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Sample records for diamond tool wear

  1. Tool wear of a single-crystal diamond tool in nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, Masahiko; Nakajima, Satoshi; Terano, Motoki

    2015-12-01

    Tool wear characteristics of a diamond tool in ductile mode machining are presented in this paper. Nano-groove machining of a quartz glass plate was conducted to examine the tool wear rate of a single-crystal diamond tool. Effects of lubrication on the tool wear rate were also evaluated. A numerical simulation technique was developed to evaluate the tool temperature and normal stress acting on the wear surface. From the simulation results it was found that the tool temperature does not increase during the machining experiment. It is also demonstrated that tool wear is attributed to the abrasive wear mechanism, but the effect of the adhesion wear mechanism is minor in nano-groove machining. It is found that the tool wear rate is reduced by using water or kerosene as a lubricant.

  2. Diamond Smoothing Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Diamond smoothing tools have been proposed for use in conjunction with diamond cutting tools that are used in many finish-machining operations. Diamond machining (including finishing) is often used, for example, in fabrication of precise metal mirrors. A diamond smoothing tool according to the proposal would have a smooth spherical surface. For a given finish machining operation, the smoothing tool would be mounted next to the cutting tool. The smoothing tool would slide on the machined surface left behind by the cutting tool, plastically deforming the surface material and thereby reducing the roughness of the surface, closing microcracks and otherwise generally reducing or eliminating microscopic surface and subsurface defects, and increasing the microhardness of the surface layer. It has been estimated that if smoothing tools of this type were used in conjunction with cutting tools on sufficiently precise lathes, it would be possible to reduce the roughness of machined surfaces to as little as 3 nm. A tool according to the proposal would consist of a smoothing insert in a metal holder. The smoothing insert would be made from a diamond/metal functionally graded composite rod preform, which, in turn, would be made by sintering together a bulk single-crystal or polycrystalline diamond, a diamond powder, and a metallic alloy at high pressure. To form the spherical smoothing tip, the diamond end of the preform would be subjected to flat grinding, conical grinding, spherical grinding using diamond wheels, and finally spherical polishing and/or buffing using diamond powders. If the diamond were a single crystal, then it would be crystallographically oriented, relative to the machining motion, to minimize its wear and maximize its hardness. Spherically polished diamonds could also be useful for purposes other than smoothing in finish machining: They would likely also be suitable for use as heat-resistant, wear-resistant, unlubricated sliding-fit bearing inserts.

  3. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, Ralph L.; Stewart, Delbert D.; Evans, Christopher J.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond.

  4. Diamond tool machining of materials which react with diamond

    DOEpatents

    Lundin, R.L.; Stewart, D.D.; Evans, C.J.

    1992-04-14

    An apparatus is described for the diamond machining of materials which detrimentally react with diamond cutting tools in which the cutting tool and the workpiece are chilled to very low temperatures. This chilling halts or retards the chemical reaction between the workpiece and the diamond cutting tool so that wear rates of the diamond tool on previously detrimental materials are comparable with the diamond turning of materials which do not react with diamond. 1 figs.

  5. On the performances and wear of WC-diamond like carbon coated tools in drilling of CFRP/Titanium stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccarusso, L.; Durante, M.; Impero, F.; Minutolo, F. Memola Capece; Scherillo, F.; Squillace, A.

    2016-10-01

    The use of hybrid structures made of CFRP and titanium alloys is growing more and more in the last years in the aerospace industry due to the high strength to weight ratio. Because of their very different characteristics, the mechanical fastening represent the most effective joining technique for these materials. As a consequence, drilling process plays a key role in the assembly. The one shot drilling, i.e. the contemporary drilling of the stack of the two materials, seems to be the best option both in terms of time saving and assembly accuracy. Nevertheless, due to the considerable different machinability of fiber reinforced plastics and metallic materials, the one shot drilling is a critical process both for the holes quality and for the tools wear. This research was carried out to study the effectiveness of new generation tools in the drilling of CFRP/Titanium stacks. The tools are made of sintered grains of tungsten carbide (WC) in a binder of cobalt and coated with Diamond like carbon (DLC), and are characterized by a patented geometry; they mainly differ in parent WC grain size and binder percentage. Both the cutting forces and the wear phenomena were accurately investigated and the results were analyzed as a function of number of holes and their quality. The results show a clear increase of the cutting forces with the number of holes for all the used drilling tools. Moreover, abrasive wear phenomena that affect initially the tools coating layer were observed.

  6. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond.

    PubMed

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond's widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp(3)-sp(2) order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  7. Diamond Sheet: A new diamond tool material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Diamond sheet is termed a diamond tool material because it is not a cutting tool, but rather a new material from which a variety of different tools may be fabricated. In appearance and properties, it resembles a sheet of copper alloy with diamond abrasive dispersed throughout it. It is capable of being cut, formed, and joined by conventional methods, and subsequently used for cutting as a metal bonded diamond tool. Diamond sheet is normally made with industrial diamond as the abrasive material. The metal matrix in diamond sheet is a medium hard copper alloy which has performed well in most applications. This alloy has the capability of being made harder or softer if specific cutting conditions require it. Other alloys have also been used including a precipitation hardened aluminum alloy with very free cutting characteristics. The material is suitable for use in a variety of cutting, surfacing, and ring type tools, as well as in such mundane items as files and sandpaper. It can also be used as a bearing surface (diamond to diamond) and in wear resistant surfaces.

  8. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond’s widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  9. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machine optical quality finishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  10. Method for machining steel with diamond tools

    DOEpatents

    Casstevens, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method for machining optical quality inishes and contour accuracies of workpieces of carbon-containing metals such as steel with diamond tooling. The wear rate of the diamond tooling is significantly reduced by saturating the atmosphere at the interface of the workpiece and the diamond tool with a gaseous hydrocarbon during the machining operation. The presence of the gaseous hydrocarbon effectively eliminates the deterioration of the diamond tool by inhibiting or preventing the conversion of the diamond carbon to graphite carbon at the point of contact between the cutting tool and the workpiece.

  11. An empirical survey on the influence of machining parameters on tool wear in diamond turning of large single crystal silicon optics

    SciTech Connect

    Blaedel, K L; Carr, J W; Davis, P J; Goodman, W; Haack, J K; Krulewich, D; McClellan, M; Syn, C K; Zimmermann, M.

    1999-07-01

    The research described in this paper is a continuation of the collaborative efforts by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Schafer Corporation and TRW to develop a process for single point diamond turning (SPDT) of large single crystal silicon (SCSi) optical substrates on the Large Optic Diamond Turning Machine (LODTM). The principal challenge to obtaining long track lengths in SCSi has been to identify a set of machining parameters which yield a process that provides both low and predictable tool wear. Identifying such a process for SCSi has proven to be a formidable task because multiple crystallographic orientations with a range of hardness values are encountered when machining conical and annular optical substrates. The LODTM cutting program can compensate for tool wear if it is predictable. However, if the tool wear is not predictable then the figured area of the optical substrate may have unacceptably high error that can not be removed by post-polishing. The emphasis of this survey was limited to elucidating the influence of cutting parameters on the tool wear. We present two preliminary models that can be used to predict tool wear over the parameter space investigated. During the past two and one-half years a series of three evolutionary investigations were performed. The first investigation, the Parameter Assessment Study (PAS), was designed to survey fundamental machining parameters and assess their influence on tool wear [1]. The results of the PAS were used as a point-of-departure for designing the second investigation, the Parameter Selection Study (PSS). The goal of the PSS was to explore the trends identified in the PAS in more detail, to determine if the experimental results obtained in the PAS could be repeated on a different diamond turning machine (DTM), and to select a more optimal set of machining parameters that could be used in subsequent investigations such as the Fluid Down-Select Study (FDS). The goal of the FDS was to compare

  12. Drilling of optical glass with electroplated diamond tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A. J.; Luan, C. G.; Yu, A. B.

    2010-10-01

    K9 optical glass drilling experiments were carried out. Bright nickel electroplated diamond tools with small slots and under heat treatment in different temperature were fabricated. Scan electro microscope was applied to analyze the wear of electroplated diamond tool. The material removal rate and grinding ratio were calculated. Machining quality was observed. Bond coating hardness was measured. The experimental results show that coolant is needed for the drilling processes of optical glasses. Heat treatment temperature of diamond tool has influence on wearability of diamond tool and grinding ratio. There were two wear types of electroplated diamond tool, diamond grit wear and bond wear. With the machining processes, wear of diamond grits included fracture, blunt and pull-out, and electroplated bond was gradually worn out. High material removal rates could be obtained by using diamond tool with suitable slot numbers. Bright nickel coating bond presents smallest grains and has better mechanical properties. Bright nickel electroplated diamond tool with slot structure and heat treatment under 200°C was suitable for optical glass drilling.

  13. Diamond-Fluoroplastic Composites for Abrasive Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrianova, O. A.; Kirillin, A. D.; Chersky, I. N.

    2001-07-01

    Composite materials based on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and natural technical diamond powders from Yakutia diamond deposits are developed. It is shown that the compositions based on PTFE and a technical diamond powder at a content of up to 60 wt.%, due to their good physicomechanical characteristics, low friction coefficient, and good wetting of diamond particles by polymer, make is possible to create abrasive tools for polishing and grinding hard metals and semiprecious and precious stones with high serviceability and operational life combined with a considerable increase in the quality of treated surfaces and operational stability of the tools. It is found that PTFE, being a more elastic and softer matrix than the traditional ones, exhibits a self-sharpening effect of diamond grains upon grinding hard surfaces, when the grains go deep into the elastic matrix, the matrix wears out, and the working part of the tool becomes enriched with the diamond powder. These conclusions are confirmed by electron microscopic investigations. It is shown that the introduction of ultradisperse fillings (up to 2 wt.%) into such compositions allows us to improve the characteristics of abrasive tools considerably, especially for grinding hard semiprecious stones. The physicomechanical and frictional characteristics of the compositions and specific examples of their application in the jewelry industry and in stone working are discussed.

  14. Novel diamond-coated tools for dental drilling applications.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W; Woodwards, R

    2007-01-01

    The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life in orthodontic applications. WC-Co tools containing 6% Co metal and 94% WC substrate with an average grain size of 1 - 3 microm were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates it is necessary to etch cobalt from the surface and prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Alternatively, a titanium nitride (TiN) interlayer can be used prior to diamond deposition. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films to TiN and etched WC substrates. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro Raman spectroscopy. The performances of diamond-coated WC-Co tools, uncoated WC-Co tools, and diamond embedded (sintered) tools have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human tooth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic tooth materials. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the tools when machining biomedical materials such as those described above. It is shown that using an interlayer such as TiN prior to diamond deposition provides the best surface preparation for producing dental tools.

  15. Analysis of the influence of tool dynamics in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, S.C.; Luttrell, D.E.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    This report describes the progress in defining the role of machine and interface dynamics on the surface finish in diamond turning. It contains a review of literature from conventional and diamond machining processes relating tool dynamics, material interactions and tool wear to surface finish. Data from experimental measurements of tool/work piece interface dynamics are presented as well as machine dynamics for the DTM at the Center.

  16. Friction and wear of plasma-deposited diamond films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan; Barnes, Paul N.; Jackson, Howard E.

    1993-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments in humid air and in dry nitrogen and unidirectional sliding friction experiments in ultrahigh vacuum were conducted with a natural diamond pin in contact with microwave-plasma-deposited diamond films. Diamond films with a surface roughness (R rms) ranging from 15 to 160 nm were produced by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In humid air and in dry nitrogen, abrasion occurred when the diamond pin made grooves in the surfaces of diamond films, and thus the initial coefficients of friction increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. In vacuum the friction for diamond films contacting a diamond pin arose primarily from adhesion between the sliding surfaces. In these cases, the initial and equilibrium coefficients of friction were independent of the initial surface roughness of the diamond films. The equilibrium coefficients of friction were 0.02 to 0.04 in humid air and in dry nitrogen, but 1.5 to 1.8 in vacuum. The wear factor of the diamond films depended on the initial surface roughness, regardless of environment; it increased with increasing initial surface roughness. The wear factors were considerably higher in vacuum than in humid air and in dry nitrogen.

  17. Diamond-coated cutting tools for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, M. J.; Hyde, L. J.; Ahmed, W.; Sein, H.; Flaxman, R. P.

    2004-08-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high-hardness, low-friction coefficient; excellent wear resistance, and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented, tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years as a method to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC substrate, with an average grain size of 1 3 µm, were used in this study. To improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates, it is necessary to etch away the surface Co and prepare the surface for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD), with a modified vertical filament arrangement, has been used for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond-coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond-embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic teeth. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining biomedical materials such as those just described.

  18. Diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission --wheel wear mechanisms and the effects of process variables

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jianshe; Dornfeld, D.; Syoji, Katsuo

    1996-12-31

    The wear of diamond wheels has significant influence on the surface finish of ground ceramics and the resulting subsurface fracture damage. For optimization and control of the grinding process it is necessary to monitor the wear states of the grinding wheels. A project on diamond wheel wear sensing with acoustic emission was started recently in the Laboratory of Manufacturing Automation at the University of California at Berkeley. The main aims of the project are: (a) to identify the possible wheel wear patterns at different combinations of bond materials, grits, and grinding conditions; (b) to develop suitable AE signal processing methods to extract the AE features to represent the wheel wear characteristics, and establish a strategy for using AE for in-process monitoring of diamond wheel wear in grinding of ceramics. This paper presents the results of part of the project. It mainly focuses on the diamond wheel wear mechanisms, the effects of process variables including basic wheel elements and grinding parameters, and the relationship with AErms and AE frequency content.

  19. Cylindrical Wire Electrical Discharge Machining of Metal Bond Diamond Wheels- Part II: Wheel Wear Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-22

    The use of stereo scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to investigate the wear mechanism of the wire EDM true metal bond diamond wheel for ceramic grinding is presented. On the grinding wheel, a wedge-shape removal part was machined to enable the examination and measurement of the worn wheel surfaces using the stereo SEM. The stereo SEM was calibrated by comparing results of depth profile of a wear groove with the profilometer measurements. On the surface of the grinding wheel after wire EDM truing and before grinding, the diamond protruding heights were measured in the level of 35 {micro}m, comparing to the 54 {micro}m average size of the diamond in the grinding wheel. The gap between the EDM wire and rotating grinding wheel is estimated to be about 35 to 40 {micro}m. This observation indicates that, during the wire EDM, electrical sparks occur between the metal bond and EDM wire, which leaves the diamond protruding in the gap between the wire and wheel. The protruding diamond is immediately fractured at the start of the grinding process, even under a light grinding condition. After heavy grinding, the grinding wheel surface and the diamond protrusion heights are also investigated using the stereo SEM. The height of diamond protrusion was estimated in the 5 to 15 {micro}m range. This study has demonstrated the use of stereo SEM as a metrology tool to study the grinding wheel surface.

  20. Modeling and Tool Wear in Routing of CFRP

    SciTech Connect

    Iliescu, D.; Fernandez, A.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Lopez de Lacalle, L. N.

    2011-01-17

    This paper presents the prediction and evaluation of feed force in routing of carbon composite material. In order to extend tool life and improve quality of the machined surface, a better understanding of uncoated and coated tool behaviors is required. This work describes (1) the optimization of the geometry of multiple teeth tools minimizing the tool wear and the feed force, (2) the optimization of tool coating and (3) the development of a phenomenological model between the feed force, the routing parameters and the tool wear. The experimental results indicate that the feed rate, the cutting speed and the tool wear are the most significant factors affecting the feed force. In the case of multiple teeth tools, a particular geometry with 14 teeth right helix right cut and 11 teeth left helix right cut gives the best results. A thick AlTiN coating or a diamond coating can dramatically improve the tool life while minimizing the axial force, roughness and delamination. A wear model has then been developed based on an abrasive behavior of the tool. The model links the feed rate to the tool geometry parameters (tool diameter), to the process parameters (feed rate, cutting speed and depth of cut) and to the wear. The model presented has been verified by experimental tests.

  1. Effects of pretreatment on the performance of diamond-coated cemented carbide cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Qing; Wang, S. G.; Yoon, S. F.; Ahn, J.; Zhao, Biaoqin; Tang, W. Z.; Miao, J. Q.; Lu, F. X.

    2003-11-01

    We studied the cutting performance of diamond-coated cemented carbide cutting tools pretreated using acid etching, Murakami reagent etching, interlayer addition, and boronization techniques. The Rockwell indentation test indicates that the best adhesion is obtained from the diamond-coated cutting tool pretreated using boronization by forming a boronized cobalt compound layer composed of CoW2B2, CoWB, and CoB. The end-milling test shows that this sample exhibits the longest lifetime among diamond-coated cutting tools, 26-times longer than that of the uncoated cutting tool. The wearing mechanism of the cutting tools used is also discussed. During the milling period, the failure of the diamond-coated tool pretreated by boronization was dominated by how the diamond grains were gradually removed from the diamond coating by the workpiece scraps, instead of the peeling off of the diamond coating. This also reveals that the diamond coating exhibits good adhesion and cutting performance.

  2. Wear mechanisms for polycrystalline-diamond compacts as utilized for drilling in geothermal environments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, L.E. Jr.; Sogoian, G.C.

    1983-05-01

    The work, which was performed in the period from 12/6/79 to 9/30/81 included: (1) rock cutting experiments with single point polycrystalline sintered diamond compact (PDC) cutters to quantitatively determine cutter wear rates and identify wear modes, (2) PDC rock cutting experiments to measure temperatures developed and examine the effects of tool wear, cutting parameters and coolant flow rates on temperature generation, (3) assisting in performing full scale laboratory drilling experiments with PDC bits, using preheated air to simulate geothermal drilling conditions, and in analyzing and reporting the experimental results, and (4) acting in a consulting role with the purpose of establishing design specifications for geothermal hard matrix PDC bits to be procured by Sandia Laboratories for test purposes.

  3. A wear simulation study of nanostructured CVD diamond-on-diamond articulation involving concave/convex mating surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Paul A.; Thompson, Raymond G.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    Using microwave-plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD), a 3-micron thick nanostructured-diamond (NSD) layer was deposited onto polished, convex and concave components that were machined from Ti-6Al-4V alloy. These components had the same radius of curvature, 25.4mm. Wear testing of the surfaces was performed by rotating articulation of the diamond-deposited surfaces (diamond-on-diamond) with a load of 225N for a total of 5 million cycles in bovine serum resulting in polishing of the diamond surface and formation of very shallow, linear wear grooves of less than 50nm depth. The two diamond surfaces remained adhered to the components and polished each other to an average surface roughness that was reduced by as much as a factor of 80 for the most polished region located at the center of the condyle. Imaging of the surfaces showed that the initial wearing-in phase of diamond was only beginning at the end of the 5 million cycles. Atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and surface profilometry were used to characterize the surfaces and verify that the diamond remained intact and uniform over the surface, thereby protecting the underlying metal. These wear simulation results show that diamond deposition on Ti alloy has potential application for joint replacement devices with improved longevity over existing devices made of cobalt chrome and ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). PMID:26989457

  4. Environmental effects on friction and wear of diamond and diamondlike carbon coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Garscadden, Alan

    1992-01-01

    Reciprocating sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural diamond flat, diamond film, and low and high density diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in contact with pin specimens of natural diamond and silicon nitride (Si3N4) both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. The results indicated that for natural diamond pin contacts the diamond films and the natural diamond flat were not susceptible to moisture but that moisture could increase both the coefficient of friction and the wear factors of the DLC films. The coefficients of friction and wear factors of the diamond films were generally similar to those of the natural diamond flat both in humid air and dry air nitrogen. In dry nitrogen the coefficients of friction of the high density DLC films in contact with pin specimens of both diamond and Si3N4 were generally low (about 0.02) and similar to those of the natural diamond flat and the diamond films. The wear factors of the materials in contact with both natural diamond and Si3N4 were generally in the ascending order of natural diamond flat, diamond film, high density DLC film, and low density DLC film. The moisture in the environment increased the coefficients of friction for Si3N4 pins in contact with all the materials. This increase in friction is due to the silicon oxide film produced on the surface of Si3N4 pins in humid air.

  5. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricating Diamond Films and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    The tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films vary with the environment, possessing a Jekyll-and-Hyde character. CVD diamond has low coefficient of friction and high wear resistance in air but high coefficient of friction and low wear resistance in vacuum. Improving the tribological functionality of materials (such as achieving low friction and good wear resistance) was an aim of this investigation. Three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of CVD diamond have shown that its friction and wear are significantly reduced in ultrahigh vacuum. The main criteria for judging whether diamond films are an effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating material were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which must be less than 0.1 and on the order of 10(exp 6) cu mm/N(dot)m, respectively. In the first study the presence of a thin film (less than 1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon (hydrogenated carbon, also called diamondlike carbon or DLC) on CVD diamond greatly decreased the coefficient of friction and the wear rate. Therefore, a thin DLC film on CVD diamond can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating in ultrahigh vacuum. In the second study the presence of an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by ion implantation significantly reduced the coefficient of friction and the wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. Therefore, such surface layers are acceptable for effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant applications of CVD diamond. In the third study CVD diamond in contact with cubic boron nitride exhibited low coefficient of friction in ultra high vacuum. Therefore, this materials combination can provide an effective self-lubricating, wear-resistant couple in ultrahigh vacuum.

  6. Friction and Wear Properties of As-deposited and Carbon Ion-implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1994-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 ke V ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2310(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40 percent relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and were properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to 10(exp -8)mm(exp 3)/N-m) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4)mm(exp 3/N-m) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implanation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, nondiamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine- and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7)mm(exp 3/N-m). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the nondiamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6)mm(exp 3)/N-m. Thus, the carbon ion-implanted, fine

  7. Friction and Wear Properties of As-Deposited and Carbon Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    Recent work on the friction and wear properties of as-deposited and carbon ion-implanted diamond films was reviewed. Diamond films were produced by the microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Diamond films with various grain sizes and surface roughnesses were implanted with carbon ions at 60 keV ion energy, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions per cm(exp 2). Various analytical techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, proton recoil analysis, Rutherford backscattering, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, were utilized to characterize the diamond films. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with a polished natural diamond pin in contact with diamond films in the three environments: humid air (40% relative humidity), dry nitrogen (less than 1 percent relative humidity), and ultrahigh vacuum (10(exp -7) Pa). The CVD diamond films indeed have friction and wear properties similar to those of natural diamond in the three environments. The as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films can be effectively used as self-lubricating, wear-resistant coatings that have low coefficients of friction (0.02 to 0.04) and low wear rates (10(exp -7) to lO(exp -8) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in both humid air and dry nitrogen. However, they have high coefficients of friction (1.5 to 1.7) and a high wear rate (10(exp -4) mm(exp 7) N(exp -1) m(exp -1)) in ultrahigh vacuum. The carbon ion implantation produced a thin surficial layer (less than 0.1 micron thick) of amorphous, non-diamond carbon on the diamond films. In humid air and dry nitrogen, the ion-implanted, fine and coarse-grain diamond films have a low coefficient of friction (around 0.1) and a low wear rate (10(exp -7) mm(exp 3) N(exp -1) m(exp-1)). Even in ultrahigh vacuum, the presence of the non-diamond carbon layer reduced the coefficient of friction of fine-grain diamond films to 0.1 or lower and the wear rate to 10(exp -6

  8. Diamond machine tool face lapping machine

    DOEpatents

    Yetter, H.H.

    1985-05-06

    An apparatus for shaping, sharpening and polishing diamond-tipped single-point machine tools. The isolation of a rotating grinding wheel from its driving apparatus using an air bearing and causing the tool to be shaped, polished or sharpened to be moved across the surface of the grinding wheel so that it does not remain at one radius for more than a single rotation of the grinding wheel has been found to readily result in machine tools of a quality which can only be obtained by the most tedious and costly processing procedures, and previously unattainable by simple lapping techniques.

  9. Friction and wear performance of boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinchang; Wang, Liang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have attracted more attentions due to their excellent mechanical properties. Whereas as-fabricated traditional diamond films in the previous studies don't have enough adhesion or surface smoothness, which seriously impact their friction and wear performance, and thus limit their applications under extremely harsh conditions. A boron doped, undoped microcrystalline and fine grained composite diamond (BD-UM-FGCD) film is fabricated by a three-step method adopting hot filament CVD (HFCVD) method in the present study, presenting outstanding comprehensive performance, including the good adhesion between the substrate and the underlying boron doped diamond (BDD) layer, the extremely high hardness of the middle undoped microcrystalline diamond (UMCD) layer, as well as the low surface roughness and favorable polished convenience of the surface fine grained diamond (FGD) layer. The friction and wear behavior of this composite film sliding against low-carbon steel and silicon nitride balls are studied on a ball-on-plate rotational friction tester. Besides, its wear rate is further evaluated under a severer condition using an inner-hole polishing apparatus, with low-carbon steel wire as the counterpart. The test results show that the BD-UM-FGCD film performs very small friction coefficient and great friction behavior owing to its high surface smoothness, and meanwhile it also has excellent wear resistance because of the relatively high hardness of the surface FGD film and the extremely high hardness of the middle UMCD film. Moreover, under the industrial conditions for producing low-carbon steel wires, this composite film can sufficiently prolong the working lifetime of the drawing dies and improve their application effects. This research develops a novel composite diamond films owning great comprehensive properties, which have great potentials as protecting coatings on working surfaces of the wear-resistant and anti

  10. Origin of Ultralow Friction and Wear in Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-11

    flats and Si3N4 spheres [13]. Substrates were ultrasonically pre- treated as in [10] except with functionalized nanodiamond powder (4 nm diameter...5.0%. [24] K. Miyoshi, in Proceedings of the Applied Diamond Conference 1995. Applications of Diamond Films and Related Materials: Third International

  11. Performance evaluation of bound diamond ring tools

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1995-07-14

    LLNL is collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (COM) and the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association (APOMA) to optimize bound diamond ring tools for the spherical generation of high quality optical surfaces. An important element of this work is establishing an experimentally-verified link between tooling properties and workpiece quality indicators such as roughness, subsurface damage and removal rate. In this paper, we report on a standardized methodology for assessing ring tool performance and its preliminary application to a set of commercially-available wheels. Our goals are to (1) assist optics manufacturers (users of the ring tools) in evaluating tools and in assessing their applicability for a given operation, and (2) provide performance feedback to wheel manufacturers to help optimize tooling for the optics industry. Our paper includes measurements of wheel performance for three 2-4 micron diamond bronze-bond wheels that were supplied by different manufacturers to nominally- identical specifications. Preliminary data suggests that the difference in performance levels among the wheels were small.

  12. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricant Diamond Films and Coatings. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films and coatings toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. Friction mechanisms and solid lubrication mechanisms of CVD diamond are stated. Effects of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon on CVD diamond, an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by carbon and nitrogen ion implantation, and a materials combination of cubic boron nitride and CVD diamond on the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum are described. How surface modification and the selected materials couple improved the tribological functionality of coatings, giving low coefficient of friction and good wear resistance, is explained.

  13. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  14. A comparative study on wear behavior of TiN and diamond coated WC-Co substrates against hypereutectic Al-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, G. V.; Chandran, Maneesh; Bhattacharya, S. S.; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Kamaraj, M.

    2012-11-01

    The demand for better tools for machining hypereutectic aluminum-silicon (Al-Si) alloys are increasing day by day since the extensive use of these alloys in internal combustion engines. In addition to the lifetime of the machining tool, surface finish of the machined piece is also equally important, as it directly affects the performance of the engine. In this paper, we compared the wear behavior of bare tungsten carbide (WC-Co), titanium nitride (TiN) coated WC-Co and diamond coated WC-Co substrates against Al-Si alloys using pin-on-disc method. Both TiN and diamond coatings were done using chemical vapor deposition technique. Diamond coated WC-Co substrates show one order less wear loss compared to the bare WC-Co substrates. Instead of weight loss, a weight gain was observed for the TiN coated WC-Co substrates. Average coefficient of friction was lowest for the diamond coated WC-Co substrates due to the different wear behavior of diamond coated tribological system, which is explained in detail.

  15. Investigation of diamond-impregnated drill bit wear while drilling under Earth and Mars conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K. A.; Cooper, G. A.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments conducted on a dry and a water-saturated rock under Martian and Earth atmospheric pressures revealed two different wear behaviors in diamond-impregnated drill bits. When the rock was saturated, drilling under Martian pressure caused the water in contact with the rotating bit to vaporize. Since the volumetric expansion of the liquid water or ice as it turned into a vapor was 170,000, the continuous flow of water vapor cleared the cuttings out of the hole. Thus the bit matrix was always exposed to abrasive wear by the rock cuttings and was continually wearing down and exposing new diamonds to the rock. When the rock was dry, an accumulation of rock cuttings protected the matrix from abrasive wear. Since fresh diamonds were not exposed in a timely manner, the rate of penetration dropped. Both rock conditions, namely, dry or water saturated, may exist on Mars. This adds to the complexity of the drill bit design as, ideally, a bit should penetrate the rock irrespective of whether it is dry or water saturated. The ``fail-safe'' bit would have a very soft matrix to always produce some rock penetration at the expense of potential excessive bit wear and shallower than anticipated hole depth.

  16. Friction and wear properties of smooth diamond films grown in fullerene-argon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Bindal, C.; Zuiker, C.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1995-08-01

    In this study, we describe the growth mechanism and the ultralow friction and wear properties of smooth (20-50 nm rms) diamond films grown in a microwave plasma consisting of Ar and fullerene (the carbon source). The sliding friction coefficients of these films against Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls are 0.04 and 0.1 in dry N{sub 2} and air, which are comparable to that of natural diamond sliding against the same pin material, but is lower by factors of 5 to 10 than that afforded by rough diamond films grown in conventional H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} plasmas. Furthermore, the smooth diamond films produced in this work afforded wear rates to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls that were two to three orders of magnitude lower than those of H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} grown films. Mechanistically, the ultralow friction and wear properties of the fullerene-derived diamond films correlate well with their initially smooth surface finish and their ability to polish even further during sliding. The wear tracks reach an ultrasmooth (3-6 nm rms) surface finish that results in very little abrasion and ploughing. The nanocrystalline microstructure and exceptionally pure sp{sup 3} bonding in these smooth diamond films were verified by numerous surface and structure analytical methods, including x-ray diffraction, high-resolution AF-S, EELS, NEXAFS, SEM, and TEM. An AFM instrument was used to characterize the topography of the films and rubbing surfaces.

  17. Smooth diamond films as low friction, long wear surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Erdemir, Ali; Bindal, Cuma; Zuiker, Christopher D.

    1999-01-01

    An article and method of manufacture of a nanocrystalline diamond film. The nanocrystalline film is prepared by forming a carbonaceous vapor, providing an inert gas containing gas stream and combining the gas stream with the carbonaceous containing vapor. A plasma of the combined vapor and gas stream is formed in a chamber and fragmented carbon species are deposited onto a substrate to form the nanocrystalline diamond film having a root mean square flatness of about 50 nm deviation from flatness in the as deposited state.

  18. Monitoring tool wear using classifier fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannatey-Asibu, Elijah; Yum, Juil; Kim, T. H.

    2017-02-01

    Real time monitoring of manufacturing processes using a single sensor often poses significant challenge. Sensor fusion has thus been extensively investigated in recent years for process monitoring with significant improvement in performance. This paper presents the results for a monitoring system based on the concept of classifier fusion, and class-weighted voting is investigated to further enhance the system performance. Classifier weights are based on the overall performances of individual classifiers, and majority voting is used in decision making. Acoustic emission monitoring of tool wear during the coroning process is used to illustrate the concept. A classification rate of 87.7% was obtained for classifier fusion with unity weighting. When weighting was based on overall performance of the respective classifiers, the classification rate improved to 95.6%. Further using state performance weighting resulted in a 98.5% classification. Finally, the classifier fusion performance further increased to 99.7% when a penalty vote was applied on the weighting factor.

  19. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  20. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  1. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    PubMed

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  2. Wear-resistant diamond nanoprobe tips with integrated silicon heater for tip-based nanomanufacturing.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Patrick C; Felts, Jonathan R; Dai, Zhenting; Jacobs, Tevis D; Zeng, Hongjun; Lee, Woo; Sheehan, Paul E; Carlisle, John A; Carpick, Robert W; King, William P

    2010-06-22

    We report exceptional nanoscale wear and fouling resistance of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tips integrated with doped silicon atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers. The resistively heated probe can reach temperatures above 600 degrees C. The batch fabrication process produces UNCD tips with radii as small as 15 nm, with average radius 50 nm across the entire wafer. Wear tests were performed on substrates of quartz, silicon carbide, silicon, or UNCD. Tips were scanned for more than 1 m at a scan speed of 25 mum s(-1) at temperatures ranging from 25 to 400 degrees C under loads up to 200 nN. Under these conditions, silicon tips are partially or completely destroyed, while the UNCD tips exhibit little or no wear, no signs of delamination, and exceptional fouling resistance. We demonstrate nanomanufacturing of more than 5000 polymer nanostructures with no deterioration in the tip.

  3. Electron microscopic evidence for a tribologically induced phase transformation as the origin of wear in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyi; Schneider, Reinhard; Müller, Erich; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Mee, Manuel; Meier, Sven; Gumbsch, Peter

    2014-02-14

    Tribological testing of a coarse-grained diamond layer, deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, was performed on a ring-on-ring tribometer with a diamond counterpart. The origin of the wear of diamond and of the low friction coefficient of 0.15 was studied by analyzing the microstructure of worn and unworn regions by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. In the worn regions, the formation of an amorphous carbon layer with a thickness below 100 nm is observed. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the C-K ionization edge reveals the transition from sp{sup 3}-hybridized C-atoms in crystalline diamond to a high fraction of sp{sup 2}-hybridized C-atoms in the tribo-induced amorphous C-layer within a transition region of less than 5 nm thickness. The mechanically induced phase transformation from diamond to the amorphous phase is found to be highly anisotropic which is clearly seen at a grain boundary, where the thickness of the amorphous layer above the two differently oriented grains abruptly changes.

  4. Numerical modelling of tool wear in turning with cemented carbide cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Franco, P.; Estrems, M.; Faura, F.

    2007-04-07

    A numerical model is proposed for analysing the flank and crater wear resulting from the loss of material on cutting tool surface in turning processes due to wear mechanisms of adhesion, abrasion and fracture. By means of this model, the material loss along cutting tool surface can be analysed, and the worn surface shape during the workpiece machining can be determined. The proposed model analyses the gradual degradation of cutting tool during turning operation, and tool wear can be estimated as a function of cutting time. Wear-land width (VB) and crater depth (KT) can be obtained for description of material loss on cutting tool surface, and the effects of the distinct wear mechanisms on surface shape can be studied. The parameters required for the tool wear model are obtained from bibliography and experimental observation for AISI 4340 steel turning with WC-Co cutting tools.

  5. Effect of tool wear on quality of carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminate during edge trimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedanianpour, Hossein

    Polymer matrix composites, especially carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) are vastly used in different high technology industries, including aerospace, automotive and wind energy. Normally, when CFRPs are cured to near net shape, finishing operations such as trimming, milling or drilling are used to remove excess materials. The quality of these finishing operations is highly essential at the level of final assembly. The present study aims to study the effect of cutting tool wear on the resulting quality for the trimming process of high performance CFRP laminates, in the aerospace field. In terms of quality parameters, the study focuses on surface roughness and material integrity damages (uncut fibers, fiber pullout, delamination or thermal damage of the matrix), which could jeopardize the mechanical performance of the components. In this study, a 3/8 inch diameter CVD diamond coated carbide tool with six flutes was used to trim 24-ply carbon fiber laminates. Cutting speeds ranging from 200 m/min to 400 m/min and feed rates ranging from 0.3048 mm/rev to 0.4064 mm/rev were used in the experiments. The results obtained using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed increasing defect rates with an increase in tool wear. The worst surface integrity, including matrix cracking, fiber pull-out and empty holes, was also observed for plies oriented at -45° degrees. For the surface finish, it was observed that an increase in tool wear resulted in a decrease in surface roughness. Regarding tool wear, a lower rate was observed at lower feed rates and higher cutting speeds, while a higher tool wear rate was observed at intermediate values of our feed rate and cutting speed ranges.

  6. Wear and Friction Characteristics of AlN/Diamond-Like Carbon Hybrid Coatings on Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masashi; Kubota, Sadayuki; Suzuki, Hideto; Haraguchi, Tadao

    2015-10-01

    The use of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings has the potential to greatly improve the wear resistance and friction of aluminum alloys, but practical application has so far been limited by poor adhesion due to large difference in hardness and elasticity between the two materials. This study investigates the deposition of DLC onto an Al-alloy using an intermediate AlN layer with a graded hardness to create a hybrid coating. By controlling the hardness of the AlN film, it was found that the wear life of the DLC film could be improved 80-fold compared to a DLC film deposited directly onto Al-alloy. Furthermore, it was demonstrated through finite element simulation that creating a hardness gradient in the AlN intermediate layer reduces the distribution of stress in the DLC film, while also increasing the force of adhesion between the DLC and AlN layers. Given that both the DLC and AlN films were deposited using the same unbalanced magnetron sputtering method, this process is considered to represent a simple and effective means of improving the wear resistance of Al-alloy components commonly used within the aerospace and automotive industries.

  7. Tool life modeling and computer simulation of tool wear when nickel-based material turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebala, W.

    2016-09-01

    Paper presents some tool life investigations, concerning modeling and simulation of tool wear when turning a difficult-to-cut material like nickel based sintered powder workpiece. A cutting tool made of CBN has its special geometry. The workpiece in the form of disc is an aircraft engine part. The aim of researches is to optimize the cutting data for the purpose to decrease the tool wear and improve the machined surface roughness.

  8. Calculation of the Intensity of Adhesive-Fatigue Wear of Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibik, V.; Ivushkina, N.; Arhipova, D.

    2016-08-01

    On the base of kinetic equation of strength the authors suggest the method carbide tools wear intensity calculation allowing comparing wear resistance basing on tool material thermal diffusivity coefficient. The authors obtain equations of tool wear resistance dependences upon its thermal diffusivity which show close correlation between these parameters. The results of wear intensity calculations correspond well to the experimental results under the cutting rates corresponding to the region of adhesive-fatigue wear. The inserts with low thermal diffusivity coefficient are characterized by lower wear rate at the inial and normal stages of wear.

  9. An investigation of chatter and tool wear when machining titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    The low thermal conductivity of titanium, together with the low contact area between chip and tool and the unusually high chip velocities, gives rise to high tool tip temperatures and accelerated tool wear. Machining speeds have to be considerably reduced to avoid these high temperatures with a consequential loss of productivity. Restoring this lost productivity involves increasing other machining variables, such as feed and depth-of-cut, and can lead to another machining problem commonly known as chatter. This work is to acquaint users with these problems, to examine the variables that may be encountered when machining a material like titanium, and to advise the machine tool user on how to maximize the output from the machines and tooling available to him. Recommendations are made on ways of improving tolerances, reducing machine tool instability or chatter, and improving productivity. New tool materials, tool coatings, and coolants are reviewed and their relevance examined when machining titanium.

  10. Wear reduction in cutting tools: Tribological properties of hard coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, B.P. ); Fabiszak, E. ); Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The cutting tool industry has become the pioneer in the use of hard coatings on different types of tools. Hard coatings, which improve the performance and lifetime of cutting tools, have been used for more than 20 years. In the study reported here, performance evaluations were made of high-speed steel and carbide tool inserts that were coated with tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}), titanium nitride (TiN), and with TiN and then with WS{sub 2}; uncoated inserts were also evaluated. The aim was to determine whether the WS{sub 2} coating improved tool life and reduced cutting-force requirements. The WS{sub 2}-coated inserts demonstrated significantly lower flank wear than the uncoated inserts. Use of WS{sub 2} also reduced flank and notch wear of uncoated and TiN-coated inserts. The greatest wear reductions were observed for inserts coated with both TiN and WS{sub 2}.

  11. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Rao, Balkrishna C.

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tungsten carbide tool for machining titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to synthesize diamond films on tungsten carbide tools. A boron-doped diamond interlayer was added to a microcrystalline diamond layer in an attempt to improve the interface adhesion strength. The dual-layered diamond-coated tool was employed in machining at cutting speeds in the range of 70 to 150 m min-1 with a lower feed and a lower depth of cut of 0.5 mm rev-1 and 0.5 mm, respectively, to operate in the transition from adhesion- to diffusion-tool-wear and thereby arrive at suitable conditions for enhancing tool life. The proposed tool was then compared, on the basis of performance under real-time cutting conditions, with commercially available microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, titanium nitride and uncoated tungsten carbide tools. The life and surface finish of the proposed dual-layered tool and uncoated tungsten carbide were also investigated in interrupted cutting such as milling. The results of this study show a significant improvement in tool life and finish of Ti-6Al-4V parts machined with the dual-layered diamond-coated tool when compared with its uncoated counterpart. These results pave the way for the use of a low-cost tool, with respect to, polycrystalline diamond for enhancing both tool life and machining productivity in critical sectors fabricating parts out of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The application of this coating technology can also be extended to the machining of non-ferrous alloys owing to its better adhesion strength.

