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Sample records for diamond lattice antiferromagnetic

  1. Kinetically Inhibited Order in a Diamond-Lattice Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Gregory J; Gout, Delphine J; Zarestky, Jerel L; Ehlers, Georg; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; McGuire, Michael A; Mandrus, David; Nagler, Stephen E

    2011-01-01

    Frustrated magnetic systems exhibit highly degenerate ground states and strong fluctuations, often leading to new physics. An intriguing example of current interest is the antiferromagnet on a diamond lattice, realized physically in the A-site spinel materials. This is a prototypical system in three dimensions where frustration arises from competing interactions rather than purely geometric constraints, and theory suggests the possibility of novel order at low temperature. Here we present a comprehensive single crystal neutron scattering study CoAl2O4, a highly frustrated A-site spinel. We observe strong diffuse scattering that peaks at wavevectors associated with Neel ordering. Below the temperature T*=6.5K, there is a dramatic change in elastic scattering lineshape accompanied by the emergence of well-defined spin-wave excitations. T* had previously been associated with the onset of glassy behavior. Our new results suggest instead that in fact T* signifies a first-order phase transition, but with true long-range order inhibited by the kinetic freezing of domain walls. This scenario might be expected to occur widely in frustrated systems containing first-order phase transitions and is a natural explanation for existing reports of anomalous glassy behavior in other materials.

  2. Ground States of Spin-1/2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnets with Frustration on a Diamond-Like-Decorated Square Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Yuhei; Oguchi, Akihide; Fukumoto, Yoshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    We study the ground-state phase diagram of a Heisenberg model with spin S = 1/2 on a diamond-like-decorated square lattice. A diamond unit has two types of antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, and the ratio λ of the length of the diagonal bond to that of the other four edges determines the strength of frustration. It has been pointed out [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn 85, 033705 (2016)] that the so-called tetramer-dimer states, which are expected to be stabilized in an intermediate region of λc < λ < 2, are identical to the square-lattice dimer-covering states, which ignited renewed interest in high-dimensional diamond-like-decorated lattices. In order to determine the phase boundary λc, we employ the modified spin wave method to estimate the energy of the ferrimagnetic state and obtain λc = 0.974. Furthermore, our numerical diagonalization study suggests that other cluster states do not appear in the ground-state phase diagram.

  3. Kinetic antiferromagnetism in the triangular lattice.

    PubMed

    Haerter, Jan O; Shastry, B Sriram

    2005-08-19

    We show that the motion of a single hole in the infinite-U Hubbard model with frustrated hopping leads to weak metallic antiferromagnetism of kinetic origin. An intimate relationship is demonstrated between the simplest versions of this problem in one and two dimensions, and two of the most subtle many body problems, namely, the Heisenberg Bethe ring in one dimension and the two-dimensional triangular lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  4. Ising antiferromagnet on the Archimedean lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2015-06-01

    Geometric frustration effects were studied systematically with the Ising antiferromagnet on the 11 Archimedean lattices using the Monte Carlo methods. The Wang-Landau algorithm for static properties (specific heat and residual entropy) and the Metropolis algorithm for a freezing order parameter were adopted. The exact residual entropy was also found. Based on the degree of frustration and dynamic properties, ground states of them were determined. The Shastry-Sutherland lattice and the trellis lattice are weakly frustrated and have two- and one-dimensional long-range-ordered ground states, respectively. The bounce, maple-leaf, and star lattices have the spin ice phase. The spin liquid phase appears in the triangular and kagome lattices.

  5. Ising antiferromagnet on the 2-uniform lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Unjong

    2016-08-01

    The antiferromagnetic Ising model is investigated on the twenty 2-uniform lattices using the Monte Carlo method based on the Wang-Landau algorithm and the Metropolis algorithm to study the geometric frustration effect systematically. Based on the specific heat, the residual entropy, and the Edwards-Anderson freezing order parameter, the ground states of them were determined. In addition to the long-range-ordered phase and the spin ice phase found in the Archimedean lattices, two more phases were found. The partial long-range order is long-range order with exceptional disordered sites, which give extensive residual entropy. In the partial spin ice phase, the partial freezing phenomenon appears: A majority of sites are frozen without long-range order, but the other sites are fluctuating even at zero temperature. The spin liquid ground state was not found in the 2-uniform lattices.

  6. Supersymmetry protected topological phases of isostatic lattices and kagome antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, Michael J.

    2016-10-01

    I generalize the theory of phonon topological band structures of isostatic lattices to frustrated antiferromagnets. I achieve this with a discovery of a many-body supersymmetry (SUSY) in the phonon problem of balls and springs and its connection to local constraints satisfied by ground states. The Witten index of the SUSY model demands the Maxwell-Calladine index of mechanical structures. "Spontaneous supersymmetry breaking" is identified as the need to gap all modes in the bulk to create the topological isostatic lattice state. Since ground states of magnetic systems also satisfy local constraint conditions (such as the vanishing of the total spin on a triangle), I identify a similar SUSY structure for many common models of antiferromagnets including the square, triangluar, kagome, pyrochlore nearest-neighbor antiferromagnets, and the J2=J1/2 square-lattice antiferromagnet. Remarkably, the kagome family of antiferromagnets is the analog of topological isostatic lattices among this collection of models. Thus, a solid-state realization of the theory of phonon topological band structure may be found in frustrated magnetic materials.

  7. Breakdown of antiferromagnetism and the Coulomb phase for RVB states on anisotropic three-dimensional lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beach, K. S. D.

    2015-03-01

    Nearest-neighbor (NN) resonating-valence-bond (RVB) wave functions often serve as prototype ground states for various frustrated models in two dimensions because of their lack of long-range magnetic correlations. In three dimensions, these states are generally not featureless, and their tendency is toward antiferromagnetic order. On the cubic and diamond lattices, for example, the NN RVB state exhibits both antiferromagnetism and power law dimer correlations characteristic of the ``Coulomb phase'' (in analogy with classical hardcore dimer models). The introduction of strong spatial anisotropy, however, leads to the destruction of these long-range and algebraic correlations, leaving behind an apparent short-range spin liquid state. We characterize the critical exponents at the phase boundaries for wave functions built from products of SU(2) singlets as well as their SU(N) generalizations and discuss attempts to construct a field theory that describes the transitions.

  8. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Piazza, B.; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, N. B.; Nilsen, G. J.; Tregenna-Piggott, P.; Perring, T. G.; Enderle, M.; McMorrow, D. F.; Ivanov, D. A.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum magnets have occupied the fertile ground between many-body theory and low-temperature experiments on real materials since the early days of quantum mechanics. However, our understanding of even deceptively simple systems of interacting spin-1/2 particles is far from complete. The quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, for example, exhibits a striking anomaly of hitherto unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. This quantum effect manifests itself for excitations propagating with the specific wavevector (π, 0). We use polarized neutron spectroscopy to fully characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound Cu(DCOO)2.4D2O, a known realization of the quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet model. Our experiments reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller-projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially extended pairs of fractional S = 1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wavevector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Our results establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration.

  9. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-24

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2,1/2,1/2) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  10. Spin-Lattice-Coupled Order in Heisenberg Antiferromagnets on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Kazushi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-06-01

    Effects of local lattice distortions on the spin ordering are investigated for the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on the pyrochlore lattice. It is found by Monte Carlo simulations that the spin-lattice coupling (SLC) originating from site phonons induces a first-order transition into two different types of collinear magnetic ordered states. The state realized at the stronger SLC is cubic symmetric characterized by the magnetic (1/2 ,1/2 ,1/2 ) Bragg peaks, while that at the weaker SLC is tetragonal symmetric characterized by the (1,1,0) ones, each accompanied by the commensurate local lattice distortions. Experimental implications to chromium spinels are discussed.

  11. Antiferromagnetic magnons in diluted triangular and Kagome lattices (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.L. ); Ching, W.Y. )

    1993-05-15

    Numerical results are presented for the local field distribution and the distribution of linearized magnon modes in diluted triangular and Kagome lattices. A nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian is assumed, and the linearization is carried out with respect to classical ground states obtained by means of an energy minimization algorithm.[sup 1] In the case of the triangular lattice, the density of states associated with a 20% vacancy concentration is used to calculate the magnon contribution to the specific heat. With an exchange integral inferred from the Curie--Weiss constant, quantitative agreement is obtained with the experimental results for La[sub 0.2]Gd[sub 0.8]CuO[sub 2] reported by Ramirez [ital et] [ital al].[sup 2] over the interval 0.1 K[le][ital T][le]0.2 K. The behavior of the diluted Kagome lattice is compared with that of the triangular array. In contrast to the latter, the local fields in the diluted Kagome lattice take on the discrete values 2[ital JS], [ital JS], and 0. In the case of a 14% vacancy concentration, the distribution of magnon modes resembles that of the fully occupied array with a noncoplanar ground state. The relevance of these results to the behavior of SrCr[sub 8]Ga[sub 4]O[sub 19] is discussed.[sup 3

  12. Mechanical Properties of Laser-Sintered-Nylon Diamond Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Clayton

    Additive manufacturing offers a manufacturing technique to produce complex geometry prototypes at a rapid pace and low cost. These advantages advocate additive manufacturing for the design and production of cellular structures. Cellular structures are interesting because they contain a large amount of porosity (void space of air) to manifest a lightweight structure. Designs of cellular structures generate a periodic pattern; often of complex geometry, called a lattice. There has been a significant amount of research to maximize specific stiffness of lattice structures but little to evaluate low-stiffness lattices. Low-stiffness structures benefit energy absorbance through bending of the lattice. This research seeks to assess diamond lattices as low stiffness, bending structures. The research involves PA2200 (Nylon 12) laser sintered diamond lattices with experimental compression testing and direct FEA model comparison. A correction factor is applied for a design offset of laser sintered lattices. Once applied, the experimental and FEA data agree in validating the diamond lattice as a bending-dominated structure. Diamond lattices show a 4th order relationship between stiffness and parameters of thickness and unit cell length. For density, stiffness maintains a 2nd order relationship, as predicted by bending dominated structures. The resulting stiffness can be tuned over a stiffness range of four orders of magnitude. Further research shows the results for modifying the diamond lattice and scaling stiffness and density using other materials (like metals) to expand the range of stiffness and compare diamond lattices on material property charts. Lastly, the effective Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 to 0.4 depending on the (t/L) ratio.

  13. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla Piazza, Bastien; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, N. B.; Nilsen, G. J.; Tregenna-Piggott, P.; Perring, T. G.; Enderle, M.; McMorrow, D. F.; Ivanov, D. A.; Ronnow, H. M.

    2014-12-15

    Quantum magnets have occupied the fertile ground between many-body theory and low-temperature experiments on real materials since the early days of quantum mechanics. However, our understanding of even deceptively simple systems of interacting spins-1/2 is far from complete. The quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet (QSLHAF), for example, exhibits a striking anomaly of hitherto unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. This quantum effect manifests itself for excitations propagating with the specific wave vector (π, 0). Here, we use polarized neutron spectroscopy to fully characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound CFTD, a known realization of the QSLHAF model. Our experiments reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller-projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially-extended pairs of fractional S=1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wave vector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Lastly, our results establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration.

  14. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Dalla Piazza, Bastien; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, N. B.; ...

    2014-12-15

    Quantum magnets have occupied the fertile ground between many-body theory and low-temperature experiments on real materials since the early days of quantum mechanics. However, our understanding of even deceptively simple systems of interacting spins-1/2 is far from complete. The quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet (QSLHAF), for example, exhibits a striking anomaly of hitherto unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. This quantum effect manifests itself for excitations propagating with the specific wave vector (π, 0). Here, we use polarized neutron spectroscopy to fully characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound CFTD, a known realization of the QSLHAF model. Our experimentsmore » reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller-projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially-extended pairs of fractional S=1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wave vector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Lastly, our results establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration.« less

  15. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound CePt3P

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Wang, Zhen; Zheng, Shiyi; Feng, Chunmu; Dai, Jianhui; Xu, Zhu’an

    2017-01-01

    A new ternary platinum phosphide CePt3P was synthesized and characterized by means of magnetic, thermodynamic and transport measurements. The compound crystallizes in an antiperovskite tetragonal structure similar to that in the canonical family of platinum-based superconductors APt3P (A = Sr, Ca, La) and closely related to the noncentrosymmetric heavy fermion superconductor CePt3Si. In contrast to all the superconducting counterparts, however, no superconductivity is observed in CePt3P down to 0.5 K. Instead, CePt3P displays a coexistence of antiferromagnetic ordering, Kondo effect and crystalline electric field effect. A field-induced spin-flop transition is observed below the magnetic ordering temperature TN1 of 3.0 K while the Kondo temperature is of similar magnitude as TN1. The obtained Sommerfeld coefficient of electronic specific heat is γCe = 86 mJ/mol·K2 indicating that CePt3P is a moderately correlated antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compound. PMID:28157184

  16. Three-sublattice skyrmion crystal in the antiferromagnetic triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales, H. D.; Cabra, D. C.; Pujol, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    The frustrated classical antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interactions on the triangular lattice is studied under a magnetic field by means of semiclassical calculations and large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. We show that even a small DM interaction induces the formation of an antiferromagnetic skyrmion crystal (AF-SkX) state. Unlike what is observed in ferromagnetic materials, we show that the AF-SkX state consists of three interpenetrating skyrmion crystals (one by sublattice), and most importantly, the AF-SkX state seems to survive in the limit of zero temperature. To characterize the phase diagram we compute the average of the topological order parameter which can be associated with the number of topological charges or skyrmions. As the magnetic field increases this parameter presents a clear jump, indicating a discontinuous transition from a spiral phase into the AF-SkX phase, where multiple Bragg peaks coexist in the spin structure factor. For higher fields, a second (probably continuous) transition occurs into a featureless paramagnetic phase.

  17. Fractional excitations in the square lattice quantum antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Piazza, B Dalla; Mourigal, M; Christensen, N B; Nilsen, G J; Tregenna-Piggott, P; Perring, T G; Enderle, M; McMorrow, D F; Ivanov, D A; Rønnow, H M

    2015-01-01

    Quantum magnets have occupied the fertile ground between many-body theory and low-temperature experiments on real materials since the early days of quantum mechanics. However, our understanding of even deceptively simple systems of interacting spins-1/2 is far from complete. The quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet (QSLHAF), for example, exhibits a striking anomaly of hitherto unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. This quantum effect manifests itself for excitations propagating with the specific wave vector (π, 0). We use polarized neutron spectroscopy to fully characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound CFTD, a known realization of the QSLHAF model. Our experiments reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller-projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially-extended pairs of fractional S=1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wave vector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Our results establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration.

  18. Cyclic period-3 window in antiferromagnetic potts and Ising models on recursive lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananikian, N. S.; Ananikyan, L. N.; Chakhmakhchyan, L. A.

    2011-09-01

    The magnetic properties of the antiferromagnetic Potts model with two-site interaction and the antiferromagnetic Ising model with three-site interaction on recursive lattices have been studied. A cyclic period-3 window has been revealed by the recurrence relation method in the antiferromagnetic Q-state Potts model on the Bethe lattice (at Q < 2) and in the antiferromagnetic Ising model with three-site interaction on the Husimi cactus. The Lyapunov exponents have been calculated, modulated phases and a chaotic regime in the cyclic period-3 window have been found for one-dimensional rational mappings determined the properties of these systems.

  19. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-04-01

    Despite their inherently non-equilibrium nature, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases of conventional condensed-matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies, microbial suspensions and tissues to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish and flocks of birds. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial and biological systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct patterns characterized by ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The coupling between adjacent vortices can be controlled by tuning the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents, reminiscent of those in quantum systems. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems.

  20. Ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic order in bacterial vortex lattices

    PubMed Central

    Wioland, Hugo; Woodhouse, Francis G.; Dunkel, Jörn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their inherent non-equilibrium nature1, living systems can self-organize in highly ordered collective states2,3 that share striking similarities with the thermodynamic equilibrium phases4,5 of conventional condensed matter and fluid systems. Examples range from the liquid-crystal-like arrangements of bacterial colonies6,7, microbial suspensions8,9 and tissues10 to the coherent macro-scale dynamics in schools of fish11 and flocks of birds12. Yet, the generic mathematical principles that govern the emergence of structure in such artificial13 and biological6–9,14 systems are elusive. It is not clear when, or even whether, well-established theoretical concepts describing universal thermostatistics of equilibrium systems can capture and classify ordered states of living matter. Here, we connect these two previously disparate regimes: Through microfluidic experiments and mathematical modelling, we demonstrate that lattices of hydrodynamically coupled bacterial vortices can spontaneously organize into distinct phases of ferro- and antiferromagnetic order. The preferred phase can be controlled by tuning the vortex coupling through changes of the inter-cavity gap widths. The emergence of opposing order regimes is tightly linked to the existence of geometry-induced edge currents15,16, reminiscent of those in quantum systems17–19. Our experimental observations can be rationalized in terms of a generic lattice field theory, suggesting that bacterial spin networks belong to the same universality class as a wide range of equilibrium systems. PMID:27213004

  1. Evaluation of Watson-like integrals for a hyper bcc antiferromagnetic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radošević, S. M.; Pantić, M. R.; Kapor, D. V.; Pavkov-Hrvojević, M. V.; Škrinjar, M. G.

    2010-04-01

    Watson-like integrals for a d-dimensional bcc antiferromagnetic lattice, I_d (\\eta ) =\\frac{1}{\\pi ^d} \\prod _{i = 1}^d \\int _0^{\\pi } \\mathrm{d}x_i \\; \\frac{ \\eta }{\\sqrt{\\eta ^2 - \\prod \

  2. Finite-temperature transition of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a distorted kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiroshi; Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2012-08-03

    Motivated by the recent experiment on kagome-lattice antiferromagnets, we study the zero-field ordering behavior of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model on a uniaxially distorted kagome lattice by Monte Carlo simulations. A first-order transition, which has no counterpart in the corresponding undistorted model, takes place at a very low temperature. The origin of the transition is ascribed to a cooperative proliferation of topological excitations inherent to the model.

  3. Random Ising antiferromagnet on Bethe-like lattices with triangular loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Terufumi

    2016-04-01

    Phase diagrams for a random Ising antiferromagnet on Bethe-like lattices with triangular loops are obtained. Triangular loops cause strong geometrical frustration for the Ising antiferromagnet. Spin glass states appear by introducing randomness in the interaction between Ising spins. The random Ising antiferromagnet is studied by the replica method using global order parameter. The phase diagrams are compared with those for the corresponding random Ising ferromagnet to see the effects of the geometrical frustration. Antiferromagnetic phase does not appear for M ≤ 4 where M is the number of the corner sharing triangles on the Bethe-like lattices. In these cases, spin glass phase appears with a reentrant behavior. Spin glass phase in the random antiferromagnet appears for much weaker randomness than that in the corresponding random ferromagnet.

  4. Orbital ice: An exact Coulomb phase on the diamond lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Chern Giawei; Wu Congjun

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate the existence of an orbital Coulomb phase as the exact ground state of a p-orbital exchange Hamiltonian on the diamond lattice. The Coulomb phase is an emergent state characterized by algebraic dipolar correlations and a gauge structure resulting from local constraints (ice rules) of the underlying lattice models. For most ice models on the pyrochlore lattice, these local constraints are a direct consequence of minimizing the energy of each individual tetrahedron. On the contrary, the orbital ice rules are emergent phenomena resulting from the quantum orbital dynamics. We show that the orbital ice model exhibits an emergent geometrical frustration by mapping the degenerate quantum orbital ground states to the spin-ice states obeying the 2-in-2-out constraints on the pyrochlore lattice. We also discuss possible realization of the orbital ice model in optical lattices with p-band fermionic cold atoms.

  5. Evidence for a bicritical point in the XXZ Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a simple cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Selke, Walter

    2011-04-01

    The classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet with uniaxial exchange anisotropy (XXZ model) in a field on a simple cubic lattice is studied with the help of extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We analyze, in particular, various staggered susceptibilities and Binder cumulants and present clear evidence for the triple point of the antiferromagnetic, spin-flop, and paramagnetic phases being a bicritical point with Heisenberg symmetry. Results are compared to previous predictions applying various theoretical approaches.

  6. Antiferromagnetic phase transition in a nonequilibrium lattice of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Tony E.; Cross, M. C.; Haeffner, H.

    2011-09-15

    We study a driven-dissipative system of atoms in the presence of laser excitation to a Rydberg state and spontaneous emission. The atoms interact via the blockade effect, whereby an atom in the Rydberg state shifts the Rydberg level of neighboring atoms. We use mean-field theory to study how the Rydberg population varies in space. As the laser frequency changes, there is a continuous transition between the uniform and antiferromagnetic phases. The nonequilibrium nature also leads to a novel oscillatory phase and bistability between the uniform and antiferromagnetic phases.

  7. Study of the Antiferromagnetic Blume-Capel Model on kagomé Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chi-Ok; Park, Sojeong; Kwak, Wooseop

    2016-09-01

    We study the anti-ferromagnetic (AF) Ising model and the AF Blume-Capel (BC) model on the kagomé lattice. Using the Wang-Landau sampling method, we estimate the joint density functions for both models on the lattice, and we obtain the exact critical magnetic fields at zero temperature by using the micro-canonical analysis. We also show the patterns of critical lines for the models from micro-canonical analysis.

  8. Spin superconductivity in the frustrated two-dimensional antiferromagnet in the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2017-02-01

    We use the SU(2) Schwinger boson formalism to study the spin transport in the two-dimensional S = 1 / 2 frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet in a square lattice, considering the second-neighbors interactions in the diagonal. We have obtained a spin superfluid behavior for the spin transport to this system similar to obtained recently to the triangular lattice. We consider an antiferromagnetic inter-chain coupling on the diagonal, J2 > 0 , and the nearest-neighbor coupling antiferromagnetic J1 > 0 . We also have in the critical temperature T0, where the correlation length ξ → 0 , that the system suffers a transition from an ordered ground state to a disordered ground state.

  9. Chern-Simons theory of the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A. ); Rojo, A.G. Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1120 ); Fradkin, E. )

    1994-06-01

    We consider the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (with anistropy [lambda]) on a square lattice using a Chern-Simons (or Wigner-Jordan) approach. We show that the average field approximation (AFA) yields a phase diagram with two phases: a Neel state for [lambda][gt][lambda][sub [ital c

  10. Narrowing of antiferromagnetic domain wall in corundum-type Cr2O3 by lattice strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Yohei; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The effect of lattice strain on single-ion magnetic anisotropy and antiferromagnetic domain wall width in corundum-type Cr2O3 is studied using first-principles calculations and micromagnetics simulations. Without lattice strain, the domain wall width L DW is about 80 nm. When the lattice constant a is increased by 1-2%, L DW is reduced to less than 20 nm due to the increase in the single-ion anisotropy constant K 1 to on the order of 106 erg/cm3.

  11. Spin-glass transition in bond-disordered Heisenberg antiferromagnets coupled with local lattice distortions on a pyrochlore lattice.

    PubMed

    Shinaoka, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yusuke; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2011-07-22

    Motivated by puzzling characteristics of spin-glass transitions widely observed in pyrochlore-based frustrated materials, we investigate the effects of coupling to local lattice distortions in a bond-disordered antiferromagnet on the pyrochlore lattice by extensive Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the spin-glass transition temperature T(f) is largely enhanced by the spin-lattice coupling and, furthermore, becomes almost independent of Δ in a wide range of the disorder strength Δ. The critical property of the spin-glass transition is indistinguishable from that of the canonical Heisenberg spin glass in the entire range of Δ. These peculiar behaviors are ascribed to a modification of the degenerate manifold from a continuous to semidiscrete one by spin-lattice coupling.

  12. Negative lattice expansion from the superconductivity--antiferromagnetism crossover in ruthenium copper oxides.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, A C; Sher, F; Attfield, J P

    2005-08-11

    The mechanism of high-transition-temperature (high-T(c)) superconductivity in doped copper oxides is an enduring problem. Antiferromagnetism is established as the competing order, but the relationship between the two states in the intervening 'pseudogap' regime has become a central puzzle. The role of the crystal lattice, which is important in conventional superconductors, also remains unclear. Here we report an anomalous increase of the distance between copper oxide planes on cooling, which results in negative thermal volume expansion, for layered ruthenium copper oxides that have been doped to the boundary of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity. We propose that a crossover between these states is driven by spin ordering in the ruthenium oxide layers, revealing a novel mechanism for negative lattice expansion in solids. The differences in volume and lattice strain between the distinct superconducting and antiferromagnetic states can account for the phase segregation phenomena found extensively in low-doped copper oxides, and show that Cooper pair formation is coupled to the lattice. Unusually large variations of resistivity with magnetic field are found in these ruthenium copper oxides at low temperatures through coupling between the ordered Ru and Cu spins.

  13. Analysis of the antiferromagnetic phase transitions of the 2D Kondo lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barbara

    2010-03-01

    The Kondo lattice continues to present an interesting and relevant challenge, with its interactions between Kondo, RKKY, and coherent order. We present our study[1] of the antiferromagnetic quantum phase transitions of a 2D Kondo-Heisenberg square lattice. Starting from the nonlinear sigma model as a model of antiferromagnetism, we carry out a renormalization group analysis of the competing Kondo-RKKY interaction to one-loop order in an ɛ-expansion. We find a new quantum critical point (QCP) strongly affected by Kondo fluctuations. Near this QCP, there is a breakdown of hydrodynamic behavior, and the spin waves are logarithmically frozen out. The renormalization group results allow us to propose a new phase diagram near the antiferromagnetic fixed point of this 2D Kondo lattice model. The T=0 phase diagram contains four phases separated by a tetracritical point, the new QCP. For small spin fluctuations, we find a stable local magnetic moment antiferromagnet. For stronger coupling, region II is a metallic quantum disordered paramagnet. We find in region III a paramagnetic phase driven by Kondo interactions, with possible ground states of a heavy fermion liquid or a Kondo driven spin-liquid. The fourth phase is a spiral phase, or a large-Fermi-surface antiferromagnetic phase. We will describe these phases in more detail, including possible experimental confirmation of the spiral phase. The existence of the tetracritical point found here would be expected to affect the phase diagram at finite temperatures as well. In addition, It is hoped that these results, and particularly the Kondo interaction paramagnetic phase, will serve to bridge to solutions starting from the opposite limit, of a Kondo effect leading to a heavy fermion ground state. Work in collaboration with T. Tzen Ong. [4pt] [1] T. Ong and B. A. Jones, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 066405 (2009).

  14. Solution of the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a tetrahedron recursive lattice.

    PubMed

    Jurčišinová, E; Jurčišin, M

    2014-03-01

    We consider the antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 Ising model on the recursive tetrahedron lattice on which two elementary tetrahedrons are connected at each site. The model represents the simplest approximation of the antiferromagnetic Ising model on the real three-dimensional tetrahedron lattice which takes into account effects of frustration. An exact analytical solution of the model is found and discussed. It is shown that the model exhibits neither the first-order nor the second-order phase transitions. A detailed analysis of the magnetization of the model in the presence of the external magnetic field is performed and the existence of the magnetization plateaus for low temperatures is shown. All possible ground states of the model are found and discussed. The existence of nontrivial singular ground states is proven and exact explicit expressions for them are found.

  15. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; ...

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a newmore » mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  16. Spin-1/2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on the Spatially Anisotropic Kagome Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnyder, Andreas; Starykh, Oleg; Balents, Leon

    2008-03-01

    We study the quasi-one-dimensional limit of the Spin-1/2 quantum antiferromagnet on the Kagome lattice, a model Hamiltonian that might be of relevance for the mineral volborthite [1,2]. The lattice is divided into antiferromagnetic spin-chains (exchange J) that are weakly coupled via intermediate ``dangling'' spins (exchange J'). Using bosonization, renormalization group methods, and current algebra techniques we determine the ground state as a function of J'/J. The case of a strictly one-dimensional Kagome strip is also discussed. [1] Z. Hiroi, M. Hanawa, N. Kobayashi, M. Nohara, Hidenori Takagi, Y. Kato, and M. Takigawa, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 70, 3377 (2001). [2] F. Bert, D. Bono, P. Mendels, F. Ladieu, F. Duc, J.-C. Trumbe, and P. Millet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 087203 (2005).

  17. Spin-Chirality-Driven Ferroelectricity on a Perfect Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Mitamura, H.; Watanuki, R.; Kaneko, Koji; Onozaki, N.; Amou, Y.; Kittaka, S.; Kobayashi, Riki; Shimura, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Suzuki, K.; Chi, Songxue; Sakakibara, T.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic field (B) variation of the electrical polarization Pc ( ∥c) of the perfect triangular lattice antiferromagnet RbFe(MoO4)2 is examined up to the saturation point of the magnetization for B⊥c. Pc is observed only in phases for which chirality is predicted in the in-plane magnetic structures. No strong anomaly is observed in Pc at the field at which the spin modulation along the c axis, and hence the spin helicity, exhibits a discontinuity to the commensurate state. These results indicate that the ferroelectricity in this compound originates predominantly from the spin chirality, the explanation of which would require a new mechanism for magnetoferroelectricity. Lastly, the obtained field-temperature phase diagrams of ferroelectricity well agree with those theoretically predicted for the spin chirality of a Heisenberg spin triangular lattice antiferromagnet.

  18. Cluster Monte Carlo dynamics for the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. M.; Yang, C. Z.

    1994-11-01

    Within the general cluster framework of Kandel, Ben-Av, and Domany, we develop a cluster algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations of the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a triangular lattice. The algorithm does not suffer from problems of metastability and is extremely efficient even at T=0, which allows us to extract the static exponent η=0.5 as well as the effective dynamical critical exponent of the algorithm z=0.64+/-0.02.

  19. GPU-Accelerated Population Annealing Algorithm: Frustrated Ising Antiferromagnet on the Stacked Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovský, Michal; Weigel, Martin; Barash, Lev Yu.; Žukovič, Milan

    2016-02-01

    The population annealing algorithm is a novel approach to study systems with rough free-energy landscapes, such as spin glasses. It combines the power of simulated annealing, Boltzmann weighted differential reproduction and sequential Monte Carlo process to bring the population of replicas to the equilibrium even in the low-temperature region. Moreover, it provides a very good estimate of the free energy. The fact that population annealing algorithm is performed over a large number of replicas with many spin updates, makes it a good candidate for massive parallelism. We chose the GPU programming using a CUDA implementation to create a highly optimized simulation. It has been previously shown for the frustrated Ising antiferromagnet on the stacked triangular lattice with a ferromagnetic interlayer coupling, that standard Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations fail to equilibrate at low temperatures due to the effect of kinetic freezing of the ferromagnetically ordered chains. We applied the population annealing to study the case with the isotropic intra- and interlayer antiferromagnetic coupling (J2/|J1| = -1). The reached ground states correspond to non-magnetic degenerate states, where chains are antiferromagnetically ordered, but there is no long-range ordering between them, which is analogical with Wannier phase of the 2D triangular Ising antiferromagnet.

  20. Magnetic Interaction in the Geometrically Frustrated Triangular LatticeAntiferromagnet CuFeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Fishman, Randy Scott; Ren, Y.; Kang, H. J.; Qiu, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2007-01-01

    The spin wave excitations of the geometrically frustrated triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLA) CuFeO2 have been measured using high resolution inelastic neutron scattering. Antiferromagnetic interactions up to third nearest neighbors in the ab plane (J1, J2, J3, with J2=J1 0:44 and J3=J1 0:57), as well as out-of-plane coupling (Jz, with Jz=J1 0:29) are required to describe the spin wave dispersion relations, indicating a three dimensional character of the magnetic interactions. Two energy deeps in the spin wave dispersion occur at the incommensurate wavevectors associated with multiferroic phase, and can be interpreted as dynamic precursors to the magnetoelectric behavior in this system.

  1. Spin excitations and thermodynamics of the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the layered honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, Artem A.; Ihle, Dieter; Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2017-03-01

    We present a spin-rotation-invariant Green-function theory for the dynamic spin susceptibility in the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a stacked honeycomb lattice. Employing a generalized mean-field approximation for arbitrary temperatures, the thermodynamic quantities (two-spin correlation functions, internal energy, magnetic susceptibility, staggered magnetization, Néel temperature, correlation length) and the spin-excitation spectrum are calculated by solving a coupled system of self-consistency equations for the correlation functions. The temperature dependence of the magnetic (uniform static) susceptibility is ascribed to antiferromagnetic short-range order. The Néel temperature is calculated for arbitrary interlayer couplings. Our results are in a good agreement with numerical computations for finite clusters and with available experimental data on the β-Cu2V2O2 compound.

  2. The ? - ? antiferromagnet on the square lattice with Dzyaloshinskii - Moriya interaction: an exact diagonalization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Andreas; Richter, Johannes

    1996-07-01

    We examine the influence of an anisotropic interaction term of Dzyaloshinskii - Moriya (DM) type on the ground state ordering of the 0953-8984/8/27/015/img3 - 0953-8984/8/27/015/img4 spin-0953-8984/8/27/015/img5 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice. For the DM term we consider several symmetries corresponding to different crystal structures. For the pure 0953-8984/8/27/015/img3 - 0953-8984/8/27/015/img4 model there are strong indications for a quantum spin liquid in the region of 0953-8984/8/27/015/img8. We find that a DM interaction influences the breakdown of the conventional antiferromagnetic order by (i) shifting the spin-liquid region, (ii) changing the isotropic character of the ground state towards anisotropic correlations and (iii) creating for certain symmetries a net ferromagnetic moment.

  3. Characterizing the antiferromagnetic ordering of fermions in a compensated optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, P. M.; Hart, R. A.; Yang, T. L.; Liu, X.; Hulet, R. G.; Paiva, T. C. L.; Huse, D.; Scalettar, R.; Trivedi, N.

    2014-05-01

    We realize the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6Li atoms in a three-dimensional, red-detuned optical lattice. The lattice is compensated by the addition of three blue-detuned gaussian beams which overlap each of the lattice laser beams, but are not retro-reflected. Using the compensated lattice potential, we have reached temperatures low enough to produce antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. The variation of the measured AF correlations as a function of the Hubbard interaction strength, U / t , provides a way to determine the temperature of the atoms in the lattice by comparison with quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This method suggests our temperature is in the range of 2-3 times the Néel ordering temperature. In this poster we present our Bragg scattering results along with our studies of the effect of the compensating potential in helping us cool the atoms in the lattice and also enlarge the size of the AF phase. Work supported by DARPA, ONR, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  4. Ising antiferromagnet on a finite triangular lattice with free boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung-Yeon

    2015-11-01

    The exact integer values for the density of states of the Ising model on an equilateral triangular lattice with free boundary conditions are evaluated up to L = 24 spins on a side for the first time by using the microcanonical transfer matrix. The total number of states is 2 N s = 2300 ≈ 2.037 × 1090 for L = 24, where N s = L( L+1)/2 is the number of spins. Classifying all 2300 spin states according to their energy values is an enormous work. From the density of states, the exact partition function zeros in the complex temperature plane of the triangular-lattice Ising model are evaluated. Using the density of states and the partition function zeros, we investigate the properties of the triangularlattice Ising antiferromagnet. The scaling behavior of the ground-state entropy and the form of the correlation length at T = 0 are studied for the triangular-lattice Ising antiferromagnet with free boundary conditions. Also, the scaling behavior of the Fisher edge singularity is investigated.

  5. Quantum spin fluctuations and ellipticity for a triangular-lattice antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Randy S.

    2011-08-01

    The effects of quantum spin fluctuations are investigated for the three-sublattice spin configurations of a geometrically frustrated triangular-lattice antiferromagnet in a magnetic field with easy-axis anisotropy. Because quantum fluctuations reduce the tilt of the spins toward the easy axis, the predicted distortion of the noncollinear state at zero field is too small to explain the ellipticity reported for the multiferroic state of CuCrO2. Due to the change in spin angles, quantum fluctuations shift the boundaries between the collinear and noncollinear phases and open a gap in field between the two types of noncollinear phases.

  6. Quantum phase transition of the randomly diluted heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice

    PubMed

    Kato; Todo; Harada; Kawashima; Miyashita; Takayama

    2000-05-01

    Ground-state magnetic properties of the diluted Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice are investigated by means of the quantum Monte Carlo method with the continuous-time loop algorithm. It is found that the critical concentration of magnetic sites is independent of the spin size S, and equal to the two-dimensional percolation threshold. However, the existence of quantum fluctuations makes the critical exponents deviate from those of the classical percolation transition. Furthermore, we found that the transition is not universal, i.e., the critical exponents significantly depend on S.

  7. Quantum selection of order in an XXZ antiferromagnet on a Kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Chernyshev, A L; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2014-12-05

    Selection of the ground state of the kagome-lattice XXZ antiferromagnet by quantum fluctuations is investigated by combining nonlinear spin-wave and real-space perturbation theories. The two methods unanimously favor q=0 over sqrt[3]×sqrt[3] magnetic order in a wide range of the anisotropy parameter 0≤Δ≲0.72. Both approaches are also in accord on the magnitude of the quantum order-by-disorder effect generated by topologically nontrivial, looplike spin-flip processes. A tentative S-Δ phase diagram of the model is proposed.

  8. Detection of antiferromagnetic order by cooling atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Teles, Rafael; Hazzard, Kaden; Hulet, Randall; Rice University Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We have realized the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6 Li atoms in a three-dimensional compensated optical lattice. The compensated optical lattice has provided low enough temperatures to produce short-range antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. Previously, we reached temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition, more than a factor of 2 below temperatures obtained previously in 3D optical lattices with fermions. In order to further reduce the entropy in the compensated lattice, we implement an entropy conduit - which is a single blue detuned laser beam with a waist size smaller than the overall atomic sample size. This repulsive narrow potential provides a conductive metallic path between the low entropy core and the edges of the atomic sample where atoms may be evaporated. In addition, the entropy conduit may store entropy, thus further lowering the entropy in the core. We will report on the status of these efforts to further cool atoms in the optical lattice. Work supported by ARO MURI Grant, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  9. Chern-Simons theory of the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ana; Rojo, A. G.; Fradkin, Eduardo

    1994-06-01

    We consider the anisotropic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (with anistropy λ) on a square lattice using a Chern-Simons (or Wigner-Jordan) approach. We show that the average field approximation (AFA) yields a phase diagram with two phases: a Neèl state for λ>λc and a flux phase for λ<λc separated by a second-order transition at λc<1. We show that this phase diagram does not describe the XY regime of the antiferromagnet. Fluctuations around the AFA induce relevant operators which yield the correct phase diagram. We find an equivalence between the antiferromagnet and a relativistic field theory of two self-interacting Dirac fermions coupled to a Chern-Simons gauge field. The field theory has a phase diagram with the correct number of Goldstone modes in each regime and a phase transition at a critical coupling λ*>λc. We identify this transition with the isotropic Heisenberg point. It has a nonvanishing Neèl order parameter, which drops to zero discontinuously for λ<λ*.

  10. Spin waves in the fcc lattice antiferromagnet: competing interactions, frustration, and instabilities in the Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Avinash; Mohapatra, Shubhajyoti; Ziman, Timothy; Chatterji, Tapan

    2017-02-01

    Spin waves in the type-III ordered antiferromagnetic state of the frustrated t- t ' Hubbard model on the face-centred-cubic (fcc) lattice are calculated to investigate finite-U-induced competing interaction and frustration effects on magnetic excitations and instabilities. Particularly strong competing interactions generated due to the interplay of fcc lattice geometry and magnetic order result in significant spin wave softening. The calculated spin wave dispersion is found to be in qualitative agreement with the measured spin wave dispersion in the pyrite mineral MnS2 obtained from inelastic neutron scattering experiments. Instabilities to other magnetic orders (type I, type II, spiral, non-collinear), as signalled by spin wave energies turning negative, are also discussed.

  11. HP-sequence design for lattice proteins—An exact enumeration study on diamond as well as square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimhan, S. L.; Rajarajan, A. K.; Vardharaj, L.

    2012-09-01

    We present an exact enumeration algorithm for identifying the native configuration—a maximally compact self-avoiding walk configuration that is also the minimum energy configuration for a given set of contact-energy schemes; the process is implicitly sequence-dependent. In particular, we show that the 25-step native configuration on a diamond lattice consists of two sheet-like structures and is the same for all the contact-energy schemes, {(-1, 0, 0); (-7, -3, 0); (-7, -3, -1); (-7, -3, 1)}; on a square lattice also, the 24-step native configuration is independent of the energy schemes considered. However, the designing sequence for the diamond lattice walk depends on the energy schemes used whereas that for the square lattice walk does not. We have calculated the temperature-dependent specific heat for these designed sequences and the four energy schemes using the exact density of states. These data show that the energy scheme (-7, -3, -1) is preferable to the other three for both diamond and square lattice because the associated sequences give rise to a sharp low-temperature peak. We have also presented data for shorter (23-, 21-, and 17-step) walks on a diamond lattice to show that this algorithm helps identify a unique minimum energy configuration by suitably taking care of the ground-state degeneracy. Interestingly, all these shorter target configurations also show sheet-like secondary structures.

  12. Some features of the phase diagram of the square lattice SU( N) antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, N.; Sachdev, Subir

    1989-04-01

    We study the properties of the nearest-neighbor SU( N) antiferromagnet a square lattice as a function of N and the number of rows ( m) and columns ( nc) in the Young tableau of the SU( N) representation on the A sublattice; the sites of the B sublattice have the conjugate representation (the familiar Heisenberg antiferromagnet has N = 2, m = 1 and nc = 2 S). We study the global phase diagram in the ( N, m, nc) space using {1}/{N} expansions; in particular: (i) for N large with m proportional to N and nc arbitrary, we find spin-Peierls (dimerized) ground states with short-range spin correlations; (ii) with m = 1, the model is shown to be equivalent, at order {1}/{N}, to a generalized quantum dimer model. We discuss the relationship of these results to the SU( N) generalization of recent arguments by Haldane on the effect of "hedgehog" point singularities in the space-time spin configuration. As an intermediate step in our calculation, we present a simple new derivation of the coherent state path integral representation of SU( N) spin models.

  13. Microscopic model calculations for the magnetization process of layered triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Marmorini, Giacomo; Danshita, Ippei

    2015-01-16

    Magnetization processes of spin-1/2 layered triangular-lattice antiferromagnets (TLAFs) under a magnetic field H are studied by means of a numerical cluster mean-field method with a scaling scheme. We find that small antiferromagnetic couplings between the layers give rise to several types of extra quantum phase transitions among different high-field coplanar phases. Especially, a field-induced first-order transition is found to occur at H≈0.7H_{s}, where H_{s} is the saturation field, as another common quantum effect of ideal TLAFs in addition to the well-established one-third plateau. Our microscopic model calculation with appropriate parameters shows excellent agreement with experiments on Ba_{3}CoSb_{2}O_{9} [T. Susuki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 267201 (2013)]. Given this fact, we suggest that the Co^{2+}-based compounds may allow for quantum simulations of intriguing properties of this simple frustrated model, such as quantum criticality and supersolid states.

  14. Coordinate Bethe ansatz computation for low temperature behavior of a triangular lattice of a spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Shuaibu, A.; Rahman, M. M.

    2014-03-05

    We study the low temperature behavior of a triangular lattice quantum spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single-site anisotropy by using coordinate Bethe ansatz method. We compute the standard two-particle Hermitian Hamiltonian, and obtain the eigenfunctions and eigenvalue of the system. The obtained results show a number of advantages in comparison with many results.

  15. Energy spectrum of the two-magnon bound states in the Heisenberg-Ising antiferromagnet on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, C. J.

    2009-06-01

    The energy spectra of the two-magnon bound states in the Heisenberg-Ising antiferromagnet on the square lattice are calculated using series expansion methods. The results confirm an earlier spin-wave prediction of Oguchi and Ishikawa that the bound states vanish into the continuum before the isotropic Heisenberg limit is reached.

  16. Spin-Ice State of the Quantum Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on the Pyrochlore Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Kun; Deng, Youjin; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature physics of the SU(2)-symmetric spin-1 /2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a pyrochlore lattice and find "fingerprint" evidence for the thermal spin-ice state in this frustrated quantum magnet. Our conclusions are based on the results of bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo simulations, with good convergence of the skeleton series down to the temperature T /J =1 /6 . The identification of the spin-ice state is done through a remarkably accurate microscopic correspondence for the static structure factor between the quantum Heisenberg, classical Heisenberg, and Ising models at all accessible temperatures, and the characteristic bowtie pattern with pinch points observed at T /J =1 /6 . The dynamic structure factor at real frequencies (obtained by the analytic continuation of numerical data) is consistent with diffusive spinon dynamics at the pinch points.

  17. Spin-Ice State of the Quantum Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on the Pyrochlore Lattice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Kun; Deng, Youjin; Prokof'ev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2016-04-29

    We study the low-temperature physics of the SU(2)-symmetric spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a pyrochlore lattice and find "fingerprint" evidence for the thermal spin-ice state in this frustrated quantum magnet. Our conclusions are based on the results of bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo simulations, with good convergence of the skeleton series down to the temperature T/J=1/6. The identification of the spin-ice state is done through a remarkably accurate microscopic correspondence for the static structure factor between the quantum Heisenberg, classical Heisenberg, and Ising models at all accessible temperatures, and the characteristic bowtie pattern with pinch points observed at T/J=1/6. The dynamic structure factor at real frequencies (obtained by the analytic continuation of numerical data) is consistent with diffusive spinon dynamics at the pinch points.

  18. Simplex SU(3) quantum antiferromagnets on the kagome and hyperkagome lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselev, Yury Yu.; Parameswaran, Siddharth A.; Arovas, Daniel P.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate SU(3) ``simplex solid'' antiferromagnets on the kagome and hyperkagome lattices. The ground states of these systems are annihilated by certain local projectors acting on triples of sites, and are analogous to the valence bond solid wavefunctions constructed by Affleck, Kennedy, Lieb, and Tasaki. Using a coherent state representation, we map to a classical model of CP2 spins with 3-spin interactions, which we analyze via single-spin Monte Carlo simulations and a cluster algorithm for the three-body interactions. We compute the static structure factor and short-range correlations encoded by the simplex solid wavefunction and rationalize the results in terms of the ``order by disorder'' mechanism. We acknowledge support from NSF grant DMR-1007028 (YYK and DPA) and from the Simons Foundation (SAP).

  19. Experience with low-alpha lattices at the Diamond Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, I. P. S.; Rehm, G.; Thomas, C.; Bartolini, R.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present the experience at Diamond Light Source in the design, implementation, and operation of low momentum compaction factor lattices for the generation of short x-ray pulses and coherent THz radiation. The effects of higher-order terms in the expansion of the momentum compaction factor on beam dynamics are reviewed from a theoretical point of view, and the details of both high- and low-emittance solutions at Diamond are discussed. Measurements taken to characterize the lattices under a variety of machine conditions are presented, along with the practical limitations that exist as the momentum compaction factor is made to approach zero.

  20. First Brillouin Polytope and Band Structure of Diamond Lattice in Four Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Masanori

    2017-03-01

    We study the diamond lattice in four dimensions — a descendant of the three-dimensional diamond lattice. As a four-dimensional polytope, we determine the first Brillouin zone and draw the band structure of the corresponding tight-binding model on two-dimensional paper in the usual manner. In the polyhedral decomposition, we find the zone boundary of the first Brillouin zone in four dimensions to be the omnitruncated 5-cell, which comprises ten truncated octahedra glued to 20 hexagonal prisms. We find Dirac line nodes inside the hexagonal prisms.

  1. Tri-critical behavior of the Blume Capel model on a diamond lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jander P.; Sá Barreto, F. C.; Rosa, D. S.

