. The nuclear reaction analysis showed very similar hydrogen depth profiles for all three types of samples. The atomic ratio of hydrogen to carbon was approximately 0.2 at the film surface and rose to approximately 1.0 at a depth of 500 A. The integrated intensity of the C-H stretching band at about 2900 per cm indicates that the amount of chemically bonded hydrogen is less than the total hydrogen content. Combustion analysis confirmed the overall atomic ratio of hydrogen to carbon determined by nuclear reaction analysis. The chemical state of the non-bonded hydrogen was not determined; however, the effective diffusion coefficient computed from the hydrogen depth profile was extremely low. This indicates either that the films are exceedingly impermeable or that the non-bonded hydrogen requires an additional activated step to leave the films, e.g., desorption or chemical reaction.

  13. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Nemtsev, G; Amosov, V; Meshchaninov, S; Popovichev, S; Rodionov, R

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  14. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemtsev, G.; Amosov, V.; Meshchaninov, S.; Popovichev, S.; Rodionov, R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  15. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtsev, G. Amosov, V.; Meshchaninov, S.; Rodionov, R.; Popovichev, S.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB

    2016-11-15

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  16. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  17. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of materials

  18. Analysis of the reverse I-V characteristics of diamond-based PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saremi, Mehdi; Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2017-07-01

    Diamond is one of the most promising candidates for high power and high temperature applications, due to its large bandgap and high thermal conductivity. As a result of the growth and fabrication process of diamond-based devices, structural defects such as threading dislocations (TDs) may degrade the electrical properties of such devices. Understanding and control of such defects are important for improving device technology, particularly the reverse breakdown characteristics. Here, we show that the reverse bias current-voltage characteristics in diamond PIN diodes can be described by hopping conduction and Poole-Frenkel emission through TDs over the temperature (T) range of 323 K < T < 423 K, for typical values of the TD density found in epitaxially grown materials.

  19. Development and Experimental Study of Surface-Electrical Discharge Diamond Grinding of Al-10 wt%SiC Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Shyam Sunder; Yadava, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    As silicon carbide possesses small fracture toughness, it is difficult to grind because it leads to cracking. Metal matrix composites can be machined using electrical discharge machining (EDM) but the process is slow. Electrical discharge diamond grinding (EDDG), which consists of diamond grinding and EDM with a rotating disk which enhanced material removal rate (MRR) and produce better surface finish. This paper describes the machining characteristic of Al-SiC composite using EDDG in surface grinding configuration which is called as surface-electrical discharge diamond grinding (S-EDDG). A chain of experiments were performed on S-EDDG set up by mounting newly self designed and fabricated set up on conventional die sinking EDM machine using the approach of one parameter-at-a-time concept. Surface roughness (Ra) and MRR are taken as output parameters as both are important outcome in the manufacturing process and they materialize a major division in the manufacturing system. The effects of current, wheel speed and depth of cut is analyzed on MRR and Ra. Finally, optimization have been done through weighted principal component analysis.

  20. Development of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit for gamma radiation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranova, M. A.; Boyko, A. V.; Chebyshev, S. B.; Cherkashin, I. I.; Kireev, V. P.; Petrov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    In the article the description of wide-ranged diamond-based detector unit is given. Characteristics of the diamond detector were studied in current and in impulse mode. As well it was studied how detector's sensitivity depends on power doze within the limits from 10-3 to 0,4Gy/h (impulse mode) and from 10-1to 2 104Gy/h (current mode). On the basis of the obtained data it is possible to estimate about the possibility of using the detector to prevent emergency accident on a nuclear power plant and for everyday control at a nuclear power plant.

  1. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  2. Microring resonator-based diamond optothermal switch: a building block for a quantum computing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Faraon, Andrei; Santori, Charles; Acosta, Victor; Beausoleil, Raymond G.

    2013-03-01

    The negatively-charged nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond has motivated many groups building scalable quantum information processors based on diamond photonics. This is owning to the long-lived electronic spin coherence and the capability for spin manipulation and readout of NV centers.1-4 The primitive operation is to create entanglement between two NV centers, based on schemes such as 'atom-photon entanglement' proposed by Cabrillo et al.5To scale this type of scheme beyond two qubits, one important component is an optical switch that allows light emitted from a particular device to be routed to multiple locations. With such a switch, one has choices of routing photons to specified paths and has the benefit of improving the entanglement speed by entangling multiple qubits at the same time. Yield of the existing diamond cavities coupled with NV centers are inevitably low, due to the nature of randomness for NV placement and orientation, variation of spectral stability, and variation of cavity resonance frequency and quality factor. An optical switch provides the capability to tolerate a large fraction of defective devices by routing only to the working devices. Many type of switching devices were built on conventional semiconductor materials with mechanisms from mechanical, thermal switching to carrier injection, photonics crystal, and polymer refractive index tuning .6-8 In this paper, we build an optical-thermal switch on diamond with micro-ring waveguides, mainly for the simplicity of the diamond fabrication. The the switching function was realized by locally tuning the temperature of the diamond waveguides. Switching efficiency of 31% at 'drop' port and 73% at 'through' port were obtained.

  3. Diamond like carbon coatings: Categorization by atomic number density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angus, John C.

    1986-01-01

    Dense diamond-like hydrocarbon films grown at the NASA Lewis Research Center by radio frequency self bias discharge and by direct ion beam deposition were studied. A new method for categorizing hydrocarbons based on their atomic number density and elemental composition was developed and applied to the diamond-like hydrocarbon films. It was shown that the diamond-like hydrocarbon films are an entirely new class of hydrocarbons with atomic number densities lying between those of single crystal diamond and adamantanes. In addition, a major review article on these new materials was completed in cooperation with NASA Lewis Research Center personnel.

  4. Effect of titanium addition on the thermal properties of diamond/cu-ti composites fabricated by pressureless liquid-phase sintering technique.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chih-Yu; Chu, Chao-Hung; Lee, Mu-Tse; Lin, Chun-Ming; Lin, Su-Jien

    2014-01-01

    In this study, minor-addition elements such as Si, Co, Cr, W, Mo, and Ti were added to matrix to improve the wettability between the diamonds and Cu matrix. The pressureless liquid-phase sintering technique adopted in this study provides a low-cost method for producing diamond/Cu composites with high potential for industrial mass production. Thermal properties of the diamond/Cu-Ti composites fabricated by pressureless liquid-phase sintering at 1373 K with variation in Ti contents were thoroughly investigated. XRD and TEM analysis show that TiC layer formed in the interface between Cu and diamond. The composites exhibited thermal conductivity as high as 620 W/m · K for 50 vol% diamond/Cu-0.6 at % Ti composite with diamond particle size of 300 µm. This value comes up to 85% of the thermal conductivity calculated by the Hasselman and Johnson (H-J) theoretical analysis. Under these conditions, a suitable coefficient of thermal expansion of 6.9 ppm/K was obtained.

  5. Effect of Titanium Addition on the Thermal Properties of Diamond/Cu-Ti Composites Fabricated by Pressureless Liquid-Phase Sintering Technique

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chih-Yu; Chu, Chao-Hung; Lee, Mu-Tse; Lin, Chun-Ming; Lin, Su-Jien

    2014-01-01

    In this study, minor-addition elements such as Si, Co, Cr, W, Mo, and Ti were added to matrix to improve the wettability between the diamonds and Cu matrix. The pressureless liquid-phase sintering technique adopted in this study provides a low-cost method for producing diamond/Cu composites with high potential for industrial mass production. Thermal properties of the diamond/Cu-Ti composites fabricated by pressureless liquid-phase sintering at 1373 K with variation in Ti contents were thoroughly investigated. XRD and TEM analysis show that TiC layer formed in the interface between Cu and diamond. The composites exhibited thermal conductivity as high as 620 W/m·K for 50 vol% diamond/Cu-0.6  at % Ti composite with diamond particle size of 300 µm. This value comes up to 85% of the thermal conductivity calculated by the Hasselman and Johnson (H-J) theoretical analysis. Under these conditions, a suitable coefficient of thermal expansion of 6.9 ppm/K was obtained. PMID:24715816

  6. In situ analysis of carbon isotopes in North American diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rythoven, A. D.; Hauri, E. H.; Wang, J.; McCandless, T.; Shirey, S. B.; Schulze, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Diamonds from three North American kimberlite occurrences were investigated with cathodoluminescence (CL) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to determine their growth history and carbon isotope composition. Diamonds analyzed include fourteen from Lynx (Quebec), twelve from Kelsey Lake (Colorado) and eleven from A154 South (Diavik mine, Northwest Territories). Growth histories for the diamonds vary from simple to highly complex based on their CL images and depending on the individual stone. Deformation laminae are evident in CL images of the Lynx diamonds that typically are brownish in color. Two to five points per diamond were analyzed by SIMS for carbon isotope composition. Sample heterogeneity is minimal in terms of δ13C (vs. PDB) values. Points within single diamond had a maximum range of approximately 1 ‰. The results for the A154 South (-6.4 to -3 ‰) and Kelsey Lake (-11.2 to -2.6 ‰) stones were in accordance with earlier reported values. The Lynx kimberlite stones have anomalously high ratios and range from -3.5 to +0.2 ‰ (average: -1.4 ‰). No previous carbon isotope analyses on diamonds from Lynx or any other eastern Superior craton occurrence have been published. The diamonds possess carbon isotope ratios higher than those for the only other reported analyses of Superior craton diamonds at Wawa, Ontario (-5.5 to -1.1 ‰). In global terms, the only published analyses of diamonds that consistently contain even higher values are those from New South Wales (Australia). However, these diamonds are alluvial and contain eclogitic and/or exotic mineral inclusions. The Lynx diamonds are entirely peridotitic and from a primary deposit. The unusually low (i.e. >-5‰) δ13C values of the Lynx (and Wawa) diamonds may indicate a different carbon reservoir for the Superior craton mantle as compared to other cratons.

  7. The implementation of universal quantum memory and gates based on large-scale diamond surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers implanted beneath the diamond surface have been demonstrated to be effective in the processing of controlling and reading-out. In this paper, NV center entangled with the fluorine nuclei collective ensemble is simplified to Jaynes-Cummings (JC) model. Based on this system, we discussed the implementation of quantum state storage and single-qubit quantum gate.

  8. Nanoscale thermometer based on color defects in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucsko, Georg; Maurer, Peter; Kubo, Minako; Yao, Norman; Park, Hongkun; Lukin, Mikhail; Lukin Group/Park Group Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    Measuring local temperature changes with confocal spatial resolution is of great interest to an array of scientific disciplines. Here we demonstrate a novel nanoscale temperature sensor with remarkable sensitivity by taking advantage of the quantum mechanical spin properties of nitrogen-vacancy color centers in diamond. This approach enables us to sense temperature variations with a sensitivity down to a few milli-kelvin and a spatial resolution of ~ 200 nm. This remarkable sensitivity is achieved by using dynamical decoupling techniques in combination with the long spin coherence properties of our systems. We also demonstrate local temperature control on a sub-cellular level by laser heating of individual gold nanoparticles and measuring the local temperature using individual nanodiamonds induced into the cytoplasm of single biological cells. These results pave the way for a variety of potential applications ranging from physical to life sciences.

  9. Progress toward a performance based specification for diamond grinding wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Piscotty, M.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-11-12

    This work sought to improve the communication between users and makers of fine diamond grinding wheels. A promising avenue for this is to formulate a voluntary product standard that comprises performance indicators that bridge the gap between specific user requirements and the details of wheel formulations. We propose a set of performance specifiers of figures-of-merit, that might be assessed by straightforward and traceable testing methods, but do not compromise proprietary information of the wheel user of wheel maker. One such performance indicator might be wheel hardness. In addition we consider technologies that might be required to realize the benefits of optimized grinding wheels. A non-contact wheel-to- workpiece proximity sensor may provide a means of monitoring wheel wear and thus wheel position, for wheels that exhibit high wear rates in exchange for improved surface finish.

  10. Detailed Study of BSA Adsorption on Micro- and Nanocrystalline Diamond/β-SiC Composite Gradient Films by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Wang, Tao; Druzhinin, Sergey I; Wesner, Daniel; Jiang, Xin; Schönherr, Holger

    2017-01-24

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on micro- and nanocrystalline diamond/β-SiC composite films synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique has been investigated by confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. BSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was employed as a probe. The BSA(FITC) conjugate was found to preferentially adsorb on both O-/OH-terminated microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond compared to the OH-terminated β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of BSA adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with an increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The different strength of adsorption (>30 times for diamond with a grain size of 570 nm) coincides with different surface energy parameters and differing conformational changes upon adsorption. Fluorescence data of the adsorbed BSA(FITC) on the gradient film with different diamond coverage show a four-exponential decay with decay times of 3.71, 2.54, 0.66, and 0.13 ns for a grain size of 570 nm. The different decay times are attributed to the fluorescence of thiourea fluorescein residuals of linked FITC distributed in BSA with different dye-dye and dye-surface distances. The longest decay time was found to correlate linearly with the diamond grain size. The fluorescence of BSA(FITC) undergoes external dynamic fluorescence quenching on the diamond surface by H- and/or sp(2)-defects and/or by amorphous carbon or graphite phases. An acceleration of the internal fluorescence concentration quenching in BSA(FITC) because of structural changes of albumin due to adsorption, is concluded to be a secondary contributor. These results suggest that the micro- and nanocrystalline diamond/β-SiC composite gradient films can be utilized to spatially control protein adsorption and diamond crystallite size, which facilitates systematic studies at these interesting (bio)interfaces.

  11. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  12. Graphene-based composites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao; Qi, Xiaoying; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Hua

    2012-01-21

    Graphene has attracted tremendous research interest in recent years, owing to its exceptional properties. The scaled-up and reliable production of graphene derivatives, such as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO), offers a wide range of possibilities to synthesize graphene-based functional materials for various applications. This critical review presents and discusses the current development of graphene-based composites. After introduction of the synthesis methods for graphene and its derivatives as well as their properties, we focus on the description of various methods to synthesize graphene-based composites, especially those with functional polymers and inorganic nanostructures. Particular emphasis is placed on strategies for the optimization of composite properties. Lastly, the advantages of graphene-based composites in applications such as the Li-ion batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells, photovoltaic devices, photocatalysis, as well as Raman enhancement are described (279 references).

  13. Carbon isotope ratios and impurities in diamonds from Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidane, Abiel; Koch-Müller, Monika; Morales, Luiz; Wiedenbeck, Michael; De Wit, Maarten

    2015-04-01

    We are investigating the sources of diamonds from southern Africa by studying both their carbon isotopic composition and chemical impurities. Our samples include macro-sized diamonds from River Ranch kimberlite in Zimbabwe and the Helam and Klipspringer kimberlitic deposits from South Africa, as well as micro-sized diamonds from Klipspringer and Premier kimberlites in South Africa. We have characterized the samples for their structurally bounded nitrogen, hydrogen and platelets defect using a Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the DiaMap routine, open source software (Howell et al., 2012), IR spectra were deconvulated and quantified for their nitrogen (A, B and D components) and hydrogen contents. High to moderate nitrogen concentrations (1810 to 400 µg/g; 400 to 50 µg/g respectively) were found in diamonds from Klipspringer and Helam. Moderate to low (<50 µg/g) nitrogen concentrations were observed in diamonds from Premier and River Ranch. Type II diamonds, i.e. diamonds with no N impurities, which are presumed to have been derived from ultramafic sources, are found in the River Ranch deposit. The macro- and micro-size diamonds from the Klipspringer deposit display similar nitrogen defects, with higher nitrogen concentration and more frequent D components found in the macro-size diamonds. One of the first steps towards reliable carbon isotope studies is the development of calibration materials for SIMS carbon isotopic analyses. We have investigated candidate materials both from a polycrystalline synthetic diamond sheet and two natural gem quality diamonds from Juina (Brazil). Electron-based images of the synthetic diamond sheet, obtained using GFZ Potsdam's dual beam FIB instrument, show many diamond grains with diameters greater than 35 µm. SIMS testing of the isotopic homogeneity of the back and front sides of the synthetic sheets reveal similar 13C/12C ratio within a RSD of <1 ‰ . SIMS isotopic analyses of the two natural diamond RMs

  14. Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Greg M. Swain, PI

    2009-03-10

    The DOE-funded research conducted by the Swain group was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder. (Note: All potentials are reported versus Ag/AgCl (sat'd KCl) and cm{sup 2} refers to the electrode geometric area, unless otherwise stated).

  15. Determination of L- and D-fucose using amperometric electrodes based on diamond paste.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Nejem, R'afat Mahmoud; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-02-21

    Monocrystalline diamond (natural diamond, synthetic-1 and synthetic-2) based electrochemical electrodes were designed for the analysis of L- and D-fucose. Response characteristics of the electrochemical electrodes were determined using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). L-fucose was determined using DPV with electrodes based on natural diamond, synthetic-1 and synthetic-2, respectively, at 240 mV using NaCl as the electrolyte (pH 3.0); at 160 mV using KNO(3) (pH 10.0) and at 80 mV using KCl as the electrolyte (pH 10.0) while D-fucose was analyzed at 120 mV using KCl as the electrolyte (pH 1.0); at 140 mV using KNO(3) as the electrolyte (pH 1.0) and at 160 mV using NaNO(3) as the electrolyte (pH 3.0). The linear concentration ranges for L-fucose were between 10(-13) and 10(-9) mol L(-1) (natural diamond), 10(-11) and 10(-8) mol L(-1) (synthetic-1) and 10(-6) and 10(-3) mol L(-1) (synthetic-2) with detection limits of 10(-14), 10(-12) and 10(-8) mol L(-1) magnitude order, respectively. For D-fucose, the linear concentration ranges were 10(-6) to 10(-3) mol L(-1) (natural diamond), 10(-5) to 10(-3) mol L(-1) (synthetic-1) and 10(-9) to 10(-3) mol L(-1) (synthetic-2) with detection limits of 10(-7), 10(-7) and 10(-10) mol L(-1) magnitude order, respectively. The sensors were used for the assay of L-fucose in serum and urine samples.

  16. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of molybdenum/phenolic resin composites binding with aluminum nitride particles for diamond cutters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Te; Lee, Hsun-Tsing; Chen, Jem-Kun

    2013-11-01

    Novolac-type bisphenol-F based molybdenum-phenolic resins/silane-modified aluminum nitride (Mo-BPF/m-AlN) composites were successfully prepared. In the preparation process, molybdate reacted with bisphenol-F based phenolic resins (BPF) to form a low cross-linked Mo-BPF with new Mosbnd O bonds which were confirmed by the FTIR and XPS spectra. Simultaneously, a special silane-modified aluminum nitride (m-AlN) was prepared with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) modifier. Then, this m-AlN was fully mixed with Mo-BPF to form Mo-BPF/m-AlN which can be further cured with hexamethylenetetramine at 200 °C. The structure and characterization of BPF, Mo-BPF and Mo-BPF/m-AlN were determined by using FTIR, DSC, DMA, TGA, SEM, mechanical properties and contact angle measurements. SEM photographs show that m-AlN particles are uniformly distributed in the Mo-BPF/m-AlN composites. Also there are no gaps or void between m-AlN and Mo-BPF phases, which implies a strong physical bonding between the two phases. The glass transition temperature, thermal resistance, flexural strength, and hardness of Mo-BPF are respectively higher than those of BPF. This is due to the presence of Mosbnd O cross-linking bonds in Mo-BPF. When the m-AlN was additionally incorporated into Mo-BPF, the well-dispersed and well-adhered m-AlN can further promote all the above-mentioned properties of the composites. Typically, the glass transition temperature, decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss and flexural strength of Mo-BPF/m-AlN are 245 °C, 428 °C and 82.7 MPa respectively, which are much higher than the corresponding values of 184 °C, 358 °C and 58.2 MPa for BPF. In addition, the hygroscopic nature of BPF can be inhibited by treating with molybdate or incorporating with m-AlN. This is due to that the m-AlN is hydrophobic and Mosbnd O groups in Mo-BPF are more hydrophobic than OH groups in BPF. Furthermore, Mo-BPF/m-AlN was compared with BPF in the performance as a binder for diamond cutting

  18. Development of high temperature, radiation hard detectors based on diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Alex; Fern, George R.; Hobson, Peter R.; Ireland, Terry; Salimian, Ali; Silver, Jack; Smith, David R.; Lefeuvre, Gwenaelle; Saenger, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties compared to current, well developed, detector materials; exceptional radiation, chemical and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry), wide bandgap and an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. However effective exploitation of these properties requires development of a suitable metallisation scheme to give stable contacts for high temperature applications. To best utilise available processing techniques to optimise sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations, a reliable model is required. This must assess the performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of detector and converter geometry. The same is also required for proper interpretation of experimental data. Sensors have been fabricated with varying metallisation schemes indented to permit high temperature operation; Present test results indicate that viable fabrication schemes for high temperature contacts have been developed and present modelling results, supported by preliminary data from partners indicate simulations provide a useful representation of response.

  19. Structural characterization of hard materials by transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Diamond-Silicon Carbide composites and Yttria-stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joon Seok

    2008-10-01

    Diamond-Silicon Carbide (SiC) composites are excellent heat spreaders for high performance microprocessors, owing to the unparalleled thermal conductivity of the former component. Such a combination is obtained by the infiltration of liquid silicon in a synthetic diamond compact, where a rigid SiC matrix forms by the reaction between the raw materials. As well as the outstanding thermal properties, this engineered compound also retains the extreme hardness of the artificial gem. This makes it difficult to perform structural analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), for it is not possible to produce thin foils out of this solid by conventional polishing methods. For the first time, a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) instrument successfully allowed site-specific preparation of electron-transparent specimens by the lift-out technique. Subsequent TEM studies revealed that the highest concentration of structural defects occurs in the vicinity of the diamond-SiC interfaces, which are believed to act as the major barriers to the transport of thermal energy. Diffraction contrast analyses showed that the majority of the defects in diamond are isolated perfect screw or 60° dislocations. On the other hand, SiC grains contain partial dislocations and a variety of imperfections such as microtwins, stacking faults and planar defects that are conjectured to consist of antiphase (or inversion) boundaries. Clusters of nanocrystalline SiC were also observed at the diamond-SiC boundaries, and a specific heteroepitaxial orientation relationship was discovered for all cubic SiC that grows on diamond {111} facets. Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) is the most common electrolyte material for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. It is an ionic conductor in which charge transfer is achieved by the transport of oxygen ions (O 2-). Like the diamond composite above, it is hard and brittle, and difficult to make into electron transparent TEM samples. Provided an effective

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  1. Ultrahard stitching of nanotwinned diamond and cubic boron nitride in C2-BN composite

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaobing; Chen, Xin; Ma, Hong-An; ...

    2016-07-27

    Materials combining the hardness and strength of diamond with the higher thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN) have broad potential value in science and engineering. Reacting nanodiamond with cBN at moderate pressures and high temperatures provides a pathway to such materials. Here we report the fabrication of Cx-BN nanocomposites, measuring up to 10 mm in longest dimension, by reacting nanodiamond with pre-synthesized cBN in a large-volume press. The nanocomposites consist of randomly-oriented diamond and cBN domains stitched together by sp3-hybridized C-B and C-N bonds, leading to p-type semiconductivity. Dislocations near the sutures accommodate lattice mismatch between diamond and cBN.more » Nanotwinning within both diamond and cBN domains further contributes to a bulk hardness ~50% higher than sintered cBN. We find the nanocomposite of C2-BN exhibits p-type semiconductivity with low activation energy and high thermal stability, making it a functional,ultrahard substance.« less

  2. Ultrahard stitching of nanotwinned diamond and cubic boron nitride in C2-BN composite

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaobing; Chen, Xin; Ma, Hong-An; Jia, Xiaopeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Guo, Jiangang; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Bina, Craig R.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Materials combining the hardness and strength of diamond with the higher thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN) have broad potential value in science and engineering. Reacting nanodiamond with cBN at moderate pressures and high temperatures provides a pathway to such materials. Here we report the fabrication of Cx-BN nanocomposites, measuring up to 10 mm in longest dimension, by reacting nanodiamond with pre-synthesized cBN in a large-volume press. The nanocomposites consist of randomly-oriented diamond and cBN domains stitched together by sp3-hybridized C-B and C-N bonds, leading to p-type semiconductivity. Dislocations near the sutures accommodate lattice mismatch between diamond and cBN. Nanotwinning within both diamond and cBN domains further contributes to a bulk hardness ~50% higher than sintered cBN. The nanocomposite of C2-BN exhibits p-type semiconductivity with low activation energy and high thermal stability, making it a functional, ultrahard substance. PMID:27461889

  3. Ultrahard stitching of nanotwinned diamond and cubic boron nitride in C2-BN composite.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobing; Chen, Xin; Ma, Hong-An; Jia, Xiaopeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Guo, Jiangang; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Bina, Craig R; Jacobsen, Steven D

    2016-07-27

    Materials combining the hardness and strength of diamond with the higher thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN) have broad potential value in science and engineering. Reacting nanodiamond with cBN at moderate pressures and high temperatures provides a pathway to such materials. Here we report the fabrication of Cx-BN nanocomposites, measuring up to 10 mm in longest dimension, by reacting nanodiamond with pre-synthesized cBN in a large-volume press. The nanocomposites consist of randomly-oriented diamond and cBN domains stitched together by sp(3)-hybridized C-B and C-N bonds, leading to p-type semiconductivity. Dislocations near the sutures accommodate lattice mismatch between diamond and cBN. Nanotwinning within both diamond and cBN domains further contributes to a bulk hardness ~50% higher than sintered cBN. The nanocomposite of C2-BN exhibits p-type semiconductivity with low activation energy and high thermal stability, making it a functional, ultrahard substance.

  4. Ultrahard stitching of nanotwinned diamond and cubic boron nitride in C2-BN composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobing; Chen, Xin; Ma, Hong-An; Jia, Xiaopeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Guo, Jiangang; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Bina, Craig R.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-07-01

    Materials combining the hardness and strength of diamond with the higher thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN) have broad potential value in science and engineering. Reacting nanodiamond with cBN at moderate pressures and high temperatures provides a pathway to such materials. Here we report the fabrication of Cx-BN nanocomposites, measuring up to 10 mm in longest dimension, by reacting nanodiamond with pre-synthesized cBN in a large-volume press. The nanocomposites consist of randomly-oriented diamond and cBN domains stitched together by sp3-hybridized C-B and C-N bonds, leading to p-type semiconductivity. Dislocations near the sutures accommodate lattice mismatch between diamond and cBN. Nanotwinning within both diamond and cBN domains further contributes to a bulk hardness ~50% higher than sintered cBN. The nanocomposite of C2-BN exhibits p-type semiconductivity with low activation energy and high thermal stability, making it a functional, ultrahard substance.

  5. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  6. Degradation mechanisms of carbon-based electrocatalyst support materials and development of an advanced support based on electrically conducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Anne Elizabeth

    2005-11-01

    conducting diamond powder was prepared by coating insulating diamond powder (8-12 mum diam) with a thin boron-doped diamond layer using microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Increases in the electrical conductivity after growth confirmed that a conductive diamond overlayer formed. The charge passed during anodic polarization at 1.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl and 25°C for 1 h was largest for GC powder (0.88 C/cm2) and smallest for conductive diamond powder (0.18 C/cm2), illustrating the dimensional stability of diamond powder compared to sp2-bonded carbon powder. Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (BND) was coated on Toray RTM carbon paper (TCP) via microwave-assisted CVD. Pt nanoparticles were deposited on TCP and BND using a pulsed galvanostatic method. The stability of the bare TCP and BND substrates and the composite Pt/TCP and Pt/BND electrodes were studied using potentiostatic polarization in 0.1 M HClO4. The BND electrode exhibited superior morphological and microstructural stability over TCP at 1.6 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Evidence was found for dissolution and redeposition of Pt on composite electrodes, particularly for Pt/TCP.

  7. Diamond anvil technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Michael

    This paper is largely a review of the techniques used in making diamond anvils and the constraints these put on the shapes of anvil. Techniques available for shaping diamonds include cleaving, sawing, polishing, laser cutting, and bruting. At present the shapes most commonly used for anvils are a modification of the brilliant cut derived from the gem industry, and a design based on an octagonal prism with truncated pyramidal top and base, known as the "Drukker standard design". Diamond orientation and material selection are considered as are future possibilities for the attainment of still higher pressures through modifications of the diamond anvil material or design.

  8. Heat Dissipation Interfaces Based on Vertically Aligned Diamond/Graphite Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Santos, N F; Holz, T; Santos, T; Fernandes, A J S; Vasconcelos, T L; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Achete, C A; Silva, R F; Costa, F M

    2015-11-11

    Crystalline carbon-based materials are intrinsically chemically inert and good heat conductors, allowing their applications in a great variety of devices. A technological step forward in heat dissipators production can be given by tailoring the carbon phase microstructure, tuning the CVD synthesis conditions. In this work, a rapid bottom-up synthesis of vertically aligned hybrid material comprising diamond thin platelets covered by a crystalline graphite layer was developed. A single run was designed in order to produce a high aspect ratio nanostructured carbon material favoring the thermal dissipation under convection-governed conditions. The produced material was characterized by multiwavelength Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy (scanning and transmission), and the macroscopic heat flux was evaluated. The results obtained confirm the enhancement of heat dissipation rate in the developed hybrid structures, when compared to smooth nanocrystalline diamond films.

  9. Unusual growth macrolayers on {100} faces of diamond crystals from magnesium-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Nechaev, Denis V.; Palyanov, Yuri N.

    2016-12-01

    We studied unusual growth macrolayers on the {100} faces of diamond crystals grown in Mg-C and Mg0.9Ge0.1-C systems at 7.0 GPa and in the temperature range of 1800-1900 °C. The layers were shaped as rectangles highly elongated in one of the [110] directions. The layer elongation (length to width ratio) was different, but did not exceed 23. We found that the ends of the macrolayers in most cases were composed of {111} microfacets, and their growth occurred by layers along these microfacets. Using selective etching, we found that the macrolayers were not associated with outcrops of dislocations and any planar defects on the {100} faces. It is supposed that the formation of these highly elongated layers occurs by two-dimensional nucleation that becomes possible at high carbon supersaturation under conditions of kinetically limited diamond growth in Mg-based systems.

  10. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smaluk, Victor; Martin, Ian; Fielder, Richard; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  11. An energy-based model to predict wear in nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscopy tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, R.; Moldovan, N.; Espinosa, H. D.

    2009-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is one of the most powerful techniques to probe surfaces and material properties at the nanoscale, and pattern organic and inorganic molecules. In all cases, knowledge of the tip geometry and its evolution with continued use is essential. In this work, a broadly applicable energy model for the evolution of scanning probe tip radii during use is presented based on quantitative wear experiments. Experiments were conducted using AFM probes made of both undoped and nitrogen-doped diamond. Undoped diamond probes were found to be nearly ten times more wear resistant than commercially available silicon nitride probes. For a constant applied force, a linear relationship between wear volume and total dissipation energy is identified. The change in tip radius was also found to be proportional to the square root of scan distance, x0.5.

  12. Tissue Equivalence Study of a Novel Diamond-Based Microdosimeter for Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jeremy A.; Guatelli, Susanna; Petasecca, Marco; Lerch, Michael L. F.; Reinhard, Mark I.; Zaider, Marco; Ziegler, James; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2014-08-01

    Radiation detectors based on diamond are attractive for radiation protection applications in space and aviation due to their radiation hardness, large breakdown voltage, fast signal collection, and low noise, thus representing a valid alternative to silicon-based detector devices. In this paper, we study the tissue equivalence of diamond in proton and particle radiation fields typical of galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events. We determine a method to convert microdosimetric response from diamond to water by means of Geant4 simulations. Results are presented showing that a simple geometrical scaling factor ( 0.32 ) of linear dimensions is adequate to convert experimentally obtained microdosimetric energy deposition spectra in diamond to equivalent microdosimetric energy deposition spectra in water.

  13. Test of a prototype neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors in a fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Ricco, G.; Caiffi, B.; Pompili, F.; Pillon, M.; Angelone, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Cardarelli, R.; Argiro, S.

    2015-07-01

    A prototype of neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors has been developed. This prototype consists of a {sup 6}Li neutron converter sandwiched between two CVD diamond crystals. The radiation hardness of the diamond crystals makes it suitable for applications in low power research reactors, while a low sensitivity to gamma rays and low leakage current of the detector permit to reach good energy resolution. A fast coincidence between two crystals is used to reject background. The detector was read out using two different electronic chains connected to it by a few meters of cable. The first chain was based on conventional charge-sensitive amplifiers, the other used a custom fast charge amplifier developed for this purpose. The prototype has been tested at various neutron sources and showed its practicability. In particular, the detector was calibrated in a TRIGA thermal reactor (LENA laboratory, University of Pavia) with neutron fluxes of 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s and at the 3 MeV D-D monochromatic neutron source named FNG (ENEA, Rome) with neutron fluxes of 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}s. The neutron spectrum measurement was performed at the TAPIRO fast research reactor (ENEA, Casaccia) with fluxes of 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2}s. The obtained spectra were compared to Monte Carlo simulations, modeling detector response with MCNP and Geant4. (authors)

  14. Proton recoil telescope based on diamond detectors for measurement of fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Caiffi, Barbara; Taiuti, Mauro; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ripani, Marco; Pillon, Mario

    2015-07-01

    Diamonds are very promising candidates for the neutron diagnostics in harsh environments such as fusion reactor. In the first place this is because of their radiation hardness, exceeding that of Silicon by an order of magnitude. Also, in comparison to the standard on-line neutron diagnostics (fission chambers, silicon based detectors, scintillators), diamonds are less sensitive to γ rays, which represent a huge background in fusion devices. Finally, their low leakage current at high temperature suppresses the detector intrinsic noise. In this talk a CVD diamond based detector has been proposed for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutrons from D-T fusion reaction. The detector was arranged in a proton recoil telescope configuration, featuring a plastic converter in front of the sensitive volume in order to induce the (n,p) reaction. The segmentation of the sensitive volume, achieved by using two crystals, allowed to perform measurements in coincidence, which suppressed the neutron elastic scattering background. A preliminary prototype was assembled and tested at FNG (Frascati Neutron Generator, ENEA), showing promising results regarding efficiency and energy resolution. (authors)

  15. Enzyme-modified field effect transistors based on surface-conductive single-crystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Härtl, Andreas; Baur, Barbara; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose A

    2008-09-02

    Enzyme-modified field effect transistors (ENFETs) were realized using surface-conductive single-crystalline diamond films. The enzymes penicillinase and acetylcholinesterase were immobilized onto the active area of diamond-based electrolytic solution gated FETs, using different organic linker molecules and cross-linking chemistries. The active area of the devices was patterned to generate enzyme-modified regions next to surface-conductive regions. Penicillinase was chosen as a robust model system, but the main focus of the present paper is on acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme essential for many neuronal signal transduction processes. All the different ENFETs show a clear and specific response to the corresponding substrate, penicillin and acetylcholine. The device response is based on the pH sensitivity of the surface-conductive active area and is enabled by the local pH change induced during the enzymatic reaction. The devices demonstrate promising stability and characteristic variations of the enzymatic activity with measurement conditions. Furthermore, the results from the ENFET measurements were compared with the results of spectrophotometric experiments, carried out with enzymes immobilized on diamond substrates and also with free enzymes in solution. This allows an analysis of the enzyme kinetics, as well as qualitative comparison of the different functionalization methods employed in this study.

  16. Nitrogen isotope systematics and origins of mixed-habit diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Stern, R. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Southworth, R.; Mikhail, S.; Stachel, T.

    2015-05-01

    mantle fluid/melt by prior diamond precipitation. The homogeneous nature of both the carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of all three diamonds, however, documents continuous and unlimited supply of diamond forming fluid/melt, with a constant composition. Such homogenous isotopic compositions exclude fluid mixing or isotopic fractionation close to the site of diamond formation and preclude distinguishing between these two processes based on diamond analyses alone.

  17. Diamond-based MEMS devices for biosensing based on electrochemical and gravimetric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, John

    2005-03-01

    Diamond offers several potential advantages as a platform material for bioinorganic interfaces, including chemical and bio-inertness, electrochemistry, and high acoustic velocity. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), with a unique combination of physical, chemical and electrical properties, is attractive for a variety of biochemical/biomedical applications such as hermetic bio-inert coatings, MEMS compatible biosensors, and electrochemical biointerfaces. Over the past several years we have worked on both the fundamental and applied science related to enabling UNCD-based bioMEMS devices, which has encompassed both the development of UNCD surface functionalization strategies that allow fine control of surface hydrophobicity and bioactivity, as well as the development of material integration strategies and surface micromachining techniques to enable the microfabrication of UNCD structural layers (e.g. cantilevers) that incorporate these functionalized surfaces into MEMS devices which are back-end compatible with CMOS electronics. These devices could thus combine the electrochemical and gravimetric transduction of the selective adsorption of target analytes in MEMS structures fabricated directly on top of a silicon microchip.. In the past year we have successfully demonstrated the use of conducting UNCD thin films as electrochemical biointerfaces, via the successful attachment of a redox enzyme onto the UNCD surface, Glucose oxidase (GOD). The procedure to achieve GOD immobilization involved the electrochemical immobilization of nitrophenyl groups to the UNCD surface and transformation of nitrophenyl to aminophenyl groups and the covalent bonding of GOD to the carboxyl groups using the diisopropylcarbodiimide/ N-hydroxysuccinimide (DCC/NHS) as the catalyst. After immobilization, the activity of the enzyme was demonstrated via the direct electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide. We have also developed CMOS-compatible UNCD MEMS cantilevers and fixed-fixed beam

  18. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Wei Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  19. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp3 bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp3-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40-70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  20. Piezoelectric actuated micro-resonators based on the growth of diamond on aluminum nitride thin films.