  12. Diamond-turning tool setting by interferogram analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rasnick, W.H.; Yoder, R.C.

    1980-10-22

    A method was developed to establish a numerically controlled tool path with respect to the work spindle centerline. Particularly adapted to the diamond turning of optics, this method is based upon interferogram analysis and is applicable to the establishment of the work spindle centerline relative to the tool path for any center-turned optic having a well-defined vertex radius of curvature. The application reported is for an f/2 concave spherical mirror.

  13. Diamond Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Advances in materials technology have demonstrated that it is possible to get the advantages of diamond in a number of applications without the cost penalty, by coating and chemically bonding an inexpensive substrate with a thin film of diamond-like carbon (DLC). Diamond films offer tremendous technical and economic potential in such advances as chemically inert protective coatings; machine tools and parts capable of resisting wear 10 times longer; ball bearings and metal cutting tools; a broad variety of optical instruments and systems; and consumer products. Among the American companies engaged in DLC commercialization is Diamonex, Inc., a diamond coating spinoff of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Along with its own proprietary technology for both polycrystalline diamond and DLC coatings, Diamonex is using, under an exclusive license, NASA technology for depositing DLC on a substrate. Diamonex is developing, and offering commercially, under the trade name Diamond Aegis, a line of polycrystalline diamond-coated products that can be custom tailored for optical, electronic and engineering applications. Diamonex's initial focus is on optical products and the first commercial product is expected in late 1990. Other target applications include electronic heat sink substrates, x-ray lithography masks, metal cutting tools and bearings.

  14. Tool Wear Characteristics of Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Particleboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnasingam, Jegatheswaran; Chew Tek, Tee; Farrokhpayam, Saied Reza

    A series of machining experiments on the Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (OPEFB) particleboard were carried out using a CNC router, to evaluate the tool wearing properties of the composite in comparison to the conventional wood-material particleboard. A single-fluted tungsten-carbide router bit (12 mm φ, 18 000 rpm), with a rake angle of 15° was used in this experiment, in which the depth of cut was 1.5 mm and feed speed was 4.5 m min-1. The router bit machined the edge of the board, moving along the full length before returning to repeat the cycle. The tool was examined for the extent of wear after complete failure had occurred. The result found that the wear pattern was similar in the oil-palm based particleboard and the wood-based particleboard, but the former was twice more abrasive compared to the latter. Microscopic examination of the cutter edge revealed greater incidence of micro-fracture when cutting the oil-palm based particleboard, indicating the presence of hard impurities in the composite. From an economic perspective, the tooling cost for machining oil-palm based particleboard is estimated to be twice of the cost for machining wood-based particleboard. This study shows that the machining properties of oil-palm based particleboard will be a primary concern, if the board is to find widespread application as a potential substitute for wood-based particleboard.

  15. Characterization of tribo-layer formed during sliding wear of SiC ball against nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Kumar, N.; Samji, Sunil Kumar; Dash, S.; Ramamoorthy, B.; Ramachandra Rao, M.S.

    2014-09-15

    Tribo-layer formation and frictional characteristics of the SiC ball were studied with the sliding test against nanocrystalline diamond coating under atmospheric test conditions. Unsteady friction coefficients in the range of 0.04 to 0.1 were observed during the tribo-test. Friction and wear characteristics were found to be influenced by the formation of cohesive tribo-layer (thickness ∼ 1.3 μm) in the wear track of nanocrystalline diamond coating. Hardness of the tribo-layer was measured using nanoindentation technique and low hardness of ∼ 1.2 GPa was observed. The presence of silicon and oxygen in the tribo-layer was noticed by the energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping and the chemical states of the silicon were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Large amount of oxygen content in the tribo-layer indicated tribo-oxidation wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Sliding wear and friction characteristics of SiC were studied against NCD coating. • Silicon oxide tribo-layer formation was observed in the NCD coating wear track. • Low hardness 1.2 GPa of tribo-layer was measured using nanoindentation technique. • Chemical states of silicon were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  16. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  17. Tool wear mechanisms in the machining of Nickel based super-alloys: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, Waseem; Sun, Jianfei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Wuyi; Saleem, Zawar

    2014-06-01

    Nickel based super-alloys are widely employed in aircraft engines and gas turbines due to their high temperature strength, corrosion resistance and, excellent thermal fatigue properties. Conversely, these alloys are very difficult to machine and cause rapid wear of the cutting tool, frequent tool changes are thus required resulting in low economy of the machining process. This study provides a detailed review of the tool wear mechanism in the machining of nickel based super-alloys. Typical tool wear mechanisms found by different researchers are analyzed in order to find out the most prevalent wear mechanism affecting the tool life. The review of existing works has revealed interesting findings about the tool wear mechanisms in the machining of these alloys. Adhesion wear is found to be the main phenomenon leading to the cutting tool wear in this study.

  18. The research on tool wear of high speed milling titanium alloy TC4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Wang, Zhichao; Ren, Huanhuan; Yuan, Haoteng

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, carbide cutting tools with physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating was used to high speed milling α+β phase TC4 titanium alloy. The PVD tool was used to study the process of milling TC4 titanium alloy tool wear patterns and wear mechanisms. The results showed that the PVD coating surface wear was small after cutter blade. The cutting life was long, it was suitable for processing of titanium alloy TC4, the wear of rake face was mainly adhesion wear and oxidation wear, the flank face was mainly boundary wear. That was because the adhesion wear of the rake face and the boundary wear of the flank face had a weakening effect on the cutting edge , which made the micro crack blade of the main cutting edge.

  19. Technological Aspects of Forming the Surface Microrelief of Low-Wear Coatings after Electro-Diamond Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. G.; Yanpolskiy, V. V.; Rakhimyanov, K. Kh

    2016-04-01

    The results of electro-diamond grinding of coatings based on the WC25 powder material are presented in the paper. It is shown that after electro-diamond grinding of the WC25 coating, an obtained magnitude (Ra=2.02µm) of surface roughness doesn’t meet the qualifying standards to parts surface working in wear-out conditions. The forming of the obtained microrelief is probably connected to the features of electrochemical dissolution of the WC25 coating material in the electrolyte being used. Based on the polarization studies, it is revealed that the electrochemical dissolution character of the indicated coating in the water solution of 10%NaNO3 is determined by the dissolution character of cobalt (Co) component. The intensive cobalt (Co) dissolution during the electro-diamond grinding of the WC25 coating leads to the tungsten carbide chipping by the grinding disk particles that increases the roughness. One of the way to improve the surface quality of low-wear coatings after electro-diamond grinding is an introduction of an additional step in a technological process, carrying out with the switched off source of technological current. For realization of the process according to this scheme a technological dimension chain is made which takes into consideration the dissolution value of the most active coating composition element while the calculating of the operating dimensions of a detail.

  20. Wear resistance of WC/Co HVOF-coatings and galvanic Cr coatings modified by diamond nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandeva, M.; Grozdanova, T.; Karastoyanov, D.; Assenova, E.

    2017-02-01

    The efforts in the recent 20 years are related to search of ecological solutions in the tribotechnologies for the replacement of galvanic Cr coatings in the contact systems operating under extreme conditions: abrasion, erosion, cavitation, corrosion, shock and vibration loads. One of the solutions is in the composite coatings deposited by high velocity gas-flame process (HVOF). The present paper presents comparative study results for mechanical and tribological characteristics of galvanic Cr coatings without nanoparticles, galvanic Cr coatings modified by diamond nanoparticles NDDS of various concentration 0.6; 10; 15 и 20% obtained under three technological regimes, and composite WC-12Co coating. Comparative results about hardness, wear, wear resistance and friction coefficient are obtained for galvanic Cr-NDDS and WC-12Co coatings operating at equal friction conditions of dry friction on abrasive surface. The WC-12Co coating shows 5.4 to 7 times higher wear resistance compared to the galvanic Cr-NDDS coatings.

  1. Communication research between working capacity of hard- alloy cutting tools and fractal dimension of their wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, K.; Nesterenko, V.; Daneykina, N.

    2016-06-01

    The results of communication research between the wear resistance of the K applicability hard-alloy cutting tools and the fractal dimension of the wear surface, which is formed on a back side of the cutting edge when processing the materials showing high adhesive activity are presented in the paper. It has been established that the wear resistance of tested cutting tools samples increases according to a fractal dimension increase of their wear surface.

  2. Investigation on the Surface Integrity and Tool Wear in Cryogenic Machining

    SciTech Connect

    Dutra Xavier, Sandro E.; Delijaicov, Sergio; Farias, Adalto de; Stipkovic Filho, Marco; Ferreira Batalha, Gilmar

    2011-01-17

    This work aimed to study the influences of cryogenic cooling on tool wear, comparing it to dry machining during on the surface integrity of test circular steel SAE 52100 hardened to 62 HRC, during the turning of the face, with the use of special PcBN, using liquid nitrogen with cooler. The surface integrity parameters analyzed were: surface roughness and white layer and tool wear. The results of the present work indicated reduction in tool wear, which enhance the tool life.

  3. Statistical description of the macrostructure of diamond-containing powder tool materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinokurov, G. G.; Sharin, P. P.; Popov, O. N.

    2015-12-01

    The macrostructure of diamond-containing tool material has been investigated. The potentials of application of a cluster theory for processing a digital metallographic image of a diamond-containing powder material are substantiated. It is proposed to consider agglomerates of diamond grains to estimate the heterogeneity of a two-phase macrostructure.

  4. Mechanism study on the wear of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride cutting tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yunhai; Li, Jiangang

    2010-12-01

    The samples of bearing steel, alloy cold-die steel, cold-harden cast iron were continuous machined by polycrystalline cubic boron nitride(PcBN) cutting tools dry turning. After the machining, the phases of cutting tools blade-edge were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analyzer and cutting tools blade-edge microstructure were observed by scanning electronic microscope. And then, the wear mechanism of PcBN cutting tools in turing process was studied. The result showed that the oxidation wear and felt wear were main invalidation factors using PcBN cutting tools dry turning bearing steel and alloy cold-die steel samples; chemical wear and oxidation wear were main invalidation factors using PcBN cutting tools dry turning cold-harden cast iron. In turning process, the granularity of cBN, the heated-stability and chemical characteristic of felt material have key function to cutting tools wear.

  5. Triphasic Tooling with Small Oriented Diamond Tip for Turning and Smoothing Lightweight Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voronov, O. A.; Tompa, G. S.; Kear, B. H.; Veress, V.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing a new method for the growth of small diamond crystals at very high temperatures and pressures directly from a carbon melt. A prototype "Supercell" has been developed for this purpose. This system is capable of high rate crystal growth in relatively large working volumes. The resulting high quality diamond crystals will be incorporated into a triphasic diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool, with an oriented diamond crystal at its tip. High pressure is needed to prevent degradation of diamond at high temperature, and to ensure the formation of a crack & composite structure. After grinding and polishing, the composite material will be joined to a steel holder, thus forming a diamond-tipped tool for turning and smoothing of a mirror surface. A properly oriented single-crystal diamond cuts and smoothes much better than a conventional polycrystalline diamond crystal. This is because the hardness depends on crystallographic orientation-the difference corresponds to 60-100 GPa on the Knoop scale. Our goal is to achieve surface roughness of about 1 nm, which will be accomplished by precision cutting and smoothing. The hardness of the functionally-graded diamond/titanium carbide/titanium composite tool varies from 100 GPa at its tip to 15 GPa at its base. Previous work has shown that the mass of machined material using an oriented-diamond tool is much larger than that for a standard diamond-metal composite tool.

  6. Correlating tool wear, tool life, surface roughness and tool vibration in finish turning with coated carbide tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, M. E. R.; Diniz, A. E.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments have been carried out in an attempt to monitor the change of workpiece surface roughness caused by the increase of tool wear, through the variation of the vibration in finish turning, under different cutting conditions. The vibration was measured by two accelerometers attached to the tool and the parameter used to make the correlation with surface roughness was the r.m.s. of the signal. The tool of one experiment was photographed at different stages of the cut in order to explain the wear formation and the behaviour of surface roughness as the cutting time elapsed. The material machined was AISI 4340 steel and the tool was coated carbide inserts. The results show that vibration of the tool can be a good way to monitor on-line the growth of surface roughness in finish turning and, therefore, it can be useful for establishing the end of tool life in these operations. Another conclusion is that, when coated tools are used, the behaviour of surface roughness as cutting time elapses is very different from that when uncoated tools are used.

  7. Electrodeposition of diamond-like carbon films on titanium alloy using organic liquids: Corrosion and wear resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcade, Tiago; Shmitzhaus, Tobias Eduardo; dos Reis, Otávio Gomes; Vargas, André Luis Marin; Hübler, Roberto; Müller, Iduvirges Lourdes; de Fraga Malfatti, Célia

    2012-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been studied as coatings for corrosion protection and wear resistance because they have excellent chemical inertness in traditional corrosive environments, besides presenting a significant reduction in coefficient of friction. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films obtained by electrochemical deposition techniques have attracted a lot of interest, regarding their potential in relation to the vapor phase deposition techniques. The electrochemical deposition techniques are carried out at room temperature and do not need vacuum system, making easier this way the technological transfer. At high electric fields, the organic molecules polarize and react on the electrode surface, forming carbon films. The aim of this work was to obtain DLC films onto Ti6Al4V substrate using as electrolyte: acetonitrile (ACN) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and wear tests. The results show that these films can improve, significantly, the corrosion resistance of titanium and its alloys and their wear resistance.

  8. Experimental results and wear predictions of petal tools that freely rotate.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Dávila, Alberto; Cabrera-Peláez, Víctor; Cuautle-Cortés, Jorge; González-García, Jorge; Robledo-Sánchez, Carlos; Bautista-Elivar, Nazario

    2005-03-10

    It is difficult to calculate the wear produced by free-pinned tools because their angular movement is not entirely predictable. We analyze the wear produced with free-pinned ring tools, using both simulations and experiments. We conclude that the wear of an incomplete ring is directly proportional to the ring's angular size, independently of the mean radius of the ring. We present an algorithm for calculation of the wear produced by free-pinned petal tools, as they can be considered a linear combination of incomplete free-pinned ring tools. Finally, we apply this result to the enhancement of a defective flat surface and to making a concave spheric surface.

  9. Wear resistance of thick diamond like carbon coatings against polymeric materials used in single screw plasticizing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitzenbacher, G.; Liu, K.; Forsich, C.; Heim, D.

    2015-05-01

    Wear on the screw and barrel surface accompany polymer single screw plasticizing technology from the beginning. In general, wear on screws can be reduced by using nitrided steel surfaces, fused armour alloys on the screw flights and coatings. However, DLC-coatings (Diamond Like Carbon) comprise a number of interesting properties such as a high hardness, a low coefficient of friction and an excellent corrosion resistance due to their amorphous structure. The wear resistance of about 50 µm thick DLC-coatings against polyamide 6.6, polybutylene terephthalate and polypropylene is investigated in this paper. The tribology in the solids conveying zone of a single screw extruder until the beginning of melting is evaluated using a pin on disc tribometer and a so called screw tribometer. The polymeric pins are pressed against coated metal samples using the pin on disc tribometer and the tests are carried out at a defined normal force and sliding velocity. The screw tribometer is used to perform tribological experiments between polymer pellets and rotating coated metal shafts simulating the extruder screw. Long term experiments were performed to evaluate the wear resistance of the DLC-coating. A reduction of the coefficient of friction can be observed after a frictional distance of about 20 kilometers using glass fibre reinforced polymeric materials. This reduction is independent on the polymer and accompanied by a black layer on the wear surface of the polymeric pins. The DLC-coated metal samples show an up to 16 µm deep wear track after the 100 kilometer test period against the glass fiber filled materials only.

  10. Method of forming fluorine-bearing diamond layer on substrates, including tool substrates

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R. P. H.; Grannen, Kevin J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of forming a fluorine-bearing diamond layer on non-diamond substrates, especially on tool substrates comprising a metal matrix and hard particles, such as tungsten carbide particles, in the metal matrix. The substrate and a fluorine-bearing plasma or other gas are then contacted under temperature and pressure conditions effective to nucleate fluorine-bearing diamond on the substrate. A tool insert substrate is treated prior to the diamond nucleation and growth operation by etching both the metal matrix and the hard particles using suitable etchants.

  11. Influence of surface passivation on the friction and wear behavior of ultrananocrystalline diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konicek, A. R.; Grierson, D. S.; Sumant, A. V.; Friedmann, T. A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Sawyer, W. G.; Carpick, R. W.

    2012-04-01

    Highly sp3-bonded, nearly hydrogen-free carbon-based materials can exhibit extremely low friction and wear in the absence of any liquid lubricant, but this physical behavior is limited by the vapor environment. The effect of water vapor on friction and wear is examined as a function of applied normal force for two such materials in thin film form: one that is fully amorphous in structure (tetrahedral amorphous carbon, or ta-C) and one that is polycrystalline with <10 nm grains [ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)]. Tribologically induced changes in the chemistry and carbon bond hybridization at the surface are correlated with the effect of the sliding environment and loading conditions through ex situ, spatially resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. At sufficiently high relative humidity (RH) levels and/or sufficiently low loads, both films quickly achieve a low steady-state friction coefficient and subsequently exhibit low wear. For both films, the number of cycles necessary to reach the steady-state is progressively reduced for increasing RH levels. Worn regions formed at lower RH and higher loads have a higher concentration of chemisorbed oxygen than those formed at higher RH, with the oxygen singly bonded as hydroxyl groups (C-OH). While some carbon rehybridization from sp3 to disordered sp2 bonding is observed, no crystalline graphite formation is observed for either film. Rather, the primary solid-lubrication mechanism is the passivation of dangling bonds by OH and H from the dissociation of vapor-phase H2O. This vapor-phase lubrication mechanism is highly effective, producing friction coefficients as low as 0.078 for ta-C and 0.008 for UNCD, and wear rates requiring thousands of sliding passes to produce a few nanometers of wear.

  12. Extremely high wear resistance and ultra-low friction behaviour of oxygen-plasma-treated nanocrystalline diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika, R.; Kumar, N.; Sankaran, K. J.; Dumpala, Ravikumar; Dash, S.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Arivuoli, D.; Tyagi, A. K.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I.-Nan

    2013-10-01

    The diamond nanowire (DNW) film was deposited by N2-enriched microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPECVD) process. As-deposited DNW film was treated in O2 plasma which resulted in chemical and microstructural modification. Sheath of the DNW film is chemically constituted by amorphous carbon (a-C)- and graphite (sp2C=C)-like bonding. However, nanowires transformed into ultra-small spherical grains after the O2-plasma treatments. In this condition, a-C and sp2C=C bonding significantly reduced due to plasma etching caused by oxygen atoms. After the O2-plasma treatment, formation of functional groups such as C=O, C-O-C, O-H, O-CH3 and H2O was observed on the surface and inside the wear track as evident from the micro FTIR analysis. H2O is hydrogen bonded to oxygen-containing groups such as -OH and -H. The O2-plasma-exposed DNW film exhibits surface charging and causes formation of dangling bonds and electron trapping centres. This results in significant decrease in contact angle, hence superhydrophilic behaviour. The friction coefficient of O2-plasma-treated film showed super low value ˜0.002 with high wear resistance 2 × 10-12 mm3 N-1 m-1. In the reciprocating ball-on-disc tribology test, only ˜80 nm wear loss was observed after the 1 km of sliding distance at 10 N loads. Such an advance in tribological properties is explained by passivation of covalent carbon bonding and transformation of sliding surfaces by weak van der Waals and hydrogen bondings. High surface energy and the consequent superhydrophilic behaviour of film is attributed to the formation of the above-mentioned functional groups on the surface. This protects against deformation of the wear track leading to extremely high wear resistance.

  13. Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

    1982-06-01

    A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

  14. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2011-05-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  15. Study on the wear mechanism and tool life of coated gun drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongguo; Yan, Xiangping; Chen, Xiaoguang; Sun, Changyu; Zhang, Xi

    2010-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the wear progress for solid carbide gun drill coated with TiAlN by machining steel S48CSiV at a cutting speed of 12.66m/s has been performed. Cutting torque was recorded and tool wear mechanism was studied. The surface morphology of the tool and the chip have been studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Results show that cutting torque fluctuates between 3% and 5% when machining less than 130 pieces of crankshaft, but it will sharply increased to nearly 18% while machining 150 pieces of crankshaft because the coating is damaged and the wear becoming severity. The dominant wear mechanisms are adhesive wear and chemical dissolution wear.

  16. Friction and wear performance of bearing ball sliding against diamond-like carbon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Kousaka, Hiroyuki; Kar, Satyananda; Li, Dangjuan; Su, Junhong

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the tribological properties of bearing steel ball (Japan standard, SUJ2) sliding against tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) coatings and amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) coatings. The reciprocating sliding testes are performed with ball-on-plate friction tester in ambient air condition. Analysis of friction coefficient, wear volume and microstructure in wear scar are carried out using optical microscopy, atom force morphology (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show the SUJ2 on ta-C coating has low friction coefficient (around 0.15) but high wear loss. In contrast, the low wear loss of SUJ2 on a-C:H coating with high (around 0.4) and unsteady friction coefficient. Some Fe2O3, FeO and graphitization have been found on the wear scar of SUJ2 sliding against ta-C coating. Nearly no oxide materials exist on the wear scar of SUJ2 against a-C:H coating. The mechanism and hypothesis of the wear behavior have been investigated according to the measurement results. This study will contribute to proper selection and understand the tribological performance of bearing steels against DLC coatings.

  17. A review of the use of wear-resistant coatings in the cutting-tool industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salik, J.

    1983-01-01

    The main mechanisms involved in the wear of cutting tools are reviewed. Evaluation of the different coating properties required for the reduction of the different kinds of wear was also reviewed. The types of coatings and their ranges of applicability are presented and discussed in view of their properties. Various coating processes as well as their advantages and shortcomings are described. Potential future developments in the field of wear-resistant coatings are discussed.

  18. Surface characterization of diamond film tool grinding on the monocrystal sapphire under different liquid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Lu, Wenzhuang; Zhou, Hai; Yang, Bin; Zuo, Dunwen

    2016-11-01

    Surface characterization of diamond film tool on the monocrystal sapphire under H2O, 3% ethylene glycol and 3% ethylenediamine was investigated. The typical components and chemical changes of the surface of diamond thick film were studied by means of Raman and XPS. Results showed that tribological properties of diamond film tool were associated with the liquid environment located the grinding. Diamond film tool under 3% ethylenediamine solution exhibited the minimum value of friction coefficient, while that under H2O exhibited maximum value of friction coefficient. As the ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol were added during the grinding process, the reaction between diamond film and the sapphire pieces occurred, and the chemical composition change of the surface was also studied. Under the same process parameters, a better surface quality of sapphire under the grinding fluid of ethylenediamine can be obtained.

  19. Diamond-Dispersed Fiber-Reinforced Composite for Superior Friction and Wear Properties in Extreme Environments and Method for Fabricating the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Street, Kenneth (Inventor); Voronov, Oleg A (Inventor); Kear, Bernard H (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Systems, methods, and articles of manufacture related to composite materials are discussed herein. These materials can be based on a mixture of diamond particles with a matrix and fibers or fabrics. The matrix can be formed into the composite material through optional pressurization and via heat treatment. These materials display exceptionally low friction coefficient and superior wear resistance in extreme environments.

  20. The effect of machining parameters on force signal and tool wear in stone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    yousefi, Reza; Gorjizadeh, Ashkan; Mikaeil, Reza

    2011-01-01

    The application of sensor system is becoming more commonplace in improving productivity and reliability. Although measuring force signal have been widely used for monitoring of metal machining process that their application to stone cutting has not been well investigated. In this paper, the effect of machining parameter on force signal and tool wear was investigated. The result indicate that increasing of the depth of cut and spindle speed will increase the force and tool wear while increasing feed rate will increase force and decrease tool wear.

  1. Creation Of The Residual Stress By Influence Of Wear Of Cutting Tool And Their Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordík, Marek; Čilliková, Mária; Mrazik, Jozef; Martinček, Juraj; Janota, Miroslav; Nicielnik, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is analysis of turned bearing ring made of material 14109 (DIN 100Cr6) without heat treatment. For the analysis a mechanical destructive method was chosen. Analysis focused on existence and character of residual stresses after turning operation of bearing ring by tool with different level of wear. The experiment reveals the relationships between residual stress creation and cutting tool wear.

  2. Development of Sequential Optimization Method for CNC Turning Based on In-Process Tool Wear Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Toshimichi; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat; Shibasaka, Toshiroh

    A system and procedures are developed to optimize the cutting speed for CNC turning. The current amount of tool wear is estimated based on the in-process cutting force measurement by applying the method developed and reported previously. Once the tool wear is estimated for the different cutting speeds, the coefficients of the Taylor’s tool life equation are determined or successively modified based on the estimated tool wear data. The optimum cutting speed is obtained by referring to the criteria of either the minimum production cost or the maximum production rate. The system developed is applied to actual turning of carbon steel with coated carbide tools, and it has been proved that the system runs satisfactory. The method developed here can be readily applied to unknown combinations of the work material and the tool, as it searches the optimum cutting conditions automatically while the process is going on.

  3. Built-up edge effect on tool wear when turning steels at low cutting speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassier, Zulay; Prato, Yidney; Muñoz-Escalona, Patricia

    2004-10-01

    In any machining process, it is very important to control the cutting variables used during the process because these will affect, for example, tool life and workpiece surface roughness. Since the built-up edge (BUE) increases the wear of the tool and affects the surface roughness of the workpiece, the study of this phenomenon is very important in predicting and minimizing the wear of a cutting tool. This research studies the influence of the BUE formation for coated carbide tools when turning medium- and high-strength steels. Different mathematical expressions were obtained to quantify this effect. Mathematical expressions for uncoated carbide tools were not possible to obtain, due to the fact that for these tools an increase in the wear and their premature fracture was observed.

  4. Frictional Characterization of Chemical-Mechanical Polishing Pad Surface and Diamond Conditioner Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yohei; Kawakubo, Masanori; Hirai, Osamu; Konishi, Nobuhiro; Kurokawa, Syuhei; Doi, Toshiro

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated a contact metrology instrument used in chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) systems for high-volume manufacture and examined in situ coefficient of friction (COF) monitoring to identify the tribology of CMP, and subsequently to determine the useful lifespan of consumables. The results showed that the direct measurement of the wear of the pad allowed for an accurate determination of both pad thickness and the ideal time to replace the pad and conditioner disk based on pad wear rate. We also presented a clear correlation between the working grid area of the conditioner disk and the tribological behavior of the pad break-in procedure, leading to the result showing that the variation in tungsten film removal rate decreased as the working grid density of the conditioner disk increased. This study has proven the effectiveness of measuring friction force for better CMP control.

  5. Wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene against damaged and undamaged stainless steel and diamond-like carbon-coated counterfaces.

    PubMed

    Firkins, P; Hailey, J L; Fisher, J; Lettington, A H; Butter, R

    1998-10-01

    The wear of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) in artificial joints and the resulting wear debris-induced osteolysis remains a major clinical concern in the orthopaedic sector. Third-body damage of metallic femoral heads is often cited as a cause of accelerated polyethylene wear, and the use of ceramic femoral heads in the hip is gaining increasing favour. In the knee prostheses and for smaller diameter femoral heads, the application of hard surface coatings, such as diamond-like carbon, is receiving considerable attention. However, to date, there has been little or no investigation of the tribology of these coatings in simulated biological environments. In this study, diamond-like carbon (DLC) has been compared to stainless steel in its undamaged form and following simulated third-body damage. The wear of UHMWPE was found to be similar when sliding against undamaged DLC and stainless steel counterfaces. DLC was found to be much more damage resistant than DLC. Under test conditions that simulate third-body damage to the femoral head, the wear of UHMWPE was seven times lower against DLC than against stainless steel (P < 0.05). The study shows DLC has considerable potential as a femoral bearing surface in artificial joints.

  6. Tool wear in cryogenic turning of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K. A.; Paul, S.; Chattopadhyay, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Though titanium alloys are being increasingly sought in a wide variety of engineering and biomedical applications, their manufacturability, especially machining and grinding imposes lot of constraints. Rapid tool wear encountered in machining of titanium alloys is a challenge that needs to be overcome. Cryogenic machining with liquid nitrogen as coolant is being investigated by researchers to reduce the cutting zone temperatures and enhance the tool life. The effects of cryogenic cooling have been studied on growth and nature tool wear in the present investigation while turning Ti-6Al-4V alloy bars with microcrystalline uncoated carbide inserts under dry, wet and cryogenic cooling environments in the cutting velocity range of 70-100 m/min. Cryogenic cooling by liquid nitrogen jets enabled substantial improvement in tool life through reduction in adhesion-dissolution-diffusion tool wear through control of machining temperature desirably at the cutting zone.

  7. Study on electroplating technology of diamond tools for machining hard and brittle materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ying; Chen, Jian Hua; Sun, Li Peng; Wang, Yue

    2016-10-01

    With the development of the high speed cutting, the ultra-precision machining and ultrasonic vibration technique in processing hard and brittle material , the requirement of cutting tools is becoming higher and higher. As electroplated diamond tools have distinct advantages, such as high adaptability, high durability, long service life and good dimensional stability, the cutting tools are effective and extensive used in grinding hard and brittle materials. In this paper, the coating structure of electroplating diamond tool is described. The electroplating process flow is presented, and the influence of pretreatment on the machining quality is analyzed. Through the experimental research and summary, the reasonable formula of the electrolyte, the electroplating technologic parameters and the suitable sanding method were determined. Meanwhile, the drilling experiment on glass-ceramic shows that the electroplating process can effectively improve the cutting performance of diamond tools. It has laid a good foundation for further improving the quality and efficiency of the machining of hard and brittle materials.

  8. Correction method for the error of diamond tool's radius in ultra-precision cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Yu, Jing-chi

    2010-10-01

    The compensation method for the error of diamond tool's cutting edge is a bottle-neck technology to hinder the high accuracy aspheric surface's directly formation after single diamond turning. Traditional compensation was done according to the measurement result from profile meter, which took long measurement time and caused low processing efficiency. A new compensation method was firstly put forward in the article, in which the correction of the error of diamond tool's cutting edge was done according to measurement result from digital interferometer. First, detailed theoretical calculation related with compensation method was deduced. Then, the effect after compensation was simulated by computer. Finally, φ50 mm work piece finished its diamond turning and new correction turning under Nanotech 250. Testing surface achieved high shape accuracy pv 0.137λ and rms=0.011λ, which approved the new compensation method agreed with predictive analysis, high accuracy and fast speed of error convergence.

  9. A Phenomenological Model for Tool Wear in Friction Stir Welding of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Tracie J.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Cook, George E.; Gibson, Brian T.; Cox, Chase D.

    2013-08-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) of metal matrix composites (MMCs) is advantageous because the solid-state nature of the process precludes formation of deleterious intermetallic phases which accompany melting. FSW of MMCs is complicated by rapid and severe wear of the welding tool, a consequence of contact between the tool and the much harder abrasive reinforcement which gives the workpiece material its enhanced strength. The current article demonstrates that Nunes's rotating plug model of material flow in FSW, which has been successfully applied in many other contexts, can also help us understand wear in FSW of MMCs. An equation for predicting the amount of wear in this application is developed and compared with experimental data. This phenomenological model explains the relationship between wear and FSW process parameters documented in previous studies.

  10. On modeling of tool wear using sensor fusion and polynomial classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deiab, Ibrahim; Assaleh, Khaled; Hammad, Firas

    2009-07-01

    With increased global competition, the manufacturing sector is vigorously working on enhancing the efficiency of manufacturing processes in terms of cost, quality, and environmental impact. This work presents a novel approach to model and predict cutting tool wear using statistical signal analysis, pattern recognition, and sensor fusion. The data are acquired from two sources: an acoustic emission sensor (AE) and a tool post dynamometer. The pattern recognition used here is based on two methods: Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Polynomial Classifiers (PC). Cutting tool wear values predicted by neural network (ANN) and polynomial classifiers (PC) are compared. For the case study presented, PC proved to significantly reduce the required training time compared to that required by an ANN without compromising the prediction accuracy. The predicted results compared well with the measured tool wear values.

  11. Cutting performance and wear mechanisms of PVD coated carbide tools during dry drilling of newly produced ADI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Anil; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-10-01

    The austempered ductile iron (ADI) material is widely used for automotive and structural applications. However, it is considered a difficult to machine material due to its strain hardening behavior and low thermal conductivity characteristics; thus delivering higher mechanical and thermal loads at the tool-chip interface, which significantly affects the tool wear and surface quality. The paper thus overviews the cutting performance and wear behavior of different cutting tools during dry drilling of newly produced ADI material. Cutting performance was evaluated in terms of specific cutting energy, workpiece surface integrity and tool wear behavior. Tool wear behavior shows crater wear mode and workpiece adhesion. The surface alteration at the machined subsurface was confirmed from the hardness variation. Multilayer (Ti,Al,Cr)N coated tool shows improved cutting performance and wear behavior due to its enhanced tribological adaptability as compared to another PVD coating leading to the reduction in specific cutting energy by 25%.

  12. Machinability of Intermetallic Compound Fe3Al from the Viewpoint of Tool Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tomohiro; Yakou, Takao

    The intermetallic compound Fe3Al was processed by a reactive sintering process, and its machinability from the viewpoint of tool wear was investigated using dry turning. In cutting Fe3Al with a cemented carbide tool, the tool life was approximately one tenth that of cutting carbon tool steel SK3 because of intense flank wear. The tool life for cutting Fe3Al using the cemented carbide P20(WC-TiC-TaC-Co) tool was longer than for cemented carbide K10(WC-Co). In addition, a cermet tool reached its tool life limit by chipping for the whole cutting speed range measured. The roughness of the machined surface of Fe3Al cut using a cemented carbide tool was much smaller than for SK3. However, for cutting using the cermet tool, the roughness showed a sharp rise due to chipping. It was found that the wear rate of the WC particles in the tool material is larger than TiC particles. The results of the study suggest that the cemented carbide P20 is suitable for cutting Fe3Al.

  13. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  14. Use-Wear Patterns on Wild Macaque Stone Tools Reveal Their Behavioural History

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, Michael; Gumert, Michael D.; Biro, Dora; Carvalho, Susana; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2013-01-01

    Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) are one of a limited number of wild animal species to use stone tools, with their tool use focused on pounding shelled marine invertebrates foraged from intertidal habitats. These monkeys exhibit two main styles of tool use: axe hammering of oysters, and pound hammering of unattached encased foods. In this study, we examined macroscopic use-wear patterns on a sample of 60 wild macaque stone tools from Piak Nam Yai Island, Thailand, that had been collected following behavioural observation, in order to (i) quantify the wear patterns in terms of the types and distribution of use-damage on the stones, and (ii) develop a Use-Action Index (UAI) to differentiate axe hammers from pound hammers by wear patterns alone. We used the intensity of crushing damage on differing surface zones of the stones, as well as stone weight, to produce a UAI that had 92% concordance when compared to how the stones had been used by macaques, as observed independently prior to collection. Our study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative archaeological use-wear techniques can accurately reconstruct the behavioural histories of non-human primate stone tools. PMID:23977365

  15. Effects of cutting parameters on tool insert wear in end milling of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Jing; Wu, Baohai; Zhang, Dinghua

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy is a kind of typical hard-to-cut material due to its low thermal conductivity and high strength at elevated temperatures, this contributes to the fast tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys. The influence of cutting conditions on tool wear has been focused on the turning process, and their influence on tool wear in milling process as well as the influence of tool wear on cutting force coefficients has not been investigated comprehensively. To fully understand the tool wear behavior in milling process with inserts, the influence of cutting parameters on tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V by using indexable cutters is investigated. The tool wear rate and trends under different feed per tooth, cutting speed, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut are analyzed. The results show that the feed rate per tooth and the radial depth of cut have a large influence on tool wear in milling Ti6Al4V with coated insert. To reduce tool wear, cutting parameters for coated inserts under experimental cutting conditions are set as: feed rate per tooth less than 0.07 mm, radial depth of cut less than 1.0 mm, and cutting speed sets between 60 and 150 m/min. Investigation on the relationship between tool wear and cutting force coefficients shows that tangential edge constant increases with tool wear and cutter edge chipping can lead to a great variety of tangential cutting force coefficient. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of milling Ti6Al4V alloy with coated inserts, and the recommend cutting parameters can be immediately applied in practical production.

  16. Effects of cutting parameters on tool insert wear in end milling of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Jing; Wu, Baohai; Zhang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Titanium alloy is a kind of typical hard-to-cut material due to its low thermal conductivity and high strength at elevated temperatures, this contributes to the fast tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys. The influence of cutting conditions on tool wear has been focused on the turning process, and their influence on tool wear in milling process as well as the influence of tool wear on cutting force coefficients has not been investigated comprehensively. To fully understand the tool wear behavior in milling process with inserts, the influence of cutting parameters on tool wear in the milling of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V by using indexable cutters is investigated. The tool wear rate and trends under different feed per tooth, cutting speed, axial depth of cut and radial depth of cut are analyzed. The results show that the feed rate per tooth and the radial depth of cut have a large influence on tool wear in milling Ti6Al4V with coated insert. To reduce tool wear, cutting parameters for coated inserts under experimental cutting conditions are set as: feed rate per tooth less than 0.07 mm, radial depth of cut less than 1.0 mm, and cutting speed sets between 60 and 150 m/min. Investigation on the relationship between tool wear and cutting force coefficients shows that tangential edge constant increases with tool wear and cutter edge chipping can lead to a great variety of tangential cutting force coefficient. The proposed research provides the basic data for evaluating the machinability of milling Ti6Al4V alloy with coated inserts, and the recommend cutting parameters can be immediately applied in practical production.

  17. Feasibility of using acoustic emission to determine in-process tool wear

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    1996-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) was evaluated for its ability to predict and recognize failure of cutting tools during machining processes when the cutting tool rotates and the workpiece is stationary. AE output was evaluated with a simple algorithm. AE was able to detect drill failure when the transducer was mounted on the workpiece holding fixture. Drill failure was recognized as size was reduced to 0.0003 in. diameter. The ability to predict failure was reduced with drill size, drill material elasticity, and tool coating. AE output for the turning process on a lathe was compared to turning tool insert wear. The turning tool must have sufficient wear to produce a detectable change in AE output to predict insert failure.

  18. Analyzing the performance of diamond-coated micro end mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, C. D.; Heaney, P. J.; Sumant, A. V.; Hamilton, M. A.; Carpick, R. W.; Pfefferkorn, F. E.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Univ. of Pennsylvania

    2009-06-01

    A method is presented to improve the tool life and cutting performance of 300 {micro}m diameter tungsten carbide (WC) micro end mills by applying thin (<300 nm) fine-grained diamond (FGD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings using the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) process. The performance of the diamond-coated tools has been evaluated by comparing their performance in dry slot milling of 6061-T6 aluminum against uncoated WC micro end mills. Tool wear, coating integrity, and chip morphology were characterized using SEM and white light interferometry. The initial test results show a dramatic improvement in the tool integrity (i.e., corners not breaking off), a lower wear rate, no observable adhesion of aluminum to the diamond-coated tool, and a significant reduction in the cutting forces (>50%). Reduction of the cutting forces is attributed to the low friction and adhesion of the diamond coating. However, approximately 80% of the tools coated with the larger FGD coatings failed during testing due to delamination. Additional machining benefits were attained for the NCD films, which was obtained by using a higher nucleation density seeding process for diamond growth. This process allowed for thinner, smaller grained diamond coatings to be deposited on the micro end mills, and enabled continued operation of the tool even after the integrity of the diamond coating had been compromised. As opposed to the FGD-coated end mills, only 40% of the NCD-tools experienced delamination issues.

  19. Cr-rich rutile: A powerful tool for diamond exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkovets, V. G.; Rezvukhin, D. I.; Belousova, E. A.; Griffin, W. L.; Sharygin, I. S.; Tretiakova, I. G.; Gibsher, A. A.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Kuzmin, D. V.; Litasov, K. D.; Logvinova, A. M.; Pokhilenko, N. P.; Sobolev, N. V.