    2017-02-01

    The mean field approximation results are obtained in a five-site cluster on the diamond lattice from the Bogoliubov inequality. Spin correlation identities for the Blume-Capel model on diamond lattice are derived from a five-site cluster and used to obtain an effective field approximation. The free-energy, magnetization, critical frontiers and tricritical points are obtained from the mean field approximation and the effective field approximation and are compared to those obtained by other methods. From the mean-field approximation, we also studied the unstable and metastable states besides the stable states present in the model.

  2. Entanglement properties of the antiferromagnetic-singlet transition in the Hubbard model on bilayer square lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2014-10-10

    Here, we calculate the bipartite R enyi entanglement entropy of an L x L x 2 bilayer Hubbard model using a determinantal quantum Monte Carlo method recently proposed by Grover [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 130402 (2013)]. Two types of bipartition are studied: (i) One that divides the lattice into two L x L planes, and (ii) One that divides the lattice into two equal-size (L x L=2 x 2) bilayers. Furthermore, we compare our calculations with those for the tight-binding model studied by the correlation matrix method. As expected, the entropy for bipartition (i) scales as L2, while the latter scales with L with possible logarithmic corrections. The onset of the antiferromagnet to singlet transition shows up by a saturation of the former to a maximal value and the latter to a small value in the singlet phase. We also comment on the large uncertainties in the numerical results with increasing U, which would have to be overcome before the critical behavior and logarithmic corrections can be quanti ed.

  3. Entanglement properties of the antiferromagnetic-singlet transition in the Hubbard model on bilayer square lattices

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Scalettar, Richard T.

    2014-10-10

    Here, we calculate the bipartite R enyi entanglement entropy of an L x L x 2 bilayer Hubbard model using a determinantal quantum Monte Carlo method recently proposed by Grover [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 130402 (2013)]. Two types of bipartition are studied: (i) One that divides the lattice into two L x L planes, and (ii) One that divides the lattice into two equal-size (L x L=2 x 2) bilayers. Furthermore, we compare our calculations with those for the tight-binding model studied by the correlation matrix method. As expected, the entropy for bipartition (i) scales as L2, while the lattermore » scales with L with possible logarithmic corrections. The onset of the antiferromagnet to singlet transition shows up by a saturation of the former to a maximal value and the latter to a small value in the singlet phase. We also comment on the large uncertainties in the numerical results with increasing U, which would have to be overcome before the critical behavior and logarithmic corrections can be quanti ed.« less

  4. Two-dimensional-lattice spin models with long-range antiferromagnetic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, S.

    1991-10-01

    We consider a classical system, consisting of m-component unit vectors (m=2,3), associated with a two-dimensional lattice \\{uk||k∈openZ2\\} and interacting via translationally and rotationally invariant antiferromagnetic pair potentials of the long-range form W=Wjk=ɛ||xj-xk||-puj.uk, p>2, where ɛ is a positive quantity, setting energy and temperature scales (i.e., T*=kBT/ɛ), and xk are the coordinates of the lattice sites. A spin-wave approach predicts orientational disorder (in the thermodynamic limit) at all finite temperatures and for all p>2 this agrees with available rigorous results for p>=4, whereas no such theorems are known in the literature when 22.

  5. Melting of Three-Sublattice Order in Easy-Axis Antiferromagnets on Triangular and Kagome Lattices.

    PubMed

    Damle, Kedar

    2015-09-18

    When the constituent spins have an energetic preference to lie along an easy axis, triangular and kagome lattice antiferromagnets often develop long-range order that distinguishes the three sublattices of the underlying triangular Bravais lattice. In zero magnetic field, this three-sublattice order melts either in a two-step manner, i.e., via an intermediate phase with power-law three-sublattice order controlled by a temperature-dependent exponent η(T)∈(1/9,1/4), or via a transition in the three-state Potts universality class. Here, I predict that the uniform susceptibility to a small easy-axis field B diverges as χ(B)∼|B|^{-[(4-18η)/(4-9η)]} in a large part of the intermediate power-law ordered phase [corresponding to η(T)∈(1/9,2/9)], providing an easy-to-measure thermodynamic signature of two-step melting. I also show that these two melting scenarios can be generically connected via an intervening multicritical point and obtain numerical estimates of multicritical exponents.

  6. Search for the Heisenberg spin glass on rewired square lattices with antiferromagnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surungan, Tasrief; Bansawang B., J.; Tahir, Dahlang

    2016-03-01

    Spin glass (SG) is a typical magnetic system with frozen random spin orientation at low temperatures. The system exhibits rich physical properties, such as infinite number of ground states, memory effect, and aging phenomena. There are two main ingredients considered to be pivotal for the existence of SG behavior, namely, frustration and randomness. For the canonical SG system, frustration is led by the presence of competing interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) couplings. Previously, Bartolozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. B73, 224419 (2006)], reported the SG properties of the AF Ising spins on scale free network (SFN). It is a new type of SG, different from the canonical one which requires the presence of both FM and AF couplings. In this new system, frustration is purely caused by the topological factor and its randomness is related to the irregular connectvity. Recently, Surungan et. al. [Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 640, 012001 (2015)] reported SG bahavior of AF Heisenberg model on SFN. We further investigate this type of system by studying an AF Heisenberg model on rewired square lattices. We used Replica Exchange algorithm of Monte Carlo Method and calculated the SG order parameter to search for the existence of SG phase.

  7. Search for the Heisenberg spin glass on rewired cubic lattices with antiferromagnetic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surungan, Tasrief

    2016-10-01

    Spin glass (SG) is a typical magnetic system which is mainly characterized by a frozen random spin orientation at low temperatures. Frustration and randomness are considered to be the key ingredients for the existence of SGs. Previously, Bartolozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. B73, 224419 (2006)] found that the antiferromagnetic (AF) Ising spins on scale free network (SFN) exhibited SG behavior. This is purely AF system, a new type of SG different from the canonical one which requires the presence of both FM and AF couplings. In this new system, frustration is purely due to a topological factor and its randomness is brought by irregular connectivity. Recently, it was reported that the AF Heisenberg model on SFN exhibited SG behavior [Surungan et al., JPCS, 640, 012005 (2015)/doi:10.1088/1742-6596/640/1/012005]. In order to accommodate the notion of spatial dimension, we further investigated this type of system by studying an AF Heisenberg model on rewired cubic lattices, constructed by adding one extra bond randomly connecting each spin to one of its next-nearest neighbors. We used Replica Exchange algorithm of Monte Carlo Method and calculated the SG order parameter to search for the existence of SG phase.

  8. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    DOE PAGES

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; ...

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to themore » mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.« less

  9. Control of the third dimension in copper-based square-lattice antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Paul A.; Singleton, John; Franke, Isabel; Moller, Johannes S.; Lancaster, Tom; Steele, Andrew J.; Topping, Craig V.; Blundell, Stephen J.; Pratt, Francis L.; Baines, Chris; Bendix, Jesper; McDonald, Ross David; Brambleby, Jamie; Lees, Martin R.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Stephens, Peter W.; Twamley, Brendan W.; Conner, Marianne M.; Funk, Kylee; Corbey, Jordan F.; Tran, Hope E.; Schlueter, John A.; Manson, Jamie L.

    2016-03-25

    Using a mixed-ligand synthetic scheme, we create a family of quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnets, namely, [Cu(HF2)(pyz)2]ClO4 [pyz = pyrazine], [CuL2(pyz)2](ClO4)2 [L = pyO = pyridine-N-oxide and 4-phpy-O = 4-phenylpyridine-N-oxide. These materials are shown to possess equivalent two-dimensional [Cu(pyz)2]2+ nearly square layers, but exhibit interlayer spacings that vary from 6.5713 to 16.777 Å, as dictated by the axial ligands. We present the structural and magnetic properties of this family as determined via x-ray diffraction, electron-spin resonance, pulsed- and quasistatic-field magnetometry and muon-spin rotation, and compare them to those of the prototypical two-dimensional magnetic polymer Cu(pyz)2(ClO4)2. We find that, within the limits of the experimental error, the two-dimensional, intralayer exchange coupling in our family of materials remains largely unaffected by the axial ligand substitution, while the observed magnetic ordering temperature (1.91 K for the material with the HF2 axial ligand, 1.70 K for the pyO and 1.63 K for the 4-phpy-O) decreases slowly with increasing layer separation. Despite the structural motifs common to this family and Cu(pyz)2(ClO4)2, the latter has significantly stronger two-dimensional exchange interactions and hence a higher ordering temperature. Here, we discuss these results, as well as the mechanisms that might drive the long-range order in these materials, in terms of departures from the ideal S = 1/2 two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet. In particular, we find that both spin-exchange anisotropy in the intralayer interaction and interlayer couplings (exchange, dipolar, or both) are needed to account for the observed ordering temperatures, with the intralayer anisotropy becoming more important as the layers are pulled

  10. Control of the third dimension in copper-based square-lattice antiferromagnets

    DOE PAGES

    Goddard, Paul A.; Singleton, John; Franke, Isabel; ...

    2016-03-25

    Using a mixed-ligand synthetic scheme, we create a family of quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnets, namely, [Cu(HF2)(pyz)2]ClO4 [pyz = pyrazine], [CuL2(pyz)2](ClO4)2 [L = pyO = pyridine-N-oxide and 4-phpy-O = 4-phenylpyridine-N-oxide. These materials are shown to possess equivalent two-dimensional [Cu(pyz)2]2+ nearly square layers, but exhibit interlayer spacings that vary from 6.5713 to 16.777 Å, as dictated by the axial ligands. We present the structural and magnetic properties of this family as determined via x-ray diffraction, electron-spin resonance, pulsed- and quasistatic-field magnetometry and muon-spin rotation, and compare them to those of the prototypical two-dimensional magnetic polymer Cu(pyz)2(ClO4)2. We find that, within the limits of themore » experimental error, the two-dimensional, intralayer exchange coupling in our family of materials remains largely unaffected by the axial ligand substitution, while the observed magnetic ordering temperature (1.91 K for the material with the HF2 axial ligand, 1.70 K for the pyO and 1.63 K for the 4-phpy-O) decreases slowly with increasing layer separation. Despite the structural motifs common to this family and Cu(pyz)2(ClO4)2, the latter has significantly stronger two-dimensional exchange interactions and hence a higher ordering temperature. Here, we discuss these results, as well as the mechanisms that might drive the long-range order in these materials, in terms of departures from the ideal S = 1/2 two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet. In particular, we find that both spin-exchange anisotropy in the intralayer interaction and interlayer couplings (exchange, dipolar, or both) are needed to account for the observed ordering temperatures, with the intralayer anisotropy becoming more important as the layers are pulled further apart.« less

  11. Current loops and fluctuations in the zero-range process on a diamond lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio-Sanchez, R.; Harris, R. J.; Touchette, H.

    2012-07-01

    We study the zero-range process on a simple diamond lattice with open boundary conditions and determine the conditions for the existence of loops in the mean current. We also perform a large deviation analysis for fluctuations of partial and total currents and check the validity of the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for these quantities. In this context, we show that the fluctuation relation is not satisfied for partial currents between sites even if it is satisfied for the total current flowing between the boundaries. Finally, we extend our methods to study a chain of coupled diamonds and demonstrate co-existence of mean current regimes.

  12. DMRG Study of the S >= 1 quantum Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on a Kagome-like lattice without loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberty, R. Zach; Changlani, Hitesh J.; Henley, Christopher L.

    2013-03-01

    The Kagome quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, for spin up to S = 1 and perhaps S = 3 / 2 , is a prime candidate to realize a quantum spin liquid or valence bond crystal state, but theoretical or computational studies for S > 1 / 2 are difficult and few. We consider instead the same interactions and S >= 1 on the Husimi Cactus, a graph of corner sharing triangles whose centers are vertices of a Bethe lattice, using a DMRG procedure tailored for tree graphs. Since both lattices are locally identical, properties of the Kagome antiferromagnet dominated by nearest-neighbor spin correlations should also be exhibited on the Cactus, whereas loop-dependent effects will be absent on the loopless Cactus. Our study focuses on the possible transition(s) that must occur with increasing S for the Cactus antiferromagnet. (It has a disordered valence bond state at S = 1 / 2 but a 3-sublattice coplanar ordered state in the large S limit). We also investigate the phase diagram of the S = 1 quantum XXZ model with on-site anisotropy, which we expect to have three-sublattice and valence-bond-crystal phases similar to the kagome case. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation through a Graduate Research Fellowship to R. Zach Lamberty, as well as grant DMR-

  13. Effect of the phase transition to the ferroquadrupolar phase on spin transport in the biquadratic antiferromagnet of the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2017-04-01

    We use the SU(N) Schwinger boson formalism to study the spin transport in the S=1 biquadratic frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnetic model in the triangular lattice, considering the next-nearest-neighbors interactions J2. We have obtained a jump in the spin conductivity in the point of cusp of the phase diagram - η vs. - α of the model at T=0, which represents the force of the biquadratic coupling versus the next-nearest-neighbor coupling (K vs. J2). We have obtained also a superfluid behavior for the spin transport in the DC limit for this system similar to ones recently obtained for other two-dimensional frustrated spin systems. We consider all the couplings, first and second couplings as antiferromagnetic.

  14. Three-dimensional nonlinear lattices: from oblique vortices and octupoles to discrete diamonds and vortex cubes.

    PubMed

    Carretero-González, R; Kevrekidis, P G; Malomed, B A; Frantzeskakis, D J

    2005-05-27

    We construct a variety of novel localized topological structures in the 3D discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The states can be created in Bose-Einstein condensates trapped in strong optical lattices and crystals built of microresonators. These new structures, most of which have no counterparts in lower dimensions, range from multipole patterns and diagonal vortices to vortex "cubes" (stack of two quasiplanar vortices) and "diamonds" (formed by two orthogonal vortices).

  15. Magnetic properties of the S =1/2 honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet 2 -Cl -3 ,6 -F2-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Toshiki; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Kittaka, Shunichiro; Sakakibara, Toshiro; Ono, Toshio; Hosokoshi, Yuko

    2017-02-01

    We successfully synthesized single crystals of the verdazyl radical 2 -Cl -3 ,6 -F2-V [=3-(2-chloro-3,6-difluorophenyl)-1,5-diphenylverdazyl], which is a rare model compound with an S =1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic (HAF) honeycomb lattice. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations indicate two dominant AF interactions, forming a slightly distorted honeycomb lattice. We explain the magnetic susceptibility and the magnetization curve up to the saturation field based on the expected spin model using the quantum Monte Carlo method. In the low-temperature regions, we found a phase transition to an AF ordered state at about 0.77 K for the zero field and obtained the magnetic field-temperature phase diagram from the magnetic susceptibility and the specific heat for various magnetic fields. Through the analysis considering the effect of lattice distortion on magnetic behavior, we confirm that the lattice distortion of the present model is small enough that it does not affect the intrinsic behavior of the uniform S =1/2 HAF honeycomb lattice.

  16. Magnetic excitations in the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4

    DOE PAGES

    Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozerov, M.; Kamenskyi, D.; ...

    2015-11-27

    We present on high- field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of magnetic excitations in the spin- 1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4. Frequency- field diagrams of ESR excitations are measured for different orientations of magnetic fields up to 25 T. We show that the substantial zero- field energy gap, Δ ≈ 9.5 K, observed in the low-temperature excitation spectrum of Cs2CuBr4 [Zvyagin et al:, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 077206 (2014)], is present well above TN. Noticeably, the transition into the long-range magnetically ordered phase does not significantly affect the size of the gap, suggesting that even below TN the high-energy spin dynamicsmore » in Cs2CuBr4 is determined by short-range-order spin correlations. The experimental data are compared with results of model spin-wave-theory calculations for spin-1/2 triangle-lattice antiferromagnet.« less

  17. ARPES view on surface and bulk hybridization phenomena in the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice CeRh2Si2

    PubMed Central

    Patil, S.; Generalov, A.; Güttler, M.; Kushwaha, P.; Chikina, A.; Kummer, K.; Rödel, T. C.; Santander-Syro, A. F.; Caroca-Canales, N.; Geibel, C.; Danzenbächer, S.; Kucherenko, Yu.; Laubschat, C.; Allen, J. W.; Vyalikh, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The hybridization between localized 4f electrons and itinerant electrons in rare-earth-based materials gives rise to their exotic properties like valence fluctuations, Kondo behaviour, heavy-fermions, or unconventional superconductivity. Here we present an angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) study of the Kondo lattice antiferromagnet CeRh2Si2, where the surface and bulk Ce-4f spectral responses were clearly resolved. The pronounced 4f 0 peak seen for the Ce terminated surface gets strongly suppressed in the bulk Ce-4f spectra taken from a Si-terminated crystal due to much larger f-d hybridization. Most interestingly, the bulk Ce-4f spectra reveal a fine structure near the Fermi edge reflecting the crystal electric field splitting of the bulk magnetic 4f 15/2 state. This structure presents a clear dispersion upon crossing valence states, providing direct evidence of f-d hybridization. Our findings give precise insight into f-d hybridization penomena and highlight their importance in the antiferromagnetic phases of Kondo lattices. PMID:26987899

  18. Multiple-q states and the Skyrmion lattice of the triangular-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet under magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Tsuyoshi; Chung, Sungki; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2012-01-06

    Ordering of the frustrated classical Heisenberg model on the triangular lattice with an incommensurate spiral structure is studied under magnetic fields by means of a mean-field analysis and a Monte Carlo simulation. Several types of multiple-q states including the Skyrmion-lattice state is observed in addition to the standard single-q state. In contrast to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction driven system, the present model allows both Skyrmions and anti-Skyrmions, together with a new thermodynamic phase where Skyrmion and anti-Skyrmion lattices form a domain state.

  19. Antiferromagnetic and Orbital Ordering on a Diamond Lattice Near Quantum Criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumb, K. W.; Morey, J. R.; Rodriguez-Rivera, J. A.; Wu, Hui; Podlesnyak, A. A.; McQueen, T. M.; Broholm, C. L.

    2016-10-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the spinel FeSc2S4 that reveal a previously unobserved magnetic ordering transition occurring at 11.8(2) K. Magnetic ordering occurs subsequent to a subtle cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition that distorts Fe coordinating sulfur tetrahedra and lifts the orbital degeneracy. The orbital ordering is not truly long ranged, but occurs over finite-sized domains that limit magnetic correlation lengths. The application of 1 GPa hydrostatic pressure appears to destabilize this Néel state, reducing the transition temperature to 8.6(8) K and redistributing magnetic spectral weight to higher energies. The relative magnitudes of ordered ⟨m ⟩2=3.1 (2 ) μB2 and fluctuating moments ⟨δ m ⟩=13 (1 ) μB2 show that the magnetically ordered state of FeSc2 S4 is drastically renormalized and close to criticality.

  20. Spin-wave approach for entanglement entropies of the J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflorencie, Nicolas; Luitz, David J.; Alet, Fabien

    2015-09-01

    Using a modified spin-wave theory which artificially restores zero sublattice magnetization on finite lattices, we investigate the entanglement properties of the Néel ordered J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice. Different kinds of subsystem geometries are studied, either corner-free (line, strip) or with sharp corners (square). Contributions from the nG=2 Nambu-Goldstone modes give additive logarithmic corrections with a prefactor nG/2 independent of the Rényi index. On the other hand, π /2 corners lead to additional (negative) logarithmic corrections with a prefactor lqc which does depend on both nG and the Rényi index q , in good agreement with scalar field theory predictions. By varying the second neighbor coupling J2 we also explore universality across the Néel ordered side of the phase diagram of the J1-J2 antiferromagnet, from the frustrated side 0 lattice systems. The singular limit of vanishing aspect ratios is also explored, where we identify for γqord a regular part and a singular component, explaining the discrepancy of the linear scaling term for fixed width vs fixed aspect ratio subsystems.

  1. Magnetism and multiferroicity of an isosceles triangular lattice antiferromagnet Sr3NiNb2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Choi, E. S.; Ma, J.; Sinclair, R.; Dela Cruz, C. R.; Zhou, H. D.

    2016-11-01

    Various experimental measurements were performed to complete the phase diagram of a weakly distorted triangular lattice system, Sr3NiNb2O9 with Ni2+ , spin-1 magnetic ions. This compound possesses an isosceles triangular lattice with two shorter bonds and one longer bond. It shows a two-step magnetic phase transition at {{T}\\text{N1}}∼ 5.1 K and {{T}\\text{N2}}∼ 5.5 K at zero magnetic field, characteristic of an easy-axis anisotropy. In the magnetization curves, a series of magnetic phase transitions was observed such as an up-up-down phase at {μ0}{{H}c1}∼ 10.5 T with 1/3 of the saturation magnetization (M sat) and an oblique phase at {μ0}{{H}c2}∼ 16 T with \\sqrt{3} /3 M sat. Intriguingly, the magnetic phase transition below T N2 is in tandem with the ferroelectricity, which demonstrates multiferroic behaviors. Moreover, the multiferroic phase persists in all magnetically ordered phases regardless of the spin structure. The comparison between the phase diagrams of Sr3NiNb2O9 and its sister compound with an equilateral triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ba3NiNb2O9 (Hwang et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 257205), illustrates how a small imbalance among exchange interactions change the magnetic ground states of the TLAFs.

  2. J1-J2 square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnets with 4 d1 spins: A MoOP O4Cl (A =K ,Rb )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Hajime; Nakamura, Nanako; Yoshida, Makoto; Takigawa, Masashi; Babkevich, Peter; Qureshi, Navid; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Yajima, Takeshi; Hiroi, Zenji

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic properties of A MoOP O4Cl (A =K ,Rb ) with M o5 + ions in the 4 d1 electronic configuration are investigated by magnetization, heat capacity, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on single crystals, combined with powder neutron diffraction experiments. The magnetization measurements reveal that they are good model compounds for the spin-1/2 J1-J2 square-lattice magnet with the first and second nearest-neighbor interactions. Magnetic transitions are observed at around 6 and 8 K in the K and Rb compounds, respectively. In contrast to the normal Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, the NMR and neutron diffraction experiments find a columnar antiferromagnetic order for each compound, which is stabilized by a dominant antiferromagnetic J2. Both compounds realize the unusual case of two interpenetrating J2 square lattices weakly coupled to each other by J1.

  3. Study of the dispersive properties of three-dimensional photonic crystals with diamond lattices containing metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Kong, Xiang-Kun

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, the dispersive properties of three-dimensional photonic crystals with diamond lattices containing isotropic dielectric and metamaterials are theoretically studied by a modified plane wave expansion method. In order to simplify the study, one only kind of the metamaterials is considered—the epsilon-negative materials. The eigenvalue equations of their structure depending on the diamond lattice realization (spheres with epsilon-negative materials inserted in the dielectric background) are deduced. A photonic band gap (PBG), a flatband region, and the first two stop band gaps (SBGs) above the flatband region in the Γ-X and Γ-L directions are found to appear. The results show that the upper edge of the flatband region cannot be tuned by any parameters except for the electronic plasma frequency. The PBG and first SBGs above the flatband region in the Γ-X and Γ-L directions for PCs can be modulated by the filling factor, relative dielectric constant and electronic plasma frequency, respectively. However, the damping factor has no effect on the locations of first PBG and the SBGs above the flatband region in the Γ-X and Γ-L directions.

  4. Superstable cycles for antiferromagnetic Q-state Potts and three-site interaction Ising models on recursive lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananikian, N.; Artuso, R.; Chakhmakhchyan, L.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the superstable cycles of the Q-state Potts (QSP) and the three-site interaction antiferromagnetic Ising (TSAI) models on recursive lattices. The rational mappings describing the models’ statistical properties are obtained via the recurrence relation technique. We provide analytical solutions for the superstable cycles of the second order for both models. A particular attention is devoted to the period three window. Here we present an exact result for the third order superstable orbit for the QSP and a numerical solution for the TSAI model. Additionally, we point out a non-trivial connection between bifurcations and superstability: in some regions of parameters a superstable cycle is not followed by a doubling bifurcation. Furthermore, we use symbolic dynamics to understand the changes taking place at points of superstability and to distinguish areas between two consecutive superstable orbits.

  5. Geometric frustration effects in the spin-1 antiferromagnetic Ising model on the kagome-like recursive lattice: exact results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurčišinová, E.; Jurčišin, M.

    2016-09-01

    The antiferromagnetic spin-1 Ising model is studied on the Husimi lattice constructed from elementary triangles with coordination number z  =  4. It is found that the model has a unique solution for arbitrary values of the magnetic field as well as for all temperatures. A detailed analysis of the magnetization is performed and it is shown that in addition to the standard plateau-like ground states, the model also contains well-defined single-point ground states related to definite values of the magnetic field. Exact values of the residual entropies for all ground states are found. The properties of the susceptibility and the specific heat of the model are also discussed. The existence of the Schottky-type behavior of the specific heat and the strong magnetocaloric effect for low enough temperatures and for the external magnetic field close to the values at which the single-point ground states exist are identified.

  6. Finite-Temperature Crossover Phenomenon in the S = 1/2 Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Model on the Kagome Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimokawa, Tokuro; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2016-11-01

    Thermal properties of the S = 1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet at low temperatures are investigated by means of the Hams-de Raedt method for clusters of up to 36 sites possessing a full symmetry of the lattice. The specific heat exhibits, in addition to the double peaks, the third and the fourth peaks at lower temperatures. With decreasing the temperature, the type of the magnetic short-range order (SRO) changes around the third-peak temperature from the √{3} × √{3} to the q = 0 states, suggesting that the third peak of the specific heat is associated with a crossover phenomenon between the spin-liquid states with distinct magnetic SRO. Experimental implications are discussed.

  7. The spin-half XXZ antiferromagnet on the square lattice revisited: A high-order coupled cluster treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.; Zinke, R.; Darradi, R.; Richter, J.; Farnell, D. J. J.; Schulenburg, J.

    2017-04-01

    We use the coupled cluster method (CCM) to study the ground-state properties and lowest-lying triplet excited state of the spin-half XXZ antiferromagnet on the square lattice. The CCM is applied to it to high orders of approximation by using an efficient computer code that has been written by us and which has been implemented to run on massively parallelized computer platforms. We are able therefore to present precise data for the basic quantities of this model over a wide range of values for the anisotropy parameter Δ in the range - 1 ≤ Δ < ∞ of interest, including both the easy-plane (- 1 < Δ < 1) and easy-axis (Δ > 1) regimes, where Δ → ∞ represents the Ising limit. We present results for the ground-state energy, the sublattice magnetization, the zero-field transverse magnetic susceptibility, the spin stiffness, and the triplet spin gap. Our results provide a useful yardstick against which other approximate methods and/or experimental studies of relevant antiferromagnetic square-lattice compounds may now compare their own results. We also focus particular attention on the behaviour of these parameters for the easy-axis system in the vicinity of the isotropic Heisenberg point (Δ = 1) , where the model undergoes a phase transition from a gapped state (for Δ > 1) to a gapless state (for Δ ≤ 1), and compare our results there with those from spin-wave theory (SWT). Interestingly, the nature of the criticality at Δ = 1 for the present model with spins of spin quantum number s =1/2 that is revealed by our CCM results seems to differ qualitatively from that predicted by SWT, which becomes exact only for its near-classical large-s counterpart.

  8. Dipolar order by disorder in the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Gia-Wei

    2014-03-01

    The first experiments on the ``kagome bilayer'' SCGO triggered a wave of interest in kagome antiferromagnets in particular, and frustrated systems in general. A cluster of early seminal theoretical papers established kagome magnets as model systems for novel ordering phenomena, discussing in particular spin liquidity, partial order, disorder-free glassiness and order by disorder. Despite significant recent progress in understanding the ground state for the quantum S = 1 / 2 model, the nature of the low-temperature phase for the classical kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet has remained a mystery: the non-linear nature of the fluctuations around the exponentially numerous harmonically degenerate ground states has not permitted a controlled theory, while its complex energy landscape has precluded numerical simulations at low temperature. Here we present an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm which removes the latter obstacle. Our simulations detect a low-temperature regime in which correlations saturate at a remarkably small value. Feeding these results into an effective model and analyzing the results in the framework of an appropriate field theory implies the presence of long-range dipolar spin order with a tripled unit cell.

  9. Lattice location of phosphorus in n-type homoepitaxial diamond films grown by chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masataka; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2001-11-01

    The lattice location of phosphorus dopant atoms in n-type homoepitaxial diamond {111} films grown by chemical-vapor deposition has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and particle-induced x-ray emission under ion-channeling conditions. It is found that phosphorus dopant atoms occupy the substitutional sites almost completely in the host diamond lattice. The substitutional fraction of phosphorus was more than 0.9 for <011> and <111> directions. Present observation implies that the deep ground-state energy level of phosphorus in diamond, which is at 0.6 eV below the bottom of the conduction band, is attributed to the relaxation of surrounding carbon atoms.

  10. Dipolar order by disorder in the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice.

    PubMed

    Chern, Gia-Wei; Moessner, R

    2013-02-15

    Ever since the experiments which founded the field of highly frustrated magnetism, the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet has been the archetypical setting for the study of fluctuation induced exotic ordering. To this day the nature of its classical low-temperature state has remained a mystery: the nonlinear nature of the fluctuations around the exponentially numerous harmonically degenerate ground states has not permitted a controlled theory, while its complex energy landscape has precluded numerical simulations at low temperature, T. Here we present an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm which removes the latter obstacle. Our simulations detect a low-temperature regime in which correlations asymptote to a remarkably small value as T→0. Feeding these results into an effective model and analyzing the results in the framework of an appropriate field theory implies the presence of long-range dipolar spin order with a tripled unit cell.

  11. Magnetic properties of the S=1/2 square lattice antiferromagnet CuF2(H2O)2(pyz)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cuihuan; Lumsden, Mark D; Fishman, Randy Scott; Ehlers, Georg; Hong, Tao; Tian, Wei; Cao, Huibo; Podlesnyak, Andrey A; Dunmars, C; Schlueter, J. A.; Manson, J. L.; Christianson, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    We have performed elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments on single crystal samples of the coordination polymer compound CuF{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(pyz) (pyz = pyrazine) to study the magnetic structure and excitations. The elastic neutron diffraction measurements indicate a collinear antiferromagnetic structure with moments oriented along the [0.7 0 1] real-space direction and an ordered moment of 0.60 {+-} 0.03 {micro}B/Cu. This value is significantly smaller than the single-ion magnetic moment, reflecting the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. The spin wave dispersion from magnetic zone center to the zone boundary points (0.5 1.5 0) and (0.5 0 1.5) can be described by a two-dimensional Heisenberg model with a nearest-neighbor magnetic exchange constant J{sub 2D} = 0.934 {+-} 0.0025 meV. The interlayer interaction J{sub perp} in this compound is less than 1.5% of J{sub 2D}. The spin excitation energy at the (0.5 0.5 0.5) zone boundary point is reduced when compared to the (0.5 1 0.5) zone boundary point by {approx}10.3% {+-} 1.4%. This zone boundary dispersion is consistent with quantum Monte Carlo and series expansion calculations for the S=1/2 Heisenberg square lattice antiferromagnet, which include corrections for quantum fluctuations to linear spin wave theory.

  12. Importance of energy transfer and lattice properties in H-atom association with the (111) surface of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Accary, C.; Barbarat, P.; Hase, W.L. ); Hass, K.C. )

    1993-09-30

    This paper reports the results of a classical trajectory study of the dynamics of H-atom association with a radical site on the (111) surface of diamond. The association dynamics are affected by the potential between the H-atom and radical site, nonbonded interactions between the H-atom and the surface of the lattice, and the lattice vibrational frequencies. The sensitivity of the association probability to the lattice frequencies suggests that in a complete theory for association the dynamics of energy transfer from H-atom relative translation to the lattice modes must be considered. As a result, a capture theory like transition-state theory is expected to overestimate the association rate constant. The trajectories also show that once the H-atom associates there is a negligible initial transient in the ensuing dissociation of this H-atom from the lattice. The trajectory results are found to be sensitive to the treatment of zero-point energy. A quasiclassical trajectory calculation as performed here, which includes lattice zero-point energy, is expected to give a larger abstraction/addition rate constant ratio for a H-atom interacting with a diamond surface than does a molecular dynamics calculation, which does not include lattice zero-point energy. 73 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-08-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions.

  14. Quantum measurement-induced antiferromagnetic order and density modulations in ultracold Fermi gases in optical lattices

    PubMed Central

    Mazzucchi, Gabriel; Caballero-Benitez, Santiago F.; Mekhov, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Ultracold atomic systems offer a unique tool for understanding behavior of matter in the quantum degenerate regime, promising studies of a vast range of phenomena covering many disciplines from condensed matter to quantum information and particle physics. Coupling these systems to quantized light fields opens further possibilities of observing delicate effects typical of quantum optics in the context of strongly correlated systems. Measurement backaction is one of the most funda- mental manifestations of quantum mechanics and it is at the core of many famous quantum optics experiments. Here we show that quantum backaction of weak measurement can be used for tailoring long-range correlations of ultracold fermions, realizing quantum states with spatial modulations of the density and magnetization, thus overcoming usual requirement for a strong interatomic interactions. We propose detection schemes for implementing antiferromagnetic states and density waves. We demonstrate that such long-range correlations cannot be realized with local addressing, and they are a consequence of the competition between global but spatially structured backaction of weak quantum measurement and unitary dynamics of fermions. PMID:27510369

  15. Variational Monte Carlo study of chiral spin liquid in quantum antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenjun; Gong, Shoushu; Sheng, Donna; Donna Sheng Team

    We investigate the Heisenberg model with chiral coupling on the triangular lattice by using Gutzwiller projected fermionic states and the variational Monte Carlo technique. As the chiral coupling grows, a gapped spin liquid with non-trivial magnetic fluxes and nonzero chiral order is stabilized. Furthermore, we calculate the topological Chern number and the degeneracy of the ground state, both of which lead us to identify this flux state as the chiral spin liquid with C = 1 / 2 fractionalized Chern number. Finally, we add spatial anisotropy in the model to study the effects for the chiral order.

  16. Magnetic structure of the S =1/2 quasi-two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet Sr2CuTeO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koga, Tomoyuki; Kurita, Nobuyuki; Avdeev, Maxim; Danilkin, Sergey; Sato, Taku J.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2016-02-01

    The magnetic structure of the double perovskite compound Sr2CuTeO6 was determined from neutron powder diffraction data. This material is magnetically described as an S =1 /2 quasi-two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions. Sr2CuTeO6 undergoes a magnetic phase transition at TN≃29 K. The spin structure below TN is Néel antiferromagnetic on the square lattice, which means that the nearest-neighbor interaction (J1) is stronger than the next-nearest-neighbor interaction (J2), in contrast to other isostructural compounds such as Ba2CuWO6 and Sr2CuWO6 , for which | J1|<| J2| is realized.

  17. Magnetism and thermodynamics of the anisotropic frustrated spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a body-centered cubic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou

    2017-02-01

    The magnetic and thermodynamic properties of anisotropic frustrated spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a body-centered cubic lattice for Néel phase (the region of weak frustration) are systematically investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method within the random phase approximation and the Anderson and Callen's decoupling. The zero-temperature sublattice magnetization and Néel temperature increase with spin anisotropy strength and single-ion anisotropy strength, and decrease with frustration strength. This indicates that quantum fluctuation is suppressed by spin anisotropy and single-ion anisotropy, by contrast, is strengthened by frustration. It is possible to tune the quantum fluctuations by the competition of anisotropy strength and frustration strength to change the ground state properties of magnetic materials. Although we find that both the spin anisotropy and the single-ion anisotropy suppress the quantum fluctuations, but their respective effects on the thermodynamic quantities, especially the internal energy and free energy, are different at zero temperature and finite temperature. Furthermore, when these two kinds of anisotropic coexist, the effect of the spin anisotropy on the sublattice magnetization and internal energy is larger than that of the single-ion anisotropy.

  18. Electric Polarization Induced by Spin Ordering under Magnetic Fields in Distorted Triangular Lattice Antiferromagnet RbCoBr3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiwaki, Yoichi; Tokunaga, Masashi; Sakakura, Ryo; Takeyama, Shojiro; Kato, Tetsuya; Iio, Katsunori

    2017-04-01

    Magnetization and electric polarization are measured for RbCoBr3 in the presence of an applied high magnetic field. The saturation of magnetization is recognized in the magnetization curve. The g-value of pseudospin and the nearest-neighbor intrachain exchange interaction of RbCoBr3, which has the properties of a quasi-one-dimensional Ising antiferromagnet, are evaluated. The electric polarization parallel to the c-axis under a magnetic field alone and also under the simultaneous application of electric and magnetic fields along the c-axis is observed to increase around the magnetic phase transition point from the ferrimagnetic low-temperature phase to the partially disordered high-temperature phase. Experimental results indicate that the electric polarization is induced through the rearrangement of the spin structure accompanied by the magnetic phase transition under an applied magnetic field. A probable reason for the enhancement of electric polarization is given from the viewpoint of the interplay between the distortion of the triangular lattice and the interchain exchange interactions.

  19. Lattice distortion and stripelike antiferromagnetic order in Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Aashish; Tucker, Gregory S; Ramazanoglu, Mehmet; Tian, Wei; Ni, N; Cava, R J; McQueeney, Robert J; Goldman, Alan I; Kreyssig, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 is the parent compound for a class of Fe-based high-temperature superconductors where superconductivity with transition temperatures up to 30 K can be introduced by partial element substitution. We present a combined high-resolution high-energy x-ray diffraction and elastic neutron scattering study on a Ca10(Pt3As8)(Fe2As2)5 single crystal. This study reveals the microscopic nature of two distinct and continuous phase transitions to be very similar to other Fe-based high-temperature superconductors: an orthorhombic distortion of the high-temperature tetragonal Fe-As lattice below TS=110(2) K followed by stripelike antiferromagnetic ordering of the Fe moments below TN=96(2) K. These findings demonstrate that major features of the Fe-based high-temperature superconductors are very robust against variations in chemical constitution as well as structural imperfection of the layers separating the Fe-As layers from each other and confirms that the Fe-As layers primarily determine the physics in this class of material.

  20. Antiferromagnetism, f -wave, and chiral p -wave superconductivity in a kagome lattice with possible application to s d2 graphenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wan-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Chun; Xiang, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the electronic instabilities in a kagome lattice with Rashba spin-orbital coupling by the unbiased singular-mode functional renormalization group. At the parent 1 /3 filling, the normal state is a quantum spin Hall system. Since the bottom of the conduction band is near the van Hove singularity, the electron-doped system is highly susceptible to competing orders upon electron interactions. The topological nature of the parent system enriches the complexity and novelty of such orders. We find 120∘-type intra-unit-cell antiferromagnetic order, f -wave superconductivity, and chiral p -wave superconductivity with increasing electron doping above the van Hove point. In both types of superconducting phases, there is a mixture of comparable spin singlet and triplet components because of the Rashba coupling. The chiral p -wave superconducting state is characterized by a Chern number Z =1 , supporting a branch of Weyl fermion states on each edge. The model bares close relevance to the so-called s d2 graphenes proposed recently.

  1. CaMn2Sb2: Spin waves on a frustrated antiferromagnetic honeycomb lattice

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, D. E.; Simonson, J. W.; Kistner-Morris, J. J.; Smith, G. J.; Hassinger, J. E.; DeBeer-Schmidt, L.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Zaliznyak, I.; Aronson, M. C.

    2015-05-22

    We present inelastic neutron scattering measurements of the antiferromagnetic insulator CaMn2Sb2:, which consists of corrugated honeycomb layers of Mn. The dispersion of magnetic excitations has been measured along the H and L directions in reciprocal space, with a maximum excitation energy of ≈ 24 meV. These excitations are well described by spin waves in a Heisenberg model, including first and second neighbor exchange interactions, J1 and J2, in the Mn plane and also an exchange interaction between planes. The determined ratio J2/J1 ≈ 1/6 suggests that CaMn2Sb2: is the first example of a compound that lies very close to the mean field tricritical point, known for the classical Heisenberg model on the honeycomb lattice, where the N´eel phase and two different spiral phases coexist. The magnitude of the determined exchange interactions reveal a mean field ordering temperature ≈ 4 times larger than the reported N´eel temperature TN = 85 K, suggesting significant frustration arising from proximity to the tricritical point.

  2. Frustrated honeycomb-lattice bilayer quantum antiferromagnet in a magnetic field: Unconventional phase transitions in a two-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krokhmalskii, Taras; Baliha, Vasyl; Derzhko, Oleg; Schulenburg, Jörg; Richter, Johannes

    2017-03-01

    We consider the spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice including interlayer frustration in the presence of an external magnetic field. In the vicinity of the saturation field, we map the low-energy states of this quantum system onto the spatial configurations of hard hexagons on a honeycomb lattice. As a result, we can construct effective classical models (lattice-gas as well as Ising models) on the honeycomb lattice to calculate the properties of the frustrated quantum Heisenberg spin system in the low-temperature regime. We perform classical Monte Carlo simulations for a hard-hexagon model and adopt known results for an Ising model to discuss the finite-temperature order-disorder phase transition that is driven by a magnetic field at low temperatures. We also discuss an effective-model description around the ideal frustration case and find indications for a spin-flop-like transition in the considered isotropic spin model.

  3. Variational Monte Carlo study of chiral spin liquid in quantum antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Gong, Shou-Shu; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    By using Gutzwiller projected fermionic wave functions and variational Monte Carlo technique, we study the spin-1 /2 Heisenberg model with the first-neighbor (J1), second-neighbor (J2), and additional scalar chiral interaction JχSi.(Sj×Sk) on the triangular lattice. In the nonmagnetic phase of the J1-J2 triangular model with 0.08 ≲J2/J1≲0.16 , recent density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) studies [Zhu and White, Phys. Rev. B 92, 041105(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.041105 and Hu, Gong, Zhu, and Sheng, Phys. Rev. B 92, 140403(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140403] find a possible gapped spin liquid with the signal of a competition between a chiral and a Z2 spin liquid. Motivated by the DMRG results, we consider the chiral interaction JχSi.(Sj×Sk) as a perturbation for this nonmagnetic phase. We find that with growing Jχ, the gapless U(1) Dirac spin liquid, which has the best variational energy for Jχ=0 , exhibits the energy instability towards a gapped spin liquid with nontrivial magnetic fluxes and nonzero chiral order. We calculate topological Chern number and ground-state degeneracy, both of which identify this flux state as the chiral spin liquid with fractionalized Chern number C =1 /2 and twofold topological degeneracy. Our results indicate a positive direction to stabilize a chiral spin liquid near the nonmagnetic phase of the J1-J2 triangular model.

  4. Bicollinear antiferromagnetic order, monoclinic distortion, and reversed resistivity anisotropy in FeTe as a result of spin-lattice coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-08

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g~12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g~12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the reversed puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. Here, we concludemore » that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.« less

  5. Bicollinear antiferromagnetic order, monoclinic distortion, and reversed resistivity anisotropy in FeTe as a result of spin-lattice coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Christopher B.; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2016-09-08

    The bicollinear antiferromagnetic order experimentally observed in FeTe is shown to be stabilized by the coupling g~12 between monoclinic lattice distortions and the spin-nematic order parameter with B2g symmetry, within a three-orbital spin-fermion model studied with Monte Carlo techniques. A finite but small value of g~12 is required, with a concomitant lattice distortion compatible with experiments, and a tetragonal-monoclinic transition strongly first order. Remarkably, the bicollinear state found here displays a planar resistivity with the reversed puzzling anisotropy discovered in transport experiments. Orthorhombic distortions are also incorporated, and phase diagrams interpolating between pnictides and chalcogenides are presented. Here, we conclude that the spin-lattice coupling we introduce is sufficient to explain the challenging properties of FeTe.

  6. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    DOE PAGES

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; ...

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) μB/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis inmore » agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  7. Refining the spin Hamiltonian in the spin-1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnet ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 using single crystals.

    PubMed

    Han, Tianheng; Chu, Shaoyan; Lee, Young S

    2012-04-13

    We report thermodynamic measurements of the S=1/2 kagome lattice antiferromagnet ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2, a promising candidate system with a spin-liquid ground state. Using single crystal samples, the magnetic susceptibility both perpendicular and parallel to the kagome plane has been measured. A small, temperature-dependent anisotropy has been observed, where χ(z)/χ(p)>1 at high temperatures and χ(z)/χ(p)<1 at low temperatures. Fits of the high-temperature data to a Curie-Weiss model also reveal an anisotropy. By comparing with theoretical calculations, the presence of a small easy-axis exchange anisotropy can be deduced as the primary perturbation to the dominant Heisenberg nearest neighbor interaction. These results have great bearing on the interpretation of theoretical calculations based on the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet model to the experiments on ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2.

  8. Photonic band gap in an imperfect atomic diamond lattice: Penetration depth and effects of finite size and vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    We study the effects of finite size and of vacancies on the photonic band gap recently predicted for an atomic diamond lattice. Close to a Jg=0→Je=1 atomic transition, and for atomic lattices containing up to N≈3×104 atoms, we show how the density of states can be affected by both the shape of the system and the possible presence of a fraction of unoccupied lattice sites. We numerically predict and theoretically explain the presence of shape-induced border states and of vacancy-induced localized states appearing in the gap. We also investigate the penetration depth of the electromagnetic field which we compare to the case of an infinite system.

  9. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Shore, Joel D; Thurston, George M

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (pH-pK,W) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of pH-pK and W, and 1/W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √74 lattice constants), first validating simulations through

  10. Phase transitions in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a body-centered cubic lattice with interactions between next-to-nearest neighbors

    SciTech Connect

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Ramazanov, M. K.; Kassan-Ogly, F. A.; Kurbanova, D. R.

    2015-01-15

    Phase transitions in the antiferromagnetic Ising model on a body-centered cubic lattice are studied on the basis of the replica algorithm by the Monte Carlo method and histogram analysis taking into account the interaction of next-to-nearest neighbors. The phase diagram of the dependence of the critical temperature on the intensity of interaction of the next-to-nearest neighbors is constructed. It is found that a second-order phase transition is realized in this model in the investigated interval of the intensities of interaction of next-to-nearest neighbors.

  11. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of p H-p K and W , and 1 /W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √{74 } lattice constants), first validating simulations

  12. Similarity between the superconductivity in the graphene with the spin transport in the two-dimensional antiferromagnet in the honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2017-02-01

    We have used the Dirac's massless quasi-particles together with the Kubo's formula to study the spin transport by electrons in the graphene monolayer. We have calculated the electric conductivity and verified the behavior of the AC and DC currents of this system, that is a relativistic electron plasma. Our results show that the AC conductivity tends to infinity in the limit ω → 0 , similar to the behavior obtained for the spin transport in the two-dimensional frustrated antiferromagnet in the honeycomb lattice. We have made a diagrammatic expansion for the Green's function and we have not gotten significative change in the results.

  13. Long-Range Order of the Three-Sublattice Structure in theS=1 Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on a Spatially Anisotropic Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hiroki; Todo, Synge; Sakai, Tôru

    2013-04-01

    We study the S=1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a spatially anisotropic triangular lattice by the numerical diagonalization method. We examine the stability of the long-range order of a three-sublattice structure observed in the isotropic system between the isotropic case and the case of isolated one-dimensional chains. It is found that the long-range-ordered ground state with this structure exists in the range of 0.7 \\simle J_2/J_1 \\le 1, where J_1 is the interaction amplitude along the chains and J_2 is the amplitude of other interactions.

  14. Critical points of quadratic renormalizations of random variables and phase transitions of disordered polymer models on diamond lattices.