    PubMed

    Hees, J; Heidrich, N; Pletschen, W; Sah, R E; Wolfer, M; Williams, O A; Lebedev, V; Nebel, C E; Ambacher, O

    2013-01-18

    Unimorph heterostructures based on piezoelectric aluminum nitride (AlN) and diamond thin films are highly desirable for applications in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. In this paper, we present a new approach to combine thin conductive boron-doped as well as insulating nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) with sputtered AlN films without the need for any buffer layers between AlN and NCD or polishing steps. The zeta potentials of differently treated nanodiamond (ND) particles in aqueous colloids are adjusted to the zeta potential of AlN in water. Thereby, the nucleation density for the initial growth of diamond on AlN can be varied from very low (10(8) cm(-2)), in the case of hydrogen-treated ND seeding particles, to very high values of 10(11) cm(-2) for oxidized ND particles. Our approach yielding high nucleation densities allows the growth of very thin NCD films on AlN with thicknesses as low as 40 nm for applications such as microelectromechanical beam resonators. Fabricated piezo-actuated micro-resonators exhibit enhanced mechanical properties due to the incorporation of boron-doped NCD films. Highly boron-doped NCD thin films which replace the metal top electrode offer Young's moduli of more than 1000 GPa.

  1. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  2. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  3. Design of a three-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Takeyoshi; Takahashi, Shun; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We design a three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal (PC) nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure. The designed structure, comprised of self-sustainable layers, is suitable for fabrication by layer stacking techniques. Quality factors (Q-factors) of nanocavities were calculated for the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond and a commonly-used woodpile structures, both of which are generated from the same diamond lattice with a lattice constant adiamond. The Q-factor of the designed nanocavity can reach as high as 230,000 with 35 stacked layers and a square in-plane PC area of the length of one side of 5\\sqrt{2} a^{\\text{diamond}}. This is 1.5 times higher than that of a 3D PC nanocavity based on the woodpile structure with the same in-plane PC size and with the same number of stacked layers. The higher Q-factor in the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure originates from its stronger in-plane light confinement over the woodpile structure. The \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure will be beneficial for improving experimentally attainable Q-factors of 3D PC nanocavities particularly fabricated by a micromanipulation method.

  4. Optics-Based Quantum Information and Sensing Platforms Utilizing the Nitrogen-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Michael

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center is a point defect in the diamond crystal lattice, forming a localized-electron system with unique optical and spin properties. In particular, optical control and read-out of the spin state, combined with long spin coherence times, make it an attractive candidate for both high-sensitivity magnetometry and as a solid-state spin qubit for quantum information processing (QIP). This dissertation documents the design, implementation, and characterization of systems aimed at each of these applications. First, the development of a GaP-on-diamond integrated photonics platform for QIP is presented. This work is motivated in part by the scalability advantages that are inherent to photonic device integration, and more fundamentally by the large potential improvements in performance. Specifically, coupling NV centers to integrated optical resonators should enable orders of magnitude improvement in entanglement generation rate through improved photon collection efficiency. This will be crucial for the development of even small-scale QIP systems, as NV-NV spin entanglement has so far only been demonstrated at rates far below the spin decoherence rate, effectively limiting NV-based QIP to two-qubit systems. Large numbers of integrated optical devices were fabricated, including optical resonators. Passive transmission measurements were performed on hundreds of individual devices, enabling statistical performance metrics and device yields to be extracted for several components. Device-coupled single-photon measurements are also presented, indicating photon collection efficiencies as high as 9%, corresponding to an efficiency-limited entanglement rate far exceeding the best reported spin decoherence rate. These results put the GaP-on-diamond platform in a competitive position relative to other photonic integration efforts for QIP. Next, a magneto-optical microscope for bio-sensing applications is presented. The microscope images photoluminescence

  5. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  6. Pulse widths dependence of programming and erasing behaviors for diamond like carbon based resistive switching memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianlong; Xie, Dan; Zhang, Chenhui; Zhang, Xiaowen; Peng, Pinggang; Fu, Di; Qian, He; Ren, Tian-ling; Liu, Litian

    2014-10-01

    We report the influences of pulse widths on the programming and erasing characteristics of diamond-like carbon films based resistive random access memory. The device can be only programmed with pulses wider than 50 ns for SET operations when the pulse voltage is 1.2 V and erased with pulses narrower than 25 ns for RESET operations when the pulse voltage is 0.4 V. The formation, rupture, and re-growth of the conductive sp2-like graphitic filaments are proposed to be responsible for the resistive switching behaviors, based on which the pulse widths dependences on its programming and erasing properties can be further explained.

  7. Influence of diamond wheel grinding process on surface micro-topography and properties of SiO2/SiO2 composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiaoyan; Lin, Bin; Wang, Yan; Wang, Shaolei

    2014-02-01

    According to anisotropic and inhomogeneous structure of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (FRCMC), it is difficult to control the surface quality with the traditional method used in metal material. The present paper studies the influence of diamond wheel grinding process on surface micro-topography and properties of SiO2/SiO2 composite. The research is based on some new discovery that the material enhanced fiber orientations play a key role in micro-topography of FRCMC grinding surface. Through a series of experiments, we investigate the relationship between grinding process and the quality of composites surface. We also analyze characteristics of the material surface topography height, wave distribution and surface support properties in details. This paper employs the orthogonal design to optimize grinding process parameters and also successfully models a critical condition to modify the surface characteristics. The results show that speed of grinding wheel has the greatest influence on height and surface support properties, the next is grain mesh size and depth of cut. The grain mesh size is the key factor for surface micro-topography modification. Compared to the surface with woven texture, the modified surface has better symmetrical characteristic. The research obtained will be an important technical support on improving the processing quality of FRCMC.

  8. Large-Area, Plasma-Assisted, Halogen-Based Diamond Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-04

    DTIC AD-A247 423 TIC RESEARCH TRIANGLE INSTITUTE RTI/5123/91-92 Quarterly March 1992 LARGE-AREA, PLASMA-ASSISTED, HALOGEN-BASED DIAMOND DEPOSITION...Quarterly Report - First and Second Quarters R.A. Rudder R.J. Markunas M.J. Mantini G.C. Hudson Office of Naval Research Program No. N00014-91-C-0177...fir , : u ____ 92-06469 POST OFFICE BOX 12194 RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NORTH CAROLINA 27709 2194 REPORT DOCUMENT PAGE Form Approved )OMB No 0704

  9. Development of at-wavelength metrology using grating-based shearing interferometry at Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Sawhney, Kawal

    2013-03-01

    The grating-based shearing interferometer has been established and further developed on B16 at Diamond Light Source. The beamline performances of both an X-ray plane mirror and a compound refractive lens (CRL) have been investigated using this technique. The slope error of the X-ray mirror was retrieved from the wavefront phase gradient, which was measured using two different processing schemes: phase stepping and moiré fringe analysis. The interferometer has demonstrated a high sensitivity with sub-microradian accuracy. Some of the advantages, disadvantages and limitations for the two approaches will also be presented.

  10. Microstructural evolution of diamond growth during HFCVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J.

    1994-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was used to study the nucleation and growth mechanism of diamond by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) process. A novel technique has shown a direct evidence for the formation of the diamond-like carbon layer 8-14 nm thick in which small diamond micro-crystallites were embedded. These diamond micro-crystallites were formed as a result of transformation of diamond-like carbon into diamond. The diamond micro-crystallites present in the amorphous diamond-like carbon layer provided nucleation sites for diamond growth. Large diamond crystallites were observed to grow from these micro-crystallites. The mechanism of diamond growth will be presented based on experimental findings.

  11. Diamond: shedding light on structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, David G; Shotton, Elizabeth J

    2015-03-06

    Structure-based drug design has become a key tool for the development of novel drugs. The process involves elucidating the three-dimensional structure of the potential drug molecule bound to the target protein that has been identified as playing a key role in the disease state. Using this three-dimensional information facilitates the process of making improvements to the potential drug molecule by highlighting existing and possible new interactions within the binding site. This knowledge is used to inform increases in potency and selectivity of the molecules as well as to help improve other drug-like properties. The speed and numbers of samples that can be studied, combined with the improved resolution of the structures that can be obtained using synchrotron radiation, have had a significant impact on the utilization of crystallography in the drug discovery process.

  12. Multiple growth events, processes and fluid sources involved in diamond genesis: A micro-analytical study of sulphide-bearing diamonds from Finsch mine, RSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palot, M.; Pearson, D. G.; Stern, R. A.; Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-04-01

    Twenty-one sulphide inclusion-bearing diamonds from the Finsch mine, South Africa, were analysed for nitrogen abundances and carbon isotope compositions by microbeam methods. On the basis of sulphide Ni contents, one diamond is of peridotitic affinity, the rest belongs to the eclogitic suite. FTIR analyses show nitrogen abundances and aggregation states from 21 to 1093 at.ppm and 0% to 83% IaB, statistically indistinguishable from previous results for Finsch eclogitic silicate inclusion-bearing diamonds (Appleyard et al., 2004) but significantly higher than observed before for diamonds of the peridotitic suite (Deines et al., 1989). Detailed analyses revealed marked variations in nitrogen characteristics within individual diamonds, demonstrating a complex mantle residence, consistent with multiple episodes of diamond growth over time. Linked to the growth stratigraphy of the diamond, SIMS micro-analyses show variations in δ13C from -8.90‰ to -2.80‰ with a mean value of -5.54 ± 1.80‰ (1 standard deviation), closely overlapping the typical worldwide value. The C-isotopic variability within individual diamonds ranges up to 3.26‰. SIMS based nitrogen abundances are 3-2221 at.ppm with heterogeneous distribution within individual diamond. From the δ13C-[N] co-variations within individual diamonds, three major processes of diamond growth for sulphide inclusion-bearing samples at Finsch are proposed. (1) Some diamonds were precipitated during a single event of open system isotopic fractionation, in fluids that varied from oxidised (carbonatitic) to reduced (CH4-rich). In this growth scenario, nitrogen is either compatible or incompatible during diamond growth. (2) Other diamonds show abrupt δ13C-[N] changes indicative of diamond growth involving mixing of several fluid sources. (3) Some diamonds grow from a combination of the two previous processes. The models are consistent with metasomatic diamond growth involving single and multiple fluid sources. Multiple

  13. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  14. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  16. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  17. Profiling of polar metabolites in biological extracts using diamond hydride-based aqueous normal phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Damien L; De Souza, David; Bacic, Antony; Roessner, Ute

    2009-07-01

    Highly polar metabolites, such as sugars and most amino acids are not retained by conventional RP LC columns. Without sufficient retention low concentration compounds are not detected due ion suppression and structural isomers are not resolved. In contrast, hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and aqueous normal phase chromatography (ANP) retain compounds based on their hydrophilicity and therefore provides a means of separating highly polar compounds. Here, an ANP method based on the diamond hydride stationary phase is presented for profiling biological small molecules by LC. A rapid separation system based upon a fast gradient that delivers reproducible chromatography is presented. Approximately 1000 compounds were reproducibly detected in human urine samples and clear differences between these samples were identified. This chromatography was also applied to xylem fluid from soyabean (Glycine max) plants to which 400 compounds were detected. This method greatly increases the metabolite coverage over RP-only metabolite profiling in biological samples. We show that both forms of chromatography are necessary for untargeted comprehensive metabolite profiling and that the diamond hydride stationary phase provides a good option for polar metabolite analysis.

  18. Diamonds in detonation soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greiner, N. Roy; Phillips, Dave; Johnson, J. D.; Volk, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Diamonds 4 to 7 nm in diameter have been identified and partially isolated from soot formed in detonations of carbon-forming composite explosives. The morphology of the soot has been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the identity of the diamond has been established by the electron diffraction pattern of the TEM samples and by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the isolated solid. Graphite is also present in the form of ribbons of turbostatic structure with a thickness of 2 to 4 nm. A fraction, about 25 percent of the soot by weight, was recovered from the crude soot after oxidation of the graphite with fuming perchloric acid. This fraction showed a distinct XRD pattern of diamond and the diffuse band of amorphous carbon. The IR spectrum of these diamonds closely matches that of diamonds recovered from meteorites (Lewis et al., 1987), perhaps indicating similar surface properties after the oxidation. If these diamonds are produced in the detonation itself or during the initial expansion, they exhibit a phenomenal crystal growth rate (5 nm/0.00001 s equal 1.8 m/hr) in a medium with a very low hydrogen/carbon ratio. Because the diamonds will be carried along with the expanding gases, they will be accelerated to velocities approaching 8 km/s.

  19. The use of electrophoretically deposited diamond powder coatings as a precursor for chemically vapor deposited diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.G.

    1991-12-31

    It has generally been observed that in order in expedite the formation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings, it is desirable to prepare a substrate by ``seeding`` it with diamond powder. We have determined that thick, stress free, shaped, diamond powder coatings can be electrophoretically deposited in a relatively short amounts of time. These diamond powder precursor coatings are then densified in a hot filament assisted CVD reactor to produce good quality CVD diamond/diamond powder composites. This combination of deposition techniques avoids many potential problems associated with predominantly CVD diamond.

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  1. Thermodynamics of diamond nucleation on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Wang, C X; Yang, Y H; Xu, N S; Yang, G W

    2004-09-15

    To have a clear insight into the diamond nucleation upon the hydrothermal synthesis and the reduction of carbide (HSRC), we performed the thermodynamic approach on the nanoscale to elucidate the diamond nucleation taking place in HSRC supercritical-fluid systems taking into account the capillary effect of the nanosized curvature of the diamond critical nuclei, based on the carbon thermodynamic equilibrium phase diagram. These theoretical analyses showed that the nanosize-induced interior pressure of diamond nuclei could drive the metastable phase region of the diamond nucleation in HSRC into the new stable phase region of diamond in the carbon phase diagram. Accordingly, the diamond nucleation is preferable to the graphite phase formation in the competing growth between diamond and graphite upon HSRC. Meanwhile, we predicted that 400 MPa should be the threshold pressure for the diamond synthesis by HSRC in the metastable phase region of diamond, based on the proposed thermodynamic nucleation on the nanoscale.

  2. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  3. Influence of the metallic contact in extreme-ultraviolet and soft x-ray diamond based Schottky photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancaglioni, I.; Di Venanzio, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray and UV photovoltaic Schottky photodiodes based on single crystal diamond were recently developed at Rome "Tor Vergata" University laboratories. In this work, different rectifying metallic contact materials were thermally evaporated on the oxidized surface of intrinsic single crystal diamond grown by chemical vapor deposition. Their impact on the detection performance in the extreme UV and soft x-ray spectral regions was studied. The electrical characterization of the metal/diamond Schottky junctions was performed at room temperature by measuring the capacitance-voltage characteristics. The diamond photodiodes were then tested both over the extreme UV spectral region from 10 to 60 eV by using He-Ne DC gas discharge as a radiation source and toroidal vacuum monochromator, and in the soft x-ray range from 6 to 20 keV at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron x-ray beam-line in Harwell (UK). In both experimental setups, time response and spectral responsivity were analyzed for all the investigated Schottky contact materials. A good agreement between the experimental data and theoretical results from Monte Carlo simulations is found

  4. Application of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films for ultraviolet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Gima, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C:H) films were grown by coaxial arc plasma deposition in the ambient of nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gases. Synthesized films were structurally investigated by X-ray photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. A heterojunction with p-type Si substrate was fabricated to study the ultraviolet photodetection properties of the film. Capacitance-voltage measurements assure the expansion of a depletion region into the film side. Current-voltage curves in the dark showed a good rectifying behaviour in the bias voltages range between ±5 V. Under 254 nm monochromatic light, the heterojunction shows a capability of deep ultraviolet light detection, which can be attribute to the existence of UNCD grains. As the diode was cooled from 300 K down to 150 K, the detectivity has a notable enhancement from 1.94 × 105 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 300 K to 5.11 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 150 K, which is mainly due to a remarkable reduction in the leakage current at low temperatures. It was experimentally demonstrated that nitrogen-doped UNCD/a-C:H film works as ultraviolet-range photovoltaic material.

  5. A Diamond-Based Electrode for Detection of Neurochemicals in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Kevin E.; Tomshine, Jonathan R.; Min, Hoon-Ki; Manciu, Felicia S.; Marsh, Michael P.; Paek, Seungleal B.; Settell, Megan L.; Nicolai, Evan N.; Blaha, Charles D.; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique to treat certain neurologic and psychiatric conditions, relies on pre-determined stimulation parameters in an open-loop configuration. The major advancement in DBS devices is a closed-loop system that uses neurophysiologic feedback to dynamically adjust stimulation frequency and amplitude. Stimulation-driven neurochemical release can be measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), but existing FSCV electrodes rely on carbon fiber, which degrades quickly during use and is therefore unsuitable for chronic neurochemical recording. To address this issue, we developed durable, synthetic boron-doped diamond-based electrodes capable of measuring neurochemical release in humans. Compared to carbon fiber electrodes, they were more than two orders-of-magnitude more physically-robust and demonstrated longevity in vitro without deterioration. Applied for the first time in humans, diamond electrode recordings from thalamic targets in patients (n = 4) undergoing DBS for tremor produced signals consistent with adenosine release at a sensitivity comparable to carbon fiber electrodes. (Clinical trials # NCT01705301). PMID:27014033

  6. Chemical vapor deposition of diamond thin films on titanium silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Songlan

    2008-10-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been the main method for synthesizing diamond thin films on hetero substrate materials since 1980s. It has been well acknowledged that both nucleation and growth of diamond on non-diamond surfaces without pre-treatment are very difficult and slow. Furthermore, the weak adhesion between the diamond thin films and substrates has been a major problem for widespread application of diamond thin films. Up to now, Si has been the most frequently used substrate for the study of diamond thin films and various methods, including bias and diamond powder scratching, have been applied to enhance diamond nucleation density. In the present study, nucleation and growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2, a newly developed ceramic-metallic material, using Microwave Plasma Enhanced (MPE) and Hot- Filament (HF) CVD reactors were carried out. In addition, synchrotron-based Near Edge Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was used to identify the electronic and chemical structures of various NCD films. The results from MPECVD showed that a much higher diamond nucleation density and a much higher film growth rate can be obtained on Ti3SiC2 compared with on Si. Consequently, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were feasibly synthesized on Ti3SiC2 under the typical conditions for microcrystalline diamond film synthesis. Furthermore, the diamond films on Ti3SiC 2 exhibited better adhesion than on Si. The early stage growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2 by HFCVD indicated that a nanowhisker-like diamond-graphite composite layer, different from diamond nucleation on Si, initially formed on the surface of Ti3SiC2, which resulted in high diamond nucleation density. These results indicate that Ti3SiC 2 has great potentials to be used both as substrates and interlayers on metals for diamond thin film deposition and application. This research may greatly expand the tribological application of both Ti3SiC 2 and diamond thin films

  7. Multistrip synthetic single-crystal-diamond photodiode based on a p-type/intrinsic/Schottky metal transverse configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciancaglioni, I.; Marinelli, Marco; Milani, E.; Prestopino, G.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Dolbnya, I.; Sawhney, K.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-04-01

    A synthetic multistrip single-crystal-diamond detector based on a p-type/intrinsic diamond/Schottky metal transverse configuration, operating at zero-bias voltage, was developed. The device was characterized at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Harwell (UK) under monochromatic high-flux X-ray beams from 6 to 20 keV and a micro-focused 10 keV beam with a spot size of ~3 μm. No significant pixel-to-pixel variation of both spectral responsivity and time response, high spatial resolution and good signal uniformity along each strip were found, suggesting the tested device structure as a promising sensor for X-ray and UV radiation imaging.

  8. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  9. Solid molecular nitrogen (δ-N2) inclusions in Juina diamonds: Exsolution at the base of the transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navon, Oded; Wirth, Richard; Schmidt, Christian; Jablon, Brooke Matat; Schreiber, Anja; Emmanuel, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Diamonds originating from the transition zone or lower mantle were previously identified based on the chemistry of their silicate or oxide mineral inclusions. Here we present data for such a super-deep origin based on the internal pressure of nitrogen in sub-micrometer inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil. Infrared spectroscopy of four diamonds, rich in such inclusions revealed high concentrations of fully aggregated nitrogen (average of 900 ppm, all in B centers) and almost no platelets. Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of solid, cubic δ-N2 at 10.9 ± 0.2 GPa (corresponding to a density of 1900 kg/m3). Transmission electron microscopy of two diamonds found two generations of octahedral inclusions: microinclusions (average size: 150 nm, average concentration: 100 ppm) and nanoinclusions (20-30 nm, 350 ppm). EELS detected nitrogen and a diffraction pattern of one nanoinclusion yielded a tetragonal phase, which resembles γ-N2 with a density of 1400 kg/m3 (internal pressure = 2.7 GPa). We also observed up-warping of small areas (∼150 nm in size) on the polished surface of one diamond. The ∼2 nm rise can be explained by a shallow subsurface microinclusion, pressurized internally to more than 10 GPa. Using available equations of state for nitrogen and diamond, we calculated the pressures and temperatures of mechanical equilibrium of the inclusions and their diamond host at the mantle geotherm. The inclusions originated at the deepest part of the transition zone at pressures of ∼22 GPa (630 km) and temperatures of ∼1640 °C. We suggest that both generations are the result of exsolution of nitrogen from B centers and that growth took a few million years in a subducting mantle current. The microinclusions nucleated first, followed by the nanoinclusions. Shortly after the exsolution events, the diamonds were trapped in a plume or an ascending melt and were transported to the base of the lithosphere and later to the surface.

  10. Method to fabricate portable electron source based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD)

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Divan, Ralu; Posada, Chrystian M.; Castano, Carlos H.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-29

    A source cold cathode field emission array (FEA) source based on ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) field emitters. This system was constructed as an alternative for detection of obscured objects and material. Depending on the geometry of the given situation a flat-panel source can be used in tomography, radiography, or tomosynthesis. Furthermore, the unit can be used as a portable electron or X-ray scanner or an integral part of an existing detection system. UNCD field emitters show great field emission output and can be deposited over large areas as the case with carbon nanotube "forest" (CNT) cathodes. Furthermore, UNCDs have better mechanical and thermal properties as compared to CNT tips which further extend the lifetime of UNCD based FEA.

  11. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    David, C; Gorelick, S; Rutishauser, S; Krzywinski, J; Vila-Comamala, J; Guzenko, V A; Bunk, O; Färm, E; Ritala, M; Cammarata, M; Fritz, D M; Barrett, R; Samoylova, L; Grünert, J; Sinn, H

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×10(17)W/cm(2) was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  12. Development of an Amorphous Selenium-Based Photodetector Driven by a Diamond Cold Cathode

    PubMed Central

    Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Saito, Ichitaro; Yamada, Takatoshi; Onishi, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Hisato; Suzuki, Yu; Oonuki, Kousuke; Kato, Nanako; Ogawa, Shuichi; Takakuwa, Yuji; Koh, Angel T. T.; Chua, Daniel H. C.; Mori, Yusuke; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Okano, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous-selenium (a-Se) based photodetectors are promising candidates for imaging devices, due to their high spatial resolution and response speed, as well as extremely high sensitivity enhanced by an internal carrier multiplication. In addition, a-Se is reported to show sensitivity against wide variety of wavelengths, including visible, UV and X-ray, where a-Se based flat-panel X-ray detector was proposed. In order to develop an ultra high-sensitivity photodetector with a wide detectable wavelength range, a photodetector was fabricated using a-Se photoconductor and a nitrogen-doped diamond cold cathode. In the study, a prototype photodetector has been developed, and its response to visible and ultraviolet light are characterized. PMID:24152932

  13. Sensitivity of diamond-capped impedance transducer to Tröger's base derivative.

    PubMed

    Stehlik, Stepan; Izak, Tibor; Kromka, Alexander; Dolenský, Bohumil; Havlík, Martin; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2012-08-01

    Sensitivity of an intrinsic nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layer to naphthalene Tröger's base derivative decorated with pyrrole groups (TBPyr) was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The transducer was made of Au interdigitated electrodes (IDE) with 50 μm spacing on alumina substrate which were capped with the NCD layer. The NCD-capped transducer with H-termination was able to electrically distinguish TBPyr molecules (the change of surface resistance within 30-60 kΩ) adsorbed from methanol in concentrations of 0.04 mg/mL to 40 mg/mL. An exponential decay of the surface resistance with time was observed and attributed to the readsorption of air moisture after methanol evaporation. After surface oxidation the NCD cap layer did not show any leakage due to NCD grain boundaries. We analyzed electronic transport in the transducer and propose a model for the sensing mechanism based on surface ion replacement.

  14. Equilibrium, chemical kinetic, and transport limitations to diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Edward Anthony

    Because of their extreme properties, diamond films have found some industrial applications, i.e., heat sinks and tool coatings. However, to increase their economic attractiveness, the growth rate must be increased, the deposition temperature must be lowered, and single crystal films must be achieved. We have studied two types of chemical vapor deposition systems, hot-filament and microwave assisted, in order to understand the factors limiting diamond growth rate. From simultaneous microbalance growth rate measurements and mass spectrometer measurements, changes in growth rate are correlated with changes in gas phase composition. Measured reaction orders support the proposal that diamond growth occurs through a single-carbon-atom species, e.g., CHsb3. When a two-carbon atom source gas is used, it is likely that the dissociation to two, single-carbon atom species occurs on the substrate surface (dissociative adsorption). Furthermore, a shift to zero-order suggests that the diamond growth is a surface-site limited process at higher hydrocarbon concentrations. The diamond growth rate maximum with pressure is explained by transport limitations of species within the reaction zone. The reported diamond growth rates in the hot-filament reactor are several times higher than those reported by other research groups. These higher growth rates result from surrounding the substrate with the filament. We have used the measured growth rates, filament temperatures, and thermocouple measurements to calculate activation energies for diamond growth. When the filament temperature is used for the calculation, an activation energy of 73 kcal per mole is obtained; however, based on estimated substrate temperatures, an activation energy of 18 kcal per mole is determined. A dimensional analysis approach was developed to select the most important gas phase reactions occurring during diamond CVD. Steady-state analysis of these reactions and the application of mass transport equations lead to

  15. Kimberlite emplacement record in diamond morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchouk, Y.; Chinn, I.

    2015-12-01

    Diamond resorption morphology reflects conditions and events in the host kimberlite magma and in diamond sources in subcratonic mantle. Recent experimental studies on diamond dissolution enable us now to use surface features of diamonds to examine magmatic fluid in kimberlites. This study uses optical and scanning electron microscopy examination of ~750 macro-diamonds from two kimberlites in Orapa cluster, Botswana. Kimberlite A is a simple body filled with coherent kimberlite facies (CK); kimberlite B is a complex body with two facies of coherent kimberlite and a massive volcaniclastic kimberlite facies (MVK). Distinction between kimberlite-induced and mantle-derived resorption was based on: the type of the most abundant resorption style, morphology of crystals with attached kimberlite fragments, and the study of pseudohemimorphic diamonds. Kimberlite-induced resorption is the focus of this work. The three facies in the pipe B show three contrasting diamond resorption types. Resorption in MVK facies leads to glossy rounded surfaces with fine striation and hillocks, and is identical to the resorption style in CK facies of pipe A. This type of resorption is typical for volcaniclastic facies and indicates emplacement in the presence of abundant COH fluid with high H2O:CO2 ratio (>50mol% of H2O). We propose that pipe A is a root zone supplying material to a larger kimberlite body filled with VK. The two CK in pipe B have very different resorption style. One forms similar glossy surfaces but with regular small cavities of rounded outline, while the other seems more corrosive and develops extremely rough features and deep cavities. Comparison to the experimental data suggests that the former had almost pure H2O fluid at low pressure (where solubility of SiO2 is low). The later CK facies was emplaced in the absence or very low abundance of a free fluid, and possibly in melt closer to carbonatitic composition.

  16. Hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on cemented tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were deposited on cemented carbide containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. With decreasing substrate temperature, the hardness was enhanced accompanied by an enhancement in the sp3/(sp2 + sp3). Energy-dispersive X-ray and secondary ion mass spectrometry spectroscopic measurements exhibited that the diffusion of Co atoms from the substrates into the films hardly occurs. The film deposited at room temperature exhibited the maximum hardness of 51.3 GPa and Young's modulus of 520.2 GPa, which evidently indicates that graphitization induced by Co in the WC substrates, and thermal deformation from sp3 to sp2 bonding are suppressed. The hard UNCD/a-C films can be deposited at a thickness of approximately 3 μm, which is an order larger than that of comparably hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress of the 51.3-GPa film is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. This is a reason for the thick deposition. The presence of a large number of grain boundaries in the film, which is a structural specific to UNCD/a-C films, might play a role in releasing the internal stress of the films.

  17. Genesis of diamond inclusions: An integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Heuvel, Quint; Matveev, Sergei; Drury, Martyn; Gress, Michael; Chinn, Ingrid; Davies, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Diamond inclusions are potentially fundamental to understanding the formation conditions of diamond and the volatile cycles in the deep mantle. In order to fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions it is vital to know whether the inclusions are proto-, syn-, or epigenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming fluids. In previous studies, the widespread assumption was made that the majority of diamond inclusions are syngenetic, based upon observation of cubo-octahedral morphology imposed on the inclusions. Recent work has reported the crystallographic relationship between inclusions and the host diamond to be highly complex and the lack of crystallographic relationships between inclusions and diamonds has led some to question the significance of imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. This study presents an integrated EBSD and CL study of 9 diamonds containing 20 pyropes, 2 diopsides, 1 forsterite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng and Letlhakane kimberlite clusters, Botswana. A new method was developed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the host diamond and the inclusions with EBSD. Diamonds plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels in the diamond. CL imaging at different depths was performed in order to produce a 3D view of diamond growth zones around the inclusions. Standard diamond polishing techniques proved too aggressive for silicate inclusions as they were damaged to such a degree that EBSD measurements on the inclusions were impossible. The inclusions were milled with a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) at a 12° angle to clean the surface for EBSD measurements. Of the 24 inclusions, 9 have an imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. Of these inclusions, 6 have faces orientated parallel to diamond growth zones and/or appear to have nucleated on a diamond growth surface, implying syngenesis. In contrast, other diamonds record resorption events such that

  18. Amperometric biosensor based on diamond paste for the enantioanalysis of L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Nejem, R'afat Mahmoud; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2012-05-15

    An amperometric biosensor was proposed for the enantioanalysis of L-lysine. The biosensor is based on the impregnation of L-lysine oxidase in diamond paste. The potential used for the determination of l-lysine was 650 mV. The biosensor exhibited a linear concentration range between 1 and 100 nmol/L with a limit of detection of 4 pmol/L. The selectivity of the biosensor is high over other amino acids, such as L-serine, L-leucine, L-aspartic acid, L-glutamic acid, histamine, glycine. The proposed biosensor can be applied for the determination of L-lysine in serum samples and pharmaceutical compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Diamond-based electrochemical aptasensor realizing a femtomolar detection limit of bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Liu, Junsong; Li, Hongdong

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we designed and fabricated an electrochemical impedance aptasensor based on Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) coated boron-doped diamond (BDD) modified with aptamers, and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) for the detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The constructed BPA aptasensor exhibits good linearity from 1.0×10(-14) to 1.0×10(-9)molL(-1). The detection limitation of 7.2×10(-15)molL(-1) was achieved, which can be attributed to the synergistic effect of combining BDD with Au-NPs, aptamers, and MCH. The examine results of BPA traces in Tris-HCl buffer and in milk, UV spectra of aptamer/BPA and interference test revealed that the novel aptasensors are of high sensitivity, specificity, stability and repeatability, which could be promising in practical applications.

  20. Boron Doped Diamond Paste Electrodes for Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices.

    PubMed

    Nantaphol, Siriwan; Channon, Robert B; Kondo, Takeshi; Siangproh, Weena; Chailapakul, Orawon; Henry, Charles S

    2017-04-04

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes have exemplary electrochemical properties; however, widespread use of high-quality BDD has previously been limited by material cost and availability. In the present article, we report the use of a BDD paste electrode (BDDPE) coupled with microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) to create a low-cost, high-performance electrochemical sensor. The BDDPEs are easy to prepare from a mixture of BDD powder and mineral oil and can be easily stencil-printed into a variety of electrode geometries. We demonstrate the utility and applicability of BDDPEs through measurements of biological species (norepinephrine and serotonin) and heavy metals (Pb and Cd) using μPADs. Compared to traditional carbon paste electrodes (CPE), BDDPEs exhibit a wider potential window, lower capacitive current, and are able to circumvent the fouling of serotonin. These results demonstrate the capability of BDDPEs as point-of-care sensors when coupled with μPADs.

  1. Goal-based h-adaptivity of the 1-D diamond difference discrete ordinate method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, R. S.; Kópházi, J.; Eaton, M. D.; Févotte, F.; Hülsemann, F.; Ragusa, J.

    2017-04-01

    The quantity of interest (QoI) associated with a solution of a partial differential equation (PDE) is not, in general, the solution itself, but a functional of the solution. Dual weighted residual (DWR) error estimators are one way of providing an estimate of the error in the QoI resulting from the discretisation of the PDE. This paper aims to provide an estimate of the error in the QoI due to the spatial discretisation, where the discretisation scheme being used is the diamond difference (DD) method in space and discrete ordinate (SN) method in angle. The QoI are reaction rates in detectors and the value of the eigenvalue (Keff) for 1-D fixed source and eigenvalue (Keff criticality) neutron transport problems respectively. Local values of the DWR over individual cells are used as error indicators for goal-based mesh refinement, which aims to give an optimal mesh for a given QoI.

  2. Picosecond laser fabrication of micro cutting tool geometries on polycrystalline diamond composites using a high-numerical aperture micro scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Gregory; Dold, Claus; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    The generation of microsized components found in LEDs, watches, molds as well as other types of micromechanics and microelectronics require a corresponding micro cutting tool in order to be manufactured, typically by milling or turning. Micro cutting tools are made of cemented tungsten carbide and are conventionally fabricated either by electrical discharge machining (EDM) or by grinding. An alternative method is proposed through a laser-based solution operating in the picosecond pulse duration whereby the beam is deflected using a modified galvanometer-driven micro scanning system exhibiting a high numerical aperture. A micro cutting tool material which cannot be easily processed using conventional methods is investigated, which is a fine grain polycrystalline diamond composite (PCD). The generation of various micro cutting tool relevant geometries, such as chip breakers and cutting edges, are demonstrated. The generated geometries are subsequently evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quality is measured in terms of surface roughness and cutting edge sharpness. Additionally, two processing strategies in which the laser beam processes tangentially and orthogonally are compared in terms of quality.

  3. The dynamic sublayers for improving the adhesion of CVD diamond films on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaydaychuk, A. V.; Linnik, S. A.; Okhotnikov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were fabricated on copper substrates by a multi-step process comprised of physical vapor deposition of Al-based composite interlayer on Cu substrate and depositing continuous diamond film on composite interlayer by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD). The interface characteristics and adhesion strength were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy, Raman analysis, calotest and indentation test. The results show that the continuous film without cracks is successfully obtained. The improved adhesion between diamond film and substrate results from the low residual stress in the film due to their compensation by Al interlayer in the sample cooling process.

  4. Devonian ultramafic lamprophyre in the Irkineeva-Chadobets trough in the southwest of the Siberian Platform: Age, composition, and implications for diamond potential prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, A. V.; Nosova, A. A.; Postnikov, A. V.; Chugaev, A. V.; Postnikova, O. V.; Popova, L. P.; Poshibaev, V. V.; Sazonova, L. V.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Smirnova, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    The results of geochronological, mineralogical, petrographical, and geochemical study of the Ilbokich ultramafic lamprophyre are reported. The specific features in the mineral and chemical compositions of the studied ultramafic lamprophyre indicate that it can be regarded as a variety similar to aillikite, while other differences dominated by K-feldspar can be referred to damtjernite. According to Rb-Sr analysis, ultramafic lamprophyre dikes intruded at the turn of the Early and Middle Devonian, about 392 Ma ago. This directly proves the existence of Early Paleozoic alkali-ultramafic magmatism in the northern part of the southwest Siberian Platform. A finding of Devonian alkali-ultramafic lamprophyre is of dual predictive importance. On the one hand, it is indicative of the low probability of finding large diamond-bearing deposits in close association with aillikite. On the other hand, it can be indicative of a possible large Devonian diamond province in the studied territory, where diamondiferous kimberlite is structurally separated from aillikite.