    2016-11-01

    Mineralogical studies and U-Pb dating have been carried out on rutile included in peridotitic and eclogitic garnets from the Internatsionalnaya pipe, Mirny field, Siberian craton. We also describe a unique peridotitic paragenesis (rutile + forsterite + enstatite + Cr-diopside + Cr-pyrope) preserved in diamond from the Mir pipe, Mirny field. Compositions of rutile from the heavy mineral concentrates of the Internatsionalnaya pipe and rutile inclusions in crustal almandine-rich garnets from the Mayskaya pipe (Nakyn field), as well as from a range of different lithologies, are presented for comparison. Rutile from cratonic mantle peridotites shows characteristic enrichment in Cr, in contrast to lower-Cr rutile from crustal rocks and off-craton mantle. Rutile with Cr2O3 > 1.7 wt% is commonly derived from cratonic mantle, while rutiles with lower Cr2O3 may be both of cratonic and off-cratonic origin. New analytical developments and availability of standards have made rutile accessible to in situ U-Pb dating by laser ablation ICP-MS. A U-Pb age of 369 ± 10 Ma for 9 rutile grains in 6 garnets from the Internatsionalnaya pipe is consistent with the accepted eruption age of the pipe (360 Ma). The equilibrium temperatures of pyropes with rutile inclusions calculated using Ni-in-Gar thermometer range between 725 and 1030 °C, corresponding to a depth range of ca 100-165 km. At the time of entrainment in the kimberlite, garnets with Cr-rich rutile inclusions resided at temperatures well above the closure temperature for Pb in rutile, and thus U-Pb ages on mantle-derived rutile most likely record the emplacement age of the kimberlites. The synthesis of distinctive rutile compositions and U-Pb dating opens new perspectives for using rutile in diamond exploration in cratonic areas.

  20. Detection of Cutting Tool Wear using Statistical Analysis and Regression Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Jaharah A.; Rizal, Muhammad; Nuawi, Mohd Zaki; Haron, Che Hassan Che; Ramli, Rizauddin

    2010-10-01

    This study presents a new method for detecting the cutting tool wear based on the measured cutting force signals. A statistical-based method called Integrated Kurtosis-based Algorithm for Z-Filter technique, called I-kaz was used for developing a regression model and 3D graphic presentation of I-kaz 3D coefficient during machining process. The machining tests were carried out using a CNC turning machine Colchester Master Tornado T4 in dry cutting condition. A Kistler 9255B dynamometer was used to measure the cutting force signals, which were transmitted, analyzed, and displayed in the DasyLab software. Various force signals from machining operation were analyzed, and each has its own I-kaz 3D coefficient. This coefficient was examined and its relationship with flank wear lands (VB) was determined. A regression model was developed due to this relationship, and results of the regression model shows that the I-kaz 3D coefficient value decreases as tool wear increases. The result then is used for real time tool wear monitoring.

  1. On the Problem of Wear Resistant Coatings Separation From Tools and Machine Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrushin, S. I.; Gubaidulina, R. H.; Gruby, S. V.; Likholat, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The article considers separation of wear resistant coatings of tool and engineering materials which arises both during coating fabrication and use of the product. The cause of this phenomenon is assumed to be related to thermal residual stresses generating on the coating- substrate border. These stresses have been analyzed and methods are provided to calculate it after produced composite material is cooled down from the temperature of coating synthesis to the ambient temperature. A no-fracture condition has been stated in relation to coating- substrate thicknesses, temperature differences and physical and mechanical properties of combined materials. The issue of intermediate layer incorporation with pre-set parameters has been discussed. A co-effect of thermal residual and functional stresses on the strength of the boundary layer has been considered when heating, tension and compression of a product with wear resistant coating. Conclusions have been made, as well as recommendations to improve fracture strength of products with thin wear resistant coatings.

  2. A comparative assessment of texture analysis techniques applied to bone tool use-wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Adam S.; Gleason, Matthew A.

    2016-06-01

    The study of bone tools, a specific class of artifacts often essential to perishable craft production, provides insight into industries otherwise largely invisible archaeologically. Building on recent breakthroughs in the analysis of microwear, this research applies confocal laser scanning microscopy and texture analysis techniques drawn from the field of surface metrology to identify use-wear patterns on experimental and archaeological bone artifacts. Our approach utilizes both conventional parameters and multi-scale geometric characterizations of the areas of worn surfaces to identify statistical similarities as a function of scale. The introduction of this quantitative approach to the study of microtopography holds significant potential for advancement in use-wear studies by reducing inter-observer variability and identifying new parameters useful in the detection of differential wear-patterns.

  3. Machinability of Green Powder Metallurgy Components: Part I. Characterization of the Influence of Tool Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Perron, Etienne; Blais, Carl; Pelletier, Sylvain; Thomas, Yannig

    2007-06-01

    The green machining process is an interesting approach for solving the mediocre machining behavior of high-performance powder metallurgy (PM) steels. This process appears as a promising method for extending tool life and reducing machining costs. Recent improvements in binder/lubricant technologies have led to high green strength systems that enable green machining. So far, tool wear has been considered negligible when characterizing the machinability of green PM specimens. This inaccurate assumption may lead to the selection of suboptimum cutting conditions. The first part of this study involves the optimization of the machining parameters to minimize the effects of tool wear on the machinability in turning of green PM components. The second part of our work compares the sintered mechanical properties of components machined in green state with other machined after sintering.

  4. Surface Roughness and Tool Wear on Cryogenic Treated CBN Insert on Titanium and Inconel 718 Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamizhmanii, S.; Mohideen, R.; Zaidi, A. M. A.; Hasan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Machining of materials by super hard tools like cubic boron nitride (cbn) and poly cubic boron nitride (pcbn) is to reduce tool wear to obtain dimensional accuracy, smooth surface and more number of parts per cutting edge. wear of tools is inevitable due to rubbing action between work material and tool edge. however, the tool wear can be minimized by using super hard tools by enhancing the strength of the cutting inserts. one such process is cryogenic process. this process is used in all materials and cutting inserts which requires wear resistance. the cryogenic process is executed under subzero temperature -186° celsius for longer period of time in a closed chamber which contains liquid nitrogen. in this research, cbn inserts with cryogenically treated was used to turn difficult to cut metals like titanium, inconel 718 etc. the turning parameters used is different cutting speeds, feed rates and depth of cut. in this research, titanium and inconel 718 material were used. the results obtained are surface roughness, flank wear and crater wear. the surface roughness obtained on titanium was lower at high cutting speed compared with inconel 718. the flank wear was low while turning titanium than inconel 718. crater wear is less on inconel 718 than titanium alloy. all the two materials produced saw tooth chips.

  5. Audio signal analysis for tool wear monitoring in sheet metal stamping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubhayaratne, Indivarie; Pereira, Michael P.; Xiang, Yong; Rolfe, Bernard F.

    2017-02-01

    Stamping tool wear can significantly degrade product quality, and hence, online tool condition monitoring is a timely need in many manufacturing industries. Even though a large amount of research has been conducted employing different sensor signals, there is still an unmet demand for a low-cost easy to set up condition monitoring system. Audio signal analysis is a simple method that has the potential to meet this demand, but has not been previously used for stamping process monitoring. Hence, this paper studies the existence and the significance of the correlation between emitted sound signals and the wear state of sheet metal stamping tools. The corrupting sources generated by the tooling of the stamping press and surrounding machinery have higher amplitudes compared to that of the sound emitted by the stamping operation itself. Therefore, a newly developed semi-blind signal extraction technique was employed as a pre-processing technique to mitigate the contribution of these corrupting sources. The spectral analysis results of the raw and extracted signals demonstrate a significant qualitative relationship between wear progression and the emitted sound signature. This study lays the basis for employing low-cost audio signal analysis in the development of a real-time industrial tool condition monitoring system.

  6. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  7. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Gene W.; Roybal, Herman E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  8. Process for ultra smooth diamond coating on metals and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); Catledge, Shane A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a new process to deposit well adhered ultra smooth diamond films on metals by adding nitrogen gas to the methane/hydrogen plasma created by a microwave discharge. Such diamond coating process is useful in tribological/wear resistant applications in bio-implants, machine tools, and magnetic recording industry.

  9. Tool wear detection in milling—An original approach with a non-dedicated sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girardin, François; Rémond, Didier; Rigal, Jean-François

    2010-08-01

    The aim of increasing productivity often makes optimising processes a priority and a means of anticipating defects. Metal cutting conditions are monitored to detect tool wear or breaks, so as to protect both machines and workpieces. Such monitoring relies on many different signals though two main approaches can be considered. The first consists in adding numerous sensors to the machine to obtain specific information, such as vibrations and cutting forces. The second consists in using information, often current or shaft power consumption, that can already be obtained from the machine and detected by standard sensors. This work focuses on the second approach that relies on using the sensors already installed, but optimising their capacities to the maximum for use under industrial conditions. The spindle rotary encoder signal is acquired through two systems: the first uses classical time-sampling while the second uses specific angular-sampling methodology. The differences between the two rotational frequency calculation technologies are described and discussed before focusing on the second methodology. Comparisons of cutting forces and variations in spindle rotational frequency reveal considerable similarities. Thus the occurrence of tool wear can be observed by monitoring variations in rotational frequency, and the genesis of tool tooth breaks can be established. Finally, we establish criteria for critical wear detection in both time and frequency domains.

  10. Three-dimensional cathodoluminescence imaging and electron backscatter diffraction: tools for studying the genetic nature of diamond inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Drury, M. R.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Bulanova, G. P.; Pearson, D. G.; Davies, G. R.

    2011-04-01

    As a step towards resolving the genesis of inclusions in diamonds, a new technique is presented. This technique combines cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) using a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) instrument with the aim of determining, in detail, the three-dimensional diamond zonation adjacent to a diamond inclusion. EBSD reveals that mineral inclusions in a single diamond have similar crystallographic orientations to the host, within ±0.4°. The chromite inclusions record a systematic change in Mg# and Cr# from core to the rim of the diamond that corresponds with a ~80°C decrease of their formation temperature as established by zinc thermometry. A chromite inclusion, positioned adjacent to a boundary between two major diamond growth zones, is multi-faceted with preferred octahedral and cubic faces. The chromite is surrounded by a volume of non-luminescent diamond (CL halo) that partially obscures any diamond growth structures. The CL halo has apparent crystallographic morphology with symmetrically oriented pointed features. The CL halo is enriched in ~200 ppm Cr and ~80 ppm Fe and is interpreted to have a secondary origin as it overprints a major primary diamond growth structure. The diamond zonation adjacent to the chromite is complex and records both syngenetic and protogenetic features based on current inclusion entrapment models. In this specific case, a syngenetic origin is favoured with the complex form of the inclusion and growth layers indicating changes of growth rates at the diamond-chromite interface. Combined EBSD and 3D-CL imaging appears an extremely useful tool in resolving the ongoing discussion about the timing of inclusion growth and the significance of diamond inclusion studies.

  11. Microstructural analyses and wear behavior of the cemented carbide tools after laser surface treatment and PVD coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Davi; Diniz, Anselmo Eduardo; Lima, Milton Sérgio Fernandes

    2013-10-01

    Adhesion is one of the most important characteristics of coating on cutting tools. Poor coating adhesion on the tool favors fragmentation and release of hard abrasive particles between the tool and the workpiece. These particles interact with the surfaces of the tool, accelerating its wear and decreasing tool life. One possible solution is the use of laser texturing prior to coating in order to achieve a desired surface topography with enhanced adhesion properties. In the texturing, a high-frequency short-pulse laser changes surface characteristics, generating resolidified material and selective vaporization. This work evaluated the effectiveness of laser texturing in improving the substrate-coating adhesion of PVD coated cemented carbide tools. To this end, the substrates were textured with a Nd:YAG laser, in four different intensities, and then coated with a PVD TiAlN film. To ascertain the effectiveness of laser texturing, Rockwell C indentation and turning experiments were performed on both textured tools and conventional unlasered tools. The PVD coated laser-textured tool showed better performance in the indentation and turning tests than the standard tools. A comparative evaluation of tool wear mechanisms indicated that texturing did not change the wear mechanisms, but altered their importance to tool wear. The anchoring provided by the higher roughness of the textured surface increased the adhesion of the coating on the substrate, thus increasing tool life. Additionally, the chemical modification of the carbide grains due to the laser heating might be responsible for an enhanced adhesion between coating and substrate.

  12. Dynamic High-Pressure Shock Compaction of Diamond Powders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-25

    superhard cutting tools and wear-resistant coatings for mechanical and optical components, to heat-sink substrates for electronic semi-conductor devices.2...tions. Carbonados can also be synthesized and sintered to make * cutting tools . Ballas diamonds are round, dense and randomly oriented polycrystals

  13. Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M.; Ariga, T.

    2010-03-01

    Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500° C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950° C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

  14. Effect of Decreasing of Cobalt Content in Properties for Diamond/Cemented Carbide Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Waratta, A.; Hamdi, M.; Ariga, T.

    2010-03-11

    Powder metallurgy plays a role in manufacturing such as automotive and cutting tool applications. Diamond/cemented carbide tools are also made from this technique. Diamond particle and other matrix materials were employed in this study. The purpose is to investigate the physical and mechanical properties of different Cobalt (Co) content samples by using Taguchi's method. The materials used in the experiments were mixed by using a ball-mill machine. The mixed powders were pressed by conventional method. Then the green samples were sintered in a vacuum furnace. After reaching 500 deg. C, the samples were sintered with Argon (Ar) gas. The sintered samples were investigated density by immersion method, porosity by water saturation method, and hardness by Vicker hardness tester. It was found that with 59.5% Co content, plain diamond type, sintering temperature of 950 deg. C, sintering time of 40 minutes, and pressure of 625 MPa, density, porosity, and hardness got the best result in this study. From the Taguchi's analysis, the significant factors effected the performance were composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time.

  15. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-01

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry1,2,3. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago1. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear. First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test. All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  16. Tribology and Tool Wear of Hot Dip Galvanized Zinc Magnesium Alloys on Cold Rolled Steel Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, A. E.; Berger, E.; Freudenthaler, J.; Leomann, F.; Walch, C.

    2011-05-04

    Recently zinc based coatings on cold rolled steel with improved functionality in terms of forming and/or corrosion behaviour have been intensively investigated in the steel industry. One of the most promising products are zinc magnesium alloys produced in hot dip galvanizing process. These coatings were already introduced in construction industry a few years ago. With some modifications the improved properties of the coating are also interesting for automotive industry. In the present work the tribological potential of hot dip galvanized zinc magnesium coatings (HDG/ZM) produced at an industrial line under regular production, was studied in terms of sliding properties, adhesive and abrasive tool wear.First a short introduction into surface morphology of HDG/ZM will be given. For the tribological characterization of the material, which is the main topic of the contribution, different tests were performed on hot dip galvanised zinc magnesium material and results were compared with classic hot dip galvanized zinc coating (HDG/Z). The investigations are mainly based on the strip draw test which allows the determination of the friction coefficient directly by using a constant contact pressure. Deep drawing property was tested by forming model cups. The abrasive tool wear was tested using a standard test for material used in automotive industry. The adhesive tool wear was investigated by characterizing the coating material transferred to the tool in the strip draw test.All performed tests show an improved drawability of HDG/ZM compared to classical HDG/Z reference material. However the most promising difference between HDG/ZM and HDG/Z is that galling was found to be less for HDG/ZM than for HDG/Z. Therefore HDG/ZM is an interesting system not only with respect to corrosion protection but also in terms of tribology and provides clear advantages in formability.

  17. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds.

    PubMed

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-05-06

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface.

  18. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface.

  19. Voltage assisted asymmetric nanoscale wear on ultra-smooth diamond like carbon thin films at high sliding speeds

    PubMed Central

    Rajauria, Sukumar; Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tribo- and electro-chemical phenomenons on the molecular level at a sliding interface is a field of growing interest. Fundamental chemical and physical insights of sliding surfaces are crucial for understanding wear at an interface, particularly for nano or micro scale devices operating at high sliding speeds. A complete investigation of the electrochemical effects on high sliding speed interfaces requires a precise monitoring of both the associated wear and surface chemical reactions at the interface. Here, we demonstrate that head-disk interface inside a commercial magnetic storage hard disk drive provides a unique system for such studies. The results obtained shows that the voltage assisted electrochemical wear lead to asymmetric wear on either side of sliding interface. PMID:27150446

  20. Aspects of ultra-high-precision diamond machining of RSA 443 optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkoko, Z.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.

    2015-08-01

    Optical aluminium alloys such as 6061-T6 are traditionally used in ultra-high precision manufacturing for making optical mirrors for aerospace and other applications. However, the optics industry has recently witnessed the development of more advanced optical aluminium grades that are capable of addressing some of the issues encountered when turning with single-point natural monocrystalline diamond cutters. The advent of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades has generally opened up new possibilities for ultra-high precision manufacturing of optical components. In this study, experiments were conducted with single-point diamond cutters on rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 443 material. The objective of this study is to observe the effects of depth of cut and feed rate at a fixed rotational speed on the tool wear rate and resulting surface roughness of diamond turned specimens. This is done to gain further understanding of the rate of wear on the diamond cutters versus the surface texture generated on the RSA 443 material. The diamond machining experiments yielded machined surfaces which are less reflective but with consistent surface roughness values. Cutting tools were observed for wear through scanning microscopy; relatively low wear pattern was evident on the diamond tool edge. The highest tool wear were obtained at higher depth of cut and increased feed rate.

  1. Comparative investigation of smooth polycrystalline diamond films on dental burs by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Rego, Christopher; Jackson, Mark; Polini, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    Depositions of hot filament chemical vapor-deposited diamond on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) rotary cutting dental burs are presented. Conventional dental tools made of sintered polycrystalline diamond have a number of problems associated with the heterogeneity of the crystallite, decreased cutting efficiency, and short life. A preferential (111) faceted diamond was obtained after 15 h of deposition at a growth rate of 1.1 µm/h. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs and conventional sintered burs are mainly used in turning, milling, and drilling operations for machining metal ceramic hard alloys such as CoCr, composite teeth, and aluminum alloy in the dental laboratory. The influence of structure, the mechanical characteristics of both diamond grains and hard alloys on the wear behavior, as well as the regimen of grinding on diamond wear are considered. Erosion wear properties are also investigated under air-sand erosion testing. After machining with excessive cutting performance, calculations can be made on flank and crater wear areas. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs offered significantly better erosion and wear resistance compared with uncoated WC-Co tools and sintered burs.

  2. Self-sharpening-effect of nickel-diamond coatings sprayed by HVOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Brinkhoff, A.; Schaak, C.; Zajaczkowski, J.

    2017-03-01

    The durability of stone working and drilling tools is an increasingly significant requirement in industrial applications. These tools are mainly produced by brazing diamond metal matrix composites inserts to the tool body. These inserts are produced by sintering diamonds and metal powder (e.g. nickel). If the wear is too high, the diamonds will break out of the metal matrix and other diamonds will be uncovered. This effect is called self-sharpening. But diamonds are difficult to handle because of their thermal sensitivity. Due to their high thermal influence, manufacturing costs, and complicate route of manufacturing (first sintering, then brazing), there is a great need for alternative production methods for such tools. One alternative to produce wear-resistant and self-sharpening coatings are thermal spray processes as examined in this paper. An advantage of thermal spray processes is their smaller thermal influence on the diamond, due to the short dwelling time in the flame. To reduce the thermal influence during spraying, nickel coated diamonds were used in the HVOF-process (high velocity oxygen fuel process). The wear resistance was subsequently investigated by means of a standardized ball-on-disc test. Furthermore, a SEM (scanning electron microscope) was used to gain information about the wear-mechanism and the self-sharpening effect of the coating.

  3. Wear behavior and tool life of modified WC-based cemented carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaumik, S.K.; Upadhyaya, G.S.; Vaidya, M.L. . Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    The alloy design of WC-10 Co cemented carbides by adding hard phases like TiC/TiN and modifying the binder phase with nickel and molybdenum has been highlighted by the authors elsewhere. The present investigation was aimed at evaluating performance of such cemented carbides in steel cutting. Addition of TiC/TiN improved the crater wear resistance and tool life of WC-10 Co cemented carbide, the improvement being better with TiN additions compared with TiC. Binder phase composition was important in controlling the microstructure and mechanical properties of the tool materials, which had a direct influence on cutting performance. The results were analyzed in terms of microstructure and various properties, viz., hardness, transverse rupture strength, oxidation resistance, and thermal shock resistance, which have a bearing on tool life.

  4. Modeling and Adhesive Tool Wear in Dry Drilling of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girot, F.; Gutiérrez-Orrantia, M. E.; Calamaz, M.; Coupard, D.

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in aeronautic drilling operations is the elimination of cutting fluids while maintaining the quality of drilled parts. This paper therefore aims to increase the tool life and process quality by working on relationships existing between drilling parameters (cutting speed and feed rate), coatings and tool geometry. In dry drilling, the phenomenon of Built-Up Layer is the predominant damage mechanism. A model fitting the axial force with the cutting parameters and the damage has been developed. The burr thickness and its dispersion decrease with the feed rate. The current diamond coatings which exhibit a strong adhesion to the carbide substrate can limit this adhesive layer phenomenon. A relatively smooth nano-structured coating strongly limits the development of this layer.

  5. Modeling and Adhesive Tool Wear in Dry Drilling of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Girot, F.; Gutierrez-Orrantia, M. E.

    2011-01-17

    One of the challenges in aeronautic drilling operations is the elimination of cutting fluids while maintaining the quality of drilled parts. This paper therefore aims to increase the tool life and process quality by working on relationships existing between drilling parameters (cutting speed and feed rate), coatings and tool geometry. In dry drilling, the phenomenon of Built-Up Layer is the predominant damage mechanism. A model fitting the axial force with the cutting parameters and the damage has been developed. The burr thickness and its dispersion decrease with the feed rate. The current diamond coatings which exhibit a strong adhesion to the carbide substrate can limit this adhesive layer phenomenon. A relatively smooth nano-structured coating strongly limits the development of this layer.

  6. DIAMONDS: A new Bayesian nested sampling tool. Application to peak bagging of solar-like oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsaro, E.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-11-01

    Context. Thanks to the advent of the space-based missions CoRoT and NASA's Kepler, the asteroseismology of solar-like oscillations is now at the base of our understanding about stellar physics. The Kepler spacecraft, especially, is releasing excellent photometric observations of more than three years length in high duty cycle, which contain a large amount of information that has not yet been investigated. Aims: To exploit the full potential of Kepler light curves, sophisticated and robust analysis tools are now required more than ever. Characterizing single stars with an unprecedented level of accuracy and subsequently analyzing stellar populations in detail are fundamental to further constrain stellar structure and evolutionary models. Methods: We developed a new code, termed Diamonds, for Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison by means of the nested sampling Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm, an efficient and powerful method very suitable for high-dimensional and multi-modal problems. A detailed description of the features implemented in the code is given with a focus on the novelties and differences with respect to other existing methods based on NSMC. Diamonds is then tested on the bright F8 V star KIC 9139163, a challenging target for peak-bagging analysis due to its large number of oscillation peaks observed, which are coupled to the blending that occurs between ℓ = 2,0 peaks, and the strong stellar background signal. We further strain the performance of the approach by adopting a 1147.5 days-long Kepler light curve, accounting for more than 840 000 data bins in the power spectrum of the star. Results: The Diamonds code is able to provide robust results for the peak-bagging analysis of KIC 9139163, while preserving a considerable computational efficiency for identifying the solution at the same time. We test the detection of different astrophysical backgrounds in the star and provide a criterion based on the Bayesian evidence for assessing the peak

  7. Tool wear condition monitoring using a sensor fusion model based on fuzzy inference system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliustaoglu, Cuneyt; Ertunc, H. Metin; Ocak, Hasan

    2009-02-01

    One of the biggest problems in manufacturing is the failure of machine tools due to loss of surface material in cutting operations like drilling and milling. Carrying on the process with a dull tool may damage the workpiece material fabricated. On the other hand, it is unnecessary to change the cutting tool if it is still able to continue cutting operation. Therefore, an effective diagnosis mechanism is necessary for the automation of machining processes so that production loss and downtime can be avoided. This study concerns with the development of a tool wear condition-monitoring technique based on a two-stage fuzzy logic scheme. For this, signals acquired from various sensors were processed to make a decision about the status of the tool. In the first stage of the proposed scheme, statistical parameters derived from thrust force, machine sound (acquired via a very sensitive microphone) and vibration signals were used as inputs to fuzzy process; and the crisp output values of this process were then taken as the input parameters of the second stage. Conclusively, outputs of this stage were taken into a threshold function, the output of which is used to assess the condition of the tool.

  8. The wear of the carbide cutting tools coated with TiN during the milling of Inconel 738

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebhi, A.; Douib, N.

    2017-02-01

    The machining of superalloy parts still an area not very clear in mechanical manufacturing. It is found to be used in particular areas such as gas turbine, rocket engine, space ships, nuclear reactors, and pumps. The machining of Inconel 738 superalloy has been studied in this context, with the aim to understand the wear behavior with carbide inserts coated with TiN and in order to optimize the cutting parameters before starting the production. The wear behavior of the inserts during the machining process of a very tough austenitic superalloy is unclear, and requires a series of well determined tests. The life of the insert under high stress such as pressure, cutting speed, high temperature, in a hostile zone and in contact with a very tough and harder material is determined. The generated process of wear is very complex, because it is followed by physico-chemical phenomenon appearing on the contact surfaces between the active part of the tool and workpiece.The lifetime of machine tools often depends on the tribological characteristics of the material couples (cutting tool / material to be machined). It has been shown that the most influential parameter is the coating, then comes the sliding speed. A relationship between the wear VB and the roughness Ra is proposed to collect information on the cutting edge and the quality of the tool by measuring the roughness. For wear measurement, an indirect method is used in coupling a Touptek photonics camera to capture and Ttoupview analysis software.

  9. Inhibiting the oxidation of diamond during preparing the vitrified dental grinding tools by depositing a ZnO coating using direct urea precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhui; Yuan, Yungang; Cheng, Xiaozhe; Li, Xiaohu; Zang, Jianbing; Lu, Jing; Yu, Yiqing; Xu, Xipeng

    2015-08-01

    Oxidation of diamond during the manufacturing of vitrified dental grinding tools would reduce the strength and sharpness of tools. Zinc oxide (ZnO) coating was deposited on diamond particles by urea precipitation method to protect diamond in borosilicate glass. The FESEM results showed that the ZnO coating was formed by plate-shaped particles. According to the TG results, the onset oxidation temperature of the ZnO-coated diamond was about 70 °C higher than the pristine diamond. The EDS results showed that ZnO diffused into the borosilicate glass during sintering. As the result, the bending strength of the composites containing ZnO-coated diamond was increased by 24% compared to that of the composites containing pristine diamond.

  10. Effect of biomimetic coupling units' morphologies on rolling contact fatigue wear resistance of steel from machine tool rolling tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wanshi; Zhou, Hong; Sun, Liang; Wang, Chuanwei; Chen, Zhikai

    2014-04-01

    The rolling contact fatigue wear resistance plays an important role on ensuring machining precision of machine tool using rolling tracks. Bio-inspired wearable surfaces with the alternated hardness were prepared on the specimen of steel material from machine tool rolling tracks by biomimetic coupling laser remelting method to imitate biological coupling principle. The microstructures and micromorphologies of bionic units in different sizes were characterized by optical microscope. The specimens with bionic units in different sizes and distributions were tested for rolling contact fatigue wear resistance. Combining the finite element analysis and the results of wear tests, a discussion on rolling contact fatigue wear was had. The specimens with bionic units had better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the untreated one, while the specimens with bionic units in the alternative depth's distributions present a better rolling contact fatigue wear resistance than the ones with bionic units in the single depth's distribution. It attributed to the alternative distribution made further improvement on the dispersion of depth of stress concentration.

  11. CNC machine tool's wear diagnostic and prognostic by using dynamic Bayesian networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Mejia, D. A.; Medjaher, K.; Zerhouni, N.

    2012-04-01

    The failure of critical components in industrial systems may have negative consequences on the availability, the productivity, the security and the environment. To avoid such situations, the health condition of the physical system, and particularly of its critical components, can be constantly assessed by using the monitoring data to perform on-line system diagnostics and prognostics. The present paper is a contribution on the assessment of the health condition of a computer numerical control (CNC) tool machine and the estimation of its remaining useful life (RUL). The proposed method relies on two main phases: an off-line phase and an on-line phase. During the first phase, the raw data provided by the sensors are processed to extract reliable features. These latter are used as inputs of learning algorithms in order to generate the models that represent the wear's behavior of the cutting tool. Then, in the second phase, which is an assessment one, the constructed models are exploited to identify the tool's current health state, predict its RUL and the associated confidence bounds. The proposed method is applied on a benchmark of condition monitoring data gathered during several cuts of a CNC tool. Simulation results are obtained and discussed at the end of the paper.

  12. The function of prehistoric lithic tools: a combined study of use-wear analysis and FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunziante Cesaro, Stella; Lemorini, Cristina

    2012-02-01

    The application of combined use-wear analysis and FTIR micro spectroscopy for the investigation of the flint and obsidian tools from the archaeological sites of Masseria Candelaro (Foggia, Italy) and Sant'Anna di Oria (Brindisi, Italy) aiming to clarify their functional use is described. The tools excavated in the former site showed in a very high percentage spectroscopically detectable residues on their working edges. The identification of micro deposits is based on comparison with a great number of replicas studied in the same experimental conditions. FTIR data confirmed in almost all cases the use-wear analysis suggestions and added details about the material processed and about the working procedures.

  13. Modeling of Principal Flank Wear: An Empirical Approach Combining the Effect of Tool, Environment and Workpiece Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mia, Mozammel; Al Bashir, Mahmood; Dhar, Nikhil Ranjan

    2016-10-01

    Hard turning is increasingly employed in machining, lately, to replace time-consuming conventional turning followed by grinding process. An excessive amount of tool wear in hard turning is one of the main hurdles to be overcome. Many researchers have developed tool wear model, but most of them developed it for a particular work-tool-environment combination. No aggregate model is developed that can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. An empirical model of principal flank wear (VB) has been developed for the different hardness of workpiece (HRC40, HRC48 and HRC56) while turning by coated carbide insert with different configurations (SNMM and SNMG) under both dry and high pressure coolant conditions. Unlike other developed model, this model includes the use of dummy variables along with the base empirical equation to entail the effect of any changes in the input conditions on the response. The base empirical equation for principal flank wear is formulated adopting the Exponential Associate Function using the experimental results. The coefficient of dummy variable reflects the shifting of the response from one set of machining condition to another set of machining condition which is determined by simple linear regression. The independent cutting parameters (speed, rate, depth of cut) are kept constant while formulating and analyzing this model. The developed model is validated with different sets of machining responses in turning hardened medium carbon steel by coated carbide inserts. For any particular set, the model can be used to predict the amount of principal flank wear for specific machining time. Since the predicted results exhibit good resemblance with experimental data and the average percentage error is <10 %, this model can be used to predict the principal flank wear for stated conditions.

  14. The effect of nitrogen and oxygen plasma on the wear properties and adhesion strength of the diamond-like carbon film coated on PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozeki, K.; Hirakuri, K. K.

    2008-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) using a radiofrequency plasma chemical vapour deposition method. Prior to DLC coating, the PTFE substrates were modified with O 2 and N 2 plasma to enhance the adhesion strength of the DLC film to the substrate. The effect of the plasma pre-treatment on the chemical composition and the surface energy of the plasma pre-treated PTFE surface was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurement, respectively. A pull-out test and a ball-on-disc test were carried out to evaluate the adhesion strength and the wear properties of the DLC-coated PTFE. In the N 2 plasma pre-treatment, the XPS result indicated that defluorination and the nitrogen grafting occurred on the plasma pre-treated PTFE surface, and the water contact angle decreased with increasing the plasma pre-treatment time. In the O 2 plasma pre-treatment, no grafting of the oxygen occurred, and the water contact angle slightly increased with the treatment time. In the pull-out test, the adhesion strength of the DLC film to the PTFE substrate was improved with the plasma pre-treatment to the PTFE substrate, and N 2 plasma pre-treatment was more effective than the O 2 plasma pre-treatment. In the ball-on-disc test, the DLC film with the N 2 plasma pre-treatment showed good wear resistance, compared with that with O 2 plasma pre-treatment.

  15. Synthesis and Mechanical Wear Studies of Ultra Smooth Nanostructured Diamond (USND) Coatings Deposited by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition with He/H2/CH4/N2 Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, S.; Borham, J.; Catledge, S. A.; Eberhardt, A. W.; Johnson, P. S.; Vohra, Y. K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra smooth nanostructured diamond (USND) coatings were deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) technique using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS surface roughness as low as 4 nm (2 micron square area) and grain size of 5–6 nm diamond coatings were achieved on medical grade titanium alloy. Previously it was demonstrated that the C2 species in the plasma is responsible for the production of nanocrystalline diamond coatings in the Ar/H2/CH4 gas mixture. In this work we have found that CN species is responsible for the production of USND coatings in He/H2/CH4/N2 plasma. It was found that diamond coatings deposited with higher CN species concentration (normalized by Balmer Hα line) in the plasma produced smoother and highly nanostructured diamond coatings. The correlation between CN/Hα ratios with the coating roughness and grain size were also confirmed with different set of gas flows/plasma parameters. It is suggested that the presence of CN species could be responsible for producing nanocrystallinity in the growth of USND coatings using He/H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture. The RMS roughness of 4 nm and grain size of 5–6 nm were calculated from the deposited diamond coatings using the gas mixture which produced the highest CN/Hα species in the plasma. Wear tests were performed on the OrthoPOD®, a six station pin-on-disk apparatus with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) pins articulating on USND disks and CoCrMo alloy disk. Wear of the UHMWPE was found to be lower for the polyethylene on USND than that of polyethylene on CoCrMo alloy. PMID:19112519

  16. SintClad: A New Approach for the Production of Wear-Resistant Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blüm, M.; Hill, H.; Moll, H.; Weber, S.; Theisen, W.

    2012-05-01

    Tools used in the mineral processing industry are required to feature high wear resistance to facilitate an adequate cost efficiency. These kinds of tools are made of composite materials based on a low-alloyed substrate material and a high-alloyed coating. The coatings can be applied in different ways using production processes like HIP cladding, deposit welding, and composite casting. The article is concerned with the problem of a novel and cost-effective coating alternative: sinter cladding, using the principle of super-solidus liquid-phase sintering (SLPS). Usually SLPS represents a sintering technique, which is used for the compaction of high-alloyed metal powders. However, no recognizable efforts were made to use the SLPS-process for applying a PM-coating on a bulk substrate material. Sinter cladding for the first time uses SLPS to combine the process of powder compaction with the application of a coating to a solid steel substrate into one single step. Another advantage of the process is the possibility to produce massive bulk coatings with thicknesses exceeding 20 mm. This article is original in the scope of question and investigation methods in terms of microstructure, hardness profiles, EDX measurements, diffusion calculations, and computational thermodynamics.

  17. A numerical study of ultraprecision machining of monocrystalline silicon with laser nano-structured diamond tools by atomistic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Houfu; Chen, Genyu; Zhou, Cong; Fang, Qihong; Fei, Xinjiang

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimension molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is employed to investigate the ultraprecision machining of single crystal silicon with structured nanoscale diamond tool fabricated by laser. The advantages and disadvantages of diamond machining using structured tools are discussed in comparison with those of using non-structured tools. The von Mises stress distribution, hydrostatic stress distribution, atomic displacement, stress, the radial distribution function, cutting forces, frictional coefficient, subsurface temperature and potential energy during the nanometric machining process are studied. A theoretical analysis model is also established to investigate the subsurface damage mechanism by analyzing the distribution of residual stress during the nanoscale machining process. The results show that a structured nanoscale tool in machining brittle material silicon causes a smaller hydrostatic stress, a less compressive normal stress σxx and σyy , a lower temperature and a smaller cutting force. However, the structured nanoscale tool machining results in smaller chip volume and more beta-silicon phase. Besides, the friction coefficient for tool with V-shape groove is smaller than those for non-structured tools and other structured nanoscale tools. This means that the tool with V-shape groove can reduce the resistance to cutting during the nanoscale machining process. In addition, the results also point out that the potential energy of subsurface atoms and the number of other atoms for pyramid-structured tool are much smaller than those of using non-structured tools and other structured nanoscale tools.

  18. Diamond coated dental bur machining of natural and synthetic dental materials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W

    2004-12-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC with an average grain size 1-3 micron were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and the bur it is necessary to etch away the surface Co to prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (H.F.C.V.D.) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterised using scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, and model tooth materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining natural and synthetic dental materials such as those described above.

  19. Tribological Characteristics and Applications of Superhard Coatings: CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Results of fundamental research on the tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond, diamondlike carbon, and cubic boron nitride films in sliding contact with CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, humid air, and water are discussed. Furthermore, the actual and potential applications of the three different superhard coatings in the field of tribology technology, particularly for wear parts and tools, are reviewed.

  20. Modeling the milling tool wear by using an evolutionary SVM-based model from milling runs experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Paulino José García; García-Gonzalo, Esperanza; Vilán, José Antonio Vilán; Robleda, Abraham Segade

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research work is to build a new practical hybrid regression model to predict the milling tool wear in a regular cut as well as entry cut and exit cut of a milling tool. The model was based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in combination with support vector machines (SVMs). This optimization mechanism involved kernel parameter setting in the SVM training procedure, which significantly influences the regression accuracy. Bearing this in mind, a PSO-SVM-based model, which is based on the statistical learning theory, was successfully used here to predict the milling tool flank wear (output variable) as a function of the following input variables: the time duration of experiment, depth of cut, feed, type of material, etc. To accomplish the objective of this study, the experimental dataset represents experiments from runs on a milling machine under various operating conditions. In this way, data sampled by three different types of sensors (acoustic emission sensor, vibration sensor and current sensor) were acquired at several positions. A second aim is to determine the factors with the greatest bearing on the milling tool flank wear with a view to proposing milling machine's improvements. Firstly, this hybrid PSO-SVM-based regression model captures the main perception of statistical learning theory in order to obtain a good prediction of the dependence among the flank wear (output variable) and input variables (time, depth of cut, feed, etc.). Indeed, regression with optimal hyperparameters was performed and a determination coefficient of 0.95 was obtained. The agreement of this model with experimental data confirmed its good performance. Secondly, the main advantages of this PSO-SVM-based model are its capacity to produce a simple, easy-to-interpret model, its ability to estimate the contributions of the input variables, and its computational efficiency. Finally, the main conclusions of this study are exposed.

  1. Use of slide presentation software as a tool to measure hip arthroplasty wear.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ho Hyun; Jajodia, Nirmal K; Myung, Jae Sung; Oh, Jong Keon; Park, Sang Won; Shon, Won Yong

    2009-12-01

    The authors propose a manual measurement method for wear in total hip arthroplasty (PowerPoint method) based on the well-known Microsoft PowerPoint software (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Wash). In addition, the accuracy and reproducibility of the devised method were quantified and compared with two methods previously described by Livermore and Dorr, and accuracies were determined at different degrees of wear. The 57 hips recruited were allocated to: class 1 (retrieval series), class 2 (clinical series), and class 3 (a repeat film analysis series). The PowerPoint method was found to have good reproducibility and to better detect wear differences between classes. The devised method can be easily used for recording wear at follow-up visits and could be used as a supplementary method when computerized methods cannot be employed.

  2. On-machine precision preparation and dressing of ball-headed diamond wheel for the grinding of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingjun; Li, Ziang; Yu, Bo; Peng, Hui; Fang, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    In the grinding of high quality fused silica parts with complex surface or structure using ball-headed metal bonded diamond wheel with small diameter, the existing dressing methods are not suitable to dress the ball-headed diamond wheel precisely due to that they are either on-line in process dressing which may causes collision problem or without consideration for the effects of the tool setting error and electrode wear. An on-machine precision preparation and dressing method is proposed for ball-headed diamond wheel based on electrical discharge machining. By using this method the cylindrical diamond wheel with small diameter is manufactured to hemispherical-headed form. The obtained ball-headed diamond wheel is dressed after several grinding passes to recover geometrical accuracy and sharpness which is lost due to the wheel wear. A tool setting method based on high precision optical system is presented to reduce the wheel center setting error and dimension error. The effect of electrode tool wear is investigated by electrical dressing experiments, and the electrode tool wear compensation model is established based on the experimental results which show that the value of wear ratio coefficient K' tends to be constant with the increasing of the feed length of electrode and the mean value of K' is 0.156. Grinding experiments of fused silica are carried out on a test bench to evaluate the performance of the preparation and dressing method. The experimental results show that the surface roughness of the finished workpiece is 0.03 μm. The effect of the grinding parameter and dressing frequency on the surface roughness is investigated based on the measurement results of the surface roughness. This research provides an on-machine preparation and dressing method for ball-headed metal bonded diamond wheel used in the grinding of fused silica, which provides a solution to the tool setting method and the effect of electrode tool wear.