    PubMed

    Monthus, Cécile; Garel, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    We study the wetting transition and the directed polymer delocalization transition on diamond hierarchical lattices. These two phase transitions with frozen disorder correspond to the critical points of quadratic renormalizations of the partition function. (These exact renormalizations on diamond lattices can also be considered as approximate Migdal-Kadanoff renormalizations for hypercubic lattices.) In terms of the rescaled partition function z=Z/Z(typ) , we find that the critical point corresponds to a fixed point distribution with a power-law tail P(c)(z) ~ Phi(ln z)/z(1+mu) as z-->+infinity [up to some subleading logarithmic correction Phi(ln z)], so that all moments z(n) with n>mu diverge. For the wetting transition, the first moment diverges z=+infinity (case 0

  15. Magnetic excitations in the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4

    SciTech Connect

    Zvyagin, S. A.; Ozerov, M.; Kamenskyi, D.; Wosnitza, J.; Krzystek, J.; Yoshizawa, D.; Hagiwara, M.; Hu, Rongwei; Ryu, Hyejin; Petrovic, C.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.

    2015-11-27

    We present on high- field electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of magnetic excitations in the spin- 1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Cs2CuBr4. Frequency- field diagrams of ESR excitations are measured for different orientations of magnetic fields up to 25 T. We show that the substantial zero- field energy gap, Δ ≈ 9.5 K, observed in the low-temperature excitation spectrum of Cs2CuBr4 [Zvyagin et al:, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 077206 (2014)], is present well above TN. Noticeably, the transition into the long-range magnetically ordered phase does not significantly affect the size of the gap, suggesting that even below TN the high-energy spin dynamics in Cs2CuBr4 is determined by short-range-order spin correlations. The experimental data are compared with results of model spin-wave-theory calculations for spin-1/2 triangle-lattice antiferromagnet.

  16. Exact Calculation of Antiferromagnetic Ising Model on an Inhomogeneous Surface Recursive Lattice to Investigate Thermodynamics and Glass Transition on Surface/Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ran; Gujrati, Purushottam D.

    2017-01-01

    An inhomogeneous 2-dimensional recursive lattice formed by planar elements has been designed to investigate the thermodynamics of Ising spin system on the surface/thin film. The lattice is constructed as a hybrid of partial Husimi square lattice representing the bulk and 1D single bonds representing the surface. Exact calculations can be achieved with the recursive property of the lattice. The model has an anti-ferromagnetic interaction to give rise to an ordered phase identified as crystal, and a solution with higher energy to represent the amorphous/metastable phase. Free energy and entropy of the ideal crystal and supercooled liquid state of the model on the surface are calculated by the partial partition function. By analyzing the free energies and entropies of the crystal and supercooled liquid state, we are able to identify the melting and ideal glass transition on the surface. The results show that due to the variation of coordination number, the transition temperatures on the surface decrease significantly compared to the bulk system. Our calculation qualitatively agrees with both experimental and simulation works on the thermodynamics of surfaces and thin films conducted by others. Interactions between particles farther than the nearest neighbor distance are taken into consideration, and their effects are investigated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11505110, the Shanghai Pujiang Talent Program under Grant No. 16PJ1431900, and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2016M591666

  17. Static and dynamical properties of the spin-1/2 equilateral triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoSb2O9

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Jie; Kamiya, Yoshitomo; Hong, Tao; ...

    2016-02-24

    We present single-crystal neutron scattering measurements of the spin-1/2 equilateral triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoSb2O9. Besides confirming that the Co2+ magnetic moments lie in the ab plane for zero magnetic field and then determining all the exchange parameters of the minimal quasi-2D spin Hamiltonian, we provide conclusive experimental evidence of magnon decay through observation of intrinsic line broadening. Through detailed comparisons with the linear and nonlinear spin-wave theories, we also point out that the large-S approximation, which is conventionally employed to predict magnon decay in noncollinear magnets, is inadequate to explain our experimental observation. Hence, our results call for a new theoreticalmore » framework for describing excitation spectra in low-dimensional frustrated magnets under strong quantum effects.« less

  18. Magnetic Excitations and Electronic Interactions in Sr2 CuTeO6 : A Spin-1 /2 Square Lattice Heisenberg Antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babkevich, P.; Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Fâk, B.; Rols, S.; Fennell, T.; Pajić, D.; Tanaka, H.; Pardini, T.; Singh, R. R. P.; Mitrushchenkov, A.; Yazyev, O. V.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Sr2 CuTeO6 presents an opportunity for exploring low-dimensional magnetism on a square lattice of S =1 /2 Cu2 + ions. We employ ab initio multireference configuration interaction calculations to unravel the Cu2 + electronic structure and to evaluate exchange interactions in Sr2 CuTeO6 . The latter results are validated by inelastic neutron scattering using linear spin-wave theory and series-expansion corrections for quantum effects to extract true coupling parameters. Using this methodology, which is quite general, we demonstrate that Sr2 CuTeO6 is an almost ideal realization of a nearest-neighbor Heisenberg antiferromagnet but with relatively weak coupling of 7.18(5) meV.

  19. Non-linear spin wave theory results for the frustrated [Formula: see text] Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a body-centered cubic lattice.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Kingshuk; Datta, Trinanjan

    2009-10-07

    At zero temperature the sublattice magnetization of the quantum spin- 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a body-centered cubic lattice with competing first and second neighbor exchange (J(1) and J(2)) is investigated using the non-linear spin wave theory. The zero temperature phases of the model consist of a two sublattice Néel phase for small J(2) (AF(1)) and a collinear phase at large J(2) (AF(2)). We show that quartic corrections due to spin wave interactions enhance the sublattice magnetization in both the AF(1) and the AF(2) phase. The magnetization corrections are prominent near the classical transition point of the model and in the J(2)>J(1) regime. The ground state energy with quartic interactions is also calculated. It is found that up to quartic corrections the first order phase transition (previously observed in this model) between the AF(1) and the AF(2) phase survives.

  20. Variational Monte Carlo study of a gapless spin liquid in the spin-1/2 XXZ antiferromagnetic model on the kagome lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Gong, Shou-Shu; Becca, Federico; Sheng, D. N.

    2015-11-01

    By using the variational Monte Carlo technique, we study the spin-1/2 XXZ antiferromagnetic model (with easy-plane anisotropy) on the kagome lattice. A class of Gutzwiller projected fermionic states with a spin Jastrow factor is considered to describe either spin liquids [with U (1 ) or Z2 symmetry] or magnetically ordered phases [with q =(0 ,0 ) or q =(4 π /3 ,0 ) ]. We find that the magnetic states are not stable in the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, there is no energy gain to break the gauge symmetry from U (1 ) to Z2 within the spin-liquid states, as previously found in the Heisenberg model. The best variational wave function is therefore the U (1 ) Dirac state, supplemented by the spin Jastrow factor. Furthermore, a vanishing S =2 spin gap is obtained at the variational level, in the whole regime from the X Y to the Heisenberg model.

  1. Pressure-induced superconductivity in the antiferromagnet κ - (ET) 2C F3S O3 with quasi-one-dimensional triangular spin lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Asai, Takayuki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hayama, Hiromi; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Saito, Gunzi

    2016-07-01

    We report an antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering at ambient pressure and a superconducting transition under pressure for κ - (ET) 2C F3S O3 [ ET =bis (ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene], which has a two-dimensional electronic system with quasi-one-dimensional triangular spin lattice. At ambient pressure, AF ordering was detected at TN=2.5 K by 1H NMR, subsequent to two structural phase transitions at 230 and 190 K. Under hydrostatic pressures, metallic behavior appeared above ˜1.1 GPa, and a superconducting transition (maximum onset Tc=4.8 K at ˜1.3 GPa) was observed up to 2.2 GPa. Superconductivity was also found under c -axis strain, which reduced t'/t , but was absent under b -axis strain which increased t'/t .

  2. Zigzag antiferromagnetic ground state with anisotropic correlation lengths in the quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb lattice compound N a2C o2Te O6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, A. K.; Yusuf, S. M.; Kumar, Amit; Ritter, C.

    2017-03-01

    The crystal structure, magnetic ground state, and the temperature-dependent microscopic spin-spin correlations of the frustrated honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet N a2C o2Te O6 have been investigated by powder neutron diffraction. A long-range antiferromagnetic (AFM) ordering has been found below TN˜24.8 K . The magnetic ground state, determined to be zigzag antiferromagnetic and characterized by a propagation vector k =(1 /2 0 0 ) , occurs due to the competing exchange interactions up to third-nearest neighbors within the honeycomb lattice. The exceptional existence of a limited magnetic correlation length along the c axis (perpendicular to the honeycomb layers in the a b planes) has been found even at 1.8 K, well below the TN˜24.8 K . The observed limited correlation along the c axis is explained by the disorder distribution of the Na ions within the intermediate layers between honeycomb planes. The reduced ordered moments mCo (1 )=2.77 (3 ) μB/C o2 + and mCo (2 )=2.45 (2 ) μB/C o2 + at 1.8 K reflect the persistence of spin fluctuations in the ordered state. Above TN˜24.8 K , the presence of short-range magnetic correlations, manifested by broad diffuse magnetic peaks in the diffraction patterns, has been found. Reverse Monte Carlo analysis of the experimental diffuse magnetic scattering data reveals that the spin correlations are mainly confined within the two-dimensional honeycomb layers (a b plane) with a correlation length of ˜12 Å at 25 K. The nature of the spin arrangements is found to be similar in both the short-range and long-range ordered magnetic states. This implies that the short-range correlation grows with decreasing temperature and leads to the zigzag AFM ordering at T ≤TN . The present study provides a comprehensive picture of the magnetic correlations over the temperature range above and below the TN and their relation to the crystal structure. The role of intermediate soft Na layers on the magnetic coupling between honeycomb planes is

  3. A first principles study of the lattice stability of diamond-structure semiconductors under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Shiquan; Zhao Jianling; Cheng Xinlu

    2013-01-14

    Using density-functional linear-response theory, we calculated the phonon dispersion curves for the diamond structural elemental semiconductors of Ge, C and zinc-blende structure semiconductors of GaAs, InSb at different electronic temperatures. We found that the transverse-acoustic phonon frequencies of C and Ge become imaginary as the electron temperature is elevated, which means the lattices of C and Ge become unstable under intense laser irradiation. These results are very similar with previous theoretical and experimental results for Si. For GaAs and InSb, not only can be obtained the similar results for their transverse-acoustic modes, but also their LO-TO splitting gradually decreases as the electronic temperature is increased. It means that the electronic excitation weakens the strength of the ionicity of ionic crystal under intense laser irradiation.

  4. Lattice-distortion Induced Magnetic Transition from Low-temperature Antiferromagnetism to High-temperature Ferrimagnetism in Double Perovskites A2FeOsO6 (A = Ca, Sr).

    PubMed

    Hou, Y S; Xiang, H J; Gong, X G

    2015-08-20

    High-temperature insulating ferrimagnetism is investigated in order to further reveal its physical mechanisms, as well as identify potentially important scientific and practical applications relative to spintronics. For example, double perovskites such as Sr2FeOsO6 and Ca2FeOsO6 are shown to have puzzling magnetic properties. The former is a low-temperature antiferromagnet while the latter is a high-temperature insulating ferrimagnet. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we have investigated the frustrated magnetism of A2FeOsO6 by employing density functional theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. We find lattice distortion enhances the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring Fe-O-Os interaction, however weakens the antiferromagnetic interactions via the Os-O-O-Os and Fe-O-Os-O-Fe paths, so is therefore responsible for the magnetic transition from the low-temperature antiferromagnetism to the high-temperature ferrimagnetism as the decrease of the A(2+) ion radii. Also discussed is the 5d(3)-3d(5) superexchange. We propose that such superexchange is intrinsically antiferromagnetic instead of ferromagnetic as previously thought. Our work clearly illustrates the magnetic frustration can be effectively relieved by lattice distortion, thus paving the way for tuning of complex magnetism in yet other 3d-5d (4d) double perovskites.

  5. Lattice-distortion Induced Magnetic Transition from Low-temperature Antiferromagnetism to High-temperature Ferrimagnetism in Double Perovskites A2FeOsO6 (A = Ca, Sr)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Y. S.; Xiang, H. J.; Gong, X. G.

    2015-01-01

    High-temperature insulating ferrimagnetism is investigated in order to further reveal its physical mechanisms, as well as identify potentially important scientific and practical applications relative to spintronics. For example, double perovskites such as Sr2FeOsO6 and Ca2FeOsO6 are shown to have puzzling magnetic properties. The former is a low-temperature antiferromagnet while the latter is a high-temperature insulating ferrimagnet. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we have investigated the frustrated magnetism of A2FeOsO6 by employing density functional theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. We find lattice distortion enhances the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring Fe-O-Os interaction, however weakens the antiferromagnetic interactions via the Os-O-O-Os and Fe-O-Os-O-Fe paths, so is therefore responsible for the magnetic transition from the low-temperature antiferromagnetism to the high-temperature ferrimagnetism as the decrease of the A2+ ion radii. Also discussed is the 5d3-3d5 superexchange. We propose that such superexchange is intrinsically antiferromagnetic instead of ferromagnetic as previously thought. Our work clearly illustrates the magnetic frustration can be effectively relieved by lattice distortion, thus paving the way for tuning of complex magnetism in yet other 3d–5d (4d) double perovskites. PMID:26289139

  6. Lattice-distortion Induced Magnetic Transition from Low-temperature Antiferromagnetism to High-temperature Ferrimagnetism in Double Perovskites A2FeOsO6 (A = Ca, Sr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. S.; Xiang, H. J.; Gong, X. G.

    2015-08-01

    High-temperature insulating ferrimagnetism is investigated in order to further reveal its physical mechanisms, as well as identify potentially important scientific and practical applications relative to spintronics. For example, double perovskites such as Sr2FeOsO6 and Ca2FeOsO6 are shown to have puzzling magnetic properties. The former is a low-temperature antiferromagnet while the latter is a high-temperature insulating ferrimagnet. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we have investigated the frustrated magnetism of A2FeOsO6 by employing density functional theory and maximally-localized Wannier functions. We find lattice distortion enhances the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighboring Fe-O-Os interaction, however weakens the antiferromagnetic interactions via the Os-O-O-Os and Fe-O-Os-O-Fe paths, so is therefore responsible for the magnetic transition from the low-temperature antiferromagnetism to the high-temperature ferrimagnetism as the decrease of the A2+ ion radii. Also discussed is the 5d3-3d5 superexchange. We propose that such superexchange is intrinsically antiferromagnetic instead of ferromagnetic as previously thought. Our work clearly illustrates the magnetic frustration can be effectively relieved by lattice distortion, thus paving the way for tuning of complex magnetism in yet other 3d-5d (4d) double perovskites.

  7. Antiferromagnetic spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, T; Marti, X; Wadley, P; Wunderlich, J

    2016-03-01

    Antiferromagnetic materials are internally magnetic, but the direction of their ordered microscopic moments alternates between individual atomic sites. The resulting zero net magnetic moment makes magnetism in antiferromagnets externally invisible. This implies that information stored in antiferromagnetic moments would be invisible to common magnetic probes, insensitive to disturbing magnetic fields, and the antiferromagnetic element would not magnetically affect its neighbours, regardless of how densely the elements are arranged in the device. The intrinsic high frequencies of antiferromagnetic dynamics represent another property that makes antiferromagnets distinct from ferromagnets. Among the outstanding questions is how to manipulate and detect the magnetic state of an antiferromagnet efficiently. In this Review we focus on recent works that have addressed this question. The field of antiferromagnetic spintronics can also be viewed from the general perspectives of spin transport, magnetic textures and dynamics, and materials research. We briefly mention this broader context, together with an outlook of future research and applications of antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  8. Randomness-Induced Quantum Spin Liquid Behavior in the s = 1/2 Random J1-J2 Heisenberg Antiferromagnet on the Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, Kazuki; Kawamura, Hikaru

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the ground-state and finite-temperature properties of the bond-random s = 1/2 Heisenberg model on a honeycomb lattice with frustrated nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions, J1 and J2, by the exact diagonalization and the Hams-de Raedt methods. The ground-state phase diagram of the model is constructed in the randomness versus the frustration (J2/J1) plane, with the aim of clarifying the effects of randomness and frustration in stabilizing a variety of distinct phases. We find that the randomness induces the gapless quantum spin liquid (QSL)-like state, the random-singlet state, in a wide range of parameter space. The observed robustness of the random-singlet state suggests that the gapless QSL-like behaviors might be realized in a wide class of frustrated quantum magnets possessing a certain amount of randomness or inhomogeneity, without fine-tuning the interaction parameters. Possible implications to recent experiments on the honeycomb-lattice magnets Ba3CuSb2O9 and 6HB-Ba3NiSb2O9 exhibiting the gapless QSL-like behaviors are discussed.

  9. Numerical study of magnetization plateaus in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the checkerboard lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capponi, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    We present numerical evidence that the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model on the two-dimensional checkerboard lattice exhibits several magnetization plateaus for m =0 , 1 /4 , 1 /2 , and 3 /4 , where m is the magnetization normalized by its saturation value. These incompressible states correspond to somewhat similar valence-bond crystal phases that break lattice symmetries, though they are different from the already established plaquette phase for m =0 . Our results are based on exact diagonalization as well as density-matrix renormalization-group large-scale simulations and interpreted in terms of simple parameter-free trial wave functions.

  10. The quantum spin-1/2 J1-J2 antiferromagnet on a stacked square lattice: a study of effective-field theory in a finite cluster.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Wagner A; de Sousa, J Ricardo; Viana, J Roberto; Richter, J

    2010-04-14

    The ground state phase diagram of the quantum spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in the presence of nearest-neighbor (J(1)) and next-nearest-neighbor (J(2)) interactions (J(1)-J(2) model) on a stacked square lattice, where we introduce an interlayer coupling through nearest-neighbor bonds of strength J(), is studied within the framework of the differential operator technique. The Hamiltonian is solved by effective-field theory in a cluster with N=4 spins (EFT-4). We obtain the sublattice magnetization m(A) for the ordered phases: antiferromagnetic (AF) and collinear (CAF-collinear antiferromagnetic). We propose a functional for the free energy Ψ(μ)(m(μ)) (μ=A, B) to obtain the phase diagram in the λ-α plane, where λ=J()/J(1) and α=J(2)/J(1). Depending on the values of λ and α, we found different ordered states (AF and CAF) and a disordered state (quantum paramagnetic (QP)). For an intermediate region α(1c)(λ) < α < α(2c)(λ) we observe a QP phase that disappears for λ below some critical value λ(1)≈0.67. For α < α(1c)(λ) and α > α(2c)(λ), and below λ(1), we have the AF and CAF semi-classically ordered states, respectively. At α=α(1c)(λ) a second-order transition between the AF and QP states occurs and at α=α(2c)(λ) a first-order transition between the AF and CAF phases takes place. The boundaries between these ordered phases merge at the critical end point CEP≡(λ(1), α(c)), where α(c)≈0.56. Above this CEP there is again a direct first-order transition between the AF and CAF phases, with a behavior described by the point α(c) independent of λ ≥ λ(1).

  11. Magnetic phases of the quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet CuCrO2 on a triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhratov, Yu. A.; Svistov, L. E.; Kuhns, P. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Reyes, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We have carried out Cu,6563 NMR spectra measurements in a magnetic field up to about 45 T on a single crystal of a multiferroic triangular antiferromagnet CuCrO2. The measurements were performed for magnetic fields aligned along the crystal c axis. Field and temperature evolution of the spectral shape demonstrates a number of phase transitions. It was found that the 3D magnetic ordering takes place in the low field range (H ≲15 T). At higher fields magnetic structures form within individual triangular planes whereas the spin directions of the magnetic ions from neighboring planes are not correlated. It is established that the 2D-3D transition is hysteretic in field and temperature. Line-shape analysis reveals several possible magnetic structures existing within individual planes for different phases of CuCrO2. Within certain regions on the magnetic H -T phase diagram of CuCrO2 a 3D magnetic ordering with tensor order parameter is expected.

  12. Kondo lattice and antiferromagnetic behavior in quaternary CeTAl4Si2 (T = Rh, Ir) single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Maurya, Arvind; Kulkarni, Ruta; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; ...

    2016-02-26

    Here, we have explored in detail the anisotropic magnetic properties of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, which undergo two antiferromagnetic transitions, at TN1 = 12.6 and 15.5 K, followed by a second transition at TN2 = 9.4 and 13.8 K, respectively, with the [001]-axis as the relatively easy axis of magnetization. The electrical resistivity at ambient and applied pressure provides evidence of Kondo interaction in both compounds, further supported by a reduced value of the entropy associated with the magnetic ordering. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ is inferred to be 195.6 and 49.4 mJ/(mol K2) for CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, respectively, classifying these materialsmore » as moderate heavy-fermion compounds. The crystal electric field energy levels are derived from the peak seen in the Schottky heat capacity. Furthermore, we have also performed electronic structure calculations by using the local spin density approximation + U [LSDA+U] approach, which provide physical insights on the observed magnetic behavior of these two compounds.« less

  13. Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya Interaction and the Ground State in S = 3/2 Perfect Kagome Lattice Antiferromagnet KCr3(OH)6(SO4)2 (Cr-Jarosite) Studied by X-Band and High-Frequency ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Susumu; Nakata, Ryohei; Ikeda, Shohei; Takahashi, Naoki; Sakurai, Takahiro; Zhang, Wei-Min; Ohta, Hitoshi; Shimokawa, Tokuro; Sakai, Tôru; Okuta, Koji; Hara, Shigeo; Sato, Hirohiko

    2017-02-01

    A single-crystal S = 3/2 perfect kagome lattice antiferromagnet, KCr3(OH)6(SO4)2 (Cr-jarosite), has been studied by X-band and high-frequency electron spin resonance (ESR). The g-values perpendicular to the kagome plane (c-axis) and in the plane were determined to be gc = 1.9704 ± 0.0002 and gξ = 1.9720 ± 0.0003, respectively, by high-frequency ESR observed at 265 K. Antiferromagnetic resonances (AFMRs) with an antiferromagnetic gap of 120 GHz were observed at 1.9 K, which is below TN = 4.5 K. The analysis of AFMR modes using the conventional molecular field theory gave dp = 0.27 K and dz = 0.07 K, where dp and dz are in-plane and out-of-plane components of d vector of the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction, respectively. On the basis of these results and the exchange interaction of J = 6.15 K estimated by Okuta et al., the ground state of Cr-jarosite was discussed in connection with the Monte Carlo simulation results with classical Heisenberg spins on the kagome lattice by Elhajal et al. Finally, the angular dependence of the linewidth and lineshape observed at 296 K by X-band ESR showed the typical behavior of a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet, suggesting the good two-dimensionality of Cr-jarosite.

  14. Unusual Magnetic State with Dual Magnetic Excitations in the Single Crystal of S = 1/2 Kagome Lattice Antiferromagnet CaCu3(OH)6Cl2 • 0.6H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Naoya; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Ishii, Yuto; Ihara, Yoshihiko; Oda, Migaku; Okabe, Hirotaka; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro; Takata, Atsushi; Kida, Takanori; Narumi, Yasuo; Hagiwara, Masayuki

    2017-03-01

    We have succeeded in preparing single crystals of CaCu3(OH)6Cl2 • 0.6H2O, a candidate for the S = 1/2 Kagome lattice antiferromagnet. Magnetic properties of the compound are dominated by the nearest neighbor antiferromagnetic interaction J1, and the next nearest neighbor ferromagnetic J2 and an antiferromagnetic Jd across a hexagon, which is different from related compounds Kapellasite and Haydeeite with ferromagnetic J1. Magnetic susceptibility exhibits a sudden increase below 13 K and a cusp anomaly at T* = 7.2 K in the ab-plane, whereas only a moderate enhancement is observed below T* along the c-axis. A tiny peak detected in heat capacity at T* indicates the occurrence of a magnetic phase transition. The low temperature magnetic heat capacity was reproduced by assuming a two-dimensional spin-wave component and a temperature-linear term. The spin-wave contribution suggests a magnon excitation in a short-range ordered region, whereas the relatively large T-linear term 5.9 mJ/(Cu-mol·K2) at H = 0 T of this insulating compound suggests the existence of an unusual quasi-particle excitation below T*. They apparently reveal the unconventionality of the ground state of this S = 1/2 Kagome lattice antiferromagnet.

  15. Quantum phase transition, universality, and scaling behaviors in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic competing interactions on a honeycomb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Zhen; Xi, Bin; Chen, Xi; Li, Wei; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Su, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The quantum phase transition, scaling behaviors, and thermodynamics in the spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic coupling J >0 in the armchair direction and ferromagnetic interaction J'<0 in the zigzag direction on a honeycomb lattice are systematically studied using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. By calculating the Binder ratio Q2 and spin stiffness ρ in two directions for various coupling ratios α =J'/J under different lattice sizes, we found that a quantum phase transition from the dimerized phase to the stripe phase occurs at the quantum critical point αc=-0.93 . Through the finite-size scaling analysis on Q2, ρx, and ρy, we determined the critical exponent related to the correlation length ν to be 0.7212(8), implying that this transition falls into a classical Heisenberg O(3) universality. A zero magnetization plateau is observed in the dimerized phase, whose width decreases with increasing α . A phase diagram in the coupling ratio α -magnetic field h plane is obtained, where four phases, including dimerized, stripe, canted stripe, and polarized, are identified. It is also unveiled that the temperature dependence of the specific heat C (T ) for different α 's intersects precisely at one point, similar to that of liquid 3He under different pressures and several magnetic compounds under various magnetic fields. The scaling behaviors of Q2, ρ , and C (T ) are carefully analyzed. The susceptibility is compared with the experimental data to give the magnetic parameters of both compounds.

  16. Quantum phase transition, universality, and scaling behaviors in the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model with ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic competing interactions on a honeycomb lattice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Zhen; Xi, Bin; Chen, Xi; Li, Wei; Wang, Zheng-Chuan; Su, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The quantum phase transition, scaling behaviors, and thermodynamics in the spin-1/2 quantum Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic coupling J>0 in the armchair direction and ferromagnetic interaction J^{'}<0 in the zigzag direction on a honeycomb lattice are systematically studied using the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. By calculating the Binder ratio Q_{2} and spin stiffness ρ in two directions for various coupling ratios α=J^{'}/J under different lattice sizes, we found that a quantum phase transition from the dimerized phase to the stripe phase occurs at the quantum critical point α_{c}=-0.93. Through the finite-size scaling analysis on Q_{2}, ρ_{x}, and ρ_{y}, we determined the critical exponent related to the correlation length ν to be 0.7212(8), implying that this transition falls into a classical Heisenberg O(3) universality. A zero magnetization plateau is observed in the dimerized phase, whose width decreases with increasing α. A phase diagram in the coupling ratio α-magnetic field h plane is obtained, where four phases, including dimerized, stripe, canted stripe, and polarized, are identified. It is also unveiled that the temperature dependence of the specific heat C(T) for different α's intersects precisely at one point, similar to that of liquid ^{3}He under different pressures and several magnetic compounds under various magnetic fields. The scaling behaviors of Q_{2}, ρ, and C(T) are carefully analyzed. The susceptibility is compared with the experimental data to give the magnetic parameters of both compounds.

  17. Unconventional Transport of Spin Bipolarons on an Antiferromagnetic buckled hexagonal lattice of half-filled d-band Mn2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorsmolle, Verner; Ignatov, Alexander; Pezzoli, Maria; Haule, Kristjan; Kolchmeyer, David; Lee, Alexander; Simonson, Jack; Aronson, Meigan; Blumberg, Girsh

    2013-03-01

    CaMn2Sb2 presents a magnetic system with a buckled hexagonal lattice of half-filled d-band Mn2+ ions. AC resistivity and susceptibility exhibit non-monotonic temperature dependence at 85-210 K. Below 85 K it has an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase with an activation energy of 28 meV, and above 210 K a paramagnetic phase. Using Raman spectroscopy we find a mode at 32 meV which develops below the AF transition. We attribute this excitation to the activation energy associated with the motion of spin bipolarons. Here, hybridization between Sb and Mn results in extra electrons for the Mn 3 d-shells. It is energetically favorable for these extra carriers to form spin-singlets. These spin-bipolarons cover two Mn sites with a binding energy of ~80 meV and conduction proceed via photo-assisted hopping with an activation energy of ~32 meV. This spin bipolaron model explains the spectroscopic features providing a self-consistent picture of this conductivity mechanism that also clarifies reported unusual temperature-dependent magnetic and transport data. VKT, AI, DK, AL and GB acknowledge support by NSF DMR-1104884 and by U.S. DOE, Office of BES, Award DE-SC0005463. MEP and JWS acknowledge support by NSSEFF, administrative by the AFOSR.

  18. Numerical evidence for a chiral spin liquid in the XXZ antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on the kagome lattice at m =2/3 magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna; Changlani, Hitesh J.; Clark, Bryan K.; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    We perform an exact-diagonalization study of the spin-1/2 XXZ Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the kagome lattice at finite magnetization m =2/3 with an emphasis on the X Y point (Jz=0 ) and in the presence of a small chiral term. Recent analytic work by Kumar et al. [K. Kumar, K. Sun, and E. Fradkin, Phys. Rev. B 90, 174409 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.90.174409] on the same model, using a newly developed flux attachment transformation, predicts a plateau at this value of the magnetization described by a chiral spin liquid (CSL) with a spin Hall conductance of σx y=1/2 . Such a state is topological in nature, has a ground-state degeneracy, and exhibits fractional excitations. We analyze the degeneracy structure in the low-energy manifold, identify the candidate topological states, and use them to compute the modular matrices and Chern numbers, all of which strongly agree with expected theoretical behavior for the σx y=1/2 CSL. In the limit of zero chirality, we find on most (not all) clusters that the topological invariants are still those of a CSL.

  19. Thermodynamic properties of frustrated arbitrary spin-S J1-J2 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the body-centered-cubic lattice in random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou

    2016-07-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the frustrated arbitrary spin-S J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the body-centered-cubic lattice for Néel phase are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green's function method within the random phase approximation (RPA). The role of spin quantum number and frustration strength on sublattice magnetization, Néel temperature, internal energy, and free energy are carefully analyzed. The curve of zero-temperature sublattice magnetization / S versus frustration strength J2/J1 values are almost flat at the larger spin quantum number S=10. With the increase of normalized temperature T/TN, the larger the spin quantum number S, the faster the / S drops, and the smaller influence of J2/J1 on the / S versus T/TN curve. Under the RPA approach, the Néel temperature TN /Sp and the internal energy E/Sp at the Néel point are independent of spin quantum number S. The numerical results show that the internal energy E/Sp at the Néel point seems independent of the frustration strength J2/J1. This indicates that thermodynamic quantities have universal characteristics for large spin quantum number.

  20. TheS=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice: Exact results and spin-wave theory for finite cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutscher, R.; Everts, H. U.

    1993-03-01

    We study the ground state properties of the S=$\\frac{1}{2}$ Heisenberg antiferromagnet (HAF) on the triangular lattice with nearest-neighbour ($J$) and next-nearest neighbour ($\\alpha J$) couplings. Classically, this system is known to be ordered in a $120^\\circ$ N\\'eel type state for values $-\\infty<\\alpha\\le 1/8$ of the ratio $\\alpha$ of these couplings and in a collinear state for $1/8<\\alpha<1$. The order parameter ${\\cal M}$ and the helicity $\\chi$ of the $120^\\circ$ structure are obtained by numerical diagonalisation of finite periodic systems of up to $N=30$ sites and by applying the spin-wave (SW) approximation to the same finite systems. We find a surprisingly good agreement between the exact and the SW results in the entire region $-\\infty<\\alpha< 1/8$. It appears that the SW theory is still valid for the simple triangular HAF ($\\alpha=0$) although the sublattice magnetisation ${\\cal M}$ is substantially reduced from its classical value by quantum fluctuations. Our numerical results for the order parameter ${\\cal N}$ of the collinear order support the previous conjecture of a first order transition between the $120^\\circ$ and the collinear order at $\\alpha \\simeq 1/8$.

  1. Magnetic phase diagram and multiferroicity of Ba3MnNb2O9 : A spin -52 triangular lattice antiferromagnet with weak easy-axis anisotropy

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, M.; Choi, E. S.; Huang, X.; ...

    2014-12-01

    Here we have performed magnetic, electric, thermal and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) experiments as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations on Ba3MnNb2 O9. All results suggest that Ba3MnNb2 O9 is a spin-5/2 triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLAF) with weak easy-axis anisotropy. At zero field, we observed a narrow two-step transition at TN1 = 3.4 K and TN2 = 3.0 K. The neutron diffraction measurement and the DFT calculation indicate a 120 spin structure in ab plane with out-of-plane canting at low temperatures. With increasing magnetic field, the 120 spin structure evolves into up-up-down (uud) and oblique phases showing successive magneticmore » phase transitions, which fits well to the theoretical prediction for the 2D Heisenberg TLAF with classical spins. Ultimately, multiferroicity is observed when the spins are not collinear but suppressed in the uud and oblique phases.« less

  2. Bose-Hubbard model on a triangular lattice with diamond ring exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, V. G.; Hettiarachchilage, K.; Tam, K.-M.; Jarrell, M.; Moreno, J.

    2016-10-01

    Ring-exchange interactions have been proposed as a possible mechanism for a Bose-liquid phase at zero temperature, a phase that is compressible with no superfluidity. Using the stochastic Green function algorithm (SGF), we study the effect of these interactions for bosons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice. We show that the supersolid phase that is known to exist in the ground state for a wide range of densities is rapidly destroyed as the ring-exchange interactions are turned on. We establish the ground-state phase diagram of the system, which is characterized by the absence of the expected Bose-liquid phase.

  3. Ionothermal synthesis of open-framework metal phosphates with a Kagome lattice network exhibiting canted anti-ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guangmei; Valldor, Martin; Mallick, Bert; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-01-01

    Four open-framework transition-metal phosphates; (NH4)2Co3(HPO4)2F4 (1), (NH4)Co3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (2), KCo3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (3), and KFe3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (4); are prepared by ionothermal synthesis using pyridinium hexafluorophosphate as the ionic liquid. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the four compounds contain cobalt/iron–oxygen/fluoride layers with Kagomé topology composed of interlinked face-sharing MO3F3/MO4F2 octahedra. PO3OH pseudo-tetrahedral groups augment the [M3O6F4] (1)/[M3O8F2] layers on both sides to give M3(HPO4)2F4 (1) and M3(HPO4)2F2 (2–4) layers. These layers are stacked along the a axis in a sequence AA…, resulting in the formation of a layer structure for (NH4)2Co3(HPO4)2F4(1). In NH4Co3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 and KM3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2, the M3(HPO4)2F2 layers are stacked along the a axis in a sequence AAi… and are connected by [PO3(OH)] tetrahedra, giving rise to a 3-D open framework structure with 10-ring channels along the [001] direction. The negative charges of the inorganic framework are balanced by K+/NH4+ ions located within the channels. The magnetic transition metal cations themselves form layers with stair-case Kagomé topology. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements reveal that all four compounds exhibit a canted anti-ferromagnetic ground state (Tc = 10 or 13 K for Co and Tc = 27 K for Fe) with different canting angles. The full orbital moment is observed for both Co2+ and Fe2+.

  4. Absence of nematic ordering transition in a diamond lattice: Application to FeSc2S4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Chandan; Leong, Zhidong; Zhang, Shuyi; Phillips, Philip W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent neutron scattering observations by [Plumb et al., Phys. Rev. X 6, 041055 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041055] reveal that the ground state of FeSc2S4 is magnetic with two distinct Fe environments, instead of a quantum spin liquid as had been previously thought. Starting with the relevant O (N ) -symmetric vector model of FeSc2S4 , we study how the discrete (Z2) and continuous rotational symmetries are successively broken, yielding nematic and ordered phases. At high temperatures, we find that the nematic order parameter falls as T-γ (γ >0 ), and therefore, FeSc2S4 lacks any distinct nematic ordering temperature. This feature indicates that the three-dimensional diamond lattice of FeSc2S4 is highly susceptible to the breaking of Ising symmetries, and explains the two distinct Fe environments that are present even at high temperatures, as seen by Mössbauer and far-infrared optical spectroscopy.

  5. Quasiclassical magnetic order and its loss in a spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice with competing bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P. H. Y.; Bishop, R. F.; Campbell, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    We use the coupled cluster method (CCM) to study the zero-temperature ground-state (GS) properties of a spin-1/2 J1-J2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice with competing nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor exchange couplings J1>0 and J2≡κ J1>0 , respectively, in the window 0 ≤κ <1 . The classical version of the model has a single GS phase transition at κcl=1/8 in this window from a phase with 3-sublattice antiferromagnetic (AFM) 120∘ Néel order for κ <κcl to an infinitely degenerate family of 4-sublattice AFM Néel phases for κ >κcl . This classical accidental degeneracy is lifted by quantum fluctuations, which favor a 2-sublattice AFM striped phase. For the quantum model we work directly in the thermodynamic limit of an infinite number of spins, with no consequent need for any finite-size scaling analysis of our results. We perform high-order CCM calculations within a well-controlled hierarchy of approximations, which we show how to extrapolate to the exact limit. In this way we find results for the case κ =0 of the spin-1/2 model for the GS energy per spin, E /N =-0.5521 (2 ) J1 , and the GS magnetic order parameter, M =0.198 (5 ) (in units where the classical value is Mcl=1/2), which are among the best available. For the spin-1/2 J1-J2 model we find that the classical transition at κ =κcl is split into two quantum phase transitions at κ1c=0.060 (10 ) and κ2c=0.165 (5 ) . The two quasiclassical AFM states (viz., the 120∘ Néel state and the striped state) are found to be the stable GS phases in the regime κ <κ1c and κ >κ2c , respectively, while in the intermediate regimes κ1c<κ <κ2c the stable GS phase has no evident long-range magnetic order.

  6. Antiferromagnetism in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    I present two experimental studies of the spin density wave antiferromagnetic order in elemental Chromium. The first addresses the response of the magnetic ground state to applied pressure. The spin and charge order parameters are probed at high pressure and low temperature in a diamond anvil cell using monochromatic X-ray diffraction. We find that the magnetism is suppressed exponentially with pressure, providing a canonical example of a weak-coupling, mean-field ground state, before terminating at a quantum phase transition. We confirm the harmonic relationship between the spin and charge degrees of freedom in the low temperature regime, and we identify the microscopic coupling between pressure and magnetism. The discovery of the long-sought-after quantum critical regime sets the stage for a complete study of antiferromagnetic quantum criticality in this clean model system. The second study addresses the thermodynamics and transport properties of antiferromagnetic domain structure. We find a robust thermal hysteresis in the longitudinal and Hall resistivities of sub-mm bulk Cr samples. The temperature limits of the hysteresis are correlated with domain wall fluctuations and freezing. The persistent sign of the hysteresis and the macroscopic return point memory warrant a new understanding of domain wall energetics. By combining electrical transport and X-ray microdiffraction measurements we are able to pinpoint the effects of antiferromagnetic domain walls on electron transport.

  7. Electrical switching of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Wadley, P; Howells, B; Železný, J; Andrews, C; Hills, V; Campion, R P; Novák, V; Olejník, K; Maccherozzi, F; Dhesi, S S; Martin, S Y; Wagner, T; Wunderlich, J; Freimuth, F; Mokrousov, Y; Kuneš, J; Chauhan, J S; Grzybowski, M J; Rushforth, A W; Edmonds, K W; Gallagher, B L; Jungwirth, T

    2016-02-05

    Antiferromagnets are hard to control by external magnetic fields because of the alternating directions of magnetic moments on individual atoms and the resulting zero net magnetization. However, relativistic quantum mechanics allows for generating current-induced internal fields whose sign alternates with the periodicity of the antiferromagnetic lattice. Using these fields, which couple strongly to the antiferromagnetic order, we demonstrate room-temperature electrical switching between stable configurations in antiferromagnetic CuMnAs thin-film devices by applied current with magnitudes of order 10(6) ampere per square centimeter. Electrical writing is combined in our solid-state memory with electrical readout and the stored magnetic state is insensitive to and produces no external magnetic field perturbations, which illustrates the unique merits of antiferromagnets for spintronics.

  8. S = 1/2 Square-Lattice Antiferromagnets: (CuX)LaB_2O_7 and (CuCl)A_2B_3O10 (X = Cl, Br; A = Ca, Sr; B = Nb, Ta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kageyama, H.; Kitano, T.; Nakanishi, R.; Yasuda, J.; Oba, N.; Baba, Y.; Nishi, M.; Ueda, Y.; Ajiro, Y.; Yoshimura, K.

    A series of magnetic compounds with the formula (CuX)LaB_2O_7 and (CuCl)A_2B_3O10 (X = Cl, Br; A = Ca, Sr; B = Nb, Ta) have been prepared through a low-temperature topochemical route starting from nonmagnetic double- (n = 2) and triple- (n = 3) layered perovskites, respectively. The magnetic susceptibility of these compounds typically exhibits a broad maximum at low temperatures, characteristic of low-dimensional antiferromagnetic compounds. However, depending on the choice of the parameters, X, A, B and n, physical quantities such as the Weiss temperature and the temperature at a maximum susceptibility vary to a great extent, which enables us to study the phase diagram of the S = 1/2 frustrated square-lattice antiferromagnets (the so-called J_1-J_2 model). In particular, (CuCl)LaNb_2O_7, possibly having a ferromagnetic J_1 and an antiferromagnetic J_2, shows a spin-liquid behavior with the spin gap of 27 K.

  9. Antiferromagnetic skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretiakov, Oleg; Barker, Joseph

    Skyrmions are topologically protected entities in magnetic materials which have the potential to be used in spintronics for information storage and processing. However, skyrmions in ferromagnets have some intrinsic difficulties which must be overcome to use them for spintronic applications, such as the inability to move straight along current. We show that skyrmions can also be stabilized and manipulated in antiferromagnetic materials. An antiferromagnetic skyrmion is a compound topological object with a similar but of opposite sign spin texture on each sublattice, which e.g. results in a complete cancelation of the Magnus force. We find that the composite nature of antiferromagnetic skyrmions gives rise to different dynamical behavior, both due to an applied current and temperature effects. O.A.T. and J.B. acknowledge support by the Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Nos. 25800184, 25247056, 25220910 and 15H01009) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and SpinNet.

  10. Communication: Phase behavior of materials with isotropic interactions designed by inverse strategies to favor diamond and simple cubic lattice ground states.

    PubMed

    Jain, Avni; Errington, Jeffrey R; Truskett, Thomas M

    2013-10-14

    We use molecular simulation to construct equilibrium phase diagrams for two recently introduced model materials with isotropic, soft-repulsive pair interactions designed to favor diamond and simple cubic lattice ground states, respectively, over a wide range of densities [Jain et al., Soft Matter 9, 3866 (2013)]. We employ free energy based Monte Carlo simulation techniques to precisely trace the inter-crystal and fluid-crystal coexistence curves. We find that both model materials display rich polymorphic phase behavior featuring stable crystals corresponding to the target ground-state structures, as well as a variety of other crystalline (e.g., hexagonal and body-centered cubic) phases and multiple reentrant melting transitions.

  11. Magnetic structure of the antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice compounds CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2

    SciTech Connect

    Ghimire, N. J.; Calder, S.; Janoschek, M.; Bauer, E. D.

    2015-06-01

    In this article, we have investigated the magnetic ground state of the antiferromagnetic Kondo-lattice compounds CeMAl4Si2(M = Rh, Ir) using neutron powder diffraction. Although both of these compounds show two magnetic transitions TN1 and TN2 in the bulk properties measurements, evidence for magnetic long-range order was only found below the lower transition TN2. Analysis of the diffraction profiles reveals a commensurate antiferromagnetic structure with a propagation vector k = (0, 0, 1/2). The magnetic moment in the ordered state of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2 were determined to be 1.14(2) and 1.41(3) μB/Ce, respectively, and are parallel to the crystallographic c-axis in agreement with magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  12. Static and dynamical properties of the spin-1/2 equilateral triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoSb2O9

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jie; Kamiya, Yoshitomo; Hong, Tao; Cao, H. B.; Ehlers, Georg; Tian, Wei; Batista, C. D.; Dun, Z. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Matsuda, Masaaki

    2016-02-24

    We present single-crystal neutron scattering measurements of the spin-1/2 equilateral triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoSb2O9. Besides confirming that the Co2+ magnetic moments lie in the ab plane for zero magnetic field and then determining all the exchange parameters of the minimal quasi-2D spin Hamiltonian, we provide conclusive experimental evidence of magnon decay through observation of intrinsic line broadening. Through detailed comparisons with the linear and nonlinear spin-wave theories, we also point out that the large-S approximation, which is conventionally employed to predict magnon decay in noncollinear magnets, is inadequate to explain our experimental observation. Hence, our results call for a new theoretical framework for describing excitation spectra in low-dimensional frustrated magnets under strong quantum effects.

  13. Application of Powder Diffraction Methods to the Analysis of Short- and Long-Range Atomic Order in Nanocrystalline Diamond and SiC: The Concept of the Apparent Lattice Parameter (alp)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Stelmakh, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Weber, H.-P.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of the analysis of powder diffraction patterns of diamond and SiC nanocrystals are presented: (a) examination of changes of the lattice parameters with diffraction vector Q ('apparent lattice parameter', alp) which refers to Bragg scattering, and (b), examination of changes of inter-atomic distances based on the analysis of the atomic Pair Distribution Function, PDF. Application of these methods was studied based on the theoretical diffraction patterns computed for models of nanocrystals having (i) a perfect crystal lattice, and (ii), a core-shell structure, i.e. constituting a two-phase system. The models are defined by the lattice parameter of the grain core, thickness of the surface shell, and the magnitude and distribution of the strain field in the shell. X-ray and neutron experimental diffraction data of nanocrystalline SiC and diamond powders of the grain diameter from 4 nm up to micrometers were used. The effects of the internal pressure and strain at the grain surface on the structure are discussed based on the experimentally determined dependence of the alp values on the Q-vector, and changes of the interatomic distances with the grain size determined experimentally by the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) analysis. The experimental results lend a strong support to the concept of a two-phase, core and the surface shell structure of nanocrystalline diamond and SiC.

  14. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice in the layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ and comparison to the superconductor LaPd1–xBi₂

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Fei; Wan, Xiangang; Phelan, Daniel; ...

    2015-07-13

    The layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ with the tetragonal ZrCuSi₂-type structure was obtained from excess Bi flux. Magnetic susceptibility data of CePd1–xBi₂ show an antiferromagnetic ordering below 6 K and are anisotropic along the c axis and the ab plane. The anisotropy is attributed to crystal-electric-field (CEF) effects and a CEF model which is able to describe the susceptibility data is given. An enhanced Sommerfeld coefficient γ of 0.191 J mol Ce⁻¹ K⁻² obtained from specific-heat measurement suggests a moderate Kondo effect in CePd1–xBi₂. Other than the antiferromagnetic peak at 6 K, the resistivity curve shows a shoulderlike behavior around 75 Kmore » which could be attributed to the interplay between Kondo and CEF effects. Magnetoresistance and Hall-effect measurements suggest that the interplay reconstructs the Fermi-surface topology of CePd1–xBi₂ around 75 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the Pd vacancies are important to the magnetic structure and enhance the CEF effects which quench the orbital moment of Ce at low temperatures.« less

  15. Magnon Spin Nernst Effect in Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir A.; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2016-11-01

    We predict that a temperature gradient can induce a magnon-mediated spin Hall response in an antiferromagnet with nontrivial magnon Berry curvature. We develop a linear response theory which gives a general condition for a Hall current to be well defined, even when the thermal Hall response is forbidden by symmetry. We apply our theory to a honeycomb lattice antiferromagnet and discuss a role of magnon edge states in a finite geometry.