  5. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C-N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  6. Applications of diamond films and related materials; Proceedings of the 1st International Conference, Auburn, AL, Aug. 17-22, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Editor); Yoshikawa, Manasori (Editor); Murakawa, Masao (Editor); Feldman, Albert (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses the nucleation and growth of diamond from hydrocarbons, the cutting tool performance of CVD thick-film diamond, the characterization of CVD diamond grinding powder, industrial applications of crystalline diamond-coated tools, standardized SEM tribometry of diamond-coated substrates, residual stress in CVD diamond films, the optical properties of CVD diamond films, polycrystalline diamond films for optical applications, and diamond growth on ferrous metals. Also discussed are ion beam-irradiation smoothing of diamond films, electronic circuits on diamond substrates, diamond-laminated surfaces for evaporative spray cooling, electron devices based on the unique properties of diamond, diamond cold cathodes, thin-film diamond microstructure applications, Schottky diodes from flame-grown diamond, diamond films for thermionic applications, methods of diamond nucleation and selective deposition, high-rate/large-area diamond film production, halogen-assisted diamond growth, the economics of diamond technology, and the optical and mechanical properties of diamondlike films.

  7. In-Situ Chemical Analyses of Mineral Inclusions in Diamonds in Kimberlitic Eclogites From Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ANAND, M.; MISRA, K. C.; TAYLOR, L. A.; SOBOLEV, N. V.

    2001-12-01

    Mineral inclusions in diamonds (DIs) are stated to provide P-T-X-t information regarding the formation of the diamonds and the nature of the upper mantle. In an endeavor to further understand the importance of diamonds and their DIs in relation to their host rocks, we have investigated several diamondiferous eclogites from Yakutia, first by HRXC tomography (Taylor et al., 2001, this meeting) and then by dissection of the eclogites into their individual minerals. The mineralogy of the host eclogite is presented by Misra et al. (2001, this meeting). Two of the diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths, although weighing but 66 g and 42 g, contain 74 and 47 macro-diamonds, resp. Based on HRXCT imaging, appropriate sections were selected in the eclogite to extract diamonds with minimum loss of material. In the majority of cases, diamonds occur as perfect octahedron with well developed crystal faces. In some cases, however, diamonds occur as macles (twinned xls). The size range of the diamonds is 1-6 mm. Optical examination reveals the sulfides as the most common DIs in these diamonds, followed by clinopyroxenes and garnets. Each diamond was cut and polished along relatively soft directions parallel to either (001) or (110) faces so as to expose DIs for in-situ analyses. Examination by cathodoluminescence (CL) on an EMP demonstrated that the majority of the diamonds have minute, optically invisible, cracks from the DIs to the surfaces of the diamonds - i.e., the possibility of an open system. These diamonds show complicated growth histories and contain DIs that are in some cases, found to be associated with secondary alteration. In addition, the DIs in each diamond, examined in-situ are of different composition from the host and different from DIs in other diamonds, a relationship reported earlier (Taylor et al., 2000, Int'l Geol Rev). These observations raise serious doubts about the significance of DIs and the pristinity and syngenesis of DIs removed by the typical diamond

  8. Mechanics in alumina ceramics modified by ultradispersed diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireitseu, Maksim V.; Yerakhavets, Sergey G.; Basenuk, Vladimir L.; Jornik, Victor

    2003-10-01

    Alumina coating modified by ultra-dispersed diamonds (UDD) have been produced by combination of thermal flame spraying and micro arc oxidizing technologies on sprayed aluminum substrate was. Structures of alumina-based ultra dispersed diamond particles composite coatings were investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy and SEM imaging. The particles were deposited with alumina layer on aluminum substrates under various conditions and have different levels of strength, hardness and internal stresses. It was revealed that by UDD strengthening the coating is to have high microhardness of 22 - 26 GPa, fine structure and smooth surface. Diamonds was found to be conglomerated in clusters along the interface obtained with high current density, but it disappeared when deposited with lower current regimes of alternating pulse current. On the other hand, the failure of crystal diamonds became smaller with decreasing current density concentrations. From the correspondence between the structures and the hardness of the composite, it was suggested that the effect of ultra dispersed diamonds resulted in the complicated trend of hardness, strength and fine structure with respect to current density and diamonds concentration in the electrolyte. In view of technological setup pulse current regime at high current frequency improve microhardness and roughness of the coatings. Potential application of the coating is sliding bearings, insulators, aerospace units.

  9. Spectroscopic constraints on growth of Siberian mixed-habit diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuzovatov, Sergei Yu.; Zedgenizov, Dmitry A.; Rakevich, Alexander L.

    2017-06-01

    Notable within-crystal variability of mineralogical and geochemical properties of single natural diamonds are commonly attributed to changing chemistry of parental fluids, sources of carbon and redox conditions of diamond precipitation. A distinct type of compositional heterogeneity (mixed-habit structure) is well-known to occur in diamonds as well as in many other minerals due to purely "structural" reasons that are unequal crystal chemistry of crystallographically different faces and selective absorption and fractionation of impurities between adjacent growth pyramids. Based on the combined cathodoluminescence, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, study of nine diamond crystals with different growth histories and external morphology, but all showing mixed-habit patterns at different growth stages, we show that mixed-diamonds may grow in closed system conditions or with a slowly decreasing growth rate from a media with a much lower impurity content than previously thought. Intracrystal nitrogen distribution seems to be a function of growth rate even in the cases of unusual impurity partitioning between growth sectors. Generally poor with IR-active hydrogen at moderate nitrogen aggregation parameters, studied diamonds likely resemble the low hydrogen content from the growth medium that, for cubic diamonds, was typically suggested hydrogen-rich and a crucial factor for growth of cubic and mixed-habit diamonds. We also show that mixed-habit diamond growth may occur not only in peridotitic suite but also in an extended field of geochemical affinities from high-Ni to low-Ni or maybe even Ni-free environments, such as pyroxenitic or eclogitic.

  10. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  11. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  12. Growth of micro- and nanocrystalline dual layer composite diamond films by microwave plasma CVD: Influence of CO2 concentration on growth of nano-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cong; Wang, Jian-Hua; Weng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The high quality and smooth micro-and nanocrystalline dual layer composite diamond films were successfully prepared using H2/CH4/Ar/CO2 plasma with a synthesis process of nucleation/MCD growth/nucleation/NCD growth. The carbon dioxide content is demonstrated to be important in controlling the NCD layer grain size and growth rate. The influences of carbon dioxide concentration on the morphology, microstructure and growth rate of the deposited NCD layer are investigated by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the additional carbonaceous sources supplied by CO2 are favourable to increase the growth rate, and meanwhile, the oxygen related species generated would enhance the etching effect not only to eliminate the non-diamond phase of NCD but also to decrease the growth rate. The appropriate addition of CO2 can increase the high quality and growth rate, decrease the surface roughness. It is demonstrated that adding CO2 strongly affects the contents of various reaction species in plasma, which would determine the growth features of NCD layers. The deposited highly smooth and quality micro-/nano-crystal layered diamond film is also expected to be applicable in surface aroustic wave (SAW) devices and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

  13. Oil base drilling fluid composition

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.D.; Salandanan, C.

    1988-04-26

    This patent describes an improved oil-base drilling fluid composition characterized by thixotropic properties resulting in a yield point of from about 10 to about 75 comprising an oil-base continuous phase and a gelling composition. The gelling composition includes a latex material copolymerized with one or more functional monomers selected from the group consisting of: amides, amines, sulfonates, monocarboxylic acids, dicarboxylic acids and combinations thereof and wherein at least one of the one or more functional monomers is an amide selected from the group consisting of: acrylamide, N-methylolacrylamide, N-alkyl-acrylamide, vinylacetamide, vinylpyrrolidone, N-vinyl-N-methylacetamide, vinylformamide and combinations thereof.

  14. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  15. Endo-Fullerenes and Doped Diamond Nanocrystallite Based Solid-State Qubits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Seongjun; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, K.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the use of endo-fullerenes and doped diamond nanocrystallites in the development of a solid state quantum computer. Arrays of qubits, which have 1/2 nuclear spin, are more easily fabricated than arrays of similar bare atoms. H-1 can be encapsulated in a C20D20 fullerene, while P-31 can be encapsulated in a diamond nanocrystallite.

  16. InAsP-based quantum wells as infrared pressure gauges for use in a diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushkin, S.; Kamińska, A.; Trzeciakowski, W.; Hopkinson, M.; Suchocki, A.

    2012-10-01

    The results of high-pressure, low-temperature luminescence measurements of three InAsP-based multiple quantum well structures are reported for application as pressure sensors for diamond anvil cells working in the near-infrared spectral range. The multiple quantum well structures exhibit a much higher pressure shift of the luminescence lines as compared with ruby, typically used as the pressure sensor for diamond anvil cell. However, the full width at half maximum of the quantum wells is much higher than that for ruby. This reduces the available sensitivity gain exhibited by the InAsP-based quantum wells, but the improvement is still 2-3 times higher than that of ruby. Three InAsP multiple quantum well samples were examined, which exhibited luminescence at various wavelengths. The wavelength shift of these samples could be calibrated using similar parameters.

  17. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  18. Composition of garnet and clinopyroxene in peridotite xenoliths from the Grib kimberlite pipe, Arkhangelsk diamond province, Russia: Evidence for mantle metasomatism associated with kimberlite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, A. V.; Sazonova, L. V.; Nosova, A. A.; Tretyachenko, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Here we present major and trace element data for garnet and clinopyroxene from mantle-derived peridotite xenoliths of the Grib kimberlite, the Arkhangelsk diamond province, Russia, and provide new insights into the metasomatic processes that occur within the subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) during the kimberlite generation and ascent. The mantle xenoliths examined in this study are both coarse and sheared garnet peridotites and consist of olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, garnet with minor ilmenite, magnetite, and Cr-spinel. Based on garnet and clinopyroxene composition, two groups of peridotite are recognized. One group contains high-Ti, light rare earth elements (LREE) enriched garnets and low-Mg# clinopyroxenes with low (La/Sm)n (C1 chondrite-normalized) values. This mineral assemblage was in equilibrium with a high-temperature carbonate-silicate metasomatic agent, presumably, a protokimberlite melt. Pressure-temperature (P-T) estimates (T = 1220 °C and P = 70 kbar) suggest that this metasomatic event occurred at the base of the SCLM. Another group contains low-Ti garnet with normal to sinusoidal rare earth elements (REE) distribution patterns and high-Mg# clinopyroxenes with wide range of (La/Sm)n values. The geochemical equilibrium between garnet and clinopyroxene coupled with their REE composition indicates that peridotite mantle experienced metasomatic transformation by injection of a low-Ti (after crystallizations of the ilmenite megacrysts) kimberlite melt that subsequently percolated through a refractory mantle column. Peridotites of this group show a wide range of P-T estimates (T = 730-1070 °C and P = 22-44 kbar). It is suggested that evolution of a kimberlite magma from REE-enriched carbonate-bearing to carbonate-rich ultramafic silicate compositions with lower REE occurs during the ascent and interaction with a surrounding lithospheric mantle, and this process leads to metasomatic modification of the SCLM with formation of both high

  19. Thermal conductivity of diamonds and other advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongyin

    1992-12-31

    In this work, the thermal properties of various synthetic materials were measured. The Klemens-Callaway model for thermal conductivity was used to analyze electrically non-conductive crystalline materials, including diamonds, silicon wafers, and AIN substrates, with emphasis on the influence of temperature and impurities-especially isotopes-as well as grain size and U-processes. Type IIa diamonds proved to be an excellent base for the study of thermal conductivity of synthetic diamonds. the Umklapp power in the Klemens-Callaway model was found to be three for diamond systems. The Klemens-Calaway model provided an accurate representation of the temperature dependent thermal conductivity k(T) of type IIa diamonds with excellent low temperature and high temperature behavior for the Umklapp power of three. The diamond system was found to be a good example for observation of the isotopic effect on its thermal conductivity. The isotopic effect was observed in the gem systems as well as in the film systems. Three scattering mechanisms-grain boundary, point defects, and Umklapp process-were found to be sufficient for diamond systems. Three semiempirical theories for isotopic correction were discussed in terms of the three dielectric materials studied, and their limitations were discussed to show the supremacy of the Klemens-Callaway model. A self-consistent McCullough model was used for the carbon fiber composites. The thermal conductivity of the composite is affected by the thermal conductivity of the components as well as by the geometry of the composite construction.

  20. Microhabitat use of the diamond darter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Smith, Dustin M.; Taylor, Nate D.

    2013-01-01

    The only known extant population of the diamond darter (Crystallaria cincotta) exists in the lower 37 km of Elk River, WV, USA. Our understanding of diamond darter habitat use was previously limited, because few individuals have been observed during sampling with conventional gears. We quantified microhabitat use of diamond darters based on measurements of water depth, water velocity and per cent substrate composition. Using spotlights at night-time, we sampled 16 sites within the lower 133 km of Elk River and observed a total of 82 diamond darters at 10 of 11 sampling sites within the lower 37 km. Glides, located immediately upstream of riffles, were the primary habitats sampled for diamond darters, which included relatively shallow depths (<1 m), moderate-to-low water velocities (often < 0.5 m·s−1) and a smooth water surface. Microhabitat use (mean ± SE) of diamond darters was estimated for depth (0.47 ± 0.02 m), average velocity (0.27 ± 0.01 m·s−1) and bottom velocity (0.15 ± 0.01 m·s−1). Substrate used (mean ± SE) by diamond darters was predominantly sand intermixed with lesser amounts of gravel and cobble: % sand (52.1 ± 1.6), % small gravel (12.2 ± 0.78), % large gravel (14.2 ± 0.83), % cobble (19.8 ± 0.96) and % boulder (1.6 ± 0.36). Based on our microhabitat use data, conservation and management efforts for this species should consider preserving glide habitats within Elk River. Spotlighting, a successful sampling method for diamond darters, should be considered for study designs of population estimation and long-term monitoring.

  1. Microfluidic platform for environmental contaminants sensing and degradation based on boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sánchez, Mariana; Mayorga-Martinez, CarmenC; Watanabe, Takeshi; Ivandini, TribidasariA; Honda, Yuki; Pino, Flavio; Nakata, Kazuya; Fujishima, Akira; Einaga, Yasuaki; Merkoçi, Arben

    2016-01-15

    We have developed a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) platform for electrochemical detection and degradation of the pesticide atrazine (Atz). It is based on boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes and a competitive magneto-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) that enables high sensitivity. To detect the enzymatic reaction, we employed a BDD electrode modified with platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs), as a highly conductive catalytic transducer. Chronoamperometry revealed a limit of detection (LOD) of 3.5 pM for atrazine, which, to the best of our knowledge, is one of the lowest value published to date. Finally, we degraded Atz in the same platform, using a bare BDD electrode that features remarkable corrosion stability, a wide potential window, and much higher O2 overvoltage as compared to conventional electrodes. These characteristics enable the electrode to produce a greater amount of HO• on the anode surface than do conventional electrodes and consequently, to destroy the pollutant more rapidly. Our new LOC platform might prove interesting as a smart system for detection and remediation of diverse pesticides and other contaminants.

  2. Origins of diamond-forming fluids: An isotopic and trace element study of diamonds and silicates from diamondiferous xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiginhas, Fernando; Pearson, D. Graham; McNeill, John; Gurney, John; Nowell, Geoff; Ottley, Chris

    2010-05-01

    While there is increasing understanding of the age of formation and nature of "gem" diamonds, significant debate revolves around the nature of the fluids/melts from which they form. Stable C and N isotopes have been shown to be highly variable and yet the role of subduction-related fluids remains strongly debated. Recent studies on fibrous diamonds have yielded new trace and major element data (e.g., Weiss et al., 2009) that, together with new radiogenic isotope data (Klein BenDavid et al., 2010) indicate such diamonds grow from fluids that comprise mixtures of hydrous silicic, hydrous saline and carbonatitic fluids, derived from different source components of asthenospheric and lithospheric origin. However, until now such data has been lacking from gem diamonds. Using a new laser-based technique (McNeill et al., 2009), we have analysed a suite of diamonds plus co-existing host silicates from several diamondiferous xenoliths (6 harzburgites, 1 eclogite) from the Finsch and Newlands kimberlites in order to try to understand the fluid compositions that produce gem diamonds and better understand their effects of their mantle wall rocks. Diamonds from the xenoliths show a wide variety of trace element enrichment levels. While the eclogitic diamond shows similar trace element systematics to some of the harzburgitic diamonds there are significant differences within the harzburgitic diamonds from different xenoliths, with those from Finsch being significantly enriched in Ba, Sr and Pb relative to other elements. Nd isotope data on the host silicates is variable and dominantly unradiogenic, indicative of long-term enrichment typically associated with the source of some diamond-forming fluids. We will present Sr isotopic data on host silicates and diamond fluids to constrain whether the "gem" diamonds require the complex sources of fluids that characterise the growth of fibrous diamonds. 1) Y. Weiss, R. Kessel, W.L. Griffin, I. Kiflawi, O. Klein-BenDavid, D.R. Bell, J

  3. Analysis of the Cytotoxicity of Carbon-Based Nanoparticles, Diamond and Graphite, in Human Glioblastoma and Hepatoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests. PMID:25816103

  4. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of carbon-based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, in human glioblastoma and hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Karolina Ewa; Samluk, Anna; Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Sławomir; Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André; Pijanowska, Dorota Genowefa; Pluta, Krzysztof Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as carriers for drug delivery to cancer cells. However, reports on their potential cytotoxicity raise questions of their safety and this matter needs attentive consideration. In this paper, for the first time, the cytotoxic effects of two carbon based nanoparticles, diamond and graphite, on glioblastoma and hepatoma cells were compared. First, we confirmed previous results that diamond nanoparticles are practically nontoxic. Second, graphite nanoparticles exhibited a negative impact on glioblastoma, but not on hepatoma cells. The studied carbon nanoparticles could be a potentially useful tool for therapeutics delivery to the brain tissue with minimal side effects on the hepatocytes. Furthermore, we showed the influence of the nanoparticles on the stable, fluorescently labeled tumor cell lines and concluded that the labeled cells are suitable for drug cytotoxicity tests.

  5. A novel and simple x-ray slit for diamond anvil cell based x-ray diffraction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, K. A.; Kumar, N. R. Sanjay; Shekar, N. V. Chandra

    2017-04-01

    We report here a novel internal x-ray slit assembly to carry out laboratory based high pressure x-ray diffraction (HPXRD) experiments in a Mao Bell type diamond anvil cell. In this assembly a tiny sheet of lead with a 100 micron hole immediately below the diamond table acts as an x-ray slit. Data resolution and statistics were compared with the older slit. This novel slit assembly has two major advantages (i) eliminates cumbersome and lengthy procedure usually adopted for alignment of x-ray slit (ii) provides high flux and improved resolution due to the comparatively low beam divergence and effective utilization of the maxima of the beam profile.

  6. X-ray spectrometer based on a bent diamond crystal for high repetition rate free-electron laser applications

    DOE PAGES

    Boesenberg, Ulrike; Samoylova, Liubov; Roth, Thomas; ...

    2017-02-03

    A precise spectral characterization of every single pulse is required in many x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) experiments due to the fluctuating spectral content of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) beams. Bent single-crystal spectrometers can provide sufficient spectral resolution to resolve the SASE spikes while also covering the full SASE bandwidth. To better withstand the high heat load induced by the 4.5 MHz repetition rate of pulses at the forthcoming European XFEL facility, a spectrometer based on single-crystal diamond has been developed. Here, we report a direct comparison of the diamond spectrometer with its Si counterpart in experiments performed at the Linacmore » Coherent Light Source.« less

  7. Ultrahard stitching of nanotwinned diamond and cubic boron nitride in C2-BN composite

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Chen, Xin; Ma, Hong-An; Jia, Xiaopeng; Wu, Jinsong; Yu, Tony; Wang, Yanbin; Guo, Jiangang; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Bina, Craig R.; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2016-07-27

    Materials combining the hardness and strength of diamond with the higher thermal stability of cubic boron nitride (cBN) have broad potential value in science and engineering. Reacting nanodiamond with cBN at moderate pressures and high temperatures provides a pathway to such materials. Here we report the fabrication of Cx-BN nanocomposites, measuring up to 10 mm in longest dimension, by reacting nanodiamond with pre-synthesized cBN in a large-volume press. The nanocomposites consist of randomly-oriented diamond and cBN domains stitched together by sp3-hybridized C-B and C-N bonds, leading to p-type semiconductivity. Dislocations near the sutures accommodate lattice mismatch between diamond and cBN. Nanotwinning within both diamond and cBN domains further contributes to a bulk hardness ~50% higher than sintered cBN. We find the nanocomposite of C2-BN exhibits p-type semiconductivity with low activation energy and high thermal stability, making it a functional,ultrahard substance.

  8. Trace elements of fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Griffin, W. L.; Navon, O.

    2009-04-01

    Twenty-seven fibrous diamonds from Kankan, Udachnaya, Diavik, DeBeers Pool and Koingnaas were analyzed for their trace element contents using the cellulose calibration LA-ICP-MS method; their major and volatile content were previously determined by EPMA and FTIR. This set of diamonds carries high-Mg carbonatitic, saline and low-Mg carbonatitic to silicic high-density fluid (HDFs) which represent the four end-members found in microinclusion-bearing diamonds. The trapped HDFs in all diamonds are highly enriched in incompatible elements typically reaching levels of a few thousand times the primitive mantle values. The majority of diamonds show similar patterns from Pr towards the more compatible elements, with moderate to high negative anomalies of Sr, Zr, Hf, Ti and Y. These anomalies are found in kimberlitic melts as well as in other metasomatic fluids in the lithospheric mantle. In the low-Mg carbonatitic to silicic HDFs and in the saline ones, two patterns are distinguished in the most incompatible elements (Cs-Ce). The first (designated "Table") has significantly higher Ba, U, Th and LREE compared to Nb, Ta and, in most cases, K, Rb and Cs. The second pattern ("Bench") is flatter with no significant anomalies in this range. The high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs do not show such defined patterns. Still, high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs from Kankan show higher depletion of the alkalis, and to a lesser extent Nb and Ta, compared with Udachnaya high-Mg HDFs. The present database is still limited, but "Table" patterns were found in the coat of a Kankan diamond that carries eclogitic inclusions in its core and in a Diavik diamond with peridotitic micro-mineral inclusions in its coat. Thus, the two patterns are probably not related to the peridotitic or eclogitic rocks that host the diamonds. "Table" and "Bench" patterns of the incompatible elements are found in HDFs of diverse major-element compositions (carbonatitic, silicic and saline). This suggests that the two patterns reflect

  9. A novel procedure to obtain nanocrystalline diamond/porous silicon composite by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration processes.

    PubMed

    Miranda, C R B; Azevedo, A F; Baldan, M R; Beloto, A F; Ferreira, N G

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films were formed on porous silicon (PS) substrate by Chemical Vapor Deposition/Infiltration (CVD/CVI) process using a hot filament reactor. This innovative procedure is determinant to grow a controlled three-dimensional diamond structure with diamond grains formation in the pores, covering uniformly the different growth planes. In this CVI process, a piece of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) was used, under de PS substrate, as an additional solid source of hydrocarbon that ensures the production of pertinent carbon growth species directly on PS and into its pores. PS substrates were obtained by anodization etching process of n-type silicon wafer in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution containing acetonitrile (CH3CN) which result in an uniform and well controlled porous distribution and size when compared with the usual ethanol solution. Depositions were performed using Ar-H2-CH4 where the methane concentration varied from 0 up to 1.0 vol%, to analyze the influence of RVC use as an additional carbon source on growth mechanism. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Field Emission Gun (FEG) were used to investigate PS and NCD film morphology. SEM images of NCD showed faceted nanograins with average size from 5 to 16 nm and uniform surface texture covering all the supports among the pores resulting in an apparent micro honeycomb structure. Raman spectra confirmed the existence of sp2-bonded carbon at the grain boundaries. The spectra showed a peak that may be deconvoluted in two components at 1332 cm(-1) (diamond) and 1345 cm(-1) (D band). Two shoulders at 1150 and 1490 cm(-1) also appear and are assigned to transpolyacetylene (TPA) segments at the grain boundaries of NCD surfaces. In addition, X-ray diffraction analyses of all films presented characteristic diamond diffraction peaks corresponding to (111), (220) and (311).

  10. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-12-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  11. A Solar-Blind UV Detector Based on Graphene-Microcrystalline Diamond Heterojunctions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Minsong; Yao, Kaiyuan; Liu, Yumeng; Yang, Chen; Zang, Xining; Lin, Liwei

    2017-09-01

    An ultraviolet detector is demonstrated through a whole-wafer, thin diamond film transfer process to realize the heterojunction between graphene and microcrystalline diamond (MCD). Conventional direct transfer processes fail to deposit graphene onto the top surface of the MCD film. However, it is found that the 2 µm thick MCD diamond film can be easily peeled off from the growth silicon substrate to expose its smooth backside for the graphene transfer process for high-quality graphene/MCD heterojunctions. A vertical graphene/MCD/metal structure is constructed as the photodiode device using graphene as the transparent top electrode for solar-blind ultraviolet sensing with high responsivity and gain factor. As such, this material system and device architecture could serve as the platform for next-generation optoelectronic systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CVD-diamond-based position sensitive photoconductive detector for high-flux x-rays and gamma rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, D.

    1999-04-19

    A position-sensitive photoconductive detector (PSPCD) using insulating-type CVD diamond as its substrate material has been developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Several different configurations, including a quadrant pattern for a x-ray-transmitting beam position monitor (TBPM) and 1-D and 2-D arrays for PSPCD beam profilers, have been developed. Tests on different PSPCD devices with high-heat-flux undulator white x-ray beam, as well as with gamma-ray beams from {sup 60}Co sources have been done at the APS and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). It was proven that the insulating-type CVD diamond can be used to make a hard x-ray and gamma-ray position-sensitive detector that acts as a solid-state ion chamber. These detectors are based on the photoconductivity principle. A total of eleven of these TBPMs have been installed on the APS front ends for commissioning use. The linear array PSPCD beam profiler has been routinely used for direct measurements of the undulator white beam profile. More tests with hard x-rays and gamma rays are planned for the CVD-diamond 2-D imaging PSPCD. Potential applications include a high-dose-rate beam profiler for fourth-generation synchrotrons radiation facilities, such as free-electron lasers.

  13. Simulation-Based Optimal Design of Hfcvd Equipment Adopted for Mass Production of Diamond Films on Inner-Hole Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinchang; Lei, Xuelin; Cheng, Lei; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2014-07-01

    HFCVD diamond films have been extensively applied on inner-hole surfaces of some wear resistant components as protective coatings, the mass production of which puts forward a high request to the HFCVD equipment. In this paper, adopting a typical kind of drawing die as the substrate, several different substrate configurations are proposed to expand the capacity of the equipment. Temperature distributions on inner-hole surfaces of the substrates are respectively predicted and compared by the finite volume method (FVM) simulations. In summary, for parallel configurations, proper-designed auxiliary devices (e.g. the heat-insulated plate, the water-cooled plate and the heat-insulated cushion block) can provide sufficient effects on the uniformity of the substrate temperature distribution. Moreover, without any auxiliary devices, homogeneous substrate temperature distributions can also be obtained using circular pattern configurations (radial, hexagon and triangular). Accordingly, the HFCVD equipment referring to the design concept of the triangular configuration is trial-manufactured. In the verification experiments, similar substrate temperature values are detected in three different modules, and as-deposited microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films both present uniform grain size, thickness and quality, well validating the rationality and correctness of the simulation-based optimal design.

  14. High-density fluids and the growth of monocrystalline diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Kiflawi, I.; Davies, N.; Navon, O.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical nature and composition of the growth medium of monocrystalline (MC) diamonds is still a matter of debate, partially because carbonate-bearing high-density fluids (HDFs) that are common in fibrous diamonds have not been found in MC diamonds. Here we report the first finding of HDF microinclusions in a MC octahedral diamond from Finsch, South Africa and in the MC octahedral core of a coated diamond from Kankan, Guinea; both diamonds carry nitrogen in B-centers. Numerous microinclusions in diamond Finsch_2a_cap1 are restricted to two thin layers parallel to the (1 1 1) face, ∼20 and 200 μm from the diamond rim. Low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs are found along the inner layer while the outer layer trapped saline compositions. The major and trace element compositions of the inclusions and their infrared spectra are highly similar to those of microinclusions found in fibrous diamonds. A few isolated microinclusions of saline compositions are scattered around a sulfide inclusion in the center of the octahedral core of diamond ON-KAN-383. This evidence for the involvement of oxidized fluids in the formation of MC diamonds adds to previous reports on the antiquity of HDFs in fibrous diamonds, the presence of carbonate and halide phases in inclusions in MC diamonds and the similarity of trace element pattern of a MC diamond to those of low-Mg carbonatitic HDF in fibrous diamonds. In addition, we show that the interaction of HDFs with depleted garnets can produce sinusoidal REE patterns which are one of the primary features of lherzolitic and harzburgitic garnet inclusions in MC diamonds. Together, these observations suggest that HDFs are involved in the formation of many types of diamonds from the Archaean to the Phanerozoic. HDFs are trapped in large quantities during rapid, fibrous growth, but must also be present during the growth of many MC diamonds.

  15. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markunas, R. J.; Rudder, R. A.; Posthill, J. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Hudson, G.

    1994-02-01

    Technical highlights from 1993 include the following: Growth Chemistries: A clear correlation was observed between ionization potential of feedstock gasses and critical power necessary for inductive coupling of the plasma and consequent diamond growth. Substrate preparation and epitaxial film quality: Ion-implantation of C and O has been coupled with either electrochemical etching or acid cleaning for surface preparation prior to homoepitaxial growth. Reactor modifications: Key improvements were made to the RF reactor to allow for long growths to consolidate substrates. Liquid mass flow controllers were added to precisely meter both the water and selected alcohol. Ion-implantation and lift off: Lift off of diamond platelets has been achieved with two processes. Ion-implantation of either C or O followed by annealing and implantation of either C or O followed by water based electrolysis. Diamond characterization: Development of novel detect characterization techniques: (1) Etch delineation of defects by exposure to propane torch flame. (2) Hydrogen plasma exposure to enhance secondary electron emission and provide non-topographical defect contrast. Acetylene will react at room temperature with sites created by partial desorption of oxygen from the (100) diamond surface. Thermal desorption measurements give an apparent activation energy for CO desorption from diamond (100) of 45 kcal/mol. Quantum chemical calculations indicate an activation energy of 38 kcal/mol for CO desorption. Ab initio calculations on (100) surfaces indicates that oxygen adsorbed at one dimer site has an effect on the dimerization of an adjacent site.

  16. Perfluorinated polyalkylether based lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.I.; Kaufman, J.; Kratzer, R.H.; Nakahara, J.H.; Paciorek, K.J.

    1980-03-25

    A description is given of a lubricant composition comprising a perfluorinated polyalkylether base fluid and a minor amount of a diphospha-striazine in which the two phosphorus atoms are substituted by aromatic groups and the carbon atom is substituted by a perfluoroalkyl or perfluoroalkylether moiety.

  17. Isotope fractionation related to kimberlite magmatism and diamond formation

    SciTech Connect

    Galimov, E.M. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper deals with a model of carbon isotope fractionation presumed to accompany the movement of mantle fluids. In the first part of the article, the experimental data and the relationships revealed are generalized and discussed; the remainder of the paper describes the model. The isotope compositions of different forms of carbon related to kimberlite magmatism vary widely. In diamonds, {delta}{sup 13}C values range from {minus}34.5 to +2.8{per thousand}. Carbonate-bearing autholiths in kimberlites occur enriched in {sup 13}C up to +35{per thousand}. Organic matter, including that occurring in fluid inclusions of magmatic minerals of kimberlites, is depleted in {sup 13}C down to {minus}30{per thousand}. It is concluded that the {delta}{sup 13}C-distribution for diamonds is specific for a particular occurrence. Principal differences in isotopic distribution patterns for diamonds of ultrabasic and basic paragenesis exist. Isotopically light diamonds are related only to the latter. The intention of the model is to explain the observed variations of carbon isotope composition of diamond and other carbonaceous substances related to kimberlite magmatism. The model is based on the interaction of reduced sub-asthenospehric fluid with a relatively oxidized lithosphere. It is suggested that diamonds of ultrabasic paragenesis are produced during interaction of the fluid with sheared garnet lbherzolite which is considered to be primitive mantle rock. During contact with the more oxidized mantle, reduced carbon (CH{sub 4}) may partially be converted to CO{sub 2}. Isotope exchange in CO{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} system, conbined with Rayleigh distillation, may provide a significant isotope fractionation. Diamonds of the basic (eclogitic) paragenesis are considered to be realted to this fractionated carbon. Also, occurrence of carbonate material highly enriched in {sup 13}C is explained by the model.

  18. Diamond Synthesis and Carbon Solubility in a Hydrous Granitoid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renfro, A.; Dobrzhinetskaya, L. P.

    2004-12-01

    An increasing number of UHP metamorphic terranes incorporated in collisional orogenic belts have been identified since the first discovery of diamonds within felsic metamorphic rocks of Kokchetav massif, Kazakhstan, extending up to ˜4000 km in length in the Dabie-SuLu-Qinling belt of China. Some have suggested that all orogenic belt diamonds formed from a carbonate or calc-alkaline melt similar to those derived from kimberlitic pipes, or alternatively that they formed from a carbon-enriched silicate melt with a granitoid bulk chemistry composition. Another group has suggested that orogenic belt diamonds crystallized from a COH-rich supercritical fluid. While the diversity of the minor components accompanying the SiO2-dominated inclusions from Kokchetav diamonds, as well as the presence of cavities bearing traces of a former fluid, suggest the idea of diamond growth from a COH fluid, a Si-rich melt as a source for diamond formation cannot be ruled out. Although many experiments were performed on diamond synthesis and on the petrology of diamond-bearing rocks, no consensus has been reached as to which of the mentioned growth media is correct to explain orogenic belt diamond formation. We report here the results of an experimental program undertaken to determine the critical point of the Si-Al-K-C-H2O system (and thus, to distinguish a melt environment from a fluid one) and to provide an understanding of how diamond is crystallized in hydrous subducted felsic continental crust. Carbon solubility in these systems was qualitatively determined based on the observed diamond growth rates. Experiments were performed at in a Walker-style multianvil apparatus at P=7 GPa and T=1500-1700° C with SiO2 ranging from 90 wt. %, imitating diamondiferous quartzite, to 62 wt. %, imitating a wide range of feldspathic diamondiferous gneisses. An additional parameter, oxygen fugacity, was also varied to test its affects on the solubility of carbon in Si-rich melt/fluid.

  19. Morphology of diamond crystals grown in magnesium-based systems at high temperatures and high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khokhryakov, Alexander F.; Sokol, Alexander G.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Palyanov, Yuri N.

    2015-09-01

    A series of experiments on diamond growth in the Mg45Cu55-C, Mg50Ni50-C, Mg50Cu25Ni25-C, Mg50Ag25Ni25-C and Mg25Cu25Ni50-C systems at a pressure of 6.3 GPa in the temperature range of 1550-1650 °C was conducted. The morphology of diamond crystals and the features of their growth were studied. The {111} and {100} faces, with the cube faces playing the dominant role, were found to be the plane-faced forms of diamond crystal growth. If the magnesium content in the system is 45-50 at%, crystal growth occurs in the regime of inhibition of the {100} faces with the formation of antiskeletal crystals. In case of a constant intensity of the face inhibition up to its complete growing out, the quasi-faces of trapezohedron {311} are formed with striations in the [110] direction. The inhibition of face growth and formation of antiskeletal crystals are related to oxygen inflow from the cell parts and are accompanied by crystallization of magnesium oxide on the diamond surface. A reduction in the magnesium content in the system from 50 to 25 at% or an increase in the temperature leads to the cessation of {100} face inhibition and promotes growth of plane-faced crystals.

  20. Novel polymer composite having diamond particles and boron nitride platelets for thermal management of electric vehicle motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Anri; Shoji, Atsushi; Yonemori, Kei; Seo, Nobuhide

    2016-02-01

    Thermal conductivities of silicone matrix polymers including fillers of diamond particles and/or hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) platelets were systematically investigated in an attempt to find a thermal interface material (TIM) having high isotropic thermal conductivity and high electrical insulating ability to enable efficient heat dissipation from the motor coil ends of electric vehicles. The TIM with mixed fillers of diamond particles and h-BN platelets had a maximum thermal conductivity of 6.1 W m-1 K-1 that was almost isotropic. This is the highest value among the thermal conductivities of TIMs with silicone matrix polymer reported to date. The mechanism behind the thermal conductivity of the TIMs was also examined from the viewpoint of the change in the number of thermally conductive networks and/or a decrease in the thermal resistivity of junctions of neighboring diamond particles through the incorporation of h-BN platelets. The TIMs developed in this study will make it possible to manage the heat of electric motors and will help to popularize electric vehicles.