  3. Influence of minimum quantity lubrication parameters on tool wear and surface roughness in milling of forged steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lutao; Yuan, Songmei; Liu, Qiang

    2012-05-01

    The minimum quantity of lubrication (MQL) technique is becoming increasingly more popular due to the safety of environment. Moreover, MQL technique not only leads to economical benefits by way of saving lubricant costs but also presents better machinability. However, the effect of MQL parameters on machining is still not clear, which needs to be overcome. In this paper, the effect of different modes of lubrication, i.e., conventional way using flushing, dry cutting and using the minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) technique on the machinability in end milling of a forged steel (50CrMnMo), is investigated. The influence of MQL parameters on tool wear and surface roughness is also discussed. MQL parameters include nozzle direction in relation to feed direction, nozzle elevation angle, distance from the nozzle tip to the cutting zone, lubricant flow rate and air pressure. The investigation results show that MQL technique lowers the tool wear and surface roughness values compared with that of conventional flood cutting fluid supply and dry cutting conditions. Based on the investigations of chip morphology and color, MQL technique reduces the cutting temperature to some extent. The relative nozzle-feed position at 120°, the angle elevation of 60° and distance from nozzle tip to cutting zone at 20 mm provide the prolonged tool life and reduced surface roughness values. This fact is due to the oil mists can penetrate in the inner zones of the tool edges in a very efficient way. Improvement in tool life and surface finish could be achieved utilizing higher oil flow rate and higher compressed air pressure. Moreover, oil flow rate increased from 43.8 mL/h to 58.4 mL/h leads to a small decrease of flank wear, but it is not very significant. The results obtained in this paper can be used to determine optimal conditions for milling of forged steel under MQL conditions.

  4. Discrimination of surface wear on obsidian tools using LSCM and RelA: pilot study results (area-scale analysis of obsidian tool surfaces).

    PubMed

    Stemp, W James; Chung, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study tests the reliability of laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) to quantitatively measure wear on experimental obsidian tools. To our knowledge, this is the first use of confocal microscopy to study wear on stone flakes made from an amorphous silicate like obsidian. Three-dimensional surface roughness or texture area scans on three obsidian flakes used on different contact materials (hide, shell, wood) were documented using the LSCM to determine whether the worn surfaces could be discriminated using area-scale analysis, specifically relative area (RelA). When coupled with the F-test, this scale-sensitive fractal analysis could not only discriminate the used from unused surfaces on individual tools, but was also capable of discriminating the wear histories of tools used on different contact materials. Results indicate that such discriminations occur at different scales. Confidence levels for the discriminations at different scales were established using the F-test (mean square ratios or MSRs). In instances where discrimination of surface roughness or texture was not possible above the established confidence level based on MSRs, photomicrographs and RelA assisted in hypothesizing why this was so.

  5. Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes the nature of clean and contaminated diamond surfaces, Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond film deposition technology, analytical techniques and the results of research on CVD diamond films, and the general properties of CVD diamond films. Further, it describes the friction and wear properties of CVD diamond films in the atmosphere, in a controlled nitrogen environment, and in an ultra-high-vacuum environment.

  6. Influence of Cutting Parameters and Tool Wear on the Surface Integrity of Cobalt-Based Stellite 6 Alloy When Machined Under a Dry Cutting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingfei, Ge; de Escalona, Patricia Muñoz; Galloway, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    The efficiency of a machining process can be measured by evaluating the quality of the machined surface and the tool wear rate. The research reported herein is mainly focused on the effect of cutting parameters and tool wear on the machined surface defects, surface roughness, deformation layer and residual stresses when dry milling Stellite 6, deposited by overlay on a carbon steel surface. The results showed that under the selected cutting conditions, abrasion, diffusion, peeling, chipping and breakage were the main tool wear mechanisms presented. Also the feed rate was the primary factor affecting the tool wear with an influence of 83%. With regard to the influence of cutting parameters on the surface roughness, the primary factors were feed rate and cutting speed with 57 and 38%, respectively. In addition, in general, as tool wear increased, the surface roughness increased and the deformation layer was found to be influenced more by the cutting parameters rather than the tool wear. Compressive residual stresses were observed in the un-machined surface, and when machining longer than 5 min, residual stress changed 100% from compression to tension. Finally, results showed that micro-crack initiation was the main mechanism for chip formation.

  7. Influence of Cutting Parameters and Tool Wear on the Surface Integrity of Cobalt-Based Stellite 6 Alloy When Machined Under a Dry Cutting Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingfei, Ge; de Escalona, Patricia Muñoz; Galloway, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency of a machining process can be measured by evaluating the quality of the machined surface and the tool wear rate. The research reported herein is mainly focused on the effect of cutting parameters and tool wear on the machined surface defects, surface roughness, deformation layer and residual stresses when dry milling Stellite 6, deposited by overlay on a carbon steel surface. The results showed that under the selected cutting conditions, abrasion, diffusion, peeling, chipping and breakage were the main tool wear mechanisms presented. Also the feed rate was the primary factor affecting the tool wear with an influence of 83%. With regard to the influence of cutting parameters on the surface roughness, the primary factors were feed rate and cutting speed with 57 and 38%, respectively. In addition, in general, as tool wear increased, the surface roughness increased and the deformation layer was found to be influenced more by the cutting parameters rather than the tool wear. Compressive residual stresses were observed in the un-machined surface, and when machining longer than 5 min, residual stress changed 100% from compression to tension. Finally, results showed that micro-crack initiation was the main mechanism for chip formation.

  8. New sapphire and ruby components and their manufacture using diamond abrasives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauser, D.

    The properties of synthetic aluminum oxides (sapphire and ruby) and their applications in watchmaking (watch bearings and watchglasses) and as hard-wearing components such as centering devices for optical fibres and water jet nozzles for material cutting are discussed. Examples are given of the use of diamonds tools for machining such components, including sawing, drilling, grinding and polishing operations.

  9. Deposition of molybdenum carbide on the surface of diamonds by electrolysis of ionic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Shapoval, V.I.; Kushkhov, Kh.B.; Malyshev, V.V.; Vesna, V.T.; Maslov, V.P.

    1986-12-01

    The use of metallized diamonds in cutting tools considerably improves their performance and service life and thereby results in the reduced consumption of this mineral. The authors of this paper investigate the kinetics of the electrochemical deposition of molybdenum carbide on diamond from ionic melts of molybdenum oxide and lithium carbonate, the dependence of this process on temperature, current density, and deposition duration, and the interrelations of the deposition parameters with the wear and fracture properties of the diamonds. The results of fracture and compression tests are given.

  10. Effect of added dispersants on diamond particles in Ni-diamond composites fabricated with electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongje; Kim, Donghyun; Son, Kyungsik; Lee, Sanghyuk; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-11-01

    The electrodeposition of Ni-diamond composites was investigated to improve the dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles, and thus, increase the performance of cutting tools. The additives, so called firstclass brighteners, benzoic sulfimide, benzene sulfonamide, and benzene sulfonic acid were used as dispersants to enhance the dispersivity of diamond particles. The dispersivity was analyzed with Image-Pro software, which was used to asses optical microscopy images, and the number of individual diamond particles and area fraction were calculated. In addition, electrochemical tests were performed, including zeta potential and galvanostatic measurements, and the adhesion strengths was tested by evaluating the wear resistance using ball-on-disk tester. The dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles were improved when benzoic sulfimide was added to the composite plating bath at a concentration of 0.06 g/L. The number of individual diamond particles was 56 EA/mm2, and the weight loss of alumina ball and specimen was 2.88 mg and 0.80 mg, respectively.

  11. Continued force wear and part correction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    This abstract reports the near completion of the first phase of this program. It is the aim of this program to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine (jig grinder) with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The second phase of this program addresses a different problem, although solving this problem is highly dependent on the results of the first phase. Diamond turned, or any lathe turned surface, exhibits regular tool marks due to the tool passing over the surface being cut. Changes in depth of cut, feed rate and work rpm will change the character of these groves, but will not eliminate them. Optical surfaces produced by this process exhibit increased scattering as the light wavelength decreases limiting their use; at least for optical purposes, to IR and some visible applications. Utilizing wear information gathered in the first part of this program we will attempt to reduce these residual tool marks by polishing. The polishing of diamond turned surfaces is not new. Diamond turned metal surfaces, especially in electroless nickel and high phosphorus nickel electroplate have been polished to improve their scatter characteristics. What we believe is unique is the use of a spherical wheel, rotating on axis and being moved over the part in a prescribed manner by numerical control. Over the past year we have made some major changes in our polishing methods and procedures. We have listed below these changes, as a refresher for the reader as to our previous procedures.

  12. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, L.; Haenninen, H.; Paro, J.; Kauppinen, V.

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  13. Active wear and failure mechanisms of TiN-Coated high speed steel and tin-coated cemented carbide tools when machining powder metallurgically made stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Laizhu; Hänninen, Hannu; Paro, Jukka; Kauppinen, Veijo

    1996-09-01

    In this study, active wear and failure mechanisms of both TiN-coated high speed steel and TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining stainless steels made by powder metallurgy in low and high cutting speed ranges, respectively, have been investigated. Abrasive wear mechanisms, fatigue-induced failure, and adhesive and diffusion wear mechanisms mainly affected the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools at cutting speeds below 35 m/min, between 35 and 45 m/min, and over 45 m/min, respectively. Additionally, fatigue-induced failure was active at cutting speeds over 45 m/min in the low cutting speed range when machining powder metallurgically made duplex stainless steel 2205 and austenitic stainless steel 316L. In the high cutting speed range, from 100 to 250 m/min, fatigue-induced failure together with diffusion wear mechanism, affected the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools when machining both 316L and 2205 stainless steels. It was noticed that the tool life of TiN-coated high speed steel tools used in the low cutting speed range when machining 2205 steel was longer than that when machining 316L steel, whereas the tool life of TiN-coated cemented carbide tools used in the high cutting speed range when machining 316L steel was longer than that when machining 2205 steel.

  14. Superhard material comparable in hardness to diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Badzian, A.R.

    1988-12-19

    Superhard boron suboxides, with hardness close to that of diamond, were synthesized from boron/boron oxide mixtures. Such hardness is expected when a material's molar volume approaches the value characteristic for diamond. These materials consist of boron-rich phases belonging to the boron-oxygen system. The phase which contains 4 at. % oxygen and a crystal structure related to ..beta..rhombohedral boron can scratch diamond faces. During scratching of diamond the suboxide is worn also, and the wear debris is amorphized. Wear on the lt. slash/100/ diamond faces results from a cleavage mechanism which leaves a rough surface covered with cleaved lt. slash/111/ microfaces. The lt. slash/100/ faces are more easily abraded than the lt. slash/111/ diamond faces. Wear on lt. slash/111/ faces consumes much more energy and leaves grooves of plastically deformed diamond.

  15. Machining graphite composites with polycrystalline diamond end mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohkonen, Kent E.; Anderson, Scott; Strong, A. B.

    One area of focus in developing light-strong materials has been the development of graphite/epoxy composites. The graphite/epoxy materials have created challenges in the area of fabrication and machining. The research objective was to determine if cutting tool material and style of cutting edge showed any significant differences in tool life. The cutting tool materials and cutter styles included helical carbide-end mills and straight and helical polycrystalline diamond-end mill cutters. The experimental design was developed using a fractional factorial design running twelve tests. Results were taken from cutting tool flank edge wear, composite part surface finish, and visual delamination of the part.

  16. Investigation of surface roughness and tool wear length with varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate of Aluminium alloy and P20 steel machining.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varmma a/l Suparmaniam, Madan; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    High-speed milling technique is often used in many industries to boost productivity of the manufacturing of high-technology components. The occurrence of wear highly limits the efficiency and accuracy of high- speed milling operations. In this paper, analysis of high-speed milling process parameters such as material removal rate, cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut carried out by implemented to conventional milling. This experiment investigate the effects of varying combination of depth of cut and feed rate to tool wear rate length using metallurgical microscope and surface roughness using portable surface roughness tester after end milling of Aluminium and P20 steel. Results showed that feed rate significantly influences the surface roughness value while depth of cut does not as the surface roughness value keep increasing with the increase of feed rate and decreasing depth of cut. Whereas, tool wear rate almost remain unchanged indicates that material removal rate strongly contribute the wear rate. It believe that with no significant tool wear rate the results of this experiment are useful by showing that HSM technique is possible to be applied in conventional machine with extra benefits of high productivity, eliminating semi-finishing operation and reducing tool load for finishing.

  17. Carbon-Based Wear Coatings: Properties and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2003-01-01

    The technical function of numerous engineering systems - such as vehicles, machines, and instruments - depends on the processes of motion and on the surface systems. Many processes in nature and technology depend on the motion and dynamic behavior of solids, liquids, and gases. Smart surface systems are essential because of the recent technological push toward higher speeds, loads, and operating temperatures; longer life; lighter weight and smaller size (including nanotechnology); and harsh environments in mechanical, mechatronic, and biomechanical systems. If proper attention is not given to surface systems, then vehicles, machines, instruments, and other technical systems could have short lives, consume excessive energy, experience breakdowns, result in liabilities, and fail to accomplish their missions. Surface systems strongly affect our national economy and our lifestyles. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we believe that proper attention to surface systems, especially in education, research, and application, could lead to economic savings of between 1.3 and 1.6 percent of the gross domestic product. Wear coatings and surface systems continue to experience rapid growth as new coating and surface engineering technologies are discovered, more cost-effective coating and surface engineering solutions are developed, and marketers aggressively pursue, uncover, and exploit new applications for engineered surface systems in cutting tools and wear components. Wear coatings and smart surface systems have been used widely in industrial, consumer, automotive, aerospace, and biomedical applications. This presentation expresses the author's views of and insights into smart surface systems in wear coatings. A revolution is taking place in carbon science and technology. Diamond, an allotrope of carbon, joins graphite, fullerenes, and nanotubes as its major pure carbon structures. It has a unique combination of extreme properties: hardness and abrasion resistance; adhesion

  18. Isomekes: A fundamental tool to determine the formation pressure for diamond-inclusion pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross; Mazzucchelli, Mattia; Nestola, Fabrizio; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2014-05-01

    Because diamond is almost chemically pure carbon and extremely chemically inert, the structure and chemistry of diamond reveals very little about its conditions of formation. Much of what is believed about the genesis and distribution of diamond in the Earth's mantle has therefore been deduced indirectly from the characterisation of its mineral inclusions. The possible depths of entrapment of an inclusion within a host phase (and hence the depth of growth of the host diamond) can be determined if (1) the final pressure of the inclusion can be measured, (2) the Equations of State (EoS) of the host and inclusion phases are known, and (3) the elastic interaction between the host and inclusion can be calculated without gross assumptions. Given knowledge of all three, an isomeke line in P-T space (from the Greek "equal" and "length", Adams et al. 1975) can be calculated. The isomeke defines the conditions at which the host and inclusion would have had the same P, T and volume, and thus represents possible entrapment conditions. The recent application (Nestola et al. 2011; Howell et al. 2012) of in-situ diffraction techniques to the measurement of entrapped inclusions provides accurate final inclusion pressures. We have reformulated the elasticity problem so that, unlike previous work, these calculations can be performed with any form of equation of state and thermal expansion, and are not restricted to linear elasticity or just invertible EoS. This alone has significant advantages in the precision of the calculated depths of formation. Numerical calculations have been performed with a new module of EoS routines (Angel et al. 2014) that has been added to the publicly-available CrysFML library. The question remains as to what uncertainties in calculated depths of formation arise from uncertainties in experimentally-determined EoS. We will present two geologically-relevant examples, for olivine and garnet in diamond. Our calculations show that there is still a clear need

  19. Discrete element thermomechanical modelling of rock cutting with valuation of tool wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojek, Jerzy

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents a thermomechanical discrete element model of rock cutting process. The thermomechanical formulation of the discrete element method considers mechanical and thermal phenomena and their reciprocal influence. The thermal model developed for transient heat conduction problems takes into account conductive heat transfer at the contact between particles and convection on the free surface. The thermal and mechanical problems are coupled by consideration of: (1) heat generated due to friction which is calculated in the mechanical problem and passed to the thermal solution, (2) influence of thermal expansion on mechanical interaction between particles. Estimation of temperature dependent wear has been included into the contact model. The coupled problem is solved using the staggered scheme.The thermomechanical algorithm has been implemented in a discrete element program and applied to simulation of rock cutting with single pick of a dredge cutter head. Numerical results confirm good performance of the developed algorithm.

  20. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rigali; Kenneth L. Knittel; Mike L. Fulcher

    2002-03-01

    During this reporting period, work continued on development of formulations using the materials identified as contenders for the fibrous monolith wear resistant components. The FM structures fabricated were: diamond/WC-Co, B{sub 4}C/WC-Co, TiB{sub 2}/WC-Co, WC-Co/Co, WC-Co/WC-Co. Results of our consolidation densification studies on these systems lead to the down-selection of WC-Co/WC-Co, WC-Co/Co and diamond/WC-Co for further development for mining applications including drill bit inserts, roof bit inserts, radial tools conical tools and wear plates (WC-Co based system only) for earth moving equipment. Prototype component fabrication focused on the fabrication of WC-Co/WC-Co FM conical tools, diamond/WC-Co coated drill bit insert prototypes. Fabrication of WC-Co/WC-Co FM insert prototypes for a grader blade is also underway. ACR plans to initiate field-testing of the drill bit insert prototypes and the grader blade insert this summer (2002). The first WC-Co/WC-Co FM conical tool prototypes were sent to Kennametal for evaluation towards the end of the current reporting period.

  1. Effect of load on the friction-wear behavior of magnetron sputtered DLC film at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ze, Sun; Dejun, Kong

    2017-01-01

    A DLC (diamond-like carbon) film was deposited on a YT14 cemented carbide cutting tool by using magnetron sputtering. The surface-interfacial morphologies, chemical composition, and phases of the obtained DLC film were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction, respectively. The friction and wear characteristics of the DLC film were investigated under different loads, the distribution of the chemical elements on the worn tracks were analyzed by using a plane scan analysis, and the wear mechanism of the DLC film was also examined. The results showed that the DLC particles were uniformly covered on the substrate with a thickness of about 600 nm, and the diamond peaks at the crystal face of (1 1 1), and (2 2 0) appear at diffraction angles of 44.40, and 75.52°, respectively. The average coefficients of friction of the DLC film under loads of 2, 4, and 6 N were 0.65, 0.65, and 0.49, respectively, and the corresponding wear rates were 0.33  ×  10‑9, 0.26  ×  10‑9, and 0.25  ×  10‑9 mm3 N‑1 s‑1, respectively. Therefore, the film represents outstanding reducing friction and wear resistance. With the increasing wear loads, the atomic fraction of C decreased, while that of O increased; the oxidation reaction occurred in the wear test. The wear mechanisms under a load of 2 N were abrasive wear, adhesive wear and oxidation wear, while that under a load of 4 N were adhesive wear and oxidation wear, and that under the load of 6 N were only oxidation wear.

  2. A Multiple-Regression Model for Monitoring Tool Wear with a Dynamometer in Milling Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jacob C.; Chen, Joseph C.

    2004-01-01

    A major goal of the manufacturing industry is increasing product quality. The quality of a product is strongly associated with the condition of the cutting tool that produced it. Catching poor tool conditions early in the production will help reduce defects. However, with current CNC technology, manufacturers still rely mainly on the operator's…

  3. Workshop on diamond and diamond-like-carbon films for the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.A.; Moores, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    Applications exist in advanced transportation systems as well as in manufacturing processes that would benefit from superior tribological properties of diamond, diamond-like-carbon and cubic boron nitride coatings. Their superior hardness make them ideal candidates as protective coatings to reduce adhesive, abrasive and erosive wear in advanced diesel engines, gas turbines and spark-ignited engines and in machining and manufacturing tools as well. The high thermal conductivity of diamond also makes it desirable for thermal management not only in tribological applications but also in high-power electronic devices and possibly large braking systems. A workshop has been recently held at Argonne National Laboratory entitled ``Diamond and Diamond-Like-Carbon Films for Transportation Applications`` which was attended by 85 scientists and engineers including top people involved in the basic technology of these films and also representatives from many US industrial companies. A working group on applications endorsed 18 different applications for these films in the transportation area alone. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  4. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of the industrial diamond industry is provided. More than 90 percent of the industrial diamond consumed in the U.S. and the rest of the world is manufactured diamond. Ireland, Japan, Russia, and the U.S. produce 75 percent of the global industrial diamond output. In 2000, the U.S. was the largest market for industrial diamond. Industrial diamond applications, prices for industrial diamonds, imports and exports of industrial diamonds, the National Defense Stockpile of industrial diamonds, and the outlook for the industrial diamond market are discussed.

  5. Characterization of tool wear and weld optimization in the friction-stir welding of cast aluminum 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, G.J.; Murr, L.E

    2004-03-15

    Tool wear for threaded steel pin tools declines with decreasing rotation speed and increasing traverse or weld speeds for the friction-stir welding (FSW) of Al 359+20% SiC metal-matrix composite (MMC). Less than 10% tool wear occurs when the threaded tool erodes to a self-optimized shape resembling a pseudo-hour glass at weld traverse distances in excess of 3 m. There is only a 7% reduction in the SiC mean particle size in the weld zone for self-optimized pin tools with no threads as compared with a 25% variation for threaded tools wearing significantly at the start of welding. The weld zone becomes more homogeneous for efficient welding with self-optimized tools, and there is a reduction in the weld zone grain size due to dynamic recrystallization, which facilitates the solid-state flow. Transmission electron microscopy shows little difference in the dislocation density from the base material to the weld zone, but there is a propensity of dislocation loops in the weld zone. The weld zone is observed to harden by as much as 30%, in contrast to the base material, as a consequence of the recrystallized grain size reduction and the SiC particles distributed therein.

  6. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  7. The Effect of the Gas Inlet on the Fluid Field during Fabricating Hfcvd Diamond-Coated Cutting Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Bin; Chen, Sulin; Cheng, Lei; Sun, Fanghong

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the fluid field in a process of fabricating diamond coated cutting tools using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method is investigated using the finite volume method (FVM), in which the effects of the inlet height, gas initial velocity, inlet radius and arrangement are illustrated in terms of the gas velocity magnitude and vector distribution near the filaments and the flute surface of cutting tools. In the simulations, the coupling effect of the temperature and the gas field is also considered by simultaneously calculating the temperature distribution. The simulation results suggest that either shortening the distance between the gas inlet and filaments, or increasing the gas initial velocity is helpful for the reactive gas arriving at filaments surface and being dissociated. Furthermore, increasing the inlet area is able to significantly increase the velocity of gas field around the filaments, as well as produce a much more uniform gas velocity field. Based on this conclusion, two novel multi-inlets setups are proposed to further improve the generated gas field and the simulation results show that the most superior gas field can be achieved with the one including 8 larger central inlets and 24 smaller outskirt inlets. Finally, an actual deposition experiment is carried out and its result indicates that adopting the optimized such inlet arrangement could generate a highly uniform and homogeneous growth environment on whole deposition area.

  8. Optimising efficiency in diamond turned Fresnel mould masters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allsop, John L.; Mateboer, Arjen; Shore, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Radial and Linear Fresnel Lenses are finding application as light concentrators for Concentrated Photovoltaic and Concentrated Solar Thermal power applications. The efficiency of these diffractive lenses directly affects the yield of such systems. Peaks and valleys of the optical facets of the Fresnel lens must be sharp in order to prevent diffusion and transmission loss due to rounding. For diamond turned mould masters, optical facet tip sharpness is affected by machining accuracy, tool-path and tool wear/mileage. Strategies to optimise optical facet tip sharpness are presented which enable production of large lenses with minimal degradation of optical quality. Radial Fresnel produced with diameters over 500mm and Linear Fresnel over 1m long are discussed with data on structure fidelity and tool wear.

  9. Diamond grooving of rapidly solidified optical aluminium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-El-Hossein, Khaled; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Ghobashy, Sameh; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Mkoko, Zwelinzima

    2015-10-01

    Traditional optical aluminium grades such as Al 6061 are intensively used for making optical components for applications ranging from mould insert fabrication to laser machine making. However, because of their irregular microstructure and relative inhomogeneity of material properties at micro scale, traditional optical aluminium may exhibit some difficulties when ultra-high precision diamond turned. Inhomogeneity and micro-variation in the material properties combined with uneven and coarse microstructure may cause unacceptable surface finish and accelerated tool wear, especially in grooving operation when the diamond tool edge is fully immersed in the material surface. Recently, new grades of optical aluminium that are featured by their ultra-fine microstructure and improved material properties have been developed to overcome the problem of high tool wear rates. The new aluminium grades have been developed using rapid solidification process which results in extremely small grain sizes combined with improved mechanical properties. The current study is concerned with investigating the performance of single-point diamond turning when grooving two grades of rapidly solidified aluminium (RSA) grades: RSA905 which is a high-alloyed aluminium grade and RSA443 which has a high silicon content. In this study, two series of experiments employed to create radial microgrooves on the two RSA grades. The surface roughness obtained on the groove surface is measured when different combinations of cutting parameters are used. Cutting speed is varied while feed rate and depth of cut were kept constant. The results show that groove surface roughness produced on RSA443 is higher than that obtained on RSA905. Also, the paper reports on the effect of cutting speed on surface roughness for each RSA grade.

  10. Ultralow wear of gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Guosong; Tan, Chee-Keong; Tansu, Nelson; Krick, Brandon A.

    2016-08-01

    Here, we reveal a remarkable (and surprising) physical property of GaN: it is extremely wear resistant. In fact, we measured the wear rate of GaN is approaching wear rates reported for diamond. Not only does GaN have an ultralow wear rate but also there are quite a few experimental factors that control the magnitude of its wear rate, further contributing to the rich and complex physics of wear of GaN. Here, we discovered several primary controlling factors that will affect the wear rate of III-Nitride materials: crystallographic orientation, sliding environment, and coating composition (GaN, InN and InGaN). Sliding in the ⟨ 1 2 ¯ 10 ⟩ is significantly lower wear than ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩ . Wear increases by 2 orders of magnitude with increasing humidity (from ˜0% to 50% RH). III-Nitride coatings are promising as multifunctional material systems for device design and sliding wear applications.

  11. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Statistics on the production, consumption, cost, trade, and government stockpile of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are provided. The outlook for the industrial diamond market is also considered.

  12. The development of plant food processing in the Levant: insights from use-wear analysis of Early Epipalaeolithic ground stone tools

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, Laure; Nadel, Dani

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the study of percussive, pounding and grinding tools has provided new insights into human evolution, more particularly regarding the development of technology enabling the processing and exploitation of plant resources. Some of these studies focus on early evidence for flour production, an activity frequently perceived as an important step in the evolution of plant exploitation. The present paper investigates plant food preparation in mobile hunter-gatherer societies from the Southern Levant. The analysis consists of a use-wear study of 18 tools recovered from Ohalo II, a 23 000-year-old site in Israel showing an exceptional level of preservation. Our sample includes a slab previously interpreted as a lower implement used for producing flour, based on the presence of cereal starch residues. The use-wear data we have obtained provide crucial information about the function of this and other percussive tools at Ohalo II, as well as on investment in tool manufacture, discard strategies and evidence for plant processing in the Late Pleistocene. The use-wear analysis indicates that the production of flour was a sporadic activity at Ohalo II, predating by thousands of years the onset of routine processing of plant foods. PMID:26483535

  13. The development of plant food processing in the Levant: insights from use-wear analysis of Early Epipalaeolithic ground stone tools.

    PubMed

    Dubreuil, Laure; Nadel, Dani

    2015-11-19

    In recent years, the study of percussive, pounding and grinding tools has provided new insights into human evolution, more particularly regarding the development of technology enabling the processing and exploitation of plant resources. Some of these studies focus on early evidence for flour production, an activity frequently perceived as an important step in the evolution of plant exploitation. The present paper investigates plant food preparation in mobile hunter-gatherer societies from the Southern Levant. The analysis consists of a use-wear study of 18 tools recovered from Ohalo II, a 23 000-year-old site in Israel showing an exceptional level of preservation. Our sample includes a slab previously interpreted as a lower implement used for producing flour, based on the presence of cereal starch residues. The use-wear data we have obtained provide crucial information about the function of this and other percussive tools at Ohalo II, as well as on investment in tool manufacture, discard strategies and evidence for plant processing in the Late Pleistocene. The use-wear analysis indicates that the production of flour was a sporadic activity at Ohalo II, predating by thousands of years the onset of routine processing of plant foods.

  14. Numerical controlled polishing, continued force wear and part correction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.J.; McClure, E.R.

    1994-09-01

    This abstract reports the near completion of the first phase of this program. It is the aim of this program to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine (jig grinder) with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The second phase of this program addresses a different problem, although solving this problem is highly dependent on the results of the first phase. Diamond turned, or any lathe turned surface, exhibits regular tool marks due to the tool passing over the surface being cut. Changes in depth of cut, feed rate and work rpm will change the character of these groves, but will not eliminate them. Optical surfaces produced by this process exhibit increased scattering as the light wavelength decreases limiting their use; at least for optical purposes, to IR and some visible applications. Utilizing wear information gathered in the first part of this program we will attempt to reduce these residual tool marks by polishing. The polishing of diamond turned surfaces is not new. Diamond turned metal surfaces, especially in electroless nickel and high phosphorus nickel electroplate have been polished to improve their scatter characteristics. What we believe is unique is the use of a spherical wheel, rotating on axis and being moved over the part in a prescribed manner by numerical control. Over the past year we have made some major changes in our polishing methods and procedures. We have listed below these changes, as a refresher for the reader as to our previous procedures. These changes will be addressed in the body of the text.

  15. A study of diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition on Nc coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polini, R.; Kumashiro, S.; Jackson, M. J.; Amar, M.; Ahmed, W.; Sein, H.

    2006-04-01

    Deposition of diamond films onto various substrates can result in significant technological advantages in terms of functionality and improved life and performance of components. Diamond is hard, wear resistant, chemically inert, and biocompatible. It is considered to be the ideal material for surfaces of cutting tools and biomedical components. However, it is well known that diamond deposition onto technologically important substrates, such as co-cemented carbides and steels, is problematic due to carbon interaction with the substrate, low nucleation densities, and poor adhesion. Several papers previously published in the relevant literature have reported the application of interlayer materials such as metal nitrides and carbides to provide bonding between diamond and hostile substrates. In this study, the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond on TiN/SiN x nc (nc) interlayers deposited at relatively low temperatures has been investigated for the first time. The nc layers were deposited at 70 or 400 °C on Si substrates using a dual ion beam deposition system. The results showed that a preliminary seeding pretreatment with diamond suspension was necessary to achieve large diamond nucleation densities and that diamond nucleation was larger on nc films than on bare sc-Si subjected to the same pretreatment and CVD process parameters. TiN/SiN x layers synthesized at 70 or 400 °C underwent different nanostructure modifications during diamond CVD. The data also showed that TiN/SiN x films obtained at 400 °C are preferable in so far as their use as interlayers between hostile substrates and CVD diamond is concerned.

  16. Research on grinding block wear in grinding of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feihu; Lu, Guodong; Liu, Minhui; Luan, Dianrong

    2014-09-01

    Silicon carbide is being the main ceramics material to make aspherical optical reflectors because of its good physical and chemical performance. But, because of the particularity of wheel structure, wheel wear form and wear loss is changing with time going, which limits the wheel wear researchment. In order to make a better research to wheel grinding, the author experimented many researches on diamond grinding blocks in grinding of SiC in the surface grinding machine, finding the relationship between diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss and grinding force, surface quality and surface precision of workpiece, including the principle of diamond grinding block wear form and wear loss changing with time going, the influencing law of surface quality and surface accuracy because of wheel wear. By changing some grinding parameters in the grinding experiments, the author gets the order of the influencing factors of grinding parameters to wheel wear by orthogonal test.

  17. Direct Coating of Nanocrystalline Diamond on Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsugawa, Kazuo; Kawaki, Shyunsuke; Ishihara, Masatou; Hasegawa, Masataka

    2012-09-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films have been successfully deposited on stainless steel substrates without any substrate pretreatments to promote diamond nucleation, including the formation of interlayers. A low-temperature growth technique, 400 °C or lower, in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition using a surface-wave plasma has cleared up problems in diamond growth on ferrous materials, such as the surface graphitization, long incubation time, substrate softening, and poor adhesion. The deposited nanocrystalline diamond films on stainless steel exhibit good adhesion and tribological properties, such as a high wear resistance, a low friction coefficient, and a low aggression strength, at room temperature in air without lubrication.

  18. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Estimated 2011 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2011, natural industrial diamonds were produced in more than 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 13 countries. About 98 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. China is the world's leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by Russia and the United States.

  19. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  20. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    Estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.44 billion carats in 2010. Natural industrial diamond deposits have been found in more than 35 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries.

  1. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, estimated world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was 630 million carats. Natural industrial diamond deposits were found in more than 35 countries. Synthetic industrial diamond is produced in at least 15 countries. More than 81% of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States.

  2. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao

    2015-04-01

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) - tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  3. A novel Mo-W interlayer approach for CVD diamond deposition on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kundrát, Vojtěch; Sullivan, John; Ye, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoling; Cooke, Kevin; Sun, Hailin

    2015-04-15

    Steel is the most widely used material in engineering for its cost/performance ratio and coatings are routinely applied on its surface to further improve its properties. Diamond coated steel parts are an option for many demanding industrial applications through prolonging the lifetime of steel parts, enhancement of tool performance as well as the reduction of wear rates. Direct deposition of diamond on steel using conventional chemical vapour deposition (CVD) processes is known to give poor results due to the preferential formation of amorphous carbon on iron, nickel and other elements as well as stresses induced from the significant difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of those materials. This article reports a novel approach of deposition of nanocrystalline diamond coatings on high-speed steel (M42) substrates using a multi-structured molybdenum (Mo) – tungsten (W) interlayer to form steel/Mo/Mo-W/W/diamond sandwich structures which overcome the adhesion problem related to direct magnetron sputtering deposition of pure tungsten. Surface, interface and tribology properties were evaluated to understand the role of such an interlayer structure. The multi-structured Mo-W interlayer has been proven to improve the adhesion between diamond films and steel substrates by acting as an effective diffusion barrier during the CVD diamond deposition.

  4. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. A review of the state of the global industrial diamond industry in 1999 is presented. World consumption of industrial diamond has increased annually in recent years, with an estimated 500 million carats valued between $650 million and $800 million consumed in 1999. In 1999, the U.S. was the world's largest market for industrial diamond and was also one of the world's main producers; the others were Ireland, Russia, and South Africa. Uses of industrial diamonds are discussed, and prices of natural and synthetic industrial diamond are reported.

  5. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  6. Diamond growth in mantle fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureau, Hélène; Frost, Daniel J.; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Leroy, Clémence; Esteve, Imène; Cordier, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    In the upper mantle, diamonds can potentially grow from various forms of media (solid, gas, fluid) with a range of compositions (e.g. graphite, C-O-H fluids, silicate or carbonate melts). Inclusions trapped in diamonds are one of the few diagnostic tools that can constrain diamond growth conditions in the Earth's mantle. In this study, inclusion-bearing diamonds have been synthesized to understand the growth conditions of natural diamonds in the upper mantle. Diamonds containing syngenetic inclusions were synthesized in multi-anvil presses employing starting mixtures of carbonates, and silicate compositions in the presence of pure water and saline fluids (H2O-NaCl). Experiments were performed at conditions compatible with the Earth's geotherm (7 GPa, 1300-1400 °C). Results show that within the timescale of the experiments (6 to 30 h) diamond growth occurs if water and carbonates are present in the fluid phase. Water promotes faster diamond growth (up to 14 mm/year at 1400 °C, 7 GPa, 10 g/l NaCl), which is favorable to the inclusion trapping process. At 7 GPa, temperature and fluid composition are the main factors controlling diamond growth. In these experiments, diamonds grew in the presence of two fluids: an aqueous fluid and a hydrous silicate melt. The carbon source for diamond growth must be carbonate (CO32) dissolved in the melt or carbon dioxide species in the aqueous fluid (CO2aq). The presence of NaCl affects the growth kinetics but is not a prerequisite for inclusion-bearing diamond formation. The presence of small discrete or isolated volumes of water-rich fluids is necessary to grow inclusion-bearing peridotitic, eclogitic, fibrous, cloudy and coated diamonds, and may also be involved in the growth of ultradeep, ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic diamonds.

  7. A procedure for diamond turning KDP crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Montesanti, R.C.; Thompson, S.L.

    1995-07-07

    A procedure and the equipment necessary for single-point diamond flycutting (loosely referred to as diamond turning) potassium di-hydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are described. It is based on current KDP diamond turning activities at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), drawing upon knowledge from the Nova crystal finishing development during the 1980`s and incorporating refinements from our efforts during 1995. In addition to describing a step-by-step process for diamond turning KDP, specific discussions are included on the necessary diamond tool geometry and edge sharpness, cutting fluid, and crystal preparation, handling, cleaning, and inspection. The authors presuppose that the reader is already familiar with diamond turning practices.

  8. Diamond film deposition on WC-Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10-6 K-1) and WC-Co (5.2  ×  10-6 K-1) or steel (12  ×  10-6 K-1). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr-N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr-N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC-Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications.

  9. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mike L. Fulcher; Kenneth L. Knittel

    2004-06-08

    The work performed on this program was to develop wear resistant, tough FM composite materials with efforts focused on WC-Co based FM systems. The materials were developed for use in mining industry wear applications. Components of interest were drill bit inserts for drilling blast holes. Other component applications investigated included wear plates for a variety of equipment such as pit shovels, wear surfaces for conveyors, milling media for ball milling operations, hydrocyclone cones, grader blades and dozer teeth. Cross-cutting technologies investigated included hot metal extrusion dies, drill bits for circuit board fabrication, cutting tools for cast iron and aluminum machining. An important part of the work was identification of the standard materials used in drilling applications. A materials trade study to determine those metals and ceramics used for mining applications provided guidance for the most important materials to be investigated. WC-Co and diamond combinations were shown to have the most desirable properties. Other considerations such as fabrication technique and the ability to consolidate shifted the focus away from diamond materials and toward WC-Co. Cooperating partners such as Kennametal and Kyocera assisted with supplies, evaluations of material systems, fabricated parts and suggestions for cross-cutting technology applications for FM architectures. Kennametal provided the raw materials (WC-Co and Al-TiCN powders) for the extent of the material evaluations. Kyocera shared their research into various FM systems and provided laboratory testing of fabricated materials. Field testing provided by partners Superior Rock Bit and Brady Mining and Construction provided insight into the performance of the fabricated materials under actual operational conditions. Additional field testing of cross-cutting technology, the extrusion of hot metals, at Extruded Metals showed the potential for additional market development.

  10. Functionally gradient hard carbon composites for improved adhesion and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Roger Jagdish

    A new approach is proposed for fabricating biomedical devices that last longer and are more biocompatible than those presently available. In this approach, a bulk material is chosen that has desirable mechanical properties (low modulus, high strength, high ductility and high fatigue strength). This material is coated with corrosion-resistant, wear-resistant, hard, and biocompatible hard carbon films. One of the many forms of carbon, tetrahedral amorphous carbon, consists mainly of sp3-bonded atoms. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon possesses properties close to diamond in terms of hardness, atomic smoothness, and inertness. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond films usually contain large amounts of compressive and sometimes tensile stresses; adhesive failure from these stresses has limited widespread use of these materials. This research involves processing, characterization and modeling of functionally gradient tetrahedral amorphous carbon and diamond composite films on metals (cobalt-chromium and titanium alloys) and polymers (polymethylmethacrylate and polyethylene) used in biomedical applications. Multilayer discontinuous thin films of titanium carbide, titanium nitride, aluminum nitride, and tungsten carbide have been developed to control stresses and graphitization in diamond films. A morphology of randomly interconnected micron sized diamond crystallites provides increased toughness and stress reduction. Internal stresses in tetrahedral amorphous carbon were reduced via incorporation of carbide forming elements (silicon and titanium) and noncarbide forming elements (copper, platinum, and silver). These materials were produced using a novel target design during pulsed laser deposition. These alloying atoms reduce hardness and sp3-bonded carbon content, but increase adhesion and wear resistance. Silver and platinum provide the films with antimicrobial properties, and silicon provides bioactivity and aids bone formation. Bilayer coatings were created that couple

  11. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  12. FPGA-Based Fused Smart-Sensor for Tool-Wear Area Quantitative Estimation in CNC Machine Inserts

    PubMed Central

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used. PMID:22319304

  13. FPGA-based fused smart-sensor for tool-wear area quantitative estimation in CNC machine inserts.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Hernandez, Miguel; Osornio-Rios, Roque Alfredo; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Rodriguez-Donate, Carlos; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Aurelio; Herrera-Ruiz, Gilberto

    2010-01-01

    Manufacturing processes are of great relevance nowadays, when there is a constant claim for better productivity with high quality at low cost. The contribution of this work is the development of a fused smart-sensor, based on FPGA to improve the online quantitative estimation of flank-wear area in CNC machine inserts from the information provided by two primary sensors: the monitoring current output of a servoamplifier, and a 3-axis accelerometer. Results from experimentation show that the fusion of both parameters makes it possible to obtain three times better accuracy when compared with the accuracy obtained from current and vibration signals, individually used.

  14. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  15. Optimization of Cvd Diamond Coating Type on Micro Drills in Pcb Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, X. L.; He, Y.; Sun, F. H.