  16. Classical Antiferromagnetism in Kinetically Frustrated Electronic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sposetti, C. N.; Bravo, B.; Trumper, A. E.; Gazza, C. J.; Manuel, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    We study, by means of the density matrix renormalization group, the infinite U Hubbard model—with one hole doped away from half filling—in triangular and square lattices with frustrated hoppings, which invalidate Nagaoka's theorem. We find that these kinetically frustrated models have antiferromagnetic ground states with classical local magnetization in the thermodynamic limit. We identify the mechanism of this kinetic antiferromagnetism with the release of the kinetic energy frustration, as the hole moves in the established antiferromagnetic background. This release can occur in two different ways: by a nontrivial spin Berry phase acquired by the hole, or by the effective vanishing of the hopping amplitude along the frustrating loops.

  17. Various disordered ground states and 1/3 magnetization-plateau-like behavior in the S =1/2 Ti3 + kagome lattice antiferromagnets Rb2NaTi3F12 , Cs2NaTi3F12 , and Cs2KTi3F12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Masato; Ueda, Hiroaki; Michioka, Chishiro; Matsuo, Akira; Kindo, Koichi; Yoshimura, Kazuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure and magnetic properties of three kagome lattice antiferromagnets, Rb2Na Ti3F12 , Cs2Na Ti3F12 , and Cs2K Ti3F12 , using single crystals. These compounds represent a S =1 /2 kagome system consisting of magnetic Ti3 + ions, which is expected to have negligibly small Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction. The structural analyses revealed that each of the three compounds has a slightly distorted kagome lattice. The distortion of the kagome lattice becomes small as the ionic radii of constituent alkali metals increase. All three compounds have nearly the same Weiss temperature of -45 K, and the ground states are disordered and strongly depend on the distortion. The ground states of Rb2Na Ti3F12 , Cs2Na Ti3F12 , and Cs2K Ti3F12 are found to be a two-component state including approximately 1/3 nearly free spins, a gapless disordered state, and a gapped disordered state, respectively. Our experimental results suggest that the ground state of the ideal S =1 /2 Heisenberg kagome lattice antiferromagnet is gapped. In addition, the magnetization curves of Cs2Na Ti3F12 and Cs2K Ti3F12 show anomalies at approximately 1/3 of the full magnetic moment of Ti3 +, which are a notable observation of signs of the theoretically proposed 1/3 magnetization plateau in S =1 /2 kagome antiferromagnets.

  18. Kondo lattice and antiferromagnetic behavior in quaternary CeTAl4Si2 (T = Rh, Ir) single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Arvind; Kulkarni, Ruta; Thamizhavel, Arumugam; Paudyal, Durga; Dhar, Sudesh Kumar

    2016-02-26

    Here, we have explored in detail the anisotropic magnetic properties of CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, which undergo two antiferromagnetic transitions, at TN1 = 12.6 and 15.5 K, followed by a second transition at TN2 = 9.4 and 13.8 K, respectively, with the [001]-axis as the relatively easy axis of magnetization. The electrical resistivity at ambient and applied pressure provides evidence of Kondo interaction in both compounds, further supported by a reduced value of the entropy associated with the magnetic ordering. The Sommerfeld coefficient γ is inferred to be 195.6 and 49.4 mJ/(mol K2) for CeRhAl4Si2 and CeIrAl4Si2, respectively, classifying these materials as moderate heavy-fermion compounds. The crystal electric field energy levels are derived from the peak seen in the Schottky heat capacity. Furthermore, we have also performed electronic structure calculations by using the local spin density approximation + U [LSDA+U] approach, which provide physical insights on the observed magnetic behavior of these two compounds.

  19. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  20. SU(N) Schwinger bosons and nematic phases in the bilinear-biquadratic S=1 triangular lattice antiferromagnet with third-nearest neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2017-01-01

    I present in details the SU(N) Schwinger boson formalism, also known as flavor wave theory, that has been used several times in the literature. I use the method to study the ferroquadrupolar phase of a quantum biquadratic Heisenberg model with spin S=1 on the triangular lattice with third-nearest-neighbor interactions. Results for the phase diagram at zero temperature and the static and dynamical quadrupolar structure factors are presented. In principle, the results could be applied to NiGa2S4.

  1. Magnetic phase diagram of the S =1/2 triangular-lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoSb2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Yoshitomo; Batista, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    To explain the recently reported magnetic phase diagram of the spin-1/2 triangular-lattice compound Ba3CoSb2O9, we present a semiclassical mean-field theory for the easy-plane XXZ model on the stacked triangular-lattice with a small inter-layer coupling. Quantum effects are incorporated by deriving effective interactions from the linear spin-wave analysis of the two-dimensional model. This analysis reproduces the main experimental observations, such as the 1/3-magnetization plateau (B || a) , a cusp near 1/3 of the saturated moment (B || c) , and a small step anomaly in the high field regime. The predicted spin configurations are compared against the NMR measurements on this compound. This work was done in collaboration with G. Koutroulakis (Los Alamos), T. Zhou (UCLA), J. D. Thompson (Los Alamos), H. D. Zhou (Univ. of Tennessee), and S. E. Brown (UCLA). Y.K. acknowledges financial support from the RIKEN iTHES Project.

  2. Twin Quintuplets in CVD Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-26

    microscopy (HRTEM). We conclude that the twin quintuplets have two main morphologies. The first consists of four Sigma = 3 twin boundaries and one...slightly more than the 70.53 deg tilt of a Sigma = 3 boundary. These grain boundaries and the conventional diamond lattice twin boundaries are the only types of boundaries that we have observed in CVD diamond.

  3. Lattice preferred orientation of olivine found in diamond-bearing garnet peridotites in Finsch, South Africa and implications for seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeseok; Jung, Haemyeong

    2015-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle provides important constraints on mantle dynamics, continental evolution and global tectonics and is believed to be produced by the flow-induced lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine. Recent experimental studies at high pressure and temperature have suggested that the LPO of olivine is affected by pressure in addition to water and stress. However, there has been no report yet for the pressure-induced LPO of natural olivine because samples from the deep upper mantle are rare and often unsuitable for study due to ambiguous foliation and lineation. Here we show evidence of the pressure-induced LPO of natural olivine in diamond-bearing garnet peridotites from Finsch, South Africa. We found that the [010] axes of olivine are aligned subnormal to foliation and that the [001] axes are aligned subparallel to lineation, which is known as B-type LPO of olivine. The equilibrium pressure of the samples, as estimated using geobarometer, was greater than 4 GPa, indicating that the samples originated from a depth greater than ~120 km. In addition, FTIR spectroscopy of the olivine showed that the samples are dry, with a water content of less than 90±20 ppm H/Si (5.5±1.2 ppm wt. H2O). These data suggest that the samples are the first natural examples of olivine displaying B-type LPOs produced due to high pressure under dry condition. Our data indicate that the trench-parallel seismic anisotropy observed in many subduction zones in and below subducting slabs at depths greater than ~90 km under dry condition may be attributed to the pressure-induced olivine fabrics (B-type LPO) and may be interpreted as the entrainment of the sub-lithospheric mantle in the direction of subduction rather than anomalous trench-parallel flow.

  4. Lattice-preferred orientation of olivine found in diamond-bearing garnet peridotites in Finsch, South Africa and implications for seismic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeseok; Jung, Haemyeong

    2015-01-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle provides important constraints on mantle dynamics, continental evolution and global tectonics and is believed to be produced by the flow-induced lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of olivine. Recent experimental studies at high pressure and temperature have suggested that the LPO of olivine is affected by pressure in addition to water and stress. However, there has been no report yet for the pressure-induced LPO of natural olivine because samples from the deep upper mantle are rare and often unsuitable for study due to ambiguous foliation and lineation. Here we show evidence of the pressure-induced LPO of natural olivine in diamond-bearing garnet peridotites from Finsch, South Africa. We found that the [010] axes of olivine are aligned subnormal to foliation and that the [001] axes are aligned subparallel to lineation, which is known as B-type LPO of olivine. The equilibrium pressure of the samples, as estimated using geobarometer, was greater than 4 GPa, indicating that the samples originated from a depth greater than ˜120 km. In addition, FTIR spectroscopy of the olivine showed that the samples are dry, with a water content of less than 90 ± 20 ppm H/Si (5.5 ± 1.2 ppm wt. H2O). These data suggest that the samples are the first natural examples of olivine displaying B-type LPOs produced due to high pressure under dry condition. Our data indicate that the trench-parallel seismic anisotropy observed in many subduction zones in and below subducting slabs at depths greater than ˜90 km under dry condition may be attributed to the pressure-induced olivine fabrics (B-type LPO) and may be interpreted as the entrainment of the sub-lithospheric mantle in the direction of subduction rather than anomalous trench-parallel flow.

  5. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  6. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  7. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  8. Itinerant Antiferromagnetism in RuO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlijn, T.; Snijders, P. C.; Delaire, O.; Zhou, H.-D.; Maier, T. A.; Cao, H.-B.; Chi, S.-X.; Matsuda, M.; Wang, Y.; Koehler, M. R.; Kent, P. R. C.; Weitering, H. H.

    2017-02-01

    Bulk rutile RuO2 has long been considered a Pauli paramagnet. Here we report that RuO2 exhibits a hitherto undetected lattice distortion below approximately 900 K. The distortion is accompanied by antiferromagnetic order up to at least 300 K with a small room temperature magnetic moment of approximately 0.05 μB as evidenced by polarized neutron diffraction. Density functional theory plus U (DFT +U ) calculations indicate that antiferromagnetism is favored even for small values of the Hubbard U of the order of 1 eV. The antiferromagnetism may be traced to a Fermi surface instability, lifting the band degeneracy imposed by the rutile crystal field. The combination of high Néel temperature and small itinerant moments make RuO2 unique among ruthenate compounds and among oxide materials in general.

  9. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems. PMID:27650053

  10. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  12. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  13. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, Donald W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on diamond, which is regarded as the world's most popular gemstone. It states that there is strength in the covalent bonding between its carbon atoms, resulting to the strength of its physical properties. The presence of colors in diamonds may be attributed to the impurities that settle in the crystal lattice. Diamonds have been used as decorative items since the ancient era.

  15. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  16. Critical two-dimensional Ising model with free, fixed ferromagnetic, fixed antiferromagnetic, and double antiferromagnetic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xintian; Izmailyan, Nickolay

    2015-01-01

    The critical two-dimensional Ising model is studied with four types boundary conditions: free, fixed ferromagnetic, fixed antiferromagnetic, and fixed double antiferromagnetic. Using bond propagation algorithms with surface fields, we obtain the free energy, internal energy, and specific heat numerically on square lattices with a square shape and various combinations of the four types of boundary conditions. The calculations are carried out on the square lattices with size N×N and 30

  17. [Spectroscopic studies on transition metal ions in colored diamonds].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ming-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Transition metals like nickel, cobalt and iron have been often used as solvent catalysts in high pressure high temperature (HPHT) synthesis of diamond, and nickel and cobalt ions have been found in diamond lattice. Available studies indicated that nickel and cobalt ions could enter the lattice as interstitial or substitutional impurities and form complexes with nitrogen. Polarized microscopy, SEM-EDS, EPR, PL and FTIR have been used in this study to investigate six fancy color natural and synthetic diamonds in order to determine the spectroscopic characteristics and the existing forms of transition metal ions in colored diamond lattice. Cobalt-related optical centers were first found in natural chameleon diamonds, and some new nickel and cobalt-related optical and EPR centers have also been detected in these diamond samples.

  18. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  19. Characterization of the antiferromagnetism in Ag(pyz)2(S2O8) with a two-dimensional square lattice of Ag 2+ ions (Ag=silver, Pyz-pyrdzine, S2O8=sulfate)

    SciTech Connect

    Singleton, John; Mc Donald, R; Sengupta, P; Cox, S; Manson, J; Southerland, H; Warter, M; Stone, K; Stephens, P; Lancaster, T; Steele, A; Blundell, S; Baker, P; Pratt, F; Lee, C; Whangbo, M

    2009-01-01

    X-ray powder diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements show that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) consists of 2D square nets of Ag{sup 2+} ions resulting from the corner-sharing of axially elongated AgN{sub 4}O{sub 2} octahedra and exhibits characteristic 2D antiferromagnetism. Nevertheless, {mu}{sup +}Sr measurements indicate that Ag(pyz){sub 2}(S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) undergoes 3D magnetic ordering below 7.8(3) K.

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  1. Antiferromagnetic Kondo lattice in the layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ and comparison to the superconductor LaPd1–xBi₂

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Fei; Wan, Xiangang; Phelan, Daniel; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Sturza, Mihai; Malliakas, Christos D.; Li, Qing'an; Han, Tian-Heng; Zhao, Qingbiao; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2015-07-13

    The layered compound CePd1–xBi₂ with the tetragonal ZrCuSi₂-type structure was obtained from excess Bi flux. Magnetic susceptibility data of CePd1–xBi₂ show an antiferromagnetic ordering below 6 K and are anisotropic along the c axis and the ab plane. The anisotropy is attributed to crystal-electric-field (CEF) effects and a CEF model which is able to describe the susceptibility data is given. An enhanced Sommerfeld coefficient γ of 0.191 J mol Ce⁻¹ K⁻² obtained from specific-heat measurement suggests a moderate Kondo effect in CePd1–xBi₂. Other than the antiferromagnetic peak at 6 K, the resistivity curve shows a shoulderlike behavior around 75 K which could be attributed to the interplay between Kondo and CEF effects. Magnetoresistance and Hall-effect measurements suggest that the interplay reconstructs the Fermi-surface topology of CePd1–xBi₂ around 75 K. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the Pd vacancies are important to the magnetic structure and enhance the CEF effects which quench the orbital moment of Ce at low temperatures.

  2. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  3. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs.

  4. Holes in Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang

    1990-05-01

    In this Brief Report we show that a recent model proposed by Shankar [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 203 (1989)], describing the motion of holes in quantum antiferromagnets is equivalent to the Schwinger model [Phys. Rev. 128, 2425 (1962)] in 1+1 dimensions. Some exact results are deduced. In addition to the superconducting long-range order found by Shankar, it is shown that there is a 2pF hole density wave existing with the superconducting pairing instability.

  5. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  6. Spin excitations in the antiferromagnet NaNiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brion, S.; Darie, C.; Holzapfel, M.; Talbayev, D.; Mihály, L.; Simon, F.; Jánossy, A.; Chouteau, G.

    2007-03-01

    In NaNiO2 , Ni3+ ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice of S=1/2 spins. The magnetic order observed below 20K has been described as an A type antiferromagnet with ferromagnetic layers weakly coupled antiferromagnetically. We studied the magnetic excitations with the electron spin resonance for frequencies 1-20cm-1 , in magnetic fields up to 14T . The bulk of the results are interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model involving biaxial anisotropy for the spins: a strong easy-plane term, and a weaker anisotropy within the plane.

  7. Spin Excitations in the Antiferromagnet NaNiO2

    SciTech Connect

    de Brion,S.; Darie, C.; Holzapfel, M.; Talbayev, D.; Mihaly, L.; Simon, F.; Janossy, A.; Chouteau, G.

    2007-01-01

    In NaNiO2 , Ni3+ ions form a quasi-two-dimensional triangular lattice of S=1/2 spins. The magnetic order observed below 20K has been described as an A type antiferromagnet with ferromagnetic layers weakly coupled antiferromagnetically. We studied the magnetic excitations with the electron spin resonance for frequencies 1 20cm-1 , in magnetic fields up to 14T . The bulk of the results are interpreted in terms of a phenomenological model involving biaxial anisotropy for the spins: a strong easy-plane term, and a weaker anisotropy within the plane

  8. Mechanism for diamond nucleation and growth on single crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, T. P.; Xiong, Fulin; Chang, R. P. H.; White, C. W.

    1992-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of diamond crystals on single-crystal copper surfaces implanted with carbon ions is studied. Microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition is used for diamond growth. The single-crystal copper substrates were implanted either at room or elevated temperature with carbon ions prior to diamond nucleation. This procedure leads to the formation of a graphite film on the copper surface which greatly enhances diamond crystallite nucleation. A simple lattice model is constructed for diamond growth on graphite as 111 line (diamond) parallel to 0001 line (graphite) and 110 line (diamond) parallel to 1 1 -2 0 (graphite).

  9. Mutual relation among lattice distortion, Hall effect property and band edge cathodoluminescence of heavily-boron-doped microwave-plasma CVD diamond films homoepitaxially grown on vicinal (001) high-pressure/high-temperature-synthesized Ib substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Reona; Maida, Osamu; Ito, Toshimichi

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated properties of heavily-B-doped diamond (HBD) films homoepitaxially grown with boron-to-carbon (B/C) mole ratios ranging from 1000 to 5000 ppm in the source gas mainly by using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), cathodoluminescence (CL), and Hall effect measurements. Each HBD layer was deposited on a vicinal (001) substrate of high-pressure/high-temperature synthesized Ib-type diamond with 5° misorientation angle by means of high-power-density microwave-plasma chemical-vapor-deposition method with a source gas composed of 4% CH4 in H2 and H2-diluted B(CH3)3. XRD data indicated that the lattice constant of the B-doped layer slightly decreased for the B/C ratios≤3000 ppm while slightly increasing for that of 5000 ppm, suggesting that for the latter HBD sample a part of the incorporated B atoms behaved differently from the remaining other B atoms. By contrast the Hall data indicated that all the HBD samples had a degenerate feature only at temperatures well below room temperature (RT), above which a semiconducting feature was evident, and that the density of the degenerate holes steeply increased from 1.3×1019 to 1.2×1021 cm-3 with increases in the incorporated B density, [B], from 1.2×1020 to 5.9×1020 cm-3. This drastic change in the hole density strongly suggested the presence of a [B]-dependent impurity band. Their evident near-band-edge CL spectra taken at RT and 85 K demonstrated that radiative transition features in the HBD layers considerably varied for the B/C ratios studied. The CL peaks were consistently assigned by assuming both the presence of an impurity band and a slight bandgap shrinkage. These observed features are discussed in relation to the energy separation between the low-mobility impurity band assumed and the valence band in the high-quality HBD layer which are not merged in energy.

  10. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    SciTech Connect

    Goldbart, P.M.; Sheehy, D.E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang{close_quote}s SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to {open_quotes}escape{close_quotes} into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Antiferromagnetic hedgehogs with superconducting cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.; Sheehy, Daniel E.

    1998-09-01

    Excitations of the antiferromagnetic state that resemble antiferromagnetic hedgehogs at large distances but are predominantly superconducting inside a core region are discussed within the context of Zhang's SO(5)-symmetry-based approach to the physics of high-temperature superconducting materials. Nonsingular, in contrast with their hedgehog cousins in pure antiferromagnetism, these texture excitations are what hedgehogs become when the antiferromagnetic order parameter is permitted to ``escape'' into superconducting directions. The structure of such excitations is determined in a simple setting, and a number of their experimental implications are examined.

  12. Spin reorientation via antiferromagnetic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, M.; Sbiaa, R.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2014-05-07

    Spin reorientation in antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) Co/Pd multilayers, wherein the thickness of the constituent Co layers was varied, was studied. AFC-Co/Pd multilayers were observed to have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for a Co sublayer thickness of 1 nm, much larger than what is usually observed in systems without antiferromagnetic coupling. When similar multilayer structures were prepared without antiferromagnetic coupling, this effect was not observed. The results indicate that the additional anisotropy energy contribution arising from the antiferromagnetic coupling, which is estimated to be around 6 × 10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, induces the spin-reorientation.

  13. Spin dynamics simulations for a nanoscale Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhuofei; Landau, D. P.; Brown, G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    Thermoinduced magnetization(TiM) is a novel response which was predicted to occur in nanoscale antiferromagnetic materials. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations footnotetextG. Brown, A. Janotti, M. Eisenbach, and G. M. Stocks, Phys.Rev.B 72, 140405(2005) have shown that TiM is an intrinsic property of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model below the Neel temperature. To obtain a fundamental understanding of TiM, spin dynamics(SD) simulations are performed to study the spin wave behavior, which seems to be the cause of TiM. A classical Heisenberg model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor exchange interaction and uniaxial single-site anisotropy is studied. Simple-cubic lattices with free boundary conditions are used. We employed the fast spin dynamics algorithms with fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of the exponential operator. Additional small excitation peaks due to surface effects are found in transverse S(q,w).

  14. Kondo Screening and Fermi Surface in the Antiferromagnetic Metal Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiji; Si, Qimiao

    2006-03-01

    We address the Kondo effect deep inside the antiferromagnetic metal phase of a Kondo lattice Hamiltonian with SU(2) invariance. The local- moment component is described in terms of a non-linear sigma model. The Fermi surface of the conduction electron component is taken to be sufficiently small, so that it is not spanned by the antiferromagnetic wavevector. The effective low energy form of the Kondo coupling simplifies drastically, corresponding to the uniform component of the magnetization that forward-scatters the conduction electrons on their own Fermi surface. We use a combined bosonic and fermionic (Shankar) renormalization group procedure to analyze this effective theory and study the Kondo screening and Fermi surface in the antiferromagnetic phase. The implications for the global magnetic phase diagram, as well as quantum critical points, of heavy fermion metals are discussed.

  15. Magnetic phase diagrams of classical triangular and kagome antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Gvozdikova, M V; Melchy, P-E; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2011-04-27

    We investigate the effect of geometrical frustration on the H-T phase diagrams of the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets on triangular and kagome lattices. The phase diagrams for the two models are obtained from large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. For the kagome antiferromagnet, thermal fluctuations are unable to lift degeneracy completely and stabilize translationally disordered multipolar phases. We find a substantial difference in the temperature scales of the order by disorder effect related to different degeneracy of the low- and the high-field classical ground states in the kagome antiferromagnet. In the low-field regime, the Kosterlitz-Thouless transition into a spin-nematic phase is produced by unbinding of half-quantum vortices.

  16. Antiferromagnetic spin Seebeck effect.

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-03

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2(110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2–80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  17. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect.

    PubMed

    Wu, Stephen M; Zhang, Wei; Kc, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E; Jiang, J Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-04

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF_{2}. A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF_{2} (110) (30  nm)/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF_{2} (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF_{2} through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9  T) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF_{2} thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  18. Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen M.; Zhang, Wei; KC, Amit; Borisov, Pavel; Pearson, John E.; Jiang, J. Samuel; Lederman, David; Hoffmann, Axel; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2016-03-01

    We report on the observation of the spin Seebeck effect in antiferromagnetic MnF2 . A device scale on-chip heater is deposited on a bilayer of MnF2 (110) (30 nm )/Pt (4 nm) grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a MgF2 (110) substrate. Using Pt as a spin detector layer, it is possible to measure the thermally generated spin current from MnF2 through the inverse spin Hall effect. The low temperature (2-80 K) and high magnetic field (up to 140 kOe) regime is explored. A clear spin-flop transition corresponding to the sudden rotation of antiferromagnetic spins out of the easy axis is observed in the spin Seebeck signal when large magnetic fields (>9 T ) are applied parallel to the easy axis of the MnF2 thin film. When the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the easy axis, the spin-flop transition is absent, as expected.

  19. Revisiting the ground state of CoAl2O4 : Comparison to the conventional antiferromagnet MnAl2O4

    DOE PAGES

    MacDougall, Gregory J.; Aczel, Adam A.; Su, Yixi; ...

    2016-11-17

    The A-site spinel material CoAl2O4 is a physical realization of the frustrated diamond-lattice antiferromagnet, a model in which unique incommensurate or “spin-spiral-liquid” ground states are predicted. Our previous single-crystal neutron scattering study instead classified it as a “kinetically inhibited” antiferromagnet, where the long-ranged correlations of a collinear Néel ground state are blocked by the freezing of domain-wall motion below a first-order phase transition at T*=6.5 K. This study provides new data sets from a number of experiments, which support and expand this work in several important ways. We show that the phenomenology leading to the kinetically inhibited order is unaffectedmore » by sample measured and instrument resolution, while new low-temperature measurements reveal spin correlations are unchanging between T=2 K and 250 mK, consistent with a frozen state. Polarized diffuse neutron measurements show several interesting magnetic features, which can be entirely explained by the existence of short-ranged Néel order. Finally, and crucially, this paper presents some neutron scattering studies of single crystalline MnAl2O4, which acts as an unfrustrated analog to CoAl2O4 and shows all the hallmarks of a classical antiferromagnet with a continuous phase transition to Néel order at TN=39 K. Direct comparison between the two compounds indicates that CoAl2O4 is unique, not in the nature of high-temperature diffuse correlations, but rather in the nature of the frozen state below T*. Finally, the higher level of cation inversion in the MnAl2O4 sample indicates that this behavior is primarily an effect of greater next-nearest-neighbor exchange.« less

  20. Revisiting the ground state of CoAl2O4 : Comparison to the conventional antiferromagnet MnAl2O4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, G. J.; Aczel, A. A.; Su, Yixi; Schweika, W.; Faulhaber, E.; Schneidewind, A.; Christianson, A. D.; Zarestky, J. L.; Zhou, H. D.; Mandrus, D.; Nagler, S. E.

    2016-11-01

    The A -site spinel material CoAl2O4 is a physical realization of the frustrated diamond-lattice antiferromagnet, a model in which unique incommensurate or "spin-spiral-liquid" ground states are predicted. Our previous single-crystal neutron scattering study instead classified it as a "kinetically inhibited" antiferromagnet, where the long-ranged correlations of a collinear Néel ground state are blocked by the freezing of domain-wall motion below a first-order phase transition at T*=6.5 K. This paper provides new data sets from a number of experiments, which support and expand this work in several important ways. We show that the phenomenology leading to the kinetically inhibited order is unaffected by sample measured and instrument resolution, while new low-temperature measurements reveal spin correlations are unchanging between T =2 K and 250 mK, consistent with a frozen state. Polarized diffuse neutron measurements show several interesting magnetic features, which can be entirely explained by the existence of short-ranged Néel order. Finally, and crucially, this paper presents some neutron scattering studies of single crystalline MnAl2O4 , which acts as an unfrustrated analog to CoAl2O4 and shows all the hallmarks of a classical antiferromagnet with a continuous phase transition to Néel order at TN=39 K. Direct comparison between the two compounds indicates that CoAl2O4 is unique, not in the nature of high-temperature diffuse correlations, but rather in the nature of the frozen state below T*. The higher level of cation inversion in the MnAl2O4 sample indicates that this behavior is primarily an effect of greater next-nearest-neighbor exchange.

  1. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  2. Spin-Flop Phenomenon of Two-Dimensional Frustrated Antiferromagnets without Anisotropy in Spin Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hiroki; Sakai, Tôru; Hasegawa, Yasumasa

    2014-08-01

    Motivated by a recent finding of a spin-flop phenomenon in a system without anisotropy in spin space reported in the S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square-kagome lattice, we study the S = 1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnets on two other lattices composed of vertex-sharing triangles by the numerical diagonalization method. One is a novel lattice including a shuriken shape with four teeth; the other is the kagome lattice with √{3} × √{3} -structure distortion, which includes a shuriken shape with six teeth. We find in the magnetization processes of these systems that a magnetization jump accompanied by a spin-flop phenomenon occurs at the higher-field-side edge of the magnetization plateau at one-third the height of saturation. This finding indicates that the spin-flop phenomenon found in the isotropic system on the square-kagome lattice is not an exceptional case.

  3. Antiferromagnetic inclusions in lunar glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Briggs, Charles; Alexander, Corrine

    1974-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of 11 glass spherules from the Apollo 15, 16, and 17 fines and two specimens of a relatively large glass spherical shell were studied as a function of temperature from room temperature to liquid helium temperatures. All but one specimen showed the presence of antiferromagnetic inclusions. Closely spaced temperature measurements of the magnetic susceptibility below 77 K on five of the specimens showed antiferromagnetic temperature transitions (Ne??el transitions). With the exception of ilmenite in one specimen, these transitions did not correspond to any transitions in known antiferromagnetic compounds. ?? 1974.

  4. Haldane Phases and Ferrimagnetic Phases with Spontaneous Translational Symmetry Breakdown in Distorted Mixed Diamond Chains with Spins 1 and 1/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Kazuo; Takano, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2010-11-01

    The ground states of two types of distorted mixed diamond chains with spins 1 and 1/2 are investigated using exact diagonalization, DMRG, and mapping onto low-energy effective models. In the undistorted case, the ground state consists of an array of independent spin-1 clusters separated by singlet dimers. The lattice distortion induces an effective interaction between cluster spins. When this effective interaction is antiferromagnetic, several Haldane phases appear with or without spontaneous translational symmetry breakdown (STSB). The transition between the Haldane phase without STSB and that with (n+1)-fold STSB (n=1, 2, and 3) belongs to the same universality class as the (n+1)-clock model. In contrast, when the effective interaction is ferromagnetic, the quantized and partial ferrimagnetic phases appear with or without STSB. An effective low-energy theory for the partial ferrimagnetic phase is presented.

  5. Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    Gem-quality diamond contains such low abundances of parent-daughter radionuclides that dating the diamond lattice directly by isotopic measurements has been and will be impossible. Absolute ages on diamonds typically are obtained through measurements of their syngenetic mineral inclusions: Rb-Sr in garnet; Sm-Nd in garnet and pyroxene; Re-Os and U-Th-Pb in sulfide; K-Ar in pyroxene; and U-Pb in zircon. The application of the first two isotope schemes in the list requires putting together many inclusions from many diamonds whereas the latter isotope schemes permit ages on single diamonds. The key limitations on the application of these decay pairs are the availability and size of the inclusions, the abundance levels of the radionuclides, and instrumental sensitivity. Practical complications of radioisotope dating of inclusions are fatal to the application of the technique for diamond provenance. In all mines, the ratio of gem-quality diamonds to stones with datable inclusions is very high. Thus there is no way to date the valuable, marketable stones that are part of the conflict diamond problem, just their rare, flawed cousins. Each analysis destroys the diamond host plus the inclusion and can only be carried out in research labs by highly trained scientists. Thus, these methods can not be automated or applied to the bulk of diamond production. The geological problems with age dating are equally fatal to its application to diamond provenance. From the geological perspective, for age determination to work as a tool for diamond provenance studies, diamond ages would have to be specific to particular kimberlites or kimberlite fields and different between fields. The southern African Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Mobile Belt is the only cratonic region where age determinations have been applied on a large enough scale to a number of kimberlites to illustrate the geological problems in age measurements for diamond provenance. However, this southern African example

  6. Chemical analysis of impurity boron atoms in diamond using soft X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D

    2008-07-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  7. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  8. Persistent nonequilibrium dynamics of the thermal energies in the spin and phonon systems of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    von Reppert, A; Pudell, J; Koc, A; Reinhardt, M; Leitenberger, W; Dumesnil, K; Zamponi, F; Bargheer, M

    2016-09-01

    We present a temperature and fluence dependent Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction study of a laser-heated antiferromagnetic dysprosium thin film. The loss of antiferromagnetic order is evidenced by a pronounced lattice contraction. We devise a method to determine the energy flow between the phonon and spin system from calibrated Bragg peak positions in thermal equilibrium. Reestablishing the magnetic order is much slower than the cooling of the lattice, especially around the Néel temperature. Despite the pronounced magnetostriction, the transfer of energy from the spin system to the phonons in Dy is slow after the spin-order is lost.

  9. Persistent nonequilibrium dynamics of the thermal energies in the spin and phonon systems of an antiferromagnet

    PubMed Central

    von Reppert, A.; Pudell, J.; Koc, A.; Reinhardt, M.; Leitenberger, W.; Dumesnil, K.; Zamponi, F.; Bargheer, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a temperature and fluence dependent Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction study of a laser-heated antiferromagnetic dysprosium thin film. The loss of antiferromagnetic order is evidenced by a pronounced lattice contraction. We devise a method to determine the energy flow between the phonon and spin system from calibrated Bragg peak positions in thermal equilibrium. Reestablishing the magnetic order is much slower than the cooling of the lattice, especially around the Néel temperature. Despite the pronounced magnetostriction, the transfer of energy from the spin system to the phonons in Dy is slow after the spin-order is lost. PMID:27679803

  10. Toward deep blue nano hope diamonds: heavily boron-doped diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Steffen; Janssen, Wiebke; Turner, Stuart; Lu, Ying-Gang; Yeap, Weng Siang; Verbeeck, Jo; Haenen, Ken; Krueger, Anke

    2014-06-24

    The production of boron-doped diamond nanoparticles enables the application of this material for a broad range of fields, such as electrochemistry, thermal management, and fundamental superconductivity research. Here we present the production of highly boron-doped diamond nanoparticles using boron-doped CVD diamond films as a starting material. In a multistep milling process followed by purification and surface oxidation we obtained diamond nanoparticles of 10-60 nm with a boron content of approximately 2.3 × 10(21) cm(-3). Aberration-corrected HRTEM reveals the presence of defects within individual diamond grains, as well as a very thin nondiamond carbon layer at the particle surface. The boron K-edge electron energy-loss near-edge fine structure demonstrates that the B atoms are tetrahedrally embedded into the diamond lattice. The boron-doped diamond nanoparticles have been used to nucleate growth of a boron-doped diamond film by CVD that does not contain an insulating seeding layer.

  11. First principles study of Fe in diamond: A diamond-based half metallic dilute magnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Benecha, E. M.; Lombardi, E. B.

    2013-12-14

    Half-metallic ferromagnetic ordering in semiconductors, essential in the emerging field of spintronics for injection and transport of highly spin polarised currents, has up to now been considered mainly in III–V and II–VI materials. However, low Curie temperatures have limited implementation in room temperature device applications. We report ab initio Density Functional Theory calculations on the properties of Fe in diamond, considering the effects of lattice site, charge state, and Fermi level position. We show that the lattice sites and induced magnetic moments of Fe in diamond depend strongly on the Fermi level position and type of diamond co-doping, with Fe being energetically most favorable at the substitutional site in p-type and intrinsic diamond, while it is most stable at a divacancy site in n-type diamond. Fe induces spin polarized bands in the band gap, with strong hybridization between Fe-3d and C-2s,2p bands. We further consider Fe-Fe spin interactions in diamond and show that substitutional Fe{sup +1} in p-type diamond exhibits a half-metallic character, with a magnetic moment of 1.0 μ{sub B} per Fe atom and a large ferromagnetic stabilization energy of 33 meV, an order of magnitude larger than in other semiconductors, with correspondingly high Curie temperatures. These results, combined with diamond's unique properties, demonstrate that Fe doped p-type diamond is likely to be a highly suitable candidate material for spintronics applications.

  12. Localized vibrational modes in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzaev, R. T.; Bachurin, D. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    Discrete breather (DB) or, synonymously, intrinsic localized mode (ILM) is a spatially localized and time-periodic vibrational mode in a defect-free nonlinear lattice, e.g., in a crystal lattice. Standing DB and DB clusters (double and triple) are studied in diamond using molecular dynamics method with the AIREBO interatomic potentials. Single DB can be easily excited by applying initial shifts, A0, to a pair of nearest atoms along the valence bond in the opposite directions. Admissible excitation amplitudes are 0.09 ≤A0 /a0 ≤ 0.12, where a0 is the equilibrium interatomic distance. The core of a DB is a pair of nearest carbon atoms oscillating out-of-phase, while the neighboring atoms oscillate with one order of magnitude lower amplitudes. DB frequency is above the top of the phonon spectrum and increases with the oscillation amplitude. DB lives for more than 100 oscillation periods which approximately corresponds to 2 ps. The range of initial amplitudes and other conditions necessary for the excitation of double and triple DB clusters as well as their lifetime are investigated in detail. Two different mechanisms of energy exchange between DBs in the DB clusters are revealed, which is the main result of the present study. Our results contribute to a deeper understanding of the nonlinear lattice dynamics of diamond.

  13. Domain states in the zero-temperature diluted antiferromagnet in an applied field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, A.; Jones, A. C.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    We use Bethe lattice calculations, directed models, and exact optimization methods to find percolating antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and domain-state structures in the diluted antiferromagnet in an applied field (DAFF). Based on these calculations, the ground-state structures occuring on simple cubic and body-centered-cubic lattices are presented for the full range of site dilution, 0⩽c⩽1 , and applied magnetic field, 0⩽H⩽∞ . Ground-state phase boundaries are identified by the onset of several different types of extensive clusters: the antiferromagnet phase boundary, where one giant antiferromagnetic cluster emerges; the domain-state (DS) boundary where two antiphase giant antiferromagnetic clusters emerge; and a phase boundary where a giant ferromagnetic cluster emerges. We find that there is an “intermediate” concentration regime in which the DS has the lowest energy so that in the ground state, there is an intermediate regime between the paramagnetic phase and the ordered antiferromagnet. We compare our results to local mean-field theory and Monte Carlo studies of the DAFF and to recent results on the ground-state structure of the random-field Ising model. In this context we discuss the relevance of the ground-state structures we calculate to the thermodynamic phase diagram and the dynamics of the DAFF.

  14. Inclusions of Hydrocarbon Fluids in Diamonds From Wafangdian, Liaoning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2015-12-01

    We studied a large number of industrial-grade diamonds from Pipe 50 of Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not suitable for polishing into gems or making cutting tools. They are usually crushed to form abrasives, without much scientific scrutiny. We report here fluid inclusions in dozens of diamonds. The first type of fluids occur in the outer rim of diamonds, just below the surface, while their interior is free of visible fluids. Under UV radiation, when a non-fluorescent diamond appeared dim, bubbles of included fluids became visible as yellow and blue spherules. Such diamonds are sometimes encrusted with euhedral micro-diamonds resembling those on thin films grown by CVD. The second type of fluid-rich diamonds display iridescence of pink, blue, green and yellow colors. They show lamellar, filamentous, or tubular structures, some of the tubes are filled with granules, probably grown from fluids in the tubes. An FT-IR investigation of both types yielded similar results. Apart from absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations, we found an outstanding group of bands just below wavenumber 3000. This indicates the presence of a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons of long chain length. Our results seem to implicate that hydrocarbons might be an important component in Earth's mantle, which might even have provided carbon from which diamonds crystllized.

  15. Sznajd Sociophysics Model on a Triangular Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Iksoo

    The Sznajd sociophysics model is generalized on the triangular lattice with pure antiferromagnetic opinion and also with both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic opinions. The slogan of the trade union ``united we stand, divided we fall'' can be realized via the propagation of ferromagnetic opinion of adjacent people in the union, but the propagation of antiferromagnetic opinion can be observed among the third countries between two big super powers or among the family members of conflicting parents. Fixed points are found in both models. The distributions of relaxation time of the mixed model are dispersed and become closer to log-normal as the initial concentration of down spins approaches 0.5, whereas for pure antiferromagnetic spins, they are collapsed into one master curve, which is roughly log-normal. We do not see the phase transition in the model.

  16. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Morales, Rafael; Batlle, Xavier; Nowak, Ulrich; Güntherodt, Gernot

    2016-10-01

    This "Critical Focused Issue" presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice.

  17. Thermophoresis of an antiferromagnetic soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tchernyshyov, Oleg; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2015-07-01

    We study the dynamics of an antiferromagnetic soliton under a temperature gradient. To this end, we start by phenomenologically constructing the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for an antiferromagnet with the aid of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We then derive the Langevin equation for the soliton's center of mass by the collective coordinate approach. An antiferromagentic soliton behaves as a classical massive particle immersed in a viscous medium. By considering a thermodynamic ensemble of solitons, we obtain the Fokker-Planck equation, from which we extract the average drift velocity of a soliton. The diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to a small damping constant α , which can yield a drift velocity of tens of m/s under a temperature gradient of 1 K/mm for a domain wall in an easy-axis antiferromagnetic wire with α ˜10-4 .

  18. Superconductivity, antiferromagnetism, and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, John M.; Xu, Guangyong; Zaliznyak, Igor A.

    2014-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in both the copper-oxide and the iron-pnictide/chalcogenide systems occurs in close proximity to antiferromagnetically ordered states. Neutron scattering has been an essential technique for characterizing the spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic phases and for demonstrating how the spin fluctuations persist in the superconductors. While the nature of the spin correlations in the superconductors remains controversial, the neutron scattering measurements of magnetic excitations over broad ranges of energy and momentum transfers provide important constraints on the theoretical options. We present an overview of the neutron scattering work on high-temperature superconductors and discuss some of the outstanding issues.

  19. Quantum Disordered State without Frustration in the Double Layer Heisenberg Antiferromagnet —Dimer Expansion and Projector Monte Carlo Study—

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Kazuo

    1992-03-01

    The quantum disordered state (QDOS) of the spin 1/2 double layer square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet is studied. Using the dimer expansion from the limit of the large interlayer coupling J', the staggered susceptibility χ, the antiferromagnetic structure factor Sπ and the antiferromagnetic correlation length ξ are calculated up to the 6-th order in the intralayer coupling J. The ratio analysis shows that the QDOS becomes unstable against the Néel ordering at J'/J≃2.56. The critical exponents are not inconsistent with the universality class of the 3-dimensional classical Heisenberg model, suggesting that our QDOS corresponds to that expected in the 2-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet with unphysically small spin (<0.276). The results of the projector Monte Carlo simulation also confirms the dimer expansion results.

  20. Fullerenes as precursors for diamond film growth without hydrogen or oxygen additions

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Liu, S.; Krauss, A.R.; Luo, J.; Pan, X.

    1993-10-01

    Diamond films are predominantly grown using one percent or so of a hydrocarbon precursor in hydrogen gas. Hydrogen is generally believed to be necessary for the diamond thin film growth process. However, hydrogen in varying amounts is inevitably incorporated in the growing diamond lattice, leading to structural defects. The authors report here for the first time the successful growth of diamond films using fullerene precursors in an argon microwave plasma, a unique development achieved without the addition of hydrogen or oxygen. It is speculated that collisional fragmentation of C{sub 60} to give C{sub 2} could be responsible for the high growth rate of the very fine grained diamond films.

  1. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  2. Intrinsic magnetization of antiferromagnetic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, Erlend G.; Müller, Tristan; Linder, Jacob; Brataas, Arne

    2016-03-01

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) exhibit intrinsic magnetization when the order parameter spatially varies. This intrinsic spin is present even at equilibrium and can be interpreted as a twisting of the homogeneous AFM into a state with a finite spin. Because magnetic moments couple directly to external magnetic fields, the intrinsic magnetization can alter the dynamics of antiferromagnetic textures under such influence. Starting from the discrete Heisenberg model, we derive the continuum limit of the free energy of AFMs in the exchange approximation and explicitly rederive that the spatial variation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter is associated with an intrinsic magnetization density. We calculate the magnetization profile of a domain wall and discuss how the intrinsic magnetization reacts to external forces. We show conclusively, both analytically and numerically, that a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field can move and control the position of domain walls in AFMs. By comparing our model to a commonly used alternative parametrization procedure for the continuum fields, we show that the physical interpretations of these fields depend critically on the choice of parametrization procedure for the discrete-to-continuous transition. This can explain why a significant amount of recent studies of the dynamics of AFMs, including effective models that describe the motion of antiferromagnetic domain walls, have neglected the intrinsic spin of the textured order parameter.

  3. Electronic structure studies of nanocrystalline diamond grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Zapol, P.; Sternberg, M.; Frauenheim, T.; Gruen, D. M.; Curtiss, L. A.

    1999-11-29

    Diamond growth from hydrogen-poor plasmas results in diamond structures that are profoundly different from conventionally CVD-grown diamond. High concentration of carbon dimers in the microwave plasma results in a high rate of heterogeneous renucleation leading to formation of nanocrystalline diamond with a typical grain size of 3--10 nm. Therefore, up to 10% of carbon atoms are located in the grain boundaries. In this paper the authors report on density-functional based tight-binding molecular dynamics calculations of the structure of a {Sigma}13 twist (100) grain boundary in diamond. Beginning with a coincidence site lattice model, simulated annealing of the initial structure was performed at 1,500 K followed by relaxation toward lower temperatures. About one-half of the carbons in the grain boundary are found to be three-coordinated. Coordination numbers, bond length and bond angle distributions are analyzed and compared to those obtained in previous studies.

  4. Phase transitions in antiferromagnets with a NaCl structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassan-Ogly, F. A.; Filippov, B. N.

    2006-05-01

    A revised derivation scheme of possible magnetic structures in an FCC lattice with the nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions taken into account is proposed. A model of simultaneous magnetic and structural phase transitions of the first order is developed for antiferromagnets with a NaCl structure and with a strong cubic magnetic anisotropy on the base of synthesis of magnetic modified 6-state Potts model and theoretical models of structural phase transitions in cubic crystals. It is shown that the high-temperature diffuse magnetic scattering of neutrons transforms into magnetic Bragg reflections below Néel point.

  5. Symmetry Reduction in the Quantum Kagome Antiferromagnet Herbertsmithite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorko, A.; Herak, M.; Gomilšek, M.; van Tol, J.; Velázquez, M.; Khuntia, P.; Bert, F.; Mendels, P.

    2017-01-01

    Employing complementary torque magnetometry and electron spin resonance on single crystals of herbertsmithite, the closest realization to date of a quantum kagome antiferromagnet featuring a spin-liquid ground state, we provide novel insight into different contributions to its magnetism. At low temperatures, two distinct types of defects with different magnetic couplings to the kagome spins are found. Surprisingly, their magnetic response contradicts the threefold symmetry of the ideal kagome lattice, suggesting the presence of a global structural distortion that may be related to the establishment of the spin-liquid ground state.

  6. Symmetry Reduction in the Quantum Kagome Antiferromagnet Herbertsmithite.

    PubMed

    Zorko, A; Herak, M; Gomilšek, M; van Tol, J; Velázquez, M; Khuntia, P; Bert, F; Mendels, P

    2017-01-06

    Employing complementary torque magnetometry and electron spin resonance on single crystals of herbertsmithite, the closest realization to date of a quantum kagome antiferromagnet featuring a spin-liquid ground state, we provide novel insight into different contributions to its magnetism. At low temperatures, two distinct types of defects with different magnetic couplings to the kagome spins are found. Surprisingly, their magnetic response contradicts the threefold symmetry of the ideal kagome lattice, suggesting the presence of a global structural distortion that may be related to the establishment of the spin-liquid ground state.

  7. Z2 antiferromagnetic topological insulators with broken C4 symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bègue, Frédéric; Pujol, Pierre; Ramazashvili, Revaz

    2017-04-01

    A two-dimensional topological insulator may arise in a centrosymmetric commensurate Néel antiferromagnet (AF), where staggered magnetization breaks both the elementary translation and time reversal, but retains their product as a symmetry. Fang et al. [6] proposed an expression for a Z2 topological invariant to characterize such systems. Here, we show that this expression does not allow to detect all the existing phases if a certain lattice symmetry is lacking. We implement numerical techniques to diagnose topological phases of a toy Hamiltonian, and verify our results by computing the Chern numbers of degenerate bands, and also by explicitly constructing the edge states, thus illustrating the efficiency of the method.

  8. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  9. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  10. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  11. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y. -H.; Bi, B.; Golding, B.

    2015-02-24

    A method of diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth is demonstrated which utilizes a photolithographic metal mask to pattern a thin (001) epitaxial diamond surface. Significant structural improvement was found, with a threading dislocation density reduced by two orders of magnitude at the top surface of a thick overgrown diamond layer. In the initial stage of overgrowth, a reduction of diamond Raman linewidth in the overgrown area was also realized. Thermally-induced stress and internal stress were determined by Raman spectroscopy of adhering and delaminated diamond films. As a result, the internal stress is found to decrease as sample thickness increases.

  12. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  13. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  14. The Nature of Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.