  1. 77 FR 20817 - Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Diamond State Generation Partners, LLC's application...

  2. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  3. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  4. Pharmacokinetic properties of new antitumor radiopharmaceutical on the basis of diamond nanoporous composites labeled with rhenium-188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petriev, V. M.; Tishchenko, V. K.; Kuril'chik, A. A.; Skvortsov, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    Today the development of address therapeutic radionuclide delivery systems directly to tumor tissue is of current interest. It can be achieved by the design of drug containers of specific sizes and shapes from carbon-based composite materials. It will be allowed to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy and avoid serious side effects. In this work we studied the pharmacokinetic properties of nanodiamond nanoporous composite labeled with rhenium-188 in rats with hepatocholangioma PC-1 after intratumoral injection. It was established that substantial part of injected radioactivity remained in tumor tissue. Within three hours after 188Re-nanoporous composites injection activity in tumor constituted 79.1-91.3% of injected dose (ID). Then activity level declined to 45.9% ID at 120 hours. No more than 1.34% ID entered the bloodstream. In soft organs and tissues, except thyroid gland, the content of compound didn’t exceed 0.3% ID/g. The highest activity in thyroid gland was 6.95% ID/g. In conclusion, received results suggest 188Re-nanoporous composites can be promising radionuclide delivery systems for cancer treatment.

  5. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  6. Topomineralogy of the Siberian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Valentin; Lobanov, Sergey; Vasiliy, Koptil; Bogdan, Pomazanskiy; Alexander, Gerasimchuk; Nikolay, Pokhilenko

    2010-05-01

    Diamond placers are widespread in the modern alluvial deposits and ancient sedimentary collectors of the Siberian craton and can be divided into two major types: 1) related with the rich and famous kimberlites such as Mir and International pipe and 2) with unidentified root source. The lattert are wide spread, industrially significant and in use in the north-east of the Siberian craton. Yet, kimberlites known in the north-east of the Siberian craton have poor diamond concentrations or non-diamondiferous at all. A contradiction occur between high alluvial and extremely-low host diamond content of this region. Detailed studies of this problem led to the fact that diamonds from the alluvial deposits of the Siberian craton, as well as other diamondiferous regions, show broader spectrum of typomorphic features than diamonds from the known kimberlites. Moreover, some diamond groups are not typical for the phanerozoic kimberlites of Siberia, or do not occur in significant amounts. The foregoing suggests that diamonds from the unknown host rock type occur in the diamond placers of the Siberian craton along with typical kimberlite diamonds. Based on the detailed studies of the typomorphic features of the alluvial diamonds from Siberian craton 5 parasteresis groups, probably related to different host rock types, were distinguished. Parasteresis is a regular spatial mineral association which are united by single geological process, such as kimberlite indicator minerals and diamonds from kimberlites which differ in genesis but united by the whole kimberlitic process. Parasteresis 1 (kimberlite-type) involves diamonds which are common for the phanerozoic kimberlites. Parasteresis 2 (supposed to be lamproitic) includes roundish (cryptolaminar) diamonds of dodecahedron habit, the so called "brazilian" or "ural" types. In Siberian phanerozoic industrial kimberlites the part of such diamonds does not exceed 15%. That is the diamonds which dominate in the placers of the Urals and

  7. Spectrally dependent photovoltages in Schottky photodiode based on (100) B-doped diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Čermák, Jan Rezek, Bohuslav; Koide, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2014-02-07

    Spectrally and spatially resolved photovoltages were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on a Schottky photo-diode made of a 4 nm thin tungsten-carbide (WC) layer on a 500 nm oxygen-terminated boron-doped diamond epitaxial layer (O-BDD) that was grown on a Ib (100) diamond substrate. The diode was grounded by the sideways ohmic contact (Ti/WC), and the semitransparent Schottky contact was let unconnected. The electrical potentials across the device were measured in dark (only 650 nm LED of KPFM being on), under broad-band white light (halogen lamp), UV (365 nm diode), and deep ultraviolet (deuterium lamp) illumination. Illumination induced shift of the electrical potential remains within 210 mV. We propose that the photovoltage actually corresponds to a shift of Fermi level inside the BDD channel and thereby explains orders of magnitude changes in photocurrent.

  8. Planar field emitters and high efficiency photocathodes based on ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Antipov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-16

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  9. Biodistribution of amino-functionalized diamond nanoparticles. In vivo studies based on 18F radionuclide emission.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Santiago; Gispert, Juan D; Martín, Roberto; Abad, Sergio; Menchón, Cristina; Pareto, Deborah; Víctor, Víctor M; Alvaro, Mercedes; García, Hermenegildo; Herance, J Raúl

    2011-07-26

    Nanoparticles have been proposed for several biomedical applications; however, in vivo biodistribution studies to confirm their potential are scarce. Nanodiamonds are carbon nanoparticles that have been recently proposed as a promising biomaterial. In this study, we labeled nanodiamonds with (18)F to study their in vivo biodistribution by positron emission tomography. Moreover, the impact on the biodistribution of their kinetic particle size and of the surfactant agents has been evaluated. Radiolabeled diamond nanoparticles accumulated mainly in the lung, spleen, and liver and were excreted into the urinary tract. The addition of surfactant agents did not lead to significant changes in this pattern, with the exception of a slight reduction in the urinary excretion rate. On the other hand, after filtration of the radiolabeled diamond nanoparticles to remove those with a larger kinetic size, the uptake in the lung and spleen was completely inhibited and significantly reduced in the liver.

  10. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  11. Planar Field Emitters and High Efficiency Photocathodes Based on Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumant, Anirudha V. (Inventor); Baryshev, Sergey V. (Inventor); Antipov, Sergey P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  12. An impedimetric immunosensor based on diamond nanowires decorated with nickel nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Palaniappan; Motorina, Anastasiia; Yeap, Weng Siang; Haenen, Ken; Coffinier, Yannick; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Niedziolka-Jonsson, Joanna; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2014-04-07

    Nanostructured boron-doped diamond has been investigated as a sensitive impedimetric electrode for the detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG). The immunosensor was constructed in a three-step process: (i) reactive ion etching of flat boron-doped diamond (BDD) interfaces to synthesize BDD nanowires (BDD NWs), (ii) electrochemical deposition of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs) on the BDD NWs, and (iii) immobilization of biotin-tagged anti-IgG onto the Ni NPs. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to follow the binding of IgG at different concentrations without the use of any additional label. A detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1) (2 nM) with a dynamic range up to 300 ng mL(-1) (2 μM) was obtained with the interface. Moreover, the study demonstrated that this immunosensor exhibits good stability over time and allows regeneration by incubation in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) aqueous solution.

  13. Single-photon emitters based on NIR color centers in diamond coupled with solid immersion lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monticone, D. Gatto; Forneris, J.; Levi, M.; Battiato, A.; Picollo, F.; Olivero, P.; Traina, P.; Moreva, E.; Enrico, E.; Brida, G.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Genovese, M.; Amato, G.; Boarino, L.

    2014-12-01

    Single-photon sources represent a key enabling technology in quantum optics, and single color centers in diamond are a promising platform to serve this purpose, due to their high quantum efficiency and photostability at room temperature. The widely studied nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers are characterized by several limitations, thus other defects have recently been considered, with a specific focus of centers emitting in the near-infra red (NIR). In the present work, we report on the coupling of native NIR-emitting centers in high-quality single-crystal diamond with solid immersion lens (SIL) structures fabricated by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. The reported improvements in terms of light collection efficiency make the proposed system an ideal platform for the development of single-photon emitters with appealing photophysical and spectral properties.

  14. Development of diamond-based X-ray detection for high-flux beamline diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bohon, Jen; Muller, Erik; Smedley, John

    2010-11-01

    High-quality single-crystal and polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond detectors with platinum contacts have been tested at the white-beam X28C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source under high-flux conditions. The voltage dependence of these devices has been measured under both DC and pulsed-bias conditions, establishing the presence or absence of photoconductive gain in each device. Linear response consistent with the theoretically determined ionization energy has been achieved over eleven orders of magnitude when combined with previous low-flux studies. Temporal measurements with single-crystal diamond detectors have resolved the nanosecond-scale pulse structures of both the NSLS and the APS. Prototype single-crystal quadrant detectors have provided the ability to simultaneously resolve the X-ray beam position and obtain a quantitative measurement of the flux.

  15. Development of diamond-based X-ray detection for high-flux beamline diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Bohon, Jen; Muller, Erik; Smedley, John

    2010-01-01

    High-quality single-crystal and polycrystalline chemical-vapor-deposition diamond detectors with platinum contacts have been tested at the white-beam X28C beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source under high-flux conditions. The voltage dependence of these devices has been measured under both DC and pulsed-bias conditions, establishing the presence or absence of photoconductive gain in each device. Linear response consistent with the theoretically determined ionization energy has been achieved over eleven orders of magnitude when combined with previous low-flux studies. Temporal measurements with single-crystal diamond detectors have resolved the nanosecond-scale pulse structures of both the NSLS and the APS. Prototype single-crystal quadrant detectors have provided the ability to simultaneously resolve the X-ray beam position and obtain a quantitative measurement of the flux. PMID:20975215

  16. Spectrally dependent photovoltages in Schottky photodiode based on (100) B-doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, Jan; Koide, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2014-02-01

    Spectrally and spatially resolved photovoltages were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on a Schottky photo-diode made of a 4 nm thin tungsten-carbide (WC) layer on a 500 nm oxygen-terminated boron-doped diamond epitaxial layer (O-BDD) that was grown on a Ib (100) diamond substrate. The diode was grounded by the sideways ohmic contact (Ti/WC), and the semitransparent Schottky contact was let unconnected. The electrical potentials across the device were measured in dark (only 650 nm LED of KPFM being on), under broad-band white light (halogen lamp), UV (365 nm diode), and deep ultraviolet (deuterium lamp) illumination. Illumination induced shift of the electrical potential remains within 210 mV. We propose that the photovoltage actually corresponds to a shift of Fermi level inside the BDD channel and thereby explains orders of magnitude changes in photocurrent.

  17. Structural aspects of metal-organic framework-based energy materials research at Diamond

    PubMed Central

    Allan, David R.; Blake, Alexander J.; Schröder, Martin; Tang, Chiu C.; Yang, Sihai

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale central facilities such as Diamond Light Source fulfil an increasingly pivotal role in many large-scale scientific research programmes. We illustrate these developments by reference to energy-centred projects at the University of Nottingham, the progress of which depends crucially on access to these facilities. Continuing access to beamtime has now become a major priority for those who direct such programmes. PMID:25624515

  18. Structural aspects of metal-organic framework-based energy materials research at Diamond.

    PubMed

    Allan, David R; Blake, Alexander J; Schröder, Martin; Tang, Chiu C; Yang, Sihai

    2015-03-06

    Large-scale central facilities such as Diamond Light Source fulfil an increasingly pivotal role in many large-scale scientific research programmes. We illustrate these developments by reference to energy-centred projects at the University of Nottingham, the progress of which depends crucially on access to these facilities. Continuing access to beamtime has now become a major priority for those who direct such programmes.

  19. Plasmon-enhanced sensitivity of spin-based sensors based on a diamond ensemble of nitrogen vacancy color centers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hao; Chen, Yulei; Wu, Dajin; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Jun; Ma, Zongmin; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    A method for enhancement of the sensitivity of a spin sensor based on an ensemble of nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers was demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles (NPs) were deposited on the bulk diamond, which had NV centers distributed on its surface. The experimental results demonstrate that, when using this simple method, plasmon enhancement of the deposited gold NPs produces an improvement of ∼10 times in the quantum efficiency and has also improved the signal-to-noise ratio by approximately ∼2.5 times. It was also shown that more electrons participated in the spin sensing process, leading to an improvement in the sensitivity of approximately seven times; this has been proved by Rabi oscillation and optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements. The proposed method has proved to be a more efficient way to design an ensemble of NV centers-based sensors; because the result increases in the number of NV centers, the quantum efficiency and the contrast ratio could greatly increase the device's sensitivity.

  20. A beam radiation monitor based on CVD diamonds for SuperB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.

    2013-08-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond particle detectors are in use in the CERN experiments at LHC and at particle accelerator laboratories in Europe, USA and Japan mainly as beam monitors. Nowadays it is considered a proven technology with a very fast signal read-out and a very high radiation tolerance suitable for measurements in high radiation environment zones i.e. near the accelerators beam pipes. The specific properties of CVD diamonds make them a prime candidate for measuring single particles as well as high-intensity particle cascades, for timing measurements on the sub-nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems in hostile environments. A single-crystalline CVD (scCVD) diamond sensor, read out with a new generation of fast and high transition frequency SiGe bipolar transistor amplifiers, has been tested for an application as radiation monitor to safeguard the silicon vertex tracker in the SuperB detector from excessive radiation damage, cumulative dose and instantaneous dose rates. Test results with 5.5 MeV alpha particles from a 241Am radioactive source and from electrons from a 90Sr radioactive source are presented in this paper.

  1. Room-temperature hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were deposited on unheated WC containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. The hardness of the film is 51.3 GPa, which is comparable with the highest values of hard a-C films deposited on nonbiased substrates. The deposited film is approximately 3 µm thick, which is one order larger than that of hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. The existence of a large number of grain boundaries in the UNCD/a-C film might play a role in the release of the internal stress.

  2. An Observation of Diamond-Shaped Particle Structure in a Soya Phosphatidylcohline and Bacteriorhodopsin Composite Langmuir Blodgett Film Fabricated by Multilayer Molecular Thin Film Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiuchi, Y.; Makino, Y.

    A composite film of soya phosphatidylcohline (soya PC) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was fabricated by the multilayer molecular thin film method using fatty acid and lipid on a quartz substrate. Direct Force Microscopy (DFM), UV absorption spectra and IR absorption spectra of the film were characterized on the detail of surface structure of the film. The DFM data revealed that many rhombus (diamond-shaped) particles were observed in the film. The spectroscopic data exhibited the yield of M-intermediate of BR in the film. On our modelling of molecular configuration indicate that the coexistence of the strong inter-molecular interaction and the strong inter-molecular interaction between BR trimmers attributed to form the particles.

  3. Spectroscopic properties and radiation damage investigation of a diamond based Schottky diode for ion-beam therapy microdosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Verona, C.; Marinelli, Marco; Verona-Rinati, G.; Magrin, G.; Solevi, P.; Mayer, R.; Grilj, V.; Jakšić, M.

    2015-11-14

    In this work, a detailed analysis of the properties of a novel microdosimeter based on a synthetic single crystal diamond is reported. Focused ion microbeams were used to investigate the device spectropscopic properties as well as the induced radiation damage effects. A diamond based Schottky diode was fabricated by chemical vapor deposition with a very thin detecting region, about 400 nm thick (approximately 1.4 μm water equivalent thickness), corresponding to the typical size in microdosimetric measurements. A 200 × 200 μm{sup 2} square metallic contact was patterned on the diamond surface by standard photolithography to define the sensitive area. Experimental measurements were carried out at the Ruder Boškovic′ Institute microbeam facility using 4 MeV carbon and 5 MeV silicon ions. Ion beam induced charge maps were employed to characterize the microdosimeter response in terms of its charge collection properties. A stable response with no evidence of polarization or memory effects was observed up to the maximum investigated ion beam flux of about 1.7 × 10{sup 9} ions·cm{sup −2}·s{sup −1}. A homogeneity of the response about 6% was found over the sensitive region with a well-defined confinement of the response within the active area. Tests of the radiation damage effect were performed by selectively irradiating small areas of the device with different ion fluences, up to about 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. An exponential decrease of the charge collection efficiency was observed with a characteristic decay constant of about 4.8 MGy and 1 MGy for C and Si ions, respectively. The experimental data were analyzed by means of GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations. A direct correlation between the diamond damaging effect and the Non Ionizing Energy Loss (NIEL) fraction was found. In particular, an exponential decay of the charge collection efficiency with an exponential decay as a function of NIEL is observed, with a characteristic constant of about

  4. Microplasma device architectures with various diamond nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Jothiramalingam Sankaran, Kamatchi; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-02-01

    Diamond nanostructures (DNSs) were fabricated from three different morphological diamonds, microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, using a reactive ion etching method. The plasma illumination (PI) behavior of microplasma devices using the DNSs and the diamond films as cathode were investigated. The Paschen curve approach revealed that the secondary electron emission coefficient (γ value) of diamond materials is similar irrespective of the microstructure (MCD, NCD, and UNCD) and geometry of the materials (DNSs and diamond films). The diamond materials show markedly larger γ-coefficient than conventional metallic cathode materials such as Mo that resulted in markedly better PI behavior for the corresponding microplasma devices. Moreover, the PI behavior, i.e. the voltage dependence of plasma current density (J pl‑V), plasma density (n e‑V), and the robustness of the devices, varied markedly with the microstructure and geometry of the cathode materials that was closely correlated to the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the cathode materials. The UNCD nanopillars, possessing good EFE properties, resulted in superior PI behavior, whereas the MCD diamond films with insufficient EFE properties led to inferior PI behavior. Consequently, enhancement of plasma characteristics is the collective effects of EFE behavior and secondary electron emission characteristics of diamond-based cathode materials.

  5. Nanostructure TEM analysis of diamond cold cathode field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Travis S.; Ghosh, Nikkon; Wittig, James Edward; Kang, Weng; Allard Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Unocic, Kinga A; Davidson, James; Tolk, Norman H.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond cold cathode devices have demonstrated significant potential as electron field emitters. Ultra-sharp diamond pyramidal tips (~5nm tip radius) have been fabricated and show improvement in emission when compared to conventional field emitters. However, the emission mechanisms in these complex diamond nanostructures are not well understood. Transmission electron microscopy performed in this study provides new insight into tip structure and composition with implications for field emission and diamond growth.

  6. Study on tribological behavior and cutting performance of CVD diamond and DLC films on Co-cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongcan; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2010-02-01

    The tribological behaviors of diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films play a major role on their machining and mechanical applications. In this study, diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on the cobalt cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate respectively adopting the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique and the vacuum arc discharge with a graphite cathode, and their friction properties are evaluated on a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer with counterfaces of silicon nitride (Si 3N 4) ceramic, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) and ball-bearing steel materials, under the ambient air without lubricating condition. Moreover, to evaluate their cutting performance, comparative turning tests are conducted using the uncoated WC-Co and as-fabricated CVD diamond and DLC coated inserts, with glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) composite materials as the workpiece. The as-deposited HFCVD diamond and DLC films are characterized with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry. Furthermore, Rocwell C indentation tests are conducted to evaluate the adhesion of HFCVD diamond and DLC films grown onto WC-Co substrates. SEM and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry are also used to investigate the worn region on the surfaces of diamond and DLC films. The friction tests suggest that the obtained friction coefficient curves that of various contacts exhibit similar evolution tendency. For a given counterface, DLC films present lower stable friction coefficients than HFCVD diamond films under the same sliding conditions. The cutting tests results indicate that flank wear of the HFCVD diamond coated insert is lower than that of DLC coated insert before diamond films peeling off.

  7. Effect of Mechanical Surface Treatment on the Repair Bond Strength of the Silorane-based Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Talatahari, Elham; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Sajadi Oskoee, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. A proper bond must be created between the existing composite resin and the new one for successful repair. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of three mechanical surface treatments, using diamond bur, air abrasion, and Er,Cr:YSGG laser, on the repair bond strength of the silorane-based composite resin. Materials and methods. Sixty cylindrical composite resin specimens (Filtek Silorane) were fabricated and randomly divided into four groups according to surface treatment: group 1 (control group) without any mechanical surface treatment, groups 24 were treated with air abrasion, Er,Cr:YSGG laser, and diamond bur, respectively. In addition, a positive control group was assigned in order to measure the cohesive strength. Silorane bonding agent was used in groups 14 before adding the new composite resin. Then, the specimens were subjected to a shear bond strength test and data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P &0.05. The topographical effects of surface treatments were characterized under a scanning electron microscope. Results. There were statistically significant differences in the repair bond strength values between groups 1 and 2 and groups 3 and 4 (P &0.001). There were no significant differences between groups 1 and 2 (P = 0.98) and groups 3 and 4 (P= 0.97). Conclusion. Surface treatment using Er,Cr:YSGG laser and diamond bur were effective in silorane-based composite resin repair. PMID:25093047

  8. Photochemical functionalization of diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Beth Marie

    Diamond surfaces are excellent substrates for potential applications in fields such as biotechnology, molecular sensing, and molecular electronics. In order to develop new diamond-based technologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of diamond surface chemistry. Previous work in the Hamers group has demonstrated covalent functionalization of hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces with molecules bearing a terminal vinyl group via a photochemical process using sub-bandgap light at 254 nm. While the reaction was shown to occur reproducibly with self-terminating monolayer surface coverage, the mechanism was never fully understood. This thesis investigates the photochemical modification of hydrogen-terminated surfaces of diamond. The results show that this reaction is a surface-mediated radical process initiated by the UV-assisted photoejection of electrons from the diamond surfaces into the liquid phase. To develop a better understanding of the photochemical mechanism, an electrical bias was applied to the diamond samples during the photochemical reaction. Applying a 1 volt potential between two diamond electrodes significantly increases the rate of functionalization of the negative electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance measurements show that the applied potential induces downward band-bending within the negative diamond film electrode. At higher voltages a Faradaic current is observed, with no further acceleration of the functionalization rate. The bias-dependent changes in rate are attributed to a field effect; the applied potential induces a downward band-bending on the negative electrode and facilitates electron ejection into the adjacent organic fluid. The ability to directly organically photopattern the surface on length scales of <25 microns has also been demonstrated using simple photomasking techniques. Techniques for the functionalization of diamond may be applied to other 'unreactive' surfaces. The activation of a

  9. Peridotitic mantle xenoliths from kimberlites on the Ekati Diamond Mine property, N.W.T., Canada: major element compositions and implications for the lithosphere beneath the central Slave craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Andrew; Westerlund, Kalle; Grütter, Herman; Gurney, John; Carlson, Jon; Fung, Agnes; Nowicki, Tom

    2004-09-01

    The composition, structure and thermal state of the lithosphere beneath the Slave craton have been studied by analysing over 300 peridotitic mantle xenoliths or multiphase xenocrysts entrained within kimberlites in the Lac de Gras area. These xenoliths are derived from seven kimberlites located on the Ekati Diamond Mine™ property and define a detailed stratigraphic profile through the central Slave lithosphere from less than 120 km down to ˜200 km. Two dominant peridotite types are present, namely garnet-bearing harzburgite and lherzolite with rare occurrences of chromite-facies peridotite, websterite and wehrlite. The pressures and temperatures ( P- T's) defined by the entire data-set range from 28 to 62 kbar and 650 to 1250 °C, respectively, and approximately intersect the diamond stability field at 900 °C and 42 kbar. There is no apparent change in the geotherm with depth that is discernable beyond the resolution of the various thermobarometers. The peridotites can be divided into two compositional zones—a shallow layer dominated by garnet harzburgite that straddles the diamond-graphite boundary and a deeper layer that is strongly dominated by garnet lherzolite. Compositionally, the harzburgites (and to a lesser extent, the shallow lherzolites) are ultra-depleted relative to the more fertile deeper layer, irrespective of whether they reside within the graphite or diamond stability field. This ultra-depleted layer beneath Ekati continues to ˜150 km.

  10. Influence on Diamonds During the Spraying of Diamond-Bronze Abrasive Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Nebel, J.; Buck, V.; Reuter, S.

    2010-01-01

    Detonation spraying provides the opportunity to produce diamond grinding tools for the machining of stone, cement, and concrete. Especially the atmospheric conditions of the spraying process yield in a high production flexibility. However, during detonation spraying, the oxygenic atmosphere as well as the thermal and kinetic energy have an impact on the processed diamond. Despite its importance for the tools’ performance, the influence of the spraying process on the superabrasive diamond is predominantly unknown. The potential decrease of the diamond durability and strength due to degradation effects during the production of sprayed diamond-CuSn 85/15 composites has not yet been determined. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to verify thermally initiated surface reactions of the sprayed diamonds after exposure to the spraying process. Additionally, reference measurements on the degradation of diamonds in oxidizing and inert conditions were carried out to compare the spraying results. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses were employed. To validate the mechanical properties of the diamond superabrasives, friability tests and fracture force tests were performed. It was found that under optimized detonation spraying conditions the thermal and mechanical impact remains low enough to ensure a good reliability of the processed diamonds. The diamond crystal structure endured the spraying process without detectable graphitization or oxidation. Deterioration indicators were not observed in SEM micrographs, x-ray diffraction patterns or Raman spectra. Furthermore, a high durability and strength of the sprayed diamonds were confirmed by mechanical testing.

  11. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  12. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  13. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  14. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  15. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  16. Diamond Tours

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-27

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  17. Carbonate Mineral Assemblages as Inclusions in Yakutian Diamonds: TEM Verifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A. M.; Wirth, R.; Sobolev, N. V.; Taylor, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate mineral inclusions are quite rare in diamonds from the upper mantle, but are evidence for a carbonate abundance in the mantle. It is believed that such carbonatitic inclusions originated from high-density fluids (HDFs) that were enclosed in diamond during its growth. Using TEM and EPMA, several kinds of carbonate inclusions have been identified in Yakutian diamonds : aragonite, dolomite, magnesite, Ba-, Sr-, and Fe-rich carbonates. Most of them are represented by multi-phase inclusions of various chemically distinct carbonates, rich in Ca, Mg, and K and associated with minor amounts of silicate, oxide, saline, and volatile phases. Volatiles, leaving some porosity, played a significant role in the diamond growth. A single crystal of aragonite (60μm) is herein reported for the first time. This inclusion is located in the center of a diamond from the Komsomolskaya pipe. Careful CL imaging reveals the total absence of cracks around the aragonite inclusion - i.e., closed system. This inclusion has been identified by X-ray diffraction and microprobe analysis. At temperatures above 1000 0C, aragonite is only stable at high pressures of 5-6 GPa. Inside this aragonite, we observed nanocrystalline inclusions of titanite, Ni-rich sulfide, magnetite, water-bearing Mg-silicate, and fluid bubbles. Dolomite is common in carbonate multi-phase inclusions in diamonds from the Internatsionalnaya, Yubileinaya, and Udachnaya kimberlite pipes. Alluvial diamonds of the northeastern Siberian Platform are divided into two groups based on the composition of HDFs: 1) Mg-rich multi-phase inclusions (60% magnesite + dolomite + Fe-spinel + Ti-silicate + fluid bubbles); and 2) Ca-rich multi-phase inclusions (Ca,Ba-, Ca,Sr-, Ca,Fe-carbonates + Ti-silicate + Ba-apatite + fluid bubbles). High-density fluids also contain K. Volatiles in the fluid bubbles are represented by water, Cl, F, S, CO2, CH4, and heavy hydrocarbons. Origin of the second group of HDFs may be related to the non

  18. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Seals, R.D.; Price, R.E.

    1997-06-03

    A method and composition is disclosed for the deposition of a thick layer of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate. The softened or molten composition crystallizes on the substrate to form a thick deposition layer comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent and may include at least one secondary constituent. Preferably, the secondary constituents are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) powder and mixtures thereof. 9 figs.

  19. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.; Price, R. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  20. Silicon-based nanoenergetic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Asay, Blaine; Son, Steven; Mason, Aaron; Yarrington, Cole; Cho, K Y; Gesner, J; Yetter, R A

    2009-01-01

    Fundamental combustion properties of silicon-based nano-energetic composites was studied by performing equilibrium calculations, 'flame tests', and instrumented burn-tube tests. That the nominal maximum flame temperature and for many Si-oxidizer systems is about 3000 K, with exceptions. Some of these exceptions are Si-metal oxides with temperatures ranging from 2282 to 2978 K. Theoretical maximum gas production of the Si composites ranged from 350-6500 cm{sup 3}/g of reactant with NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} - Si producing the most gas at 6500 cm{sup 3}/g and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} producing the least. Of the composites tested NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4} - Si showed the fastest burning rates with the fastest at 2.1 km/s. The Si metal oxide burning rates where on the order of 0.03-75 mls the slowest of which was nFe{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Si.

  1. Microstructure, Mechanical and Wear Behaviors of Hot-Pressed Copper-Nickel-Based Materials for Diamond Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, G.; Ferreira, P.; Buciumeanu, M.; Cabral, A.; Fredel, M.; Silva, F. S.; Henriques, B.

    2017-08-01

    The current trend to replace cobalt in diamond cutting tools (DCT) for stone cutting has motivated the study of alternative materials for this end. The present study characterizes several copper-nickel-based materials (Cu-Ni; Cu-Ni-10Sn, Cu-Ni-15Sn, Cu-Ni-Sn-2WC and Cu-Ni-Sn-10WC) for using as matrix material for diamond cutting tools for stone. Copper-nickel-based materials were produced by hot pressing, at a temperature of 850 °C during 15 min and under an applied pressure of 50 MPa. The mechanical properties were evaluated though the shear strength and hardness values. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were analyzed by SEM. The wear behavior of all specimens was assessed using a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer. The hot pressing produced compacts with good densification. Sn and WC promoted enhanced mechanical properties and wear performance to Cu-Ni alloys. Cu-Ni-10Sn and Cu-Ni-10Sn-2WC displayed the best compromise between mechanical and wear performance.

  2. Trace elements in Gem-Quality Diamonds - Origin and evolution of diamond-forming fluid inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Graham; Krebs, Mandy; Stachel, Thomas; Woodland, Sarah; Chinn, Ingrid; Kong, Julie

    2017-04-01

    In the same way that melt inclusions in phenocrysts have expanded our idea of melt formation and evolution in basalts, studying fluids trapped in diamonds is providing important new constraints on the nature of diamond-forming fluids. Fibrous and cloudy diamonds trap a high but variable density of fluid inclusions and so have been extensively studied using major and trace element compositions. In contrast, constraining the nature of the diamond-forming fluid for high purity gem-quality diamonds has been restricted by the rarity of available high quality trace element data. This is due to the extremely low concentrations of impurities that gem diamonds contain - often in the ppt range. The recent discovery of fluids in gem diamonds showing similar major element chemistry to fluid-rich diamonds suggest that many diamonds may share a common spectrum of parental fluids. Here we test this idea further. Recent advances in analytical techniques, in particular the development of the "off-line" laser ablation pre-concentration approach, have allowed fully quantitative trace element data to be recovered from "fluid-poor", high quality gem diamonds. We present trace element data for gem diamonds from a variety of locations from Canada, S. Africa and Russia, containing either silicate or sulphide inclusions to examine possible paragenetic or genetic differences between fluids. REE abundance in the "gem" diamonds vary from 0.1 to 0.0001 x chondrite. To a first order, we observe the same spectrum of trace element compositions in the gem diamonds as that seen in fluid-rich "fibrous" diamonds, supporting a common origin for the fluids. REE patterns range from extremely flat (Ce/Yb)n 2.5 to 5 (commonly in sulphide-bearing diamonds) to >70, the latter having significantly greater inter-element HFSE/LILE fractionation. In general, the fluids from the sulphide-bearing diamonds are less REE-enriched than the silicate-bearing diamonds, but the ranges overlap significantly. The very

  3. Finishing of display glass for mobile electronics using 3M Trizact diamond tile abrasive pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lianbin; Fletcher, Tim; Na, Tee Koon; Sventek, Bruce; Romero, Vince; Lugg, Paul S.; Kim, Don

    2010-10-01

    This paper will describe a new method being used during the finishing of glass displays for mobile electronics including mobile hand held devices and notebook computers. The new method consists of using 3M TrizactTM Diamond Tile Abrasive Pads. TrizactTM Diamond Tile is a structured fixed abrasive grinding technology developed by 3M Company. The TrizactTM Diamond Tile structured abrasive pad consists of an organic (polymeric binder) - inorganic (abrasive mineral, i.e., diamond) composite that is used with a water-based coolant. TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology can be applied in both double and single side grinding applications. A unique advantage of TrizactTM Diamond Tile technology is the combination of high stock removal and low sub-surface damage. Grinding results will be presented for both 9 micron and 20 micron grades of TrizactTM Diamond Tile abrasive pads used to finish several common display glasses including Corning GorillaTM glass and Soda Lime glass.

  4. New volcanogenic-eruptive genetic type of diamond occurrence (based on studying the 2012-2013 Fissure Tolbachik Eruption in Kamchatka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Gennady; Anikin, Leonid; Filatov, Stanislav; Silaev, Valery; Petrovsky, Vitaly; Zolotarev, Andrey; Dunin-Barkovsky, Romuald; Volynets, Anna

    2014-05-01

    During the 2012-2013 Fissure Tolbachik eruption, diamonds were found both in fresh pyroclastics and in the effusive lava pores. Lavas are aphyric and subaphyric porous aluminous basaltic trachyandesites with rare megacrysts and subphenocrysts of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene. Groundmass is hyalopilitic, pilotaxitic, occasionally hyaline, with abundant plagioclase microlites. So far, over 750 diamond grains have been found sized mostly 100-500 mkm. Generally, grains are well formed isometric, plane-faced and sharp-edged monocrystals of cubic-octahedral habit and green color, rarer colorless. Faces of rhombic-dodecahedron, tetragonal-trisoctahedron and trigonal-trisoctahedron also occur. Crystal cubic faces host pits of diffusive depletion, and pits with induction surfaces formed after the breakoff of syngenetic inclusions. Octahedral faces often show pyramidal etching pits formed at the dislocation outcrops. Pits contain coatings whose composition includes Fe, Mg, Ca, Si, and Cu-Sn (Zn) alloy films. Diamond X-ray diffraction data (Bruker APEX DUO, STOE IPDS II, MoKα-radiation, 788 reflections) show space group Fd-3m, cubic unit cell parameter a = 3.574(3) A and major reflections (111), (220), (311) etc. at Gandolfi pattern. Raman spectra with red beam reveal only one strong line at 1332 cm-1 typical for diamonds. Spectra excited by the 785 nm beam reveal a wide line with the peak at 1370 cm-1, whose intensity oscillates from 1% to 70% of the diamond line intensity at 1332 cm-1. Infrared absorption spectra reflect two lines with peaks at 1345 and 1130 cm-1, corresponding to structural C-defects (isolated N atoms). Partially, these defects occur in the positive charge state - N+. Structural nitrogen concentration in the form of C-defects varies from 150 to 500 ppm, while that in the form of N+ - from 10 to 30 ppm. Lines of infrared absorption on A and B1 nitrogen defects, as well as those on hydrogen defects typical for most natural diamonds, are not detected for

  5. Magnetoelectric Composite Based Microwave Attenuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarenko, A. S.; Srinivasan, G.

    2005-03-01

    Ferrite-ferroelectric composites are magnetoelectric (ME) due to their response to elastic and electromagnetic force fields. The ME composites are characterized by tensor permittivity, permeability and ME susceptibility. The unique combination of magnetic, electrical, and ME interactions, therefore, opens up the possibility of electric field tunable ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) based devices [1]. Here we discuss an ME attenuator operating at 9.3 GHz based on FMR in a layered sample consisting of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate bonded to yttrium iron garnet (YIG) film on a gadolinium gallium garnet substrate. Electrical tuning is realized with the application of a control voltage due to ME effect; the shift is 0-15 Oe as E is increased from 0 to 3 kV/cm. If the attenuator is operated at FMR, the corresponding insertion loss will range from 25 dB to 2 dB. 1. S. Shastry and G. Srinivasan, M.I. Bichurin, V.M. Petrov, A.S. Tatarenko. Phys. Rev. B, 70 064416 (2004). - supported by grants the grants from the National Science Foundation (DMR-0302254), from Russian Ministry of Education (Å02-3.4-278) and from Universities of Russia Foundation (UNR 01.01.026).

  6. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  7. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, C; Nocente, M; Rebai, M; Tardocchi, M; Calvani, P; Croci, G; Giacomelli, L; Girolami, M; Griesmayer, E; Grosso, G; Pillon, M; Trucchi, D M; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the (12)C(n, α)(9)Be reaction occurring between neutrons and (12)C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  8. A diamond based neutron spectrometer for diagnostics of deuterium-tritium fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cazzaniga, C. Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Rebai, M.; Giacomelli, L.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Grosso, G.; Calvani, P.; Girolami, M.; Trucchi, D. M.; Griesmayer, E.; Pillon, M.