    2016-12-01

    The demand for better tools for machining printed circuit boards (PCBs) is increasing due to the extensive usage of these boards in digital electronic products. This paper is aimed at optimizing coating type on micro drills in order to extend their lifetime in PCB machining. First, the tribotests involving micro crystalline diamond (MCD), nano crystalline diamond (NCD) and bare tungsten carbide (WC-Co) against PCBs show that NCD-PCB tribopair exhibits the lowest friction coefficient (0.35) due to the unique nano structure and low surface roughness of NCD films. Thereafter, the dry machining performance of the MCD- and NCD-coated micro drills on PCBs is systematically studied, using diamond-like coating (DLC) and TiAlN-coated micro drills as comparison. The experiments show that the working lives of these micro drills can be ranked as: NCD>TiAlN>DLC>MCD>bare WC-Co. The superior cutting performance of NCD-coated micro drills in terms of the lowest flank wear growth rate, no tool degradation (e.g. chipping, tool tipping) appearance, the best hole quality as well as the lowest feed force may come from the excellent wear resistance, lower friction coefficient against PCB as well as the high adhesive strength on the underneath substrate of NCD films.

  16. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rigali

    2001-10-01

    Published mechanical and thermal properties data on a variety of materials was gathered, with focus on materials that have potential with respect to developing wear resistant and damage tolerant composite for mining industry applications. Preliminary core materials of interest include but are not limited to: Diamond, Tungsten Carbide and Cemented Tungsten Carbides, Carbides of Boron, Silicon, Titanium and Aluminum, Diboride of Titanium and Aluminum, Nitrides of Aluminum, Silicon, Titanium, and Boron, Aluminum Oxide, Tungsten, Titanium, Iron, Cobalt and Metal Alloys. Preliminary boundary materials of interest include but are not limited to: W metal, WC-Co, W-Co, WFeNi, and Mo metal and alloys. Several FM test coupons were fabricated with various compositions using the above listed materials. These coupons were consolidated to varying degrees by uniaxial hot pressing, then cut and ground to expose the FM cell structure. One promising system, WC-Co core and WFeNi boundary, was consolidated to 97% of theoretical density, and demonstrates excellent hardness. Data on standard mechanical tests was gathered, and tests will begin on the consolidated test coupons during the upcoming reporting period. The program statements of work for ACR Inc. and its subcontractors, as well as the final contract negotiations, were finalized during the current reporting period. The program start date was February 22nd, 2001. In addition to the current subcontractors, Kennametal Inc., a major manufacturer of cutting tools and wear resistant tooling for the mining industry, expressed considerable interest in ACR's Fibrous Monolith composites for both machine and mining applications. At the request of Kennametal, ARC Inc fabricated and delivered several Fibrous Monolith coupons and components for testing and evaluation in the mining and machine tool applications. Additional samples of Diamond/Tungsten Carbide-6%Cobalt Fibrous Monolith were fabricated and delivered for testing Kennametal's Rapid

  17. Effect of cutting temperature on hardness of SiC and diamond in the nano-cutting process of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiachun; Li, Yuntao; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Lv, Maoqiang

    2016-10-01

    In the process of cutting silicon by natural diamond tools, groove wear happens on the flank face of cutting tool frequently.Scholars believe that one of the wear reasons is mechanical scratching effect by hard particles like SiC. To reveal the mechanical scratching mechanism, it is essential to study changes in the mechanical properties of hard particles and diamond, especially the effect of cutting temperature on hardness of diamond and hard particles. Molecular dynamics (MD) model that contact-zone temperature between tool and workpiece was calculated by dividing zone while nano-cutting monocrystalline silicon was established, cutting temperature values in different regions were computed as the simulation was carried out.On this basis, the models of molecular dynamics simulation of SiC and diamond were established separately with setting the initial temperature to room temperature. The laws of length change of C-C bond and Si-C bond varing with increase of simulation temperature were studied. And drawing on predecessors' research on theoretical calculation of hardness of covalent crystals and the relationship between crystal valence electron density and bond length, the curves that the hardness of diamond and SiC varing with bond length were obtained. The effect of temperature on the hardness was calculated. Results show that, local cutting temperature can reach 1300K.The rise in cutting temperature leaded to a decrease in the diamond local atomic clusters hardness,SiC local atomic clusters hardness increased. As the cutting temperature was more than 1100K,diamond began to soften, the local clusters hardness was less than that of SiC.

  18. Physical and Tribological Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-Both, A. L.; Jayne, D. T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P. J.; Wu, R. L. C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P. N.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  19. Physical and tribological characteristics of ion-implanted diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, K.; Heidger, S.; Korenyi-both, A.L.; Jayne, D.T.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Shogrin, B.; Wilbur, P.J.; Wu, R.L.C.; Garscadden, A.; Barnes, P.N.

    1994-11-01

    Unidirectional sliding friction experiments were conducted with a natural, polished diamond pin in contact with both as-deposited and carbon-ion-implanted diamond films in ultrahigh vacuum. Diamond films were deposited on silicon, silicon carbide, and silicon nitride by microwave-plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The as-deposited diamond films were impacted with carbon ions at an accelerating energy of 60 keV and a current density of 50 micron A/cm(exp 2) for approximately 6 min, resulting in a dose of 1.2 x 10(exp 17) carbon ions/cm(exp 2). The results indicate that the carbon ion implantation produced a thin surface layer of amorphous, nondiamond carbon. The nondiamond carbon greatly decreased both friction and wear of the diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films were less than 0.1, factors of 20 to 30 lower than those for the as-deposited, fine-grain diamond films. The coefficients of friction for the carbon-ion-implanted, coarse-grain diamond films were approximately 0.35, a factor of five lower than those for the as-deposited, coarse-grain diamond films. The wear rates for the carbon-ion-implanted, diamond films were on the order of 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/Nm, factors of 30 to 80 lower than that for the as-deposited diamond films, regardless of grain size. The friction of the carbon-ion-implanted diamond films was greatly reduced because the amorphous, nondiamond carbon, which had a low shear strength, was restricted to the surface layers (less than 0.1 micron thick) and because the underlying diamond materials retained their high hardness. In conclusion, the carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain diamond films can be used effectively as wear resistant, self-lubricating coatings for ceramics, such as silicon nitride and silicon carbide, in ultrahigh vacuum.

  20. UV-laser treatment of nanodiamond seeds—a valuable tool for modification of nanocrystalline diamond films properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlček, J.; Fitl, P.; Vrňata, M.; Fekete, L.; Taylor, A.; Fendrych, F.

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to study the UV-laser treatment of precursor (i.e. nanodiamond (ND) seeds on silicon substrates) and its influence on the properties of grown nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. Pulsed Nd : YAG laser operating at the fourth harmonic frequency (laser fluence EL = 250 mJ cm-2, pulse duration 5 ns) was used as a source, equipped with an optical system for focusing laser beam onto the sample, allowing exposure of a local spot and horizontal patterning. The variable parameters were: number of pulses (from 5 to 400) and the working atmosphere (He, Ar and O2). Ablation and/or graphitization of seeded nanodiamond particles were observed. Further the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition was employed to grow NCD films on exposed and non-exposed areas of silicon substrates. The size, shape and density distribution of laser-treated nanodiamond seeds were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and their chemical composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The resulting NCD films (uniform thickness of 400 nm) were characterized by: Raman spectroscopy to analyse occurrence of graphitic phase, and AFM to observe morphology and surface roughness. The highest RMS roughness (˜85 nm) was achieved when treating the precursor in He atmosphere. Horizontal microstructures of diamond films were fabricated.

  1. Picosecond laser fabrication of micro cutting tool geometries on polycrystalline diamond composites using a high-numerical aperture micro scanning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Gregory; Dold, Claus; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-03-01

    The generation of microsized components found in LEDs, watches, molds as well as other types of micromechanics and microelectronics require a corresponding micro cutting tool in order to be manufactured, typically by milling or turning. Micro cutting tools are made of cemented tungsten carbide and are conventionally fabricated either by electrical discharge machining (EDM) or by grinding. An alternative method is proposed through a laser-based solution operating in the picosecond pulse duration whereby the beam is deflected using a modified galvanometer-driven micro scanning system exhibiting a high numerical aperture. A micro cutting tool material which cannot be easily processed using conventional methods is investigated, which is a fine grain polycrystalline diamond composite (PCD). The generation of various micro cutting tool relevant geometries, such as chip breakers and cutting edges, are demonstrated. The generated geometries are subsequently evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quality is measured in terms of surface roughness and cutting edge sharpness. Additionally, two processing strategies in which the laser beam processes tangentially and orthogonally are compared in terms of quality.

  2. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2007-01-01

    World production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 648 million carats in 2006, with 79 percent of the production coming from Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa, and the U.S. U.S. consumption was was an estimated 602 million carats, imports were over 391 million carats, and exports were about 83 million carats. About 87 percent of the industrial diamonds market uses synthetic diamonds, which are expected to become less expensive as technology improves and competition from low-cost producers increases.

  3. Industrial diamond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olson, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Part of the 2003 industrial minerals review. Supply and demand data for industrial diamond are provided. Topics discussed are consumption, prices, imports and exports, government stockpiles, and the outlook for 2004.

  4. Diamond-Coated Wire-Feeding Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Hard vacuum-deposited film improves nozzle properties. Tip and bore surfaces of proposed nozzle for feeding wire for gas/tungsten arc welding coated with film of synthetic diamond. Film gives nozzle following advantages: lower friction, thermal conductivity, less wear, electrical isolation of wire from nozzle, and high resistance to corrosion.

  5. Investigation of wear phenomena by microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved in the loss of material from metallic and nonmetallic surfaces are discussed. The results presented indicate how various microscopy techniques used in conjunction with other analytical tools can assist in the elucidation of a wear mechanism. Without question, microscopy is the single most important tool for the study of the wear of surfaces, to assess and address inherent mechanisms of the material removal process.

  6. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  7. 3D FEM Simulation of Flank Wear in Turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attanasio, Aldo; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Giardini, Claudio

    2011-05-01

    This work deals with tool wear simulation. Studying the influence of tool wear on tool life, tool substitution policy and influence on final part quality, surface integrity, cutting forces and power consumption it is important to reduce the global process costs. Adhesion, abrasion, erosion, diffusion, corrosion and fracture are some of the phenomena responsible of the tool wear depending on the selected cutting parameters: cutting velocity, feed rate, depth of cut, …. In some cases these wear mechanisms are described by analytical models as a function of process variables (temperature, pressure and sliding velocity along the cutting surface). These analytical models are suitable to be implemented in FEM codes and they can be utilized to simulate the tool wear. In the present paper a commercial 3D FEM software has been customized to simulate the tool wear during turning operations when cutting AISI 1045 carbon steel with uncoated tungsten carbide tip. The FEM software was improved by means of a suitable subroutine able to modify the tool geometry on the basis of the estimated tool wear as the simulation goes on. Since for the considered couple of tool-workpiece material the main phenomena generating wear are the abrasive and the diffusive ones, the tool wear model implemented into the subroutine was obtained as combination between the Usui's and the Takeyama and Murata's models. A comparison between experimental and simulated flank tool wear curves is reported demonstrating that it is possible to simulate the tool wear development.

  8. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  9. Cobalt excretion in urine: results of a study on workers producing diamond grinding tools and on a control group.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Bacis, M; Vitali, M T; Leghissa, P; Sabbioni, E

    1994-06-30

    A study was carried out on cobalt (Co) excretion in the urine of 12 workers exposed to known cobalt concentrations in the stone cutting diamond wheel production and in six volunteers: four of these were exposed in the same work environment for a whole workshift and the other two were exposed to cobalt in a cabin under experimental conditions. The kinetics of the urinary excretion was multiphase: (i) a first stage of rapid elimination (T 1/2' = 43.9 h); (ii) a second phase of slower elimination (T 1/2'' = 10 days); (iii) a longer period of retention, of the order of years, in subjects with higher exposure. In the control group (4 subjects), the excretion proved to be much faster in the first stage (T 1/2' = 20 h). The different behaviour of the two groups could be related to the different body burden, of cobalt and/or to the possibility of different kinetics induced by continuous exposure to the metal. Moreover, 3 weeks after the removal of the workers from exposure the urinary cobalt concentrations were not within the normal limits of CoU for the general population, (even for workers exposed to cobalt levels of the same order as the TLV). The increase of CoU concentrations in the first 3 h after the end of exposure, stresses the problem of when urine samples for biological monitoring of the workers should be collected. The present study confirms the utility of CoU in discriminating between exposed and non-exposed subjects as well as in assessing high and low level exposure.

  10. Quantitative three-dimensional microtextural analyses of tooth wear as a tool for dietary discrimination in fishes

    PubMed Central

    Purnell, Mark; Seehausen, Ole; Galis, Frietson

    2012-01-01

    Resource polymorphisms and competition for resources are significant factors in speciation. Many examples come from fishes, and cichlids are of particular importance because of their role as model organisms at the interface of ecology, development, genetics and evolution. However, analysis of trophic resource use in fishes can be difficult and time-consuming, and for fossil fish species it is particularly problematic. Here, we present evidence from cichlids that analysis of tooth microwear based on high-resolution (sub-micrometre scale) three-dimensional data and new ISO standards for quantification of surface textures provides a powerful tool for dietary discrimination and investigation of trophic resource exploitation. Our results suggest that three-dimensional approaches to analysis offer significant advantages over two-dimensional operator-scored methods of microwear analysis, including applicability to rough tooth surfaces that lack distinct scratches and pits. Tooth microwear textures develop over a longer period of time than is represented by stomach contents, and analyses based on textures are less prone to biases introduced by opportunistic feeding. They are more sensitive to subtle dietary differences than isotopic analysis. Quantitative textural analysis of tooth microwear has a useful role to play, complementing existing approaches, in trophic analysis of fishes—both extant and extinct. PMID:22491979

  11. 'Diamond' in 3-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This 3-D, microscopic imager mosaic of a target area on a rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  12. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in the diamond technology is in progress, as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear-resistant, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly regarding solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This paper reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamonds to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  13. Applications for precision cutting of sharpening CVD diamond film

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Fuminori; Yoshikawa, Masanori

    1995-12-31

    A thick CVD diamond has been expected to the applications for cutting tools. But it is difficult to sharpen thick CVD diamond films by means of a conventional sharpening method using diamond grinding wheel for forming a large chipping of scores of micrometers at the cutting edge. Accordingly, we have made a thermochemical polishing n apparatus capable of polishing a sharpening for cutting tool and thick CVD diamond films were processed by this apparatus. And then the cutting test by aluminum alloy was conducted and the cutting performance of thick CVD diamond films polished by thermochemical polishing method was evaluated.

  14. Diagnostic Techniques Used to Study Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    The advantages and utility of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond as an industrial ceramic can only be realized if the price and quality are right. Until recently, this technology was of interest only to the academic and basic research community. However, interest has grown because of advances made by leading CVD diamond suppliers: 1) Reduction of the cost of CVD polycrystalline diamond deposition below $5/carat ($8/sq cm); 2) Installation of production capacity; 3) Epitaxial growth of CVD single-crystal diamond. Thus, CVD diamond applications and business are an industrial reality. At present, CVD diamond is produced in the form of coatings or wafers. CVD diamond film technology offers a broader technological potential than do natural and high-pressure synthetic diamonds because size, geometry, and eventually cost will not be as limiting. Now that they are cost effective, diamond coatings - with their extreme properties - can be used in a variety of applications. Diamond coatings can improve many of the surface properties of engineering substrate materials, including erosion, corrosion, and wear resistance. Examples of actual and potential applications, from microelectromechanical systems to the wear parts of diamond coatings and related superhard coatings are described. For example, diamond coatings can be used as a chemical and mechanical barrier for the space shuttles check valves, particularly on the guide pins and seat assemblies.

  15. Influence on Diamonds During the Spraying of Diamond-Bronze Abrasive Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Nebel, J.; Buck, V.; Reuter, S.

    2010-01-01

    Detonation spraying provides the opportunity to produce diamond grinding tools for the machining of stone, cement, and concrete. Especially the atmospheric conditions of the spraying process yield in a high production flexibility. However, during detonation spraying, the oxygenic atmosphere as well as the thermal and kinetic energy have an impact on the processed diamond. Despite its importance for the tools’ performance, the influence of the spraying process on the superabrasive diamond is predominantly unknown. The potential decrease of the diamond durability and strength due to degradation effects during the production of sprayed diamond-CuSn 85/15 composites has not yet been determined. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to verify thermally initiated surface reactions of the sprayed diamonds after exposure to the spraying process. Additionally, reference measurements on the degradation of diamonds in oxidizing and inert conditions were carried out to compare the spraying results. Differential thermal and thermogravimetric analyses were employed. To validate the mechanical properties of the diamond superabrasives, friability tests and fracture force tests were performed. It was found that under optimized detonation spraying conditions the thermal and mechanical impact remains low enough to ensure a good reliability of the processed diamonds. The diamond crystal structure endured the spraying process without detectable graphitization or oxidation. Deterioration indicators were not observed in SEM micrographs, x-ray diffraction patterns or Raman spectra. Furthermore, a high durability and strength of the sprayed diamonds were confirmed by mechanical testing.

  16. Diamond Tours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On April 24, a group traveling with Diamond Tours visited StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center in South Mississippi. The trip marked Diamond Tours' return to StenniSphere since Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29, 2005. About 25 business professionals from Georgia enjoyed the day's tour of America's largest rocket engine test complex, along with the many displays and exhibits at the museum. Before Hurricane Katrina, the nationwide company brought more than 1,000 visitors to StenniSphere each month. That contributed to more than 100,000 visitors from around the world touring the space center each year. In past years StenniSphere's visitor relations specialists booked Diamond Tours two or three times a week, averaging 40 to 50 people per visit. SSC was established in the 1960s to test the huge engines for the Saturn V moon rockets. Now 40 years later, the center tests every main engine for the space shuttle. SSC will soon begin testing the rocket engines that will power spacecraft carrying Americans back to the moon and on to Mars. For more information or to book a tour, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis/home/index.html and click on the StenniSphere logo; or call 800-237-1821 or 228-688-2370.

  17. 76 FR 775 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts thereof (``diamond sawblades'') from the People's..., 2010. In this instance, Hanson Diamond Tools (Danyang) Co., Ltd. (``Hanson'') made a sale of...

  18. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Catledge, S A; Thomas, V; Vohra, Y K

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties.

  19. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    PubMed Central

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  20. Adhesion and wear resistance of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies into the nature of bonding at the interface between two solids in contact or a solid and deposited film have provided a better understanding of those properties important to the adhesive wear resistance of materials. Analytical and experimental progress are reviewed. For simple metal systems the adhesive bond forces are related to electronic wave function overlap. With metals in contact with nonmetals, molecular-orbital energy, and density of states, respectively can provide insight into adhesion and wear. Experimental results are presented which correlate adhesive forces measured between solids and the electronic surface structures. Orientation, surface reconstruction, surface segregation, adsorption are all shown to influence adhesive interfacial strength. The interrelationship between adhesion and the wear of the various materials as well as the life of coatings applied to substrates are discussed. Metallic systems addressed include simple metals and alloys and these materials in contact with themselves, both oxide and nonoxide ceramics, diamond, polymers, and inorganic coating compounds, h as diamondlike carbon.

  1. Tribological properties of amorphous alloys and the role of surfaces in abrasive wear of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The research approach undertaken by the authors relative to the subject, and examples of results from the authors are reviewed. The studies include programs in adhesion, friction, and various wear mechanisms (adhesive and abrasive wear). The materials which have been studied include such ceramic and metallic materials as silicon carbide, ferrites, diamond, and amorphous alloys.

  2. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  3. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alterna-tives to high- tensile- strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine- tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive- contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and micro-hardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of duc-tile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricated sliding wear tests on specimens and compo-nents for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylinder unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine- tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  4. A model for predicting wear rates in tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar; Pajares, Antonia; Constantino, Paul J; Lawn, Brian R

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesized that wear of enamel is sensitive to the presence of sharp particulates in oral fluids and masticated foods. To this end, a generic model for predicting wear rates in brittle materials is developed, with specific application to tooth enamel. Wear is assumed to result from an accumulation of elastic-plastic micro-asperity events. Integration over all such events leads to a wear rate relation analogous to Archard׳s law, but with allowance for variation in asperity angle and compliance. The coefficient K in this relation quantifies the wear severity, with an arbitrary distinction between 'mild' wear (low K) and 'severe' wear (high K). Data from the literature and in-house wear-test experiments on enamel specimens in lubricant media (water, oil) with and without sharp third-body particulates (silica, diamond) are used to validate the model. Measured wear rates can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on contact asperity conditions, accounting for the occurrence of severe enamel removal in some human patients (bruxing). Expressions for the depth removal rate and number of cycles to wear down occlusal enamel in the low-crowned tooth forms of some mammals are derived, with tooth size and enamel thickness as key variables. The role of 'hard' versus 'soft' food diets in determining evolutionary paths in different hominin species is briefly considered. A feature of the model is that it does not require recourse to specific material removal mechanisms, although processes involving microplastic extrusion and microcrack coalescence are indicated.

  5. Nanotwinned diamond with unprecedented hardness and stability.

    PubMed

    Huang, Quan; Yu, Dongli; Xu, Bo; Hu, Wentao; Ma, Yanming; Wang, Yanbin; Zhao, Zhisheng; Wen, Bin; He, Julong; Liu, Zhongyuan; Tian, Yongjun

    2014-06-12

    Although diamond is the hardest material for cutting tools, poor thermal stability has limited its applications, especially at high temperatures. Simultaneous improvement of the hardness and thermal stability of diamond has long been desirable. According to the Hall-Petch effect, the hardness of diamond can be enhanced by nanostructuring (by means of nanograined and nanotwinned microstructures), as shown in previous studies. However, for well-sintered nanograined diamonds, the grain sizes are technically limited to 10-30 nm (ref. 3), with degraded thermal stability compared with that of natural diamond. Recent success in synthesizing nanotwinned cubic boron nitride (nt-cBN) with a twin thickness down to ∼3.8 nm makes it feasible to simultaneously achieve smaller nanosize, ultrahardness and superior thermal stability. At present, nanotwinned diamond (nt-diamond) has not been fabricated successfully through direct conversions of various carbon precursors (such as graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon and C60). Here we report the direct synthesis of nt-diamond with an average twin thickness of ∼5 nm, using a precursor of onion carbon nanoparticles at high pressure and high temperature, and the observation of a new monoclinic crystalline form of diamond coexisting with nt-diamond. The pure synthetic bulk nt-diamond material shows unprecedented hardness and thermal stability, with Vickers hardness up to ∼200 GPa and an in-air oxidization temperature more than 200 °C higher than that of natural diamond. The creation of nanotwinned microstructures offers a general pathway for manufacturing new advanced carbon-based materials with exceptional thermal stability and mechanical properties.

  6. A Preliminary Evaluation of Diamond-Like Carbon Coated Polycarbonate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    moisture sensitive coatings provide good protection against laser induced damage. Proper adhesion between each coating layers needs to be estab- lished... coating that is being pursued is to increase the wear, abra- sion, and chemical resistance of the current ballistic/laser protective spectacles (BLPS...unique ion beam system. These diamond-like carbon coatings have considera’le potential as wear-resistant protective hardcoatings for transparent

  7. Diamond Anvil Cell Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermarini, Gasper J.

    It has often been said that scientific advances are made either in a dramatic and revolutionary way, or, as in the case of the diamond anvil cell (DAC), in a slow and evolutionary manner over a period of several years. For more than 2 decades, commencing in 1958, the DAC developed stepwise from a rather crude qualitative instrument to the sophisticated quantitative research tool it is today, capable of routinely producing sustained static pressures in the multi-megabar range and readily adaptable to numerous scientific measurement techniques because of its optical accessibility, miniature size, and portability.

  8. Diamond stabilization of ice multilayers at human body temperature.

    PubMed

    Wissner-Gross, Alexander D; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2007-08-01

    Diamond is a promising material for wear-resistant medical coatings. Here we report a remarkable increase in the melting point of ice resting on a diamond (111) surface modified with a submonolayer of Na+. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that the interfacial ice bilayer melts at a temperature 130 K higher than in free ice, and relatively thick ice films (2.6 nm at 298 K and 2.2 nm at 310 K ) are stabilized by dipole interactions with the substrate. This unique physical effect may enable biocompatibility-enhancing ice overcoatings for diamond at human body temperature.

  9. Machinability of lithium disilicate glass ceramic in in vitro dental diamond bur adjusting process.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Fei; Ren, Hai-Tao; Yin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Esthetic high-strength lithium disilicate glass ceramics (LDGC) are used for monolithic crowns and bridges produced in dental CAD/CAM and oral adjusting processes, which machinability affects the restorative quality. A machinability study has been made in the simulated oral clinical machining of LDGC with a dental handpiece and diamond burs, regarding the diamond tool wear and chip control, machining forces and energy, surface finish and integrity. Machining forces, speeds and energy in in vitro dental adjusting of LDGC were measured by a high-speed data acquisition and force sensor system. Machined LDGC surfaces were assessed using three-dimensional non-contact chromatic confocal optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Diamond bur morphology and LDGC chip shapes were also examined using SEM. Minimum tool wear but significant LDGC chip accumulations were found. Machining forces and energy significantly depended on machining conditions (p<0.05) and were significantly higher than other glass ceramics (p<0.05). Machining speeds dropped more rapidly with increased removal rates than other glass ceramics (p<0.05). Two material machinability indices associated with the hardness, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were derived based on the normal force-removal rate relations, which ranked LDGC the most difficult to machine among glass ceramics. Surface roughness for machined LDGC was comparable for other glass ceramics. The removal mechanisms of LDGC were dominated by penetration-induced brittle fracture and shear-induced plastic deformation. Unlike most other glass ceramics, distinct intergranular and transgranular fractures of lithium disilicate crystals were found in LDGC. This research provides the fundamental data for dental clinicians on the machinability of LDGC in intraoral adjustments.

  10. Wear of engineering materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, J.A.

    1998-12-31

    Nearly 60 papers discuss fundamental and applied research in the areas of wear, erosion and wear-corrosion of materials. Focus is on ceramics, ceramic and polymer-matrix composites, and coatings; the effect of sliding wear and wear-corrosion of materials in manufacturing processes, automobiles and bearings; and wear and erosion of materials used in fossil-fuel power plants, minerals processing and heavy manufacturing.

  11. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Rigali

    2001-08-15

    A set of materials property data for potential wear resistant materials was collected. These materials are designated for use as the ''core'' materials in the Fibrous Monolith structure. The material properties of hardness, toughness, thermal conductivity and cost were selected as determining factors for material choice. Data for these four properties were normalized, and weighting factors were assigned for each property to establish priority and evaluate the effects of priority fluctuation. Materials were then given a score based on the normalized parameters and weighting values. Using the initial estimates for parameter priority, the highest ranking material was tungsten carbide, with diamond as the second ranked material. Several materials were included in the trade study, and five were selected as promising ''core'' materials to include in this effort. These materials are tungsten carbide, diamond, boron carbide, titanium diboride and silicon carbide. Work was initiated on a trade study to evaluate ''shell'' materials. These materials will require the investigation of different material properties, including ultimate tensile strength, ductility, toughness, thermal expansion, thermal conductivity and compatibility during consolidation with the ''core'' materials. Kyocera Industrial Ceramics in Kyoto, Japan was visited, with the purpose of negotiating and signing the subcontract for Kyocera's participation on this program. An assessment was made on the testing and manufacturing capabilities of Kyocera and how such capabilities can be integrated into our development effort. Tours were conducted of Kyocera's machine tool production plant in Sendai, Japan, as well as their research and development facilities in Kagoshima, Japan. Kyocera's facilities include substantial materials characterization and testing capabilities at room and elevated temperatures, and manufacturing capabilities of thousands of parts/hr, all of which will be made available to us for use on

  12. Computer controlled precision optical polishing on the diamond turning machine

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Day, R.D.; Hatch, D.

    1993-10-01

    This abstract reports the force and wear data required to predict the material removal, or wear, for the Numerical controlled (N/C) polishing program. The program`s aim is to provide the operator of a N/C diamond turning machine or N/C grinding machine with the wear characteristics necessary to achieve uniform material removal. The first phase of the program looks at a rotating polishing wheel, moving from near the center to edge of a rotating glass disc. future phases will look at more complex shapes.

  13. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond.

    PubMed

    Field, J E

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of

  14. The mechanical and strength properties of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Diamond is an exciting material with many outstanding properties; see, for example Field J E (ed) 1979 The Properties of Diamond (London: Academic) and Field J E (ed) 1992 The Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamond (London: Academic). It is pre-eminent as a gemstone, an industrial tool and as a material for solid state research. Since natural diamonds grew deep below the Earth's surface before their ejection to mineable levels, they also contain valuable information for geologists. The key to many of diamond's properties is the rigidity of its structure which explains, for example, its exceptional hardness and its high thermal conductivity. Since 1953, it has been possible to grow synthetic diamond. Before then, it was effectively only possible to have natural diamond, with a small number of these found in the vicinity of meteorite impacts. Techniques are now available to grow gem quality synthetic diamonds greater than 1 carat (0.2 g) using high temperatures and pressures (HTHP) similar to those found in nature. However, the costs are high, and the largest commercially available industrial diamonds are about 0.01 carat in weight or about 1 mm in linear dimension. The bulk of synthetic diamonds used industrially are 600 µm or less. Over 75% of diamond used for industrial purposes today is synthetic material. In recent years, there have been two significant developments. The first is the production of composites based on diamond; these materials have a significantly greater toughness than diamond while still maintaining very high hardness and reasonable thermal conductivity. The second is the production at low pressures by metastable growth using chemical vapour deposition techniques. Deposition onto non-diamond substrates was first demonstrated by Spitsyn et al 1981 J. Cryst. Growth 52 219-26 and confirmed by Matsumoto et al 1982 Japan J. Appl. Phys. 21 L183-5. These developments have added further to the versatility of diamond. Two other groups of materials

  15. Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Goel, Sneha; Pandey, Chandra Prabha; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-02-01

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5-10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10-3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03-0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08-0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries.

  16. Multi-Length Scale Tribology of Electrophoretically Deposited Nickel-Diamond Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Goel, Sneha; Pandey, Chandra Prabha; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-10-01

    Electrophoretically deposited (EPD) nickel and its composite coatings are widely used to enhance the life span of continuous ingot casting molds in the steel, aerospace and automotive industries. This article reports the effect of different concentrations of diamond particles (2.5-10 g/L) on the wear mechanism of EPD Ni. The distribution of diamond particles in the Ni matrix was observed using Voronoi tessellation. Variation in COF was observed by a fretting wear test to be 0.51 ± 0.07 for Ni, which decreases to 0.35 ± 0.03 for the Ni-diamond coatings. The wear volume of the coatings with 7.5 g/L concentration of diamond was observed to be a minimum (0.051 ± 0.02 × 10-3 mm3) compared with other composite coatings. Further, the micro-scratch testing of the coatings also exhibited a reduced COF (0.03-0.12) for 7.5 g/L diamond concentration compared with Ni (0.08-0.13). Higher wear resistance of the diamond-added coatings (optimum 7.5 g/L concentration) is due to the balance between the dispersion strengthening mechanism and the enhancement of the load-bearing capacity due to the incorporation of diamond particles. Thus, these composites can be used for applications in automotive and aerospace industries.

  17. Designing shallow donors in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    The production of n-type semiconducting diamond has been a long-standing experimental challenge. The first-principles simulation of shallow dopants in semiconductors has been a long-standing theoretical challenge. A desirable theoretical goal is to identify impurities that will act as shallow donors in diamond and assess their experimental viability. I will discuss this identification process for the LiN4 donor complex. It builds a scientific argument from several models and computational results in the absence of computational tools that are both trustworthy and computationally tractable for this task. I will compare the theoretical assessment of viability with recent experimental efforts to co-dope diamond with lithium and nitrogen. Finally, I discuss the computational tools needed to facilitate future work on this problem and some preliminary simulations of donors near diamond surfaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program lab managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Development of a low-pressure diamond anvil cell and analytical tools to monitor microbial activities in situ under controlled P and T.

    PubMed

    Oger, Phil M; Daniel, Isabelle; Picard, Aude

    2006-03-01

    We have designed a new low-pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC), calibrated two novel pressure calibrants and validated the use of semi-quantitative Raman and X-ray spectroscopies to monitor the fate of microbes, their metabolism or their cellular components under controlled pressures and temperatures in the 0.1-1.4 GPa and 20-300 degrees C P,T range. The low-pressure DAC has a 250- to 600-microm-thick observation diamond window to allow for lower detection limits and improved microscopic imaging. This new design allows the determination of cellular growth parameters from automated image analysis, which can be correlated with the spectroscopic data obtained on metabolism, ensuring high quality data collection on microbial activity under pressure. The novel pressure sensors offer the ease of use of the well-known ruby scale, while being more sensitive and reacting to pressure variations instantaneously.

  19. Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirey, S. B.

    2002-05-01

    Gem-quality diamond contains such low abundances of parent-daughter radionuclides that dating the diamond lattice directly by isotopic measurements has been and will be impossible. Absolute ages on diamonds typically are obtained through measurements of their syngenetic mineral inclusions: Rb-Sr in garnet; Sm-Nd in garnet and pyroxene; Re-Os and U-Th-Pb in sulfide; K-Ar in pyroxene; and U-Pb in zircon. The application of the first two isotope schemes in the list requires putting together many inclusions from many diamonds whereas the latter isotope schemes permit ages on single diamonds. The key limitations on the application of these decay pairs are the availability and size of the inclusions, the abundance levels of the radionuclides, and instrumental sensitivity. Practical complications of radioisotope dating of inclusions are fatal to the application of the technique for diamond provenance. In all mines, the ratio of gem-quality diamonds to stones with datable inclusions is very high. Thus there is no way to date the valuable, marketable stones that are part of the conflict diamond problem, just their rare, flawed cousins. Each analysis destroys the diamond host plus the inclusion and can only be carried out in research labs by highly trained scientists. Thus, these methods can not be automated or applied to the bulk of diamond production. The geological problems with age dating are equally fatal to its application to diamond provenance. From the geological perspective, for age determination to work as a tool for diamond provenance studies, diamond ages would have to be specific to particular kimberlites or kimberlite fields and different between fields. The southern African Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Mobile Belt is the only cratonic region where age determinations have been applied on a large enough scale to a number of kimberlites to illustrate the geological problems in age measurements for diamond provenance. However, this southern African example

  20. Diamond-Bronze Coatings for Grinding Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Nebel, J.

    2008-12-01

    Grinding applications for the machining of stone and concrete require composite tools where large diamonds are perfectly embedded into a metallic matrix. With the detonation flame spraying process, it is possible to manufacture these super abrasive composites. Excellent embedment of the voluminous super abrasive particles into the matrix coating material can be realized to produce high quality composite layers for grinding applications of stone and concrete. In this paper, different diamond gradings as well as different volume contents of diamond in matrix are compared. Especially, the influence of particle size on its implantation efficiency is investigated and the influence of process and substrate temperature is analyzed. The thermal sprayed grinding tools are evaluated with respect to their microstructure as well as their grinding abilities. Compared to sintered diamond-bronze samples, the results of an adaptively designed grinding test for the machining of concrete are presented and analyzed.

  1. Deposition Of Cubic BN On Diamond Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ong, Tiong P.; Shing, Yuh-Han

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of polycrystalline, pure, cubic boron nitride (c-BN) formed on various substrates, according to proposal, by chemical vapor deposition onto interlayers of polycrystalline diamond. Substrate materials include metals, semiconductors, and insulators. Typical substrates include metal-cutting tools: polycrystalline c-BN coats advantageous for cutting ferrous materials and for use in highly oxidizing environments-applications in which diamond coats tend to dissolve in iron or be oxidized, respectively.

  2. Wear of materials 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included erosion in aluminium oxides, abrasive wear tests, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, wear tests of low-cobalt alloys for hardfacing nuclear components, microstructure, the elevated temperature erosion of steels, and steels under cyclic operation in corrosive liquids.

  3. Wear of materials - 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ludema, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on materials testing to determine wear resistance. Topics considered at the conference included the wear of metals in a magnetic field, ceramics in advanced heat engine applications, wear tests of silicon carbides, microstructure, hardfacing alloys, sliding friction, coated systems, abrasion, erosion, test methods, tribology, stacking fault energy, and adhesion.

  4. Wear-mechanism modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, M.F. . Dept. of Engineering)

    1993-03-01

    Goals of the program are to calculate the surface temperatures in dry sliding, develop a soft wear tester for ceramics, survey the wear mechanisms in brittle solids, and couple the temperature calculations with models to give wear maps for brittle solids. (DLC)

  5. Tribological properties of nanocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.; Kraus, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; McCauley, T.; Csencsits, R. T.

    2000-01-26

    In this paper, the authors present the friction and wear properties of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown in A-fullerene (C{sub 60}) and Ar-CH{sub 4} microwave plasmas. Specifically, they address the fundamental tribological issues posed by these films during sliding against Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} counterfaces in ambient air and inert gases. Grain sizes of the films grown by the new method are very small (10--30 nm) and are much smoother (20-40 nm, root mean square) than those of films grown by the conventional H{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} microwave-assisted chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the grain boundaries of these films are very sharp and free of nondiamond phases. The microcrystalline diamond (MCD) films grown by most conventional methods consist of large grains and a rough surface finish, which can cause severe abrasion during sliding against other materials. The friction coefficients of films grown by the new method (i.e., in Ar-C{sub 60} and Ar-CH{sub 4} plasmas) are comparable to those of natural diamond, and wear damage on counterface materials is minimal. Fundamental tribological studies indicate that these films may undergo phase transformation during long-duration, high-speed and/or high-load sliding tests and that the transformation products trapped at the sliding interfaces can intermittently dominate friction and wear performance. Using results from a combination of TEM, electron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), they describe the structural chemistry of the debris particles trapped at the sliding interfaces and elucidate their possible effects on friction and wear of NCD films in dry N{sub 2}. Finally, they suggest a few potential applications in which NCD films can improve performance and service lives.

  6. Influence of coolant on ductile mode processing of binderless nanocrystalline tungsten carbide through ultraprecision diamond turning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetz, Marius; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz; Fähnle, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    Molds made of tungsten carbide are typically used for the replicative mass production of glass lenses by precision glass molding. Consequently an ultra-precision grinding process with a subsequent fresh-feed polishing operation is conventionally applied. These processes are time consuming and have a relatively low reproducibility. An alternative manufacturing technology, with a high predictability and efficiency, which additionally allows a higher geometrical flexibility, is the single point diamond turning technique (SPDT). However, the extreme hardness and the chemical properties of tungsten carbide lead to significant tool wear and therefore the impossibility of machining the work pieces in an economical way. One approach to enlarge the tool life is to affect the contact zone between tool and work piece by the use of special cutting fluids. This publication emphasizes on the most recent investigations and results in direct machining of nano-grained tungsten carbide with mono crystal diamonds under the influence of various kinds of cutting fluids. Therefore basic ruling experiments on binderless nano grained tungsten carbide were performed, where the tool performed a linear movement with a steadily increasing depth of cut. As the ductile cutting mechanism is a prerequisite for the optical manufacturing of tungsten carbide these experiments serve the purpose for establish the influence of different cutting fluid characteristics on the cutting performance of mono crystal diamonds. Eventually it is shown that by adjusting the coolant fluid it is possible to significantly shift the transition point from ductile to brittle removal to larger depths of cut eventually enabling a SPDT of binderless tungsten carbide molds.

  7. Opalescent Diamonds Enriched in Hydrocarbon Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I.; Tsao, C.

    2006-05-01

    We studied a large number of diamonds from Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not gem-quality, do not have sharp corners and sharp edges, they are not suitable for making cutting tools. Such industrial diamonds are usually crushed to form abrasives, thus, they might escape the scrutiny of researchers. In China, diamonds were routinely soaked in HF overnight to remove mud and other substances, and no oil and grease were used in the processing. It is not uncommon to see iridescence in pink, pale yellow and grey diamonds. The most common opalescent colors are alternating sharp bands of intense pink and indigo blue, and, less frequently, bands of yellow and blue-green, all may appear in the same diamond. As the bands have uniform thickness, their colors might not be due simply to optical effects, but rather, might be chemically related. We had chosen 10 diamonds to study their FT-IR spectra. Six of the crystals exhibited a group of hydrocarbons (HCs) peaks located just below 3000 cm-1, while all but one had a C-H stretch peak at 3107 cm-1. Two other diamonds had weak HCs peaks, but a very strong peak at 3107 cm-1. Two more diamonds had very weak HCs and C-H stretch peaks. To sum up, when a spectrum has strong HCs peaks, the C-H stretch peak is weak, and vice versa. There seems to be a chemical relationship between the substances represented by these peaks. Our observations indicate that hydrocarbon fluids might have been trapped during crystallization, but subsequently unmixed into well- organized thin bands. If fluids observed in the opalescent diamonds were soaked up in the mantle, then the amount of hydrocarbons existing in Earth's mantle might be quite appreciable in some environment.