    1997-10-01

    The paragon of physical perfection and a sparkling example of Earth's forces at work, the diamond has fascinated all realms of society, from starlets to scientists. The Nature of Diamonds is a comprehensive look at nature's most coveted gem. A handsome, large-format book, The Nature of Diamonds is an authoritative and richly-illustrated tribute to the diamond. Leading geologists, gemologists, physicists, and cultural observers cover every facet of the stone, from its formation in the depths of the Earth, its ascent to the surface, and its economic, regal, social, and technological roles. Cutting-edge research takes the reader to the frontiers of diamond exploration and exploitation, from the Arctic wastes to the laboratories where diamonds are created for massive road shredders that rip up and then re-create superhighways. Here also is an overview of cutting, from the rough stones in Roman rings to the highly-faceted stones we see today, and a glimpse into the business of diamonds. Finally, The Nature of Diamonds chronicles scientific and cultural history and explores the diamond as both a sacred and a social symbol, including a picture history of betrothal rings. Wide-ranging illustrations explain the geology of diamonds, chart the history of mining from its origins in India and Brazil through the diamond rush in South Africa and today's high-tech enterprises, and capture the brilliance and beauty of this extraordinary gem. _

  15. Large anomalous Hall effect in a half-Heusler antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Chisnell, R.; Devarakonda, A.; Liu, Y.-T.; Feng, W.; Xiao, D.; Lynn, J. W.; Checkelsky, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum mechanical (Berry) phase of the electronic wavefunction plays a critical role in the anomalous and spin Hall effects, including their quantized limits. While progress has been made in understanding these effects in ferromagnets, less is known in antiferromagnetic systems. Here we present a study of antiferromagnet GdPtBi, whose electronic structure is similar to that of the topologically non-trivial HgTe (refs ,,), and where the Gd ions offer the possibility to tune the Berry phase via control of the spin texture. We show that this system supports an anomalous Hall angle ΘAH > 0.1, comparable to the largest observed in bulk ferromagnets and significantly larger than in other antiferromagnets. Neutron scattering measurements and electronic structure calculations suggest that this effect originates from avoided crossing or Weyl points that develop near the Fermi level due to a breaking of combined time-reversal and lattice symmetries. Berry phase effects associated with such symmetry breaking have recently been explored in kagome networks; our results extend this to half-Heusler systems with non-trivial band topology. The magnetic textures indicated here may also provide pathways towards realizing the topological insulating and semimetallic states predicted in this material class.

  16. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  17. Nonequilibrium antiferromagnetic mixed-spin Ising model.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Mauricio; Figueiredo, Wagner

    2002-09-01

    We studied an antiferromagnetic mixed-spin Ising model on the square lattice subject to two competing stochastic processes. The model system consists of two interpenetrating sublattices of spins sigma=1/2 and S=1, and we take only nearest neighbor interactions between pairs of spins. The system is in contact with a heat bath at temperature T, and the exchange of energy with the heat bath occurs via one-spin flip (Glauber dynamics). Besides, the system interacts with an external agency of energy, which supplies energy to it whenever two nearest neighboring spins are simultaneously flipped. By employing Monte Carlo simulations and a dynamical pair approximation, we found the phase diagram for the stationary states of the model in the plane temperature T versus the competition parameter between one- and two-spin flips p. We observed the appearance of three distinct phases, that are separated by continuous transition lines. We also determined the static critical exponents along these lines and we showed that this nonequilibrium model belongs to the universality class of the two-dimensional equilibrium Ising model.

  18. Antiferromagnetic Skyrmion: Stability, Creation and Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations in ferromagnets, which have the topo-logical number Q = ± 1, and hence show the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE) due to the Magnus force effect originating from the topology. Here, we propose the counterpart of the magnetic skyrmion in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) system, that is, the AFM skyrmion, which is topologically protected but without showing the SkHE. Two approaches for creating the AFM skyrmion have been described based on micromagnetic lattice simulations: (i) by injecting a vertical spin-polarized current to a nanodisk with the AFM ground state; (ii) by converting an AFM domain-wall pair in a nanowire junction. It is demonstrated that the AFM skyrmion, driven by the spin-polarized current, can move straightly over long distance, benefiting from the absence of the SkHE. Our results will open a new strategy on designing the novel spintronic devices based on AFM materials. PMID:27099125

  19. Antiferromagnetic Skyrmion: Stability, Creation and Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Ezawa, Motohiko

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are particle-like topological excitations in ferromagnets, which have the topo-logical number Q = ± 1, and hence show the skyrmion Hall effect (SkHE) due to the Magnus force effect originating from the topology. Here, we propose the counterpart of the magnetic skyrmion in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) system, that is, the AFM skyrmion, which is topologically protected but without showing the SkHE. Two approaches for creating the AFM skyrmion have been described based on micromagnetic lattice simulations: (i) by injecting a vertical spin-polarized current to a nanodisk with the AFM ground state; (ii) by converting an AFM domain-wall pair in a nanowire junction. It is demonstrated that the AFM skyrmion, driven by the spin-polarized current, can move straightly over long distance, benefiting from the absence of the SkHE. Our results will open a new strategy on designing the novel spintronic devices based on AFM materials.

  20. Ising antiferromagnet with ultracold bosonic mixtures confined in a harmonic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmino, M.; Penna, V.; Capogrosso-Sansone, B.

    2011-09-15

    We present accurate results based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations of two-component bosonic systems on a square lattice and in the presence of an external harmonic confinement. Starting from hopping parameters and interaction strengths which stabilize the Ising antiferromagnetic phase in the homogeneous case and at half-integer filling factor, we study how the presence of the harmonic confinement challenges the realization of such a phase. We consider realistic trapping frequencies and number of particles, and we establish under which conditions, i.e., total number of particles and population imbalance, the antiferromagnetic phase can be observed in the trap.

  1. Topological Weyl semimetals in the chiral antiferromagnetic materials Mn3Ge and Mn3Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Shi, Wu-Jun; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Yan, Binghai

    2017-01-01

    Recent experiments revealed that Mn3Sn and Mn3Ge exhibit a strong anomalous Hall effect at room temperature, provoking us to explore their electronic structures for topological properties. By ab initio band structure calculations, we have observed the existence of multiple Weyl points in the bulk and corresponding Fermi arcs on the surface, predicting antiferromagnetic Weyl semimetals in Mn3Ge and Mn3Sn. Here the chiral antiferromagnetism in the Kagome-type lattice structure is essential to determine the positions and numbers of Weyl points. Our work further reveals a new guiding principle to search for magnetic Weyl semimetals among materials that exhibit a strong anomalous Hall effect.

  2. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng; Xiong, Lun; Liu, Jing

    2015-09-07

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. High-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  3. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; ...

    2015-09-08

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis andmore » characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. In conclusion, high-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.« less

  4. Phenomenological effets of tantalum incorporation into diamond films: Experimental and first principle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmad, E.; Raza, Rizwan; Hussain, Fayyaz; Hussain, Akhtar; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2016-09-01

    Tantalum (Ta) incorporated diamond films are synthesized on silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition under gas mixture of CH4 + H2. Characterizations of the resulting films indicate that morphology and resistivity of as-grown diamond films are significantly influenced by the process parameters and the amount of tantalum incorporated in the diamond films. XRD plots reveal that diamond films are composed of TaC along with diamond for higher concentration of tantalum and Ta2C phases for lower concentration of tantalum. EDS spectra confirms the existence of tantalum in the diamond films. Resistivity measurements illustrate a sudden fall of about two orders of magnitude by the addition of tantalum in the diamond films. Band structure of Ta-incorporated diamond has been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) using VASP code. Band structure calculations lead to the semiconducting behavior of Ta-incorporated diamond films because of the creation of defects states inside the band gap extending towards conduction band minimum. Present DFT results support experimental trend of resistivity that with the incorporation of tantalum into diamond lattice causes a decrease in the resistivity of diamond films so that tantalum-incorporated diamond films behave like a good semiconductor.

  5. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  6. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  7. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-03-15

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  8. Cathodoluminescence of diamond as an indicator of its metamorphic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylova, Maya; Bruce, Loryn; Longo, Micaela; Ryder, John; Dobrzhinetskaya, Larissa

    2010-05-01

    optical centers (neutrally charged complexes of a vacancy and a single nitrogen). We ascribe the effect of metamorphism on the diamond CL to low-T, low-P deformation that creates lattice dislocations and vacancies. These combine with substitutional N to make and enhance optical centers. The metamorphism-induced CL anneals when diamonds are stored at high-T mantle conditions, as the mobility of dislocations at T>750oC quenches the luminescence. Indeed, all studied diamonds that displayed unusual green, yellow and red CL were found in low and medium grade metamorphic rocks, i.e. Wawa greenschists (T<350oC and P< 3 kb) and Kokchetav and Erzgebirge UHP terranes retrograded in the amphibolite facies (T<750oC, P<14 kb) Our study suggest that a low abundance of octahedrally grown Type IaAB diamonds with blue CL colours among detrital diamonds may indicate that the stones may have once been a part of a low- or medium-grade metamorphic terrane. The CL characteristics superimposed by metamorphism could survive through billions of years of the geological history if not annealed by a high -T process. The discovered record of metamorphism in the diamond crystal lattice provides an opportunity for a better reconstruction of the crustal history and provenance studies of diamond.

  9. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  10. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  11. Coupled-cluster method: A lattice-path-based subsystem approximation scheme for quantum lattice models

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2011-04-15

    An approximation hierarchy, called the lattice-path-based subsystem (LPSUBm) approximation scheme, is described for the coupled-cluster method (CCM). It is applicable to systems defined on a regular spatial lattice. We then apply it to two well-studied prototypical (spin-(1/2) Heisenberg antiferromagnetic) spin-lattice models, namely, the XXZ and the XY models on the square lattice in two dimensions. Results are obtained in each case for the ground-state energy, the ground-state sublattice magnetization, and the quantum critical point. They are all in good agreement with those from such alternative methods as spin-wave theory, series expansions, quantum Monte Carlo methods, and the CCM using the alternative lattice-animal-based subsystem (LSUBm) and the distance-based subsystem (DSUBm) schemes. Each of the three CCM schemes (LSUBm, DSUBm, and LPSUBm) for use with systems defined on a regular spatial lattice is shown to have its own advantages in particular applications.

  12. Antiferromagnetic spin flop and exchange bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogués, J.; Morellon, L.; Leighton, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Schuller, Ivan K.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of the antiferromagnetic spin flop on exchange bias has been investigated in antiferromagnetic (MnF2)-ferromagnetic (Fe) bilayers. Cooling and measuring in fields larger than the antiferromagnetic spin-flop field, HSF, causes an irreversible reduction of the magnitude of the exchange bias field, HE. This indicates that, contrary to what is normally assumed, the interface spin structure does not remain ``frozen in'' below TN if large enough fields are applied.

  13. Magnetic phase diagram and multiferroicity of Ba3MnNb2O9 : A spin -52 triangular lattice antiferromagnet with weak easy-axis anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.; Choi, E. S.; Huang, X.; Ma, J.; Dela Cruz, C. R.; Matsuda, M.; Tian, W.; Dun, Z. L.; Dong, S.; Zhou, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    Here we have performed magnetic, electric, thermal and neutron powder diffraction (NPD) experiments as well as density functional theory (DFT) calculations on Ba3MnNb2 O9. All results suggest that Ba3MnNb2 O9 is a spin-5/2 triangular lattice antiferromagnet (TLAF) with weak easy-axis anisotropy. At zero field, we observed a narrow two-step transition at TN1 = 3.4 K and TN2 = 3.0 K. The neutron diffraction measurement and the DFT calculation indicate a 120 spin structure in ab plane with out-of-plane canting at low temperatures. With increasing magnetic field, the 120 spin structure evolves into up-up-down (uud) and oblique phases showing successive magnetic phase transitions, which fits well to the theoretical prediction for the 2D Heisenberg TLAF with classical spins. Ultimately, multiferroicity is observed when the spins are not collinear but suppressed in the uud and oblique phases.

  14. Topological magnon bands in ferromagnetic star lattice.

    PubMed

    Owerre, S A

    2017-05-10

    The experimental observation of topological magnon bands and thermal Hall effect in a kagomé lattice ferromagnet Cu(1-3, bdc) has inspired the search for topological magnon effects in various insulating ferromagnets that lack an inversion center allowing a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) spin-orbit interaction. The star lattice (also known as the decorated honeycomb lattice) ferromagnet is an ideal candidate for this purpose because it is a variant of the kagomé lattice with additional links that connect the up-pointing and down-pointing triangles. This gives rise to twice the unit cell of the kagomé lattice, and hence more interesting topological magnon effects. In particular, the triangular bridges on the star lattice can be coupled either ferromagnetically or antiferromagnetically which is not possible on the kagomé lattice ferromagnets. Here, we study DM-induced topological magnon bands, chiral edge modes, and thermal magnon Hall effect on the star lattice ferromagnet in different parameter regimes. The star lattice can also be visualized as the parent material from which topological magnon bands can be realized for the kagomé and honeycomb lattices in some limiting cases.

  15. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    methyl radicals to a nickel (111) surface . The detailed results are contained in an attached copy of a recently published journal article, "Effects of...nucleation on surfaces which otherwise would not even nucleate diamond. The second area of research is devoted to the development of implant and...in explaining results of hydrogen dosing of diamond surfaces . Experimental results indicated that the dimmer bond on the diamond 2x1 surface was very

  16. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  17. X-ray diffraction characterization of epitaxial CVD diamond films with natural and isotopically modified compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorov, I. A.; Voloshin, A. E.; Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P.; Romanov, D. A.; Khomich, A. A.; Sozontov, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Comparative investigations of homoepitaxial diamond films with natural and modified isotopic compositions, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on type-Ib diamond substrates, are carried out using double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and topography. The lattice mismatch between the substrate and film is precisely measured. A decrease in the lattice constant on the order of (Δ a/ a)relax ˜ (1.1-1.2) × 10-4 is recorded in isotopically modified 13C (99.96%) films. The critical thicknesses of pseudomorphic diamond films is calculated. A significant increase in the dislocation density due to the elastic stress relaxation is revealed by X-ray topography.

  18. Large magnetostriction and negative thermal expansion in the frustrated antiferromagnet ZnCr2Se4.

    PubMed

    Hemberger, J; von Nidda, H-A Krug; Tsurkan, V; Loidl, A

    2007-04-06

    A detailed investigation of ZnCr2Se4 is presented which is dominated by strong ferromagnetic exchange but orders antiferromagnetically at TN=21 K. Specific heat and thermal expansion exhibit sharp first-order anomalies at the antiferromagnetic transition. TN is shifted to lower temperatures by external magnetic fields and finally is fully suppressed by a field of 65 kOe. The relative length change DeltaL/L(T) is unusually large and exhibits negative thermal expansion alpha below 75 K down to TN indicating strong frustration of the lattice. Magnetostriction DeltaL/L(H) reveals large values comparable to giant magnetostrictive materials. These results point to a spin-driven origin of the structural instability at TN explained in terms of competing ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions.

  19. Diamond anvil technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Michael

    This paper is largely a review of the techniques used in making diamond anvils and the constraints these put on the shapes of anvil. Techniques available for shaping diamonds include cleaving, sawing, polishing, laser cutting, and bruting. At present the shapes most commonly used for anvils are a modification of the brilliant cut derived from the gem industry, and a design based on an octagonal prism with truncated pyramidal top and base, known as the "Drukker standard design". Diamond orientation and material selection are considered as are future possibilities for the attainment of still higher pressures through modifications of the diamond anvil material or design.

  20. Structure, properties, and possible mechanisms of formation of diamond-like phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenkov, E. A.; Greshnyakov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    An analysis was performed for relations between the structural parameters and the properties of 36 carbon diamond-like phases consisting of atoms occupying crystallographically equivalent positions. It was found that the crystal lattices of these phases were in stressed states with respect to the cubic diamond lattice. The density of diamond-like phases, their sublimation energies, bulk moduli, hardnesses, and band gaps depend on the deformation parameters Def and Str. The most stable phases must be phases with minimal parameters Def and Str and also with ring parameter Rng that is most close to the corresponding parameter of cubic diamond. The structures and energy characteristics of fullerites, nanotube bundles, and graphene layers of which diamond-like phases can be obtained as a result of polymerization at high pressures have been calculated.

  1. Spin liquids and spin dynamics in kagome antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendels, Philippe

    2006-03-01

    Among all the corner sharing highly frustrated magnets, only a few experimental systems are good candidates for a low-T fluctuating state, ie fulfilling the important conditions of the pure Heisenberg lattice with nn couplings. The combination of the weakness of the single-ion anisotropy and of a direct overlap antiferromagnetic exchange are certainly the major advantages of the chromate S=3/2 kagome bilayer Ba2Sn2ZnGa10-7pCr7pO22- BSZCGO(p)- and the long studied SrCr9pGa12-9pO19 - SCGO(p). Beyond the absence of ordering well below the Curie-Weiss temperature, the unusual large value of the specific heat unveils a high density of low lying excitations and its field independence suggests that the excited states are mostly singlets. Moreover, their ground state is found essentially fluctuating although an intrinsic spin glass (SG) signature is observed in susceptibility measurements. Through a review of our past years work, I'll illustrate all the potential of local studies (NMR and μSR) to reveal some key aspects of the physics of these compounds: susceptibility, fluctuations, impact of dilution defects which generate an extended response of the spin-lattice ... as well as the puzzling spin-glass state. More recently we also investigated new series of compounds, among them volborthite and delafossites which feature S=1/2 spins on a corner sharing antiferromagnetic lattice. I'll introduce these compounds and shortly discuss their relation to ideal Hamiltonians and novel features. - D. Bono et al.Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 187201 (2004), 92, 217202 (2004) ; Cond-mat/0503496. F. Bert et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 95, 087203 (2005). L. Limot, et al., Phys. Rev. B, 65, 132403 (2002). P. Mendels et al. Phys. Rev. Lett., 85, 3496 (2000).

  2. Antiferromagnetic state in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, Maxim

    2012-11-01

    Motivated by the recent experiment of Velasco Jr. [J. Velasco Jr. , Nat. Nanotechnology1748-338710.1038/nnano.2011.251 7, 156 (2012)], we develop a mean-field theory of the interaction-induced antiferromagnetic (AF) state in bilayer graphene at charge neutrality point at arbitrary perpendicular magnetic field B. We demonstrate that the AF state can persist at all B. At higher B, the state continuously crosses over to the AF phase of the ν=0 quantum Hall ferromagnet, recently argued to be realized in the insulating ν=0 state. The mean-field quasiparticle gap is finite at B=0 and grows with increasing B, becoming quasilinear in the quantum Hall regime, in accord with the reported behavior of the transport gap. By adjusting the two free parameters of the model, we obtain a simultaneous quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the key parameters of the gap dependence—its zero-field value and slope at higher fields. Our findings suggest that the insulating state observed in bilayer graphene in Ref. is antiferromagnetic (canted, once the Zeeman effect is taken into account) at all magnetic fields.

  3. Pressure-tuned spin and charge ordering in an itinerant antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yejun; Jaramillo, R; Srajer, G; Lang, J C; Islam, Z; Somayazulu, M S; Shpyrko, O G; Pluth, J J; Mao, H-K; Isaacs, E D; Aeppli, G; Rosenbaum, T F

    2007-09-28

    Elemental chromium orders antiferromagnetically near room temperature, but the ordering temperature can be driven to zero by applying large pressures. We combine diamond anvil cell and synchrotron x-ray diffraction techniques to measure directly the spin and charge order in the pure metal at the approach to its quantum critical point. Both spin and charge order are suppressed exponentially with pressure, well beyond the region where disorder cuts off such a simple evolution, and they maintain a harmonic scaling relationship over decades in scattering intensity. By comparing the development of the order parameter with that of the magnetic wave vector, it is possible to ascribe the destruction of antiferromagnetism to the growth in electron kinetic energy relative to the underlying magnetic exchange interaction.

  4. Discrete-Symmetry Breaking and Novel Critical Phenomena in an Antiferromagnetic Planar (XY) Model in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Joannopoulos, J. D.; Negele, J. W.; Landau, D. P.

    1984-02-01

    Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson symmetry analyses and Monte Carlo calculations for the classical antiferromagnetic planar (XY) model on a triangular lattice reveal a wealth of interesting critical phenomena. From this simple model arise a zero-field transition to a state of long-range order, a new mechanism for spin disordering, and a critical point associated with a possible new universality class.

  5. Competing antiferromagnetic orders in the double perovskite Mn2MnReO6 (Mn3ReO6).

    PubMed

    Arévalo-López, A M; Stegemann, F; Attfield, J P

    2016-04-25

    The new double perovskite Mn2MnReO6 has been synthesised at high pressure. Mn(2+) and Re(6+) spins order antiferromagnetically through two successive transitions that are coupled by magnetoelastic effects, as order of the Mn spins at 109 K leads to lattice distortions that reduce frustration prompting Re order at 99 K.

  6. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko; Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi; Djerdj, Igor; Tonejc, Andelka; Gamulin, Ozren

    2008-08-01

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  7. Superconductivity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Bauer, E D; Mel'nik, N N; Curro, N J; Thompson, J D; Stishov, S M

    2004-04-01

    Diamond is an electrical insulator well known for its exceptional hardness. It also conducts heat even more effectively than copper, and can withstand very high electric fields. With these physical properties, diamond is attractive for electronic applications, particularly when charge carriers are introduced (by chemical doping) into the system. Boron has one less electron than carbon and, because of its small atomic radius, boron is relatively easily incorporated into diamond; as boron acts as a charge acceptor, the resulting diamond is effectively hole-doped. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond synthesized at high pressure (nearly 100,000 atmospheres) and temperature (2,500-2,800 K). Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and field-dependent resistance measurements show that boron-doped diamond is a bulk, type-II superconductor below the superconducting transition temperature T(c) approximately 4 K; superconductivity survives in a magnetic field up to Hc2(0) > or = 3.5 T. The discovery of superconductivity in diamond-structured carbon suggests that Si and Ge, which also form in the diamond structure, may similarly exhibit superconductivity under the appropriate conditions.

  8. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  9. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  10. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  11. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory.

    PubMed

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-03

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  12. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  13. Phase transition in Heisenberg stacked triangular antiferromagnets: end of a controversy.

    PubMed

    Ngo, V Thanh; Diep, H T

    2008-09-01

    By using the Wang-Landau flat-histogram Monte Carlo (MC) method for very large lattice sizes never simulated before, we show that the phase transition in the frustrated Heisenberg stacked triangular antiferromagnet is of first order, contrary to results of earlier MC simulations using old-fashioned methods. Our result lends support to the conclusion of a nonperturbative renormalization group performed on an effective Hamiltonian. It puts an end to a 20-year -long controversial issue.

  14. Thick homoepitaxial (110)-oriented phosphorus-doped n-type diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, Y.; Pobedinskas, P.; Janssens, S. D.; Sakr, G.; Jomard, F.; Turner, S.; Lu, Y.-G.; Dexters, W.; Soltani, A.; Verbeeck, J.; Barjon, J.; Nesládek, M.; Haenen, K.

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of n-type diamond is essential for the realization of electronic components for extreme environments. We report on the growth of a 66 μm thick homoepitaxial phosphorus-doped diamond on a (110)-oriented diamond substrate, grown at a very high deposition rate of 33 μm h-1. A pristine diamond lattice is observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy, which indicates the growth of high quality diamond. About 2.9 × 1016 cm-3 phosphorus atoms are electrically active as substitutional donors, which is 60% of all incorporated dopant atoms. These results indicate that P-doped (110)-oriented diamond films deposited at high growth rates are promising candidates for future use in high-power electronic applications.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation with aspect-ratio optimization: Anomalous anisotropic scaling in dimerized antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Shinya; Todo, Synge

    2013-12-01

    We present a method that optimizes the aspect ratio of a spatially anisotropic quantum lattice model during the quantum Monte Carlo simulation, and realizes the virtually isotropic lattice automatically. The anisotropy is removed by using the Robbins-Monro algorithm based on the correlation length in each direction. The method allows for comparing directly the value of the critical amplitude among different anisotropic models, and identifying the universality more precisely. We apply our method to the staggered dimer antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model and demonstrate that the apparent nonuniversal behavior is attributed mainly to the strong size correction of the effective aspect ratio due to the existence of the cubic interaction.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation with aspect-ratio optimization: anomalous anisotropic scaling in dimerized antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Shinya; Todo, Synge

    2013-12-01

    We present a method that optimizes the aspect ratio of a spatially anisotropic quantum lattice model during the quantum Monte Carlo simulation, and realizes the virtually isotropic lattice automatically. The anisotropy is removed by using the Robbins-Monro algorithm based on the correlation length in each direction. The method allows for comparing directly the value of the critical amplitude among different anisotropic models, and identifying the universality more precisely. We apply our method to the staggered dimer antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model and demonstrate that the apparent nonuniversal behavior is attributed mainly to the strong size correction of the effective aspect ratio due to the existence of the cubic interaction.

  17. Femtosecond optomagnetism in dielectric antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossini, D.; Rasing, Th

    2017-02-01

    Optical femtosecond manipulation of magnetic order is attractive for the development of new concepts for ultrafast magnetic recording. Theoretical and experimental investigations in this research area aim at establishing a physical understanding of magnetic media in light-induced non-equilibrium states. Such a quest requires one to adjust the theory of magnetism, since the thermodynamical concepts of elementary excitations and spin alignment determined by the exchange interaction are not applicable on the femtosecond time-scale after the photo-excitation. Here we report some key milestones concerning the femtosecond optical control of spins in dielectric antiferromagnets, whose spin dynamics is by nature faster than that of ferromagnets and can be triggered even without any laser heating. The recent progress of the opto-magnetic effect in the sub-wavelength regime makes this exciting research area even more promising, in terms of both fundamental breakthroughs and technological perspectives.

  18. Tuning the magnetic ground state of a triangular lattice system

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Savici, Andrei T; Jin, Rongying

    2011-01-01

    The anisotropic triangular lattice of the crednerite system Cu(Mn$_{1-x}$Cu$_{x}$)O$_{2}$ is used as a basic model for studying the influence of spin disorder on the ground state properties of a two-dimensional frustrated antiferromagnet. Neutron diffraction measurements show that the undoped phase (x=0) undergoes a transition to antiferromagnetic long-range order that is stabilized by a frustration-relieving structural distortion. Small deviation from the stoichiometric composition alters the magnetoelastic characteristics and reduces the effective dimensionality of the magnetic lattice. Upon increasing the doping level, the interlayer coupling changes from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic, while the structural distortion is fully suppressed. Concomitantly, the long-range magnetic order is gradually transformed into a two-dimensional order.

  19. Probing spin ordering in iron-platinum based antiferromagnetic films using neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Prakash

    The antiferromagnetic properties of chemically ordered and epitaxial films of FexPt100-x grown on MgO(111) & MgO(100) and Fe50Pt50- xRhx grown on MgO(100) have been studied with neutron diffraction. Epitaxial films of FexPt 100-x (x = 25, 30) have two kinds of antiferromagnetic ordering. The Neel temperature of spin wave vector QA = (1/2 1/2 0) is T N = 160 K and QB = (1/2 0 0) is TN = 100 K, respectively. Neutron diffraction is used to determine the phase diagram of the antiferromagnetic ordering as a function of composition and temperature. The nature of antiferromagnetic ordering was found to be strongly related to the lattice strain present in the system. Lattice-matched antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic films offer an ideal layered system to study exchange bias. The loop shifts in FePt3(AF)/CoPt 3(F) multilayers are correlated with rocking curve peak widths, and it has been shown that films with a narrower full-width-half-maximum have a smaller exchange bias. Neutron reflectivity is also applied to CoPt 3/FePt3 multilayers in order to probe layer-specific magnetizations owing to the significant difference in neutron scattering length density between Fe and Co. Fe50Pt50-xRh x (x˜10) exhibits a temperature dependent antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic-paramagnetic triple point near 400 K. The temperature and composition dependent spin structure of Fe50Pt 50-xRhx alloy films grown on MgO(100) have been determined for the first time with neutron diffraction. Three types of antiferromagnetic orderings were observed: (0 0 1/2), (1/2 1/2 1/2), and (1/2 1/2 3/2). Future studies have been planned to explore a magnetic field induced antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in Fe50Pt50-xRh x alloy films.

  20. [Studies on nano-diamond prepared by explosive detonation by Raman and infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wen, Chao; Jin, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Xiao-Xin; Li, Xun; Guan, Jin-Qing; Sun, De-Yu; Lin, Ying-Rui; Tang, Shi-Ying; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Jun-De

    2005-05-01

    Nano-diamond was synthesized by TNT/RDX explosives detonation in a steel chamber and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. XRD results indicate that nano-diamond has cubic diamond structure. The parameter of unit cell of nano-diamond is 0.359 23 nm and is 0.72% larger than that of the bulk diamond. The high-density defects and other impurity atoms in the nano-diamond structure may lead to the large lattice constant. The examination results of Raman spectra show that the Raman band is broader and shifts to l ow frequency by 3 cm(-1), because the size of nano-diamond reaches nanometer order. There is little graphite in the nano-diamond. There are two peaks in FTIR of the nano-diamond, which are characteristic peaks of diamond at 1 262 and 1 134 cm(-1). Besides these two peaks, there are six peaks at 3 422, 1 643, 2 971, 2 930, 2 857 and 1 788 cm(-1) respectively. The FTIR bands at 2 930 and 2 857 cm(-1) are the antisymmetrical and symmetrical stretch vibration absorption spectra of CH2 respectively. The 3 422 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of O-H. The 1 634 cm(-1) confirms that there are H2O in the nano-diamond. The 2 971 cm(-1) is the antisymmetrical stretch vibration absorption peak of CH3. The 1 788 cm(-1) is the stretch vibration absorption peak of C=O. These indicate that there are H and O elements in the nano-diamond. From the mechanism of the nano-diamond, the authors discuss the reason for the vibration absorption peaks of O-H, CH2, CH3, and C=O, existing in the FTIR of the nano-diamond.

  1. Striped spin liquid crystal ground state instability of kagome antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Clark, Bryan K; Kinder, Jesse M; Neuscamman, Eric; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Lawler, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    The Dirac spin liquid ground state of the spin 1/2 Heisenberg kagome antiferromagnet has potential instabilities. This has been suggested as the reason why it does not emerge as the ground state in large-scale numerical calculations. However, previous attempts to observe these instabilities have failed. We report on the discovery of a projected BCS state with lower energy than the projected Dirac spin liquid state which provides new insight into the stability of the ground state of the kagome antiferromagnet. The new state has three remarkable features. First, it breaks spatial symmetry in an unusual way that may leave spinons deconfined along one direction. Second, it breaks the U(1) gauge symmetry down to Z(2). Third, it has the spatial symmetry of a previously proposed "monopole" suggesting that it is an instability of the Dirac spin liquid. The state described herein also shares a remarkable similarity to the distortion of the kagome lattice observed at low Zn concentrations in Zn-paratacamite and in recently grown single crystals of volborthite suggesting it may already be realized in these materials.

  2. Domain walls in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films.

    PubMed

    Hellwig, Olav; Berger, Andreas; Fullerton, Eric E

    2003-11-07

    We report experimentally observed magnetic domain-wall structures in antiferromagnetically coupled multilayer films with perpendicular anisotropy. Our studies reveal a first-order phase transition from domain walls with no net moment to domain walls with ferromagnetic cores. The transition originates from the competition between dipolar and exchange energies, which we tune by means of layer thickness. Although observed in a synthetic antiferromagnetic system, such domain-wall structures may be expected to occur in A-type antiferromagnets with anisotropic exchange coupling.

  3. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kühn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-01

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E 1 , 2 p →5 d ) or quadrupole (E 2 , 2 p →4 f ) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5 d and localized 4 f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3 -τ ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4 f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4 f -5 d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  4. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho.

    PubMed

    Rettig, L; Dornes, C; Thielemann-Kühn, N; Pontius, N; Zabel, H; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chollet, M; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Glownia, J M; Schüßler-Langeheine, C; Johnson, S L; Staub, U

    2016-06-24

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L_{3} absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p→5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p→4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3-τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f-5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  5. Quantum kagome frustrated antiferromagnets: One route to quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendels, Philippe; Bert, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    After introducing the field of Highly Frustrated Magnetism through the quest for a quantum spin liquid in dimension higher than one, we focus on the emblematic case of the kagome network. From a theoretical point of view, the simple Heisenberg case for an antiferromagnetic kagome lattice decorated with quantum spins has been a long-standing problem, not solved yet. Experimental realizations have remained scarce for long until the discovery of herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2 in 2005. This is one of the very few quantum kagome spin liquid candidates that triggered a burst of activity both on theory and experiment sides. We give a survey of theory outcomes on the "kagome" problem, review the experimental properties of that model candidate and shortly discuss them with respect to recent theoretical results.

  6. The magnetic order of two-dimensional anisotropic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ai-Yuan; Wang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the square lattice with easy-axis exchange anisotropy by means of Green's function approach within random phase and Callen's approximations. The Néel temperature TN, energy gap w0 and staggered magnetization m are calculated. The theoretical predictions of TN and w0 for K2NiF4, Rb2MnF4, K2MnF4, Rb2MnCl4 and (CH3NH3)2MnCl4 fit well to the measured values. The power law behavior of w(T)/w(0)=β[ is also investigated. The exponents β and ν for K2NiF4 are in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Edge and impurity response in two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metlitski, Max A.; Sachdev, Subir

    2008-11-01

    Motivated by recent Monte Carlo simulations of Höglund and Sandvik (arXiv:0808.0408), we study edge response in square lattice quantum antiferromagnets. We use the O(3) nonlinear σ model to compute the decay asymptotics of the staggered magnetization, energy density, and local magnetic susceptibility away from the edge. We find that the total edge susceptibility is negative and diverges logarithmically as the temperature T→0 . We confirm the predictions of the continuum theory by performing a 1/S expansion of the microscopic Heisenberg model with the edge. We propose a qualitative explanation of the edge dimerization seen in Monte Carlo simulations by a theory of valence-bond-solid correlations in the Néel state. We also discuss the extension of the latter theory to the response of a single nonmagnetic impurity, and its connection to the theory of the deconfined critical point.

  8. Terahertz-Driven Nonlinear Spin Response of Antiferromagnetic Nickel Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baierl, S.; Mentink, J. H.; Hohenleutner, M.; Braun, L.; Do, T.-M.; Lange, C.; Sell, A.; Fiebig, M.; Woltersdorf, G.; Kampfrath, T.; Huber, R.

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz magnetic fields with amplitudes of up to 0.4 Tesla drive magnon resonances in nickel oxide while the induced dynamics is recorded by femtosecond magneto-optical probing. We observe distinct spin-mediated optical nonlinearities, including oscillations at the second harmonic of the 1 THz magnon mode. The latter originate from coherent dynamics of the longitudinal component of the antiferromagnetic order parameter, which are probed by magneto-optical effects of second order in the spin deflection. These observations allow us to dynamically disentangle electronic from lattice-related contributions to magnetic linear birefringence and dichroism—information so far only accessible by ultrafast THz spin control. The nonlinearities discussed here foreshadow physics that will become essential in future subcycle spin switching.

  9. Space Group Symmetry Fractionalization in a Chiral Kagome Heisenberg Antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Zaletel, Michael P; Zhu, Zhenyue; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Vishwanath, Ashvin; White, Steven R

    2016-05-13

    The anyonic excitations of a spin liquid can feature fractional quantum numbers under space group symmetries. Detecting these fractional quantum numbers, which are analogs of the fractional charge of Laughlin quasiparticles, may prove easier than the direct observation of anyonic braiding and statistics. Motivated by the recent numerical discovery of spin-liquid phases in the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet, we theoretically predict the pattern of space group symmetry fractionalization in the kagome lattice SO(3)-symmetric chiral spin liquid. We provide a method to detect these fractional quantum numbers in finite-size numerics which is simple to implement in the density matrix renormalization group. Applying these developments to the chiral spin liquid phase of a kagome Heisenberg model, we find perfect agreement between our theoretical prediction and numerical observations.

  10. Influence of annealing treatment on as-grown Ib-type diamond crystal at a high temperature and high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guo-Feng; Yin, Ji-Wen; Bai, Hong-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ga; Kai, Li; Jing, Jing; Ma, Hong-An; Jia, Xiao-Peng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we report on the influence of annealing treatment on as-grown Ib-type diamond crystal under high pressure and high temperature in a china-type cubic anvil high-pressure apparatus. Experiments are carried out at a pressure of 7.0 GPa and temperatures ranging from 1700 °C to 1900 °C for 1 h. Annealing treatment of the diamond crystal shows that the aggregation rate constant of nitrogen atoms in the as-grown Ib-type diamond crystal strongly depends on diamond morphology and annealing temperature. The aggregation rate constant of nitrogen remarkably increases with the increase of annealing temperature and its value in octahedral diamond is much higher than that in cubic diamond annealed at the same temperature. The colour of octahedral diamond crystal is obviously reduced from yellow to nearly colorless after annealing treatment for 1 h at 1900 °C, which is induced by nitrogen aggregation in a diamond lattice. The extent of nitrogen aggregation in an annealed diamond could approach approximately 98% indicated from the infrared absorption spectra. The micro-Raman spectrum reveals that the annealing treatment can improve the crystalline quality of Ib-type diamond characterized by a half width at full maximum at first order Raman peak, and therefore the annealed diamond crystals exhibit nearly the same properties as the natural IaA-type diamond stones of high quality in the Raman measurements.

  11. Topology of the space of periodic ground states in the antiferromagnetic Ising and Potts models in selected spatial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.

    2010-05-01

    Topology of the space of periodic ground states in the antiferromagnetic Ising and Potts (3-state) models is analysed in selected spatial structures. The states are treated as graph nodes, connected by one-spin-flip transitions. The spatial structures are the triangular lattice, the Archimedean ( 3,12) lattice and the cubic Laves C15 lattice with the periodic boundary conditions. In most cases the ground states are isolated nodes, but for selected systems we obtain connected graphs. The latter means that the magnetisation can vary in time with zero energy cost. The ground states are classified according to their degree and type of neighbours.

  12. Fabrication of diamond shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  13. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  14. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  15. Quantum engineering: Diamond envy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen atoms trapped tens of nanometres apart in diamond can now be linked by quantum entanglement. This ability to produce and control entanglement in solid systems could enable powerful quantum computers.

  16. Solitonlike magnetization textures in noncollinear antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa, Camilo; Nunez, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    We show that proper control of magnetization textures can be achieved in noncollinear antiferromagnets. This opens the versatile toolbox of domain-wall manipulation in the context of a different family of materials. In this way, we show that noncollinear antiferromagnets are a good prospect for applications in the context of antiferromagnetic spintronics. As in many noncollinear antiferromagnets, the order parameter field takes values in SO(3). By performing a gradient expansion in the energy functional we derive an effective theory that accounts for the physics of the magnetization of long-wavelength excitations. We apply our formalism to static and dynamic textures such as domain walls and localized oscillations, and identify topologically protected textures that are spatially localized. Our results are applicable to the exchange-bias materials Mn3X , with X =Ir,Rh,Pt .

  17. Diamond Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    thermal stresses of 10 million Watts per meter, 1,000 times better than Zerodur *. This property is also important for many thermal management...products UTD has coated to date include: • Optical windows, lenses, and mirrors . Zinc sulfide infrared windows coated with a 2.5 micron-thick...implants 16, 49 microwave plasma-enhanced CVD 2 mirrors , diamond-coated 49 models of diamond growth 10, 25, 33, 34, 39 moderators 10

  18. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  19. Synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles with tunable susceptibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Wilson, Robert J.; Earhart, Christopher M.; Koh, Ai Leen; Sinclair, Robert; Wang, Shan X.

    2009-01-01

    High-moment monodisperse disk-shaped Co–Fe magnetic nanoparticles, stable in aqueous solution, were physically fabricated by using nanoimprinted templates and vacuum deposition techniques. These multilayer synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles exhibit nearly zero magnetic remanence and coercivity, and susceptibilities which can be tuned by exploiting interlayer magnetic interactions. In addition, a low cost method of scaling up the production of sub-100 nm synthetic antiferromagnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated. PMID:19529797

  20. Charge dynamics of the antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xing-Jie; Liu, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Xin; Chen, Jing; Liao, Hai-Jun; Xie, Zhi-Yuan; Normand, B.; Xiang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a slave-fermion formulation in which to study the charge dynamics of the half-filled Hubbard model on the square lattice. In this description, the charge degrees of freedom are represented by fermionic holons and doublons and the Mott-insulating characteristics of the ground state are the consequence of holon-doublon bound-state formation. The bosonic spin degrees of freedom are described by the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model, yielding long-ranged (Néel) magnetic order at zero temperature. Within this framework and in the self-consistent Born approximation, we perform systematic calculations of the average double occupancy, the electronic density of states, the spectral function and the optical conductivity. Qualitatively, our method reproduces the lower and upper Hubbard bands, the spectral-weight transfer into a coherent quasiparticle band at their lower edges and the renormalisation of the Mott gap, which is associated with holon-doublon binding, due to the interactions of both quasiparticle species with the magnons. The zeros of the Green function at the chemical potential give the Luttinger volume, the poles of the self-energy reflect the underlying quasiparticle dispersion with a spin-renormalised hopping parameter and the optical gap is directly related to the Mott gap. Quantitatively, the square-lattice Hubbard model is one of the best-characterised problems in correlated condensed matter and many numerical calculations, all with different strengths and weaknesses, exist with which to benchmark our approach. From the semi-quantitative accuracy of our results for all but the weakest interaction strengths, we conclude that a self-consistent treatment of the spin-fluctuation effects on the charge degrees of freedom captures all the essential physics of the antiferromagnetic Mott-Hubbard insulator. We remark in addition that an analytical approximation with these properties serves a vital function in developing a full understanding of the

  1. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  2. Quantum annealing with antiferromagnetic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Seki, Yuya; Nishimori, Hidetoshi

    2012-05-01

    We introduce antiferromagnetic quantum fluctuations into quantum annealing in addition to the conventional transverse-field term. We apply this method to the infinite-range ferromagnetic p-spin model, for which the conventional quantum annealing has been shown to have difficulties in finding the ground state efficiently due to a first-order transition. We study the phase diagram of this system both analytically and numerically. Using the static approximation, we find that there exists a quantum path to reach the final ground state from the trivial initial state that avoids first-order transitions for intermediate values of p. We also study numerically the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state and find evidence for intermediate values of p for which the time complexity scales polynomially with the system size at a second-order transition point along the quantum path that avoids first-order transitions. These results suggest that quantum annealing would be able to solve this problem with intermediate values of p efficiently, in contrast to the case with only simple transverse-field fluctuations.

  3. Forced diffusion of impurities in natural diamond and polycrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovici, Galina; Sung, T.; Khasawinah, S.; Prelas, M. A.; Wilson, R. G.

    1995-06-01

    A method is proposed for the determination of the state of an impurity (donor, acceptor, or deep level) in semiconductor lattice. To demonstrate the method boron was diffused into type Ia natural diamond under a dc electric field. The concentration and diffusion profiles of boron were affected by the applied field. Boron diffuses as a negative ion since it is an acceptor shallow enough to be partially ionized at the temperature of diffusion. The drift velocity of boron ions at the temperature of diffusion was also estimated. The diffusion of lithium and oxygen from a Li2CO3 source in chemical vapor deposited diamond films was performed under bias at 1000 °C in an argon atmosphere. After diffusion, the concentrations of Li, O, and H in the diamond films were found to be around (3-4)×1019 cm-3. No dependence of these concentrations on the applied bias was observed. It was found that the diffusion of Li goes primarily through grain boundaries, which may explain why it does not depend on the applied voltage. Fluorine was present as an impurity in the dopant source. Its concentration in the films was around (1-2)×1017 cm-3 and did depend on the applied bias, indicating that fluorine may have formed a shallow level in the diamond band gap.

  4. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  5. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  6. Large topological Hall effect in the non-collinear phase of an antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Sürgers, Christoph; Fischer, Gerda; Winkel, Patrick; Löhneysen, Hilbert V

    2014-03-05

    Non-trivial spin arrangements in magnetic materials give rise to the topological Hall effect observed in compounds with a non-centrosymmetric cubic structure hosting a skyrmion lattice, in double-exchange ferromagnets and magnetically frustrated systems. The topological Hall effect has been proposed to appear also in presence of non-coplanar spin configurations and thus might occur in an antiferromagnetic material with a highly non-collinear and non-coplanar spin structure. Particularly interesting is a material where the non-collinearity develops not immediately at the onset of antiferromagnetic order but deep in the antiferromagnetic phase. This unusual situation arises in non-cubic antiferromagnetic Mn5Si3. Here we show that a large topological Hall effect develops well below the Néel temperature as soon as the spin arrangement changes from collinear to non-collinear with decreasing temperature. We further demonstrate that the effect is not observed when the material is turned ferromagnetic by carbon doping without changing its crystal structure.

  7. Room Temperature Antiferromagnetic Ordering of Nanocrystalline Tb1.90Ni0.10O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, J.; Dalal, M.; Sarkar, B. J.; Chakrabarti, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-doped terbium oxide (Tb1.90Ni0.10O3) has been synthesized by the co-precipitation method followed by annealing at 700°C for 6 h in vacuum. The crystallographic phase and the substitution of Ni2+ ions in the lattice of Tb2O3 are confirmed by Rietveld analysis of the x-ray diffraction pattern using the software MAUD. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is also carried out to study the morphology of the sample. Magnetic measurements are carried out at different temperatures from 5 K to 300 K using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The dependence of the magnetization of Tb1.90Ni0.10O3 as a function of temperature ( M- T) and magnetic field ( M- H) suggests the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature, but antiferromagnetic phase dominates below ˜120 K. The lack of saturation in the M- H curve and good fitting of the M- T curve by the Johnston formula also indicate the presence of both paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phase at room temperature. Interestingly, an antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition is observed below ˜40 K. The result also shows a high value of magnetization at 5 K.

  8. Titanium-silicon carbide composite lattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree

    Sandwich panel structures with stiff, strong face sheets and lightweight cellular cores are widely used for weight sensitive, bending dominated loading applications. The flexural stiffness and strength of a sandwich panel is determined by the stiffness, strength, thickness, and separation of the face sheets, and by the compressive and shear stiffness and strength of the cellular core. Panel performance can be therefore optimized using cores with high specific stiffness and strength. The specific stiffness and strength of all cellular materials depends upon the specific elastic modulus and strength of the material used to make the structure. The stiffest and strongest cores for ambient temperature applications utilize carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) honeycombs and lattice structures. Few options exist for lightweight sandwich panels intended for high temperature uses. High temperature alloys such as Ti-6A1-4V can be applied to SiC monofilaments to create very high specific modulus and strength fibers. These are interesting candidates for the cores of elevated temperature sandwich structures such as the skins of hypersonic vehicles. This dissertation explores the potential of sandwich panel concepts that utilize millimeter scale titanium matrix composite (TMC) lattice structures. A method has been developed for fabricating millimeter cell size cellular lattice structures with the square or diamond collinear truss topologies from 240 mum diameter Ti-6A1-4V coated SiC monofilaments (TMC monofilaments). Lattices with relative densities in the range 10% to 20% were manufactured and tested in compression and shear. Given the very high compressive strength of the TMC monofilaments, the compressive strengths of both the square and diamond lattices were dominated by elastic buckling of the constituent struts. However, under shear loading, some of the constituent struts of the lattices are subjected to tensile stresses and failure is then set by tensile failure of the

  9. Cobalt magnetism in a superstructured metallic antiferromagnet Na0.825CoO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Ben-Li; Chu, P.-Y.; Juang, J. Y.; Shu, G. J.; Chou, F. C.