    2014-11-15

    Single crystal Diamond Detectors (SDD) are being increasingly exploited for neutron diagnostics in high power fusion devices, given their significant radiation hardness and high energy resolution capabilities. The geometrical efficiency of SDDs is limited by the size of commercially available crystals, which is often smaller than the dimension of neutron beams along collimated lines of sight in tokamak devices. In this work, we present the design and fabrication of a 14 MeV neutron spectrometer consisting of 12 diamond pixels arranged in a matrix, so to achieve an improved geometrical efficiency. Each pixel is equipped with an independent high voltage supply and read-out electronics optimized to combine high energy resolution and fast signals (<30 ns), which are essential to enable high counting rate (>1 MHz) spectroscopy. The response function of a prototype SDD to 14 MeV neutrons has been measured at the Frascati Neutron Generator by observation of the 8.3 MeV peak from the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction occurring between neutrons and {sup 12}C nuclei in the detector. The measured energy resolution (2.5% FWHM) meets the requirements for neutron spectroscopy applications in deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  9. An imaging magnetometer for bio-sensing based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Michael; Barbour, Russell; Chen, Chris; Zhu, Zhiting; Fu, Kai-Mei

    2014-03-01

    We present a widefield microscopy system for imaging super-paramagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs), and propose to use it as a bio-sensing system wherein SPNs are used as tags. Potential advantages of magnetic tags over conventional fluorescent tags include the elimination of noise from auto-fluorescence, optical isolation of the biological system from the measurement apparatus, and the potential for magnetic removal of non-specifically bound material. The microscope magnetic sensing surface is composed of a thin layer of nitrogen-vacancy defect centers in the top 200 nm of a diamond substrate. Nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond have been shown to be suitable for use as highly sensitive magnetometers due to their long spin-coherence time at room temperature. Furthermore, spin-dependent photoluminescence allows for simple far-field optical readout of the spin state, which in turn allows for opticallydetected magnetic resonance measurements. We will present our results detecting a single, lithographically defined 50 nm diameter by 100 nm thick iron nanodot. With the current sensitivity of 9 μTṡHz-1/2, we expect to be able to detect single 20 nm magnetite SPNs, our proposed tags, in less than one minute. By further optimizing the sensor surface, we predict DC magnetic sensitivities as low as 1 μTṡHz-1/2.

  10. Swift heavy ion effects on DLC-nanotube-diamond thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wei; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-09-01

    The composites based on a mixture of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and diamond-like-carbon (DLC)-CNT are of great interest due to the potential to achieve unique electronic and optical properties with enhanced mechanical wear resistance. Swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation of such carbon nanostucture composites suggest a way to tune the material’s properties via localized structural modifications. We use classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with an inelastic thermal spike model to study the mechanisms of track formation by SHI in DLC-CNT-diamond thin films. We observe a clear increase of content of atoms with sp2 hybridization compared to the initial structure. When the system reached an equilibrium state after the energy deposition, the track was structurally expanded outwards from the most underdense core. In addition, we found that the track radii are different in different composites, with smaller track radii in pure diamond and larger radii in DLC. Sputtering occurred predominantly from the track center.

  11. Chemical Nucleation of Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Soumen; Thomas, Evan L H; Jenny, Titus A; Williams, Oliver A

    2016-10-05

    With the large differences in surface energy between film and substrate in combination with the low sticking coefficient of hydrocarbon radicals, nanocrystalline diamond growth on foreign substrates typically results in poor nucleation densities. A seeding technique is therefore required to realize pinhole-free and thin coalesced films. In this work, a chemical nucleation method for growth of diamond on nondiamond substrates based on 2,2-divinyladamantane is shown. After treating with the carbon-containing DVA, the chemically treated wafers were exposed to low-power-density plasma, known as the incubation phase, to facilitate the formation of diamond nucleation sites followed by a high-power-density growth regime to produce coalesced films. The resulting films demonstrate high crystallinity, whereas the Raman spectra suggest high-quality diamond with low sp(2) content.

  12. Fluid inclusions in diamonds from the Diavik mine, Canada and the evolution of diamond-forming fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-BenDavid, Ofra; Izraeli, Elad S.; Hauri, Erik; Navon, Oded

    2007-02-01

    The analysis of micro-inclusions in fibrous diamonds from the Diavik mine, Canada revealed the presence of high density fluids (HDFs) that span a continuous compositional range between carbonatitic and saline end-members. The carbonatitic end-member is rich in Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Ba and carbonate; the saline one is rich in K, Cl and water. In molar proportions, the composition of the saline end-member is: K 38Na 7.7Ca 1.8Mg 1.6Fe 1.5Ba 1.9SiO 3.1Cl 46(CO 3) 5.5(H 2O) 56 and that of the carbonatitic end member is: K 15Na 21Ca 6.7Mg 8.1Fe 6.2Ba 5.7Si 4.8Ti 1.4Al 1.9O 17Cl 29(CO 3) 29(H 2O) 29. The micro-inclusions in one diamond span a narrow range between a silicic end-member (rich in Si, K and water) and a carbonatitic one (rich in Mg, Ca, Fe and carbonate). Its average composition is: K 26Na 5.5Ca 13.8Mg 8.3Fe 9.6Ba 0.9P 2.5Si 25Ti 1.6Al 3.8Cl 2.5O 81(CO 3) 29(H 2O) 78. Thus, the Diavik diamonds span most of the known compositional range for fluids trapped in diamonds. Based on these data and previous analyses of fluids trapped in diamonds, we discuss possible models for the evolution of diamond-forming fluids. The most plausible model is where carbonatitic-HDFs are parental to all the other compositions. They evolve by fractionation of divalentions- and alkali-carbonates and by immiscible separation into saline- and silicic-HDFs. Each phase continues to evolve separately, crystallizing carbonates, diamond, and accessory silicates, phosphates, halides and more of the immiscible phase. Other processes, like the mixing of evolved fluids with fresh parental carbonatitic fluids, or metasomatic interactions with the wallrock also play a role in the evolution of the HDFs. We also propose that the parental carbonatitic-HDF evolves through fractional crystallization of an alkali-rich, low degree melt that is similar to the high pressure parental melts of kimberlites or lamproites.

  13. Graphene-based Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Mohammad Ali

    We investigated the mechanical properties, such as fracture toughness (KIc), fracture energy (GIc), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), Young¡¦s modulus (E), and fatigue crack propagation rate (FCPR) of epoxy-matrix composites with different weight fractions of carbon-based fillers, including graphene platelets (GPL), graphene nanoribbons (GNR), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), and fullerenes (C60). Only ˜0.125 wt.% GPL was found to increase the KIc of the pure epoxy by ˜65% and the GIc by ˜115%. To get similar improvement, CNT and nanoparticle epoxy composites required one to two orders of magnitude greater weight fraction of nanofillers. Moreover, ˜0.125% wt.% GPL also decreased the fatigue crack propagation rate in the epoxy by ˜30-fold. The E value of 0.1 wt.% GPL/epoxy nanocomposite was ˜31% larger than the pure epoxy while there was only an increase of ˜3% for the SWNT composites. The UTS of the pristine epoxy was improved by ˜40% with GPLs in comparison with ˜14% enhancement for the MWNTs. The KIc of the GPL nanocomposite enhanced by ˜53% over the pristine epoxy compared to a ˜20% increase for the MWNT-reinforced composites. The results of the FCPR tests for the GPL nanocomposites showed a different trend. While the CNT nanocomposites were not effective enough to suppress the crack growth at high values of the stress intensity factor (DeltaK), the reverse behavior is observed for the GPL nanocomposites. The advantage of the GPLs over CNTs in terms of mechanical properties enhancement is due to their enormous specific surface area, enhanced adhesion at filler/epoxy interface (because of the wrinkled surfaces of GPLs), as well as the planar structure of the GPLs. We also show that unzipping of MWNTs into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) enhances the load transfer effectiveness in epoxy nanocomposites. For instance, at ˜0.3 wt.% of fillers, the Young's modulus (E) of the epoxy nanocomposite with GNRs increased

  14. Synthesis and properties of aluminum-based composite materials for high operating temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorozhtsov, Sergey; Khrustalyov, Anton; Kulkov, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    Aluminum-based composite materials reinforced with ceramic particles are of great practical interest due to their potentially high physical and mechanical properties. In this work, Al-Al4C3 composites are obtained by a hot-pressing method. Introduction of nanodiamonds into aluminum nanopowder in the amount 10 wt % leads to the formation of 15 wt % of aluminum carbide during hot pressing. It is found that composite materials with the diamond content of 10 wt % in the initial powder mixture have the microhardness 150 HV whilst the similarly hot-pressed aluminum powder without reinforcing particles shows a hardness of 75 HV. The mechanical properties of an Al-Al4C3 composite material at elevated test temperatures exceed those of commercial casting aluminum alloys.

  15. Electronic transition imaging of carbon based materials: The photothreshold of melanin and thermionic field emission from diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garguilo, Jacob

    This study explores electronic transitions in carbon based materials through the use of a custom built, non rastering electron emission microscope. The specifics and history of electron emission are described as well as the equipment used in this study. The materials examined fall into two groups, melanosome films isolated from the human body and polycrystalline diamond tip arrays. A novel technique for determining the photothreshold of a heterogeneous material on a microscopic or smaller scale is developed and applied to melanosome films isolated from the hair, eyes, and brain of human donors. The conversion of the measured photothreshold on the vacuum scale to an electrochemical oxidation potential is discussed and the obtained data is considered based on this conversion. Pheomelanosomes isolated from human hair are shown to have significantly lower photoionization energy than eumelanosomes, indicating their likelihood as sources of oxidative stress. The ionization energies of the hair melanosomes are checked with complimentary procedures. Ocular melanosomes from the retinal pigment epithelium are measured as a function of patient age and melanosome shape. Lipofuscin, also found in the eye, is examined with the same microscopy technique and shown to have a significantly lower ionization threshold than RPE melanosomes. Neuromelanin from the substantia nigra is also examined and shown to have an ionization threshold close to that of eumelanin. A neuromelanin formation model is proposed based on these results. Polycrystalline diamond tip arrays are examined for their use as thermionic energy converter emitters. Thermionic energy conversion is accomplished through the combination of a hot electron emitter in conjunction with a somewhat cooler electron collector. The generated electron current can be used to do work in an external load. It is shown that the tipped structures of these samples result in enhanced emission over the surrounding flat areas, which may prove

  16. Peridotitic diamonds from the Slave and the Kaapvaal cratons—similarities and differences based on a preliminary data set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W.; Tappert, Ralf; Brey, Gerhard P.

    2003-12-01

    A comparison of the diamond productions from Panda (Ekati Mine) and Snap Lake with those from southern Africa shows significant differences: diamonds from the Slave typically are un-resorbed octahedrals or macles, often with opaque coats, and yellow colours are very rare. Diamonds from the Kaapvaal are dominated by resorbed, dodecahedral shapes, coats are absent and yellow colours are common. The first two features suggest exposure to oxidizing fluids/melts during mantle storage and/or transport to the Earth's surface, for the Kaapvaal diamond population. Comparing peridotitic inclusions in diamonds from the central and southern Slave (Panda, DO27 and Snap Lake kimberlites) and the Kaapvaal indicates that the diamondiferous mantle lithosphere beneath the Slave is chemically less depleted. Most notable are the almost complete absence of garnet inclusions derived from low-Ca harzburgites and a generally lower Mg-number of Slave inclusions. Geothermobarometric calculations suggest that Slave diamonds originally formed at very similar thermal conditions as observed beneath the Kaapvaal (geothermal gradients corresponding to 40-42 mW/m 2 surface heat flow), but the diamond source regions subsequently cooled by about 100-150 °C to fall on a 37-38 mW/m 2 (surface heat flow) conductive geotherm, as is evidenced from touching (re-equilibrated) inclusions in diamonds, and from xenocrysts and xenoliths. In the Kaapvaal, a similar thermal evolution has previously been recognized for diamonds from the De Beers Pool kimberlites. In part very low aggregation levels of nitrogen impurities in Slave diamonds imply that cooling occurred soon after diamond formation. This may relate elevated temperatures during diamond formation to short-lived magmatic perturbations. Generally high Cr-contents of pyrope garnets (inside and outside of diamonds) indicate that the mantle lithosphere beneath the Slave originally formed as a residue of melt extraction at relatively low pressures (within

  17. High-resolution vector microwave magnetometry based on solid-state spins in diamond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengfei; Yuan, Zhenheng; Huang, Pu; Rong, Xing; Wang, Mengqi; Xu, Xiangkun; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-03-23

    The measurement of the microwave field is crucial for many developments in microwave technology and related applications. However, measuring microwave fields with high sensitivity and spatial resolution under ambient conditions remains elusive. In this work, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to measure both the strength and orientation of the microwave magnetic field by utilizing the quantum coherent dynamics of nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. An angular resolution of 5.7 mrad and a sensitivity of 1.0 μT Hz(-1/2) are achieved at a microwave frequency of 2.6000 GHz, and the microwave magnetic field vectors generated by a copper wire are precisely reconstructed. The solid-state microwave magnetometry with high resolution and wide frequency range that can work under ambient conditions proposed here enables unique potential applications over other state-of-art microwave magnetometry.

  18. Wear-resistant diamond nanoprobe tips with integrated silicon heater for tip-based nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Patrick C; Felts, Jonathan R; Dai, Zhenting; Jacobs, Tevis D; Zeng, Hongjun; Lee, Woo; Sheehan, Paul E; Carlisle, John A; Carpick, Robert W; King, William P

    2010-06-22

    We report exceptional nanoscale wear and fouling resistance of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tips integrated with doped silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. The resistively heated probe can reach temperatures above 600 degrees C. The batch fabrication process produces UNCD tips with radii as small as 15 nm, with average radius 50 nm across the entire wafer. Wear tests were performed on substrates of quartz, silicon carbide, silicon, or UNCD. Tips were scanned for more than 1 m at a scan speed of 25 mum s(-1) at temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 degrees C under loads up to 200 nN. Under these conditions, silicon tips are partially or completely destroyed, while the UNCD tips exhibit little or no wear, no signs of delamination, and exceptional fouling resistance. We demonstrate nanomanufacturing of more than 5000 polymer nanostructures with no deterioration in the tip.

  19. Progress towards Mechanism-Based Treatment for Diamond-Blackfan Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sjögren, Sara E.; Flygare, Johan

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplastic anemia, characterized by macrocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and severely reduced numbers of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. For more than fifty years, glucocorticoids have remained the main option for pharmacological treatment of DBA. While continuous glucocorticoid administration increases hemoglobin levels in a majority of DBA patients, it also causes severe side effects. There is therefore a great need for more specific and effective treatments to boost or replace the use of glucocorticoids. Over the years, many alternative therapies have been tried out, but most of them have shown to be ineffective. Here we review previous and current attempts to develop such alternative therapies for DBA. We further discuss how emerging knowledge regarding the pathological mechanism in DBA and the therapeutic mechanism of glucocorticoids treatment may reveal novel drug targets for DBA treatment. PMID:22619618

  20. Detection and analysis of diamond fingerprinting feature and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Huang, Guoliang; Li, Qiang; Chen, Shengyi

    2011-01-01

    Before becoming a jewelry diamonds need to be carved artistically with some special geometric features as the structure of the polyhedron. There are subtle differences in the structure of this polyhedron in each diamond. With the spatial frequency spectrum analysis of diamond surface structure, we can obtain the diamond fingerprint information which represents the "Diamond ID" and has good specificity. Based on the optical Fourier Transform spatial spectrum analysis, the fingerprinting identification of surface structure of diamond in spatial frequency domain was studied in this paper. We constructed both the completely coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by laser and the partially coherent diamond fingerprinting detection system illuminated by led, and analyzed the effect of the coherence of light source to the diamond fingerprinting feature. We studied rotation invariance and translation invariance of the diamond fingerprinting and verified the feasibility of real-time and accurate identification of diamond fingerprint. With the profit of this work, we can provide customs, jewelers and consumers with a real-time and reliable diamonds identification instrument, which will curb diamond smuggling, theft and other crimes, and ensure the healthy development of the diamond industry.

  1. Diamond-Bronze Coatings for Grinding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Nebel, J.

    2008-12-01

    Grinding applications for the machining of stone and concrete require composite tools where large diamonds are perfectly embedded into a metallic matrix. With the detonation flame spraying process, it is possible to manufacture these super abrasive composites. Excellent embedment of the voluminous super abrasive particles into the matrix coating material can be realized to produce high quality composite layers for grinding applications of stone and concrete. In this paper, different diamond gradings as well as different volume contents of diamond in matrix are compared. Especially, the influence of particle size on its implantation efficiency is investigated and the influence of process and substrate temperature is analyzed. The thermal sprayed grinding tools are evaluated with respect to their microstructure as well as their grinding abilities. Compared to sintered diamond-bronze samples, the results of an adaptively designed grinding test for the machining of concrete are presented and analyzed.

  2. Simulation of surface topography of big aspheric fabrication by ultra-precision diamond turning based on tool swing feeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Honghui; Li, Zengqiang; Sun, Tao

    2014-08-01

    In the respect of ultra-precision manufacturing of axisymmetric surface, the machine tool with tool swing feeding which has less interpolation error sources compared to the conventional ultra-precision diamond turning machine tool with T-structureis worth studying.Therefore,based on the dynamic simulation modeling and multi-body dynamics theory,in this paper, we establish the control model,and tool path for Ultra-precision machine.Then we got the model for surface topography with differentinput parameters like spindle speed, feedrate, tool parameters and so on. Taking the spherical optics part with diameter of 300 mm, for example, we input the process parameters and get its surface topography, then evaluate its surface quality by surface roughness value (Ra) and surface shape accuracy(PV) .

  3. In situ Analysis of North American Diamond: Implications for Diamond Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, D. J.; Van Rythoven, A. D.; Hauri, E.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Diamond crystals from three North American kimberlite occurrences were investigated with cathodoluminescence (CL) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to determine their growth history, carbon isotope composition and nitrogen content. Samples analyzed include sixteen from Lynx (Quebec), twelve from Kelsey Lake (Colorado) and eighteen from A154 South (Diavik mine, Northwest Territories). Growth histories for the samples vary from simple to highly complex based on their CL images and depending on the individual stone. Deformation lamellae are evident in CL images of the Lynx crystals which typically are brownish in color. Two to five points per diamond were analyzed by SIMS for carbon isotope composition (δ13CPDB) and three to seven points for nitrogen content. The results for the A154 South (δ13CPDB = -6.76 to -1.68 ‰) and Kelsey Lake (δ13CPDB = -11.81 to -2.43 ‰) stones (mixed peridotitic and eclogitic suites) are similar to earlier reported values. The Lynx kimberlite stones have anomalously high carbon isotope ratios and range from -3.58 to +1.74 ‰. The Lynx diamond suite is almost entirely peridotitic. The unusually high (i.e. >-5‰) δ13C values of the Lynx diamonds, as well as those from Wawa, Ontario and Renard, Quebec, may indicate an anomalous carbon reservoir for the Superior cratonic mantle relative to other cratons. In addition to the heavier carbon isotope values, the Lynx samples have very low nitrogen contents (<100 ppm). Nitrogen contents for Kelsey Lake and Diavik samples are more typical and range to ~1100 ppm. Comparison of observed core to rim variations in nitrogen content and carbon isotopes with modeled Rayleigh fractionation trends for published diamond growth mechanisms allows for evaluation of carbon speciation and other parent fluid conditions. Observed trends that closely follow modeled data are rare, but appear to suggest diamond growth from carbonate-bearing fluids at Lynx and Diavik, and growth from a methane

  4. Nanostructured Diamond Device for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Fijalkowski, M; Karczemska, A; Lysko, J M; Zybala, R; KozaneckI, M; Filipczak, P; Ralchenko, V; Walock, M; Stanishevsky, A; Mitura, S

    2015-02-01

    Diamond is increasingly used in biomedical applications because of its unique properties such as the highest thermal conductivity, good optical properties, high electrical breakdown voltage as well as excellent biocompatibility and chemical resistance. Diamond has also been introduced as an excellent substrate to make the functional microchip structures for electrophoresis, which is the most popular separation technique for the determination of analytes. In this investigation, a diamond electrophoretic chip was manufactured by a replica method using a silicon mold. A polycrystalline 300 micron-thick diamond layer was grown by the microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD) technique onto a patterned silicon substrate followed by the removal of the substrate. The geometry of microstructure, chemical composition, thermal and optical properties of the resulting free-standing diamond electrophoretic microchip structure were examined by CLSM, SFE, UV-Vis, Raman, XRD and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and by a modified laser flash method for thermal property measurements.

  5. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, Kathleen B.; Tiegs, Terry N.; Becher, Paul F.; Waters, Shirley B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite.

  6. Re-Os isotope measurements of single sulfide inclusions in a Siberian diamond and its nitrogen aggregation systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, D. G.; Shirey, S. B.; Bulanova, G. P.; Carlson, R. W.; Milledge, H. J.

    1999-03-01

    We have measured the Re-Os isotopic compositions of individual syngenetic sulfide inclusions from three different growth zones within a central cross section plate cut from a single Siberian diamond. Individual sulfides in their diamond host were isolated by laser cutting. The sulfides, and hence the different growth zones of the diamond have been suggested to differ in age by up to 2 Ga on the basis of their Pb isotope compositions. Re-Os model ages of the four inclusions range from 3.1 ± 0.3 to 3.5 ± 0.3 Ga and suggest a Middle Archaean age for the diamond. A sulfide inclusion in the rim of the diamond is very different in elemental composition from those of the core and intermediate zones. It is enriched in Os, Re, Pb, and Zn and has more radiogenic Os and Pb isotopes. The inclusion is connected to the surface of the diamond by a healed crack, revealed by cathodoluminescence. The compositional distinction may be caused either by postformational interaction between an ancient sulfide and a fluid, possibly at the time of kimberlite eruption, or later stage growth of new diamond plus sulfide. Such chemical complexities, and the presence of healed fractures within the host diamond, emphasize the desirability of analyzing individual inclusions from well-characterized diamonds if isotope data for inclusions are to be better understood. Nitrogen contents and aggregation state in the core and intermediate zone of the host diamond closely approximate theoretically calculated isotherms based on consideration of experimentally determined nitrogen aggregation kinetics. The nitrogen content of the rim diamond is too low to obtain spectra that allow accurate deconvolution of relative aggregation levels for use in residence time calculations. The aggregation state of nitrogen in the core and intermediate growth zones is compatible with a long, ca. 3 Ga mantle residence time at normal lithospheric temperatures. The similarity of the sulfide inclusion Re-Os model ages to the

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED DRILL COMPONENTS FOR BHA USING MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY INCORPORATING CARBIDE, DIAMOND COMPOSITES AND FUNCTIONALLY GRADED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Dinesh Agrawal; Rustum Roy

    2000-11-01

    The main objective of this program was to develop an efficient and economically viable microwave processing technique to process cobalt cemented tungsten carbide with improved properties for drill-bits for advanced drilling operations for oil, gas, geothermal and excavation industries. The program was completed in three years and successfully accomplished all the states goals in the original proposal. In three years of the program, we designed and built several laboratory scale microwave sintering systems for conducting experiments on Tungsten carbide (WC) based composites in controlled atmosphere. The processing conditions were optimized and various properties were measured. The design of the system was then modified to enable it to process large commercial parts of WC/Co and in large quantities. Two high power (3-6 kW) microwave systems of 2.45 GHz were built for multi samples runs in a batch process. Once the process was optimized for best results, the technology was successfully transferred to our industrial partner, Dennis Tool Co. We helped them to built couple of prototype microwave sintering systems for carbide tool manufacturing. It was found that the microwave processed WC/Co tools are not only cost effective but also exhibited much better overall performance than the standard tools. The results of the field tests performed by Dennis Tool Co. showed remarkable advantage and improvement in their overall performance. For example: wear test shows an increase of 20-30%, corrosion test showed much higher resistance to the acid attack, erosion test exhibited about 15% better resistance than standard sinter-HIP parts. This proves the success of microwave technology for WC/Co based drilling tools. While we have successfully transferred the technology to our industrial partner Dennis Tool Co., they have signed an agreement with Valenite, a world leading WC producer of cutting and drilling tools and wear parts, to push aggressively the new microwave technology in

  8. Five Empirically Based Composition Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano, Robert J.; DiStefano, Philip

    Seven hundred and fifty compositions, randomly selected from National Assessment of Educational Progress essays written by 9-, 13- and 17-year-olds, were analyzed in a study of the skills that go into the writing of a good composition. The essays were first rated as high, medium, or low in quality. A total of 43 different indices reported or…

  9. Formation of diamond in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, Thomas; Harris, Jeff W.

    2009-09-01

    The principal sources of natural diamonds are peridotitic (about 2/3 of diamonds) and eclogitic (1/3) domains located at 140-200 km depth in the subcratonic lithospheric mantle. There, diamonds probably form during redox reactions in the presence of melt (likely for eclogitic and lherzolitic diamonds) or under subsolidus conditions in the presence of CHO fluids (likely for harzburgitic diamonds). Co-variations of δ13C and the nitrogen content of diamonds suggest that two modes of formation may have been operational in peridotitic sources: (1) reduction of carbonates, that during closed system fractionation drives diamond compositions to higher δ13C values and lower nitrogen concentrations and (2) oxidation of methane, that in a closed system leads to a trend of decreasing δ13C with decreasing nitrogen. The present day redox state of subcratonic lithospheric mantle is generally too reduced to allow for methane oxidation to be a widespread process. Therefore, reduction of carbonate dissolved in melts and fluids is likely the dominant mode of diamond formation for the Phanerozoic (545 Ma-present) and Proterozoic (2.5 Ga-545 Ma). Model calculations indicate, however, that for predominantly Paleoarchean (3.6-3.2 Ga) to Mesoarchean (3.2-2.8 Ga) harzburgitic diamonds, methane reduction is the principal mode of precipitation. This suggests that the reduced present day character (oxygen fugacity below carbonate stability) of peridotitic diamond sources may be a secondary feature, possibly acquired during reducing Archean (>2.5 Ga) metasomatism. Recycling of biogenic carbonates back into the mantle through subduction only became an important process in the Paleoproterozoic (2.5-1.6 Ga) and diamonds forming during carbonate reduction, therefore, may predominantly be post-Archean in age. For eclogitic diamonds, open system fractionation processes involving separation of a CO2 fluid appear to dominate, but in principal the same two modes of formation (methane oxidation

  10. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-12

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ∼3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ∼5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ∼200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  11. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-01

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ~3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ~5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ~200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  12. CVD diamond-based semi-transparent beam-position monitors for synchrotron beamlines: preliminary studies and device developments at CEA/Saclay.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, P; Tromson, D; Mer, C

    2006-03-01

    Polycrystalline diamond synthesized using the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique can be used to fabricate new types of photodetectors for the characterization of X-ray light in synchrotron beamlines. Since diamond exhibits a low absorption to low-energy photons, such devices allow beam-position monitoring with very little beam attenuation at photon energies as low as 2 keV up to 15-20 keV. Here it is shown how diamond-based devices can simply be processed as ionization chambers for advanced semi-transparent position monitoring with high position resolution (<2 microm). Other configurations using the same principle can also enable in-line field profiling. It is also shown what can be expected from these devices in terms of performances, signal-to-noise ratios and reliability, together with their inherent limitations caused by the presence of defects in polycrystalline materials. In particular, diamond devices with extremely low carrier lifetimes, owing to quenched transport properties, could also be of particular interest for the characterization of the temporal structure of synchrotron light. Interest in these devices lies in the permanent insertion into beamlines and withstanding high levels of radiation for continuous beam monitoring.

  13. Alumina-based ceramic composite

    DOEpatents

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-07-23

    An improved ceramic composite comprising oxide ceramic particulates, nonoxide ceramic particulates selected from the group consisting of carbides, borides, nitrides of silicon and transition metals and mixtures thereof, and a ductile binder selected from the group consisting of metallic, intermetallic alloys and mixtures thereof is described. The ceramic composite is made by blending powders of the ceramic particulates and the ductile to form a mixture and consolidating the mixture of under conditions of temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite. 5 figs.

  14. Yeast-based Biochemical Oxygen Demand Sensors Using Gold-modified Boron-doped Diamond Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Harmesa; Saepudin, Endang; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2015-01-01

    A gold nanoparticle modified boron-doped diamond electrode was developed as a transducer for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) measurements. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UICC Y-181 was immobilized in a sodium alginate matrix, and used as a biosensing agent. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to study the oxygen reduction reaction at the electrode, while amperometry was employed to detect oxygen, which was not consumed by the microorganisms. The optimum waiting time of 25 min was observed using 1-mm thickness of yeast film. A comparison against the system with free yeast cells shows less sensitivity of the current responses with a linear dynamic range (R(2) = 0.99) of from 0.10 mM to 0.90 mM glucose (equivalent to 10 - 90 mg/L BOD) with an estimated limit of detection of 1.90 mg/L BOD. However, a better stability of the current responses could be achieved with an RSD of 3.35%. Moreover, less influence from the presence of copper ions was observed. The results indicate that the yeast-immobilized BOD sensors is more suitable to be applied in a real condition.

  15. Wide bandwidth instantaneous radio frequency spectrum analyzer based on nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipaux, M.; Toraille, L.; Larat, C.; Morvan, L.; Pezzagna, S.; Meijer, J.; Debuisschert, T.

    2015-12-01

    We propose an original analog method to perform instantaneous and quantitative spectral analysis of microwave signals. An ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers held in a diamond plate is pumped by a 532 nm laser. Its photoluminescence is imaged through an optical microscope and monitored by a digital camera. An incoming microwave signal is converted into a microwave field in the area of the NV centers by a loop shaped antenna. The resonances induced by the magnetic component of that field are detected through a decrease of the NV centers photoluminescence. A magnetic field gradient induces a Zeeman shift of the resonances and transforms the frequency information into spatial information, which allows for the simultaneous analysis of the microwave signal in the entire frequency bandwidth of the device. The time dependent spectral analysis of an amplitude modulated microwave signal is demonstrated over a bandwidth of 600 MHz , associated to a frequency resolution of 7 MHz , and a refresh rate of 4 ms . With such integration time, a field of a few hundreds of μ W can be detected. Since the optical properties of NV centers can be maintained even in high magnetic field, we estimate that an optimized device could allow frequency analysis in a range of 30 GHz , only limited by the amplitude of the magnetic field gradient. In addition, an increase of the NV centers quantity could lead both to an increase of the microwave sensitivity and to a decrease of the minimum refresh rate down to a few μ s .

  16. Hydrophilic nano-silica coating agents with platinum and diamond nanoparticles for denture base materials.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Taro; Akiba, Norihisa; Inokoshi, Masanao; Shimada, Masayuki; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-05-31

    Preventing microorganisms from adhering to the denture surface is important for ensuring the systemic health of elderly denture wearers. Silica coating agents provide high hydrophilicity but lack durability. This study investigated solutions to improve the durability of the coating layer, determine an appropriate solid content concentration of SiO2 in the silica coating agent, and evaluate the effect of adding platinum (Pt) and diamond nanoparticles (ND) to the agent. Five coating agents were prepared with different SiO2 concentrations with/without Pt and ND additives. The contact angle was measured, and the brush-wear test was performed. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the silica coating layer. The appropriate concentration of SiO2 was found to be 0.5-0.75 wt%. The coating agents with additives showed significantly high hydrophilicity immediately after coating and after the brush-wear test. The coating agents with/without additives formed a durable coating layer even after the brush-wear test.

  17. Stable isotope evidence for crustal recycling as recorded by superdeep diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, A. D.; Thomson, A. R.; Bulanova, G. P.; Kohn, S. C.; Smith, C. B.; Walter, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Sub-lithospheric diamonds from the Juina-5 and Collier-4 kimberlites and the Machado River alluvial deposit in Brazil have carbon isotopic compositions that co-vary with the oxygen isotopic compositions of their inclusions, which implies that they formed by a mixing process. The proposed model for this mixing process, based on interaction of slab-derived carbonate melt with reduced (carbide- or metal-bearing) ambient mantle, explains these isotopic observations. It is also consistent with the observed trace element chemistries of diamond inclusions from these localities and with the experimental phase relations of carbonated subducted crust. The 18O-enriched nature of the inclusions demonstrates that they incorporate material from crustal protoliths that previously interacted with seawater, thus confirming the subduction-related origin of superdeep diamonds. These samples also provide direct evidence of an isotopically anomalous reservoir in the deep (≥350 km) mantle.

  18. Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    is seen as typical of other cratons. Here, the nearly universal occurrence of Archean or Proterozoic diamonds in much younger (often Cretaceous) kimberlites proves that diamonds are xenocrysts inherited from the ancient mantle lithospheric keel by the host kimberlite as it erupts. Differences in diamond ages are on the scale of the geological assembly of the mantle lithospheric keel and relate to geological terranes in the lithosphere; they have little to do with individual kimberlites. In southern Africa, two age groupings of diamonds exist: Archean (3.2 to 2.9 Ga) diamonds associated with initial creation/final stabilization of the mantle lithosphere and Proterozoic (1 to 2 Ga) diamonds associated with compositional changes to the mantle keel from magmatism and metasomatism. The distribution of these two age types is cratonwide, encompasses many kimberlites and both age groupings can occur in an individual kimberlite. One expects a recurrence of similar ages with a possible 2 Ga age spread from many different kimberlites across the craton. Similar old ages are seen on other cratons (e.g. Siberian, Slave); thus age can not even distinguish diamond source at the scale of a craton. A further complication is that both sampling of diamonds from their lithospheric host and the resting position of diamonds at the final solidification level of the kimberlite in the crust are accidental. This can produce significant variability in the diamond population which is further complicated if erosion and deposition of the diamonds to form alluvial deposits has obscured their host kimberlite.

  19. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Watertown, MA, July 1991. - 59 - 9. Williams , B.E. et al, "CVD Coated Tungsten Powder Composites, Part I: Powder Processing and Characterization...34, Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys - Recent Advances, TMS, Warrendale, PA c1991. 10. Williams , B.E. et al, "CVD Coated Tungsten Powder Composites, Part II: Powder...MIAC/ CINDAS , Purdue University, 2595 Yeager Road, West Lafayette, IN 47905 Commander, Army Research Office, P.O. Box 12211, Research Triangle Park, NC

  20. The depth of sub-lithospheric diamond formation and the redistribution of carbon in the deep mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Christopher; Frost, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Most diamonds form in the Earth's lithosphere but a small proportion contain Si-rich majoritic garnet inclusions that indicate formation in the deeper mantle. The compositions of syngenetic garnet inclusions can potential yield information on both the depth and mantle lithology in which the diamonds formed. Pressure dependent changes in garnet compositions have been calibrated using the results of experiments conducted in a multi-anvil apparatus at pressures between 6 and 16 GPa and temperatures of 1000 to 1400 °C. Using the results of these experiments a barometer was formulated based on an empirical parameterisation of the two major majoritic substitutions, referred to as majorite (Maj; Al3+ =Mg2+ +Si4+), and Na-majorite (Na-Maj; Mg2+ +Al3+ =Na+ +Si4+). Moreover, previously published experimental garnet compositions from basaltic, kimberlite, komatiite and peridotite bulk compositions were included in the calibration, which consequently covers pressures from 6 to 20 GPa and temperatures from 900 to 2100 °C. Experimental pressures are reproduced over these conditions with a standard deviation of 0.86 GPa. The barometer is used to determine equilibration pressures of approximately 500 reported garnet inclusions in diamonds from a range of localities. As the majority of these inclusions are proposed to be syngenetic this allows a detailed picture of diamond formation depths and associated source rocks to be established using inclusion chemistry. Geographic differences in diamond source rocks are mapped within the sub-lithospheric mantle to over 500 km depth. Continuous diamond formation occurs over this depth range within lithologies with eclogitic affinities but also in lithologies that appear transitional between eclogitic and peridotitic bulk compositions, with an affinity to pyroxenites. The geographic differences between eclogitic and pyroxenitic diamond source rocks are rationalised in terms of diamond formation within downwelling and upwelling regimes

  1. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    traded diamond companies may be due to investors losing patience with the slow pace or absence of new promising discoveries and switching into shares of base metals and fertilizers for agriculture (potash and phosphates).

  2. Kankan diamonds (Guinea) III: δ13C and nitrogen characteristics of deep diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.; Aulbach, S.; Deines, P.

    2001-08-01

    Diamonds from the Kankan area in Guinea formed over a large depth profile beginning within the cratonic mantle lithosphere and extending through the asthenosphere and transition zone into the lower mantle. The carbon isotopic composition, the concentration of nitrogen impurities and the nitrogen aggregation level of diamonds representing this entire depth range have been determined. Peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds of lithospheric origin from Kankan have carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C: peridotitic -5.4 to -2.2‰ eclogitic -19.7 to -0.7‰) and nitrogen characteristics (N: peridotitic 17-648 atomic ppm; eclogitic 0-1,313 atomic ppm; aggregation from IaA to IaB) which are generally typical for diamonds of these two suites worldwide. Geothermobarometry of peridotitic and eclogitic inclusion parageneses (worldwide sources) indicates that both suites formed under very similar conditions within the cratonic lithosphere, which is not consistent with a derivation of diamonds with light carbon isotopic composition from subducted organic matter within subducting oceanic slabs. Diamonds containing majorite garnet inclusions fall to the isotopically heavy side (δ13C: -3.1‰ to +0.9‰) of the worldwide diamond population. Nitrogen contents are low (0-126 atomic ppm) and one of the two nitrogen-bearing diamonds shows such a low level of nitrogen aggregation (30% B-centre) that it cannot have been exposed to ambient temperatures of the transition zone (>=1,400 °C) for more than 0.2 Ma. This suggests rapid upward transport and formation of some Kankan diamonds pene-contemporaneous to Cretaceous kimberlite activity. Similar to these diamonds from the asthenosphere and the transition zone, lower mantle diamonds show a small shift towards isotopic heavy compositions (-6.6 to -0.5‰, mode at -3.5‰). As already observed for other mines, the nitrogen contents of lower mantle diamonds were below detection (using FTIRS). The mutual shift of sublithospheric diamonds towards

  3. Kankan diamonds (Guinea) III: δ13C and nitrogen characteristics of deep diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.; Aulbach, S.; Deines, P.