  8. Wire Electrical Discharge Truing of Metal Bond Diamond Grinding Wheels

    SciTech Connect

    McSpadden, SB

    2002-01-24

    Cylindrical wire EDM profile truing of the metal bond diamond wheel for precision form grinding of ceramics is presented in this report. First a corrosion-resistant, precise spindle with the high-electrical current capability for wire EDM truing of grinding wheel was fabricated. An arc profile was adopted in order to determine form tolerances capabilities of this process. Results show the wire EDM process can generate {micro}m-scale precision form on the diamond wheel efficiently. The wheel, after truing, was used to grind silicon nitride. Grinding forces, surface finish of ground components, and wheel wear were measured. The EDM trued wheel showed a reduction in grinding force from that of the stick dressed wheel. Surface finishes between the two truing methods were similar. In the beginning of the grinding, significant wheel wear rate was identified. The subsequent wheel wear rate stabilized and became considerably lower.

  9. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  10. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  11. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  12. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  13. Characterization and measurement of polymer wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Aron, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical tools which characterize the polymer wear process are discussed. The devices discussed include: visual observation of polymer wear with SEM, the quantification with surface profilometry and ellipsometry, to study the chemistry with AES, XPS and SIMS, to establish interfacial polymer orientation and accordingly bonding with QUARTIR, polymer state with Raman spectroscopy and stresses that develop in polymer films using a X-ray double crystal camera technique.

  14. 'Diamond Jenness': A Tough Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the target area called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  15. 'Diamond Jenness': After the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock dubbed 'Diamond Jenness.' It was taken on sol 177 (July 23, 2004) after the rover first ground into the rock with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.' The rover later ground into the rock a second time. A sliced spherule, or 'blueberry,' is visible in the upper left corner of the hole.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  16. 'Diamond Jenness': Before the Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the rock called 'Diamond Jenness' was snapped on sol 177 before NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool, or 'Rat.'

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  17. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yung-Hsiu

    This dissertation describes improvements in the growth of single crystal diamond by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Heteroepitaxial (001) diamond was grown on 1 cm. 2 a-plane sapphiresubstrates using an epitaxial (001) Ir thin-film as a buffer layer. Low-energy ion bombardment of the Ir layer, a process known as bias-enhanced nucleation, is a key step in achieving a high density of diamond nuclei. Bias conditions were optimized to form uniformly-high nucleation densities across the substrates, which led to well-coalesced diamond thin films after short growth times. Epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) was used as a means of decreasing diamond internal stress by impeding the propagation of threading dislocations into the growing material. Its use in diamond growth requires adaptation to the aggressive chemical and thermal environment of the hydrogen plasma in a CVD reactor. Three ELO variants were developed. The most successful utilized a gold (Au) mask prepared by vacuum evaporation onto the surface of a thin heteroepitaxial diamond layer. The Au mask pattern, a series of parallel stripes on the micrometer scale, was produced by standard lift-off photolithography. When diamond overgrows the mask, dislocations are largely confined to the substrate. Differing degrees of confinement were studied by varying the stripe geometry and orientation. Significant improvement in diamond quality was found in the overgrown regions, as evidenced by reduction of the Raman scattering linewidth. The Au layer was found to remain intact during diamond overgrowth and did not chemically bond with the diamond surface. Besides impeding the propagation of threading dislocations, it was discovered that the thermally-induced stress in the CVD diamond was significantly reduced as a result of the ductile Au layer. Cracking and delamination of the diamond from the substrate was mostly eliminated. When diamond was grown to thicknesses above 0.1 mm it was found that

  18. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  19. Size Dependence of Nanoscale Wear of Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Tangpatjaroen, Chaiyapat; Grierson, David; Shannon, Steve; Jakes, Joseph E; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2017-01-18

    Nanoscale, single-asperity wear of single-crystal silicon carbide (sc-SiC) and nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) is investigated using single-crystal diamond nanoindenter tips and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips under dry conditions, and the wear behavior is compared to that of single-crystal silicon with both thin and thick native oxide layers. We discovered a transition in the relative wear resistance of the SiC samples compared to that of Si as a function of contact size. With larger nanoindenter tips (tip radius ≈ 370 nm), the wear resistances of both sc-SiC and nc-SiC are higher than that of Si. This result is expected from the Archard's equation because SiC is harder than Si. However, with the smaller AFM tips (tip radius ≈ 20 nm), the wear resistances of sc-SiC and nc-SiC are lower than that of Si, despite the fact that the contact pressures are comparable to those applied with the nanoindenter tips, and the plastic zones are well-developed in both sets of wear experiments. We attribute the decrease in the relative wear resistance of SiC compared to that of Si to a transition from a wear regime dominated by the materials' resistance to plastic deformation (i.e., hardness) to a regime dominated by the materials' resistance to interfacial shear. This conclusion is supported by our AFM studies of wearless friction, which reveal that the interfacial shear strength of SiC is higher than that of Si. The contributions of surface roughness and surface chemistry to differences in interfacial shear strength are also discussed.

  20. Diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Y. -H.; Bi, B.; Golding, B.

    2015-02-24

    A method of diamond heteroepitaxial lateral overgrowth is demonstrated which utilizes a photolithographic metal mask to pattern a thin (001) epitaxial diamond surface. Significant structural improvement was found, with a threading dislocation density reduced by two orders of magnitude at the top surface of a thick overgrown diamond layer. In the initial stage of overgrowth, a reduction of diamond Raman linewidth in the overgrown area was also realized. Thermally-induced stress and internal stress were determined by Raman spectroscopy of adhering and delaminated diamond films. As a result, the internal stress is found to decrease as sample thickness increases.

  1. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-04-19

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  2. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  3. The Nature of Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.

    1997-10-01

    The paragon of physical perfection and a sparkling example of Earth's forces at work, the diamond has fascinated all realms of society, from starlets to scientists. The Nature of Diamonds is a comprehensive look at nature's most coveted gem. A handsome, large-format book, The Nature of Diamonds is an authoritative and richly-illustrated tribute to the diamond. Leading geologists, gemologists, physicists, and cultural observers cover every facet of the stone, from its formation in the depths of the Earth, its ascent to the surface, and its economic, regal, social, and technological roles. Cutting-edge research takes the reader to the frontiers of diamond exploration and exploitation, from the Arctic wastes to the laboratories where diamonds are created for massive road shredders that rip up and then re-create superhighways. Here also is an overview of cutting, from the rough stones in Roman rings to the highly-faceted stones we see today, and a glimpse into the business of diamonds. Finally, The Nature of Diamonds chronicles scientific and cultural history and explores the diamond as both a sacred and a social symbol, including a picture history of betrothal rings. Wide-ranging illustrations explain the geology of diamonds, chart the history of mining from its origins in India and Brazil through the diamond rush in South Africa and today's high-tech enterprises, and capture the brilliance and beauty of this extraordinary gem. _

  4. Optimization of pulsed DC PACVD parameters: Toward reducing wear rate of the DLC films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Mansoureh; Mahboubi, Farzad; Naimi-Jamal, M. Reza

    2016-12-01

    The effect of pulsed direct current (DC) plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) parameters such as temperature, duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio on the wear behavior and wear durability of the diamond-like carbon (DLC) films was studied by using response surface methodology (RSM). DLC films were deposited on nitrocarburized AISI 4140 steel. Wear rate and wear durability of the DLC films were examined with the pin-on-disk method. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation techniques were used for studying wear mechanisms, chemical structure, and hardness of the DLC films. RSM results show that duty cycle is one of the important parameters that affect the wear rate of the DLC samples. The wear rate of the samples deposited with a duty cycle of >75% decreases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. In contrast, for a duty cycle of <65%, the wear rate increases with an increase in the argon/CH4 ratio. The wear durability of the DLC samples increases with an increase in the duty cycle, hydrogen flow, and argon/CH4 flow ratio at the deposition temperature between 85 °C and 110 °C. Oxidation, fatigue, abrasive wear, and graphitization are the wear mechanisms observed on the wear scar of the DLC samples deposited with the optimum deposition conditions.

  5. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOEpatents

    Radtke, Robert P.

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  6. Does the Use of Diamond-Like Carbon Coating and Organophosphate Lubricant Additive Together Cause Excessive Tribochemical Material Removal?

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Meyer, Harry M.; Luo, Huimin; Qu, Jun

    2015-08-22

    We observe unexpected wear increase on a steel surface that rubbed against diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings only when lubricated by phosphate-based antiwear additives. Contrary to the literature hypothesis of a competition between zinc dialkyldithiophosphate produced tribofilms and DLC-induced carbon transfer, here a new wear mechanism based on carbon-catalyzed tribochemical interactions supported by surface characterization is proposed

  7. Growth, processing and properties of CVD diamond for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snail, Keith A.

    1992-11-01

    In recent years there has been an increased need for optical materials for use in adverse chemical, thermal, abrasive, and/or radiation environments. Diamond is a natural candidate for many of these applications because of its radiation hardness, superb resistance to chemical attack and abrasive wear, high thermal conductivity, and low absorption coefficient throughout the visible and much of the infrared. The use of synthetic (high pressure-high temperature) and natural diamond in optical components has been limited by the size and shapesof available crystals, and the inability to coat optical elements. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of polycrystalline diamond does not suffer the same limitations, and is therefore the focus of an expanding worldwide research effort. CVD diamond is not without its own shortcomings, however, and in this paper a status report is given on the obstacles and current research related to using CVD diamond as an optical material. Natural diamond's relevant physical properties and the optical applications envisioned for CVD diamond are also discussed.

  8. Structures and Mechanical Properties of Natural and Synthetic Diamonds. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    A revolution in diamond technology is in progress as the low-pressure process becomes an industrial reality. It will soon be possible to take advantage of the demanding properties of diamond to develop a myriad of new applications, particularly for self-lubricating, wear, and superhard coatings. The production of large diamond films or sheets at low cost, a distinct possibility in the not-too-distant future, may drastically change tribology technology, particularly solid lubricants and lubricating materials and systems. This chapter reviews the structures and properties of natural and synthetic diamond to gain a better understanding of the tribological properties of diamond and related materials to be described in the following chapters. Atomic and crystal structure, impurities, mechanical properties, and indentation hardness of diamond are described.

  9. Inclusions of Hydrocarbon Fluids in Diamonds From Wafangdian, Liaoning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, I. S.; Tsao, C.

    2015-12-01

    We studied a large number of industrial-grade diamonds from Pipe 50 of Liaoning, China. These diamonds are not suitable for polishing into gems or making cutting tools. They are usually crushed to form abrasives, without much scientific scrutiny. We report here fluid inclusions in dozens of diamonds. The first type of fluids occur in the outer rim of diamonds, just below the surface, while their interior is free of visible fluids. Under UV radiation, when a non-fluorescent diamond appeared dim, bubbles of included fluids became visible as yellow and blue spherules. Such diamonds are sometimes encrusted with euhedral micro-diamonds resembling those on thin films grown by CVD. The second type of fluid-rich diamonds display iridescence of pink, blue, green and yellow colors. They show lamellar, filamentous, or tubular structures, some of the tubes are filled with granules, probably grown from fluids in the tubes. An FT-IR investigation of both types yielded similar results. Apart from absorption due to intrinsic diamond lattice vibrations, we found an outstanding group of bands just below wavenumber 3000. This indicates the presence of a saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons of long chain length. Our results seem to implicate that hydrocarbons might be an important component in Earth's mantle, which might even have provided carbon from which diamonds crystllized.

  10. Nano-inclusions in diamond: Evidence of diamond genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, R.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Focused Ion Beam technology (FIB) for TEM sample preparation introduced approximately 15 years ago revolutionized the application of TEM in Geosciences. For the first time, FIB enabled cutting samples for TEM use from exactly the location we are interested in. Applied to diamond investigation, this technique revealed the presence of nanometre-sized inclusions in diamond that have been simply unknown before. Nanoinclusions in diamond from different location and origin such as diamonds from the Lower and Upper Mantle, metamorphic diamonds (Kazakhstan, Erzgebirge, Bohemia), diamonds from ophiolites (Tibet, Mongolia, Xinjiang, Ural Mountains), diamonds from igneous rocks (Hawaii, Kamchatka) and impact diamonds (Popigai Crater, Siberia) have been investigated during the last 15 years. The major conclusion of all these TEM studies is, that the nanoinclusions, their phases and phase composition together with the micro- and nanostructure evidence the origin of diamond and genesis of diamond. We can discriminate Five different mechanisms of diamond genesis in nature are observed: Diamond crystallized from a high-density fluid (Upper mantle and metamorphic diamond). Diamond crystallized from carbonatitic melt (Lower mantle diamond). Diamond precipitates from a metal alloy melt (Diamond from ophiolites). Diamond crystallized by gas phase condensation or chemical vapour condensation (CVD) (Lavas from Kamchatka, xenoliths in Hawaiian lavas). Direct transformation of graphite into diamond.

  11. Electrochemical inactivation of cyanobacteria and microcystin degradation using a boron-doped diamond anode - A potential tool for cyanobacterial bloom control.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Andrej; Pecman, Anja; Rozina, Tinkara; Leštan, Domen; Sedmak, Bojan

    2017-03-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are global phenomena that can occur in calm and nutrient-rich (eutrophic) fresh and marine waters. Human exposure to cyanobacteria and their biologically active products is possible during water sports and various water activities, or by ingestion of contaminated water. Although the vast majority of harmful cyanobacterial products are confined to the interior of the cells, these are eventually released into the surrounding water following natural or artificially induced cell death. Electrochemical oxidation has been used here to damage cyanobacteria to halt their proliferation, and for microcystin degradation under in-vitro conditions. Partially spent Jaworski growth medium with no addition of supporting electrolytes was used. Electrochemical treatment resulted in the cyanobacterial loss of cell-buoyancy regulation, cell proliferation arrest, and eventual cell death. Microcystin degradation was studied separately in two basic modes of treatment: batch-wise flow, and constant flow, for electrolytic-cell exposure. Batch-wise exposure simulates treatment under environmental conditions, while constant flow is more appropriate for the study of boron-doped diamond electrode efficacy under laboratory conditions. The effectiveness of microcystin degradation was established using high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector analysis, while the biological activities of the products were estimated using a colorimetric protein phosphatase-1 inhibition assay. The results indicate potential for the application of electro-oxidation methods for the control of bloom events by taking advantage of specific intrinsic ecological characteristics of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. The applicability of the use of boron-doped diamond electrodes in remediation of water exposed to cyanobacteria bloom events is discussed.

  12. 76 FR 20317 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... Diamond Tools Co., Ltd. (``PTDT'').\\1\\ We gave interested parties an opportunity to comment on the... New Shipper Review of Pujiang Talent Diamond Tools Co., Ltd., dated March 9, 2011...

  13. FIBROUS MONOLITH WEAR RESISTANT COMPONENTS FOR THE MINING INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth L. Knittel

    2005-05-09

    The work performed on this program was to develop wear resistant, tough FM composite materials with efforts focused on WC-Co based FM systems. The materials were developed for use in mining industry wear applications. Components of interest were drill bit inserts for drilling blast holes. Other component applications investigated included wear plates for a variety of equipment such as pit shovels, wear surfaces for conveyors, milling media for ball milling operations, hydrocyclone cones, grader blades and dozer teeth. Cross-cutting technologies investigated included hot metal extrusion dies, drill bits for circuit board fabrication, cutting tools for cast iron and aluminum machining. An important part of the work was identification of the standard materials used in drilling applications. A materials trade study to determine those metals and ceramics used for mining applications provided guidance for the most important materials to be investigated. WC-Co and diamond combinations were shown to have the most desirable properties. Other considerations such as fabrication technique and the ability to consolidate shifted the focus away from diamond materials and toward WC-Co. Cooperating partners such as Kennametal and Kyocera assisted with supplies, evaluations of material systems, fabricated parts and suggestions for cross-cutting technology applications for FM architectures. Kennametal provided the raw materials (WC-Co and Al-TiCN powders) for the extent of the material evaluations. Kyocera shared their research into various FM systems and provided laboratory testing of fabricated materials. Kyocera also continued research of the FM systems with the intention of developing commercial markets for a variety of applications. The continued development of FM technology by Kyocera is seen as a direct result of the cooperation established under this funding. Kyocera has a specific interest in the commercial development of the FM technology and have licensed it and have paid

  14. Tribological evaluation of diamond coating on pure titanium in comparison with plasma nitrided titanium and uncoated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, B.; Loh, N.L.; Fu, Y.; Sun, C.Q.; Hing, P.

    1999-12-01

    Titanium alloys are characterized by poor tribological properties, and the traditional use of titanium alloys has been restricted to nontribological applications. The deposition of a well adherent diamond coating is a promising way to solve this problem. In this study, the tribological properties of diamond-coated titanium were studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer, and the results were compared with those of pure titanium and plasma nitrided titanium. The tribological behavior of pure titanium was characterized by high coefficient of friction and rapid wear of materials. Plasma nitriding improved the wear resistance only under low normal load; however, this hardened layer was not efficient in improving the wear resistance and the friction properties under high normal load. Diamond coating on pure titanium improved the wear resistance of titanium significantly. Surface profilometry measurement indicated that little or no wear of the diamond coating occurred under the test conditions loads. The roughness of the diamond coating was critical because it controlled the amount of abrasive damage on the counterface. Reducing the surface roughness by polishing led to the reductions in both the friction and wear of the counterface.

  15. Towards In Situ-Process Control in Tribological or Tool Applications: A Material Concept for the Design of Smart Thin Film Wear Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Sven; Klever, C.; Leiste, H.; Seemann, K.; Stüber, M.

    The optimization of processes for tribological or machining applications requires the development of (i) high performance substrate materials, especially ultra fine grain cemented carbides for cutting tools, (ii) complex tool geometries and (iii) innovative, nano-scaled hard and tough multi-functional protective coatings. Very important is also the in-situ process control which can be realized with (i) sensors which are embedded in the protective coating using microsystem technology or (ii) if possible, by using tailored coating designs which show itself both protective and sensor functionality.

  16. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    methyl radicals to a nickel (111) surface . The detailed results are contained in an attached copy of a recently published journal article, "Effects of...nucleation on surfaces which otherwise would not even nucleate diamond. The second area of research is devoted to the development of implant and...in explaining results of hydrogen dosing of diamond surfaces . Experimental results indicated that the dimmer bond on the diamond 2x1 surface was very

  17. Multiple Diamond Anvil (MDA) apparatus using nano-polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irifune, T.; Kunimoto, T.; Tange, Y.; Shinmei, T.; Isobe, F.; Kurio, A.; Funakoshi, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thanks to the great efforts by Dave Mao, Bill Bassett, Taro Takahashi, and their colleagues at the University of Rochester through 1960s-70s, diamond anvil cell (DAC) became a major tool to investigate the deep Earth after its invention by scientists at NBS in 1958. DAC can now cover almost the entire pressure and temperature regimes of the Earth's interior, which seems to have solved the longstanding debate on the crystal structure of iron under the P-T conditions of the Earth's inner core. In contrast, various types of static large-volume presses (LVP) have been invented, where tungsten carbide has conventionally been used as anvils. Kawai-type multianvil apparatus (MA), which utilize 6 first-stage harden steel and 8 tungsten carbide anvils, is the most successful LVP, and has been used for accurate measurements of phase transitions, physical properties, element partitioning, etc. at high pressure and temperature. However, pressures using tungsten carbide as the second-stage anvils have been limited to about 30 GPa due to significant plastic deformation of the anvils. Efforts have been made to expand this pressure limit by replacing tungsten carbide anvils with harder sintered diamond (SD) anvils over the last two decades, but the pressures available in KMA with SD anvils have still been limited to below 100 GPa. We succeeded to produce nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD or HIME-Diamond) in 2003, which is known to have ultrahigh hardness, very high toughness and elastic stiffness, high transmittance of light, relatively low thermal conductivity. These properties are feasible for its use as anvils, and some preliminary experiments of application of NPD anvils to laser heated DAC have successfully made in the last few years. We are now able to synthesize NPD rods with about 1cm in both diameter and length using a newly constructed 6000-ton KMA at Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, and have just started to apply this new polycrystalline diamond as anvils

  18. Wear Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Lewis Research Center developed a tribometer for in-house wear tests. Implant Sciences Corporation (ISC), working on a NASA contract to develop coatings to enhance the wear capabilities of materials, adapted the tribometer for its own use and developed a commercial line of user-friendly systems. The ISC-200 is a pin-on-disk type of tribometer, functioning like a record player and creating a wear groove on the disk, with variables of speed and load. The system can measure the coefficient of friction, the wear behavior between materials, and the integrity of thin films or coatings. Applications include measuring wear on contact lenses and engine parts and testing disk drives.

  19. Diamond anvil technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, Michael

    This paper is largely a review of the techniques used in making diamond anvils and the constraints these put on the shapes of anvil. Techniques available for shaping diamonds include cleaving, sawing, polishing, laser cutting, and bruting. At present the shapes most commonly used for anvils are a modification of the brilliant cut derived from the gem industry, and a design based on an octagonal prism with truncated pyramidal top and base, known as the "Drukker standard design". Diamond orientation and material selection are considered as are future possibilities for the attainment of still higher pressures through modifications of the diamond anvil material or design.

  20. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    When the main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m, respectively, carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond and DLC ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the requirements regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  1. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  2. Fabrication and testing of diamond-machined gratings in ZnSe, GaP, and bismuth germanate for the near infrared and visible

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, P J; Little, S L; Ikeda, Y; Kobayashi, N

    2008-06-22

    High quality immersion gratings for infrared applications have been demonstrated in silicon and germanium. To extend this technology to shorter wavelengths other materials must be investigated. We selected three materials, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide and bismuth germanate (Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}), based on high refractive index, good visible transmission and commercial availability in useful sizes. Crystal samples were diamond turned on an ultra-precision lathe to identify preferred cutting directions. Using this information we diamond-flycut test gratings over a range of feed rates to determine the optimal cutting conditions. For both ZnSe and GaP good surface quality was achieved at feed rates up to 1.0 cm/minute using a special compound angle diamond tool with negative rake angles on both cutting surfaces. The surface roughness of the groove facets was about 4 nm. A Zygo interferometer measured grating wavefront errors in reflection. For the ZnSe the RMS error was < {lambda}/20 at 633nm. More extensive testing was performed with a HeNe laser source and a cooled CCD camera. These measurements demonstrated high relative diffraction efficiency (> 80%), low random groove error (2.0 nm rms), and Rowland ghost intensities at < 0.1%. Preliminary tests on bismuth germanate show high tool wear.

  3. Tribological performance of diamond and diamondlike carbon films at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.

    1995-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the tribological performance of diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) films as a function of ambient temperature. Both films were deposited on silicon carbide (SiC) by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and ion-beam deposition processes. Tribological tests were performed on a reciprocating wear machine in open air (20 to 30% relative humidity) and under a 10-N load using SiC pins. For the test conditions explored, the steady- state friction coefficients of test pairs without a diamond or DLC film were 0.7 to 0.9 and the average wear rates of pins were 10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup {minus}7} mm{sup 3}/N.m, depending on ambient temperature. DLC films reduced the steady-state friction coefficients of test pairs by factors of 3 to 5 and the wear rates of pins by two to three orders of magnitude. Low friction coefficients were also obtained with the diamond films, but wear rates of the counterface pins were high due to the very abrasive nature of these films. The wear of SiC disks coated with either diamond or DLC films was virtually unmeasurable while the wear of uncoated disks was substantial. Test results showed that the DLC films could afford low friction up to about 300{degrees}C. At higher temperatures, the DLC films became graphitized and were removed from the surface. The diamond films could withstand much higher temperatures, but their tribological behavior degraded. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to elucidate the friction and wear mechanisms of both films at high temperatures.

  4. Polymer wear and its control

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in polymer (P) tribology are discussed in reviews and reports based on contributions to a symposium held by the Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering of the Americal Chemical Society in St. Louis in spring 1984. Topics examined are mechanisms of P wear, controls of P wear, the tribological behavior of Ps, wear of biomaterials and P composites, characterization and measurements of P wear, and degradation and wear of polymeric films and filaments. Consideration is given to the fracture and surface energetics of P wear, fatigue-abrasive mechanisms of P wear, plasma modification of P surfaces, the wear characteristics of articular cartilage, the role of fillers in the wear of high-density polyethylene, the tribology of fiber-reinforced polyimides sliding against steel and Si3N4, laboratory and in-service wear tests of Ps, and the effect of degree of crystallinity on wear of poly(ethylene terephthalate).

  5. Precision truing of diamond wheel with sharp edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Cheng; Guo, Bing; Zhao, QIngliang; Chen, Bing; Wang, Jinhu

    2014-08-01

    Diamond wheel with sharp edge has small contour structures, which can lead to fast wear of wheel in the grinding process. Traditional truing methods are hard to apply to this kind of wheels. Therefore, as for the difficulty of precision truing of diamond wheel with sharp edge, the novel methods for resin and metal bonded diamond wheels with sharp edge are presented, respectively. In this experiment, a conditioning procedure with rare metal alloy block Ta was used to true the resin bonded diamond grinding wheel and in the same way Nb alloy block was utilized to complete rough truing of metal bonded diamond grinding wheel. Then a CNC truing technique with rotational green carbide (GC) truing stick was applied to precise truing of metal bonded diamond grinding wheel. Methods mentioned above were measured in order to evaluate the performance of truing. Geometric features of the wheel sharp edge were duplicated on the organic glass (PMMA) in order to measure and calculate the radius of the sharp edge. The edge radius of trued resin bonded wheel and metal bonded wheel is perceived as an important assessment. The experiments results revealed that the edge radius of 12.45μm for the resin bonded wheel and the edge radius of 30.17μm for the metal bonded wheel could be achieved.

  6. Ultrasound effects on the tribological properties of synthesized diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Snikta, V.; Trava-Airoldi, V.J.; Baranauskas, V.

    1995-09-01

    The friction and wear behavior of chemical vapor deposition grown diamond films has been investigated under strong ultrasound conditions at the friction interface. Experiments were performed on an alternating {open_quotes}pin-on-plate{close_quotes} tribometer constructed as an ultrasonic motor with excited bimodal mechanical vibrations at the frequency of 20 kHz. Ultrasound sliding of the films was done against alumina ceramics and with the diamond film itself. We have shown that chemical vapor deposition diamond films can be fast polished mechanically without significant graphitization by ultrasonic treatment. The initial film roughness was reduced from an average R{sub a} {approximately}3000 nm to R{sub a} {approximately}10 nm. The polishing decreased the static coefficient of friction of the diamond film from about 0.53 to about 0.12. The operative mechanism for the polishing in the case of initially rough diamond samples appears to be asperity fracture. For smooth diamond samples it is suggested that tribochemical oxidation is also a polishing mechanism. 17 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Superconductivity in diamond.

    PubMed

    Ekimov, E A; Sidorov, V A; Bauer, E D; Mel'nik, N N; Curro, N J; Thompson, J D; Stishov, S M

    2004-04-01

    Diamond is an electrical insulator well known for its exceptional hardness. It also conducts heat even more effectively than copper, and can withstand very high electric fields. With these physical properties, diamond is attractive for electronic applications, particularly when charge carriers are introduced (by chemical doping) into the system. Boron has one less electron than carbon and, because of its small atomic radius, boron is relatively easily incorporated into diamond; as boron acts as a charge acceptor, the resulting diamond is effectively hole-doped. Here we report the discovery of superconductivity in boron-doped diamond synthesized at high pressure (nearly 100,000 atmospheres) and temperature (2,500-2,800 K). Electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and field-dependent resistance measurements show that boron-doped diamond is a bulk, type-II superconductor below the superconducting transition temperature T(c) approximately 4 K; superconductivity survives in a magnetic field up to Hc2(0) > or = 3.5 T. The discovery of superconductivity in diamond-structured carbon suggests that Si and Ge, which also form in the diamond structure, may similarly exhibit superconductivity under the appropriate conditions.

  8. Diamond nucleation using polyethene

    SciTech Connect

    Morell, Gerardo; Makarov, Vladimir; Varshney, Deepak; Weiner, Brad

    2013-07-23

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  9. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  10. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Messier, R.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  11. Development of flank wear model of cutting tool by using adaptive feedback linear control system on machining AISI D2 steel and AISI 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orra, Kashfull; Choudhury, Sounak K.

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build an adaptive feedback linear control system to check the variation of cutting force signal to improve the tool life. The paper discusses the use of transfer function approach in improving the mathematical modelling and adaptively controlling the process dynamics of the turning operation. The experimental results shows to be in agreement with the simulation model and error obtained is less than 3%. The state space approach model used in this paper successfully check the adequacy of the control system through controllability and observability test matrix and can be transferred from one state to another by appropriate input control in a finite time. The proposed system can be implemented to other machining process under varying range of cutting conditions to improve the efficiency and observability of the system.

  12. Plasma and ion beam enhanced chemical vapour deposition of diamond and diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yongji

    WC-Co cutting tools are widely used in the machining industry. The application of diamond coatings on the surfaces of the tools would prolong the cutting lifetime and improves the manufacturing efficiency. However, direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond coatings on WC-Co suffer from severe premature adhesion failure due to interfacial graphitization induced by the binder phase Co. In this research, a combination of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrogen (H2) plasma pretreatments and a novel double interlayer of carbide forming element (CFE)/Al were developed to enhance diamond nucleation and adhesion. The results showed that both the pretreatments and interlayers were effective in forming continuous and adhesive nanocrystalline diamond coatings. The method is a promising replacement of the hazardous Murakami's regent currently used in WC-Co pretreatment with a more environmental friendly approach. Apart from coatings, diamond can be fabricated into other forms of nanostructures, such as nanotips. In this work, it was demonstrated that oriented diamond nanotip arrays can be fabricated by ion beam etching of as-grown CVD diamond. The orientation of diamond nanotips can be controlled by adjusting the direction of incident ion beam. This method overcomes the limits of other techniques in producing nanotip arrays on large areas with controlled orientation. Oriented diamond nano-tip arrays have been used to produce anisotropic frictional surface, which is successfully used in ultra-precision positioning systems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) has many properties comparable to diamond. In this thesis, the preparation of alpha-C:H thin films by end-Hall (EH) ion source and the effects of ion energy and nitrogen doping on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the as-deposited thin films were investigated. The results have demonstrated that smooth and uniform alpha-C:H and alpha-C:H:N films with large area and reasonably high hardness and Young's modulus can be

  13. Wear mechanisms of milling inserts: Dry and wet cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, J.; Tung, S.C.; Barber, G.C.

    1998-07-01

    There is less literature on wear of milling tools than on wear of turning tools because milling is one of the most complicated machining operations. The intermittent milling action creates mechanical and thermal surges that distinguish milling from single-point machining. A systematic tool life study for face milling inserts was conducted with and without coolant. Workpieces made of 4140 steel were cut by C5 grade carbide inserts under various cutting conditions. The comparison between dry and wet cutting shows that caution should be taken when applying a coolant for milling operations. Special tests should be carried out in evaluating potential coolant candidates. It is not always true that coolant enhances tool life for milling. Wear mechanisms are presented by means of war maps. Identified wear mechanisms are: micro-attrition, micro-abrasion, mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, thermal pitting, and edge chipping.

  14. Study on effect of plasma surface treatments for diamond deposition by DC arc plasmatron.

    PubMed

    Kang, In-Je; Joa, Sang-Beom; Lee, Heon-Ju

    2013-11-01

    To improve the thermal conductivity and wear resistance of ceramic materials in the field of renewable energy technologies, diamond coating by plasma processing has been carried out in recent years. This study's goal is to improve diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates by plasma surface treatments. Before diamond deposition was carried out in a vacuum, plasma surface treatments using Ar gas were conducted to improve conditions for deposition. We also conducted plasma processing for diamond deposition on Al2O3 ceramic substrates using a DC arc Plasmatron. The Al2O3 ceramic substrates with diamond film (5 x 15 mm2), were investigated by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and XRD (X-ray Diffractometer). Then, the C-H stretching of synthetic diamond films by FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) was studied. We identified nanocrystalline diamond films on the Al2O3 ceramic substrates. The results showed us that the deposition rate of diamond films was 2.3 microm/h after plasma surface treatments. Comparing the above result with untreated ceramic substrates, the deposition rate improved with the surface roughness of the deposited diamond films.

  15. Wellhead bowl protector and retrieving tool

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.A.

    1991-09-03

    This patent describes improvement in a wellhead protection system including a wear bushing and a retrieving tool. The improvement comprises a wear bushing supported within the wellhead, wherein the wear bushing includes an enlarged upper end having an external support shoulder for engagement with an internal support shoulder formed in the wellhead; wherein the wear bushing further includes an internal circumferential slot intersected by at least one vertically extending slot, the vertical slot extending from the circumferential slot to the upper end of the wear bushing; a retrieving tool having at least one outwardly biased, retractable lug member mounted thereon; and wherein the retrieving tool includes an enlarged portion adapted to be received within the enlarged upper end of the wear bushing. This patent also describes a method of retrieving a wear bushing from a wellhead comprising the steps of: lowering a retrieving tool into the wellhead for locking engagement with the wear bushing; aligning the retrieving tool with the wear bushing for automatically forcing lug members carried by the retrieving tool outwardly into locking engagement with the wear bushing; monitoring drill string weight for determining engagement of the retrieving tool with the wear bushing, wherein a substantial decrease in drill string weight is an indication that the retrieving tool is engaged with the wear bushing; and removing the wear bushing from the wellhead.

  16. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers` cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  17. Cutting tool study: 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.

    1992-07-29

    The Rocky Flats Plant conducted a study to test cermet cutting tools by performing machinability studies on War Reserve product under controlled conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the most satisfactory tools that optimize tool life, minimize costs, improve reliability and chip control, and increase productivity by performing the operations to specified Accuracies. This study tested three manufacturers' cermet cutting tools and a carbide tool used previously by the Rocky Flats Plant for machining spherical-shaped 21-6-9 stainless steel forgings (Figure 1). The 80-degree diamond inserts were tested by experimenting with various chip-breaker geometries, cutting speeds, feedrates, and cermet grades on the outside contour roughing operation. The cermets tested were manufactured by Kennametal, Valenite, and NTK. The carbide tool ordinarily used for this operation is manufactured by Carboloy. Evaluation of tho tools was conducted by investigating the number of passes per part and parts per insert, tool wear, cutting time, tool life, surface finish, and stem taper. Benefits to be gained from this study were: improved part quality, better chip control, increased tool life and utilization, and greater fabrication productivity. This was to be accomplished by performing the operation to specified accuracies within the scope of the tools tested.

  18. Ion implantation to reduce wear on polyethylene prosthetic devices. Rept. for Aug 89-Jan 91

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Researchers studied the use of ion implantation to improve the wear performance of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). UHMWPE samples were implanted with high energy ions, tested for wear performance, and compared to unimplanted control samples. Surface friction and hardness measurements, Raman scattering, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), water contact angle, and film transfer tests were performed to characterize the surface property changes of implanted UHMWPE samples. Results indicated a 90% reduction in wear on implanted UHMWPE disks. Implantation increased surface microhardness and surface energy. The Raman spectrum revealed a diamond-like signature, indicting carbon bonds of a different nature than those found in unimplanted polyehtylene. Photographic analysis of pins used in wear testing revealed differences between implanted and unimplanted samples in the polyethylene film transferred in the initial stages of wear from the disk to the pin.

  19. An in vitro investigation of wear resistance and hardness of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Liqun; Zhao, Xinyi; Gong, Xu; Zhao, Shouliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the wear resistance and hardness of five kinds of composite resins. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five specimens were fabricated with one nano-hybrid (Charisma Diamond), two micro-hybrid (3MZ250, Clearfil AP-X) and two packable (3MP60, Surefil) composite resins, according to a randomized complete block design (n=13, 8 for wear test; 5 for hardness test). The composites were filled in a rectangular mold, and light polymerization. After storage in 37°C deionized water for 24h, all specimens were tested with a custom-made toothbrush machine with a stainless-steel ball as antagonist (3N loads, 1Hz, 6×105 cycles) immersed in calcium fluoride slurry. Wear volume, hardness and surface structure of each tested material was examined by a three-dimensional non-contact optical profilometer, Vickers indentation technique and scanning electron microscope. Results: The volume loss ranked from least to most as follows: Charisma Diamond, P60, Z250, Clearfil AP-X and Surefil. Regarding hardness, the rank from highest to lowest as follows: Clearfil AP-X, P60, Surefil, Z250, Charisma Diamond. The interactions between wear resistance and microhardness were not significant. Conclusions: The custom-made machine is considered suitable to simulate sliding of an antagonist cusp on an opposing occlusal composite restoration. Nanofilled composite may have superior wear compared to other composite resins. PMID:23844265

  20. 78 FR 48414 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts thereof from the People's Republic of China. The... Husqvarna Jikai Diamond Tools Co., Ltd.\\1\\ We invited parties to comment. No parties submitted comments,...

  1. 76 FR 38357 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China... changed circumstances review (``CCR'') of the antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts... Diamond Tools Co., Ltd. (``Hebei Husqvarna'') is not the successor-in-interest to Hebei Jikai...

  2. 76 FR 4634 - Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China (PRC): Rescission of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... International Trade Administration Diamond Sawblades and Parts Thereof From the People's Republic of China (PRC... Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: In response to a request from Hanson Diamond Tools (Danyang) Co... antidumping duty order on diamond sawblades and parts thereof from the People's Republic of China...

  3. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng; Xiong, Lun; Liu, Jing

    2015-09-07

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. High-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  4. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; ...

    2015-09-08

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis andmore » characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. In conclusion, high-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.« less

  5. PROCESS FOR COLORING DIAMONDS

    DOEpatents

    Dugdale, R.A.

    1960-07-19

    A process is given for coloring substantially colorless diamonds in the blue to blue-green range and comprises the steps of irradiating the colorless diamonds with electrons having an energy within the range 0.5 to 2 Mev to obtain an integrated electron flux of between 1 and 2 x 10/sup 18/ thc diamonds may be irradiated 1 hr when they take on a blue color with a slight green tint: After being heated at about 500 deg C for half an hour they become pure blue. Electrons within this energy range contam sufficient energy to displace the diamond atoms from their normal lattice sites into interstitial sites, thereby causing the color changes.

  6. Fabrication of diamond shells

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  7. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  8. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Quantum engineering: Diamond envy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen atoms trapped tens of nanometres apart in diamond can now be linked by quantum entanglement. This ability to produce and control entanglement in solid systems could enable powerful quantum computers.

  10. X-ray topographic study of diamonds: implications for the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrosì, Giovanna; Nestola, Fabrizio; Tempesta, Gioacchino; Bruno, Marco; Scandale, Eugenio; Harris, Jeff W.

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, several studies have focused on the growth conditions of the diamonds through the analysis of the mineral inclusions trapped in them (Howell, 2012 and references therein). Nevertheless, to obtain rigorous information about chemical and physical conditions of diamond formation, it is crucial to determine if the crystallization of the inclusions occurred before (protogenetic nature), during (syngenetic nature) or after (epigenetic nature) the growth of diamond (Wiggers de Vries et al., 2011). X-ray topography (XRDT) can be a helpful tool to verify the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond. This technique characterizes the extended defects and reconstructs the growth history of the samples (Agrosì et al., 2013 and references therein) and, consequently contributes to elucidation of the relationship between the inclusions and the host-diamond. With this aim a diamond from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Siberia, was investigated. The diamond crystal was the one previously studied by Nestola et al. (2011) who performed in-situ crystal structure refinement of the inclusions to obtain data about the formation pressure. The inclusions were iso-oriented olivines that did not show evident cracks and subsequently could not be considered epigenetic. Optical observations revealed an anomalous birefringence in the adjacent diamond and the inclusions had typical "diamond-imposed cubo-octahedral" shape for the largest olivine. The diffraction contrast study shows that the diamond exhibits significant deformation fields related to plastic post growth deformation. The crystallographic direction of strains was established applying the extinction criterion. Section topographs were taken to minimize the overlapping of the strain field associate with the different defects and revealed that no dislocations nucleated from the olivine inclusions. Generally, when a solid inclusion has been incorporated in the growing crystal, the associated volume distortion can be minimized by

  11. Diamond Technology Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    thermal stresses of 10 million Watts per meter, 1,000 times better than Zerodur *. This property is also important for many thermal management...products UTD has coated to date include: • Optical windows, lenses, and mirrors . Zinc sulfide infrared windows coated with a 2.5 micron-thick...implants 16, 49 microwave plasma-enhanced CVD 2 mirrors , diamond-coated 49 models of diamond growth 10, 25, 33, 34, 39 moderators 10

  12. Rig for testing the relative wear resistance of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Berdikov, V.F.; Diulin, A.I.; Efimchuk, V.P.; Pushkarev, O.I.; Finogenov, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple and compact rig for studying the relative wear resistance of materials subjected to mechanical abrasion and friction. The rig has an electronic control system. It was used to test the relative wear resistance of a wide range of superhard and brittle materials under mechanical abrasion against a counterbody. The counterbody was made of modified iron and the test medium was a diamond suspension in oil. The results showed that specimen wear exhibits a linear relationship with abrasion time (in the range of 0.5-20 min.) at unit pressure from 0.01 to 0.10 MPa. That a standard wear pattern exists within a wide range of parameters indicates that abrasive conditions are highly stable and makes it possible to control conditions. The rig was used to establish the relative wear resistance of several abrasives, minerals, and refractory compounds. The very large difference (15.2 times) between the most and least-resistant materials (tungsten carbide and fluoride) illustrates the sensitivity of the methodology.