    2013-08-01

    The Na atomic ordering and the local Co magnetism, in a metallic antiferromagnet made of Na0.825CoO2, are investigated by nuclear magnetic-resonance (NMR) techniques. Multiple well-resolved NMR peaks of 23Na and 59Co are observed, which suggests a superlattice structure forming in this Na-vacant cobaltate. Examining clues from published x-ray data, we refine the lattice superstructure so as to obtain the best description for the peaks seen in our NMR data. Magnetic Co ions are found to form a striped structure, which produces nontrivial magnetism. Analyzing the NMR frequency shift for each peak, we observe a frequency-shift anomaly, i.e., the breakdown of linearity between the NMR shift (that is, the local susceptibility) and the bulk susceptibility. We find that the shift anomaly can be described by an additional susceptibility component emerging at ˜60 K. Slow spin dynamics are observed near a metamagnetic transition where the spins flip between the antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic orders. Unlike in ordinary spin glasses, this glassy behavior is induced by a magnetic field, which causes competition between the in-plane ferromagnetic and out-of-plane antiferromagnetic interactions, in a magnetic-frustrated triangular lattice.

  10. Competing antiferromagnetic and spin-glass phases in a hollandite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Y.; Andreanov, A.; Seriani, N.

    2013-07-01

    We introduce a simple lattice model with Ising spins as a zeroth-order approximation of the hollandite-type magnetic compounds. We argue that geometrical frustration of the lattice in combination with nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions are responsible for the appearance of a spin-glass phase in presence of disorder. We investigate this system numerically using parallel tempering. The model reproduces magnetic transitions present in some oxides with hollandite structure and displays a rich phenomenology: in the absence of disorder we have identified five different ground states, depending on the relative strength and sign of the interactions: one ferromagnetically ordered, three antiferromagnetically ordered, and one disordered, macroscopically degenerate ground state. Remarkably, for the sets of AFM couplings having an AFM ground state in the clean system, there exists a critical value of the disorder above which the ground state becomes a spin glass while maintaining all the couplings antiferromagnetically. This model presents this kind of transition with nearest-neighbor frustrated AFM interactions. We argue that this model is useful for understanding the relation between AFM coupling, disorder, and appearance of spin-glass phases.

  11. The Diamond Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1999-08-01

    Since time immemorial, we have treasured diamonds for their exquisite beauty and unrivaled hardness. Yet, most of the earth's diamonds lie deep underground and totally unaccessible to us--if only we knew how to fabricate them! In The Diamond Makers Robert Hazen vividly recounts the very human desire to exceed nature and create a synthetic diamond. Spanning centuries of ground-breaking science, instances of bitter rivalry, cases of outright fraud and self-delusion, Hazen blends drama and science to reveal the extraordinary technological advances and devastating failures of the diamond industry. Along the way, readers will be introduced to the brilliant, often eccentric and controversial, pioneers of high-pressure research who have harnessed crushing pressures and scorching temperatures to transform almost any carbon-rich material, from road tar to peanut butter, into the most prized of all gems. Robert M. Hazen is the author of fifteen books, including the bestseller, Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy, which he wrote with James Trefil. Dr. Hazen has won numerous awards for his research and scientific writing.

  12. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markunas, R. J.; Rudder, R. A.; Posthill, J. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Hudson, G.

    1994-02-01

    Technical highlights from 1993 include the following: Growth Chemistries: A clear correlation was observed between ionization potential of feedstock gasses and critical power necessary for inductive coupling of the plasma and consequent diamond growth. Substrate preparation and epitaxial film quality: Ion-implantation of C and O has been coupled with either electrochemical etching or acid cleaning for surface preparation prior to homoepitaxial growth. Reactor modifications: Key improvements were made to the RF reactor to allow for long growths to consolidate substrates. Liquid mass flow controllers were added to precisely meter both the water and selected alcohol. Ion-implantation and lift off: Lift off of diamond platelets has been achieved with two processes. Ion-implantation of either C or O followed by annealing and implantation of either C or O followed by water based electrolysis. Diamond characterization: Development of novel detect characterization techniques: (1) Etch delineation of defects by exposure to propane torch flame. (2) Hydrogen plasma exposure to enhance secondary electron emission and provide non-topographical defect contrast. Acetylene will react at room temperature with sites created by partial desorption of oxygen from the (100) diamond surface. Thermal desorption measurements give an apparent activation energy for CO desorption from diamond (100) of 45 kcal/mol. Quantum chemical calculations indicate an activation energy of 38 kcal/mol for CO desorption. Ab initio calculations on (100) surfaces indicates that oxygen adsorbed at one dimer site has an effect on the dimerization of an adjacent site.

  13. Diamond Nanowire for UV Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-28

    addition to the stated goal of solar - blind , radiation-hard diamond nanowire UV detectors [3]. The use of diamond nanowires in field-effect transistors could...the next phase. As a result, a working diamond nanowire UV detector can be expected within the coming few months. And, a completely new diamond...attractive candidate for use in ultraviolet ( UV ) light detectors and emitters[2]. Of all known materials, it is the hardest, and has the highest

  14. Critical dynamics of the classical anisotropic BCC Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shan-Ho; Bunker, Alex; Landau, D. P.

    2001-03-01

    Large-scale spin-dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the dynamic behavior of the classical Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single-site uniaxial anisotropy, in bcc lattices. Time evolutions of spin configurations were determined numerically from coupled equations of motion for individual spins using an algorithm implemented by Krech et al [1], which is based on fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of exponential operators. The dynamic structure factor S(q,ω) was calculated from the space- and time-displaced spin-spin correlation function. Preliminary results for the transverse and the longitudinal components of S(q,ω) show that while the former is propagative, with a relatively short time scale, the latter is diffusive and its computation requires very long time integrations. Because of difficulties for experiments to probe the critical region, experimental data have not yet been able to distinguish between competing theories. While limited by finite lattice size and finite integration time, simulations offer the hope of shedding light on the differences between theories and experiment. [1] M. Krech, A. Bunker, D.P. Landau, Comput. Phys. Commun. 111, 1 (1998). Supported by NSF and SDSC

  15. Direct manipulation of the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spins in exchange coupled system by GeV ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Amitesh; Boeni, P.; Paul, N.; Hoepfner, Britta; Lauermann, Iver; Lux-Steiner, M.; Trautmann, C.; Mattauch, S.

    2012-06-18

    Incident ion energy to matrix electrons of a material is dissipated within a narrow cylinder surrounding the swift heavy ion path. The temperature of the lattice exceeds the melting point and upon quenching causes nanometric modifications. We present here a unique ex situ approach in manipulating the uncompensated spins in antiferromagnetic layers of ferro-/antiferromagnetic exchange coupled systems on a nanometric scale. We use the impact of relativistic heavy ion (1-2 GeV) irradiation on such systems. We find an increase in the bias field and a restoration of the reversal via domain nucleation in the trained state. These are identified as plausible results of ion-induced antiferromagnetic ordering with little or no effect on the layer structure. This study demonstrates, therefore, the possibility of nanoscale tailoring of exchange coupled systems that survive even in the trained state.

  16. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  17. Making Diamond in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the graphite to diamond transformation and a phase diagram for carbon. Describes high temperature-higher pressure experimental apparatus and growth of diamonds from seed crystals. Reviews properties of the diamond which suggest uses for the synthetic product. Illustrations with text. (GH)

  18. Antiferromagnetism in a bosonic mixture of rubidium ({sup 87}Rb) and potassium ({sup 41}K)

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Uttam

    2010-10-15

    We simulate the experimental possibility of observing antiferromagnetic (AF) order in bosonic mixtures of rubidium ({sup 87}Rb) and potassium ({sup 41}K) in a two-dimensional optical lattice in the presence of harmonic confinement. By tuning the interspecies interactions and the lattice heights, we have found the ground states, within the mean-field approximation, that interpolate from phase separation to AF order. For a moderate lattice height, the coexistence of the Mott and AF phases is possible for the Rb atoms whereas the K atoms remain in the AF-superfluid phase. This observation may provide an experimentally feasible route to hitherto unobserved AF order for {sup 87}Rb-{sup 41}K mixtures.

  19. Growth of oriented diamond on nickel wafers and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei

    2000-10-01

    ) of oriented diamond on Ni thin films. Focused ion beam (FIB) technique was used for the sample preparation. Heteroepitaxial diamond nuclei formed at the early nucleation stage and after longer growth time were studied. A carbide interfacial layer between the diamond nuclei and Ni was observed. Diamond grew epitaxially on this interfacial layer with very few defects. All defects appeared to have propagated into the interfacial layer and consisted primarily of stacking faults and dislocations. The selected area diffraction showed a slight misorientation of the interfacial layer with the Ni film. It is believed, that the interfacial layer, which has the same crystal structure and a very close lattice constant with Ni, stabilized the sp3 carbon and facilitated diamond nucleation. A model describing the nucleation mechanism is proposed.

  20. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; Liu, L.; Huang, Q.; Siegrist, T.; Frandsen, B.; Lynn, J. W.; Nevidomskyy, Andriy H.; Gamża, Monika B.; Aronson, M. C.; Uemura, Y. J.; Morosan, E.

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemed crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.

  1. An itinerant antiferromagnetic metal without magnetic constituents

    DOE PAGES

    Svanidze, E.; Wang, Jiakui K.; Besara, T.; ...

    2015-07-13

    The origin of magnetism in metals has been traditionally discussed in two diametrically opposite limits: itinerant and local moments. Surprisingly, there are very few known examples of materials that are close to the itinerant limit, and their properties are not universally understood. In the case of the two such examples discovered several decades ago, the itinerant ferromagnets ZrZn2 and Sc3In, the understanding of their magnetic ground states draws on the existence of 3d electrons subject to strong spin fluctuations. Similarly, in Cr, an elemental itinerant antiferromagnet with a spin density wave ground state, its 3d electron character has been deemedmore » crucial to it being magnetic. Here, we report evidence for an itinerant antiferromagnetic metal with no magnetic constituents: TiAu. Antiferromagnetic order occurs below a Néel temperature of 36 K, about an order of magnitude smaller than in Cr, rendering the spin fluctuations in TiAu more important at low temperatures. In conclusion, this itinerant antiferromagnet challenges the currently limited understanding of weak itinerant antiferromagnetism, while providing insights into the effects of spin fluctuations in itinerant–electron systems.« less

  2. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory

    PubMed Central

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics. PMID:28045029

  3. Antiferromagnetic domain wall motion driven by spin-orbit torques

    PubMed Central

    Shiino, Takayuki; Oh, Se-Hyeok; Haney, Paul M.; Lee, Seo-Won; Go, Gyungchoon; Park, Byong-Guk; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls driven by spin-orbit torques in antiferromagnet/heavy metal bilayers. We show that spin-orbit torques drive antiferromagnetic domain walls much faster than ferromagnetic domain walls. As the domain wall velocity approaches the maximum spin-wave group velocity, the domain wall undergoes Lorentz contraction and emits spin-waves in the terahertz frequency range. The interplay between spin-orbit torques and the relativistic dynamics of antiferromagnetic domain walls leads to the efficient manipulation of antiferromagnetic spin textures and paves the way for the generation of high frequency signals from antiferromagnets. PMID:27588878

  4. Lattice overview

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1984-01-01

    After reviewing some recent developments in supercomputer access, the author discusses a few areas where perturbation theory and lattice gauge simulations make contact. The author concludes with a brief discussion of a deterministic dynamics for the Ising model. This may be useful for numerical studies of nonequilibrium phenomena. 13 references.

  5. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  6. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-12

    of CH3 and C6 H6 adsorbed on nickel. Calculated chemisorption energies of pyramidal CH3 on Ni(l 11) are 38 for the clean surface and 50 , 47, and 17... results from early experiments on the diamond (100) surface . In Figure 3.1 we can easily distinguish features associated with the conversion of the...those 5 reports were for fairly thin (< 2 gm) epitaxial layers. The results reported there for homoepitaxy on the diamond (100) surface were quite

  7. Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    surface roughness. 0.9 0.8 p0.7 0.6 0.5 C0.4 0.3 0.2- 0.1- 0-. 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 frequency (cm-1) Figure 10. Transmission spectrum of CVD...significantly less than one micrometer. The resultant films show root-mean- squared surface roughnesses -0.02 pm as long as the film thickness is not much... Derjaguin , B.V., Vapor Growth of Diamond on Diamond and Other Surfaces , J. Cryst. Growth 52:219-226 (1981); Spitsyn, B.V., The State of the Art in

  8. Applications Of Diamond In Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, M.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews existing and new applications of single crystal diamond, both natural and synthetic, in optical science. The traditional application is as transmissive components, making use of the very wide spectral transmission range, high thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness of diamond. Diamond windows for corrosive environments are well known; diamond surgical endoscope components are under development; and the use of sharpened diamonds as combined surgical cutting instruments and light pipes for internal illumination of the edge is commercial reality. The superb ability of diamond to conduct heat, combined with its very low thermal expansion coefficient makes it suitable for the transmission of high power laser energy, though there is a problem currently being addressed of a high surface reflection coefficient. It is very probable that CVD diamond-like films will form good anti-reflection coatings for diamond. In new applications, the technology of making diamond lenses is being developed. The use of diamond as a detector of ionising radiation is well known, but recent work shows its possibilities in thermoluminescent as well as conduction and pulse counting modes. There are further possibilities of using diamond for the detection and measurement of optical radiation. Examples are low, medium, and high intensity far ultraviolet (< 225 nm) and very high intensity near ultraviolet and visible light from excimer, dye, or argon lasers. Diamond is very radiation resistant! Sensitivities, response times and impurity trap levels have been measured and appropriate diamonds can be synthesised. The use of diamond as fast opto-electronic switches has been reported in the literature and the mechanical and thermal design of diamond "heat sink" substrates for semiconductor laser diodes is advancing rapidly.

  9. Magnetostriction and Magnetostructural Domains in Antiferromagnetic YBa2Cu3O6.

    PubMed

    Náfrádi, B; Keller, T; Hardy, F; Meingast, C; Erb, A; Keimer, B

    2016-01-29

    We use high-resolution neutron Larmor diffraction and capacitative dilatometry to investigate spontaneous and forced magnetostriction in undoped, antiferromagnetic YBa_{2}Cu_{3}O_{6.0}, the parent compound of a prominent family of high-temperature superconductors. Upon cooling below the Néel temperature T_{N}=420  K, Larmor diffraction reveals the formation of magnetostructural domains of characteristic size ∼240  nm. In the antiferromagnetic state, dilatometry reveals a minute (4×10^{-6}) orthorhombic distortion of the crystal lattice in external magnetic fields. We attribute these observations to exchange striction and spin-orbit coupling induced magnetostriction, respectively, and show that they have an important influence on the thermal and charge transport properties of undoped and lightly doped cuprates.

  10. Evidence for a gapped spin-liquid ground state in a kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Mingxuan; Imai, Takahashi; Han, Tian -Heng; ...

    2015-11-06

    Here, the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet is a leading candidate in the search for a spin system with a quantum spin-liquid ground state. The nature of its ground state remains a matter of active debate. We conducted oxygen-17 single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of the spin-1/2 kagome lattice in herbertsmithite [ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2], which is known to exhibit a spinon continuum in the spin excitation spectrum. We demonstrated that the intrinsic local spin susceptibility χkagome, deduced from the oxygen-17 NMR frequency shift, asymptotes to zero below temperatures of 0.03J, where J ~ 200 kelvin is the copper-copper superexchange interaction. Combined with themore » magnetic field dependence of χkagome that we observed at low temperatures, these results imply that the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a spin-liquid ground state with a finite gap.« less

  11. Evidence for a gapped spin-liquid ground state in a kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

    PubMed

    Fu, Mingxuan; Imai, Takashi; Han, Tian-Heng; Lee, Young S

    2015-11-06

    The kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet is a leading candidate in the search for a spin system with a quantum spin-liquid ground state. The nature of its ground state remains a matter of active debate. We conducted oxygen-17 single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of the spin-1/2 kagome lattice in herbertsmithite [ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2], which is known to exhibit a spinon continuum in the spin excitation spectrum. We demonstrated that the intrinsic local spin susceptibility χ(kagome), deduced from the oxygen-17 NMR frequency shift, asymptotes to zero below temperatures of 0.03J, where J ~ 200 kelvin is the copper-copper superexchange interaction. Combined with the magnetic field dependence of χ(kagome) that we observed at low temperatures, these results imply that the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a spin-liquid ground state with a finite gap.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure and quantum transport in the graphene-C(111) diamond surface system.

    PubMed

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor; Leoni, Stefano; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David; Seifert, Gotthard

    2013-10-30

    We investigate the interaction of a graphene monolayer with the C(111) diamond surface using ab initio density functional theory. To accommodate the lattice mismatch between graphene and diamond, the overlayer deforms into a wavy structure that binds strongly to the diamond substrate. The detached ridges of the wavy graphene overlayer behave electronically as free-standing polyacetylene chains with delocalized π electrons, separated by regions containing only sp(3) carbon atoms covalently bonded to the (111) diamond surface. We performed quantum transport calculations for different geometries of the system to study how the buckling of the graphene layer and the associated bonding to the diamond substrate affect the transport properties. The system displays high carrier mobility along the ridges and a wide transport gap in the direction normal to the ridges. These intriguing, strongly anisotropic transport properties qualify the hybrid graphene-diamond system as a viable candidate for electronic nanodevices.

  13. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; ...

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibilitymore » of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.« less

  14. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.

  15. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  16. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  17. Paramagnetic and Antiferromagnetic Spin Seebeck Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Stephen

    We report on the observation of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic insulators. By using a microscale on-chip local heater, it is possible to generate a large thermal gradient confined to the chip surface without a large increase in the total sample temperature. This technique allows us to easily access low temperatures (200 mK) and high magnetic fields (14 T) through conventional dilution refrigeration and superconducting magnet setups. By exploring this regime, we detect the spin Seebeck effect through the spin-flop transition in antiferromagnetic MnF2 when a large magnetic field (>9 T) is applied along the easy axis direction. Using the same technique, we are also able to resolve a spin Seebeck effect from the paramagnetic phase of geometrically frustrated antiferromagnet Gd3Ga5O12 (gadolinium gallium garnet) and antiferromagnetic DyScO3 (DSO). Since these measurements occur above the ordering temperatures of these two materials, short-range magnetic order is implicated as the cause of the spin Seebeck effect in these systems. The discovery of the spin Seebeck effect in these two materials classes suggest that both antiferromagnetic spin waves and spin excitations from short range magnetic order may be used to generate spin current from insulators and that the spin wave spectra of individual materials are highly important to the specifics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect. Since insulating antiferromagnets and paramagnets are far more common than the typical insulating ferrimagnetic materials used in spin Seebeck experiments, this discovery opens up a large new class of materials for use in spin caloritronic devices. All authors acknowledge support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. The use of facilities at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, was supported by the U.S. DOE, BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  18. Antiferromagnetic domains in epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholl, Andreas

    2002-03-01

    Interface and surface effects play a central role in modern magnet structures. Magnetic exchange coupling and bias, spin injection across the boundary between magnetic and non-magnetic layers, and the surface and interface anisotropy in multilayers are examples for interface phenomena that are utilized in magneto-electronics. In particular, the microscopic origin of exchange bias at ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interfaces is still an unsolved problem despite of intense research, driven by the important application of exchange bias in hard disk read-heads and magnetic RAM. Knowledge of the microscopic magnetic structure in antiferromagnetic thin films and surfaces is of crucial importance for a better understanding of the exchange bias effect. Microscopic experiments on magnetically coupled ferromagnet/antiferromagnet layers using X-ray Photoemission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) now provide a new insight into the microscopic processes at this important interface. Using a combination of x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) contrast and microscopic electron yield detection we have resolved the magnetic domain structure in LaFeO3 and NiO thin films and crystals. The antiferromagnetic domain structure is linked to the crystallographic structure of the material and vanishes approaching the magnetic ordering temperature. Ferromagnetic films grown on the antiferromagnetic substrate show a corresponding ferromagnetic domain structure, an uniaxial exchange anistropy and a local bias which increases with decreasing domain size, suggesting a statistical origin of the bias effect. The role of uncompensated interface spins will also be discussed. We will present first experiments on magnetic interlayer coupling across metallic antiferromagnets, which suggest a similar origin of bias in full-metallic exchange bias system. A. Scholl et al., Science 287, 1014 (2000), F. Nolting et al., Nature 405, 767 (2000), H. Ohldag et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 2878 (2001)

  19. Observation of antiferromagnetic correlations in UBe 13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, K. U.; Capellmann, H.; Fisk, Z.; Smith, J. L.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    1986-11-01

    The wavevector and energy dependence of the paramagnetic response in the normal phase of the Heavy Fermion system UBe 13 has been investigated between 10 K and 300 K using polarized neutrons and polarization analysis. At 10 K the response was found to be enhanced at non zero wave-vectors indicating the presence of strong antiferromagnetic correlations. The peaks in the scattering occured at positions expected for incipient type G antiferromagnetism of the simple cubic uranium sublattice. At room temperature the spatial correlations completely disappeared and the response was wave vector independent. Constant Q scans carried out at 10 K confirmed the Lorentzian dependence proposed by Goldman et al. [1].

  20. Simulation and bonding of dopants in nanocrystalline diamond.

    PubMed

    Barnard, A S; Russo, S P; Snook, I K

    2005-09-01

    The doping of the wide-band gap semiconductor diamond has led to the invention of many electronic and optoelectronic devices. Impurities can be introduced into diamond during chemical vapor deposition or high pressure-high temperature growth, resulting in materials with unusual physical and chemical properties. For electronic applications one of the main objectives in the doping of diamond is the production of p-type and n-type semiconductors materials; however, the study of dopants in diamond nanoparticles is considered important for use in nanodevices, or as qubits for quantum computing. Such devices require that bonding of dopants in nanodiamond must be positioned substitutionally at a lattice site, and must exhibit minimal or no possibility of diffusion to the nanocrystallite surface. In light of these requirements, a number of computational studies have been undertaken to examine the stability of various dopants in various forms of nanocrystalline diamond. Presented here is a review of some such studies, undertaken using quantum mechanical based simulation methods, to provide an overview of the crystal stability of doped nanodiamond for use in diamondoid nanodevices.

  1. Transition from the Z2 spin liquid to antiferromagnetic order: Spectrum on the torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitsitt, Seth; Sachdev, Subir

    2016-08-01

    We describe the finite-size spectrum in the vicinity of the quantum critical point between a Z2 spin liquid and a coplanar antiferromagnet on the torus. We obtain the universal evolution of all low-lying states in an antiferromagnet with global SU(2) spin rotation symmetry, as it moves from the fourfold topological degeneracy in a gapped Z2 spin liquid to the Anderson "tower-of-states" in the ordered antiferromagnet. Due to the existence of nontrivial order on either side of this transition, this critical point cannot be described in a conventional Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson framework. Instead, it is described by a theory involving fractionalized degrees of freedom known as the O (4) * model, whose spectrum is altered in a significant way by its proximity to a topologically ordered phase. We compute the spectrum by relating it to the spectrum of the O (4 ) Wilson-Fisher fixed point on the torus, modified with a selection rule on the states, and with nontrivial boundary conditions corresponding to topological sectors in the spin liquid. The spectrum of the critical O (2 N ) model is calculated directly at N =∞ , which then allows a reconstruction of the full spectrum of the O (2N ) * model at leading order in 1 /N . This spectrum is a unique characteristic of the vicinity of a fractionalized quantum critical point, as well as a universal signature of the existence of proximate Z2 topological and antiferromagnetically ordered phases, and can be compared with numerical computations on quantum antiferromagnets on two-dimensional lattices.

  2. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  3. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  4. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  5. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ... 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data ...

  6. ELECTRON AMPLIFICATION IN DIAMOND.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; WU, Q.

    2006-07-10

    We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission ''amplifiers'' for photocathodes. Secondary emission gain of over 300 has been achieved in transmission mode and emission mode for a variety of diamond samples. Techniques of sample preparation, including hydrogenation to achieve negative electron affinity (NEA), have been adapted to this application.

  7. Lattice fermions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    1987-01-01

    A simple heuristic proof of the Nielsen-Ninomaya theorem is given. A method is proposed whereby the multiplication of fermion species on a lattice is reduced to the minimal doubling, in any dimension, with retention of appropriate chiral symmetries. Also, it is suggested that use of spatially thinned fermion fields is likely to be a useful and appropriate approximation in QCD - in any case, it is a self-checking one.

  8. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  9. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  10. TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF THE ANTIFERROMAGNETIC ANISOTROPY IN MNF2,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Existing data on the temperature dependence of the sublattice magnetization and of the antiferromagnetic resonance frequency of MnF2, together with...new antiferromagnetic resonance data, are used to determine the temperature dependence of the antiferromagnetic anisotropy energy. The experimental

  11. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Xiong, Lun; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-08

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. In conclusion, high-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  12. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  13. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  14. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  15. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  16. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  17. Ultracold Quantum Gases in Hexagonal Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengstock, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    Hexagonal structures occur in a vast variety of systems, ranging from honeycombs of bees in life sciences to carbon nanotubes in material sciences. The latter, in particular its unfolded two-dimensional layer -- Graphene -- has rapidly grown to one of the most discussed topics in condensed-matter physics. Not only does it show proximity to various carbon-based materials but also exceptional properties owing to its unusual energy spectrum. In quantum optics, ultracold quantum gases confined in periodic light fields have shown to be very general and versatile instruments to mimic solid state systems. However, so far nearly all experiments were performed in cubic lattice geometries only. Here we report on the first experimental realization of ultracold quantum gases in a state-dependent, two-dimensional, Graphene-like optical lattice with hexagonal symmetry. The lattice is realized via a spin-dependent optical lattice structure with alternating σ^+ and σ^- -sites and thus constitutes a so called `magnetic'-lattice with `antiferromagnetic'-structure. Atoms with different spin orientation can be loaded to specific lattice sites or -- depending on the parameters -- to the whole lattice. As a consequence e.g. superpositions of a superfluid spin component with a different spin component in the Mott-insulating phase can be realized as well as spin-dependent transport properties, disorder etc. After preparing an antiferromagnetically ordered state we e.g. measure sustainable changes of the transport properties of the atoms. This manifests in a significant reduction of the tunneling as compared to a single-component system. We attribute this observation to a partial tunneling blockade for one spin component induced by population in another spin component localized at alternating lattice sites. Within a Gutzwiller-Ansatz we calculate the phase diagrams for the mixed spin-states and find very good agreement with our experimental results. Moreover, by state-resolved recording

  18. Direct measurement of antiferromagnetic domain fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Shpyrko, O G; Isaacs, E D; Logan, J M; Feng, Yejun; Aeppli, G; Jaramillo, R; Kim, H C; Rosenbaum, T F; Zschack, P; Sprung, M; Narayanan, S; Sandy, A R

    2007-05-03

    Measurements of magnetic noise emanating from ferromagnets owing to domain motion were first carried out nearly 100 years ago, and have underpinned much science and technology. Antiferromagnets, which carry no net external magnetic dipole moment, yet have a periodic arrangement of the electron spins extending over macroscopic distances, should also display magnetic noise. However, this must be sampled at spatial wavelengths of the order of several interatomic spacings, rather than the macroscopic scales characteristic of ferromagnets. Here we present a direct measurement of the fluctuations in the nanometre-scale superstructure of spin- and charge-density waves associated with antiferromagnetism in elemental chromium. The technique used is X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, where coherent X-ray diffraction produces a speckle pattern that serves as a 'fingerprint' of a particular magnetic domain configuration. The temporal evolution of the patterns corresponds to domain walls advancing and retreating over micrometre distances. This work demonstrates a useful measurement tool for antiferromagnetic domain wall engineering, but also reveals a fundamental finding about spin dynamics in the simplest antiferromagnet: although the domain wall motion is thermally activated at temperatures above 100 K, it is not so at lower temperatures, and indeed has a rate that saturates at a finite value-consistent with quantum fluctuations-on cooling below 40 K.

  19. Studying the effect of hydrogen on diamond growth by adding C10H10Fe under high pressures and high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chao; Jia, Xiaopeng; Sun, Shishuai; Yan, Bingmin; Li, Yadong; Chen, Ning; Li, Yong; Ma, Hong-an

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, hydrogen-doped industrial diamonds and gem diamonds were synthesized in the Fe-Ni-C system with C10H10Fe additive, high pressures and high temperatures range of 5.2-6.2 GPa and 1250-1460°C. Experimental results indicate similar effect of hydrogen on these two types of diamonds: with the increasing content of C10H10Fe added in diamond growth environment, temperature is a crucial factor that sensitively affects the hydrogen-doped diamond crystallization. The temperature region for high-quality diamond growth becomes higher and the morphology of diamond crystal changes from cube-octahedral to octahedral. The defects on the {100} surfaces of diamond are more than those on the {111} surfaces. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results indicate that the hydrogen atoms enter into the diamond crystal lattice from {100} faces more easily. Most interestingly, under low temperature, nitrogen atoms can also easily enter into the diamond crystal lattice from {100} faces cooperated with hydrogen atoms.

  20. Raman investigation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li-Ming

    1993-12-31

    Extensive Raman investigations were conducted on a wide range of diamond films whose structures were dilineated by optical and confocal microscopy. The Raman Spectra from one extreme of this range indicates a very intense 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} line diagnostic of bulk crystalline diamond. Microscopy of the corresponding film shows the presence of many large true diamond crystallite. The 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} Raman line at the other extreme of the range, however, is virtually absent. It is replaced, at this extreme, by a very broad Raman contour whose maxima occur near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}. Optical microscopy now reveals a complete lack of diamond crystallites. The ratio of the integrated Raman intensity of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diamond line to the integral of the entire broad contour extending from {approx}1200 cm{sup {minus}1} to 1800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with maxima near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}, was determined. This ratio rises with increasing diamond crystallite size, and it decreases as true diamond crystallites are replaced by diamond-like, but amorphous, hard carbon, which produces the broad Raman contour. The measured intensity ratio was analyzed in terms of a differential equation related to phonon coupling. The increase of the intensity ratio of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diagnostic diamond peak is due to phono-phonon coupling between the diamond crystallites, as the concentration of the amorphous diamond-like carbon decreases. Confocal microscopy indicates many amorphous-like regions interspersed between diamond crystallites which account for the intensity loss, and agree with the Raman intensity measurements. These Raman measurements crystallinity versus amorphous hard-carbon character of thin diamond film.

  1. The mechanical properties of various chemical vapor deposition diamond structures compared to the ideal single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The structural and electronic properties of the diamond lattice, leading to its outstanding mechanical properties, are discussed. These include the highest elastic moduli and fracture strength of any known material. Its extreme hardness is strongly connected with the extreme shear modulus, which even exceeds the large bulk modulus, revealing that diamond is more resistant to shear deformation than to volume changes. These unique features protect the ideal diamond lattice also against mechanical failure and fracture. Besides fast heat conduction, the fast vibrational movement of carbon atoms results in an extreme speed of sound and propagation of crack tips with comparable velocity. The ideal mechanical properties are compared with those of real diamond films, plates, and crystals, such as ultrananocrystalline (UNC), nanocrystalline, microcrystalline, and homo- and heteroepitaxial single-crystal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, produced by metastable synthesis using CVD. Ultrasonic methods have played and continue to play a dominant role in the determination of the linear elastic properties, such as elastic moduli of crystals or the Young's modulus of thin films with substantially varying impurity levels and morphologies. A surprising result of these extensive measurements is that even UNC diamond may approach the extreme Young's modulus of single-crystal diamond under optimized deposition conditions. The physical reasons for why the stiffness often deviates by no more than a factor of two from the ideal value are discussed, keeping in mind the large variety of diamond materials grown by various deposition conditions. Diamond is also known for its extreme hardness and fracture strength, despite its brittle nature. However, even for the best natural and synthetic diamond crystals, the measured critical fracture stress is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than the ideal value obtained by ab initio calculations for the ideal cubic lattice. Currently

  2. Astronomers debate diamonds in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-04-01

    diamonds --a million times smaller than a millimetre and thus called "nanodiamonds"-- from a sample of the Orgueil meteorite, and then subjected them to infrared spectroscopy. The researchers conclude that nanodiamonds of a certain kind, defective ones in which some atoms of the lattice are missing, have a "chemical signature" that matches the one detected in the stars very closely. Footnote on ISO ESA's infrared space telescope, ISO, was put into orbit in November 1995, by an Ariane 44P launcher from the European Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Its operational phase lasted till 16 May, 1998, almost a year longer than expected. As an unprecedented observatory for infrared astronomy, able to examine cool and hidden places in the Universe, ISO made nearly 30 000 scientific observations. These are now available to the scientific community via the ISO Archive (http://www.iso.vilspa.esa.es) at the ISO Data Centre, in Villafranca, near Madrid, Spain.

  3. Hydrogen species in diamond: Molecular dynamics simulation in bulk diamond for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, D.; Vila, R.

    2014-09-01

    For an electron cyclotron resonance heating system, a diamond window seems to be the only material able to withstand the high microwave power and radiation effects and at the same time act as a tritium barrier. Therefore it is important to understand the evolution of hydrogen isotopes in diamond. Both, hydrogen content and radiation can quite rapidly degrade its excellent properties. Hydrogen isotopes can be introduced in the material by two processes: (1) during the growth process of synthetic samples and (2) as a neutron radiation effect when devices are exposed to a fusion irradiation environment. In the last case, both device performance (thermal, optical and dielectric properties degradation) and hands-on maintenance of the window (tritium inventory), demand a good knowledge of hydrogen species concentrations and their evolution with lattice damage. In this paper, a classical molecular dynamics study analyses the hydrogen equilibrium sites in diamond, and also their bulk and interstitial vibrational characteristics, including isotopic shifts. Some interesting results are presented and discussed. We confirm that the bond-centred site is the more stable configuration for H. Vibrational studies show lines in the C-H stretching region. Isotopic studies reveal ratios close to the theoretical ones for BC and ET sites. On the contrary, the AB site vibrations obtained suggest the existence of a local carbon oscillation.

  4. Directly probing spin dynamics in insulating antiferromagnets using ultrashort terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bowlan, Pamela Renee; Trugman, Stuart Alan; Wang, X.; Dai, Yaomin; Cheong, S.-W.; Bauer, Eric Dietzgen; Taylor, Antoinette Jane; Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch; Prasankumar, Rohit Prativadi

    2016-11-22

    We investigate spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) multiferroic TbMnO3 using opticalpump, terahertz (THz)-probe spectroscopy. Photoexcitation results in a broadband THz transmission change, with an onset time of 25 ps at 6 K that becomes faster at higher temperatures. We attribute this time constant to spin-lattice thermalization. The excellent agreement between our measurements and previous ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on the same material confirms that our THz pulse directly probes spin order. We suggest that this could be the case in general for insulating AFM materials, if the origin of the static absorption in the THz spectral range is magnetic.

  5. An NMR investigation of superconductivity and antiferromagnetism in CaFe2As2 under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seung H; Lee, Han O; Bauer, E D; Ronning, F; Park, T; Thompson, J D; Brown, S E; Curro, N J

    2009-01-01

    We report {sup 75}As NMR measurements in CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, made under applied pressures up to 0.83 CPa produced by a standard clamp pressure cell. Our data reveal phase segregation of paramagnetic (PM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases over a range of pressures, with the AFM phase more than 90% dominant at low temperatures. In situ RF susceptibility measurements indicate the presence of superconductivity. {sup 75}As spin-lattice relaxation experiments indicate that the {sup 75}As nuclei sample the superconductivity while in the magnetically-ordered environment.

  6. Néel temperature of quasi-low-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, C; Todo, S; Hukushima, K; Alet, F; Keller, M; Troyer, M; Takayama, H

    2005-06-03

    The Néel temperature T(N) of quasi-one- and quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Heisenberg models on a cubic lattice is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations as a function of interchain (interlayer) to intrachain (intralayer) coupling J(')/J down to J(')/J approximately = 10(-3). We find that T(N) obeys a modified random-phase approximationlike relation for small J(')/J with an effective universal renormalized coordination number, independent of the size of the spin. Empirical formulas describing T(N) for a wide range of J(') and useful for the analysis of experimental measurements are presented.

  7. Spin transport of the frustrated quasi-two-dimensional XY-like antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use the Self Consistent Harmonic Approximation together with the Kubo formalism of the Linear Response Theory to study the spin transport in the two-dimensional frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet in a square lattice with easy-plane ion single anisotropy. The regular part of the spin conductivity σreg(ω) is determined for several values of the critical ion single parameter Dc, that separates the low D region from the large D quantum paramagnetic phase. We have obtained an abrupt change in the spin conductivity in the discontinuity points of the graphic Dc vs. η, where the system presents a quantum phase transition.

  8. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  9. Lattice effects on Laughlin wave functions and parent Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasser, Ivan; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Sierra, Germán; Nielsen, Anne E. B.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate lattice effects on wave functions that are lattice analogs of bosonic and fermionic Laughlin wave functions with number of particles per flux ν =1 /q in the Landau levels. These wave functions are defined analytically on lattices with μ particles per lattice site, where μ may be different than ν . We give numerical evidence that these states have the same topological properties as the corresponding continuum Laughlin states for different values of q and for different fillings μ . These states define, in particular, particle-hole symmetric lattice fractional quantum Hall states when the lattice is half filled. On the square lattice it is observed that for q ≤4 this particle-hole symmetric state displays the topological properties of the continuum Laughlin state at filling fraction ν =1 /q , while for larger q there is a transition towards long-range ordered antiferromagnets. This effect does not persist if the lattice is deformed from a square to a triangular lattice, or on the kagome lattice, in which case the topological properties of the state are recovered. We then show that changing the number of particles while keeping the expression of these wave functions identical gives rise to edge states that have the same correlations in the bulk as the reference lattice Laughlin states but a different density at the edge. We derive an exact parent Hamiltonian for which all these edge states are ground states with different number of particles. In addition this Hamiltonian admits the reference lattice Laughlin state as its unique ground state of filling factor 1 /q . Parent Hamiltonians are also derived for the lattice Laughlin states at other fillings of the lattice, when μ ≤1 /q or μ ≥1 -1 /q and when q =4 also at half filling.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions Shwachman-Diamond syndrome Shwachman-Diamond syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is an inherited condition that affects many ...

  12. Long-range interactions in lattice field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, J.M.

    1981-06-01

    Lattice quantum field theories containing fermions can be formulated in a chirally invariant way provided long-range interactions are introduced. It is established that in weak-coupling perturbation theory such a lattice theory is renormalizable when the corresponding continuum theory is, and that the continuum theory is indeed recovered in the perturbative continuum limit. In the strong-coupling limit of these theories one is led to study an effective Hamiltonian describing a Heisenberg antiferromagnet with long-range interactions. Block-spin renormalization group methods are used to find a critical rate of falloff of the interactions, approximately as inverse distance squared, which separates a nearest-neighbor-antiferromagnetic phase from a phase displaying identifiable long-range effects. A duality-type symmetry is present in some block-spin calculations.

  13. Diamond films for laser hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Watkins, L.; Ravi, K.; Yokota, S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser-damage experiments were performed on free-standing polycrystalline diamond films prepared by plasma-enhanced CVD. The high laser-induced stress resistance found for this material makes it useful for thin-film coatings for laser optics. Results for diamond-coated silicon substrates demonstrate the enhanced damage threshold imparted by diamond thin-film coatings to materials susceptible to laser damage.

  14. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

  15. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

  16. Incommensurate lattice modulations in Potassium Vanadate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakoumakos, Bryan; Banerjee, Arnab; Mark, Lumsden; Cao, Huibo; Kim, Jong-Woo; Hoffman, Christina; Wang, Xiaoping

    Potassium Vanadate (K2V3O8) is an S = 1/2 2D square lattice antiferromagnet that shows spin reorientation indicating a strong coupling between the magnetism and its dielectric properties with a promise of rich physics that promises multiferroicity. These tangible physical properties are strongly tied through a spin-lattice coupling to the underlying lattice and superlattice behavior. It has a superlattice (SL) onsetting below Tc = 115 K with an approximate [3 x 3 x 2] modulation. Here we present our recent experiments at TOPAZ beamline at SNS which for the first time proves conclusively that the lattice modulations are incommensurate, with an in-plane Q of 0.315. We will also show our attempts to refine the data using JANA which requires a redefinition of the lattice, as well as the temperature and Q dependence of the superlattice modulation measured using neutrons at HFIR and synchrotron x-rays at APS. Our results are not only relevant for the ongoing search of multifunctional behavior in K2V3O8 but also generally for the superlattice modulations observed in a large family of fresnoites. Work performed at ORNL and ANL is supported by U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of User Facilities Division.

  17. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  18. Diamond Technology Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-11

    has been conducted into the use of diamond as a TWT helix support material to increase the average output power capability of broadband high frequency...unifilar helix is the one TWT circuit capable of broadband operation with good efficiency, methods to increase jT its power dissipation capability are of...BIBLIOGRAPHY IRa D> AE .,L,-,# ACot .,i n iv 4 I IPT-5413 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure No. Title 1 Temperature Differences in a PPM Focused Helix TWT

  19. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  20. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  1. Characteristics of Impact Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, R.; Bouska, V. J.

    1992-07-01

    Having studied two Czech diamonds in UV light (lambda=366 nm) they appeared to be an extraordinary dirty orange color [1], the same as in the case of Popigai and ureilites impact diamonds (ID) [2]. SEM images show evidence of a thatch-like surface that is very similar to that of the Abee chondrite [3]. Commonly, the ID contain microscopic black plates which are formed by graphite or a carbon matter with indefinite structure, and they are always associated with hexagonal moissanite [2,4]. One unexplained fact is connected with a fabric of the ID aggregates, i.e. both Czech diamonds are single crystals, otherwise other ID form polycrystalline strongly textured aggregates. [1] Bouska V.J. and Skala R.M. (1992) Abstracts for International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution, in press. [2] Masaitis V.L., Shafranovskii G.I., Ezerskii V.A., and Reshetnyak N.B. (1990) Meteoritica 49, 180-196. [3] Russell S.S. and Pillinger C.T. (1991) Abstracts 54th Ann. Meet. Meteor. Soc. 200. [4] Bauer J., Fiala J., and Hrichova R. (1963) Amer. Mineral. 48, 620-634.

  2. Understanding the source: The nitrogen isotope composition of Type II mantle diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhail, Sami; Howell, Dan; Jones, Adrian; Milledge, Judith; Verchovsky, Sasha

    2010-05-01

    Diamonds can be broadly subdivided into 2 groups based on their nitrogen content; type I with > 10ppm nitrogen and type II with < 10ppm (1). Roughly 98 % of upper mantle diamonds are classified as type I, interestingly nearly all lower mantle diamonds are of type II (2). This study aims to identify the processes involved or source of type II diamonds from several localities by measuring their carbon and nitrogen stable isotope compositions simultaneously for the first time. Samples have been categorised as type II using Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) analysis. The carbon and nitrogen isotopes as well as additional nitrogen content data have been acquired using a custom made a hi-sensitivity gas sourced mass spectrometer built and housed at the Open University, UK. There are two ways in which we can model the petrogenesis of type II diamonds. 1- During diamond growth nitrogen can be incorporated into diamond as a compatible element in a closed system and therefore the N/C ratio in the source can be depleted by Rayleigh fractionation as the first diamonds to crystallise will partition nitrogen atoms into their lattice as a 1:1 substitution for carbon atoms (type I diamonds). However nitrogen may behave as an incompatible element in diamond (and be a compatible element in the metasomatic fluid), this coupled with an open system would lead to the removal of nitrogen by the metasomatic fluids, thus causing the source to progressively become depleted in nitrogen. Continued diamond crystallization in either system will produce diamonds with ever decreasing nitrogen concentrations with time, possibly to the point of them being almost nitrogen free. 2- It is conceivable that type I & II diamonds found in the same deposit and sharing a common paragenesis (eclogitic or peridotitic) may have formed from different metasomatic fluids in separate diamond forming events. The latter has been proposed for samples from the Cullinan mine (South Africa) based on their carbon

  3. Conversion of fullerenes to diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond or diamond-like films on a substrate surface. The method involves the steps of providing a vapor selected from the group of fullerene molecules or an inert gas/fullerene molecule mixture, providing energy to the fullerene molecules consisting of carbon-carbon bonds, the energized fullerene molecules breaking down to form fragments of fullerene molecules including C.sub.2 molecules and depositing the energized fullerene molecules with C.sub.2 fragments onto the substrate with farther fragmentation occurring and forming a thickness of diamond or diamond-like films on the substrate surface.

  4. Diamonds in ophiolites: Contamination or a new diamond growth environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, J.; Gain, S.; Stern, R. A.; Huang, J.-X.; Jacob, D. E.; Xu, X.; Stokes, A. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Pearson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    For more than 20 years, the reported occurrence of diamonds in the chromites and peridotites of the Luobusa massif in Tibet (a complex described as an ophiolite) has been widely ignored by the diamond research community. This skepticism has persisted because the diamonds are similar in many respects to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic/industrial diamonds (grown from metal solvents), and the finding previously has not been independently replicated. We present a detailed examination of the Luobusa diamonds (recovered from both peridotites and chromitites), including morphology, size, color, impurity characteristics (by infrared spectroscopy), internal growth structures, trace-element patterns, and C and N isotopes. A detailed comparison with synthetic industrial diamonds shows many similarities. Cubo-octahedral morphology, yellow color due to unaggregated nitrogen (C centres only, Type Ib), metal-alloy inclusions and highly negative δ13C values are present in both sets of diamonds. The Tibetan diamonds (n = 3) show an exceptionally large range in δ15N (-5.6 to + 28.7 ‰) within individual crystals, and inconsistent fractionation between {111} and {100} growth sectors. This in contrast to large synthetic HPHT diamonds grown by the temperature gradient method, which have with δ15N = 0 ‰ in {111} sectors and + 30 ‰ in {100} sectors, as reported in the literature. This comparison is limited by the small sample set combined with the fact the diamonds probably grew by different processes. However, the Tibetan diamonds do have generally higher concentrations and different ratios of trace elements; most inclusions are a NiMnCo alloy, but there are also some small REE-rich phases never seen in HPHT synthetics. These characteristics indicate that the Tibetan diamonds grew in contact with a C-saturated Ni-Mn-Co-rich melt in a highly reduced environment. The stable isotopes indicate a major subduction-related contribution to the chemical environment. The

  5. Antiferromagnetic order in the Cd6R (R = rare earth) quasicrystal approximants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Alan; Kim, Min Gyu; Beutier, Guillaume; Kreyssig, Andreas; Hiroto, Takanobu; Yamada, Tsunetomo; Kim, Jong Woo; de Boissieu, Marc; Tamura, Ryuji

    2013-03-01

    Many theoretical treatments of spins on aperiodic lattices support the notion of long-range antiferromagnetic order. However, to date, there has been no experimental confirmation of long-range magnetic order in quasicrystalline systems. The absence of long-range magnetic order extends to crystalline approximant phases of the icosahedral structures as well. Surprisingly, the 1/1 approximant to the Cd-Mg-R icosahedral phases, Cd6 R , appears to be an exception to the rule. Here, we report on the results of x-ray resonant magnetic scattering measurements on Cd6 R approximants which show that long range antiferromagnetic order is, indeed, realized. For R = Tb and Ho, viewing the structure as a body-centered cubic packing of Tsai clusters, we find that the R ions associated with the icosahedral cluster at the corner of the unit cell are antiferromagnetically correlated with the R ions associated with the icosahedral cluster at the body-center of the unit cell. Work at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. Work at the Tokyo University of Science was supported by KAKENHI (Grant No. 20045017)

  6. Relief of frustration in the Heisenberg pyrochlore antiferromagnet Gd2Pt2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, A. M.; Sharma, A. Z.; Cai, Y.; Munsie, T. J.; Wilson, M. N.; Tachibana, M.; Wiebe, C. R.; Luke, G. M.