    Diamonds from the Kankan area in Guinea formed over a large depth profile beginning within the cratonic mantle lithosphere and extending through the asthenosphere and transition zone into the lower mantle. The carbon isotopic composition, the concentration of nitrogen impurities and the nitrogen aggregation level of diamonds representing this entire depth range have been determined. Peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds of lithospheric origin from Kankan have carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C: peridotitic -5.4 to -2.2‰ eclogitic -19.7 to -0.7‰) and nitrogen characteristics (N: peridotitic 17-648 atomic ppm; eclogitic 0-1,313 atomic ppm; aggregation from IaA to IaB) which are generally typical for diamonds of these two suites worldwide. Geothermobarometry of peridotitic and eclogitic inclusion parageneses (worldwide sources) indicates that both suites formed under very similar conditions within the cratonic lithosphere, which is not consistent with a derivation of diamonds with light carbon isotopic composition from subducted organic matter within subducting oceanic slabs. Diamonds containing majorite garnet inclusions fall to the isotopically heavy side (δ13C: -3.1‰ to +0.9‰) of the worldwide diamond population. Nitrogen contents are low (0-126 atomic ppm) and one of the two nitrogen-bearing diamonds shows such a low level of nitrogen aggregation (30% B-centre) that it cannot have been exposed to ambient temperatures of the transition zone (>=1,400 °C) for more than 0.2 Ma. This suggests rapid upward transport and formation of some Kankan diamonds pene-contemporaneous to Cretaceous kimberlite activity. Similar to these diamonds from the asthenosphere and the transition zone, lower mantle diamonds show a small shift towards isotopic heavy compositions (-6.6 to -0.5‰, mode at -3.5‰). As already observed for other mines, the nitrogen contents of lower mantle diamonds were below detection (using FTIRS). The mutual shift of sublithospheric diamonds towards

  4. Diamond resorption features as a new method for examining conditions of kimberlite emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedortchouk, Yana

    2015-10-01

    The study develops a new approach utilizing parameters of trigonal etch pits on diamond crystals to infer the conditions of diamond residence in kimberlite magma. Diamond crystals from dissolution experiments conducted at 1 GPa and 1150-1350 °C in the presence of H2O-rich or CO2-rich fluid were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM data of resorbed diamond surfaces show that much deeper surface relief was produced in CO2 fluid. It also clearly distinguishes the profiles of the trigonal etch pits forming regular flat-bottomed trigons in H2O fluid, and round- or pointed-bottomed trigons in CO2 fluid. The relationship between the diameter and the depth of the trigonal pits is found to be another important indicator of the fluid composition. Dissolution in H2O fluid develops trigons with constant diameter and variable depth where the diameter increases with temperature. Trigons developed in CO2 fluid have a large range of diameters showing a strong positive correlation with the depth. The developed criteria applied to the natural diamond crystals from three Ekati Mine kimberlites indicate significant variation in CO2-H2O ratio and temperature of their magmatic fluid. This conclusion based on diamond resorption agrees with the mineralogy of microphenocrysts and groundmass of the studied kimberlites offering new method to study crystallization conditions of kimberlite magma.

  5. Eclogitic Diamond Inclusions from the Komsomolskaya Pipe, Yakutia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logvinova, A.; Taylor, L. A.; Sovolev, N. V.; Floss, C.

    2005-12-01

    Mineral inclusions from diamonds (DIs) provide important constraints on the conditions prevailing at the time of the diamond's formation. Diamonds from all major operating mines of Yakutia, including the Mir, Udachnaya, Sytykanskaya, and Aykhal, contain an extremely high ratio of U/P (ultramafic/peridotitic) type inclusions versus E (eclogitic) type - i.e., '99/1' for the -3+1 mm-size fraction - based upon prior study (Yefimova and Sobolev, 1977, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 237). However, the recently developed Komsomolskaya mine has attracted special attention because of the first discovery of majoritic (Si = 3.13 pfu) E-type garnet inclusions among Yakutian diamonds, as well as for the unusually high proportion of E-type garnet DIs, reaching 15% (Sobolev et al., 2004, Lithos, 77). All the mines mentioned above have a narrow emplacement-age range within 344-365 Ma (Agashev et al., 2004, Dokl. Earth Sci., 399). We report here major- and trace-element variations in eclogitic DIs from 30 Komsomolskaya diamonds. Most of these DIs were studied in-situ, on a single polished surface of each diamond. About half of these samples contain multiple inclusions, with up to 4 grains of garnet and/or omphacite in a single diamond. Only one DI of touching grains of omphacite + coesite was detected, but another sample contains isolated coesite and omphacite DIs. Kyanite associated with high Ca-garnet was also found. Examination of the diamond polished surfaces with CL reveals relative times-of-encapsulation for the multiple DIs. All multiple DIs in a single diamond have similar major-element contents. However, between diamonds, the garnet inclusions have a wide range of 3.5 to 16.2 wt.% CaO, a span that covers practically the entire range of E-type DIs worldwide. Omphacites from 15 samples, however, possess a restricted compositional range in Na2O from 3.75 to 6.18 wt% only. Significant variations in trace elements occur in both garnets and pyroxenes in these DIs. Garnets range in Y, 24

  6. Wear Characteristics of Polymer -Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Y.; Mirzayev, H.

    2015-11-01

    The dry wear of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based composites, including bronze-filled composites (B60), glass-filled composites (G15), and carbon-filled composites (C25), produced by the mold casting method were investigated under different sliding conditions. The Taguchi L27 method and the analysis of variance were used to identify the effect of process parameters on the wear of tested materials. Experimental results showed that the wear resistance of G15 polymer composites was better than those of C25 and B60 ones. The specific wear rate decreased with increasing sliding distance and load, but partly decreased with increasing tensile strength.

  7. Fast bolometer built in an artificial HPHT diamond matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klokov, A Yu; Sharkov, A I; Galkina, T I; Khmelnitskii, R A; Dravin, V A; Gippius, Aleksei A

    2010-05-26

    A fast bolometer built in a plate of diamond grown at high pressure by the gradient growth method is developed and fabricated. The parameters of this structure are compared with these of the structures investigated earlier, which were fabricated based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond and natural type IIa diamond.

  8. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  9. n-Type diamond and method for producing same

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    A new n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed, which is doped with n-type dopant atoms. Such diamond is advantageously formed by chemical vapor deposition from a source gas mixture comprising a carbon source compound for the diamond, and a volatile hot wire filament for the n-type impurity species, so that the n-type impurity atoms are doped in the diamond during its formation. A corresponding chemical vapor deposition method of forming the n-type semiconducting diamond is disclosed. The n-type semiconducting diamond of the invention may be usefully employed in the formation of diamond-based transistor devices comprising pn diamond junctions, and in other microelectronic device applications.

  10. Buffer layers for deposition of superconducting YBaCuO thin film on polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beetz, Charles P.; Cui, G. J.; Lincoln, B. A.; Kirlin, Peter S.

    1992-09-01

    In an attempt to combine the properties of high temperature superconductors with the high thermal conductivity and low specific heat of diamond, we have explored the deposition of in- situ YBa(subscript 2)Cu(subscript 3)O(subscript 7-(delta) ) (YBCO) superconducting films on polycrystalline diamond thin films. We demonstrate for the first time superconducting YBCO films on diamond employing multiple layer buffer layer systems. Three different composite buffer layer systems were explored for this purpose: (1) Diamond/Zr/YSZ/YBCO, (2) Diamond/Si(subscript 3)N(subscript 4)/YSZ/YBCO, and (3) Diamond/SiO(subscript 2)/YSZ/YBCO. Adherent thin Zr films were deposited by dc sputtering on the diamond films at 450 to 820 degree(s)C. The yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was deposited by reactive RF sputtering at 680 to 750 degree(s)C. The Si(subscript 3)N(subscript 4) and SiO(subscript 2) were also deposited by on-axis RF sputtering at 400 to 700 degree(s)C. YBCO films were grown on the buffer layers by off-axis RF sputtering at substrate temperatures between 690 degree(s)C and 750 degree(s)C. In all cases, the as-deposited YBCO films were superconducting above 77 K. This demonstration enables the fabrication of low heat capacity, fast response time bolometric far IR detectors and paves the way for the use of HTSC as a high frequency interconnect metallization on thick diamond film based multichip modules.

  11. [Manufacture of diamond blades via microsystem technology].

    PubMed

    Spraul, Christoph W; Ertl, Stephan; Strobel, Stefan; Gretzschel, Ralph; Schirmer, Enrico; Rösch, Rudolf; Lingenfelder, Christian; Lang, Gerhard K

    2003-04-01

    The application of diamond knives has steadily increased in ophthalmic surgery. However, the geometry of the blade, its thickness and the sharpness of the cutting edge are limited by the abrasive diamond polishing process, e. g. the crystalline morphology of the bulk material and the grinding powder used. A new generation of diamond blades is presented herewith allowing free choice of blade shape and thickness and possessing excellent sharpness due to a new polishing process. The new production method is based on a high-quality CVD (chemical vapour deposition) diamond film of some tenths of microns thickness, deposited on a silicon wafer as microchip technology. The mechanical properties of this synthetic diamond film are almost equal to those of a natural diamond and the surface of this film is mirror-like after deposition without requiring post-polishing. The shape of the blade can be freely defined and is transferred into the diamond film by a plasma polishing process adopted from microsystem technology. The new production method results in highly reproducible diamond blades. Concave blades and round shapes can now be realised without the restrictions of the conventional production process. The force-free fabrication method even allows realisation of miniaturized blades (e. g. width < 0.125 mm, thickness < 50 microm) far beyond the possibilities of conventional diamond blade production. Plasma polishing by means of gas atoms results in extreme sharpness with the cutting edge radius in the range of approx. 3 nm. Utilising microsystem technology we were able to manufacture reproducible artificial diamond blades. The new process offers for the first time surgeons a possibility of designing blades with a geometry close to their personal needs. Furthermore, the potential of facet-free ergonomically shaped diamond blades may stimulate further improvements towards novel surgical techniques.

  12. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg [East Lansing, MI; Fischer, Anne [Arlington, VA; Bennett, Jason [Lansing, MI; Lowe, Michael [Holt, MI

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  13. Cleaning of ophthalmic diamond scalpels.

    PubMed

    Beran, R F

    1994-01-01

    To ensure optimal performance, it is imperative to properly maintain the condition of ophthalmic diamond scalpels. Refractive surgeons are often confronted with conflicting cleaning recommendations from manufacturers. The problem encountered is to maximize cleaning while minimizing trauma to the diamond to maintain its longevity. The author describes a flexible graded approach to cleaning and maintaining diamond scalpels. The principle of this approach was the development of four successive levels of cleaning based on an increasing risk of trauma to the diamond: Level I--irrigation with distilled water, Level II--hydrogen peroxide or enzyme cleaning, Level III--ultrasonic and detergent cleaning, and Level IV--mechanical styrofoam block cleaning. The protocol was performed prospectively on 50 consecutive radial keratotomy cases, inspecting the blade microscopically after each cleaning step, and determining the level at which cleanliness of the blade was achieved. The effectiveness (clean/dirty) of each cleaning level was evaluated by the author and an experienced surgical assistant. The difficulty in accurately measuring the amount of debris and the force necessary to remove it, limited the judgments made to subjective observation. Only 2 of 50 blades were cleaned at Level I, while 41 of 48 at Level III, and 7 of 7 at Level IV. A multi-leveled systematic process for cleaning maintenance appears most effective for maximal performance and longevity of diamond scalpels used for refractive keratotomy surgery.

  14. Diamond nucleation under bias conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, R.; Stammler, M.; Janischowsky, K.; Ley, L.; Albrecht, M.; Strunk, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    The so-called bias pretreatment allows the growth of heteroepitaxial diamond films by plasma chemical vapor deposition on silicon (100) surfaces. We present plan-view and cross-sectional transmission electron micrographs of the substrate surface at different phases of the bias pretreatment. These observations are augmented by measurements of the etch rates of Si, SiC, and different carbon modifications under plasma conditions and the size distribution of oriented diamond crystals grown after bias pretreatment. Based on these results a new model for diamond nucleation under bias conditions is proposed. First, a closed layer of nearly epitaxially oriented cubic SiC with a thickness of about 10 nm is formed. Subplantation of carbon into this SiC layer causes a supersaturation with carbon and results in the subcutaneous formation of epitaxially oriented nucleation centers in the SiC layer. Etching of the SiC during the bias pretreatment as well as during diamond growth brings these nucleation centers to the sample surface and causes the growth of diamonds epitaxially oriented on the Si/SiC substrate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  16. A new model for the evolution of diamond-forming fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Kessel, R.; Griffin, W. L.; Kiflawi, I.; Klein, O.; Bell, D. R.; Harris, J. W.; Navon, O.

    2009-04-01

    High-density fluids (HDFs, either melts or supercritical fluids) are trapped as myriads of sub-micrometer inclusions during the growth of fibrous diamonds and represent the medium in which these diamonds grew. Their chemical properties shed light not only on the genesis of fibrous diamonds, but perhaps on the formation of monocrystalline diamond as well. The major-element composition of the HDFs varies between two carbonatitic (high- and low-Mg) end-members, rich in Mg, Ca, Fe and carbonate; a hydrous-silicic end-member, rich in Si, Al and water and a hydrous-saline one, rich in K, Na, Cl and water. High levels of potassium appear in all four types, range between 10-22 wt% in the carbonatitic and silicic compositions and reaching up to 32% in the saline ones (water- and CO2-free basis). Most of the analyzed diamonds are homogenous and show no radial evolution (i.e. no changes in the medium during diamond growth); some show limited radial evolution of a few percent in their major-element concentrations; and only in four diamonds (two from Kankan, Guinea, one from Brazil and one from Diavik, Canada) large variations were found. The data collected from such diamonds show contrasting evolution during growth and precludes the formation of the end-members from a single parental fluid. Recent trace-elements (Cs, Rb, K, Ba, U, Th, Nb, Ta and LREE) and isotopic (Sr, Nd and Pb) data also support more than a single source for the different fluids. Based on HDF composition in diamonds from Africa, Brazil, Canada and Siberia and on the similarity of the HDFs to experimental near-solidus melt compositions of carbonated/hydrous peridotite and eclogite, we propose a new model for the evolution of HDFs. We suggest that the source rock for the high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs is peridotite, while the one for the low-Mg carbonatitic to hydrous-silicic compositions is eclogite. For most major elements, the saline HDF form a clear array that extends to the high-Mg carbonatitic compositions

  17. High pressure low temperature studies on 1-2-2 iron-based superconductors using designer diamond cells

    DOE PAGES

    Uhoya, Walter O.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; ...

    2013-01-01

    In this study, high pressure low temperature electrical resistance measurements were carried out on a series of 122 iron-based superconductors using a designer diamond anvil cell. These studies were complemented by image plate x-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and low temperatures at beamline 16-BM-D, HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. A common feature of the 1-2-2 iron-based materials is the observation of anomalous compressibility effects under pressure and a Tetragonal (T) to Collapsed Tetragonal (CT) phase transition under high pressures. Specific studies on antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 and Ba(Fe0.9Ru0.1)2As2 samples are presented to 10 K and 41 GPa. The collapsed tetragonal phasemore » was observed at a pressure of 14 GPa in Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 at ambient temperature. The highest superconducting transition temperature in Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 was observed to be at 32 K at a pressure of 4.7 GPa. The superconductivity was observed to be suppressed on transformation to the CT phase in 122 materials.« less

  18. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana

    2014-04-07

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

  19. Uncertainty-based grade modelling of kimberlite: A case study of the Jay kimberlite pipe, EKATI Diamond Mine, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sara; Leuangthong, Oy; Crawford, Barbara; Oshust, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Understanding uncertainty in resource models is a significant requirement of mineral resource evaluation. Geostatistical simulation is one method that can be used to quantify uncertainty and Sequential Gaussian Simulation (SGS) is one of the easiest techniques to understand and implement. Using SGS provides both a spatial model of a given variable and the ranges around that variable at any number of scales. The Jay kimberlite pipe is located in the southeastern quadrant of the EKATI property. Drilling to date has identified three kimberlitic domains characterized by varying lithological properties. These domains are not separated by hard contacts, but rather by boundaries that are transitional. Within these domains, vertical trends exist; in particular, diamond grade increases with depth. For these reasons, Jay required an in-depth investigation of the best uncertainty-based grade modelling method to use. Grade was modelled by organic SGS and by using the stepwise conditional transform (SCT) to incorporate a trend into the simulation routine. Although the SGS results were valid, they did not fully reproduce the trend and therefore, the results did not fully match the geological interpretation of the deposit. The SCT results reproduced the trend, however, did not correspond to the variability of the data and therefore under-represented the actual uncertainty in the model. This was confirmed through detailed uncertainty calculation and probabilistic resource classification. Therefore, the SGS model was chosen as the preferred uncertainty-based grade model for the Jay pipe.

  20. Estimating Decision Indices Based on Composite Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knupp, Tawnya Lee

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an IRT model that would enable the estimation of decision indices based on composite scores. The composite scores, defined as a combination of unidimensional test scores, were either a total raw score or an average scale score. Additionally, estimation methods for the normal and compound multinomial models…

  1. Infrared spectral and carbon isotopic characteristics of micro- and macro-diamonds from the Panda kimberlite (Central Slave Craton, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, G. L.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.; Carlson, J.; Harris, J. W.

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-one micro-diamonds (< 1 mm) and 90 macro-diamonds (2.5 mm to 3.4 mm) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati mine, Central Slave Craton, Canada) were analyzed for nitrogen content, nitrogen aggregation state (%B) and platelet and hydrogen peak areas (cm- 2). Micro-diamond nitrogen concentrations range from < 10 at. ppm to 1696 at. ppm (median = 805 at. ppm) and the median aggregation state is 23%B. Macro-diamonds range from < 10 at. ppm to 1260 at. ppm (median = 187 at. ppm) nitrogen and have a median nitrogen aggregation of 26%B. Platelet and hydrogen peaks were observed in 37% and 79% of the micro-diamonds and 79% and 56% of the macro-diamonds, respectively. Nitrogen based time averaged residence temperatures indicate that micro- and macro-diamonds experienced similar thermal mantle residence histories, both populations displaying bimodal residence temperature distributions with a gap between 1130 °C and 1160 °C (at 3.5 Ga residence). In addition, SIMS carbon isotopic analyses for the micro-diamonds were obtained: δ13C compositions range from - 6.9‰ to + 1.8‰ (median = - 4.3‰). CL imaging reveals distinct growth layers that in some samples differ by > 2‰, but mostly vary by < 0.5‰. Comparison of only the “gem-quality” samples (n = 49 micro- and 90 macro-diamonds) between the two diamond sets, indicates a statistically significant shift of + 1.3‰ in average δ13C from macro- to micro-diamonds and this shift documents distinct diamond forming fluids, fractionation process or growth histories. A broad transition to heavier isotopic values is also observed in connection to decreasing mantle residence temperatures. The bimodal mantle residence temperature distribution may coincide with the transition from highly depleted shallow to more fertile deep lithospheric mantle observed beneath the Central Slave Craton. The increase in δ13C with decreasing residence temperature (proxy for decreasing depth) is interpreted to reflect diamond

  2. Prospects of bipolar diamond devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksov, A.; Denisenko, A.; Kohn, E.

    2000-02-01

    The prospects of diamond bipolar devices are analysed theoretically and experimentally in respect to the problem of deep doping, especially the deep donor in diamond. For this purpose a set of p- n- p bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is fabricated on p-type diamond substrates by epitaxial growth using boron ( EA=0.4 eV) and nitrogen ( ED=1.7 eV) as the p- and n-type dopants respectively. It is shown that at the boron/nitrogen junction a p- n junction is formed. The built-in potential of the junction is determined by the ionised boron/nitrogen impurities. The specific features of the fabricated devices are the high resistivity of the nitrogen doped base (10 GΩ·cm at 20°C) and a significant leakage current of the reverse biased p- n junctions. These factors limit the transistor action to d.c.-operation in the nA-current range and to temperatures below 200°C where leakage starts to dominate. The values of the static current gain IC/ IB are measured in the common base mode 200 and in the common emitter mode 1.1. The theoretical section of the paper deals with the calculation of the static current gain of diamond pnp transistor structures in dependence of the donor energy level, temperature and frequency. Both the theoretical and the experimental results indicate that diamond bipolar transistors with a nitrogen doped n-type base can exhibit a current gain β of up to 30,000 in the d.c.-regime provided the leakage of the p- n junctions is sufficiently low. High-gain diamond transistors operating in GHz-frequency can be expected as soon as n-doping by shallow donor like phosphorous ( ED<0.5 eV) becomes available.

  3. Discovery of carbonatitic microinclusions in diamonds with highly aggregated nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablon, B. M.; Navon, O.

    2014-12-01

    It is accepted that fibrous diamonds grew from the high-density fluids (HDFs) they trapped as microinclusions. Such fluids are not found in monocrystalline (MC) diamonds, leaving their source of carbon a mystery. Fibrous diamonds carry nitrogen in A centers and are young (106 years), while most MC diamonds carry aggregated nitrogen in both A and B centers and are older (109 years). Weiss et al. (2014) found saline HDFs in the core of a coated diamond from Guinea and carbonatitic and saline fluids in a South African diamond, both with low concentrations of B centers (5-27%). Here we report finding microinclusions with high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs in MC diamonds. The infrared spectrum of these diamonds confirms their highly aggregated nature (>60%). We studied a suite of twinned diamonds, macles, from the Venetia mine in South Africa. The diamonds were polished perpendicular to their twinning plane and cleaned in HF and HNO3. We identified the twinning planes in cathodoluminescence images and methodically searched along and next to these planes, assuming that inclusions were preferentially trapped there. Shallow, sub-surface inclusions were analyzed using a JEOL JXA-8230 EPMA and an EDS detector. In two out of 11 diamonds we found inclusions with high concentrations of MgO (26-31 wt%), CaO (21-34%), K2O (9-16%), FeO (7-12%) and SiO2 (8-13%). These compositions are similar to those of HDFs in fibrous diamonds from Guinea and Yakutia (Weiss et al., 2009; Klein-BenDavid et al., 2009; Zedgenizov et al., 2009). Eight carbonatitic inclusions were found in diamond ON-VNT-608 and three in ON-VNT-605. Five microinclusions in 608 and one in 605 carry high concentrations of SiO2, MgO and FeO, with little else. Their compositions fall close to that of orthopyroxene, suggesting that both diamonds belong to the peridotitic paragenesis. Other inclusions, rich in SiO2 and Al2O3 in variable proportions were found in 8 of the 11 diamonds. The nature of these inclusions is not yet clear

  4. A composite material based on recycled tires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malers, L.; Plesuma, R.; Locmele, L.

    2009-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the elaboration and investigation of a composite material based on mechanically grinded recycled tires and a polymer binder. The correlation between the content of the binder, some technological parameters, and material properties of the composite was clarified. The apparent density, the compressive stress at a 10% strain, the compressive elastic modulus in static and cyclic loadings, and the insulating properties (acoustic and thermal) were the parameters of special interest of the present investigation. It is found that a purposeful variation of material composition and some technological parameters leads to multifunctional composite materials with different and predictable mechanical and insulation properties.

  5. Alluvial Diamond Resource Potential and Production Capacity Assessment of Ghana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chirico, Peter G.; Malpeli, Katherine C.; Anum, Solomon; Phillips, Emily C.

    2010-01-01

    In May of 2000, a meeting was convened in Kimberley, South Africa, and attended by representatives of the diamond industry and leaders of African governments to develop a certification process intended to assure that rough, exported diamonds were free of conflictual concerns. This meeting was supported later in 2000 by the United Nations in a resolution adopted by the General Assembly. By 2002, the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) was ratified and signed by both diamond-producing and diamond-importing countries. Over 70 countries were included as members at the end of 2007. To prevent trade in 'conflict' diamonds while protecting legitimate trade, the KPCS requires that each country set up an internal system of controls to prevent conflict diamonds from entering any imported or exported shipments of rough diamonds. Every diamond or diamond shipment must be accompanied by a Kimberley Process (KP) certificate and be contained in tamper-proof packaging. The objective of this study was to assess the alluvial diamond resource endowment and current production capacity of the alluvial diamond-mining sector in Ghana. A modified volume and grade methodology was used to estimate the remaining diamond reserves within the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields. The production capacity of the sector was estimated using a formulaic expression of the number of workers reported in the sector, their productivity, and the average grade of deposits mined. This study estimates that there are approximately 91,600,000 carats of alluvial diamonds remaining in both the Birim and Bonsa diamond fields: 89,000,000 carats in the Birim and 2,600,000 carats in the Bonsa. Production capacity is calculated to be 765,000 carats per year, based on the formula used and available data on the number of workers and worker productivity. Annual production is highly dependent on the international diamond market and prices, the numbers of seasonal workers actively mining in the sector, and

  6. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  7. Petrochemical types of kimberlites and their diamond-bearing capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostrovitsky, Sergey

    2010-05-01

    Kimberlite rocks of Yakutian province (belong to 1 group of kimberlites after Smith, 1983) are characterized by wide variations of rock-forming oxides [Ilupin et al., 1986; Milashev, 1965; Kharkiv et al., 1991]. A number of factors could be discussed to explain the variety of chemical compositions of rocks. The first factor, explaining the regional differences in the kimberlite composition with primarily different composition of source kimberlite melt-fluid, is conventionally called «primary». All other factors are connected with the secondary redistribution of chemical components of kimberlites. Irrespective of intensity of secondary factors, the primary composition of kimberlites varies broadly, which is noticeable in kimberlites of some provinces, kimberlites fields, pipe clusters and individual pipes. The petrochemical types are classified based on the contents of such oxides as FeO, TiO2 and K2O, being relatively inert in the secondary processes. In the Yakutian Province we have distinguished 5 petrochemical types of kimberlites (Kostrovitsky et al, 2007); with principal ones - high-Mg, magnesium-ferruginous (Mg-Fe) and ferruginous-titaniferous, their composition: < 6; 6-9; 8-15 % FeOtotal and < 1; 1-2.5; 1.5-5.0 % TiO2). Some petrochemical and mineralogical criteria of diamond-bearing capacity of kimberlites were identified some time before. The essence of petrochemical criterion consists of the inverse correlation dependence between the contents FeOtotal, TiO2 in kimberlite rocks and their diamond-bearing capacity (Milashev, 1965; Krivonos, 1998). The mineralogical criteria of diamond-bearing capacity infer presence of direct dependence of the rate of capacity on the content in kimberlites of low-Ca, high-Cr garnet and chrome spinellids with Cr2O3 > 62% and TiO2 < 0.5%, of dunite-harzburgite paragenesis (Sobolev, 1974; Meyer, 1968). The acquired results are applied to evaluate «efficiency» of criteria of diamond-bearing capacity exemplified by the

  8. Isotopic Characterization of Diamond Growth in Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Hélène; Remusat, Laurent; Esteve, Imène; Pinti, Daniele; Cartigny, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Trapping inclusions in diamonds has been used as a diagnostic to constrain diamond growth media (e.g. Navon et al., 1994; Weiss et al., 2015) in the Earth's upper mantle. Experimental works now generate inclusion-bearing diamonds from seeds in mixtures of carbonates, graphite, and silicates in the presence of excess of pure water or saline fluids (H2O-NaCl) and investigate in more details the conditions of natural diamond growth (Bureau et al., 2012; 2016). Experiments were carried at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm between 6-7 GPa (1300-1675°C) in multi-anvil presses at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Bayreuth from a few hours two a few days. Results show that within the timescale of the experiments diamond growth occurs on seeds if water and alkali-bearing carbonates are present. We show that water promotes fast diamond growth, which is favorable to the formation of inclusions. Thin sections of a few diamond seeds containing exposed inclusions were prepared using a Focus Ion Beam (about 2 to 5 µm thickness). These sections were deposited on silicon wafers and gold coated for micron-scale determination of the delta 13C isotopic compositions using the NanoSIMS 50 installed at the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris. Carbon isotope measurement with NanoSIMS were calibrated against a natural Ia and a synthetic IIa diamond used for diamond anvil cells, whose compositions were determined by gas-source mass spectrometry at IPGP at 3.6±0.1‰ and -20.9±0.1‰, respectively (Pinti et al., 2016). All the starting materials used for the experiments were also characterized for their delta 13C by the same technique at GEOTOP, Montréal. The isotopic composition of the new diamond grown areas were measured close to the inclusions. They exhibit a different isotopic signature than that of the starting seeds (starting diamond composition: -29.6 to -30.4±1.4‰). The new diamond signatures are falling into the range of signatures of the starting

  9. Fiber-Coupled Diamond Quantum Nanophotonic Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burek, Michael J.; Meuwly, Charles; Evans, Ruffin E.; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sipahigil, Alp; Meesala, Srujan; Machielse, Bartholomeus; Sukachev, Denis D.; Nguyen, Christian T.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Lončar, Marko

    2017-08-01

    Color centers in diamond provide a promising platform for quantum optics in the solid state, with coherent optical transitions and long-lived electron and nuclear spins. Building upon recent demonstrations of nanophotonic waveguides and optical cavities in single-crystal diamond, we now demonstrate on-chip diamond nanophotonics with a high-efficiency fiber-optical interface achieving >90 % power coupling at visible wavelengths. We use this approach to demonstrate a bright source of narrow-band single photons based on a silicon-vacancy color center embedded within a waveguide-coupled diamond photonic crystal cavity. Our fiber-coupled diamond quantum nanophotonic interface results in a high flux (approximately 38 kHz) of coherent single photons (near Fourier limited at <1 -GHz bandwidth) into a single-mode fiber, enabling possibilities for realizing quantum networks that interface multiple emitters, both on chip and separated by long distances.

  10. Conducting polyheterocycle composites based on porous hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Ruckenstein, E.

    1992-02-01

    Conducting composites based on porous substrates (cotton fiber, non-woven polypropylene mat and porous crosslinked polystyrene) have been prepared by a two step imbibition technique. First, the substrate was imbibed with a solution of monomer (pyrrole or bithiophene) in acetonitrile, followed by partial drying. Subsequently, the substrate was again imbibed, this time with an oxidant dissolved in a suitable solvent. The polymerization of the monomer inside the host in the presence of the oxidant and the doping of the polymer with the oxidant leads to the conducting composite. The highly hydrophobic and porous crosslinked polystyrene, prepared by the concentrated emulsion polymerization method, is the most efficient. The solvent employed for the oxidant plays a major role. A FeCl3-methanol system and porous crosslinked polystyrene lead to conductivities of polythiophene and polypyrrole based composites of 3.63 and 0.65 S/cm, respectively. Copper perchlorate and iron perchlorate are also suitable oxidants. The environmental and thermal stabilities of polypyrrole based composites are lower than those of polythiophene based composites. The thermal stability of polypyrrole based composites can be enhanced by including a small amount of an organic antioxidant, such as amides or substituted phenols, in the composite.

  11. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y. -H.; Bi, B.; Golding, B.

    2015-02-24

    A method of diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth is demonstrated which utilizes a photolithographic metal mask to pattern a thin (001) epitaxial diamond surface. Significant structural improvement was found, with a threading dislocation density reduced by two orders of magnitude at the top surface of a thick overgrown diamond layer. In the initial stage of overgrowth, a reduction of diamond Raman linewidth in the overgrown area was also realized. Thermally-induced stress and internal stress were determined by Raman spectroscopy of adhering and delaminated diamond films. As a result, the internal stress is found to decrease as sample thickness increases.

  12. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  13. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Y. -H.; Bi, B.; Golding, B.

    2015-02-24

    A method of diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth is demonstrated which utilizes a photolithographic metal mask to pattern a thin (001) epitaxial diamond surface. Significant structural improvement was found, with a threading dislocation density reduced by two orders of magnitude at the top surface of a thick overgrown diamond layer. In the initial stage of overgrowth, a reduction of diamond Raman linewidth in the overgrown area was also realized. Thermally-induced stress and internal stress were determined by Raman spectroscopy of adhering and delaminated diamond films. As a result, the internal stress is found to decrease as sample thickness increases.

  14. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  15. Effect of an Extra Hydrophobic Resin Layer on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rahbani Nobar, Behnam

    2015-12-01

    Composite repair is a minimally invasive and conservative approach. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin layer on the repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite repaired with silorane or methacrylate-based composite. Sixty bar-shaped composite blocks were fabricated and stored in saline for 72 hours. The surface of the samples were roughened by diamond burs and etched with phosphoric acid; then, they were randomly divided into three groups according to the repairing process: Group 1: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-silorane composite; group 2: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin-silorane composite, and group 3: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin methacrylate-based composite. Repairing composite blocks measured 2.5×2.5×5mm. After repairing, the samples were stored in saline for 24 hours and thermocycled for 1500 cycles. The repair bond strength was measured at a strain rate of 1mm/min. Twenty additional cylindrical composite blocks (diameter: 2.5mm, height: 6mm) were also fabricated for measuring the cohesive strength of silorane-based composite. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). Cohesive bond strength of silorane composite was significantly higher than the repair bond strengths in other groups (P<0.001). The repair bond strength of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 (P=0.001). Application of an additional hydrophobic resin layer for repair of silorane-based composite with a methacrylate-based composite enhanced the repair shear bond strength.

  16. Effect of an Extra Hydrophobic Resin Layer on Repair Shear Bond Strength of a Silorane-Based Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Rahbani Nobar, Behnam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Composite repair is a minimally invasive and conservative approach. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an additional hydrophobic resin layer on the repair shear bond strength of a silorane-based composite repaired with silorane or methacrylate-based composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty bar-shaped composite blocks were fabricated and stored in saline for 72 hours. The surface of the samples were roughened by diamond burs and etched with phosphoric acid; then, they were randomly divided into three groups according to the repairing process: Group 1: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-silorane composite; group 2: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin-silorane composite, and group 3: Silorane composite-silorane bonding agent-hydrophobic resin methacrylate-based composite. Repairing composite blocks measured 2.5×2.5×5mm. After repairing, the samples were stored in saline for 24 hours and thermocycled for 1500 cycles. The repair bond strength was measured at a strain rate of 1mm/min. Twenty additional cylindrical composite blocks (diameter: 2.5mm, height: 6mm) were also fabricated for measuring the cohesive strength of silorane-based composite. The data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey’s test (α=0.05). Results: Cohesive bond strength of silorane composite was significantly higher than the repair bond strengths in other groups (P<0.001). The repair bond strength of group 3 was significantly higher than that of group 1 (P=0.001). Conclusion: Application of an additional hydrophobic resin layer for repair of silorane-based composite with a methacrylate-based composite enhanced the repair shear bond strength. PMID:27559348

  17. Planar Diamond-Based Multiarrays to Monitor Neurotransmitter Release and Action Potential Firing: New Perspectives in Cellular Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Carabelli, Valentina; Marcantoni, Andrea; Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Olivero, Paolo; Carbone, Emilio

    2017-02-15

    High biocompatibility, outstanding electrochemical responsiveness, inertness, and transparency make diamond-based multiarrays (DBMs) first-rate biosensors for in vitro detection of electrochemical and electrical signals from excitable cells together, with potential for in vivo applications as neural interfaces and prostheses. Here, we will review the electrochemical and physical properties of various DBMs and how these devices have been employed for recording released neurotransmitter molecules and all-or-none action potentials from living cells. Specifically, we will overview how DBMs can resolve localized exocytotic events from subcellular compartments using high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs), or monitoring oxidizable neurotransmitter release from populations of cells in culture and tissue slices using low-density MEAs. Interfacing DBMs with excitable cells is currently leading to the promising opportunity of recording electrical signals as well as creating neuronal interfaces through the same device. Given the recent increasingly growing development of newly available DBMs of various geometries to monitor electrical activity and neurotransmitter release in a variety of excitable and neuronal tissues, the discussion will be limited to planar DBMs.