  13. High-mobility diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landstrass, Maurice I.

    1994-04-01

    Recent improvements in the CVD diamond deposition process have made possible the fabrication of diamond photoconductive diodes with carrier mobility and lifetime exceeding the values typical of natural gemstones. One of the more surprising recent results is that the best room-temperature carrier properties have been measured on polycrystalline diamond films. The combined electron- hole mobility, as measured by transient photoconductivity at low carrier densities, is 4000 square centimeters per volt per second at electric field of 200 volts per centimeter and is comparable to that of the best single-crystal IIa natural diamonds. Carrier lifetimes measured under the same conditions are 150 picoseconds for the CVD diamond films. The collection distance within the diamond films, at the highest applied fields, is comparable to the average film grain size, indicative of little or no carrier scattering at grain boundaries. A comparison of SIMS measurements with electrical results suggest that impurity incorporation in the near grain boundary regions are responsible for controlling the carrier mobility.

  14. Optical wear monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kidane, Getnet S; Desilva, Upul P.; He, Chengli; Ulerich, Nancy H.

    2016-07-26

    A gas turbine includes first and second parts having outer surfaces located adjacent to each other to create an interface where wear occurs. A wear probe is provided for monitoring wear of the outer surface of the first part, and includes an optical guide having first and second ends, wherein the first end is configured to be located flush with the outer surface of the first part. A fiber bundle includes first and second ends, the first end being located proximate to the second end of the optical guide. The fiber bundle includes a transmit fiber bundle comprising a first plurality of optical fibers coupled to a light source, and a receive fiber bundle coupled to a light detector and configured to detect reflected light. A processor is configured to determine a length of the optical guide based on the detected reflected light.

  15. Characteristics of deposited boron doping diamond on tungsten carbide insert by MPECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Seok; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Jeong Wan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-coated cutting tools are used primarily for machining non-ferrous materials such as aluminum-silicon alloys, copper alloys, fiber-reinforced polymers, green ceramics and graphite. Because the tool life of cemented carbide cutting tool is greatly improved by diamond coating, and typically more than 10 times of the tool life is obtained. However, research of boron-doped diamond (BDD) coating tool has not been fully researched yet. In this study, we have succeeded to make boron-doped microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond-coated Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) inserts. Microcrystalline BDD thin film is deposited on WC-Co insert by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the as-deposited diamond films.1,2

  16. Ceramic wear in indentation and sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The various wear mechanisms involved with single-crystal ceramic materials in indentation and in sliding contacts. Experiments simulating interfacial events have been conducted with hemispherical, conical and pyramidal indenters (riders). With spherical riders, under either abrasive or adhesive conditions, two types of fracture pits have been observed. First, spherical-shaped fracture pits and wear particles are found as a result of either indenting or sliding. These are shown to be due to a spherical-shaped fracture along the circular or spherical stress trajectories. Second, polyhedral fracture pits and debris, produced by anisotropic fracture, and also found both during indenting and sliding. These are primarily controlled by surface and subsurface cracking along cleavage planes. Several quantitative results have also been obtained from this work. For example, using a pyramidal diamond, crack length of Mn-Zn ferrite in the indentation process grows linearly with increasing normal load. Moreover, the critical load to fracture both in indentation and sliding is essentially isotropic and is found to be directly proportional to the indenter radius.

  17. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  18. Development of processes for producing sintered diamond compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ervens, W.

    1980-12-01

    Using eutectoid alloys of Co-Si and Co-Ti as binding metals, compacts with more than 80% diamond are obtained at temperatures of 1300 to 1400 C and pressures of 50 to 55 kbar. Under such conditions a direct bonding of adjacent diamond crystals occurs. Techniques for setting the compacts in tool holders were developed and the results of cutting and machining tests are shown to be excellent.

  19. Cryotribology of diamond and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasa, Yukikazu; Ashaboglu, A.F.; Rabinowicz, E.R.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental study was carried out on the tribological behavior of materials of interest in cryogenic applications, focusing on diamond and graphite. Both natural diamond (referred in the text as diamond) and chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) diamond (CVD-diamond) were used. The experiment was carried out using a pin-on-disk tribometer capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures, from 4.2 to 293 K. Two basic scenarios of testing were used: (1) frictional coefficient ({mu}) vs velocity (v) characteristics at constant temperatures; (2) {mu} vs temperature (T) behavior at fixed sliding speeds. For diamond/CVD-diamond, graphite/CVD-diamond, stainless steel/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are virtually velocity independent. For each of diamond/graphite, alumina/graphite, and graphite/graphite pairs, the {partial_derivative}{mu}/{partial_derivative}v characteristic is favorable, i.e., positive. For diamond/CVD-diamond and graphite/CVD-diamond pairs, {mu}`s are nearly temperature independent between in the range 77 - 293 K. Each {mu} vs T plot for pin materials sliding on graphite disks has a peak at a temperature in the range 100 - 200 K.

  20. Localized and generalized simulated wear of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Erickson, R L; Tsujimoto, A; Latta, M; Miyazaki, M

    2015-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine the wear of resin composite materials using both a localized and generalized wear simulation model. Twenty specimens each of seven resin composites (Esthet•X HD [HD], Filtek Supreme Ultra [SU], Herculite Ultra [HU], SonicFill [SF], Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill [TB], Venus Diamond [VD], and Z100 Restorative [Z]) were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles for both localized and generalized wear in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulator (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom cylinder-shaped stainless steel fixtures. A stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) was used as the antagonist for localized wear, and a stainless steel, cylindrical antagonist with a flat tip was used for generalized wear. A water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads was used as the abrasive media. A noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan software was used to digitize the surface contours of the pretest and posttest specimens. AnSur 3D software was used for wear assessment. For localized testing, maximum facet depth (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used to compare the materials. The mean depth of the facet surface (μm) and volume loss (mm(3)) were used for comparison of the generalized wear specimens. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test were used for data analysis of volume loss for both localized and generalized wear, maximum facet depth for localized wear, and mean depth of the facet for generalized wear. The results for localized wear simulation were as follows [mean (standard deviation)]: maximum facet depth (μm)--Z, 59.5 (14.7); HU, 99.3 (16.3); SU, 102.8 (13.8); HD, 110.2 (13.3); VD, 114.0 (10.3); TB, 125.5 (12.1); SF, 195.9 (16.9); volume loss (mm(3))--Z, 0.013 (0.002); SU, 0.026 (0.006); HU, 0.043 (0.008); VD, 0.057 (0.009); HD, 0.058 (0.014); TB, 0.061 (0.010); SF, 0.135 (0.024). Generalized wear simulation results were as follows: mean depth of facet (μm)--Z, 9.3 (3

  1. Diamond Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isberg, J.

    2010-11-01

    For high-power and high-voltage applications, silicon is by far the dominant semiconductor material. However, silicon has many limitations, e.g. a relatively low thermal conductivity, electric breakdown occurs at relatively low fields and the bandgap is 1.1 eV which effectively limits operation to temperatures below 175° C. Wide-bandgap materials, such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN) and diamond offer the potential to overcome both the temperature and power handling limitations of silicon. Diamond is the most extreme in this class of materials. By the fundamental material properties alone, diamond offers the largest benefits as a semiconductor material for power electronic applications. On the other hand, diamond has a problem with a large carrier activation energy of available dopants which necessitates specialised device concepts to allow room temperature (RT) operation. In addition, the role of common defects on the charge transport properties of diamond is poorly understood. Notwithstanding this, many proof-of-principle two-terminal and three-terminal devices have been made and tested. Two-terminal electronic diamond devices described in the literature include: p-n diodes, p-i-n diodes, various types of radiation detectors, Schottky diodes and photoconductive or electron beam triggered switches. Three terminal devices include e.g. MISFETs and JFETs. However, the development of diamond devices poses great challenges for the future. A particularly interesting way to overcome the doping problem, for which there has been some recent progress, is to make so-called delta doped (or pulse-doped) devices. Such devices utilise very thin (˜1 nm) doped layers in order to achieve high RT activation.

  2. Co-electrodeposition of hard Ni-W/diamond nanocomposite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Das, Malay Kumar; Hao, Ruru; Zhong, Hua; Thueploy, Adisak; Limpanart, Sarintorn; Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2016-01-01

    Electroplated hard chrome coating is widely used as a wear resistant coating to prolong the life of mechanical components. However, the electroplating process generates hexavalent chromium ion which is known carcinogen. Hence, there is a major effort throughout the electroplating industry to replace hard chrome coating. Composite coating has been identified as suitable materials for replacement of hard chrome coating, while deposition coating prepared using traditional co-deposition techniques have relatively low particles content, but the content of particles incorporated into a coating may fundamentally affect its properties. In the present work, Ni-W/diamond composite coatings were prepared by sediment co-electrodeposition from Ni-W plating bath, containing suspended diamond particles. This study indicates that higher diamond contents could be successfully co-deposited and uniformly distributed in the Ni-W alloy matrix. The maximum hardness of Ni-W/diamond composite coatings is found to be 2249 ± 23 Hv due to the highest diamond content of 64 wt.%. The hardness could be further enhanced up to 2647 ± 25 Hv with heat treatment at 873 K for 1 h in Ar gas, which is comparable to hard chrome coatings. Moreover, the addition of diamond particles could significantly enhance the wear resistance of the coatings. PMID:26924136

  3. Co-electrodeposition of hard Ni-W/diamond nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Qin, Jiaqian; Das, Malay Kumar; Hao, Ruru; Zhong, Hua; Thueploy, Adisak; Limpanart, Sarintorn; Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant; Ma, Mingzhen; Liu, Riping

    2016-02-01

    Electroplated hard chrome coating is widely used as a wear resistant coating to prolong the life of mechanical components. However, the electroplating process generates hexavalent chromium ion which is known carcinogen. Hence, there is a major effort throughout the electroplating industry to replace hard chrome coating. Composite coating has been identified as suitable materials for replacement of hard chrome coating, while deposition coating prepared using traditional co-deposition techniques have relatively low particles content, but the content of particles incorporated into a coating may fundamentally affect its properties. In the present work, Ni-W/diamond composite coatings were prepared by sediment co-electrodeposition from Ni-W plating bath, containing suspended diamond particles. This study indicates that higher diamond contents could be successfully co-deposited and uniformly distributed in the Ni-W alloy matrix. The maximum hardness of Ni-W/diamond composite coatings is found to be 2249 ± 23 Hv due to the highest diamond content of 64 wt.%. The hardness could be further enhanced up to 2647 ± 25 Hv with heat treatment at 873 K for 1 h in Ar gas, which is comparable to hard chrome coatings. Moreover, the addition of diamond particles could significantly enhance the wear resistance of the coatings.

  4. Employees Wearing Religious Attire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry

    2004-01-01

    While adherents to many religions can be identified by distinctive clothing or accessories, the wearing of such garb by teachers is not necessarily related to evangelism in the classroom. The following case and the accompanying question-and-answer discussion illustrate the problem of the principal caught between the rock of First Amendment…

  5. Wear resistant valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A valve which is resistant to wear caused by particles trapped between the valve seat and the valve member or poppet when the valve closes, including an outlet for directing washing fluid at the valve seat and/or sealing face of the poppet and means for supplying pressured fluid to the outlet at the time when the valve is closing.

  6. Two- and three-dimensional ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) structures for a high resolution diamond-based MEMS technology.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.; Tucek, J.; Sumant, A.; Jayatissa, A.; Moldovan, N.; Mancini, D. C.; Gardos, M. N.

    2000-01-17

    Silicon is currently the most commonly used material for the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). However, silicon-based MEMS will not be suitable for long-endurance devices involving components rotating at high speed, where friction and wear need to be minimized, components such as 2-D cantilevers that may be subjected to very large flexural displacements, where stiction is a problem, or components that will be exposed to corrosive environments. The mechanical, thermal, chemical, and tribological properties of diamond make it an ideal material for the fabrication of long-endurance MEMS components. Cost-effective fabrication of these components could in principle be achieved by coating Si with diamond films and using conventional lithographic patterning methods in conjunction with e. g. sacrificial Ti or SiO{sub 2} layers. However, diamond coatings grown by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods exhibit a coarse-grained structure that prevents high-resolution patterning, or a fine-grained microstructure with a significant amount of intergranular non-diamond carbon. The authors demonstrate here the fabrication of 2-D and 3-D phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) MEMS components by coating Si with UNCD films, coupled with lithographic patterning methods involving sacrificial release layers. UNCD films are grown by microwave plasma CVD using C{sub 60}-Ar or CH{sub 4}-Ar gas mixtures, which result in films that have 3--5 nm grain size, are 10--20 times smoother than conventionally grown diamond films, are extremely resistant to corrosive environments, and are predicted to have a brittle fracture strength similar to that of single crystal diamond.

  7. Structure and Properties of Teflon Composites with Natural Diamond Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okhlopkova, A. A.; Shits, E. Yu.

    2004-03-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the structure and properties of composites based on polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) containing natural diamond powders (NDP) of different dispersity are presented. To obtain diamond-containing compositions for antifrictional applications, we used a preliminary mechanical treatment of NDP (40 μm) in a planetary mill. It was stated that the formation of the maximum ordered small-spherulite structure of PTFE after injection of NDP significantly increased the wear resistance and deformational and strength characteristics of the polymer composite materials. To produce abrasive materials, PTFE was filled with NDP having a larger graininess (from 40 to 125 μm). It was found that the injection of NDP did not cause evident morphological changes in the binder — the bonds between diamond grains and the polymer are created by physicomechanical forces. To strengthen the adhesion interaction at the interface between the binder and diamond grains and to raise the wear resistance of the material, a complex modification of the polymer with inorganic and organic fillers was carried out. It is shown that the injection of the complex filler significantly improves the tribotechnical and operational properties of the diamond-containing composite material. The general laws of the influence of NDP on the formation of the supermolecular structure of PTFE are revealed. It is shown that, by varying the degree of dispersity and the content of NDP in PTFE, and by applying different methods of their injection into the polymer matrix, it is possible to control the operational properties of the composites and to produce materials of different functional application, from antifrictional to abrasive ones.

  8. Wear Assessment of Conical Pick used in Coal Cutting Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2015-09-01

    Conical pick is a widely used tool for cutting coal in mines. It has a cemented carbide tip inserted in a steel body. Cemented carbide has been in use for many years for coal/rock cutting because it has the optimum combination of hardness, toughness and resistance against abrasive wear. As coal/rock is a heterogeneous substance, the cutting tool has to undergo various obstructions at the time of excavation that cause the tool to wear out. The cracks and fractures developing in the cemented carbide limit the life of the tool. For a long time, different wear mechanisms have been studied to develop improved grades of cemented carbide with high wear resistance properties. The research is still continuing. Moreover, due to the highly unpredictable nature of coal/rock, it is not easy to understand the wear mechanisms. In the present work, an attempt has been made to understand the wear mechanisms in four conical picks, which were used in a continuous miner machine for underground mining of coal. The wearing pattern of the conical pick indicates damage in its cemented carbide tip as well as the steel body. The worn out parts of the tools have been critically examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) point analysis. Mainly four types of wear mechanisms, namely, coal/rock intermixing, plastic deformation, rock channel formation and crushing and cracking, have been detected. The presence of coal/rock material and their respective concentrations in the selected area of worn out surface were observed using the spectra generated by EDX analysis.

  9. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  10. The Diamond Makers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, Robert M.

    1999-08-01

    Since time immemorial, we have treasured diamonds for their exquisite beauty and unrivaled hardness. Yet, most of the earth's diamonds lie deep underground and totally unaccessible to us--if only we knew how to fabricate them! In The Diamond Makers Robert Hazen vividly recounts the very human desire to exceed nature and create a synthetic diamond. Spanning centuries of ground-breaking science, instances of bitter rivalry, cases of outright fraud and self-delusion, Hazen blends drama and science to reveal the extraordinary technological advances and devastating failures of the diamond industry. Along the way, readers will be introduced to the brilliant, often eccentric and controversial, pioneers of high-pressure research who have harnessed crushing pressures and scorching temperatures to transform almost any carbon-rich material, from road tar to peanut butter, into the most prized of all gems. Robert M. Hazen is the author of fifteen books, including the bestseller, Science Matters: Achieving Scientific Literacy, which he wrote with James Trefil. Dr. Hazen has won numerous awards for his research and scientific writing.

  11. Heteroepitaxial diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markunas, R. J.; Rudder, R. A.; Posthill, J. B.; Thomas, R. E.; Hudson, G.

    1994-02-01

    Technical highlights from 1993 include the following: Growth Chemistries: A clear correlation was observed between ionization potential of feedstock gasses and critical power necessary for inductive coupling of the plasma and consequent diamond growth. Substrate preparation and epitaxial film quality: Ion-implantation of C and O has been coupled with either electrochemical etching or acid cleaning for surface preparation prior to homoepitaxial growth. Reactor modifications: Key improvements were made to the RF reactor to allow for long growths to consolidate substrates. Liquid mass flow controllers were added to precisely meter both the water and selected alcohol. Ion-implantation and lift off: Lift off of diamond platelets has been achieved with two processes. Ion-implantation of either C or O followed by annealing and implantation of either C or O followed by water based electrolysis. Diamond characterization: Development of novel detect characterization techniques: (1) Etch delineation of defects by exposure to propane torch flame. (2) Hydrogen plasma exposure to enhance secondary electron emission and provide non-topographical defect contrast. Acetylene will react at room temperature with sites created by partial desorption of oxygen from the (100) diamond surface. Thermal desorption measurements give an apparent activation energy for CO desorption from diamond (100) of 45 kcal/mol. Quantum chemical calculations indicate an activation energy of 38 kcal/mol for CO desorption. Ab initio calculations on (100) surfaces indicates that oxygen adsorbed at one dimer site has an effect on the dimerization of an adjacent site.

  12. Diamond Nanowire for UV Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-28

    addition to the stated goal of solar - blind , radiation-hard diamond nanowire UV detectors [3]. The use of diamond nanowires in field-effect transistors could...the next phase. As a result, a working diamond nanowire UV detector can be expected within the coming few months. And, a completely new diamond...attractive candidate for use in ultraviolet ( UV ) light detectors and emitters[2]. Of all known materials, it is the hardest, and has the highest

  13. PREFACE: Science's gem: diamond science 2009 Science's gem: diamond science 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainwood, Alison; Newton, Mark E.; Stoneham, Marshall

    2009-09-01

    devices, exploiting excellent quality boron doped p-type material, can be designed [3]. Electrical contacts can be tricky to fabricate, but progress is being made here [3, 27]. Diamond is perceived as unacceptably expensive, but for a high-quality device for an exceptional environment, this is not a problem. Carbon-based electronic materials are strikingly diverse. They include diamond, graphite, nanotubes and buckyball structures, amorphous carbons, and nanodiamond. Add hydrogen and one has a range of diamond-like carbons and the wealth of organics. Such carbon-based materials include small molecules and polymers: impressive insulators, semiconducting and conducting polymers, switchable forms, superconducting and magnetic forms, and some with the highest electrical conductivities of any material. Diamond-like carbons can have controllable mechanical properties from the viscoelastic to the highly rigid. Photochemistry brings opportunities for novel processing methods. Even water-based processing may sometimes be possible (alas, not for diamond), and additional tools like self-organisation of organic molecules on surfaces have been demonstrated. The best carbons have impressive, sometimes supreme, performances, including the mobility and optical properties of diamond, spin-conserving transport in carbon nanotubes, and electron emission. For almost all measures of performance, there is some carbon-based material that performs better than silicon. Might hybrid carbon-based materials be more successful even than silicon [28]? Should we think less about 'diamond' and more about the integration of diamond as one component of carbon electronics? Device fabrication needs lithography optics and resists, and processing at the anticipated smaller scales may well exploit new electronic excitation methods. Alternative dielectrics and interconnect materials introduce new compatibility issues, and there are further varied constraints from displays, spintronic components, electron

  14. Friction and Wear Behavior of Silicon Under Conditions of Sliding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimpalli, Chandrasekhar Venkata

    Silicon is gaining importance as a material in micromechanical applications such as micromotors and microactuators. Friction and wear can affect the performance of these devices and hence it is important to study the friction and wear behavior of silicon. The deformation behavior of n-type silicon is fundamentally different from p-type. On deformation, n -type silicon may convert to p-type, but p-type silicon does not convert to n-type on deformation. This is related to the effect of dislocations interacting with the electrical charge carriers. Friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon was studied under conditions of sliding wear. Sliding was selected because the stress system associated with sliding introduces large plastic strains at the surface. The friction and wear behavior of n and p-type silicon is expected to be different due to the differences in their deformation behavior. Also, the n to p transition may show up in the friction and wear behavior. The samples were tested in air and in vacuum. Diamond was used as the slider. The wear tracks showed evidence of plastic flow. The morphology of this material was similar to that seen in more ductile materials. The coefficient of friction was also high. Other researchers have reported that DC Silicon transforms to a more ductile phase when sufficient pressure is applied. When shear stresses are present, as in sliding wear, the pressure for phase transformation has been reported to be about 8 GPa. The maximum pressure under the slider in the present set of experiments was estimated to be 8.2 GPa. Therefore, it is possible that transformed material extruded during sliding to produce the flow-like features observed at the wear track. The work involved in this phase transformation, as well as the work in deforming DC Silicon and/or the ductile product phase would contribute to the frictional energy. The debris from the air tests was DC silicon (as determined by XRD and TEM). No significant differences were

  15. Diamond collecting in northern Colorado.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of numerous diamond-bearing kimberlite diatremes in the N Front Range of Colorado and Wyoming is of both scientific and economic interest. Species recovered from heavy-mineral concentrates include Cr-diopside, spinel, Mg-ilmenite, pyrope and diamond. A nodule tentatively identified as a graphite-diamond eclogite was also found. -G.W.R.

  16. Making Diamond in the Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Herbert

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the graphite to diamond transformation and a phase diagram for carbon. Describes high temperature-higher pressure experimental apparatus and growth of diamonds from seed crystals. Reviews properties of the diamond which suggest uses for the synthetic product. Illustrations with text. (GH)

  17. Drag blade bit with diamond cutting elements

    SciTech Connect

    Radtke, R. P.; Morris, W. V.

    1985-02-19

    A drag blade bit for connection on a drill string has a hollow body on which there are welded a plurality of cutting or drilling blades. The blades extend longitudinally and radially of the bit body and terminate in relatively flat, radially extending cutting edges. A plurality of cutters are positioned in and spaced along the cutting edges and consists of cylindrical sintered carbide inserts with polycrystalline diamond cutting elements mounted thereon. Hardfacing is provided on the cutting edges between the cutters and on the other surfaces of the blades and the bit body subject to abrasive wear. One or more nozzles are positioned in passages from the interior of the bit body for directing flow of drilling fluid for flushing cuttings from the well bore and for cooling the bit.

  18. Polycrystalline CVD diamond device level modeling for particle detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozzi, A.; Passeri, D.; Kanxheri, K.; Servoli, L.; Lagomarsino, S.; Sciortino, S.

    2016-12-01

    Diamond is a promising material whose excellent physical properties foster its use for radiation detection applications, in particular in those hostile operating environments where the silicon-based detectors behavior is limited due to the high radiation fluence. Within this framework, the application of Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation tools is highly envisaged for the study, the optimization and the predictive analysis of sensing devices. Since the novelty of using diamond in electronics, this material is not included in the library of commercial, state-of-the-art TCAD software tools. In this work, we propose the development, the application and the validation of numerical models to simulate the electrical behavior of polycrystalline (pc)CVD diamond conceived for diamond sensors for particle detection. The model focuses on the characterization of a physically-based pcCVD diamond bandgap taking into account deep-level defects acting as recombination centers and/or trap states. While a definite picture of the polycrystalline diamond band-gap is still debated, the effect of the main parameters (e.g. trap densities, capture cross-sections, etc.) can be deeply investigated thanks to the simulated approach. The charge collection efficiency due to β -particle irradiation of diamond materials provided by different vendors and with different electrode configurations has been selected as figure of merit for the model validation. The good agreement between measurements and simulation findings, keeping the traps density as the only one fitting parameter, assesses the suitability of the TCAD modeling approach as a predictive tool for the design and the optimization of diamond-based radiation detectors.

  19. Wear Resistance and Wear Mechanism of a Hot Dip Aluminized Steel in Sliding Wear Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiyong; Hao, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yao; Gu, Lingyun; Ren, Yu; Zheng, Ruipeng

    2016-12-01

    Sliding wear experiments were conducted on a hot dip aluminized steel to investigate its wear resistance and wear mechanism. The wear tests were also carried out on a hot dip galvanized steel and the base material (steel Q345) as a comparison. Results show that the wear resistance and hardness of the hot dip aluminized steel are significantly higher than that of the hot dip galvanized steel and the steel Q345 at room temperature. The better wear resistance of the hot dip aluminized steel attributes mainly to the formation of a transition layer containing abundant Fe-Al intermetallic compounds and the transformation of wear-resisting oxides during the friction process. The main phase in the transition layer is Fe2Al5. The thickness of the transition layer is about 90-120 μm. When the wear load increases from 3 N to 19 N, the wear type of the aluminized layer transform from adhesive wear (3 N) into abrasive wear (7 N) and finally into slight wear mixed with oxidation (higher than 11 N).

  20. Low-Wear Ball-Bearing Separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkinson, Elden L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed ball-bearing separator for use in cryogenic pump stronger and more resistant to wear. Consists of molded plastic-and-metal composite ring imbued with solid lubricant and containing embedded metal ring. Obtains combination of strength and lubricity. Before molding and machining, ring includes tooling portion for handling and indexing. Molded composite blend of PTFE and fluorinated ethylene/propylene (FEP) filled with brass and bronze powder and molybdenum disulfide powder.

  1. Heteroepitaxial Diamond Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-12

    of CH3 and C6 H6 adsorbed on nickel. Calculated chemisorption energies of pyramidal CH3 on Ni(l 11) are 38 for the clean surface and 50 , 47, and 17... results from early experiments on the diamond (100) surface . In Figure 3.1 we can easily distinguish features associated with the conversion of the...those 5 reports were for fairly thin (< 2 gm) epitaxial layers. The results reported there for homoepitaxy on the diamond (100) surface were quite

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposited Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    surface roughness. 0.9 0.8 p0.7 0.6 0.5 C0.4 0.3 0.2- 0.1- 0-. 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 frequency (cm-1) Figure 10. Transmission spectrum of CVD...significantly less than one micrometer. The resultant films show root-mean- squared surface roughnesses -0.02 pm as long as the film thickness is not much... Derjaguin , B.V., Vapor Growth of Diamond on Diamond and Other Surfaces , J. Cryst. Growth 52:219-226 (1981); Spitsyn, B.V., The State of the Art in

  3. Applications Of Diamond In Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seal, M.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews existing and new applications of single crystal diamond, both natural and synthetic, in optical science. The traditional application is as transmissive components, making use of the very wide spectral transmission range, high thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness of diamond. Diamond windows for corrosive environments are well known; diamond surgical endoscope components are under development; and the use of sharpened diamonds as combined surgical cutting instruments and light pipes for internal illumination of the edge is commercial reality. The superb ability of diamond to conduct heat, combined with its very low thermal expansion coefficient makes it suitable for the transmission of high power laser energy, though there is a problem currently being addressed of a high surface reflection coefficient. It is very probable that CVD diamond-like films will form good anti-reflection coatings for diamond. In new applications, the technology of making diamond lenses is being developed. The use of diamond as a detector of ionising radiation is well known, but recent work shows its possibilities in thermoluminescent as well as conduction and pulse counting modes. There are further possibilities of using diamond for the detection and measurement of optical radiation. Examples are low, medium, and high intensity far ultraviolet (< 225 nm) and very high intensity near ultraviolet and visible light from excimer, dye, or argon lasers. Diamond is very radiation resistant! Sensitivities, response times and impurity trap levels have been measured and appropriate diamonds can be synthesised. The use of diamond as fast opto-electronic switches has been reported in the literature and the mechanical and thermal design of diamond "heat sink" substrates for semiconductor laser diodes is advancing rapidly.

  4. Cosmogenic Helium In Alluvial Diamonds From Namaqualand, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, R.; Harris, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    The interpretation of He in diamonds is not straightforward, potential sources include trapped mantle-derived He, radiogenic 4He, and 3He produced in situ by cosmic-ray spallation. The presence of cosmogenic 3He is manifested by high 3He/4He values and ratios of >200 Ra have been measured. 3He contents can be used to distinguish pipe from alluvial diamonds and the time interval that they have been involved in the sedimentary cycle, i.e. their surface exposure history. This is important information for locating the source of alluvial diamonds, understanding their transport histories and may provide a useful tool for diamond exploration. In this study we are analysing the He composition of ten alluvial diamonds from the Koignass-Namaqualand area along the south-west coast of South Africa and Namibia. Diamonds are currently mined at a depth of 100m below the surface from deposits of gravel beaches and river channels. Helium is extracted from the diamonds using a newly developed high temperature filament furnace having a blank approximately 200x lower than conventional resistance furnaces. The low blank of this system means it is possible to extract He by stepwise heating of diamonds weighing 0.05 g. Helium isotopes were analysed using a mass spectrometer with a 3He detection limit of 2,000,000 atoms equivalent to about 20 ka of surface exposure. Results from one diamond from Namaqualand illustrate the range of data obtained so far. This diamond was analysed using eight temperature steps and shows an overall increase in 3He/4He value with temperature from 8.8 x 10-6 to 2.6 x 10-2, the latter being only 10x lower than the pure spallogenic ratio. The cosmogenic 3He content is estimated at 73.5 x 10-12 cm3/g which is at the upper end of the range determined previously in alluvial diamonds from west African sources. Assuming a sea level 3He production rate at 30°S, then the 3He content of this diamond is equivalent to 16 Ma of surface exposure. Most of this exposure is

  5. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  6. Friction and Wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomey, Jacques

    1952-01-01

    From the practical point of view, this analysis shows that each problem of friction or wear requires its particular solution. There is no universal solution; one or other of the factors predominates and defines the choice of the solution. In certain cases, copper alloys of great thermal conductivity are preferred; in others, plastics abundantly supplied with water. Sometimes, soft antifriction metals are desirable to distribute the load; at other times, hard metals with high resistance to abrasion or heat.

  7. Polymer Wear Modes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    first was the rubbing of Nylon 6—6, Nylon 11, Delrin 500, Delrin AF, and ultra—high molecular weight polyethylene ( UHMWPE ) against 440C stainless steel...strength at* T T Measured Time to Temperature ofPolymer . room temp. _~~ _i ~2!~ U severe wear counterface substrate UHMWP E 24.1 MPa 140°C 400°C -1.47 rn/s

  8. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  9. Wear and Tear - Mechanical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this chapter is on the long term wear and tear, or aging, of the mechanical subsystem of a spacecraft. The mechanical subsystem is herein considered to be the primary support structure (as in a skeleton or exoskeleton) upon which all other spacecraft systems rest, and the associated mechanisms. Mechanisms are devices which have some component that moves at least once, in response to some type of passive or active control system. For the structure, aging may proceed as a gradual degradation of mechanical properties and/or function, possibly leading to complete structural failure over an extended period of time. However, over the 50 years of the Space Age such failures appear to be unusual. In contrast, failures for mechanisms are much more frequent and may have a very serious effect on mission performance. Just as on Earth, all moving devices are subject to normal (and possibly accelerated) degradation from mechanical wear due to loss or breakdown of lubricant, misalignment, temperature cycling effects, improper design/selection of materials, fatigue, and a variety of other effects. In space, such environmental factors as severe temperature swings (possibly 100's of degrees C while going in and out of direct solar exposure), hard vacuum, micrometeoroids, wear from operation in a dusty or contaminated environment, and materials degradation from radiation can be much worse. In addition, there are some ground handling issues such as humidity, long term storage, and ground transport which may be of concern. This chapter addresses the elements of the mechanical subsystem subject to wear, and identifies possible causes. The potential impact of such degradation is addressed, albeit with the recognition that the impact of such wear often depends on when it occurs and on what specific components. Most structural elements of the mechanical system typically are conservatively designed (often to a safety factor of greater than approximately 1.25 on yield for

  10. DIAMOND AMPLIFIED PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY,J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BOHON, J.; CHANG, X.; GROVER, R.; ISAKOVIC, A.; RAO, T.; WU, Q.

    2007-11-26

    High-average-current linear electron accelerators require photoinjectors capable of delivering tens to hundreds of mA average current, with peak currents of hundreds of amps. Standard photocathodes face significant challenges in meeting these requirements, and often have short operational lifetimes in an accelerator environment. We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission amplifiers for photocathodes, which are intended to increase the achievable average current while protecting the cathode from the accelerator. The amplifier is a thin diamond wafer which converts energetic (few keV) primary electrons into hundreds of electron-hole pairs via secondary electron emission. The electrons drift through the diamond under an external bias and are emitted into vacuum via a hydrogen-terminated surface with negative electron affinity (NEA). Secondary emission gain of over 200 has been achieved. Two methods of patterning diamond, laser ablation and reactive-ion etching (RIE), are being developed to produce the required geometry. A variety of diagnostic techniques, including FTIR, SEM and AFM, have been used to characterize the diamonds.

  11. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbrough, W.A.

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  12. California: Diamond Valley

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... water storage capacity. In addition to routine water management, Diamond Valley Lake is designed to provide protection against ... 20, 2001 (Terra orbit 7564), is a false-color view combining data from the instrument's 26-degree forward view (displayed as blue) with data ...

  13. ELECTRON AMPLIFICATION IN DIAMOND.

    SciTech Connect

    SMEDLEY, J.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RAO, T.; SEGALOV, Z.; WU, Q.

    2006-07-10

    We report on recent progress toward development of secondary emission ''amplifiers'' for photocathodes. Secondary emission gain of over 300 has been achieved in transmission mode and emission mode for a variety of diamond samples. Techniques of sample preparation, including hydrogenation to achieve negative electron affinity (NEA), have been adapted to this application.

  14. Natural occurrence of pure nano-polycrystalline diamond from impact crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Yamashita, Tomoharu; Isobe, Futoshi; Afanasiev, Valentin P.; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P.

    2015-10-01

    Consolidated bodies of polycrystalline diamond with grain sizes less than 100 nm, nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD), has been experimentally produced by direct conversion of graphite at high pressure and high temperature. NPD has superior hardness, toughness and wear resistance to single-crystalline diamonds because of its peculiar nano-textures, and has been successfully used for industrial and scientific applications. Such sintered nanodiamonds have, however, not been found in natural mantle diamonds. Here we identified natural pure NPD, which was produced by a large meteoritic impact about 35 Ma ago in Russia. The impact diamonds consist of well-sintered equigranular nanocrystals (5-50 nm), similar to synthetic NPD, but with distinct [111] preferred orientation. They formed through the martensitic transformation from single-crystal graphite. Stress-induced local fragmentation of the source graphite and subsequent rapid transformation to diamond in the limited time scale result in multiple diamond nucleation and suppression of the overall grain growth, producing the unique nanocrystalline texture of natural NPD. A huge amount of natural NPD is expected to be present in the Popigai crater, which is potentially important for applications as novel ultra-hard material.

  15. Natural occurrence of pure nano-polycrystalline diamond from impact crater

    PubMed Central

    Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Irifune, Tetsuo; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Yamashita, Tomoharu; Isobe, Futoshi; Afanasiev, Valentin P.; Pokhilenko, Nikolai P.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidated bodies of polycrystalline diamond with grain sizes less than 100 nm, nano-polycrystalline diamond (NPD), has been experimentally produced by direct conversion of graphite at high pressure and high temperature. NPD has superior hardness, toughness and wear resistance to single-crystalline diamonds because of its peculiar nano-textures, and has been successfully used for industrial and scientific applications. Such sintered nanodiamonds have, however, not been found in natural mantle diamonds. Here we identified natural pure NPD, which was produced by a large meteoritic impact about 35 Ma ago in Russia. The impact diamonds consist of well-sintered equigranular nanocrystals (5–50 nm), similar to synthetic NPD, but with distinct [111] preferred orientation. They formed through the martensitic transformation from single-crystal graphite. Stress-induced local fragmentation of the source graphite and subsequent rapid transformation to diamond in the limited time scale result in multiple diamond nucleation and suppression of the overall grain growth, producing the unique nanocrystalline texture of natural NPD. A huge amount of natural NPD is expected to be present in the Popigai crater, which is potentially important for applications as novel ultra-hard material. PMID:26424384

  16. Chemical vapor deposition of diamond thin films on titanium silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Songlan

    2008-10-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has been the main method for synthesizing diamond thin films on hetero substrate materials since 1980s. It has been well acknowledged that both nucleation and growth of diamond on non-diamond surfaces without pre-treatment are very difficult and slow. Furthermore, the weak adhesion between the diamond thin films and substrates has been a major problem for widespread application of diamond thin films. Up to now, Si has been the most frequently used substrate for the study of diamond thin films and various methods, including bias and diamond powder scratching, have been applied to enhance diamond nucleation density. In the present study, nucleation and growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2, a newly developed ceramic-metallic material, using Microwave Plasma Enhanced (MPE) and Hot- Filament (HF) CVD reactors were carried out. In addition, synchrotron-based Near Edge Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (NEXAFS) was used to identify the electronic and chemical structures of various NCD films. The results from MPECVD showed that a much higher diamond nucleation density and a much higher film growth rate can be obtained on Ti3SiC2 compared with on Si. Consequently, nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were feasibly synthesized on Ti3SiC2 under the typical conditions for microcrystalline diamond film synthesis. Furthermore, the diamond films on Ti3SiC 2 exhibited better adhesion than on Si. The early stage growth of diamond thin films on Ti3SiC2 by HFCVD indicated that a nanowhisker-like diamond-graphite composite layer, different from diamond nucleation on Si, initially formed on the surface of Ti3SiC2, which resulted in high diamond nucleation density. These results indicate that Ti3SiC 2 has great potentials to be used both as substrates and interlayers on metals for diamond thin film deposition and application. This research may greatly expand the tribological application of both Ti3SiC 2 and diamond thin films

  17. Lower pressure synthesis of diamond material

    DOEpatents

    Lueking, Angela; Gutierrez, Humberto; Narayanan, Deepa; Burgess Clifford, Caroline E.; Jain, Puja

    2010-07-13

    Methods of synthesizing a diamond material, particularly nanocrystalline diamond, diamond-like carbon and bucky diamond are provided. In particular embodiments, a composition including a carbon source, such as coal, is subjected to addition of energy, such as high energy reactive milling, producing a milling product enriched in hydrogenated tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon compared to the coal. A milling product is treated with heat, acid and/or base to produce nanocrystalline diamond and/or crystalline diamond-like carbon. Energy is added to produced crystalline diamond-like carbon in particular embodiments to produce bucky diamonds.

  18. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    DOEpatents

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon <100>substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  19. Identification of the diamond-like B-C phase by confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zinin, P V; Kudryashov, I; Konishi, N; Ming, L C; Solozhenko, V L; Sharma, S K

    2005-08-01

    The new diamond-like B-C phase was obtained from the graphite-like BC phase in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell at high temperature 2230+/-140 K and high pressure 45 GPa. Raman spectra of the new phase measured at ambient conditions revealed a peak at 1315 cm(-1), which was attributed to longitudinal-optical (LO) mode. The X-Y Raman mapping was used to investigate spatial distribution of the diamond-like phases and was shown to be a powerful tool in studying the sp(2)-to-sp(3) phase transformations occurring in the diamond cell under high temperature and high pressure.

  20. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  1. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  2. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  3. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  4. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  5. Raman investigation of diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li-Ming

    1993-12-31

    Extensive Raman investigations were conducted on a wide range of diamond films whose structures were dilineated by optical and confocal microscopy. The Raman Spectra from one extreme of this range indicates a very intense 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} line diagnostic of bulk crystalline diamond. Microscopy of the corresponding film shows the presence of many large true diamond crystallite. The 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} Raman line at the other extreme of the range, however, is virtually absent. It is replaced, at this extreme, by a very broad Raman contour whose maxima occur near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}. Optical microscopy now reveals a complete lack of diamond crystallites. The ratio of the integrated Raman intensity of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diamond line to the integral of the entire broad contour extending from {approx}1200 cm{sup {minus}1} to 1800 cm{sup {minus}1}, with maxima near 1355 cm{sup {minus}1} and 1575 cm{sup {minus}1}, was determined. This ratio rises with increasing diamond crystallite size, and it decreases as true diamond crystallites are replaced by diamond-like, but amorphous, hard carbon, which produces the broad Raman contour. The measured intensity ratio was analyzed in terms of a differential equation related to phonon coupling. The increase of the intensity ratio of the 1331 cm{sup {minus}1} diagnostic diamond peak is due to phono-phonon coupling between the diamond crystallites, as the concentration of the amorphous diamond-like carbon decreases. Confocal microscopy indicates many amorphous-like regions interspersed between diamond crystallites which account for the intensity loss, and agree with the Raman intensity measurements. These Raman measurements crystallinity versus amorphous hard-carbon character of thin diamond film.