    2016-10-01

    The gadolinium pyrochlores Gd2B2O7 are among the best realizations of antiferromagnetically coupled Heisenberg spins on a pyrochlore lattice. We present a magnetic characterization of Gd2Pt2O7 , a unique member of this family. Magnetic susceptibility, heat capacity, and muon spin relaxation measurements show that Gd2Pt2O7 undergoes an antiferromagnetic ordering transition at TN=1.6 K. This transition is strongly first order, as indicated by the sharpness of the heat capacity anomaly, thermal hysteresis in the magnetic susceptibility, and a nondivergent relaxation rate in μ SR . The form of the heat capacity below TN suggests that the ground state is an anisotropic collinear antiferromagnet with an excitation spectrum that is gapped by 0.245(1) meV. The ordering temperature in Gd2Pt2O7,TN=1.6 K, is a substantial 160% increase from other gadolinium pyrochlores, which are all known to order at 1 K or lower. We attribute this enhancement in TN to the B -site cation, platinum. Despite being nonmagnetic, platinum has a filled 5 d t2 g orbital and an empty 5 d eg orbital that can facilitate superexchange. Thus, the magnetic frustration in Gd2Pt2O7 is partially "relieved," thereby promoting magnetic order.

  7. Double phase transition in the triangular antiferromagnet Ba3CoTa2O9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith, K. M.; Brinda, K.; Arjun, U.; Hegde, N. G.; Nath, R.

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report the synthesis and magnetic properties of a new triangular lattice antiferromagnet Ba3CoTa2O9. The effective spin of Co2+ is found to be J  =  1/2 at low temperatures due to the combined effect of crystal field and spin–orbit coupling. Ba3CoTa2O9 undergoes two successive magnetic phase transitions at {{T}\\text{N1}}≃ 0.70 K and {{T}\\text{N2}}≃ 0.57 K in zero applied field, which is typical for triangular antiferromagnets with the easy-axis magnetic anisotropy. With increasing field, the transition anomalies are found to shift toward low temperatures, confirming the antiferromagnetic nature of the transitions. At higher fields, the transition peaks in the heat capacity data disappear and give way to a broad maximum, which can be ascribed to a Schottky anomaly due to the Zeeman splitting of spin levels. The H  ‑  T phase diagram of the compound shows three distinct phases. The possible nature of these phases is discussed.

  8. Moire-Fringe Images of Twin Boundaries in Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-10

    Features in lattice image micrographs of chemical vapor deposited diamond can be interpreted as Moire fringes that occur when viewing twin boundaries that...are inclined to the electron beam. The periodicities in images of inclined twin boundaries with Sigma=3 and Sigma=9 misorientations have been modeled by computer graphic simulation.

  9. Spin-dynamics simulations of the triangular antiferromagnetic XY model*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2003-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo and spin-dynamics methods, we have studied the dynamic behavior of the classical, antiferromagnetic XY model on a triangular lattice. The temporal evolutions of spin configurations were obtained by solving numerically the coupled equations of motion for each spin using fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of exponential operators. We calculated the dynamic structure factor S(q,w) for momentum q and frequency w. Below T_KT (Kosteritz-Thouless transition), both the in-plane (S^xx) and out-of-plane (S^zz) components exhibit very strong and sharp spin-wave peaks. Well above T_KT, S^xx and S^zz apparently display a central peak, and spin-wave signatures are still seen in S^zz. In addition, we also observed an almost dispersionless domain-wall peak at high w below Tc (Ising transition), where long-range order appears in the staggered chirality[1]. We found that our results demonstrate the consistency of the dynamic finite-size scaling theory for the characteristic frequency wm and S(q,w). *Supported by NSF [1] D.H. Lee, J.D. Joannopoulos, J.W. Negele, and D.P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 433 (1984)

  10. Spin-dynamics simulations of the antiferromagnetic triangular XY model*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2002-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo and spin-dynamics methods, we have simulated the dynamic behavior of the classical, antiferromagnetic XY model on a triangular lattice. The temporal evolutions of spin configurations were obtained by solving numerically the coupled equations of motion for each spin using fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of exponential operators. From space-and time-displaced spin-spin correlation functions and their space-time Fourier transforms we obtained the dynamic structure factor S(q,w) for momentum q and frequency w. Below T_c, where long-range order appears in the staggered chirality[1], S(q,w) exhibits very strong and sharp spin-wave peaks in the in-plane-component S^xx. We also observe two-spin-wave peaks at low w and an almost dispersionless domain-wall peak at high w. Above T_c, a weak spin-wave peak persists but the domain-wall peak disappears for all q. We have calculated the dispersion relation and the linewidth of the spin-wave peak in S^xx by fitting the line shape to simple Lorentzians. *Supported by NSF [1] D.H. Lee, J.D. Joannopoulos, J.W. Negele, and D.P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 433 (1984)

  11. Photo-induced Spin Angular Momentum Transfer into Antiferromagnetic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fan; Fan, Yichun; Ma, Xin; Zhu, J.; Li, Q.; Ma, T. P.; Wu, Y. Z.; Chen, Z. H.; Zhao, H. B.; Luepke, Gunter; College of William and Mary Team; Department of Physics, Fudan University Team; Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University Team

    2014-03-01

    Spin angular momentum transfer into antiferromagnetic(AFM) insulator is observed in single crystalline Fe/CoO/MgO(001) heterostructure by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE). The transfer process is mediated by the Heisenberg exchange coupling between Fe and CoO spins. Below the Neel temperature(TN) of CoO, the fact that effective Gilbert damping parameter α is independent of external magnetic field and it is enhanced with respect to the intrinsic damping in Fe/MgO, indicates that the damping process involves both the intrinsic spin relaxation and the transfer of Fe spin angular momentum to CoO spins via FM-AFM exchange coupling and then into the lattice by spin-orbit coupling. The work at the College of William and Mary was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. The work at Department of Physics, Fudan, was supported by NSFC. The work at Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan was supported by NSFC and NCET.

  12. Kondo bahavior in antiferromagnetic NpPdSn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, K.; Prokes, K.; Griveau, J.-C.; Jardin, R.; Colineau, E.; Caciuffo, R.; Eloirdi, R.; Gofryk, K.

    Actinide-based intermetallics show a large variety of exotic physical phenomena mainly coming from 5f hybridization with both on-site and neighboring ligand states. Depending on the strength of these process unusual behaviors such as long-range magnetic order, Kondo effect, heavy-fermion ground state, valence fluctuations, and/or superconductivity have been observed. Here we report results of our extensive studies on NpPdSn. The compound crystalizes in hexagonal ZrNiAl-type of crystal structure and is studied by means of x-ray and neutron diffraction, magnetization, heat capacity, electrical resistivity, and thermoelectric power measurements, performed over a wide range of temperatures and applied magnetic fields. All the results revealed Kondo lattice behavior and antiferromagnetic ordering below 19 K. NpPdSn can be classified as a moderately enhanced heavy-fermion system, one of very few known amidst Np-based intermetallics. Work at Idaho National Laboratory was supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences, and Engineering Division.

  13. Ultrafast band engineering and transient spin currents in antiferromagnetic oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-04-29

    Here, we report a dynamic structure and band engineering strategy with experimental protocols to induce indirect-to-direct band gap transitions and coherently oscillating pure spin-currents in three-dimensional antiferromagnets (AFM) using selective phononic excitations. In the Mott insulator LaTiO3, we show that a photo-induced nonequilibrium phonon mode amplitude destroys the spin and orbitally degenerate ground state, reduces the band gap by 160 meV and renormalizes the carrier masses. The time scale of this process is a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Then in the hole-doped correlated metallic titanate, we show how pure spin-currents can be achieved to yield spin-polarizations exceeding those observed inmore » classic semiconductors. Last, we demonstrate the generality of the approach by applying it to the non-orbitally degenerate AFM CaMnO3. These results advance our understanding of electron-lattice interactions in structures out-of-equilibrium and establish a rational framework for designing dynamic phases that may be exploited in ultrafast optoelectronic and optospintronic devices.« less

  14. Ultrafast Band Engineering and Transient Spin Currents in Antiferromagnetic Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-01-01

    We report a dynamic structure and band engineering strategy with experimental protocols to induce indirect-to-direct band gap transitions and coherently oscillating pure spin-currents in three-dimensional antiferromagnets (AFM) using selective phononic excitations. In the Mott insulator LaTiO3, we show that a photo-induced nonequilibrium phonon mode amplitude destroys the spin and orbitally degenerate ground state, reduces the band gap by 160 meV and renormalizes the carrier masses. The time scale of this process is a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Then in the hole-doped correlated metallic titanate, we show how pure spin-currents can be achieved to yield spin-polarizations exceeding those observed in classic semiconductors. Last, we demonstrate the generality of the approach by applying it to the non-orbitally degenerate AFM CaMnO3. These results advance our understanding of electron-lattice interactions in structures out-of-equilibrium and establish a rational framework for designing dynamic phases that may be exploited in ultrafast optoelectronic and optospintronic devices. PMID:27126354

  15. Valence bond distribution and correlation in bipartite Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, David; Alet, Fabien; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    Every singlet state of a quantum spin-1/2 system can be decomposed into a linear combination of valence bond basis states. The range of valence bonds within this linear combination as well as the correlations between them can reveal the nature of the singlet state and are key ingredients in variational calculations. In this work, we study the bipartite valence bond distributions and their correlations within the ground state of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on bipartite lattices. In terms of field theory, this problem can be mapped to correlation functions near a boundary. In dimension d ≥2, a nonlinear σ model analysis reveals that at long distances the probability distribution P (r) of valence bond lengths decays as |r|-d-1 and that valence bonds are uncorrelated. By a bosonization analysis, we also obtain P(r )∝|r|-d-1 in d =1 despite the different mechanism. On the other hand, we find that correlations between valence bonds are important even at large distances in d =1, in stark contrast to d ≥2. The analytical results are confirmed by high-precision quantum Monte Carlo simulations in d =1, 2, and 3. We develop a single-projection loop variant of the valence bond projection algorithm, which is well designed to compute valence bond probabilities and for which we provide algorithmic details.

  16. Ultrafast Band Engineering and Transient Spin Currents in Antiferromagnetic Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-04-01

    We report a dynamic structure and band engineering strategy with experimental protocols to induce indirect-to-direct band gap transitions and coherently oscillating pure spin-currents in three-dimensional antiferromagnets (AFM) using selective phononic excitations. In the Mott insulator LaTiO3, we show that a photo-induced nonequilibrium phonon mode amplitude destroys the spin and orbitally degenerate ground state, reduces the band gap by 160 meV and renormalizes the carrier masses. The time scale of this process is a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Then in the hole-doped correlated metallic titanate, we show how pure spin-currents can be achieved to yield spin-polarizations exceeding those observed in classic semiconductors. Last, we demonstrate the generality of the approach by applying it to the non-orbitally degenerate AFM CaMnO3. These results advance our understanding of electron-lattice interactions in structures out-of-equilibrium and establish a rational framework for designing dynamic phases that may be exploited in ultrafast optoelectronic and optospintronic devices.

  17. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; SchuBler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  18. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    DOE PAGES

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; ...

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flipmore » process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.« less

  19. Ultrafast band engineering and transient spin currents in antiferromagnetic oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Mingqiang; Rondinelli, James M.

    2016-04-29

    Here, we report a dynamic structure and band engineering strategy with experimental protocols to induce indirect-to-direct band gap transitions and coherently oscillating pure spin-currents in three-dimensional antiferromagnets (AFM) using selective phononic excitations. In the Mott insulator LaTiO3, we show that a photo-induced nonequilibrium phonon mode amplitude destroys the spin and orbitally degenerate ground state, reduces the band gap by 160 meV and renormalizes the carrier masses. The time scale of this process is a few hundreds of femtoseconds. Then in the hole-doped correlated metallic titanate, we show how pure spin-currents can be achieved to yield spin-polarizations exceeding those observed in classic semiconductors. Last, we demonstrate the generality of the approach by applying it to the non-orbitally degenerate AFM CaMnO3. These results advance our understanding of electron-lattice interactions in structures out-of-equilibrium and establish a rational framework for designing dynamic phases that may be exploited in ultrafast optoelectronic and optospintronic devices.

  20. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-12-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  1. Dirac fermions in an antiferromagnetic semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peizhe; Zhou, Quan; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Analogues of the elementary particles have been extensively searched for in condensed-matter systems for both scientific interest and technological applications. Recently, massless Dirac fermions were found to emerge as low-energy excitations in materials now known as Dirac semimetals. All of the currently known Dirac semimetals are non-magnetic with both time-reversal symmetry and inversion symmetry . Here we show that Dirac fermions can exist in one type of antiferromagnetic system, where both and are broken but their combination is respected. We propose orthorhombic antiferromagnet CuMnAs as a candidate, analyse the robustness of the Dirac points under symmetry protections and demonstrate its distinctive bulk dispersions, as well as the corresponding surface states, by ab initio calculations. Our results provide a possible platform to study the interplay of Dirac fermion physics and magnetism.

  2. Orbital degeneracy removed by charge order in triangular antiferromagnet AgNiO2.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyńska, E; Coldea, R; Wheeler, E M; Mazin, I I; Johannes, M D; Sörgel, T; Jansen, M; Ibberson, R M; Radaelli, P G

    2007-10-12

    We report a high-resolution neutron diffraction study on the orbitally degenerate spin-1/2 hexagonal metallic antiferromagnet AgNiO2. A structural transition to a tripled unit cell with expanded and contracted NiO6 octahedra indicates sqrt[3]xsqrt[3] charge order on the Ni triangular lattice. This suggests charge order as a possible mechanism of lifting the orbital degeneracy in the presence of charge fluctuations, as an alternative to the more usual Jahn-Teller distortions. A novel magnetic ground state is observed at low temperatures with the electron-rich S=1 Ni sites arranged in alternating ferromagnetic rows on a triangular lattice, surrounded by a honeycomb network of nonmagnetic and metallic Ni ions. We also report first-principles band-structure calculations that explain microscopically the origin of these phenomena.

  3. The stability of a crystal with diamond structure for patchy particles with tetrahedral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noya, Eva G.; Vega, Carlos; Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Louis, Ard A.

    2010-06-01

    The phase diagram of model anisotropic particles with four attractive patches in a tetrahedral arrangement has been computed at two different values of the range of the potential, with the aim of investigating the conditions under which a diamond crystal can be formed. We find that the diamond phase is never stable for our longer-ranged potential. At low temperatures and pressures, the fluid freezes into a body-centered-cubic solid that can be viewed as two interpenetrating diamond lattices with a weak interaction between the two sublattices. Upon compression, an orientationally ordered face-centered-cubic crystal becomes more stable than the body-centered-cubic crystal, and at higher temperatures, a plastic face-centered-cubic phase is stabilized by the increased entropy due to orientational disorder. A similar phase diagram is found for the shorter-ranged potential, but at low temperatures and pressures, we also find a region over which the diamond phase is thermodynamically favored over the body-centered-cubic phase. The higher vibrational entropy of the diamond structure with respect to the body-centered-cubic solid explains why it is stable even though the enthalpy of the latter phase is lower. Some preliminary studies on the growth of the diamond structure starting from a crystal seed were performed. Even though the diamond phase is never thermodynamically stable for the longer-ranged model, direct coexistence simulations of the interface between the fluid and the body-centered-cubic crystal and between the fluid and the diamond crystal show that at sufficiently low pressures, it is quite probable that in both cases the solid grows into a diamond crystal, albeit involving some defects. These results highlight the importance of kinetic effects in the formation of diamond crystals in systems of patchy particles.

  4. The stability of a crystal with diamond structure for patchy particles with tetrahedral symmetry.

    PubMed

    Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos; Doye, Jonathan P K; Louis, Ard A

    2010-06-21

    The phase diagram of model anisotropic particles with four attractive patches in a tetrahedral arrangement has been computed at two different values of the range of the potential, with the aim of investigating the conditions under which a diamond crystal can be formed. We find that the diamond phase is never stable for our longer-ranged potential. At low temperatures and pressures, the fluid freezes into a body-centered-cubic solid that can be viewed as two interpenetrating diamond lattices with a weak interaction between the two sublattices. Upon compression, an orientationally ordered face-centered-cubic crystal becomes more stable than the body-centered-cubic crystal, and at higher temperatures, a plastic face-centered-cubic phase is stabilized by the increased entropy due to orientational disorder. A similar phase diagram is found for the shorter-ranged potential, but at low temperatures and pressures, we also find a region over which the diamond phase is thermodynamically favored over the body-centered-cubic phase. The higher vibrational entropy of the diamond structure with respect to the body-centered-cubic solid explains why it is stable even though the enthalpy of the latter phase is lower. Some preliminary studies on the growth of the diamond structure starting from a crystal seed were performed. Even though the diamond phase is never thermodynamically stable for the longer-ranged model, direct coexistence simulations of the interface between the fluid and the body-centered-cubic crystal and between the fluid and the diamond crystal show that at sufficiently low pressures, it is quite probable that in both cases the solid grows into a diamond crystal, albeit involving some defects. These results highlight the importance of kinetic effects in the formation of diamond crystals in systems of patchy particles.

  5. Diamond LED substrate and novel quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sung, James C; Sung, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Nitride LED (e.g., GaN) has become the mainstream of blue light source. The blue light can be converted to white light by exciting a phosphor (e.g., Nichia's YAG or Osram's TAG) with the complementary yellow emission. However, GaN is typically deposited on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates formed by crystal pulling or hexagonal (e.g., 4 H or 6 H) SiC wafers condensed from SiC vapor. In either case, the nitride lattice is ridden (e.g., 10(9)/cm2) with dislocations. The high dislocation density with sapphire is due to the large (>13%) lattice mismatch; and with hexagonal SiC, because of intrinsic defects. Cubic (beta) SiC may be deposited epitaxially using a CVD reactor onto silicon wafer by diffusing the interface and by chemical gradation. A reactive echant (e.g., hydrogen or fluorine) can be introduced periodically to gasify mis-aligned atoms. In this case, large single crystal wafers would be available for the manufacture of high bright LED with superb electro-optical efficiency. The SiC wafer may be coated with diamond film that can eliminate heat in real time. As a result of lower temperature, the nitride LED can be brighter and it will last longer. The blue light of GaN LED formed on SiC on Diamond (SiCON) LED may also be scattered by using novel quantum dots (e.g., 33 atom pairs of CdSe) to form a broad yellow light that blend in with the original blue light to form sunlight-like white light. This would be the ideal source for general illumination (e.g., for indoor) or backlighting (e.g., for LCD).

  6. Half-metallic diluted antiferromagnetic semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Akai, H; Ogura, M

    2006-07-14

    The possibility of half-metallic antiferromagnetism, a special case of ferrimagnetism with a compensated magnetization, in the diluted magnetic semiconductors is highlighted on the basis of the first-principles electronic structure calculation. As typical examples, the electrical and magnetic properties of II-VI compound semiconductors doped with 3d transition metal ion pairs--(V, Co) and (Fe, Cr)--are discussed.

  7. Misfit accommodation mechanism at the heterointerface between diamond and cubic boron nitride

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Kato, Takeharu; Shibata, Naoya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) are the top two hardest materials on the Earth. Clarifying how the two seemingly incompressible materials can actually join represents one of the most challenging issues in materials science. Here we apply the temperature gradient method to grow the c-BN single crystals on diamond and report a successful epitaxial growth. By transmission electron microscopy, we reveal a novel misfit accommodation mechanism for a {111} diamond/c-BN heterointerface, that is, lattice misfit can be accommodated by continuous stacking fault networks, which are connected by periodically arranged hexagonal dislocation loops. The loops are found to comprise six 60° Shockley partial dislocations. Atomically, the carbon in diamond bonds directly to boron in c-BN at the interface, which electronically induces a two-dimensional electron gas and a quasi-1D electrical conductivity. Our findings point to the existence of a novel misfit accommodation mechanism associated with the superhard materials. PMID:25687399

  8. Misfit accommodation mechanism at the heterointerface between diamond and cubic boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Zhongchang; Kato, Takeharu; Shibata, Naoya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2015-02-17

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (c-BN) are the top two hardest materials on the Earth. Clarifying how the two seemingly incompressible materials can actually join represents one of the most challenging issues in materials science. Here we apply the temperature gradient method to grow the c-BN single crystals on diamond and report a successful epitaxial growth. By transmission electron microscopy, we reveal a novel misfit accommodation mechanism for a {111} diamond/c-BN heterointerface, that is, lattice misfit can be accommodated by continuous stacking fault networks, which are connected by periodically arranged hexagonal dislocation loops. The loops are found to comprise six 60° Shockley partial dislocations. Atomically, the carbon in diamond bonds directly to boron in c-BN at the interface, which electronically induces a two-dimensional electron gas and a quasi-1D electrical conductivity. Our findings point to the existence of a novel misfit accommodation mechanism associated with the superhard materials.

  9. Investigation of the thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in a strongly diluted three-vertex antiferromagnetic Potts model by the Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazaev, A. K.; Babaev, A. B.; Ataeva, G. Ya.

    2017-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties and phase transitions in a two-dimensional strongly diluted threevertex antiferromagnetic Potts model on a triangular lattice have been investigated using the Monte Carlo method. The systems with linear dimensions of L × L = N, where L = 18-48, have been considered. It has been shown using the method of fourth-order Binder cumulants that, upon the introduction of nonmagnetic impurities into the spin system described by the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Potts model, the firstorder phase transition changes to a second-order phase transition.

  10. Spin transfer in antiferromagnets (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    Since antiferromagnets (AFMs) have no spontaneous magnetization unlike ferromagnetic materials, it is not easy to manipulate the magnetic moments in AFMs by external magnetic field. However, recent theoretical studies suggest that it is possible to manipulate the magnetization in AFMs by spin-transfer-torque in a similar manner to ferromagnetic materials. In this study, we perform spin-toque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) measurements on FeNi/NiO/Pt multilayers to experimentally investigate the interaction between the spin current and the magnetic moments of antiferromagnetic NiO. The spin current is injected to the NiO by the spin Hall effect in Pt. The monotonous change in the FMR linewidth of this system with respect to the spin current can be interpreted in a way that the spin current is transferred through the NiO and interacts with the FeNi. This intriguing spin current transport can be explained by the angular momentum transfer mediated by the antiferromagnetic magnons. The results assure that the spin current exerts a torque on the NiO magnetic moments and excites their dynamics. In the talk, recent results will be also discussed.

  11. Spin Seebeck Effect Signals from Antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Arati; Brangham, Jack; Yang, Fengyuan; Heremans, Joseph

    The Longitudinal Spin Seebeck Effect (LSSE), in which a heat current stimulates spin propagation across an interface between a magnetic material and a normal metal, is well established and observed in ferromagnetic systems. Data have been presented indicating that antiferromagnetic systems could also give rise to LSSE signals. We report here on LSSE signal measured on the Pt/NiO/YIG structure, where NiO is an antiferromagnet. This system is reported to exhibit antiferromagnonic transport. We explore the dependence of the signal on the thickness of the NiO and YIG layers. We also report its temperature dependence, which was not explored before. The results are interpreted in terms of the temperature dependence of the magnon density of states. It appears that magnon modes with energies below about 40 K are most involved in the process, as was the case to the LSSE on YIG itself. Preliminary results using other antiferromagnets and other inverse spin-Hall layers look promising and will also be reported Work supported by ARO- MURI W911NF-14-1-0016.

  12. Exotic magnetism of s-electron cluster arrays: Ferromagnetism, ferrimagnetism and antiferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Takehito; Hanh, Duong Thi; Nozue, Yasuo; Nam, Nguyen Hoang; Duan, Truong Cong; Araki, Shingo

    2013-08-01

    Alkali metal nanoclusters can be stabilized in the regular cages of zeolite crystals by the loading of guest alkali metals. Cages are connected by the sharing of windows of the framework, and arrayed in simple cubic, diamond and body centered cubic structures in zeolites A, X and sodalite, respectively. The s-electrons have the localized nature of nanoclusters with magnetic moments, and have mutual interactions through the windows of cages. They show exotic magnetism depending on the structure type of zeolites, the kind of alkali metals and the average loading density of alkali atoms per cage. In zeolite A, potassium clusters are formed in α-cages that have an inside diameter of 11 Å. They exhibit ferromagnetic properties explained by the canted antiferromagnetism of the Mott insulator, where the 1 p-like degenerate orbitals of clusters play an essential role in the magnetic properties. Na-K alloy clusters generated at supercages and β-cages of low-silica X (LSX) zeolite exhibit Néel's N-type ferrimagnetism at specific loading densities of alkali metals. Alkali metal clusters in sodalite show the ideal Heisenberg antiferromagnetism of the Mott insulator.

  13. Nitrogen and silicon defect incorporation during homoepitaxial CVD diamond growth on (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond growth on (111)-diamond surfaces has received increased attention lately because of the use of N-V related centers in quantum computing as well as application of these defect centers in sensing nano-Tesla strength magnetic fields. We have carried out a detailed study of homoepitaxial diamond deposition on (111)-single crystal diamond (SCD) surfaces using a 1.2 kW microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) system employing methane/hydrogen/nitrogen/oxygen gas phase chemistry. We have utilized Type Ib (111)-oriented single crystal diamonds as seed crystals in our study. The homoepitaxially grown diamond films were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, Photoluminescence Spectroscopy (PL), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The nitrogen concentration in the plasma was carefully varied between 0 and 1500 ppm while a ppm level of silicon impurity is present in the plasma from the quartz bell jar. The concentration of N-V defect centers with PL zero phonon lines (ZPL) at 575nm and 637nm and the Si-defect center with a ZPL at 737nm were experimentally detected from a variation in CVD growth conditions and were quantitatively studied. As a result, altering nitrogen and oxygen concentration in the plasma was observed to directly affect N-V and Si-defect incorporation into the (111)-oriented diamond lattice and these findings are presented.

  14. Nitrogen and silicon defect incorporation during homoepitaxial CVD diamond growth on (111) surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Moore, Samuel L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond growth on (111)-diamond surfaces has received increased attention lately because of the use of N-V related centers in quantum computing as well as application of these defect centers in sensing nano-Tesla strength magnetic fields. We have carried out a detailed study of homoepitaxial diamond deposition on (111)-single crystal diamond (SCD) surfaces using a 1.2 kW microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) system employing methane/hydrogen/nitrogen/oxygen gas phase chemistry. We have utilized Type Ib (111)-oriented single crystal diamonds as seed crystals in our study. The homoepitaxially grown diamond films were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, Photoluminescence Spectroscopy (PL), X-ray Photoelectronmore » Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The nitrogen concentration in the plasma was carefully varied between 0 and 1500 ppm while a ppm level of silicon impurity is present in the plasma from the quartz bell jar. The concentration of N-V defect centers with PL zero phonon lines (ZPL) at 575nm and 637nm and the Si-defect center with a ZPL at 737nm were experimentally detected from a variation in CVD growth conditions and were quantitatively studied. As a result, altering nitrogen and oxygen concentration in the plasma was observed to directly affect N-V and Si-defect incorporation into the (111)-oriented diamond lattice and these findings are presented.« less

  15. Topomineralogy of the Siberian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Valentin; Lobanov, Sergey; Vasiliy, Koptil; Bogdan, Pomazanskiy; Alexander, Gerasimchuk; Nikolay, Pokhilenko

    2010-05-01

    Diamond placers are widespread in the modern alluvial deposits and ancient sedimentary collectors of the Siberian craton and can be divided into two major types: 1) related with the rich and famous kimberlites such as Mir and International pipe and 2) with unidentified root source. The lattert are wide spread, industrially significant and in use in the north-east of the Siberian craton. Yet, kimberlites known in the north-east of the Siberian craton have poor diamond concentrations or non-diamondiferous at all. A contradiction occur between high alluvial and extremely-low host diamond content of this region. Detailed studies of this problem led to the fact that diamonds from the alluvial deposits of the Siberian craton, as well as other diamondiferous regions, show broader spectrum of typomorphic features than diamonds from the known kimberlites. Moreover, some diamond groups are not typical for the phanerozoic kimberlites of Siberia, or do not occur in significant amounts. The foregoing suggests that diamonds from the unknown host rock type occur in the diamond placers of the Siberian craton along with typical kimberlite diamonds. Based on the detailed studies of the typomorphic features of the alluvial diamonds from Siberian craton 5 parasteresis groups, probably related to different host rock types, were distinguished. Parasteresis is a regular spatial mineral association which are united by single geological process, such as kimberlite indicator minerals and diamonds from kimberlites which differ in genesis but united by the whole kimberlitic process. Parasteresis 1 (kimberlite-type) involves diamonds which are common for the phanerozoic kimberlites. Parasteresis 2 (supposed to be lamproitic) includes roundish (cryptolaminar) diamonds of dodecahedron habit, the so called "brazilian" or "ural" types. In Siberian phanerozoic industrial kimberlites the part of such diamonds does not exceed 15%. That is the diamonds which dominate in the placers of the Urals and

  16. Observation of antiferromagnetic correlations in the Hubbard model with ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Russell A.; Duarte, Pedro M.; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Liu, Xinxing; Paiva, Thereza; Khatami, Ehsan; Scalettar, Richard T.; Trivedi, Nandini; Huse, David A.; Hulet, Randall G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices have great potential to contribute to a better understanding of some of the most important issues in many-body physics, such as high-temperature superconductivity. The Hubbard model--a simplified representation of fermions moving on a periodic lattice--is thought to describe the essential details of copper oxide superconductivity. This model describes many of the features shared by the copper oxides, including an interaction-driven Mott insulating state and an antiferromagnetic (AFM) state. Optical lattices filled with a two-spin-component Fermi gas of ultracold atoms can faithfully realize the Hubbard model with readily tunable parameters, and thus provide a platform for the systematic exploration of its phase diagram. Realization of strongly correlated phases, however, has been hindered by the need to cool the atoms to temperatures as low as the magnetic exchange energy, and also by the lack of reliable thermometry. Here we demonstrate spin-sensitive Bragg scattering of light to measure AFM spin correlations in a realization of the three-dimensional Hubbard model at temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition. This temperature regime is beyond the range of validity of a simple high-temperature series expansion, which brings our experiment close to the limit of the capabilities of current numerical techniques, particularly at metallic densities. We reach these low temperatures using a compensated optical lattice technique, in which the confinement of each lattice beam is compensated by a blue-detuned laser beam. The temperature of the atoms in the lattice is deduced by comparing the light scattering to determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations and numerical linked-cluster expansion calculations. Further refinement of the compensated lattice may produce even lower temperatures which, along with light scattering thermometry, would open avenues for producing and characterizing other novel quantum states of

  17. Sudden and Slow Quenches into the Antiferromagnetic Phase of Ultracold Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojekhile, Monika; Höppner, Robert; Moritz, Henning; Mathey, Ludwig

    2016-12-01

    We propose a method to reach the antiferromagnetic state of two-dimensional Fermi gases trapped in optical lattices: Independent subsystems are prepared in suitable initial states and then connected by a sudden or slow quench of the tunneling between the subsystems. Examples of suitable low-entropy subsystems are double wells or plaquettes, which can be experimentally realised in Mott insulating shells using optical super-lattices. We estimate the effective temperature T* of the system after the quench by calculating the distribution of excitations created using the spin wave approximation in a Heisenberg model. We investigate the effect of an initial staggered magnetic field and find that for an optimal polarisation of the initial state the effective temperature can be significantly reduced from T*≈1.7 Tc at zero polarisation to T*<0.65Tc, where Tc is the crossover temperature to the antiferromagnetic state. The temperature can be further reduced using a finite quench time. We also show that T* decreases logarithmically with the linear size of the subsystem.

  18. Coalescence-driven magnetic order of the uncompensated antiferromagnetic Co doped ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, V.; Henne, B.; Lumetzberger, J.; Wilhelm, F.; Ollefs, K.; Rogalev, A.; Kovacs, A.; Kieschnick, M.; Ney, A.

    2016-12-01

    The evolution of the structural and magnetic properties of Co doped ZnO has been investigated over an unprecedented concentration range above the coalescence limit. ZnO films with Co concentrations from 20% to 60% of the cationic lattice have been grown by reactive magnetron sputtering. The wurtzite crystal structure was maintained even for these high dopant concentrations. By measuring the x-ray absorption at the near edge and the linear and circular dichroism of the films at the Zn and Co K edge, it could be shown that Co substitutes predominantly for Zn in the lattice. No indications of metallic Co have been found in the samples. At low Co concentrations, the films are paramagnetic, but with increasing Co content, the films become antiferromagnetically ordered with increasing order temperature. Uncompensated spins, coupled to the antiferromagnetic dopant configurations, lead to a vertical exchange-bias-like effect, which increases with increasing Co concentration. In parallel, the single-ion anisotropy is gradually lost.

  19. High efficiency diamond solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2008-05-06

    A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

  20. Gardner-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Joyce H; Yagerman, Sarah; Feng, Hao; Kim, Randie H; Meehan, Shane A; Lewin, Jesse

    2016-12-15

    Gardner-Diamond syndrome, which also is knownas autoerythrocyte sensitization disorder, is a raresyndrome of inflammatory, edematous papulesthat evolve into painful ecchymoses on the trunkand lower legs after a period of stress with no priorhistory of trauma. This syndrome usually occurs inwomen with a history of psychiatric disorders, themost common one being depression. Although theexact mechanism of injury is not well understood,it is hypothesized that these patients haveautoantibodies to phosphatidylserine, which is aphospholipid membrane component in erythrocytes.Treatment for this disorder includes symptomatictherapies and psychotropic medications to treat theunderlying psychiatric disorder.

  1. Diamond Anvil Cell Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermarini, Gasper J.

    It has often been said that scientific advances are made either in a dramatic and revolutionary way, or, as in the case of the diamond anvil cell (DAC), in a slow and evolutionary manner over a period of several years. For more than 2 decades, commencing in 1958, the DAC developed stepwise from a rather crude qualitative instrument to the sophisticated quantitative research tool it is today, capable of routinely producing sustained static pressures in the multi-megabar range and readily adaptable to numerous scientific measurement techniques because of its optical accessibility, miniature size, and portability.

  2. Extreme Mechanics of Probing the Ultimate Strength of Nanotwinned Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-09-01

    Recently synthesized nanotwinned diamond (NTD) exhibits unprecedented Vickers hardness exceeding 200 GPa [Q. Huang et al., Nature (London) 510, 250 (2014)]. This extraordinary finding challenges the prevailing understanding of material deformation and stress response under extreme loading conditions. Here we unveil by first-principles calculations a novel indenter-deformation generated stress confinement mechanism that suppresses the graphitization or bond collapse failure modes commonly known in strong covalent solids, leading to greatly enhanced peak stress and strain range in the indented diamond lattice. Moreover, the twin boundaries in NTD promote a strong stress concentration that drives preferential bond realignments, producing a giant indentation strain stiffening. These results explain the exceptional indentation strength of NTD and offer insights into the extreme mechanics of the intricate interplay of the indenter and indented crystal in probing ultrahard materials.

  3. Extreme Mechanics of Probing the Ultimate Strength of Nanotwinned Diamond.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Sun, Hong; Chen, Changfeng

    2016-09-09

    Recently synthesized nanotwinned diamond (NTD) exhibits unprecedented Vickers hardness exceeding 200 GPa [Q. Huang et al., Nature (London) 510, 250 (2014)]. This extraordinary finding challenges the prevailing understanding of material deformation and stress response under extreme loading conditions. Here we unveil by first-principles calculations a novel indenter-deformation generated stress confinement mechanism that suppresses the graphitization or bond collapse failure modes commonly known in strong covalent solids, leading to greatly enhanced peak stress and strain range in the indented diamond lattice. Moreover, the twin boundaries in NTD promote a strong stress concentration that drives preferential bond realignments, producing a giant indentation strain stiffening. These results explain the exceptional indentation strength of NTD and offer insights into the extreme mechanics of the intricate interplay of the indenter and indented crystal in probing ultrahard materials.

  4. Optical properties of ultrapure nano-polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    We synthesized an ultrapure nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD) containing very few chemical impurities (<1 ppm). The 13C concentration of the carbon source was reduced to less than 0.01% by using 12C-enriched high-purity carbon. The ultrapure NPD was synthesized by direct conversion from graphite under high-pressure and high-temperature (HPHT) conditions. We measured the optical properties of the ultrapure NPD, which appeared yellowish, attributed to the structural features of the specimen. Also, the one-phonon absorption peak at 1220 cm-1 is attributed to the broken symmetry of the diamond lattice. Moreover, a defect-related PL peak was found at 730 nm.

  5. Photochemical functionalization of diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Beth Marie

    Diamond surfaces are excellent substrates for potential applications in fields such as biotechnology, molecular sensing, and molecular electronics. In order to develop new diamond-based technologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of diamond surface chemistry. Previous work in the Hamers group has demonstrated covalent functionalization of hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces with molecules bearing a terminal vinyl group via a photochemical process using sub-bandgap light at 254 nm. While the reaction was shown to occur reproducibly with self-terminating monolayer surface coverage, the mechanism was never fully understood. This thesis investigates the photochemical modification of hydrogen-terminated surfaces of diamond. The results show that this reaction is a surface-mediated radical process initiated by the UV-assisted photoejection of electrons from the diamond surfaces into the liquid phase. To develop a better understanding of the photochemical mechanism, an electrical bias was applied to the diamond samples during the photochemical reaction. Applying a 1 volt potential between two diamond electrodes significantly increases the rate of functionalization of the negative electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance measurements show that the applied potential induces downward band-bending within the negative diamond film electrode. At higher voltages a Faradaic current is observed, with no further acceleration of the functionalization rate. The bias-dependent changes in rate are attributed to a field effect; the applied potential induces a downward band-bending on the negative electrode and facilitates electron ejection into the adjacent organic fluid. The ability to directly organically photopattern the surface on length scales of <25 microns has also been demonstrated using simple photomasking techniques. Techniques for the functionalization of diamond may be applied to other 'unreactive' surfaces. The activation of a

  6. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  7. Dynamics of antiferromagnetic skyrmion driven by the spin Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chendong; Song, Chengkun; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic skyrmion moved by the spin-Hall effect is promising for the application of the generation racetrack memories. However, the Magnus force causes a deflected motion of skyrmion, which limits its application. Here, we create an antiferromagnetic skyrmion by injecting a spin-polarized pulse in the nanostripe and investigate the spin Hall effect-induced motion of antiferromagnetic skyrmion by micromagnetic simulations. In contrast to ferromagnetic skyrmion, we find that the antiferromagnetic skyrmion has three evident advantages: (i) the minimum driving current density of antiferromagnetic skyrmion is about two orders smaller than the ferromagnetic skyrmion; (ii) the velocity of the antiferromagnetic skyrmion is about 57 times larger than the ferromagnetic skyrmion driven by the same value of current density; (iii) antiferromagnetic skyrmion can be driven by the spin Hall effect without the influence of Magnus force. In addition, antiferromagnetic skyrmion can move around the pinning sites due to its property of topological protection. Our results present the understanding of antiferromagnetic skyrmion motion driven by the spin Hall effect and may also contribute to the development of antiferromagnetic skyrmion-based racetrack memories.

  8. Effect of the repulsion interaction on the ground-state of the Kondo lattice model with a superlattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the ground-state of a new Kondo lattice model, where the free carriers interact repulsively between them and undergo an external superlattice potential. This model can be simulated with 171Yb atoms confined in optical lattices. We use the density matrix renormalization group method to evaluate the charge and spin gaps, and the structure factors. We found that the ground-state evolves from a Kondo spin liquid state to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with zero spin gap, when the antiferromagnetic exchange increases. Also, we verify that the quantum critical point varies linearly with the repulsion and the exchange.

  9. Ground-state entropy of Potts antiferromagnets: Bounds, series, and Monte Carlo measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrock, Robert; Tsai, Shan-Ho

    1997-09-01

    We report several results concerning W(Λ,q)=exp(S0/kB), the exponent of the ground-state entropy of the Potts antiferromagnet on a lattice Λ. First, we improve our previous rigorous lower bound on W(hc,q) for the honeycomb (hc) lattice and find that it is extremely accurate; it agrees to the first 11 terms with the large-q series for W(hc,q). Second, we investigate the heteropolygonal Archimedean 4.82 lattice, derive a rigorous lower bound, on W(4.82,q), and calculate the large-q series for this function to O(y12) where y=1/(q-1). Remarkably, these agree exactly to all 13 terms calculated. We also report Monte Carlo measurements, and find that these are very close to our lower bound and series. Third, we study the effect of non-nearest-neighbor couplings, focusing on the square lattice with next-nearest-neighbor bonds.

  10. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  11. The electrical and optical properties of thin film diamond implanted with silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, K. J.; Kolodzey, J.; Swann, C. P.; Tsao, M. W.; Rabolt, J. F.; Chen, J.; Brandes, G. R.

    2001-05-01

    The superb mechanical and electrical properties of diamond make it an attractive material for use in extreme conditions. Diamond devices have been fabricated, but the combination of diamond with other materials to form alloys is not yet well-understood. We have investigated the electrical and optical properties of diamond implanted with Si, which is in principle isoelectronic in diamond. The diamond layers were 23 μm thick p-type layers grown on Si(1 0 0) substrates. Silicon was implanted at room temperature, at energy of 300 keV with doses of up to 8.0×10 16 cm -3. A two-stage post-implant anneal process was then performed at 500°C for 30 min, then 800°C for 30 min. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements indicated Si concentrations up to 2 at.%, in agreement with simulations of implant profiles. X-ray measurements indicated that about 60-70% of the Si was incorporated substitutionally, corresponding to up to 1.5 at.% from linear interpolation of lattice constants. Raman spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the diamond structure was reconstructed with the post-implant anneal treatment. NEXAFS measurements confirmed the reconstruction of the sp 3 diamond bonds from sp 2 graphite after annealing. Electrical measurements indicated an increase in diode current density with increased Si dose and a decrease in contact resistance with contact anneals. These novel diamond alloys may be useful for electronic and optical devices. We report on the preparation and properties of these alloys.

  12. Proceedings of U.S. Army Research Office Workshop on U.S. Army Applications for Diamond and Diamondlike Materials Held at Chapel Hill, North Carolina on 13-14 June 1989

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    consistent with HRTEM observations. A new laser ablation and plasma hybrid technique has been developed for depositing thin diamond-like carbon ( DLC ) films on...Code) P.O. Box 12211 P. 0. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Sa . NAME OF FUNDINGISPONSORING 8b...lattice planes in the absence of matching of lattice constants. The HRTEM micrographs cleady show that fivefold symmetry in diamond microcrystallites

  13. Ferrimagnetism in a transverse Ising antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyoshi, T.

    2016-05-01

    The phase diagrams and temperature dependences of total magnetization mT in a transverse Ising antiferromagnet consisting of alternating two (A and B) layers are studied by the uses of the effective-field theory with correlations and the mean-field-theory. A lot of characteristic phenomena, namely ferrimagnetic behaviors, have been found in the mT, when the crystallographically equivalent conditions between the A and B layers are broken. The appearance of a compensation point has been found below its transition temperature.

  14. Switching of antiferromagnetic chains with magnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Kun; Polyakov, Oleg P.; Stepanyuk, Valeri S.

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the possibility of information storage in short antiferromagnetic chains on an insulator substrate [S. Loth et al., Science 335, 196 (2012), 10.1126/science.1214131]. Here, using the density functional theory and atomistic spin dynamics simulations, we show that a local magnetic control of such chains with a magnetic tip and magnetic pulses can be used for fast switching of their magnetization. Furthermore, by changing the position of the tip one can engineer the magnetization dynamics of the chains.

  15. High-Tc spin superfluidity in antiferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Bunkov, Yu M; Alakshin, E M; Gazizulin, R R; Klochkov, A V; Kuzmin, V V; L'vov, V S; Tagirov, M S

    2012-04-27

    We report the observation of the unusual behavior of induction decay signals in antiferromagnetic monocrystals with Suhl-Nakamura interactions. The signals show the formation of the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons and the existence of spin supercurrent, in complete analogy with the spin superfluidity in the superfluid (3)He and the atomic BEC of quantum gases. In the experiments described here, the temperature of the magnon BEC is a thousand times larger than in the superfluid (3)He. It opens a possibility to apply the spin supercurrent for various magnetic spintronics applications.

  16. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond film properties

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; McCauley, Thomas G.; Zhou, Dan; Krauss, Alan R.

    2003-07-15

    A method for controlling the crystallite size and growth rate of plasma-deposited diamond films. A plasma is established at a pressure in excess of about 55 Torr with controlled concentrations of hydrogen up to about 98% by volume, of unsubstituted hydrocarbons up to about 3% by volume and an inert gas of one or more of the noble gases and nitrogen up to about 98% by volume. The volume ratio of inert gas to hydrogen is preferably maintained at greater than about 4, to deposit a diamond film on a suitable substrate. The diamond film is deposited with a predetermined crystallite size and at a predetermined growth rate.

  17. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic hydrogen defect free diamond or diamond like films on a substrate. The method involves providing vapor containing fullerene molecules with or without an inert gas, providing a device to impart energy to the fullerene molecules, fragmenting at least in part some of the fullerene molecules in the vapor or energizing the molecules to incipient fragmentation, ionizing the fullerene molecules, impinging ionized fullerene molecules on the substrate to assist in causing fullerene fragmentation to obtain a thickness of diamond on the substrate.

  18. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  19. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraimovitch, D.; Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ruzin, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz-1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  20. Emergent lattices with geometrical frustration in doped extended Hubbard models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Tocchio, Luca F.; Valentí, Roser; Gros, Claudius

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous charge ordering occurring in correlated systems may be considered as a possible route to generate effective lattice structures with unconventional couplings. For this purpose we investigate the phase diagram of doped extended Hubbard models on two lattices: (i) the honeycomb lattice with on-site U and nearest-neighbor V Coulomb interactions at 3 /4 filling (n =3 /2 ) and (ii) the triangular lattice with on-site U , nearest-neighbor V , and next-nearest-neighbor V' Coulomb interactions at 3 /8 filling (n =3 /4 ). We consider various approaches including mean-field approximations, perturbation theory, and variational Monte Carlo. For the honeycomb case (i), charge order induces an effective triangular lattice at large values of U /t and V /t , where t is the nearest-neighbor hopping integral. The nearest-neighbor spin exchange interactions on this effective triangular lattice are antiferromagnetic in most of the phase diagram, while they become ferromagnetic when U is much larger than V . At U /t ˜(V/t ) 3 , ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions nearly cancel out, leading to a system with four-spin ring-exchange interactions. On the other hand, for the triangular case (ii) at large U and finite V', we find no charge order for small V , an effective kagome lattice for intermediate V , and one-dimensional charge order for large V . These results indicate that Coulomb interactions induce [case (i)] or enhance [case(ii)] emergent geometrical frustration of the spin degrees of freedom in the system, by forming charge order.

  1. Antiferromagnetism of Zn2VO (PO4)2 and the dilution with Ti4 +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogi, A.; Ahmed, N.; Nath, R.; Tsirlin, A. A.; Kundu, S.; Mahajan, A. V.; Sichelschmidt, J.; Roy, B.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We report static and dynamic properties of the antiferromagnetic compound Zn2(VO )(PO4)2, and the consequences of nonmagnetic Ti4 + doping at the V4 + site. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and spin-lattice relaxation rate (1 /T1 ) consistently show the formation of the long-range antiferromagnetic order below TN=3.8 -3.9 K. The critical exponent β =0.33 ±0.02 estimated from the temperature dependence of the sublattice magnetization measured by 31P NMR at 9.4 MHz is consistent with universality classes of three-dimensional spin models. The isotropic and axial hyperfine couplings between the 31P nuclei and V4 + spins are Ahfiso=(9221 ±100 ) Oe /μB and Ahfax=(1010 ±50 ) Oe /μB, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility data above 6.5 K and heat capacity data above 4.5 K are well described by quantum Monte Carlo simulations for the Heisenberg model on the square lattice with J ≃7.7 K. This value of J is consistent with the values obtained from the NMR shift, 1 /T1 , and electron spin resonance intensity analysis. Doping Zn2VO (PO4)2 with nonmagnetic Ti4 + leads to a marginal increase in the J value and the overall dilution of the spin lattice. In contrast to the recent ab initio results, we find neither evidence for the monoclinic structural distortion nor signatures of the magnetic one-dimensionality for doped samples with up to 15% of Ti4 +. The Néel temperature TN decreases linearly with increasing the amount of the nonmagnetic dopant.