  18. The Nature of Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.

    1997-10-01

    The paragon of physical perfection and a sparkling example of Earth's forces at work, the diamond has fascinated all realms of society, from starlets to scientists. The Nature of Diamonds is a comprehensive look at nature's most coveted gem. A handsome, large-format book, The Nature of Diamonds is an authoritative and richly-illustrated tribute to the diamond. Leading geologists, gemologists, physicists, and cultural observers cover every facet of the stone, from its formation in the depths of the Earth, its ascent to the surface, and its economic, regal, social, and technological roles. Cutting-edge research takes the reader to the frontiers of diamond exploration and exploitation, from the Arctic wastes to the laboratories where diamonds are created for massive road shredders that rip up and then re-create superhighways. Here also is an overview of cutting, from the rough stones in Roman rings to the highly-faceted stones we see today, and a glimpse into the business of diamonds. Finally, The Nature of Diamonds chronicles scientific and cultural history and explores the diamond as both a sacred and a social symbol, including a picture history of betrothal rings. Wide-ranging illustrations explain the geology of diamonds, chart the history of mining from its origins in India and Brazil through the diamond rush in South Africa and today's high-tech enterprises, and capture the brilliance and beauty of this extraordinary gem. _

  19. Influence of surface preparation on fracture load of resin composite-based repairs

    PubMed Central

    Mateos-Palacios, Rocío; Román-Rodríguez, Juan-Luis; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda; Fons-Font, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the fracture load of composite-based repairs to fractured zirconium oxide (Z) crowns and to ceramic-fused-to-metal (CM) crowns, comparing different mechanical surface preparation methods. A total of 75 crowns were repaired; samples then underwent dynamic loading and thermocycling. Final fracture load values for failure of the repaired crowns were measured and the type of fracture registered. Group I: CM: Surface preparation with a diamond bur + 9.5% Hydrofluoric Acid (HF) etching; Group II): CM: air-particle (Al2O3) + 9.5% HF; Group III: CM: Silica coating (SiO2); Group IV): Z: air-particle (Al2O3) + HF 9.5%; Group V) Z: Silica coating (SiO2). Of the three CM groups, Group I (CM-diamond bur) showed the highest mean failure value, with significant difference in comparison with Group III (CM-silica coating). For the zirconia groups, the highest value was obtained by Group V (silica coating). Key words:Crown, ceramic-fused-to-metal, zirconia, resin-composite, ceramic covering. PMID:25810848

  20. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  1. Synthetic 3D diamond-based electrodes for flexible retinal neuroprostheses: Model, production and in vivo biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Bendali, Amel; Rousseau, Lionel; Lissorgues, Gaëlle; Scorsone, Emmanuel; Djilas, Milan; Dégardin, Julie; Dubus, Elisabeth; Fouquet, Stéphane; Benosman, Ryad; Bergonzo, Philippe; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2015-10-01

    Two retinal implants have recently received the CE mark and one has obtained FDA approval for the restoration of useful vision in blind patients. Since the spatial resolution of current vision prostheses is not sufficient for most patients to detect faces or perform activities of daily living, more electrodes with less crosstalk are needed to transfer complex images to the retina. In this study, we modelled planar and three-dimensional (3D) implants with a distant ground or a ground grid, to demonstrate greater spatial resolution with 3D structures. Using such flexible 3D implant prototypes, we showed that the degenerated retina could mould itself to the inside of the wells, thereby isolating bipolar neurons for specific, independent stimulation. To investigate the in vivo biocompatibility of diamond as an electrode or an isolating material, we developed a procedure for depositing diamond onto flexible 3D retinal implants. Taking polyimide 3D implants as a reference, we compared the number of neurones integrating the 3D diamond structures and their ratio to the numbers of all cells, including glial cells. Bipolar neurones were increased whereas there was no increase even a decrease in the total cell number. SEM examinations of implants confirmed the stability of the diamond after its implantation in vivo. This study further demonstrates the potential of 3D designs for increasing the resolution of retinal implants and validates the safety of diamond materials for retinal implants and neuroprostheses in general.

  2. [The possibilities for the application of the fluoroplast-based prostheses with a diamond-like carbon nanocoating in ear surgery (an experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, V P; Shil'ko, S V; Khusam, Él'-Refaĭ; Nadyrov, É A; Kazachenko, V P; Dzhaĭnakbaev, N T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate general and local characteristics of the tissue reactions to the implantation of radiation-modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-based fluoroplast F-4PM20 with a diamond-like carbon (DLC) nanocoating or with the diamond-like carbon coating containing the dispersed nano-sized silver particles to the experimental animals (rats). A total of 150 inbred white rats were included into the experiment; they were divided into 3 groups comprised of 50 animals each. The rats in group 1 were implanted with the 5 nm thick strips of fluoroplast F-4PM20 having the diamond-like carbon nanocoating. The animals of group 2 were implanted with the same material containing nanoparticles of chemically pure silver dispersed in the coating, those in group 3 (controls) were implanted with the fluoroplast F-4PM20 without a coating. The animals were sacrificed on days 7, 21, 30, and 60 days after the onset of the experiment. The tissues surrounding the implant as well as heart, lung, spleen, liver, and kidney tissues were taken for the histological study. The local reactions of different tissues were found to be uniform even though there was an apparent tendency toward the less pronounced granulation and scarification processes in the animals implanted with the diamond-like carbon coating containing the dispersed nano-sized silver particles. In none of the groups, the animals exhibited statistically significant lymphoid tissue hyperplasia in the spleen which suggested the activation of the immune system in response to implantation. It is concluded that the PTFE-based fluoroplast F-4PM20 implants with the 5 nm thick DLC coating and a similar coating containing the dispersed nano-sized silver particles can be applied for middle ear reconstructive surgery, being a histologically compatible material that does not cause an inflammatory degenerative response of the tissues.

  3. Mechanism for direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongxian; Yin, Fuxing; Yu, Tao; Wang, Jian-Tao; Liang, Chunyong

    2014-01-01

    Using classical molecular dynamics with a more reliable reactive LCBOPII potential, we have performed a detailed study on the direct graphite-to-diamond phase transition. Our results reveal a new so-called “wave-like buckling and slipping” mechanism, which controls the transformation from hexagonal graphite to cubic diamond. Based on this mechanism, we have explained how polycrystalline cubic diamond is converted from hexagonal graphite, and demonstrated that the initial interlayer distance of compressed hexagonal graphite play a key role to determine the grain size of cubic diamond. These results can broaden our understanding of the high pressure graphite-to-diamond phase transition. PMID:25088720

  4. Below-Band-Gap Laser Ablation Of Diamond For TEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Thomas; Foote, Marc C.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Fortier, Edward P.; Posthill, John B.

    1995-01-01

    Thin, electron-transparent layers of diamond for examination in transmission electron microscope (TEM) fabricated from thicker diamond substrates by using laser beam to ablate surface of substrate. Involves use of photon energy below band gap. Growing interest in use of diamond as bulk substrate and as coating material in variety of applications has given rise to increasing need for TEM for characterization of diamond-based materials. Below-band-gap laser ablation method helps to satisfy this need. Also applied in general to cutting and etching of diamonds.

  5. Diamonds in space: a brief history and recent laboratory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Stardust grains exist in outer space. However, due to their low abundance, structural heterogeneities, and lack of distinct spectroscopic features, unambiguous identification of their chemical composition has been a challenge. Diamond is a notable exception because it is composed of carbon and has several unique physicochemical properties that make the identification possible. Here, we provide a brief review on how diamonds were discovered in space based on the remarkable spectral matching between laboratory spectra and astronomical observations of the infrared emission at 3.43 and 3.53 µm, followed by a discussion of fluorescent nanodiamond as a possible carrier for extended red emission at 600 — 800 nm. Recent evidence to support the latter suggestion is provided.

  6. Superhard Diamond/tungsten Carbide Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Z Lin; J Zhang; B Li; L Wang; H Mao; R Hemley; Y Zhao

    2011-12-31

    We investigated the processing conditions of diamond/tungsten carbide (WC) composites using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and reactive sintering techniques at high pressure and high temperatures. The as-synthesized composites were characterized by synchrotron XRD, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and indentation hardness measurements. Through tuning of the reaction temperature and time, we produced fully reacted, well-sintered, and nanostructured diamond composites with Vickers hardness of about 55 GPa and the grain size of WC binding matrix smaller than 50 nm. A specific set of orientation relationships between WC and tungsten is identified to gain microstructural insight into the reaction mechanism between diamond and tungsten.

  7. Realization of a diamond based high density multi electrode array by means of Deep Ion Beam Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picollo, F.; Battiato, A.; Bernardi, E.; Boarino, L.; Enrico, E.; Forneris, J.; Gatto Monticone, D.; Olivero, P.

    2015-04-01

    In the present work we report about a parallel-processing ion beam fabrication technique whereby high-density sub-superficial graphitic microstructures can be created in diamond. Ion beam implantation is an effective tool for the structural modification of diamond: in particular ion-damaged diamond can be converted into graphite, therefore obtaining an electrically conductive phase embedded in an optically transparent and highly insulating matrix. The proposed fabrication process consists in the combination of Deep Ion Beam Lithography (DIBL) and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling. FIB micromachining is employed to define micro-apertures in the contact masks consisting of thin (<10 μm) deposited metal layers through which ions are implanted in the sample. A prototypical single-cell biosensor was realized with the above described technique. The biosensor has 16 independent electrodes converging inside a circular area of 20 μm diameter (typical neuroendocrine cells size) for the simultaneous recording of amperometric signals.

  8. Field electron emission based on resonant tunneling in diamond/CoSi2/Si quantum well nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changzhi; Jiang, Xin; Lu, Wengang; Li, Junjie; Mantl, Siegfried

    2012-01-01

    Excellent field electron emission properties of a diamond/CoSi2/Si quantum well nanostructure are observed. The novel quantum well structure consists of high quality diamond emitters grown on bulk Si substrate with a nanosized epitaxial CoSi2 conducting interlayer. The results show that the main emission properties were modified by varying the CoSi2 thickness and that stable, low-field, high emission current and controlled electron emission can be obtained by using a high quality diamond film and a thicker CoSi2 interlayer. An electron resonant tunneling mechanism in this quantum well structure is suggested, and the tunneling is due to the long electron mean free path in the nanosized CoSi2 layer. This structure meets most of the requirements for development of vacuum micro/nanoelectronic devices and large-area cold cathodes for flat-panel displays. PMID:23082241

  9. Microfabrication of diamond-based slow-wave circuits for mm-wave and THz vacuum electronic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueck, M. R.; Malta, D. M.; Gilchrist, K. H.; Kory, C. L.; Mearini, G. T.; Dayton, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    Planar and helical slow-wave circuits for THz radiation sources have been made using novel microfabrication and assembly methods. A biplanar slow-wave circuit for a 650 GHz backward wave oscillator (BWO) was fabricated through the growth of diamond into high aspect ratio silicon molds and the selective metallization of the tops and sidewalls of 90 µm tall diamond features using lithographically created shadow masks. Helical slow-wave circuits for a 650 GHz BWO and a 95 GHz traveling wave tube were created through the patterning of trenches in thin film diamond, electroplating of gold half-helices, and high accuracy bonding of helix halves. The development of new techniques for the microfabrication of vacuum electronic components will help to facilitate compact and high-power sources for terahertz range radiation.

  10. Planetesimal Compositions in Exoplanet Systems based on Host Star Composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T. V.; Mousis, O.; Lunine, J. I.; Madhusudhan, N.

    2012-04-01

    We have used recent surveys of the stellar abundances of solid forming elements in a sample of exoplanet host stars discussed by Bond et al. (Astrophys. J. 715, 1050-1070, 2010) to calculate the expected composition of silicate and ice planetesimals formed beyond the snow line in these systems. The refractory silicate and metal composition is derived following Johnson and Lunine (Nature 435, 69-71, 2005) and Wong et al. (in Oxygen in the Solar System Vol. Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry Vol. 68 (ed G. J. MacPherson) Ch. 10, 241-246, 2008). The nebula gas C and O composition was set based on amount of O tied up in refractories and the volatile condensation sequence for ices in the 5-10 AU region of the stellar systems calculated following Mousis et al. (Astrophys. J. 727, 7pp, 2011). The resultant condensate compositions show that planetesimal compositions in exoplanet systems may differ significantly from solar system planet forming materials. The C/O abundance of the exoplanet host star has the strongest effect on planetesimal composition, strongly affecting the relative proportions of refractory materials and volatile ices, particularly water ice and C-bearing ices. For stars with sub-solar C/O values H2O and silicate plus metal dominate the condensate composition with CO2 as the next most abundant species at < ~0.10 mass fraction. Minor species (CH3OH, H2S, NH3, CH4, PH3), with mass fractions of 10-4to 10-2, are present in approximately the relative proportions as for the solar nebula. As stellar C/O increases, H2O decreases and beyond the solar value ([C/O] =0, C/O = 0.55), rapidly disappears as the C/O = ~0.8 is approached, with CO2 and CH3OH ices becoming more important. Planetesimals in these systems will have refractory, silicate plus metal rich compositions compared with solar system conditions. If the midplane temperatures in the circumstellar nebula are

  11. Transmission diamond imaging detector

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, John Pinelli, Don; Gaoweia, Mengjia; Muller, Erik; Ding, Wenxiang; Zhou, Tianyi; Bohon, Jen

    2016-07-27

    Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

  12. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-08-24

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH{sub 4}/N{sub 2} plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E{sub 0} = 2.48 V/μm (J{sub e} = 1.0 mA/cm{sup 2} at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  13. Synthesis of ultra-nano-carbon composite materials with extremely high conductivity by plasma post-treatment process of ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chien-Jui; Manoharan, Divinah; Chang, Hsin-Tzer; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2015-08-01

    Needle-like diamond grains encased in nano-graphitic layers are an ideal granular structure of diamond films to achieve high conductivity and superior electron field emission (EFE) properties. This paper describes the plasma post-treatment (ppt) of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films at low substrate temperature to achieve such a unique granular structure. The CH4/N2 plasma ppt-processed films exhibit high conductivity of σ = 1099 S/cm as well as excellent EFE properties with turn-on field of E0 = 2.48 V/μm (Je = 1.0 mA/cm2 at 6.5 V/μm). The ppt of UNCD film is simple and robust process that is especially useful for device applications.

  14. Microinclusions in polycrystalline diamonds: insights into processes of diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Enzmann, F.; Schwarz, J. O.; Kronz, A.

    2009-04-01

    fluid. One multiphase inclusion was found to be still fluid-bearing, showing characteristic continuous changes in diffraction contrast due to density fluctuations caused by the electron beam. No other elements than carbon were detected during AEM of this area which suggests that the fluid consists of relatively pure C-H-O species. In addition to the fluid, this inclusion contained fine-grained FeS, a silicate phase rich in Fe, P, Mg, Al, Ca and K and a quench phase, rich in Fe, P and Si. Macroinclusions (>5µm) are magnetite, often surrounded by hematite, FeS, low-Cr garnet (Py50Alm39Grs11) and omphacite (Jd23). Garnet and cpx were found as non-touching inclusions and yield 1256°C at 5 GPa. Most of the magnetite inclusions are single crystals and some are strongly deformed with signs of recrystallization. Hematite occurs as porous aggregates of nano-granules of ca. 5-7 nm sizes. High Resolution µ-Computer Tomography (HR-µCT) shows pores in the sample and the included mineral phases as areas of differing grey-values. These are a direct function of the specific x-ray density of the specific phase and can be used to differentiate oxides and silicates. Based on the 3D tomogram, the amount of pores per total volume of the diamond plus inclusion matrix is calculated to be 0.65 vol%, while magnetite inclusions amount to 3.16 vol%. The average equivalent radius of the magnetite grains (radius of a sphere with the same volume as the grain) is 17.8 µm, while that of the pores is 12.6µm. Discussion The occurrence of omphacite, rutile and FeS as microinclusions within the diamond crystals clearly shows that these phases are cogenetic to the diamonds. However, magnetite and hematite were only encountered as large inclusions in cavities that appear to be interstitial porosity. Moreover, analysis of the equivalent radius distribution of the pores and the magnetite inclusions derived from HR-µCT shows a complete overlap of the mode, indicating that magnetite preferentially fills

  15. Base deflection and microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L A; de Goes, M F; Consani, S

    1994-06-01

    The flexural deflections of human dentin, Herculite XR, Dycal, Vidrion F, zinc phosphate base, and combinations of composite-base were determined. The influence of the flexural deflections in the marginal microleakage was also determined for the composite-base combinations. The flexural deflection test for dentin showed no statistically significant differences between the two floor cavity depths studied. There were significant differences among cements when the thickness of the base was 1 mm whereas no differences occurred at 2 mm. The composite-base combinations did not present statistical differences. There were no statistically significant differences in the microleakage levels among loaded and non-loaded specimens; however, dye penetration was visually greater in loaded samples.

  16. New amperometric biosensors based on diamond paste for the assay of L- and D-pipecolic acids in serum samples.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Raluca-Ioana; Nejem, R'afat Mahmoud; van Staden, Jacobus F; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2004-05-01

    Monocrystalline natural diamond, L-amino acid oxidase (L-AAOD), D-amino acid oxidase (D-AAOD), and paraffin oil were used for the design of the modified diamond paste. The technique used for the direct voltammetric assay was differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with applied potential pulse amplitude of 25 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Using the new amperometric biosensors L-pipecolic acid (L-PA) and D-pipecolic acid (D-PA) were determined reliably from serum samples at 700 and 200 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively, with low limits of detection.

  17. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  18. Noble gases in diamonds - Occurrences of solarlike helium and neon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honda, M.; Reynolds, J. H.; Roedder, E.; Epstein, S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventeen diamond samples from diverse locations were analyzed for the contents of He, Ar, Kr, and Xe, and of their isotopes, using a Reynolds (1956) type glass mass spectrometer. The results disclosed a large spread in the He-3/He-4 ratios, ranging from values below atmospheric to close to the solar ratio. In particular, solarlike He-3/He-4 ratios were seen for an Australian colorless diamond composite and an Arkansas diamond, which also displayed solarlike neon isotopic ratios. Wide variation was also observed in the He-4/Ar-40 ratios, suggesting a complex history for the source regions and the diamond crystallization processes.

  19. Wood-based composite materials : panel products, glued-laminated timber, structural composite lumber, and wood-nonwood composite materials

    Treesearch

    Nicole M. Stark; Zhiyong Cai; Charles Carll

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the general types and composition of wood-based composite products and the materials and processes used to manufacture them. It describes conventional wood-based composite panels and structural composite materials intended for general construction, interior use, or both. This chapter also describes wood–nonwood composites. Mechanical...

  20. High pressure low temperature studies on 1-2-2 iron-based superconductors using designer diamond cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uhoya, Walter O.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Mitchell, Jonathan, E.; Safa-Sefat, Athena; Weir, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    In this study, high pressure low temperature electrical resistance measurements were carried out on a series of 122 iron-based superconductors using a designer diamond anvil cell. These studies were complemented by image plate x-ray diffraction measurements under high pressures and low temperatures at beamline 16-BM-D, HPCAT, Advanced Photon Source. A common feature of the 1-2-2 iron-based materials is the observation of anomalous compressibility effects under pressure and a Tetragonal (T) to Collapsed Tetragonal (CT) phase transition under high pressures. Specific studies on antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 and Ba(Fe0.9Ru0.1)2As2 samples are presented to 10 K and 41 GPa. The collapsed tetragonal phase was observed at a pressure of 14 GPa in Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 at ambient temperature. The highest superconducting transition temperature in Ba0.5Sr0.5Fe2As2 was observed to be at 32 K at a pressure of 4.7 GPa. The superconductivity was observed to be suppressed on transformation to the CT phase in 122 materials.

  1. Magnesium Based Composite via Friction Stir Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    process developed by Mishra et.al [8] based on the principles of friction stir welding ( FSW ) is getting increased attention. It involves the traverse...compared to other thermomechanical processes [9]. Mishra et al. [10] have used FSP to fabricate a surface composite with SiC particulates in aluminum ...This work was followed by other reports of composite fabrication in aluminum alloys with various reinforcements, like Al3Ti, Al2Cu, Al2O3

  2. Tantalum-Based Ceramics for Refractory Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Leiser, Daniel; DiFiore, Robert; Kalvala, Victor

    2006-01-01

    A family of tantalum-based ceramics has been invented as ingredients of high-temperature composite insulating tiles. These materials are suitable for coating and/or permeating the outer layers of rigid porous (foam-like or fibrous) ceramic substrates to (1) render the resulting composite ceramic tiles impervious to hot gases and (2) enable the tiles to survive high heat fluxes at temperatures that can exceed 3,000 F ( 1,600 C).

  3. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  4. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  5. A mantle origin for Paleoarchean peridotitic diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Slave Craton: Evidence from 13C-, 15N- and 33,34S-stable isotope systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartigny, Pierre; Farquhar, James; Thomassot, Emilie; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Wing, Bozwell; Masterson, Andy; McKeegan, Kevin; Stachel, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    In order to address diamond formation and origin in the lithospheric mantle underlying the Central Slave Craton, we report N- and C-stable isotopic compositions and N-contents and aggregation states for 85 diamonds of known paragenesis (73 peridotitic, 8 eclogitic and 4 from lower mantle) from the Panda kimberlite (Ekati Mine, Lac de Gras Area, Canada). For 12 peridotitic and two eclogitic sulfide inclusion-bearing diamonds from this sample set, we also report multiple-sulfur isotope ratios. The 73 peridotitic diamonds have a mean δ13C-value of - 5.2‰ and range from - 6.9 to - 3.0‰, with one extreme value at - 14.1‰. The associated δ15N-values range from - 17.0 to + 8.5‰ with a mean value of - 4.0‰. N-contents range from 0 to 1280 ppm. The 8 eclogitic diamonds have δ13C-values ranging from - 11.2 to - 4.4‰ with one extreme value at - 19.4‰. Their δ15N ranges from - 2.1 to + 7.9‰ and N-contents fall between 0 and 3452 ppm. Four diamonds with an inferred lower mantle origin are all Type II (i.e. nitrogen-free) and have a narrow range of δ13C values, between - 4.5 and - 3.5‰. The δ34S of the 14 analyzed peridotitic and eclogitic sulfide inclusions ranges from - 3.5 to +5.7‰. None of them provide evidence for anomalous δ33S-values; observed variations in δ33S are from +0.19 to - 0.33‰, i.e. within the 2 sigma uncertainties of mantle sulfur ( δ33S = 0‰). At Panda, the N contents and the δ13C of sulfide-bearing peridotitic diamonds show narrower ranges than silicate-bearing peridotitic diamonds. This evidence supports the earlier suggestion established from eclogitic diamonds from the Kaapvaal that sulfide-(±silicate) bearing diamonds sample a more restricted portion of sublithospheric mantle than silicate-(no sulfide) bearing diamonds. Our findings at Panda suggest that sulfide-bearing diamonds should be considered as a specific diamond population on a global-scale. Based on our study of δ34S, Δ 33S, δ15N and δ13C, we find no

  6. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  7. Understanding garnet variability: Application of geometallurgy to diamonds and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoal, K. O.; Appleby, S. K.; Stammer, J. G.

    2009-05-01

    Peridotitic and eclogitic garnets are a fundamental component in understanding mantle petrology, diamond petrogenesis, and the ascent of mantle materials in kimberlites. They are also critical in exploration programs, as the presence of mantle garnets at the earth's surface provides an indication of dispersion from a deeply derived magmatic carrier. The composition of these garnets further is used as an indicator of diamond prospectivity, on the basis of comparison with garnet compositions known to be in some degree of equilibrium with diamonds. For mantle xenoliths and kimberlites, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis (EPMA), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are the main tools used for understanding key mineralogical and textural variability relationships. Mineralogy and texture reflect diamond genesis, metasomatic alteration, fluid migration and manifestation, volcanological processes, peridotite disaggregation, and other manifestations of mantle processes that are observable, describable, and applicable in exploration and mining. Mineralogy and texture studies lead to further questions that are better addressed by higher resolution chemical analysis of isotopes and rare earth elements, or luminescence. Understanding mineralogical and textural variability is the primary geological input for geometallurgy (geomet), the field integrating the earth sciences with the extractive industries. The framework for geomet encompasses geology, mineralogy, deposit modeling and extraction methods for the optimum value return of resources, and it relies on the fact that the mineralogy and texture of rocks influence subsequent interpretation and downstream applications. Developments in this area have been made possible by the new generation of high-speed SEM-based quantitative mineralogical instruments, enabling the statistical assessment of thousands of grains or particles, or samples, and their application to models for exploration, ore deposits, or geomet

  8. Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    forming substrates such as silicon or molybdenum. Diamond can also be grown on other substrates such as silicon carbide, silicon nitride , mullite...thermal expansion of diamond with several substrate materials. Silicon nitride has a good z 0.010 alumina -,- - 0.006Cm Si, -diamond LJ 0.002 , 0...The authors checked the accuracy of their measurements by performing the measurements on specimens of copper, silver, aluminum, and aluminum nitride

  9. Diamond detector - material science, design and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaowei, Mengjia

    Modern synchrotrons, such as the NSLS-II, will enable unprecedented science by having extremely high brightness and flux with exceptional beam stability. These capabilities create a harsh and demanding environment for measuring the characteristics of the x-ray beam. In many cases, existing measurement techniques fail completely, requiring the development of new detectors which can meet the demands of the synchrotron. The combination of diamond properties ranked diamond an appealing candidate in the field of radiation detection in extreme conditions and it has been used as x-ray sensor material for decades. However, only until the development of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process in the synthesis of diamond that has it been considered for wider applications in the state-of-art synchrotron light sources as part of beamline diagnostics, including the detection of x-ray beam flux and position. While defects and dislocations in CVD grown single crystal diamonds are inevitable, there are solutions in other aspects of a device fabrication to compensate this technological downside, including improving device performance in engineering diamond surface electrode materials and patterns and slicing and polishing diamond plates into thinner pieces. The content of this dissertation summarizes our effort in addressing several problems we encounter in the process of design and fabrication of single crystal CVD diamond based electronic devices. In order to study the generation of post-anneal photoconductive gain in our devices we have discussed in section 3 and 4 the two criteria for the observation of photoconductive current. In section 3 we reveal the correlation between structural defects in diamond and the post-anneal photoconductive regions. Section 4 introduces the measurements of hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) we applied to investigate the diamond-metal Schottky barrier height for several metals and diamond surface terminations. The position of the

  10. The Geopolitical Setting of Conflict Diamonds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    2002-05-01

    ) in the Earth's mantle, are old (about 3 Ga), and are emplaced volcanically into continental crust (cratons), at specific times geologically. Clusters of diamond volcanoes are common throughout the world, and in Africa spill over into several countries. Although there are subtle distinctions in geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of diamondiferous settings globally, these differences decrease within provinces (1000 sq km), and are minor at the district level (10-100 sq km). For diamonds: clear, sharp edged octahedra are typical of Siberia; pink stones are mostly from W. Australia; Cape yellow and blue diamonds occur in South Africa and India; corroded and etched diamonds are prevalent in E. Africa; and fibrous diamonds, once considered the domain of the Congo Republic and Sierra Leone were recently discovered in the non conflict, Slave Province, Canada. These examples are neither craton nor site specific. Is there a non destructive analytical method to uniquivocally identify diamonds regionally, or ideally at a more localized level? The intrinsic approach (vs applied) is challenging because geographical boundaries do not correspond to geological contacts. Spectroscopy, trace elements, isotopes, mineral inclusions, and the conductivities of diamonds show some promise but the overlaps are large. Refinements will evolve and analytical innovations will develop. However, legally acquired conflict diamonds are needed on which to perform basic experiments, establish background levels, and develop a data base for global comparisons. US assistance, UN permission, and funding (e.g. NSF, DOD) are urgently required if this geoscientific initiative is to move forward in stopping the flow of conflict diamonds into the hands of terrorist organizations. We have a scientific obligation to society.

  11. Deep Mantle Fluids Bottled Up in Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Y.; Pearson, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Many mantle xenoliths and mineral inclusions in diamonds reflect refertilisation and enrichment by mantle metasomatism, a key mechanism for controlling abrupt changes in the chemical and physical properties of the continental lithospheric mantle (CLM) globally. However, the nature of the fluids involved can normally only be constrained indirectly from geochemical proxies or calculated using mineral/melt partition coefficients. Direct samples of mantle metasomatic fluids, shielded from any late stage alteration, are encased as microinclusions in fast-growing diamonds - "fibrous diamonds". These trapped high-density fluids (HDFs) provide a unique chemical and physical record for tracing the sources of deep mantle fluids and constraining the processes that shape their nature.Diamond HDFs vary between four major compositional types: saline, silicic and high-Mg plus low-Mg carbonatitic. A strong connection has been established between high-Mg carbonatitic HDFs and a carbonated peridotite source. In addition, the silicic and low-Mg carbonatitic HDFs have been related to hydrous eclogite (±carbonate). However, the compositionally extreme saline fluid endmember remained enigmatic and its source in the deep lithosphere has remained ambiguous. Our new data on fluid-rich diamonds show the geochemical fingerprints of a subducting slab as the source of deep mantle fluids of saline composition. In addition, for the first time, we show that these deep saline fluids are parental, via fluid rock interaction, to in-situ forming carbonatitic and silicic melts in the lithosphere. This model provides a strong platform for resolving the effects of the compositional spectrum of mantle fluids, which alter the deep lithosphere globally and play key roles in diamond formation.

  12. Synthesizing Diamond from Liquid Feedstock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua

    2005-01-01

    other suitable flow controller. When the liquid enters the low-pressure environment inside the chamber, it evaporates to form a vapor mixture of the same chemical composition. In addition to the inlet for the feedstock liquid, the chamber is fitted with an outlet connected to a vacuum pump (not shown) through a throttle valve (also not shown) that is automatically controlled to keep the pressure at or near the required value throughout the deposition process. Inside the chamber, a spiral filament made of tungsten, tantalum, graphite, or other high-melting-temperature material is electrically heated to a temperature >2,000 C high enough to cause dissociation of vapor molecules into the aforementioned radicals. A deposition substrate typically, a diamond-polished silicon wafer about 2.5 cm square is positioned about 2 cm away from the filament. The exact location of the substrate is chosen so that the substrate becomes heated by the filament to a deposition temperature in the approximate range of 800 to 1,000 C.

  13. Noble gases in presolar diamonds I: Three distinct components and their implications for diamond origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, Gary R.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1994-01-01

    High-purity separates of presolar diamond were prepared from 14 primitive chondrites from 7 compositional groups. Their noble gases were measured using stepped pyrolysis. Three distinct noble gas components are present in diamonds, HL, P3, and P6, each of which is found to consist of five noble gases. P3, released between 200 C and 900 C, has a 'planetary' elemental abundance pattern and roughly 'normal' isotopic ratios. HL, consisting of isotopically anomalous Xe-HL and Kr-H, Ar with high Ar-38/Ar-36, and most of the gas making up Ne-A2 and He-A, is released between 1100 C and 1600 C. HL has 'planetary' elemental ratios, except that it has much more He and Ne than other known 'planetary' components. HL gases are carried in the bulk diamonds, not in some trace phase. P6 has a slightly higher median release temperature than HL and is not cleanly separated from HL by stepped pyrolysis. Our data suggest that P6 has roughly 'normal' isotopic compositions and 'planetary' elemental ratios. Both P3 and P6 seem to be isotopically distinct from P1, the dominant 'planetary' noble-gas component in primitive chondrites. Release characteristics suggest that HL and P6 are sited in different carriers within the diamond fractions, while P3 may be sited near the surfaces of the diamonds. We find no evidence of separability of Xe-H and Xe-L or other isotopic variations in the HL component. However, because approximately 10(exp 10) diamonds are required to measure a Xe composition, a lack of isotopic variability does not constrain diamonds to come from a single source. In fact, the high abundance of diamonds in primitive chondrites and the presence of at least three distinct noble-gas components strongly suggest that diamonds originated in many sources. Relative abundances of noble-gas components in diamonds correlate with degree of thermal processing, indicating that all meteorites sampled essentially the same mixture of diamonds. That mixture was probably inherited from the Sun

  14. Cavity-Enhanced Single-Photon Source Based on the Silicon-Vacancy Center in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedikter, Julia; Kaupp, Hanno; Hümmer, Thomas; Liang, Yuejiang; Bommer, Alexander; Becher, Christoph; Krueger, Anke; Smith, Jason M.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Hunger, David

    2017-02-01

    Single-photon sources are an integral part of various quantum technologies, and solid-state quantum emitters at room temperature appear to be a promising implementation. We couple the fluorescence of individual silicon-vacancy centers in nanodiamonds to a tunable optical microcavity to demonstrate a single-photon source with high efficiency, increased emission rate, and improved spectral purity compared to the intrinsic emitter properties. We use a fiber-based microcavity with a mode volume as small as 3.4 λ3 and a quality factor of 1.9 ×1 04 and observe an effective Purcell factor of up to 9.2. Furthermore, we study modifications of the internal rate dynamics and propose a rate model that closely agrees with the measurements. We observe lifetime changes of up to 31%, limited by the finite quantum efficiency of the emitters studied here. With improved materials, our achieved parameters predict single-photon rates beyond 1 GHz.

  15. Electrical Characterization of Diamond/Boron Doped Diamond Nanostructures for Use in Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołuński, Ł.; Zwolski, K.; Płotka, P.

    2016-01-01

    The polycrystalline boron doped diamond (BDD) shows stable electrical properties and high tolerance for harsh environments (e.g. high temperature or aggressive chemical compounds) comparing to other materials used in semiconductor devices. In this study authors have designed electronic devices fabricated from non-intentionally (NiD) films and highly boron doped diamond structures. Presented semiconductor devices consist of highly boron doped structures grown on NiD diamond films. Fabricated structures were analyzed by electrical measurements for use in harsh environment applications. Moreover, the boron-doping level and influence of oxygen content on chemical composition of diamond films were particularly investigated. Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (MW PE CVD) has been used for thin diamond films growth. Non-intentionally doped diamond (0 ppm [B]/[C]) films have been deposited on the Si/SiO2 wafers with different content of carbon, boron and oxygen in the gas phase. Then, the shape of the highly doped diamond structures were obtained by pyrolysis of SiO2 on NiD film and standard lithography process. The highly doped structures were obtained for different growth time and [B]/[C] ratio (4000 - 10000 ppm). The narrowest distance between two highly doped structures was 5pm. The standard Ti/Au ohmic contacts were deposited using physical vapour deposition for electrical characterization of NiD/BDD devices. The influence of diffusion boron from highly doped diamond into non-doped/low-doped diamond film was investigated. Surface morphology of designed structures was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope and optical microscope. The resistivity of the NiD and film was studied using four-point probe measurements also DC studies were done.

  16. FTIR thermochronometry of natural diamonds: A closer look

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Simon C.; Speich, Laura; Smith, Christopher B.; Bulanova, Galina P.

    2016-11-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a commonly-used technique for investigating diamonds, that gives the most useful information if spatially-resolved measurements are used. In this paper we discuss the best way to acquire and present FTIR data from diamonds, using examples from Murowa (Zimbabwe), Argyle (Australia) and Machado River (Brazil). Examples of FTIR core-to-rim line scans, maps with high spatial resolution and maps with high spectral resolution that are fitted to extract the spatial variation of different nitrogen and hydrogen defects are presented. Model mantle residence temperatures are calculated from the concentration of A and B nitrogen-containing defects in the diamonds using known times of annealing in the mantle. A new, two-stage thermal annealing model is presented that better constrains the thermal history of the diamond and that of the mantle lithosphere in which the diamond resided. The effect of heterogeneity within the analysed FTIR volume is quantitatively assessed and errors in model temperatures that can be introduced by studying whole diamonds instead of thin plates are discussed. The spatial distribution of VN3H hydrogen defects associated with the 3107 cm- 1 vibration does not follow the same pattern as nitrogen defects, and an enrichment of VN3H hydrogen at the boundary between pre-existing diamond and diamond overgrowths is observed. There are several possible explanations for this observation including a change in chemical composition of diamond forming fluid during growth or kinetically controlled uptake of hydrogen.

  17. Diamond network: template-free fabrication and properties.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Nianjun; Fu, Haiyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Chun; Huang, Nan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-03-11

    A porous diamond network with three-dimensionally interconnected pores is of technical importance but difficult to be produced. In this contribution, we demonstrate a simple, controllable, and "template-free" approach to fabricate diamond networks. It combines the deposition of diamond/β-SiC nanocomposite film with a wet-chemical selective etching of the β-SiC phase. The porosity of these networks was tuned from 15 to 68%, determined by the ratio of the β-SiC phase in the composite films. The electrochemical working potential and the reactivity of redox probes on the diamond networks are similar to those of a flat nanocrystalline diamond film, while their surface areas are hundreds of times larger than that of a flat diamond film (e.g., 490-fold enhancement for a 3 μm thick diamond network). The marriage of the unprecedented physical/chemical features of diamond with inherent advantages of the porous structure makes the diamond network a potential candidate for various applications such as water treatment, energy conversion (batteries or fuel cells), and storage (capacitors), as well as electrochemical and biochemical sensing.

  18. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  19. Superconductivity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Bauer, E D; Mel'nik, N N; Curro, N J; Thompson, J D; Stishov, S M

    2004-04-01

    Diamond is an electrical insulator well known for its exceptional hardness. It also conducts heat even more effectively than copper, and can withstand very high electric fields. With these physical properties, diamond is attractive for electronic applications, particularly when charge carriers are introduced (by chemical doping) into the system. Boron has one less electron than carbon and, because of its small atomic radius, boron is relatively easily incorporated into diamond; as boron acts as a charge acceptor, the resulting diamond is effectively hole-doped. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond synthesized at high pressure (nearly 100,000 atmospheres) and temperature (2,500-2,800 K). Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and field-dependent resistance measurements show that boron-doped diamond is a bulk, type-II superconductor below the superconducting transition temperature T(c) approximately 4 K; superconductivity survives in a magnetic field up to Hc2(0) > or = 3.5 T. The discovery of superconductivity in diamond-structured carbon suggests that Si and Ge, which also form in the diamond structure, may similarly exhibit superconductivity under the appropriate conditions.

  20. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  1. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  2. A single-crystal diamond-based thermal neutron beam monitor for instruments at pulsed neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Verona Rinati, G.; Verona, C.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2009-11-01

    Single-crystal diamond detectors manufactured through a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) technique are recent technology devices that have been employed in reactor and Tokamak environments in order to detect both thermal and almost monochromatic 14 MeV neutrons produced in deuterium-tritium ( d-t) nuclear fusion reactions. Their robustness and compactness are the key features that can be exploited for different applications as well. Aim of the present experimental investigation is the assessment of the performance of a diamond detector as a thermal neutron beam monitor at pulsed neutron sources. To this aim, a test measurement was carried out on the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Great Britain). The experiment has shown the capability of these devices to work at a pulsed neutron source for beam monitoring purposes. Other interesting possible applications are also suggested.

  3. Rhombic Coulomb diamonds in a single-electron transistor based on an Au nanoparticle chemically anchored at both ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Yasuo; Onuma, Yuto; Sakamoto, Masanori; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Majima, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Rhombic Coulomb diamonds are clearly observed in a chemically anchored Au nanoparticle single-electron transistor. The stability diagrams show stable Coulomb blockade phenomena and agree with the theoretical curve calculated using the orthodox model. The resistances and capacitances of the double-barrier tunneling junctions between the source electrode and the Au core (R1 and C1, respectively), and those between the Au core and the drain electrode (R2 and C2, respectively), are evaluated as 4.5 MΩ, 1.4 aF, 4.8 MΩ, and 1.3 aF, respectively. This is determined by fitting the theoretical curve against the experimental Coulomb staircases. Two-methylene-group short octanedithiols (C8S2) in a C8S2/hexanethiol (C6S) mixed self-assembled monolayer is concluded to chemically anchor the core of the Au nanoparticle at both ends between the electroless-Au-plated nanogap electrodes even when the Au nanoparticle is protected by decanethiol (C10S). This is because the R1 value is identical to that of R2 and corresponds to the tunneling resistances of the octanedithiol chemically bonded with the Au core and the Au electrodes. The dependence of the Coulomb diamond shapes on the tunneling resistance ratio (R1/R2) is also discussed, especially in the case of the rhombic Coulomb diamonds. Rhombic Coulomb diamonds result from chemical anchoring of the core of the Au nanoparticle at both ends between the electroless-Au-plated nanogap electrodes.

  4. Ultrafast quantum nondemolition measurement based on diamond-shaped artificial atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küng, Bruno; Dumur, Etienne; Diniz, Igor; Feofanov, Alexey; Weissl, Thomas; Naud, Cécile; Guichard, Wiebke; Auffèves, Alexia; Buisson, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of a quantum nondemolition readout scheme based on a superconducting artificial atom with two internal degrees of freedom. In comparison with the most widely employed readout scheme for superconducting qubits, the dispersive readout in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, our approach promises a significantly stronger measurement signal. This should allow for a high-fidelity readout in a single shot. Our device consists of two transmons (i.e., small capacitively shunted Josephson junctions) coupled via a large inductance. The resulting circuit exhibits a symmetric and an antisymmetric oscillation which we use as a logical and ancilla qubit, respectively. The Josephson non-linearity leads to a cross-Kerr-like coupling of the two oscillations. This allows us to read out the logical qubit state by measuring the ancilla qubit frequency. To measure the ancilla qubit frequency, we couple it to a superconducting microwave resonator, allowing for a large amplitude and a fast response of the transmitted microwave signal. At the same time, the logical qubit remains weakly coupled and far detuned from the resonator, preventing qubit relaxation due to the Purcell effect.

  5. MoSi2-Base Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2003-01-01

    Addition of 30 to 50 vol% of Si3N4 particulate to MoSi2 eliminated its low temperature catastrophic failure, improved room temperature fracture toughness and the creep resistance. The hybrid composite SCS-6/MoSi2-Si3N4 did not show any matrix cracking and exhibited excellent mechanical and environmental properties. Hi-Nicalon continuous fiber reinforced MoSi2-Si3N4 also showed good strength and toughness. A new MoSi2-base composite containing in-situ whisker-type (Beta)Si3N4 grains in a MoSi2 matrix is also described.

  6. Method and article of manufacture corresponding to a composite comprised of ultra nonacrystalline diamond, metal, and other nanocarbons useful for thermoelectric and other applications

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2010-05-18

    One provides (101) disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered crystallites that are each sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then reacts (102) these crystallites with a metallic component. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also substantially preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material. The reaction process can comprise combining (201) the crystallites with one or more metal salts in an aqueous solution and then heating (203) that aqueous solution to remove the water. This heating can occur in a reducing atmosphere (comprising, for example, hydrogen and/or methane) to also reduce the salt to metal.

  7. Endo-Fullerene and Doped Diamond Nanocrystallite Based Models of Qubits for Solid-State Quantum Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Seongjun; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Models of encapsulated 1/2 nuclear spin H-1 and P-31 atoms in fullerene and diamond nanocrystallite, respectively, are proposed and examined with ab-initio local density functional method for possible applications as single quantum bits (qubits) in solid-state quantum computers. A H-1 atom encapsulated in a fully deuterated fullerene, C(sub 20)D(sub 20), forms the first model system and ab-initio calculation shows that H-1 atom is stable in atomic state at the center of the fullerene with a barrier of about 1 eV to escape. A P-31 atom positioned at the center of a diamond nanocrystallite is the second model system, and 3 1P atom is found to be stable at the substitutional site relative to interstitial sites by 15 eV, Vacancy formation energy is 6 eV in diamond so that substitutional P-31 atom will be stable against diffusion during the formation mechanisms within the nanocrystallite. The coupling between the nuclear spin and weakly bound (valance) donor electron coupling in both systems is found to be suitable for single qubit applications, where as the spatial distributions of (valance) donor electron wave functions are found to be preferentially spread along certain lattice directions facilitating two or more qubit applications. The feasibility of the fabrication pathways for both model solid-state qubit systems within practical quantum computers is discussed with in the context of our proposed solid-state qubits.

  8. Excitation of hypersonic acoustic waves in diamond-based piezoelectric layered structure on the microwave frequencies up to 20GHz.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, B P; Kvashnin, G M; Novoselov, A S; Bormashov, V S; Golovanov, A V; Burkov, S I; Blank, V D

    2017-07-01

    First ultrahigh frequency (UHF) investigation of quality factor Q for the piezoelectric layered structure «Al/(001)AlN/Mo/(100) diamond» has been executed in a broad frequency band from 1 up to 20GHz. The record-breaking Q·f quality parameter up to 2.7·10(14)Hz has been obtained close to 20GHz. Frequency dependence of the form factor m correlated with quality factor has been analyzed by means of computer simulation, and non-monotonic frequency dependence can be explained by proper features of thin-film piezoelectric transducer (TFPT). Excluding the minimal Q magnitudes measured at the frequency points associated with minimal TFPT effectiveness, one can prove a rule of Qf∼f observed for diamond on the frequencies above 1GHz and defined by Landau-Rumer's acoustic attenuation mechanism. Synthetic IIa-type diamond single crystal as a substrate material for High-overtone Bulk Acoustic Resonator (HBAR) possesses some excellent acoustic properties in a wide microwave band and can be successfully applied for design of acoustoelectronic devices, especially the ones operating at a far UHF band. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon and nitrogen isotope systematics in diamond: Different sensitivities to isotopic fractionation or a decoupled origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogberg, K.; Stachel, T.; Stern, R. A.

    2016-11-01

    Using stable isotope data obtained on multiple aliquots of diamonds from worldwide sources, it has been argued that carbon and nitrogen in diamond are decoupled. Here we re-investigate the carbon-nitrogen relationship based on the most comprehensive microbeam data set to date of stable isotopes and nitrogen concentrations in diamonds (n = 94) from a single locality. Our diamond samples, derived from two kimberlites in the Chidliak Field (NE Canada), show large variability in δ13C (- 28.4 ‰ to - 1.1‰, mode at - 5.8‰), δ15N (- 5.8 to + 18.8‰, mode at - 3.0‰) and nitrogen contents ([N]; 3800 to less than 1 at.ppm). In combination, cathodoluminescence imaging and microbeam analyses reveal that the diamonds grew from multiple fluid pulses, with at least one major hiatus documented in some samples that was associated with a resorption event and an abrupt change from low δ13C and [N] to mantle-like δ13C and high [N]. Overall, δ13C appears to be uncorrelated to δ15N and [N] on both the inter- and intra-diamond levels. Co-variations of δ15N-log[N], however, result in at least two parallel, negatively correlated linear arrays, which are also present on the level of the individual diamonds falling on these two trends. These arrays emerge from the two principal data clusters, are characterized by slightly negative and slightly positive δ15N (about - 3 and + 2‰, respectively) and variable but overall high [N]. Using published values for the diamond-fluid nitrogen isotope fractionation factor and nitrogen partition coefficient, these trends are perfectly reproduced by a Rayleigh fractionation model. Overall, three key elements are identified in the formation of the diamond suite studied: (1.) a low δ13C and low [N] component that possibly is directly associated with an eclogitic diamond substrate or introduced during an early stage fluid event. (2.) Repeated influx of a variably nitrogen-rich mantle fluid (mildly negative δ13C and δ15N). (3.) In waning

  10. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke )

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  11. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  12. Crack Formation in Cement-Based Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprince, A.; Pakrastinsh, L.; Vatin, N.

    2016-04-01

    The cracking properties in cement-based composites widely influences mechanical behavior of construction structures. The challenge of present investigation is to evaluate the crack propagation near the crack tip. During experiments the tension strength and crack mouth opening displacement of several types of concrete compositions was determined. For each composition the Compact Tension (CT) specimens were prepared with dimensions 150×150×12 mm. Specimens were subjected to a tensile load. Deformations and crack mouth opening displacement were measured with extensometers. Cracks initiation and propagation were analyzed using a digital image analysis technique. The formation and propagation of the tensile cracks was traced on the surface of the specimens using a high resolution digital camera with 60 mm focal length. Images were captured during testing with a time interval of one second. The obtained experimental curve shows the stages of crack development.

  13. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, A.

    2015-04-01

    With the first three years of the LHC running complete, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with more radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond is one such technology. CVD diamond has been used extensively in beam condition monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. The lessons learned in constructing the ATLAS Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM), Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM) and the CMS Pixel Luminosity Telescope (PLT) all of which are based on CVD diamond with the goal of elucidating the issues that should be addressed for future diamond based detector systems. The first beam test results of prototype diamond devices with 3D detector geometry should further enhance the radiation tolerance of this material.

  14. Repair of dental resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Baur, Veronika; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-03-01

    The study analyzed the reparability and compatibility of light-curing resin-based composites (RBCs) of the categories "microhybrid," "nanohybrid," and "packable." Six RBCs with different matrix and filler formulation--purely methacrylate-based composites (MBCs), ormocer-based composites (OBCs), and silorane-based composites (SBCs)--were used for the specimens. Every material was combined with itself and with the other five RBCs, resulting in a total of 36 combination groups (n = 20). The specimens were polymerized, aged for 8 weeks in distilled water at 37 °C, and then repaired by means of a repair kit. Shear bond strength and fracture mode were measured after aging of the specimens, undergoing storage for 24 h in distilled water at 37 °C followed by thermocycling (5,000 cycles, 5-55 °C) and an additional 4-week storage in distilled water at 37 °C. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA with TUKEY HSD post hoc test (α = 0.05). On average, the OBC Admira reached the highest value as a substrate material (30.41 MPa), and the SBC Filtek Silorane reached the lowest value (8.14 MPa). Filtek Silorane was identified as the repair material with the highest bond strength value (28.70 MPa), while a packable composite reached the lowest bond strength value (15.55 MPa). The analysis of the break modes showed that adhesive breaks are typical when strength is at its lowest (6.27 MPa). A large number of cohesive fractures are conspicuous when identical materials are used for repair, except Filtek Silorane (2 % cohesive fractures). The study demonstrated that the effect of the different materials on bond strength varies strongly, depending on whether the material is used as filling or as repair material. It is generally advisable but not compulsory to combine identical RBCs.

  15. Grade-tonnage and other models for diamond kimberlite pipes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bliss, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Grade-tonnage and other quantitative models help give reasonable answers to questions about diamond kimberlite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes are those diamondiferous kimberlite pipes that either have been worked or are expected to be worked for diamonds. These models are not applicable to kimberlite dikes and sills or to lamproite pipes. Diamond kimberlite pipes contain a median 26 million metric tons (mt); the median diamond grade is 0.25 carat/metric ton (ct/mt). Deposit-specific models suggest that the median of the average diamond size is 0.07 ct and the median percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality is 67 percent. The percentage of diamonds that are industrial quality can be predicted from deposit grade using a regression model (log[industrial diamonds (percent)]=1.9+0.2 log[grade (ct/mt)]). The largest diamond in a diamond kimberlite pipe can be predicted from deposit tonnage using a regression model (log[largest diamond (ct)]=-1.5+0.54 log[size (mt]). The median outcrop area of diamond pipes is 12 hectares (ha). Because the pipes have similar forms, the tonnage of the deposits can be predicted by the outcrop area (log[size (mt)]=6.5+1.0 log[outcrop area (ha)]). Once a kimberlite pipe is identified, the probability is approximately .005 that it can be worked for diamonds. If a newly discovered pipe is a member of a cluster that contains a known diamond kimberlite pipe, the probability that the new discovery can be mined for diamonds is 56 times that for a newly discovered kimberlite pipe in a cluster without a diamond kimberlite pipe. About 30 percent of pipes with worked residual caps at the surface will be worked at depth. Based on the number of discovered deposits and the area of stable craton rocks thought to be well explored in South Africa, about 10-5 diamond kimberlite pipes are present per square kilometer. If this density is applicable to the South American Precambrian Shield, more than 70 undiscovered kimberlite pipes are predicted to

  16. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called ;headless; diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  17. Thickness measurement of sample in diamond anvil cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Gao, Chunxiao; Peng, Gang; He, Chunyuan; Hao, Aimin; Huang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dongmei; Yu, Cuiling; Ma, Yanzhang; Zou, Guangtian

    2007-07-01

    We report on an original method that measures sample thickness in a diamond anvil cell under high pressures. The method is based on two hypotheses: completely plastic deformation on the gasket and completely elastic deformation of the diamonds. This method can further eliminate the effect of diamond deformation on the thickness measurement of a sample, which permits us to measure the thickness of alumina up to 41.4 GPa.

  18. Electro-oxidation of methanol and ethanol using a Pt-RuO 2/C composite prepared by the sol-gel technique and supported on boron-doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffredini, H. B.; Tricoli, V.; Vatistas, N.; Avaca, L. A.

    A detailed description of the preparation, characterization and electrochemical performance towards methanol and ethanol oxidation in acid medium of a platinum-ruthenium oxide carbon powder composite is presented here. The composite was prepared by the sol-gel technique and fixed on the surface of a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. The physical characterization by XRD and EDX revealed the crystalline nature of the catalysts particles having an average size of 7.2 nm and a mass ratio of practically 1:1 for Pt and Ru, in accordance with the preparation conditions. Initial electrochemical experiments using also glassy carbon as the substrate for the composite showed that BDD has a superior performance, probably related to the very low capacitive currents of that material. The oxidation of methanol and ethanol in H 2SO 4 solutions was studied by cyclic voltammetry, Tafel plots and chronoamperometry and the results were compared to those obtained using a commercial Pt/C powder composite under the same conditions. In all cases, the Pt-RuO 2/C composite showed larger anodic current densities and increased stability than the other material thus confirming the suitability of the simple and straightforward preparation technique for the catalysts.

  19. Magnetically Orchestrated Formation of Diamond at Lower Temperatures and Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Reginald B.; Lochner, Eric; Goddard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Man's curiosity and fascination with diamonds date back to ancient times. The knowledge of the many properties of diamond is recorded during Biblical times. Antoine Lavoisier determined the composition of diamond by burning in O2 to form CO2. With the then existing awareness of graphite as carbon, the race began to convert graphite to diamond. The selective chemical synthesis of diamond has been pursued by Cagniard, Hannay, Moisson and Parson. On the basis of the thermodynamically predicted equilibrium line of diamond and graphite, P W Bridgman attempted extraordinary conditions of high temperature (>2200°C) and pressure (>100,000 atm) for the allotropic conversion of graphite to diamond. H T Hall was the first to successfully form bulk diamond by realizing the kinetic restrictions to Bridgman's (thermodynamic) high pressure high temperature direct allotropic conversion. Moreover, Hall identified catalysts for the faster kinetics of diamond formation. H M Strong determined the import of the liquid catalyst during Hall's catalytic synthesis. W G Eversole discovered the slow metastable low pressure diamond formation by pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition with the molecular hydrogen etching of the rapidly forming stable graphitic carbon. J C Angus determined the import of atomic hydrogen for faster etching for faster diamond growth at low pressure. S Matsumoto has developed plasma and hot filament technology for faster hydrogen and carbon radical generations at low pressure for faster diamond formation. However the metastable low pressure chemical vapor depositions by plasma and hot filament are prone to polycrystalline films. From Bridgman to Hall to Eversole, Angus and Matsumoto, much knowledge has developed of the importance of pressure, temperature, transition metal catalyst, liquid state of metal (metal radicals atoms) and the carbon radical intermediates for diamond synthesis. Here we advance this understanding of diamond formation by demonstrating the external

  20. The Petrography of Meteoritic Nano-Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    At least some meteoritic nanodiamonds are likely of presolar origin because of their association with anomalous Xe-HL and Te isotopic components indicative of a supernova (SN) origin. But the abundance of Xe is such that only approx. 1 in 10(exp 6) nano-diamonds contains a Xe atom, and the bulk C-13/C-12 composition of nano-diamond acid residues is chondritic (solar). Therefore, it is possible that a significant fraction of meteoritic nano-diamonds formed within the solar nebula. Nano-diamonds have recently been detected for the first time within the accretion discs of young stars by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). No comparable evidence of nanodiamonds in the interstellar medium has yet been found. We have identified nano-diamonds in acid etched thin-sections of meteorites, polar micrometeorites, and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with the goal of determining their distribution as a function of heliocentric distance. (It is assumed the meteorites and the polar micrometeorites are from asteroids at 2-4 AU and at least some of the IDPs are from comets at >50AU). We found that nano-diamonds are heterogeneously distributed throughout carbon-rich meteoritic materials (we identified them in some IDPs and not in others), and that their abundance may actually decrease with heliocentric distance, consistent with the hypothesis that some of them formed within the inner solar system and not in a presolar (SN) environment. In order to gain further insight about the origins of meteoritic nano-diamonds we are currently investigating their distribution in unetched thin-sections. We have examined a chondritic cluster IDP (U220GCA), fragments of the Tagish Lake (CM1) meteorite, and a SN graphite spherule (KE3d8) isolated from the Murchison (CM) meteorite. We selected U220GCA because its nano-diamond abundance (in acid etched thin-sections) appears to be as much as approx. 10X higher than in Murchison matrix, Tagish Lake because it has a higher reported nano-diamond

  1. The Petrography of Meteoritic Nano-Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Z. R.; Bradley, J. P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Joswiak, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    At least some meteoritic nanodiamonds are likely of presolar origin because of their association with anomalous Xe-HL and Te isotopic components indicative of a supernova (SN) origin. But the abundance of Xe is such that only approx. 1 in 10(exp 6) nano-diamonds contains a Xe atom, and the bulk C-13/C-12 composition of nano-diamond acid residues is chondritic (solar). Therefore, it is possible that a significant fraction of meteoritic nano-diamonds formed within the solar nebula. Nano-diamonds have recently been detected for the first time within the accretion discs of young stars by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). No comparable evidence of nanodiamonds in the interstellar medium has yet been found. We have identified nano-diamonds in acid etched thin-sections of meteorites, polar micrometeorites, and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with the goal of determining their distribution as a function of heliocentric distance. (It is assumed the meteorites and the polar micrometeorites are from asteroids at 2-4 AU and at least some of the IDPs are from comets at >50AU). We found that nano-diamonds are heterogeneously distributed throughout carbon-rich meteoritic materials (we identified them in some IDPs and not in others), and that their abundance may actually decrease with heliocentric distance, consistent with the hypothesis that some of them formed within the inner solar system and not in a presolar (SN) environment. In order to gain further insight about the origins of meteoritic nano-diamonds we are currently investigating their distribution in unetched thin-sections. We have examined a chondritic cluster IDP (U220GCA), fragments of the Tagish Lake (CM1) meteorite, and a SN graphite spherule (KE3d8) isolated from the Murchison (CM) meteorite. We selected U220GCA because its nano-diamond abundance (in acid etched thin-sections) appears to be as much as approx. 10X higher than in Murchison matrix, Tagish Lake because it has a higher reported nano-diamond

  2. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  3. Orapa Diamond Mine, Botswana

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-16

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the Orapa diamond mine, the world largest diamond mine by area. The mine is located in Botswana. It is the oldest of four mines operated by the same company, having begun operations in 1971. Orapa is an open pit style of mine, located on two kimberlite pipes. Currently, the Orapa mine annually produces approximately 11 million carats (2200 kg) of diamonds. The Letlhakane diamond mine is also an open pit construction. In 2003, the Letlhakane mine produced 1.06 million carats of diamonds. The Damtshaa diamond mine is the newest of four mines, located on top of four distinct kimberlite pipes of varying ore grade. The mine is forecast to produce about 5 million carats of diamond over the projected 31 year life of the mine. The image was acquired October 5, 2014, covers an area of 28 by 45 km, and is located at 21.3 degrees south, 25.4 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20104

  4. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  5. Using chemical vapor deposition diamond finishing burs for conservative esthetic procedures.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Runnacles, Patricio; Pirolo, Rodrigo; Zielak, Joao Cesar

    2013-07-01

    The article demonstrates how chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond burs were used in a simple esthetic and cosmetic procedure to treat discolored anterior teeth. A patient who experienced discoloration after bleaching was treated with direct resin composite veneers. Excess restorative material close to the periodontium was removed with a CVD diamond bur attached to an ultrasonic handpiece. The results indicate that CVD diamond burs are appropriate for removing excess material at the gingival margins of resin composite restorations without damaging the periodontium.

  6. Single crystal diamond detector for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirru, F.; Kisielewicz, K.; Nowak, T.; Marczewska, B.

    2010-07-01

    The new generation of synthetic diamonds grown as a CVD single crystal on a high pressure high temperature substrate offers a wide range of applications. In particular, because of the near tissue equivalence and its small size (good spatial resolution), CVD single crystal diamond finds applicability in radiotherapy as a dosemeter of ionizing radiation. In this paper we report the electrical and dosimetric properties of a new diamond detector which was fabricated at IFJ based on a single crystal detector-grade CVD diamond provided with a novel contact metallization. Diamond properties were assessed at IFJ using a Theratron 680E therapeutic 60Co gamma rays unit and at COOK with 6 and 18 MV x-rays Varian Clinac CL2300 C/D accelerator. The new dosemeter showed high electric and dosimetric performances: low value of dark current, high current at the level of some nanoamperes during irradiation, very fast dynamic response with a rise time amounting to parts of a second, good stability and repeatability of the current and linearity of the detector signal at different dose and dose rate levels typically applied in radiotherapy. The results confirm the potential applicability of diamond material as a dosemeter for applications in radiotherapy.

  7. Cancer treatment with nano-diamonds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan; Gupta, Sneh

    2017-01-01

    Diamond nano-particles find new and far-reaching applications in modern biomedical science and biotechnologies. Due to its excellent biocompatibility, nano-diamonds serve as versatile platforms that can be embedded within polymer-based microfilm devices. Nano-diamonds are complexed with a chemotherapeutic that enables sustained/slow release of the drug for a minimum of one month, with a significant amount of drug in reserve. This opens up the potential for highly localized drug release as a complementary and potent form of treatment with systemic injection towards the reduction of continuous dosing, and as such, attenuation of the often powerful side effects of chemotherapy. Nano-diamonds are quite economical, enabling the broad impact of these devices towards a spectrum of physiological disorders e.g. serving as a local chemotherapeutic patch, or as a pericardial device to suppress inflammation after open heart surgery. Nano-diamond patch could be used to treat a localized region where residual cancer cells might remain after a tumor is removed. Nano-diamonds can be used to explore a broad range of therapeutic classes, including additional small molecules, proteins, therapeutic antibodies, RNAi.

  8. Conditions of origin of natural diamonds of peridotite affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, F. R.; Finnerty, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    Studies of mineral inclusions in natural diamonds and rare diamondiferous xenoliths from kimberlites show that most diamonds are associated with a dunite or harzburgite paragenesis. The diamondiferous periodites and dunites have predominantly coarse or tabular textures that suggest low-temperature (less than 1100 C) equilibration. Application of the K(D) Fe/Mg(Ga/Ol) geothermometer of O'Neill and Wood to analytical data for the minerals in these rocks shows that most have equilibrated below 1100 C. Application of this thermometer to pairs of olivine and garnet crystals included in individual diamonds indicates that the diamonds have crystallized in the range 900-1300 C, with a majority of estimated equilibration temperatures falling in the range below 1150 C. Comparison of these estimates of equilibration temperature with the zone of invariant vapor composition solidus for kimberlite and garnet lherzolite determined by Eggler and Wendlandt (1979) suggests that many diamonds may have formed in subsolidus events.

  9. Diamond heat sinks for electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chou H.

    During the interim stage of this Phase 1 R and D, a useful metallizing procedure for bulk diamond has been developed, with natural diamond chips, granules, and polished wafers from two vendors. Small-scale statistical experiments were designed and executed by systematically varying several material and processing variables including: metallizing and brazing compositions, processing temperature and time, ambient control, and other procedural changes. Under selected combinations of these variables, metallizing of these diamond samples was achieved. Surface wetting appears to be excellent. The metallized surfaces were brazed or soldered to metal for future heat sink uses in high-power electronic circuits. These results clearly demonstrate the proof of the principle that is our main objective in Phase 1. The remainder of the Phase 1 work will be directed to metallizing and brazing polished diamond wafers to metal (copper and/or Kovar) substrates; detailed sample characterization including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microstructural and microprobing analyses; thermal conductance measurements of mounted diamond wafers; and analyzing all results for the final report.

  10. Fluid inclusions in Ebelyakh diamonds: Evidence of CO2 liberation in eclogite and the effect of H2O on diamond habit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Kopylova, Maya G.; Frezzotti, Maria Luce; Afanasiev, Valentin P.

    2015-02-01

    Fluid inclusions were studied in six octahedrally-grown, eclogitic diamonds from the Ebelyakh River mine, northern Russia, using microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy. The fluids are CO2-N2 mixtures with 40 ± 4 mol% N2, which are trapped along fractures that healed in the diamond stability field. The CO2-rich composition of the fluids provides the first empirical evidence that CO2 can be liberated as a free phase in eclogite in the diamond stability field of the lithospheric mantle, as has been previously predicted from theory. This finding means that the interpretation of carbon isotopes in eclogitic diamonds should not overlook isotopic fractionation due to CO2 liberation from carbonatitic diamond-forming media as it percolates through eclogites. Preferential nucleation of CO2 bubbles in eclogite compared to peridotite may lead to a rock type-specific fracturing mechanism and sampling bias that would help explain the overabundance of eclogite xenoliths in kimberlites. Fluid inclusions in octahedrally-grown, non-fibrous diamonds from both the studied Ebelyakh diamonds and those from other cratons do not show detectable amounts of water. In comparison, fibrous diamond fluid inclusions typically contain 10-25 wt.% water. The absence of "dry" fluids in fibrous diamonds and the presence of these in octahedrally-grown diamonds may indicate different compositions of fluids equilibrated with these two types of diamonds. If there is variability in the water content in diamond-forming fluids, it should affect diamond growth morphology. Water could be responsible for causing fibrous diamond growth, by inhibiting the advancement of growth steps within octahedral faces.

  11. Multimode model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Gregory, E.

    2016-02-01

    A newly-initiated research program for model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites is summarized. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing delamination and porosity. Forward predictions of measurement response are presented, as well as examples of model-based inversion of measured data for the estimation of defect parameters.

  12. Characterization of diamond thin films: Diamond phase identification, surface morphology, and defect structures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, B.E.; Glass, J.T.

    1989-03-01

    Thin carbon films grown from a low pressure methane-hydrogen gas mixture by microwave plasma enhanced CVD have been examined by Auger electron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron and x-ray diffraction, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. They were determined to be similar to natural diamond in terms of composition, structure, and bonding. The surface morphology of the diamond films was a function of position on the sample surface and the methane concentration in the feedgas. Well-faceted diamond crystals were observed near the center of the sample whereas a less faceted, cauliflower texture was observed near the edge of the sample, presumably due to variations in temperature across the surface of the sample. Regarding methane concentration effects, threefold /111/ faceted diamond crystals were predominant on a film grown at 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while fourfold /100/ facets were observed on films grown in 1.0% and 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/. Transmission electron microscopy of the diamond films has shown that the majority of diamond crystals have a very high defect density comprised of /111/ twins, /111/ stacking faults, and dislocations. In addition, cross-sectional TEM has revealed a 50 A epitaxial layer of ..beta..--SiC at the diamond-silicon interface of a film grown with 0.3% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/ while no such layer was observed on a diamond film grown in 2.0% CH/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/.

  13. Radiation-induced diamond crystallization: Origin of carbonados and its implications on meteorite nano-diamonds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ozima, M.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1997-01-01

    Ten carbonados from Central Africa were studied for U-Th-Pb systematics. To extract U, Th, and Pb from the samples, we developed a cold combustion technique wherein diamond was burnt in liquid oxygen. The technique gave low blanks; 25-50 pg for Pb, 3 pg for U, and 5 pg for Th. After very thorough acid treatments of the carbonados with hot HNO3, HF, and HCl over one week, most of U, Th, and Pb were removed from the samples. Lead in the acid-leached diamonds was highly radiogenic (206Pb/204Pb up to 470). However, the amounts of U and Th in the acid-leached diamonds are too low to account for the radiogenic Pb even if we assume 4.5 Ga for the age of the diamonds. Therefore, we conclude that the radiogenic Pb was implanted into the diamonds from surroundings by means of recoil energy of radioactive decays of U and Th. From the radiogenic lead isotopic composition, we estimate a minimum age of 2.6 Ga and a maximum age of 3.8 Ga for the formation of the carbonados. The above findings of the implantation of recoiled radiogenic Pb into carbonados is consistent with the process of radiation-induced crystallization which was proposed for carbonado by Kaminsky (1987). We show from some theoretical considerations that when highly energetic particles, such as those emitted from radioactive decay of U and Th, interact with carbonaceous materials, they give rise to cascades of atomic disturbance (over regions of about a few nanometer), and the disturbed atoms are likely to recrystallize to form micro-diamonds because of increasing surface energy due to small size. The radiation-induced diamond formation mechanism may be relevant to the origin of nano-diamonds in primitive meteorites. Copyright ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  14. Diamond of Possibly Metallurgical and Seismic Origin: PART 3: Additional Specimens and a Proposal Calling for adjusted Methodologies for Diamondism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giamn, M.

    2007-05-01

    Per Giamn [1,2,3], additional or potential specimens have been sought after. Examination was made of known specimens located in the proximity of iron ores, a number with template-like or proportionate (the larger bodies of diamond associated with the larger bodies of iron)arrangements.An exercise was made to illustrate my theory by utilizing a hypothetical iron ore in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, respectively, which is seismically induced by recent real seismic events into diamond-bearing. If I were to suggest that the study of a number of major phases, for instance the olivines, pyroxenes, feldspars, oxides, sulfides, be based upon data of small (the top 1 of 1,000,000) number of large sized grains only and from limited geographical regions, ages, modes of occurrence only, I would be confronted with (i) enormous opposition since such methodology would impede mineralogy, which is a form of generally specimen-based science; and questions of (ii) what the purposes may be in such a deviantly unusual pursuit? What is being achieved by knowing omission of the majority of specimen population? (iii) A simpler and fairer solution is not unavailable. (iv) What is wrong with underaddressed average and small sized grains especially most of them workable with current analytical instruments except those extremely fine grained; (v) Placing greater importance to grains of lager economic value is historically common among the most topical economic minerals, yet not necessary. For instance, the platinum group elements (PGE)is pluralistic. Research of PGE has been a rigorous institution based not solely upon ingot-sized grains; (vi) Is this not a clear manifestation of prejudice and misrepresentation, endemic blind excessive blatant sensationalism and objectification of basic science? There is no rational basis. Yet the knowledge of diamond is based primarily upon a small number of morbidly obese specimens irrepresentative of the real diamond population. A realistic

  15. Temperature-dependent current-voltage characteristics and ultraviolet light detection of heterojunction diodes comprising n-type ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films and p-type silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    Heterojunction diodes comprising poorly (1 at. %) nitrogen-doped n-type ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite (UNCD/a-C:H) films and p-type Si substrates were prepared in nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gas atmosphere by coaxial arc plasma deposition. Dark current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics were studied in the temperature range of 200-400 K, in order to investigate the current transport mechanism through the fabricated heterojunctions. The temperature dependence of the ideality factor and reverse saturation current reveals that carrier transport predominantly occurs in the generation-recombination mechanism and, at low temperatures, it accompanies tunneling via weak traps. The heterojunctions surely exhibited photodetection for 254 nm ultraviolet light illumination. It is expected that photocarriers will be generated at UNCD grains and transported through an a-C:H matrix.

  16. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  17. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  18. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ... to stand out prominently by taking advantage of the strong change in brightness between the two view angles and the contrasting angular ...

  19. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  20. Quantum engineering: Diamond envy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen atoms trapped tens of nanometres apart in diamond can now be linked by quantum entanglement. This ability to produce and control entanglement in solid systems could enable powerful quantum computers.

  1. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  2. Fabrication of diamond shells

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  3. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanchao; Peng, Jinghui; Xu, Lei; Srinivasakannan, C.; Zhang, Libo; Xia, Yi; Wu, Qingtian; Xia, Hongying

    2016-12-01

    Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  4. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    that will allow their subcontractual work to impact the goals of the RTI prime contract in a timely fashion. As part of this process , new work statements...extremely low temperature diamond growth (250 - 300’C). Another example of where low temperature processing would be indispensable would be for...a low temperature process to preserve the cubic carbide and propagate the diamond. It is now clearly evident that water plays a pivotal role in low

  5. Diamond Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    thermal stresses of 10 million Watts per meter, 1,000 times better than Zerodur *. This property is also important for many thermal management...products UTD has coated to date include: • Optical windows, lenses, and mirrors . Zinc sulfide infrared windows coated with a 2.5 micron-thick...implants 16, 49 microwave plasma-enhanced CVD 2 mirrors , diamond-coated 49 models of diamond growth 10, 25, 33, 34, 39 moderators 10

  6. Experimental study of diamond resorption during mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorchuk, Yana; Schmidt, Max W.; Liebske, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Many of kimberlite-derived diamonds are partially dissolved to various degree but show similar resorption style. This resorption style has been observed in experiments with aqueous fluid at the conditions corresponding to kimberlite emplacement (1-2 GPa). At the same time, each diamond population has more than ten percent of diamond crystals with several drastically different resorption styles, which have not been observed in experiments, and may represent partial dissolution of diamonds during metasomatism in different mantle domains. Metasomatic processes modify the composition of subcratonic mantle, may trigger the formation of kimberlite magma, and result in the growth and partial dissolution of diamonds. Composition of metasomatic agents as constrained from studies of the reaction rims on mantle minerals (garnet, clinopyroxene) and experimental studies vary between carbonatitic melt, aqueous silicate melt, and CHO fluid. However, complex chemical pattern of mantle minerals and estimates of redox regime in subcratonic mantle allow different interpretations. Here we explore diamond dissolution morphology as an indicator of the composition of mantle metasomatic agents. Towards this end we examine diamond dissolution morphologies developed in experiments at the conditions of mantle metasomatism in different reacting media and compare them to the mantle-derived dissolution features of natural diamonds. The experiments were conducted in multi-anvil (Walker-Type) apparatus at 6 GPa and 1200-1500oC. Dissolution morphology of natural octahedral diamond crystals (0.5 mg) was examined in various compositions in synthetic system MgO-CaO- SiO2-CO2-H2O. The runs had the following phases present: solid crystals with fluid (various ratio of H2O-CO2-SiO2, and in the air), carbonate melt, carbonate-silicate melt, and carbonate melt with CHO fluid. Experiments produced three different styles of diamond resorption. In the presence of a fluid phase with variable proportions of H2O

  7. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  8. Mineral inclusions in diamonds may be synchronous but not syngenetic

    PubMed Central

    Nestola, Fabrizio; Jung, Haemyeong; Taylor, Lawrence A.<