  2. Spin liquid nature in the Heisenberg J1-J2 triangular antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Hu, Wen-Jun; Thomale, Ronny; Poilblanc, Didier; Becca, Federico

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the spin-1/2 Heisenberg model on the triangular lattice in the presence of nearest-neighbor J1 and next-nearest-neighbor J2 antiferromagnetic couplings. Motivated by recent findings from density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) claiming the existence of a gapped spin liquid with signatures of spontaneously broken lattice point group symmetry [Zhu and White, Phys. Rev. B 92, 041105 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.041105 and Hu, Gong, Zhu, and Sheng, Phys. Rev. B 92, 140403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140403], we employ the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) approach to analyze the model from an alternative perspective that considers both magnetically ordered and paramagnetic trial states. We find a quantum paramagnet in the regime 0.08 ≲J2/J1≲0.16 , framed by 120∘ coplanar (stripe collinear) antiferromagnetic order for smaller (larger) J2/J1 . By considering the optimization of spin-liquid wave functions of a different gauge group and lattice point group content as derived from Abrikosov mean-field theory, we obtain the gapless U(1 ) Dirac spin liquid as the energetically most preferable state in comparison to all symmetric or nematic gapped Z2 spin liquids so far advocated by DMRG. Moreover, by the application of few Lanczos iterations, we find the energy to be the same as the DMRG result within error bars. To further resolve the intriguing disagreement between VMC and DMRG, we complement our methodological approach by the pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) to compare the spin structure factors for the paramagnetic regime calculated by VMC, DMRG, and PFFRG. This model promises to be an ideal test bed for future numerical refinements in tracking the long-range correlations in frustrated magnets.

  3. Antiferromagnetic phase diagram of the cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, L. H. C. M.; Teixeira, A. W.; Marino, E. C.

    2017-02-01

    Taking the spin-fermion model as the starting point for describing the cuprate superconductors, we obtain an effective nonlinear sigma-field hamiltonian, which takes into account the effect of doping in the system. We obtain an expression for the spin-wave velocity as a function of the chemical potential. For appropriate values of the parameters we determine the antiferromagnetic phase diagram for the YBa2Cu3O6+x compound as a function of the dopant concentration in good agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, our approach provides a unified description for the phase diagrams of the hole-doped and the electron doped compounds, which is consistent with the remarkable similarity between the phase diagrams of these compounds, since we have obtained the suppression of the antiferromagnetic phase as the modulus of the chemical potential increases. The aforementioned result then follows by considering positive values of the chemical potential related to the addition of holes to the system, while negative values correspond to the addition of electrons.

  4. Antiferromagnetic Dirac semimetals in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing

    2017-03-01

    The search for symmetry-protected two-dimensional (2D) Dirac semimetals analogous to graphene is important both for fundamental and practical interest. The 2D Dirac cones are protected by crystalline symmetries and magnetic ordering may destroy their robustness. Here we propose a general framework to classify stable 2D Dirac semimetals in spin-orbit coupled systems having the combined time-reversal and inversion symmetries, and show the existence of the stable Dirac points in 2D antiferromagnetic semimetals. Compared to 3D Dirac semimetals which fall into two distinct classes, Dirac semimetals in 2D with combined time-reversal and inversion symmetries belong to a single class which is closely related to the nonsymmorphic space-group symmetries. We further provide a concrete model in antiferromagnetic semimetals which supports symmetry-protected 2D Dirac points. The symmetry breaking in such systems leads to 2D chiral topological states such as quantum anomalous Hall insulator and chiral topological superconductor phases.

  5. Orientational transitions in antiferromagnetic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhlevnykh, A. N.; Petrov, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The orientational phases in an antiferromagnetic liquid crystal (ferronematic) based on the nematic liquid crystal with the negative anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility are studied in the framework of the continuum theory. The ferronematic was assumed to be compensated; i.e., in zero field, impurity ferroparticles with the magnetic moments directed parallel and antiparallel to the director are equiprobably distributed in it. It is established that under the action of a magnetic field the ferronematic undergoes orientational transitions compensated (antiferromagnetic) phase-non-uniform phase-saturation (ferrimagnetic) phase. The analytical expressions for threshold fields of the transitions as functions of material parameters are obtained. It is shown that with increasing magnetic impurity segregation parameter, the threshold fields of the transitions significantly decrease. The bifurcation diagram of the ferronematic orientational phases is built in terms of the energy of anchoring of magnetic particles with the liquid-crystal matrix and magnetic field. It is established that the Freedericksz transition is the second-order phase transition, while the transition to the saturation state can be second- or first-order. In the latter case, the suspension exhibits orientational bistability. The orientational and magnetooptical properties of the ferronematic in different applied magnetic fields are studied.

  6. Spanning Trees of the Generalised Union Jack Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingyun; Yan, Weigen

    2016-04-01

    The Union Jack lattice UJL(n, m) with toroidal boundary condition can be obtained from an n×m square lattice with toroidal boundary condition by inserting a new vertex vf to each face f and adding four edges (vf, ui(f)), where u1(f), u2(f), u3(f), and u4(f) are four vertices on the boundary of f. The Union Jack lattice has been studied extensively by statistical physicists. In this article, we consider the problem of enumeration of spanning trees of the so-called generalised Union Jack lattice UDn, which is obtained from the Aztec diamond ADnt of order n with toroidal boundary condition by inserting a new vertex vf to each face f and adding four edges (vf, ui(f)), where u1(f), u2(f), u3(f) and u4(f) are four vertices on the boundary of f.

  7. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  8. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  9. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  10. Helium ion microscope generated nitrogen-vacancy centres in type Ib diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, D.; Fox, D.; O'Hara, N.; Usov, V.; Scanlan, D.; McEvoy, N.; Duesberg, G. S.; Cross, G. L. W.; Zhang, H. Z.; Donegan, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    We report on position and density control of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres created in type Ib diamond using localised exposure from a helium ion microscope and subsequent annealing. Spatial control to <380 nm has been achieved. We show that the fluorescence lifetime of the created centres decreases with increasing ion dose. Furthermore, we show that for doses >1 × 1017 ion/cm2, significant damage of the diamond lattice occurs resulting in fluorescence quenching and amorphization. This places an upper limit on the density of NV centres that can be created using this method.

  11. Pulse laser induced graphite-to-diamond phase transition: the role of quantum electronic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhengFei; Liu, Feng

    2017-02-01

    First-principles calculations show that the pulse laser induced graphite-to-diamond phase transition is related to the lattice stress generated by the excited carriers, termed as "quantum electronic stress (QES)". We found that the excited carriers in graphite generate a large anisotropic QES that increases linearly with the increasing carrier density. Using the QES as a guiding parameter, structural relaxation spontaneously transforms the graphite phase into the diamond phase, as the QES is reduced and minimized. Our results suggest that the concept of QES can be generally applied as a good measure to characterize the pulse laser induced phase transitions, in analogy to pressure induced phase transitions.

  12. Cubic lattice nanosheets: thickness-driven light emission.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Zhi

    2014-07-22

    Silicon has a diamond-like cubic crystal lattice for which two-dimensional (2D) nanometer thickness nanosheet crystallization appears not to be trivial. However, in this issue of ACS Nano, the group led by Heon-Jin Choi demonstrates the gas-phase dendritic growth of Si nanosheets, only 1 to 13 nm thick. Moreover, such nanosheets display strong thickness-dependent photoluminescence in a visible range with red, green, and blue emission each documented.

  13. Unified molecular field theory for collinear and noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    DOE PAGES

    Johnston, David C.

    2015-02-27

    In this study, a unified molecular field theory (MFT) is presented that applies to both collinear and planar noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets (AFs) on the same footing. The spins in the system are assumed to be identical and crystallographically equivalent. This formulation allows calculations of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T below the AF ordering temperature TN to be carried out for arbitrary Heisenberg exchange interactions Jij between arbitrary neighbors j of a given spin i without recourse to magnetic sublattices. The Weiss temperature θp in the Curie-Weiss law is written in terms of the Jij values and TNmore » in terms of the Jij values and an assumed AF structure. Other magnetic and thermal properties are then expressed in terms of quantities easily accessible from experiment as laws of corresponding states for a given spin S. For collinear ordering these properties are the reduced temperature t=T/TN, the ratio f = θp/TN, and S. For planar noncollinear helical or cycloidal ordering, an additional parameter is the wave vector of the helix or cycloid. The MFT is also applicable to AFs with other AF structures. The MFT predicts that χ(T ≤ TN) of noncollinear 120° spin structures on triangular lattices is isotropic and independent of S and T and thus clarifies the origin of this universally observed behavior. The high-field magnetization and heat capacity for fields applied perpendicular to the ordering axis (collinear AFs) and ordering plane (planar noncollinear AFs) are also calculated and expressed for both types of AF structures as laws of corresponding states for a given S, and the reduced perpendicular field versus reduced temperature phase diagram is constructed.« less

  14. Unified molecular field theory for collinear and noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, David C.

    2015-02-27

    In this study, a unified molecular field theory (MFT) is presented that applies to both collinear and planar noncollinear Heisenberg antiferromagnets (AFs) on the same footing. The spins in the system are assumed to be identical and crystallographically equivalent. This formulation allows calculations of the anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T below the AF ordering temperature TN to be carried out for arbitrary Heisenberg exchange interactions Jij between arbitrary neighbors j of a given spin i without recourse to magnetic sublattices. The Weiss temperature θp in the Curie-Weiss law is written in terms of the Jij values and TN in terms of the Jij values and an assumed AF structure. Other magnetic and thermal properties are then expressed in terms of quantities easily accessible from experiment as laws of corresponding states for a given spin S. For collinear ordering these properties are the reduced temperature t=T/TN, the ratio f = θp/TN, and S. For planar noncollinear helical or cycloidal ordering, an additional parameter is the wave vector of the helix or cycloid. The MFT is also applicable to AFs with other AF structures. The MFT predicts that χ(T ≤ TN) of noncollinear 120° spin structures on triangular lattices is isotropic and independent of S and T and thus clarifies the origin of this universally observed behavior. The high-field magnetization and heat capacity for fields applied perpendicular to the ordering axis (collinear AFs) and ordering plane (planar noncollinear AFs) are also calculated and expressed for both types of AF structures as laws of corresponding states for a given S, and the reduced perpendicular field versus reduced temperature phase diagram is constructed.

  15. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in antiferromagnetic NiO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ravikumar, Patta; Kisan, Bhagaban; Perumal, A.

    2015-08-15

    We report systematic investigations of structural, vibrational, resonance and magnetic properties of nanoscale NiO powders prepared by ball milling process under different milling speeds for 30 hours of milling. Structural properties revealed that both pure NiO and as-milled NiO powders exhibit face centered cubic structure, but average crystallite size decreases to around 11 nm along with significant increase in strain with increasing milling speed. Vibrational properties show the enhancement in the intensity of one-phonon longitudinal optical (LO) band and disappearance of two-magnon band due to size reduction. In addition, two-phonon LO band exhibits red shift due to size-induced phonon confinement effect and surface relaxation. Pure NiO powder exhibit antiferromagnetic nature, which transforms into induced ferromagnetic after size reduction. The average magnetization at room temperature increases with decreasing the crystallite size and a maximum moment of 0.016 μ{sub B}/f.u. at 12 kOe applied field and coercivity of 170 Oe were obtained for 30 hours milled NiO powders at 600 rotation per minute milling speed. The change in the magnetic properties is also supported by the vibrational properties. Thermomagnetization measurements at high temperature reveal a well-defined magnetic phase transition at high temperature (T{sub C}) around 780 K due to induced ferromagnetic phase. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies reveal a good agreement between the EPR results and magnetic properties. The observed results are described on the basis of crystallite size variation, defect density, large strain, oxidation/reduction of Ni and interaction between uncompensated surfaces and particle core with lattice expansion. The obtained results suggest that nanoscale NiO powders with high T{sub C} and moderate magnetic moment at room temperature with cubic structure would be useful to expedite for spintronic devices.

  16. Nematic antiferromagnetic states in bulk FeSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Xiang, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The existence of nematic order, which breaks the lattice rotational symmetry with nonequivalent a and b axes in iron-based superconductors, is a well-established experimental fact. An antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition is accompanying this order, observed in nearly all parent compounds, except bulk FeSe. The absence of the AFM order in FeSe casts doubt on the magnetic mechanism of iron-based superconductivity, since the nematic order is believed to be driven by the same interaction that is responsible for the superconducting pairing in these materials. Here we show, through systematic first-principles electronic structure calculations, that the ground state of FeSe is in fact strongly AFM correlated but without developing a magnetic long-range order. Actually, there are a series of staggered n -mer AFM states with corresponding energies below that of the single stripe AFM state, which is the ground state for the parent compounds of most iron-based superconductors. Here, the staggered n -mer (n any integer >1 ) means a set of n adjacent parallel spins on a line along the b axis with antiparallel spins between n -mers along both a and b axes. Moreover, different n -mers can antiparallelly mix with each other to coexist. Among all the states, we find that the lowest energy states formed by the staggered dimer, staggered trimer, and their random antiparallel aligned spin states along the b axis are quasidegenerate. The thermal average of these states does not show any magnetic long-range order, but it does possess a hidden one-dimensional AFM order along the a axis, which can be detected by elastic neutron scattering measurements. Our finding gives a natural account for the absence of long-range magnetic order and suggests that the nematicity is driven predominantly by spin fluctuations even in bulk FeSe, providing a unified description on the phase diagram of iron-based superconductors.

  17. Micropolar dissipative models for the analysis of 2D dispersive waves in periodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, H.; Ganghoffer, J. F.; Lakiss, H.

    2017-03-01

    The computation of the dispersion relations for dissipative periodic lattices having the attributes of metamaterials is an actual research topic raising the interest of researchers in the field of acoustics and wave propagation phenomena. We analyze in this contribution the impact of wave damping on the dispersion features of periodic lattices, which are modeled as beam-lattices. The band diagram structure and damping ratio are computed for different repetitive lattices, based on the homogenized continuum response of the initially discrete lattice architecture, modeled as Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic beams. Three of these lattices (reentrant hexagonal, chiral diamond, hexachiral lattice) are auxetic metamaterials, since they show negative Poisson's ratio. The effective viscoelastic anisotropic continuum behavior of the lattices is first computed in terms of the homogenized stiffness and viscosity matrices, based on the discrete homogenization technique. The dynamical equations of motion are obtained for an equivalent homogenized micropolar continuum evaluated based on the homogenized properties, and the dispersion relation and damping ratio are obtained by inserting an harmonic plane waves Ansatz into these equations. The comparison of the acoustic properties obtained in the low frequency range for the four considered lattices shows that auxetic lattices attenuate waves at lower frequencies compared to the classical hexagonal lattice. The diamond chiral lattice shows the best attenuation properties of harmonic waves over the entire Brillouin zone, and the hexachiral lattice presents better acoustic properties than the reentrant hexagonal lattice. The range of validity of the effective continuum obtained by the discrete homogenization has been assessed by comparing the frequency band structure of this continuum with that obtained by a Floquet-Bloch analysis.

  18. Mo2C coating on diamond: Different effects on thermal conductivity of diamond/Al and diamond/Cu composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songdi; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Ma, Liying

    2017-04-01

    Mo2C submicron layer coated diamond particles prepared by a molten salts route with Mo powder as the starting material were used as the filler in Cu- and Al- matrix composites. The microstructure and thermal property of the composites prepared by a vacuum pressure infiltration method were investigated. When introducing a 500 nm thick Mo2C layer, the thermal conductivity of the composites with different matrix presented different performance. A high thermal conductivity (657 W m-1 K-1) was obtained in diamond/Cu composites owing to the improved interfacial bonding and lower interfacial thermal resistance, while the thermal conductivity of diamond/Al composites decreased from 553 W m-1 K-1 to 218 W m-1 K-1 when introducing the Mo2C layer, which can be attributed to the formation of harmful granule-phase (Al12Mo) at the interface of diamond and aluminum. This work provides a promising approach to improve performance of diamond reinforced metal matrix composites by selecting carbide as an interface modifier.

  19. Tailoring exchange couplings in magnetic topological-insulator/antiferromagnet heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing Lin; Kou, Xufeng; Grutter, Alexander J.; Yin, Gen; Pan, Lei; Che, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yuxiang; Nie, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bin; Disseler, Steven M.; Kirby, Brian J.; Ratcliff, William, II; Shao, Qiming; Murata, Koichi; Zhu, Xiaodan; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Montazeri, Mohammad; Han, Xiaodong; Borchers, Julie A.; Wang, Kang L.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic topological insulators such as Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 provide a platform for the realization of versatile time-reversal symmetry-breaking physics. By constructing heterostructures exhibiting Néel order in an antiferromagnetic CrSb and ferromagnetic order in Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3, we realize emergent interfacial magnetic phenomena which can be tailored through artificial structural engineering. Through deliberate geometrical design of heterostructures and superlattices, we demonstrate the use of antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in manipulating the magnetic properties of magnetic topological insulators. Proximity effects are shown to induce an interfacial spin texture modulation and establish an effective long-range exchange coupling mediated by antiferromagnetism, which significantly enhances the magnetic ordering temperature in the superlattice. This work provides a new framework on integrating topological insulators with antiferromagnetic materials and unveils new avenues towards dissipationless topological antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  20. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  1. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    PubMed Central

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  2. Design of a three-dimensional photonic crystal nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajiri, Takeyoshi; Takahashi, Shun; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We design a three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystal (PC) nanocavity based on a \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure. The designed structure, comprised of self-sustainable layers, is suitable for fabrication by layer stacking techniques. Quality factors (Q-factors) of nanocavities were calculated for the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond and a commonly-used woodpile structures, both of which are generated from the same diamond lattice with a lattice constant adiamond. The Q-factor of the designed nanocavity can reach as high as 230,000 with 35 stacked layers and a square in-plane PC area of the length of one side of 5\\sqrt{2} a^{\\text{diamond}}. This is 1.5 times higher than that of a 3D PC nanocavity based on the woodpile structure with the same in-plane PC size and with the same number of stacked layers. The higher Q-factor in the \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure originates from its stronger in-plane light confinement over the woodpile structure. The \\langle 110\\rangle -layered diamond structure will be beneficial for improving experimentally attainable Q-factors of 3D PC nanocavities particularly fabricated by a micromanipulation method.

  3. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  4. High Precision Calculations of the Lennard-Jones Lattice Constants for Five Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    The total potential energy of a crystal as described by the Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential depends in part upon the calculation of lattice constants. Knowing these constants to high precision is useful for prediction of the lattice type and simulation of crystals such as rare-gas solids or germanium detectors, but reaching higher precision is computationally costly and challenging. Presented here is the extension of the precision of the lattice constants, Lp, up to 32 decimal digits, and in some cases corrections from previous publication. The Lp terms are given for 4 <= p <= 30 in the simple cubic, face-centered cubic, body-centered cubic, hexagonal-close-pack, and diamond lattices. This precision was obtained through the use of careful parallelization technique, exploitation of the symmetries of each lattice, and the ``onionization'' of the simulated crystal. The results of this computation, along with the tools and algorithm strategies to make this computation possible, are explained in detail graphically.

  5. Strong correlation induced charge localization in antiferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Qi, Yang; Tian, Chushun; Weng, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The fate of a hole injected in an antiferromagnet is an outstanding issue of strongly correlated physics. It provides important insights into doped Mott insulators closely related to high-temperature superconductivity. Here, we report a systematic numerical study of t-J ladder systems based on the density matrix renormalization group. It reveals a surprising result for the single hole's motion in an otherwise well-understood undoped system. Specifically, we find that the common belief of quasiparticle picture is invalidated by the self-localization of the doped hole. In contrast to Anderson localization caused by disorders, the charge localization discovered here is an entirely new phenomenon purely of strong correlation origin. It results from destructive quantum interference of novel signs picked up by the hole, and since the same effect is of a generic feature of doped Mott physics, our findings unveil a new paradigm which may go beyond the single hole doped system. PMID:24002668

  6. Spin supercurrent in the canted antiferromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Yusuke; Tsitsishvili, George; Ezawa, Zyun F.

    2013-03-01

    The spin and layer (pseudospin) degrees of freedom are entangled coherently in the canted antiferromagnetic phase of the bilayer quantum Hall system at the filling factor ν=2. A complex Goldstone mode emerges describing such a combined degree of freedom. In the zero tunneling-interaction limit (ΔSAS→0), its phase field provokes a supercurrent carrying both spin and charge within each layer. The Hall resistance is predicted to become anomalous precisely as in the ν=1 bilayer system in the counterflow and drag experiments. Furthermore, it is shown that the total current flowing in the bilayer system is a supercurrent carrying solely spins in the counterflow geometry. It is intriguing that all these phenomena occur only in imbalanced bilayer systems.

  7. High temperature diamond film deposition on a natural diamond anvil

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, T.S.; Vohra, Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of a 100 {mu}m thick by 350 {mu}m diameter diamond layer on the culet of a type Ia brilliant cut natural diamond anvil by microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD). While our previous work [1] on diamond anvils resulted in homoepitaxial film growth at a rate of approximately 20 {mu}m/hr, the present 100 {mu}m thick diamond layer grew in less than 2 hours. This unprecedented growth rate of {approximately} 50 {mu}m/hr is believed to be the result of the extremely high substrate temperature (1800{degrees}-2100{degrees}C) during deposition. The translucent diamond layer was characterized by micro-Raman, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman analysis shows the deposit to be of high quality. The PL spectra show numerous features, including prominent emission bands at 575 nm (2.16 eV), 636 nm (1.95 eV), 735 nm (1.68 eV) and 777 run, (1.60 eV).

  8. Classical Spin Liquid on the Maximally Frustrated Honeycomb Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehn, J.; Sen, Arnab; Damle, Kedar; Moessner, R.

    2016-10-01

    We show that the honeycomb Heisenberg antiferromagnet with J1/2 =J2=J3, where J1 , J2 , and J3 are first-, second-, and third-neighbor couplings, respectively, forms a classical spin liquid with pinch-point singularities in the structure factor at the Brillouin zone corners. Upon dilution with nonmagnetic ions, fractionalized degrees of freedom carrying 1 /3 of the free moment emerge. Their effective description in the limit of low temperature is that of spins randomly located on a triangular lattice, with a frustrated sublattice-sensitive interaction of long-ranged logarithmic form. The X Y version of this magnet exhibits nematic thermal order by disorder. This comes with a clear experimental diagnostic in neutron scattering, which turns out to apply also to the case of the celebrated planar order by disorder of the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  9. Quasiparticle bandstructure of antiferromagnetic EuTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathi Jaya, S.; Nolting, W.

    1997-11-01

    The temperature-dependent electronic quasiparticle spectrum of the antiferromagnetic semiconductor EuTe is derived by use of a combination of a many-body model procedure with a tight-binding - `linear muffin tin orbital' (TB - LMTO) band structure calculation. The central part is the d - f model for a single band electron (`test electron') being exchange coupled to the antiferromagnetically ordered localized moments of the Eu ions. The single-electron Bloch energies of the d - f model are taken from a TB - LMTO calculation for paramagnetic EuTe. The d - f model is evaluated by a recently proposed moment conserving Green function technique to get the temperature-dependent sublattice - quasiparticle bandstructure (S - QBS) and sublattice - quasiparticle density of states (S - QDOS) of the unoccupied 5d - 6s energy bands. Unconventional correlation effects and the appearance of characteristic quasiparticles (`magnetic polarons') are worked out in detail. The temperature dependence of the S - QDOS and S - QBS is mainly provoked by the spectral weights of the energy dispersions. Minority- and majority-spin spectra coincide for all temperatures but with different densities of states. Upon cooling from 0953-8984/9/47/012/img1 to T = 0 K the lower conduction band edge exhibits a small blue shift of -0.025 eV in accordance with the experiment. Quasiparticle damping manifesting itself in a temperature-dependent broadening of the spectral density peaks arises from spin exchange processes between (5d - 6s) conduction band electrons and localized 4f moments.

  10. Optically induced dynamic nuclear spin polarisation in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuer, Jochen; Schwartz, Ilai; Chen, Qiong; Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Carl, Patrick; Höfer, Peter; Retzker, Alexander; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Isoya, Junichi; Luy, Burkhard; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) depends strongly on nuclear spin polarisation and, motivated by this observation, dynamical nuclear spin polarisation has recently been applied to enhance MRI protocols (Kurhanewicz et al 2011 Neoplasia 13 81). Nuclear spins associated with the 13C carbon isotope (nuclear spin I = 1/2) in diamond possess uniquely long spin lattice relaxation times (Reynhardt and High 2011 Prog. Nucl. Magn. Reson. Spectrosc. 38 37). If they are present in diamond nanocrystals, especially when strongly polarised, they form a promising contrast agent for MRI. Current schemes for achieving nuclear polarisation, however, require cryogenic temperatures. Here we demonstrate an efficient scheme that realises optically induced 13C nuclear spin hyperpolarisation in diamond at room temperature and low ambient magnetic field. Optical pumping of a nitrogen-vacancy centre creates a continuously renewable electron spin polarisation which can be transferred to surrounding 13C nuclear spins. Importantly for future applications we also realise polarisation protocols that are robust against an unknown misalignment between magnetic field and crystal axis.

  11. Thermal diffusion boron doping of single-crystal natural diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung-Hun; Wu, Henry; Mikael, Solomon; Mi, Hongyi; Blanchard, James P.; Venkataramanan, Giri; Zhou, Weidong; Gong, Shaoqin; Morgan, Dane; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-01

    With the best overall electronic and thermal properties, single crystal diamond (SCD) is the extreme wide bandgap material that is expected to revolutionize power electronics and radio-frequency electronics in the future. However, turning SCD into useful semiconductors requires overcoming doping challenges, as conventional substitutional doping techniques, such as thermal diffusion and ion implantation, are not easily applicable to SCD. Here we report a simple and easily accessible doping strategy demonstrating that electrically activated, substitutional doping in SCD without inducing graphitization transition or lattice damage can be readily realized with thermal diffusion at relatively low temperatures by using heavily doped Si nanomembranes as a unique dopant carrying medium. Atomistic simulations elucidate a vacancy exchange boron doping mechanism that occurs at the bonded interface between Si and diamond. We further demonstrate selectively doped high voltage diodes and half-wave rectifier circuits using such doped SCD. Our new doping strategy has established a reachable path toward using SCDs for future high voltage power conversion systems and for other novel diamond based electronic devices. The novel doping mechanism may find its critical use in other wide bandgap semiconductors.

  12. Thermal characterization and properties of a copper-diamond composite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Pin; Chavez, Thomas P.; DiAntonio, Christopher Brian; Coker, Eric Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    The thermal properties of a commercial copper-diamond composite were measured from below -50°C to above 200°C. The results of thermal expansion, heat capacity, and thermal diffusivity were reported. These data were used to calculate the thermal conductivity of the composite as a function of temperature in the thickness direction. These results are compared with estimated values based on a simple mixing rule and the temperature dependence of these physical properties is represented by curve fitting equations. These fitting equations can be used for thermal modeling of practical devices/systems at their operation temperatures. The results of the mixing rule showed a consistent correlation between the amount of copper and diamond in the composite, based on density, thermal expansion, and heat capacity measurements. However, there was a disparity between measured and estimated thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity. These discrepancies can be caused by many intrinsic material issues such as lattice defects and impurities, but the dominant factor is attributed to the large uncertainty of the interfacial thermal conductance between diamond and copper.

  13. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  14. Interlaced Particle Systems and Tilings of the Aztec Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Benjamin J.; Forrester, Peter J.

    2011-02-01

    Motivated by the problem of domino tilings of the Aztec diamond, a weighted particle system is defined on N lines, with line j containing j particles. The particles are restricted to lattice points from 0 to N, and particles on successive lines are subject to an interlacing constraint. It is shown that this particle system is exactly solvable, to the extent that not only can the partition function be computed exactly, but so too can the marginal distributions. These results in turn are used to give new derivations within the particle picture of a number of known fundamental properties of the tiling problem, for example that the number of distinct configurations is 2 N( N+1)/2, and that there is a limit to the GUE minor process, which we show at the level of the joint PDFs. It is shown too that the study of tilings of the half Aztec diamond—not known from earlier literature—also leads to an interlaced particle system, now with successive lines 2 n-1 and 2 n ( n=1,…, N/2-1) having n particles. Its exact solution allows for an analysis of the half Aztec diamond tilings analogous to that given for the Aztec diamond tilings.

  15. Tiny radio is based on diamond effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-02-01

    You could soon be tuning into “Diamond FM”, thanks to a new radio receiver based on atomic-scale defects in diamond, unveiled by physicists at Harvard University in the US and Element Six in the UK.

  16. Diamond radiation detectors I. Detector properties for IIa diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-05-16

    The detector properties and carrier dynamics of type IIa diamonds are reasonably well understood. The trends in the electron and hole mobilities have been characterized as a function of temperature, impurity content, electric field and carrier density. The carrier lifetimes are coupled through the nitrogen impurity. This leaves us with typical samples with collection distances of 20 to 50 micrometers. The detailed dynamics of the carriers can be modeled using a rate equation analysis. Much progress has been made in understanding the detector properties of diamond, but continued progress has been limited by the geologic processes used to make the material, for example sample size and no synthesis control. CVD diamond promises to eliminate these restrictions.

  17. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  18. Perfect alignment and preferential orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers during chemical vapor deposition diamond growth on (111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michl, Julia; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Zaiser, Sebastian; Jakobi, Ingmar; Waldherr, Gerald; Dolde, Florian; Neumann, Philipp; Doherty, Marcus W.; Manson, Neil B.; Isoya, Junichi; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic diamond production is a key to the development of quantum metrology and quantum information applications of diamond. The major quantum sensor and qubit candidate in diamond is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center. This lattice defect comes in four different crystallographic orientations leading to an intrinsic inhomogeneity among NV centers, which is undesirable in some applications. Here, we report a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond growth technique on (111)-oriented substrates, which yields perfect alignment (94% ± 2%) of as-grown NV centers along a single crystallographic direction. In addition, clear evidence is found that the majority (74% ± 4%) of the aligned NV centers were formed by the nitrogen being first included in the (111) growth surface and then followed by the formation of a neighboring vacancy on top. The achieved homogeneity of the grown NV centers will tremendously benefit quantum information and metrology applications.

  19. Perfect alignment and preferential orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers during chemical vapor deposition diamond growth on (111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michl, Julia; Zaiser, Sebastian; Jakobi, Ingmar; Waldherr, Gerald; Dolde, Florian; Neumann, Philipp Wrachtrup, Jörg; Teraji, Tokuyuki; Doherty, Marcus W.; Manson, Neil B.; Isoya, Junichi

    2014-03-10

    Synthetic diamond production is a key to the development of quantum metrology and quantum information applications of diamond. The major quantum sensor and qubit candidate in diamond is the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center. This lattice defect comes in four different crystallographic orientations leading to an intrinsic inhomogeneity among NV centers, which is undesirable in some applications. Here, we report a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition diamond growth technique on (111)-oriented substrates, which yields perfect alignment (94% ± 2%) of as-grown NV centers along a single crystallographic direction. In addition, clear evidence is found that the majority (74% ± 4%) of the aligned NV centers were formed by the nitrogen being first included in the (111) growth surface and then followed by the formation of a neighboring vacancy on top. The achieved homogeneity of the grown NV centers will tremendously benefit quantum information and metrology applications.

  20. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  1. Organophosphonate biofunctionalization of diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Caterino, R; Csiki, R; Wiesinger, M; Sachsenhauser, M; Stutzmann, M; Garrido, J A; Cattani-Scholz, A; Speranza, Giorgio; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K

    2014-08-27

    The modification of the diamond surface with organic molecules is a crucial aspect to be considered for any bioapplication of this material. There is great interest in broadening the range of linker molecules that can be covalently bound to the diamond surface. In the case of protein immobilization, the hydropathicity of the surface has a major influence on the protein conformation and, thus, on the functionality of proteins immobilized at surfaces. For electrochemical applications, particular attention has to be devoted to avoid that the charge transfer between the electrode and the redox center embedded in the protein is hindered by a thick insulating linker layer. This paper reports on the grafting of 6-phosphonohexanoic acid on OH-terminated diamond surfaces, serving as linkers to tether electroactive proteins onto diamond surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the formation of a stable layer on the surface. The charge transfer between electroactive molecules and the substrate is studied by electrochemical characterization of the redox activity of aminomethylferrocene and cytochrome c covalently bound to the substrate through this linker. Our work demonstrates that OH-terminated diamond functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid is a suitable platform to interface redox-proteins, which are fundamental building blocks for many bioelectronics applications.

  2. Spin-lattice coupling in uranium dioxide probed by magnetostriction measurements at high magnetic fields (P08358-E001-PF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gofryk, K.; Jaime, M.

    2014-12-01

    Our preliminary magnetostriction measurements have already shown a strong interplay of lattice dynamic and magnetism in both antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic states, and give unambiguous evidence of strong spin- phonon coupling in uranium dioxide. Further studies are planned to address the puzzling behavior of UO2 in magnetic and paramagnetic states and details of the spin-phonon coupling.

  3. Critical space-time networks and geometric phase transitions from frustrated edge antiferromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Trugenberger, Carlo A

    2015-12-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time that self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension d(H)=4. The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (d(H)-d(s)), where d(s) is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean-field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  4. Effect of disorder in the frustrated Ising FCC antiferromagnet: phase diagram and stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, V. Thanh; Hoang, D. Tien; Diep, H. T.; Campbell, I. A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we study the phase transition in a face-centered-cubic antiferromagnet with Ising spins as a function of the concentration p of ferromagnetic bonds randomly introduced into the system. Such a model describes the spin-glass phase at strong bond disorder. Using the standard Monte Carlo simulation and the powerful Wang-Landau flat-histogram method, we carry out in this work intensive simulations over the whole range of p. We show that the first-order transition disappears with a tiny amount of ferromagnetic bonds, namely p 0.01, in agreement with theories and simulations on other 3D models. The antiferromagnetic long-range order is also destroyed with a very small p (≃5%). With increasing p, the system changes into a spin glass and then to a ferromagnetic phase when p > 0.65. The phase diagram in the space (Tc, p) shows an asymmetry, unlike the case of the ±J Ising spin glass on the simple cubic lattice. We calculate the relaxation time around the spin-glass transition temperature and we show that the spin autocorrelation follows a stretched exponential relaxation law where the factor b is equal to ≃1/3 at the transition as suggested by the percolation-based theory. This value is in agreement with experiments performed on various spin glasses and with Monte Carlo simulations on different SG models.

  5. Anomalous Curie response of an impurity in a quantum critical spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höglund, Kaj; Sandvik, Anders

    2007-03-01

    There is a disagreement concerning the low-temperature (T) magnetic susceptibility χ^zimp˜C/T of a spin-S impurity in a nearly quantum critical antiferromagnetic host. Field-theoretical work [1] predicted an anomalous Curie constant S^2/30 quantum Monte Carlo simulations in order to resolve the controversy. Our main result is for a vacancy in a quantum critical spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a bilayer lattice. In our susceptibility data for the S=1/2 impurity we observe a Curie constant C=0.262(2). Although the value falls outside the predicted range, it should correspond to an anomalous impurity response, as proposed in Ref. [1]. [1] S. Sachdev, C. Buragohain, and M. Vojta, Science 286, 2479 (1999); M. Vojta, C. Buragohain, and S. Sachdev, Phys. Rev. B 61, 15152 (2000). [2] O. P. Sushkov, Phys. Rev. B 62, 12135 (2000). [3] M. Troyer, Prog. Theor. Phys. Supp. 145, 326 (2002).

  6. Critical space-time networks and geometric phase transitions from frustrated edge antiferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time that self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension dH=4 . The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (dH-ds) , where ds is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean-field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  7. Evidence for a gapped spin-liquid ground state in a kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Mingxuan; Imai, Takahashi; Han, Tian -Heng; Lee, Young S.

    2015-11-06

    Here, the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet is a leading candidate in the search for a spin system with a quantum spin-liquid ground state. The nature of its ground state remains a matter of active debate. We conducted oxygen-17 single-crystal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of the spin-1/2 kagome lattice in herbertsmithite [ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2], which is known to exhibit a spinon continuum in the spin excitation spectrum. We demonstrated that the intrinsic local spin susceptibility χkagome, deduced from the oxygen-17 NMR frequency shift, asymptotes to zero below temperatures of 0.03J, where J ~ 200 kelvin is the copper-copper superexchange interaction. Combined with the magnetic field dependence of χkagome that we observed at low temperatures, these results imply that the kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet has a spin-liquid ground state with a finite gap.

  8. Antiferromagnetic instability in Sr3Ru2O7: stabilized and revealed by dilute Mn impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Muhammed; Bohnenbuck, B.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Cruz, E.; Wu, H.-H.; Tjeng, L. H.; Elfimov, I. S.; Hussain, Z.; Keimer, B.; Sawatzky, G. A.; Damascelli, A.

    2009-03-01

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and Resonant Elastic Soft X-ray Scattering (RESXS) studies have been performed on Mn-doped Sr3Ru2O7, both on the Ru and Mn L-edges, to investigate the origin of the metal insulator transition. Extensive simulations based on our experimental findings point toward an intrinsic antiferromagnetic instability in the parent Sr3Ru2O7 compound that is stabilized by the dilute Mn impurities. We show that the metal-insulator transition is a direct consequence of the antiferromagnetic order and we propose a phenomenological model that may be applicable also to metal-insulator transitions seen in other oxides. Moreover, a comparison of Ru and Mn L-edge data on 5% Mn doped system reveals that dilute Mn impurities are generating much more intense signal than Ru which is occupying 95% of the lattice sites. This suggests the embedding of dilute impurities as a powerful mean to probe weak and, possibly, spatially inhomogeneous order in solid-state systems. In collaboration with: Y. Yoshida (AIST), J. Geck, D.G. Hawthorn (UBC), M.W. Haverkort, Z. Hu, C. Sch"ußler-Langeheine (Cologne), R. Mathieu, Y. Tokura, S. Satow, H. Takagi (Tokyo), J.D. Denlinger (ALS).

  9. Electrically tunable transport in antiferromagnetic Sr3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jianshi-S.; Goodenough, John B.; Tsoi, Maxim

    Recently we demonstrated experimentally the existence of interconnections between magnetic state and transport currents in antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulator Sr2IrO4. We found a very large anisotropic magnetoresistance and demonstrated a reversible resistive switching driven by high-density currents/high electric fields. These results support the feasibility of AFM spintronics, where antiferromagnets are used in place of ferromagnets, however a low Néel temperature of this material (240 K) questions any practical applications. Here we present a comparative electrical transport study of its sister compound Sr2IrO4 which has a higher transition temperature (285 K). Similar to the case of Sr2IrO4, we find a continuous reduction in the resistivity of Sr3Ir2O7 as a function of increasing electrical bias and abrupt reversible changes above a threshold bias current. We explain these results by a reduction of activation energy associated with a field-driven lattice distortion. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162, and DMR-1122603.

  10. Crucial role of interlayer distance for antiferromagnet-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo-Yao; Lin, Po-Han; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Shih, Chun-Wei; Lee, Meng-Ju; Huang, Chun-Wei; Jih, Nae-Yeou; Cheng, Pei-Yu; Wei, Der-Hsin

    2015-12-01

    Antiferromagnetic (AFM) thin films were recently proposed to be an alternative to conventional materials for achieving perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in ferromagnetic thin films, because AFM thin films exhibit an advantage of flexible control. Here, we report that antiferromagnet-induced PMA is highly sensitive to interfacial moments of AFM thin films as well as the magnetic interaction of such moments with volume moments, determined according to the vertical interlayer distance. Magnetic hysteresis loops and x-ray magnetic domain imaging revealed the establishment of perpendicular magnetization on face-centered tetragonal (fct)-like Mn/Co/Ni films when covered with monolayered Mn films. A cover of Mn films that exhibit contracted fct- [vertical-to-in-plane lattice constant ratio (c /a )=0.95 ] and expanded fct-like (c /a =1.05 ) structures at different thickness levels induced in-plane magnetic anisotropy and PMA in Co/Ni films, respectively, confirming that the interlayer distance is a crucial parameter for establishing perpendicular magnetization.

  11. Lattice parameters guide superconductivity in iron-arsenides.

    PubMed

    Konzen, Lance M N; Sefat, Athena S

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of superconducting materials has led to their use in technological marvels such as magnetic-field sensors in MRI machines, powerful research magnets, short transmission cables, and high-speed trains. Despite such applications, the uses of superconductors are not widespread because they function much below room-temperature, hence the costly cooling. Since the discovery of Cu- and Fe-based high-temperature superconductors (HTS), much intense effort has tried to explain and understand the superconducting phenomenon. While no exact explanations are given, several trends are reported in relation to the materials basis in magnetism and spin excitations. In fact, most HTS have antiferromagnetic undoped 'parent' materials that undergo a superconducting transition upon small chemical substitutions in them. As it is currently unclear which 'dopants' can favor superconductivity, this manuscript investigates crystal structure changes upon chemical substitutions, to find clues in lattice parameters for the superconducting occurrence. We review the chemical substitution effects on the crystal lattice of iron-arsenide-based crystals (2008 to present). We note that (a) HTS compounds have nearly tetragonal structures with a-lattice parameter close to 4 Å, and (b) superconductivity can depend strongly on the c-lattice parameter changes with chemical substitution. For example, a decrease in c-lattice parameter is required to induce 'in-plane' superconductivity. The review of lattice parameter trends in iron-arsenides presented here should guide synthesis of new materials and provoke theoretical input, giving clues for HTS.

  12. Lattice parameters guide superconductivity in iron-arsenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konzen, Lance M. N.; Sefat, Athena S.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of superconducting materials has led to their use in technological marvels such as magnetic-field sensors in MRI machines, powerful research magnets, short transmission cables, and high-speed trains. Despite such applications, the uses of superconductors are not widespread because they function much below room-temperature, hence the costly cooling. Since the discovery of Cu- and Fe-based high-temperature superconductors (HTS), much intense effort has tried to explain and understand the superconducting phenomenon. While no exact explanations are given, several trends are reported in relation to the materials basis in magnetism and spin excitations. In fact, most HTS have antiferromagnetic undoped ‘parent’ materials that undergo a superconducting transition upon small chemical substitutions in them. As it is currently unclear which ‘dopants’ can favor superconductivity, this manuscript investigates crystal structure changes upon chemical substitutions, to find clues in lattice parameters for the superconducting occurrence. We review the chemical substitution effects on the crystal lattice of iron-arsenide-based crystals (2008 to present). We note that (a) HTS compounds have nearly tetragonal structures with a-lattice parameter close to 4 Å, and (b) superconductivity can depend strongly on the c-lattice parameter changes with chemical substitution. For example, a decrease in c-lattice parameter is required to induce ‘in-plane’ superconductivity. The review of lattice parameter trends in iron-arsenides presented here should guide synthesis of new materials and provoke theoretical input, giving clues for HTS.

  13. Kapitza problem for the magnetic moments of synthetic antiferromagnetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhezherya, Yu. I.; Demishev, K. O.; Korenivskii, V. N.

    2012-08-15

    The dynamics of magnetization in synthetic antiferromagnetic systems with the magnetic dipole coupling in a rapidly oscillating field has been examined. It has been revealed that the system can behave similar to the Kapitza pendulum. It has been shown that an alternating magnetic field can be efficiently used to control the magnetic state of a cell of a synthetic antiferromagnet. Analytical relations have been obtained between the parameters of such an antiferromagnet and an external magnetic field at which certain quasistationary states are implemented.

  14. Piezo-antiferromagnetic effect of sawtooth-like graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shangqian; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Yuchun; Lu, Wengang; Liang, Wenjie; Wang, Enge

    2014-05-01

    A type of sawtooth-like graphene nanoribbon (SGNR) with piezo-antiferromagnetic effect is studied numerically. The ground state of the studied SGNR changes from nonmagnetic state to antiferromagnetic state with uniaxial strain. The changes of the spin-charge distributions during the stretching are investigated. The Hubbard model reveals that the hopping integrals between the π-orbitals of the carbon atoms are responsible to the piezo-antiferromagnetic effect. The study sheds light on the application of graphene-based structures to nanosensors and spintronic devices.

  15. Microscopic and macroscopic signatures of antiferromagnetic domain walls.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, R; Rosenbaum, T F; Isaacs, E D; Shpyrko, O G; Evans, P G; Aeppli, G; Cai, Z

    2007-03-16

    Magnetotransport measurements on small single crystals of Cr, the elemental antiferromagnet, reveal the hysteretic thermodynamics of the domain structure. The temperature dependence of the transport coefficients is directly correlated with the real-space evolution of the domain configuration as recorded by x-ray microprobe imaging, revealing the effect of antiferromagnetic domain walls on electron transport. A single antiferromagnetic domain wall interface resistance is deduced to be of order 5 x 10(-5) mu Omega cm(2) at a temperature of 100 K.

  16. Use of Diamond as an Optical Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    New polishing methods hpve yielded smooth surfaces in reasonable polishing times. Recent research hclds promise for large optics made from single... forced to the surface , precipitating on the surface as a diamond layer. A halogen-assisted CVD method has recently been discovered for producing...diamond [24]; however, this research is in an early stage and has not yet resulted in good quality diamond films. Optical Properties of CVD Diamond. Many

  17. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  18. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  19. Directly probing spin dynamics in insulating antiferromagnets using ultrashort terahertz pulses

    DOE PAGES

    Bowlan, Pamela Renee; Trugman, Stuart Alan; Wang, X.; ...

    2016-11-22

    We investigate spin dynamics in the antiferromagnetic (AFM) multiferroic TbMnO3 using opticalpump, terahertz (THz)-probe spectroscopy. Photoexcitation results in a broadband THz transmission change, with an onset time of 25 ps at 6 K that becomes faster at higher temperatures. We attribute this time constant to spin-lattice thermalization. The excellent agreement between our measurements and previous ultrafast resonant x-ray diffraction measurements on the same material confirms that our THz pulse directly probes spin order. We suggest that this could be the case in general for insulating AFM materials, if the origin of the static absorption in the THz spectral range ismore » magnetic.« less

  20. Magnetic soft modes in the distorted triangular antiferromagnet -CaCr2O4

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Sandor; Lake, Bella; Hradil, Klaudia; Rule, K; Stone, Matthew B; Islam, A. T. M. N.

    2012-01-01

    -CaCr2O4 is a spin-3/2, distorted triangular lattice antiferromagnet with a simple 120 spin structure that masks the complex pattern of exchange interactions. The magnetic excitation spectrum has been measured using inelastic neutron scattering on powder and single crystal samples. It reveals unusual low energy modes which can be explained by linear spin-wave theory assuming nearest and next-nearest neighbor interactions. The mode softening is due to the next-nearest neighbor interactions and indicates a new magnetic phase nearby as revealed by the phase diagram constructed for this system. The extracted direct exchange interactions correlate well with the Cr3+{Cr3+ distances and are in agreement with other chromium oxide delafossite compounds.