  6. Research of Influence Electric Conditions Combined ElectroDiamond Processing by on Specific Consumption of Wheel*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, D. V.; Arkhipov, P. V.; Yanyushkin, A. S.; Skeeba, V. Yu

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents results of stability research of cutting properties of diamond abrasive tools in metal binder for grinding high-strength composite materials, as well as the need to reduce the specific consumption of wheel, as one of the most important economic indicators of processing. Shows a comparative analysis of the results of preliminary researches of various methods diamond processing, in which determined that the minimum specific consumption of wheel reached by combined electro-diamond grinding, combining electrochemical grinding with simultaneous continuous electrochemical correction surface wheel. Were conducted more research directed at identifying the specific consumption the diamond wheel on metallic binder depending from electric conditions combined electrodiamond processing. Researches have established the advantages of combined electro-diamond of hard alloys processing and define rational modes to ensure a satisfactory consumption of the diamond wheel, as well as significantly increasing quality and performance.

  7. Wearing someone else's shoes.

    PubMed

    Rae, Kym

    2010-06-01

    This paper recounts a journey of discovery by a scientist who inadvertently takes on coordination of an ArtsHealth programme. The dynamics of role change are explored showcasing the vulnerabilities and fears that often accompany these career adjustments. The associated ArtsHealth programme (Gomeroi gaaynggal) works with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in Australia throughout their pregnancy to improve understanding of issues that impact the health of themselves and their developing baby. By wearing someone else shoes, the scientist is immersed in the project and must confront issues including skill mix, learning and cultural diversity.

  8. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  9. Progress toward a performance based specification for diamond grinding wheels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.S.; Piscotty, M.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-11-12

    This work sought to improve the communication between users and makers of fine diamond grinding wheels. A promising avenue for this is to formulate a voluntary product standard that comprises performance indicators that bridge the gap between specific user requirements and the details of wheel formulations. We propose a set of performance specifiers of figures-of-merit, that might be assessed by straightforward and traceable testing methods, but do not compromise proprietary information of the wheel user of wheel maker. One such performance indicator might be wheel hardness. In addition we consider technologies that might be required to realize the benefits of optimized grinding wheels. A non-contact wheel-to- workpiece proximity sensor may provide a means of monitoring wheel wear and thus wheel position, for wheels that exhibit high wear rates in exchange for improved surface finish.

  10. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  11. Evaluating the accuracy of wear formulae for acetabular cup liners.

    PubMed

    Wu, James Shih-Shyn; Hsu, Shu-Ling; Chen, Jian-Horng

    2010-02-01

    This study proposes two methods for exploring the wear volume of a worn liner. The first method is a numerical method, in which SolidWorks software is used to create models of the worn out regions of liners at various wear directions and depths. The second method is an experimental one, in which a machining center is used to mill polyoxymethylene to manufacture worn and unworn liner models, then the volumes of the models are measured. The results show that the SolidWorks software is a good tool for presenting the wear pattern and volume of a worn liner. The formula provided by Ilchmann is the most suitable for computing liner volume loss, but is not accurate enough. This study suggests that a more accurate wear formula is required. This is crucial for accurate evaluation of the performance of hip components implanted in patients, as well as for designing new hip components.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions Shwachman-Diamond syndrome Shwachman-Diamond syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is an inherited condition that affects many ...

  14. Diamond films for laser hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Watkins, L.; Ravi, K.; Yokota, S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser-damage experiments were performed on free-standing polycrystalline diamond films prepared by plasma-enhanced CVD. The high laser-induced stress resistance found for this material makes it useful for thin-film coatings for laser optics. Results for diamond-coated silicon substrates demonstrate the enhanced damage threshold imparted by diamond thin-film coatings to materials susceptible to laser damage.

  15. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond film thickness on the substrate.

  16. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1993-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond on a substrate is disclosed. The method involves providing a substrate surface covered with a fullerene or diamond coating, positioning a fullerene in an ionization source, creating a fullerene vapor, ionizing fullerene molecules, accelerating the fullerene ions to energies above 250 eV to form a fullerene ion beam, impinging the fullerene ion beam on the substrate surface and continuing these steps to obtain a diamond thickness on the substrate.

  17. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  18. Diamond Technology Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-11

    has been conducted into the use of diamond as a TWT helix support material to increase the average output power capability of broadband high frequency...unifilar helix is the one TWT circuit capable of broadband operation with good efficiency, methods to increase jT its power dissipation capability are of...BIBLIOGRAPHY IRa D> AE .,L,-,# ACot .,i n iv 4 I IPT-5413 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure No. Title 1 Temperature Differences in a PPM Focused Helix TWT

  19. Diamond turning of glass

    SciTech Connect

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  20. DIAMOND AMPLIFIER FOR PHOTOCATHODES.

    SciTech Connect

    RAO,T.; BEN-ZVI,I.; BURRILL,A.; CHANG,X.; HULBERT,S.; JOHNSON,P.D.; KEWISCH,J.

    2004-06-21

    We report a new approach to the generation of high-current, high-brightness electron beams. Primary electrons are produced by a photocathode (or other means) and are accelerated to a few thousand electron-volts, then strike a specially prepared diamond window. The large Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) provides a multiplication of the number of electrons by about two orders of magnitude. The secondary electrons drift through the diamond under an electric field and emerge into the accelerating proper of the ''gun'' through a Negative Electron Affinity surface of the diamond. The advantages of the new approach include the following: (1) Reduction of the number of primary electrons by the large SEY, i.e. a very low laser power in a photocathode producing the primaries. (2) Low thermal emittance due to the NEA surface and the rapid thermalization of the electrons. (3) Protection of the cathode from possible contamination from the gun, allowing the use of large quantum efficiency but sensitive cathodes. (4) Protection of the gun from possible contamination by the cathode, allowing the use of superconducting gun cavities. (5) Production of high average currents, up to ampere class. (6) Encapsulated design, making the ''load-lock'' systems unnecessary. This paper presents the criteria that need to be taken into account in designing the amplifier.

  1. Characteristics of Impact Diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skala, R.; Bouska, V. J.

    1992-07-01

    Having studied two Czech diamonds in UV light (lambda=366 nm) they appeared to be an extraordinary dirty orange color [1], the same as in the case of Popigai and ureilites impact diamonds (ID) [2]. SEM images show evidence of a thatch-like surface that is very similar to that of the Abee chondrite [3]. Commonly, the ID contain microscopic black plates which are formed by graphite or a carbon matter with indefinite structure, and they are always associated with hexagonal moissanite [2,4]. One unexplained fact is connected with a fabric of the ID aggregates, i.e. both Czech diamonds are single crystals, otherwise other ID form polycrystalline strongly textured aggregates. [1] Bouska V.J. and Skala R.M. (1992) Abstracts for International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution, in press. [2] Masaitis V.L., Shafranovskii G.I., Ezerskii V.A., and Reshetnyak N.B. (1990) Meteoritica 49, 180-196. [3] Russell S.S. and Pillinger C.T. (1991) Abstracts 54th Ann. Meet. Meteor. Soc. 200. [4] Bauer J., Fiala J., and Hrichova R. (1963) Amer. Mineral. 48, 620-634.

  2. Conversion of fullerenes to diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1995-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic diamond or diamond-like films on a substrate surface. The method involves the steps of providing a vapor selected from the group of fullerene molecules or an inert gas/fullerene molecule mixture, providing energy to the fullerene molecules consisting of carbon-carbon bonds, the energized fullerene molecules breaking down to form fragments of fullerene molecules including C.sub.2 molecules and depositing the energized fullerene molecules with C.sub.2 fragments onto the substrate with farther fragmentation occurring and forming a thickness of diamond or diamond-like films on the substrate surface.

  3. Diamonds in ophiolites: Contamination or a new diamond growth environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, D.; Griffin, W. L.; Yang, J.; Gain, S.; Stern, R. A.; Huang, J.-X.; Jacob, D. E.; Xu, X.; Stokes, A. J.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Pearson, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    For more than 20 years, the reported occurrence of diamonds in the chromites and peridotites of the Luobusa massif in Tibet (a complex described as an ophiolite) has been widely ignored by the diamond research community. This skepticism has persisted because the diamonds are similar in many respects to high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) synthetic/industrial diamonds (grown from metal solvents), and the finding previously has not been independently replicated. We present a detailed examination of the Luobusa diamonds (recovered from both peridotites and chromitites), including morphology, size, color, impurity characteristics (by infrared spectroscopy), internal growth structures, trace-element patterns, and C and N isotopes. A detailed comparison with synthetic industrial diamonds shows many similarities. Cubo-octahedral morphology, yellow color due to unaggregated nitrogen (C centres only, Type Ib), metal-alloy inclusions and highly negative δ13C values are present in both sets of diamonds. The Tibetan diamonds (n = 3) show an exceptionally large range in δ15N (-5.6 to + 28.7 ‰) within individual crystals, and inconsistent fractionation between {111} and {100} growth sectors. This in contrast to large synthetic HPHT diamonds grown by the temperature gradient method, which have with δ15N = 0 ‰ in {111} sectors and + 30 ‰ in {100} sectors, as reported in the literature. This comparison is limited by the small sample set combined with the fact the diamonds probably grew by different processes. However, the Tibetan diamonds do have generally higher concentrations and different ratios of trace elements; most inclusions are a NiMnCo alloy, but there are also some small REE-rich phases never seen in HPHT synthetics. These characteristics indicate that the Tibetan diamonds grew in contact with a C-saturated Ni-Mn-Co-rich melt in a highly reduced environment. The stable isotopes indicate a major subduction-related contribution to the chemical environment. The

  4. Risk Assessment for Tooth Wear.

    PubMed

    Kontaxopoulou, Isavella; Alam, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    Tooth wear has an increasing prevalence in the UK population. The aetiology is commonly multifactorial, and the aetiopathology is through a combination of erosion, attrition, abrasion and abfraction. Erosion is associated with intrinsic or extrinsic acids, and therefore subjects with reflux disease and eating disorders are at increased risk. Fruit juice, fruits and carbonated drink consumption, frequency of consumption and specific habits are also risk factors. Attrition is more prevalent in bruxists. Other habits need to be considered when defining the risk of tooth wear. Abrasion is usually associated with toothbrushing and toothpastes, especially in an already acidic environment. Patients with extensive lesions that affect dentin may be at higher risk, as well as those presenting with unstained lesions. Monitoring of the progress of tooth wear is recommended to identify those with active tooth wear. Indices for tooth wear are a helpful aid.

  5. Short Pulse Laser Production of Diamond Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Dinh, L.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; McLean, W.; Perry, M.D.

    1998-03-20

    The use of diamond thin films has the potential for major impact in many industrial and scientific applications. These include heat sinks for electronics, broadband optical sensors, windows, cutting tools, optical coatings, laser diodes, cold cathodes, and field emission displays. Attractive properties of natural diamond consist of physical hardness, high tensile yield strength, chemical inertness, low coefficient of friction, high thermal conductivity, and low electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, these properties are not completely realized in currently produced diamond thin films. Chemical vapor deposition, in its many forms, has been the most successful to this point in producing crystalline diamond films microns to millimeters in thickness which are made up of closely packed diamond crystals microns in physical dimension. However, high purity films are difficult to realize due to the use of hydrogen in the growth process which becomes included in the film matrix. These impurities are manifest in film physical properties which are inferior to those of pure crystalline diamond. In addition, the large density of grain boundaries due to the polycrystalline nature of the films reduce the films' diamond-like character. Finally, substrates must be heated to several hundred degrees Celsius which is not suitable for many materials. Pulsed laser deposition is attractive due to its ability to produce high purity films-limited only by the purity of the target. For diamond film production, high purity carbon can be ablated directly by lasers and deposited as thin films at ambient temperatures. However, lasers currently in use generally deliver long (>10 ns) pulses, and the generally explosive nature of laser ablation, in addition to the desired single-atom or single-ion carbon, liberates significant amounts of carbon clusters (C{sub n} where n=2-30) and macroscopic particles (> 1-10 pm) of carbon. These carbon particles interrupt the ordered deposition of crystalline

  6. Low friction wear resistant graphene films

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Berman, Diana; Erdemir, Ali

    2017-02-07

    A low friction wear surface with a coefficient of friction in the superlubric regime including graphene and nanoparticles on the wear surface is provided, and methods of producing the low friction wear surface are also provided. A long lifetime wear resistant surface including graphene exposed to hydrogen is provided, including methods of increasing the lifetime of graphene containing wear surfaces by providing hydrogen to the wear surface.

  7. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-12-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  8. Biological evaluation of ultrananocrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond coatings.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Shelby A; Kumar, Girish; Zheng, Jiwen; Sumant, Anirudha V; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured biomaterials have been investigated for achieving desirable tissue-material interactions in medical implants. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings are the two most studied classes of synthetic diamond coatings; these materials are grown using chemical vapor deposition and are classified based on their nanostructure, grain size, and sp(3) content. UNCD and NCD are mechanically robust, chemically inert, biocompatible, and wear resistant, making them ideal implant coatings. UNCD and NCD have been recently investigated for ophthalmic, cardiovascular, dental, and orthopaedic device applications. The aim of this study was (a) to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of UNCD and NCD coatings and (b) to determine if variations in surface topography and sp(3) content affect cellular response. Diamond coatings with various nanoscale topographies (grain sizes 5-400 nm) were deposited on silicon substrates using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed uniform coatings with different scales of surface topography; Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbon bonding typical of diamond coatings. Cell viability, proliferation, and morphology responses of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) to UNCD and NCD surfaces were evaluated. The hBMSCs on UNCD and NCD coatings exhibited similar cell viability, proliferation, and morphology as those on the control material, tissue culture polystyrene. No significant differences in cellular response were observed on UNCD and NCD coatings with different nanoscale topographies. Our data shows that both UNCD and NCD coatings demonstrate in vitro biocompatibility irrespective of surface topography.

  9. Switch wear leveling

    DOEpatents

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2015-09-01

    An apparatus for switch wear leveling includes a switching module that controls switching for two or more pairs of switches in a switching power converter. The switching module controls switches based on a duty cycle control technique and closes and opens each switch in a switching sequence. The pairs of switches connect to a positive and negative terminal of a DC voltage source. For a first switching sequence a first switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than a second switch of the pair of switches. The apparatus includes a switch rotation module that changes the switching sequence of the two or more pairs of switches from the first switching sequence to a second switching sequence. The second switch of a pair of switches has a higher switching power loss than the first switch of the pair of switches during the second switching sequence.

  10. Picosecond pulsed laser processing of polycrystalline diamond and cubic boron nitride composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warhanek, Maximilian G.; Pfaff, Josquin; Meier, Linus; Walter, Christian; Wegener, Konrad

    2016-03-01

    Capabilities and advantages of laser ablation processes utilizing ultrashort pulses have been demonstrated in various applications of scientific and industrial nature. Of particular interest are applications that require high geometrical accuracy, excellent surface integrity and thus tolerate only a negligible heat-affected zone in the processed area. In this context, this work presents a detailed study of the ablation characteristics of common ultrahard composite materials utilized in the cutting tool industry, namely polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride composite (PCBN). Due to the high hardness of these materials, conventional mechanical processing is time consuming and costly. Herein, laser ablation is an appealing solution, since no process forces and no wear have to be taken into consideration. However, an industrially viable process requires a detailed understanding of the ablation characteristics of each material. Therefore, the influence of various process parameters on material removal and processing quality at 10 ps pulse duration are investigated for several PCD and PCBN grades. The main focus of this study examines the effect of different laser energy input distributions, such as pulse frequency and burst pulses, on the processing conditions in deep cutting kerfs and the resulting processing speed. Based on these results, recommendations for efficient processing of such materials are derived.

  11. Wear resistance and wear mechanisms in polymer + metal composites.

    PubMed

    Olea-Mejia, Oscar; Brostow, Witold; Buchman, Eli

    2010-12-01

    We have investigated composites containing metallic micro-size and nano-sized particles as the 10 wt% dispersed phase. Branched low density polyethylene (LDPE) was the matrix. Microsized metals were Al, Ag and Ni; nanosized metals were Al and Ag. Several mechanisms of wear are observed in function of the kind and size of metal used: deformation, delamination, abrasion, adhesion and rolls formation. The presence of Ag particles increases the wear rate as compared to neat LDPE. The presence of Al particles lowers the wear of LDPE significantly; nanoparticles are more effective than microparticles.

  12. Critical Investigation of Wear Behaviour of WC Drill Bit Buttons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anurag; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath; Hloch, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    Mining and petroleum drill bits are subjected to highly abrasive rock and high-velocity fluids that cause severe wear and erosion in service. To augment the rate of penetration and minimize the cost per foot, such drill bits are subjected to increasing rotary speeds and weight. A rotary/percussive drill typically hits the rock 50 times per second with hydraulic impact pressure of about 170-200 bar and feed pressure of about 90-100 bar, while rotating at 75-200 rpm. The drill rig delivers a high-velocity flow of drilling fluid onto the rock surface to dislodge cuttings and cool the bit. The impingement of high-velocity drilling fluid with entrained cuttings accelerates the erosion rate of the bit. Also, high service temperature contributes to softening of the rock for increased penetration. Hence, there is a need to optimize the drilling process and balance the wear rate and penetration rate simultaneously. This paper presents an experimental scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of electroplated (nickel-bonded) diamond drills for different wear modes.

  13. Design and investigation of properties of nanocrystalline diamond optical planar waveguides.

    PubMed

    Prajzler, Vaclav; Varga, Marian; Nekvindova, Pavla; Remes, Zdenek; Kromka, Alexander

    2013-04-08

    Diamond thin films have remarkable properties comparable with natural diamond. Because of these properties it is a very promising material for many various applications (sensors, heat sink, optical mirrors, chemical and radiation wear, cold cathodes, tissue engineering, etc.) In this paper we report about design, deposition and measurement of properties of optical planar waveguides fabricated from nanocrystalline diamond thin films. The nanocrystalline diamond planar waveguide was deposited by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and the structure of the deposited film was studied by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The design of the presented planar waveguides was realized on the bases of modified dispersion equation and was schemed for 632.8 nm, 964 nm, 1 310 nm and 1 550 nm wavelengths. Waveguiding properties were examined by prism coupling technique and it was found that the diamond based planar optical element guided one fundamental mode for all measured wavelengths. Values of the refractive indices of our NCD thin film measured at various wavelengths were almost the same as those of natural diamond.

  14. Topomineralogy of the Siberian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyev, Valentin; Lobanov, Sergey; Vasiliy, Koptil; Bogdan, Pomazanskiy; Alexander, Gerasimchuk; Nikolay, Pokhilenko

    2010-05-01

    Diamond placers are widespread in the modern alluvial deposits and ancient sedimentary collectors of the Siberian craton and can be divided into two major types: 1) related with the rich and famous kimberlites such as Mir and International pipe and 2) with unidentified root source. The lattert are wide spread, industrially significant and in use in the north-east of the Siberian craton. Yet, kimberlites known in the north-east of the Siberian craton have poor diamond concentrations or non-diamondiferous at all. A contradiction occur between high alluvial and extremely-low host diamond content of this region. Detailed studies of this problem led to the fact that diamonds from the alluvial deposits of the Siberian craton, as well as other diamondiferous regions, show broader spectrum of typomorphic features than diamonds from the known kimberlites. Moreover, some diamond groups are not typical for the phanerozoic kimberlites of Siberia, or do not occur in significant amounts. The foregoing suggests that diamonds from the unknown host rock type occur in the diamond placers of the Siberian craton along with typical kimberlite diamonds. Based on the detailed studies of the typomorphic features of the alluvial diamonds from Siberian craton 5 parasteresis groups, probably related to different host rock types, were distinguished. Parasteresis is a regular spatial mineral association which are united by single geological process, such as kimberlite indicator minerals and diamonds from kimberlites which differ in genesis but united by the whole kimberlitic process. Parasteresis 1 (kimberlite-type) involves diamonds which are common for the phanerozoic kimberlites. Parasteresis 2 (supposed to be lamproitic) includes roundish (cryptolaminar) diamonds of dodecahedron habit, the so called "brazilian" or "ural" types. In Siberian phanerozoic industrial kimberlites the part of such diamonds does not exceed 15%. That is the diamonds which dominate in the placers of the Urals and

  15. Twin Quintuplets in CVD Diamond

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-26

    microscopy (HRTEM). We conclude that the twin quintuplets have two main morphologies. The first consists of four Sigma = 3 twin boundaries and one...slightly more than the 70.53 deg tilt of a Sigma = 3 boundary. These grain boundaries and the conventional diamond lattice twin boundaries are the only types of boundaries that we have observed in CVD diamond.

  16. Wear of hot rolling mill rolls: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuzic, S.; Strafford, K. N.; Subramanian, C.; Savage, G.

    1994-08-01

    Rolling is today one of the most important industrial processes because a greater volume of material is worked by rolling than by any other technique. Roll wear is a multiplex process where mechanical and thermal fatigue combines with impact, abrasion, adhesion and corrosion, which all depend on system interactions rather than material characteristics only. The situation is more complicated in section rolling because of the intricacy of roll geometry. Wear variables and modes are reviewed along with published methods and models used in the study and testing of roll wear. This paper reviews key aspects of roll wear control - roll material properties, roll pass design, and system factors such as temperature, loads and sliding velocity. An overview of roll materials is given including adamites, high Cr materials, high speed tool steels and compound rolls. Non-uniform wear, recognized as the most detrimental phenomenon in section rolling, can be controlled by roll pass design. This can be achieved by computer-aided graphical and statistical analyses of various pass series. Preliminary results obtained from pilot tests conducted using a two-disc hot wear rig and a scratch tester are discussed.

  17. High efficiency diamond solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2008-05-06

    A photovoltaic device and method of making same. A layer of p-doped microcrystalline diamond is deposited on a layer of n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond such as by providing a substrate in a chamber, providing a first atmosphere containing about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 99% by volume H.sub.2 with dopant quantities of a boron compound, subjecting the atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer on the substrate, providing a second atmosphere of about 1% by volume CH.sub.4 and about 89% by volume Ar and about 10% by volume N.sub.2, subjecting the second atmosphere to microwave energy to deposit a n-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond layer on the p-doped microcrystalline diamond layer. Electrodes and leads are added to conduct electrical energy when the layers are irradiated.

  18. Gardner-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Joyce H; Yagerman, Sarah; Feng, Hao; Kim, Randie H; Meehan, Shane A; Lewin, Jesse

    2016-12-15

    Gardner-Diamond syndrome, which also is knownas autoerythrocyte sensitization disorder, is a raresyndrome of inflammatory, edematous papulesthat evolve into painful ecchymoses on the trunkand lower legs after a period of stress with no priorhistory of trauma. This syndrome usually occurs inwomen with a history of psychiatric disorders, themost common one being depression. Although theexact mechanism of injury is not well understood,it is hypothesized that these patients haveautoantibodies to phosphatidylserine, which is aphospholipid membrane component in erythrocytes.Treatment for this disorder includes symptomatictherapies and psychotropic medications to treat theunderlying psychiatric disorder.

  19. Graphitic polymer nanocomposites: Wear performance and wear debris analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tian

    With the addition of appropriate nanofillers, nanocomposites have been shown to be an effective avenue to achieve a multitude of enhanced properties, even extending to multi-functionalities not normally considered possible for conventional polymer materials. However, the structure and properties of polymeric nanocomposites can be influenced by some environmental factors in practical use, such as wear and temperature, due to the nature of viscoelasticity of polymer matrix. The large interfacial areas exist between matrix and nanofillers are also susceptible to the wear/temperature-related changes. In this work, I was devoted to developing high wear and/or thermal performance graphitic nanofiller reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites. Two critical issues, including appropriate filler-matrix interactions and proper dispersion of the nano-reinforcement, were addressed through the effective nanofiller surface modification. Wear, thermal and mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposites were systematically investigated. Meanwhile, the wear debris generated on the sliding surface of composite materials was analyzed morphologically and quantitatively. In particular, the research regarding the possibility of determining the effects of wear and thermal processes on the nanocomposites by detecting dielectric signals over the lifetime of polymeric materials was conducted. Correlations that exist between effects of wear or thermal processes and dielectric properties of the nanocomposites were then explored. Based on the studies of HDPE nanocomposites, high quality ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) nanocomposite reinforced by graphitic nanofillers was finally extended in this thesis. UHMWPE is an extremely viscous polymer and thus cannot be processed conventionally, typically resulting in dispersion issues far worse than that of other composite systems. The research presented aims at solving the issue by using ultrasonication-assisted melt

  20. Physical and tribological properties of diamond films grown in argon-carbon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zuiker, C.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Pan, X.; Li, J.C.; Csencsits, R.; Erdemir, A.; Bindal, C.; Fenske, G.

    1995-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films have been deposited using a microwave plasma consisting of argon, 2--10% hydrogen and a carbon precursor such as C{sub 60} or CH{sub 4}. It was found that it is possible to grow the diamond phase with both carbon precursors, although the hydrogen concentration in the plasma was 1--2 orders of magnitude lower than normally required in the absence of the argon. Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction measurements and transmission electron microscopy indicate the films are predominantly composed of diamond. Surface roughness, as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicate the nanocrystalline films grown in low hydrogen content plasmas grow exceptionally smooth (30--50 nm) to thicknesses of 10 {mu}m. The smooth nanocrystalline films result in low friction coefficients ({mu}=0.04--0.06) and low average wear rates as determined by pin-on-disk measurements.

  1. Photochemical functionalization of diamond surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Beth Marie

    Diamond surfaces are excellent substrates for potential applications in fields such as biotechnology, molecular sensing, and molecular electronics. In order to develop new diamond-based technologies, it is important to develop a fundamental understanding of diamond surface chemistry. Previous work in the Hamers group has demonstrated covalent functionalization of hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces with molecules bearing a terminal vinyl group via a photochemical process using sub-bandgap light at 254 nm. While the reaction was shown to occur reproducibly with self-terminating monolayer surface coverage, the mechanism was never fully understood. This thesis investigates the photochemical modification of hydrogen-terminated surfaces of diamond. The results show that this reaction is a surface-mediated radical process initiated by the UV-assisted photoejection of electrons from the diamond surfaces into the liquid phase. To develop a better understanding of the photochemical mechanism, an electrical bias was applied to the diamond samples during the photochemical reaction. Applying a 1 volt potential between two diamond electrodes significantly increases the rate of functionalization of the negative electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance measurements show that the applied potential induces downward band-bending within the negative diamond film electrode. At higher voltages a Faradaic current is observed, with no further acceleration of the functionalization rate. The bias-dependent changes in rate are attributed to a field effect; the applied potential induces a downward band-bending on the negative electrode and facilitates electron ejection into the adjacent organic fluid. The ability to directly organically photopattern the surface on length scales of <25 microns has also been demonstrated using simple photomasking techniques. Techniques for the functionalization of diamond may be applied to other 'unreactive' surfaces. The activation of a

  2. Interaction of carbon nanotubes and diamonds under hot-filament chemical vapor deposition conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Nagraj

    A composite of CNTs and diamond can be expected to have unique mechanical, electrical and thermal properties due to the synergetic combination of the excellent properties of these two allotropes of carbon. The composite may find applications in various fields that require a combination of good mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties such as, wear-resistant coatings, thermal management of integrated chips (ICs), and field emission devices. This research is devoted to the experimental studies of phase stability of diamond and CNTs under chemical vapor deposition conditions to investigate the possibility of combining these materials to produce a hybrid composite. Growth of the hybrid material is investigated by starting with a pre-existing film of CNTs and subsequently growing diamond on it. The diamond growth phase space is systematically scanned to determine optimal conditions where diamond nucleates on the CNT without destroying it. Various techniques including SEM, TEM, and Micro Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the hybrid material. A selective window where the diamond directly nucleates on the CNT without destroying the underlying CNT network is identified. Based on the material characterization, a growth mechanism based on etching of CNT at the defective sites to produce sp3 dangling bonds onto which diamond nucleates is proposed. Though a hybrid material is synthesized, the nucleation density of diamond on the CNTs is low and highly non-homogenous. Improvements to the CNT dispersion in the hybrid material are investigated in order to produce a homogenous material with predictable CNT loading fractions and to probe the low nucleation density of diamond on the CNT. The effect of several dispersion techniques and solvents on CNT surface homogeneity is studied using SEM, and a novel, vacuum drying based approach using CNT/dichlorobenzene dispersions is suggested. SEM and Raman analysis of the early stage nucleation are used to develop a

  3. Electron energy loss spectrometry of interstellar diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, Thomas J.; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Lewis, Roy S.

    1990-01-01

    The results are reported of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) measurements on diamond residues from carbonaceous meteorites designed to elucidate the structure and composition of interstellar diamonds. Dynamic effective medium theory is used to model the dielectric properties of the diamonds and in particular to synthesize the observed spectra as mixtures of diamond and various pi-bonded carbons. The results are shown to be quantitatively consistent with the idea that diamonds and their surfaces are the only contributors to the electron energy loss spectra of the diamond residues and that these peculiar spectra are the result of the exceptionally small grain size and large specific surface area of the interstellar diamonds.

  4. They shall wear fringes.

    PubMed

    Sugar, M

    1999-01-01

    The multiple functions of clothes include utility, protection, rivalry, disguise, camouflage, display for seduction purposes, aggression, totemism, and status. Here the focus is on a decorative and distinctive hierarchical aspect of ancient dress, the tsitsit or fringes, whose original function is long absent, but that has endured for 3,500 years in Judaism. The beginning of their use beyond the totemic appears related to issues of changing identity from slavery to liberty, endowing noble status, exhibitionism, a symbol of identity, identification with the aggressor, a talisman, and potency. It is conceptualized that they became a symbol, or a specifier, that helped promote group cohesion in ex-slaves who were frightened, dependent, anxious, and not hopeful about their future. The tsitsit aided the development of a new identity and made all Israelites equal and noble to the observer. The durability of this symbol to the present is evident in its daily wear, as an accompaniment to daily prayers, as well as in its use as a burial shroud for males. It appears that the tsitsit have additional multiple functions. These are the promise of oral and genital satisfaction, and the pleasure of the after-life, superego warnings and control of sexual impulses, protection, survival value, and affirmation. Since they offer sublimation with acceptable gratification of instincts, the tsitsit have become ritualized and endure.

  5. Intelligent Detection of Drill Wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T. I.; Chen, W. Y.; Anatharaman, K. S.

    1998-11-01

    Backpropagation neural networks (BPNs) were used for on-line detection of drill wear. The neural network consisted of three layers: input, hidden, and output. The input vector comprised drill size, feed rate, spindle speed, and eight features obtained by processing the thrust and torque signals. The output was the drill wear state which either usable or failure. Drilling experiments with various drill sizes, feed rates and spindle speeds were carried out. The learning process was performed effectively by utilising backpropagation with smoothing and an activation function slope. The on-line detection of drill wear states using BPNs achieved 100% reliability even when the drill size, feed rate and spindle speed were changed. In other words, the developed on-line drill wear detection systems have very high robustness and hence can be used in very complex production environments, such as flexible manufacturing systems.

  6. Wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Y. S.; Kingsbury, G. R.

    1998-02-01

    A detailed review of wear resistance properties of austempered ductile iron (ADI) was undertaken to examine the potential applications of this material for wear parts, as an alternative to steels, alloyed and white irons, bronzes, and other competitive materials. Two modes of wear were studied: adhesive (frictional) dry sliding and abrasive wear. In the rotating dry sliding tests, wear behavior of the base material (a stationary block) was considered in relationship to countersurface (steel shaft) wear. In this wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was only one-fourth that of pearlitic ductile iron (DI) grade 100-70-03; the wear rates of aluminum bronze and leaded-tin bronze, respectively, were 3.7 and 3.3 times greater than that of ADI. Only quenched DI with a fully martensitic matrix slightly outperformed ADI. No significant difference was observed in the wear of steel shafts running against ADI and quenched DI. The excellent wear performance of ADI and its countersurface, combined with their relatively low friction coefficient, indicate potential for dry sliding wear applications. In the abrasive wear mode, the wear rate of ADI was comparable to that of alloyed hardened AISI 4340 steel, and approximately one-half that of hardened medium-carbon AISI 1050 steel and of white and alloyed cast irons. The excellent wear resistance of ADI may be attributed to the strain-affected transformation of high-carbon austenite to martensite that takes place in the surface layer during the wear tests.

  7. Nanocoatings for High-Efficiency Industrial Hydraulic and Tooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton B. Higdon III

    2011-01-07

    Industrial manufacturing in the U.S. accounts for roughly one third of the 98 quadrillion Btu total energy consumption. Motor system losses amount to 1.3 quadrillion Btu, which represents the largest proportional loss of any end-use category, while pumps alone represent over 574 trillion BTU (TBTU) of energy loss each year. The efficiency of machines with moving components is a function of the amount of energy lost to heat because of friction between contacting surfaces. The friction between these interfaces also contributes to downtime and the loss of productivity through component wear and subsequent repair. The production of new replacement parts requires additional energy. Among efforts to reduce energy losses, wear-resistant, low-friction coatings on rotating and sliding components offer a promising approach that is fully compatible with existing equipment and processes. In addition to lubrication, one of the most desirable solutions is to apply a protective coating or surface treatment to rotating or sliding components to reduce their friction coefficients, thereby leading to reduced wear. Historically, a number of materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), titanium nitride (TiN), titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), and tungsten carbide (WC) have been examined as tribological coatings. The primary objective of this project was the development of a variety of thin film nanocoatings, derived from the AlMgB14 system, with a focus on reducing wear and friction in both industrial hydraulics and cutting tool applications. Proof-of-concept studies leading up to this project had shown that the constituent phases, AlMgB14 and TiB2, were capable of producing low-friction coatings by pulsed laser deposition. These coatings combine high hardness with a low friction coefficient, and were shown to substantially reduce wear in laboratory tribology tests. Selection of the two applications was based largely on the concept of improved mechanical interface efficiencies for

  8. Diamond machining of micro-optical components and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gläbe, Ralf; Riemer, Oltmann

    2010-05-01

    Diamond machining originates from the 1950s to 1970s in the USA. This technology was originally designed for machining of metal optics at macroscopic dimensions with so far unreached tolerances. During the following decades the machine tools, the monocrystalline diamond cutting tools, the workpiece materials and the machining processes advanced to even higher precision and flexibility. For this reason also the fabrication of small functional components like micro optics at a large spectrum of geometries became technologically and economically feasible. Today, several kinds of fast tool machining and multi axis machining operations can be applied for diamond machining of micro optical components as well as diffractive optical elements. These parts can either be machined directly as single or individual component or as mold insert for mass production by plastic replication. Examples are multi lens arrays, micro mirror arrays and fiber coupling lenses. This paper will give an overview about the potentials and limits of the current diamond machining technology with respect to micro optical components.

  9. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.; Tylczak, J.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate. In this study stainless steel was evaluated as a function of wear erosion conditions.

  10. Qualitative link between work of adhesion and thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Monachon, Christian Weber, Ludger; Schusteritsch, Georg; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2014-03-28

    We report Time-Domain ThermoReflectance experiments measuring the Thermal Boundary Conductance (TBC) of interfaces between diamond and metal surfaces, based on samples consisting of [111]-oriented diamond substrates with hydrogen or with sp{sup 2} carbon surface terminations created using plasma treatments. In a concurrent theoretical study, we calculate the work of adhesion between Ni, Cu, and diamond interfaces with (111) surface orientation, with or without hydrogen termination of the diamond surface, using first-principles electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). We find a positive correlation between the calculated work of adhesion and the measured conductance of these interfaces, suggesting that DFT could be used as a screening tool to identify metal/dielectric systems with high TBC. We also explain the negative effect of hydrogen on the thermal conductance of metal/diamond interfaces.

  11. Phase Retrieval System for Assessing Diamond Turning and Optical Surface Defects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, Bruce; Maldonado, Alex; Bolcar, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    An optical design is presented for a measurement system used to assess the impact of surface errors originating from diamond turning artifacts. Diamond turning artifacts are common by-products of optical surface shaping using the diamond turning process (a diamond-tipped cutting tool used in a lathe configuration). Assessing and evaluating the errors imparted by diamond turning (including other surface errors attributed to optical manufacturing techniques) can be problematic and generally requires the use of an optical interferometer. Commercial interferometers can be expensive when compared to the simple optical setup developed here, which is used in combination with an image-based sensing technique (phase retrieval). Phase retrieval is a general term used in optics to describe the estimation of optical imperfections or aberrations. This turnkey system uses only image-based data and has minimal hardware requirements. The system is straightforward to set up, easy to align, and can provide nanometer accuracy on the measurement of optical surface defects.

  12. Invited Article: Precision nanoimplantation of nitrogen vacancy centers into diamond photonic crystal cavities and waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukraft, M.; Zheng, J.; Schröder, T.; Mouradian, S. L.; Walsh, M.; Trusheim, M. E.; Bakhru, H.; Englund, D. R.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a self-aligned lithographic technique for precision generation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers within photonic nanostructures on bulk diamond substrates. The process relies on a lithographic mask with nanoscale implantation apertures for NV creation, together with larger features for producing waveguides and photonic nanocavities. This mask allows targeted nitrogen ion implantation, and precision dry etching of nanostructures on bulk diamond. We demonstrate high-yield generation of single NVs at pre-determined nanoscale target regions on suspended diamond waveguides. We report implantation into the mode maximum of diamond photonic crystal nanocavities with a single-NV per cavity yield of ˜26% and Purcell induced intensity enhancement of the zero-phonon line. The generation of NV centers aligned with diamond photonic structures marks an important tool for scalable production of optically coupled spin memories.

  13. Tailoring nanocrystalline diamond film properties

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; McCauley, Thomas G.; Zhou, Dan; Krauss, Alan R.

    2003-07-15

    A method for controlling the crystallite size and growth rate of plasma-deposited diamond films. A plasma is established at a pressure in excess of about 55 Torr with controlled concentrations of hydrogen up to about 98% by volume, of unsubstituted hydrocarbons up to about 3% by volume and an inert gas of one or more of the noble gases and nitrogen up to about 98% by volume. The volume ratio of inert gas to hydrogen is preferably maintained at greater than about 4, to deposit a diamond film on a suitable substrate. The diamond film is deposited with a predetermined crystallite size and at a predetermined growth rate.

  14. Conversion of fullerenes to diamond

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    1994-01-01

    A method of forming synthetic hydrogen defect free diamond or diamond like films on a substrate. The method involves providing vapor containing fullerene molecules with or without an inert gas, providing a device to impart energy to the fullerene molecules, fragmenting at least in part some of the fullerene molecules in the vapor or energizing the molecules to incipient fragmentation, ionizing the fullerene molecules, impinging ionized fullerene molecules on the substrate to assist in causing fullerene fragmentation to obtain a thickness of diamond on the substrate.

  15. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  16. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraimovitch, D.; Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ruzin, A.

    2017-02-01

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz-1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  17. Improved tool grinding machine

    DOEpatents

    Dial, C.E. Sr.

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thicknesses may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  18. Tool grinding machine

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Sr., Charles E.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved tool grinding mechanism for grinding single point diamond cutting tools to precise roundness and radius specifications. The present invention utilizes a tool holder which is longitudinally displaced with respect to the remainder of the grinding system due to contact of the tool with the grinding surface with this displacement being monitored so that any variation in the grinding of the cutting surface such as caused by crystal orientation or tool thickness may be compensated for during the grinding operation to assure the attainment of the desired cutting tool face specifications.

  19. Diamond-cBN alloy: A universal cutting material

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Wang, Liping; Kou, Zili; Li, Yong; Xiong, Lun; Hu, Qiwei; Xu, Chao; Lei, Li; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Yusheng

    2015-09-08

    Diamond and cubic boron nitride (cBN) as conventional superhard materials have found widespread industrial applications, but both have inherent limitations. Diamond is not suitable for high-speed cutting of ferrous materials due to its poor chemical inertness, while cBN is only about half as hard as diamond. Because of their affinity in structural lattices and covalent bonding character, diamond and cBN could form alloys that can potentially fill the performance gap. However, the idea has never been demonstrated because samples obtained in the previous studies were too small to be tested for their practical performance. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of transparent bulk diamond-cBN alloy compacts whose diameters (3 mm) are sufficiently large for them to be processed into cutting tools. The testing results show that the diamond-cBN alloy has superior chemical inertness over polycrystalline diamond and higher hardness than single crystal cBN. In conclusion, high-speed cutting tests on hardened steel and granite suggest that diamond-cBN alloy is indeed a universal cutting material.

  20. Electronic devices from diamond-like carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, W. I.

    2003-03-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out over the past few years on the application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) materials to electronic devices. The use of such materials is still in its infancy due to their high defect state density and associated low mobilities. To date, the major effort in the electronic field has been in their attempted use as cold cathode field emitters where their low threshold field has attracted much attention. However, attempts have also been made to produce metal semiconductor metal structures, diodes, a-C/c-Si heterostructures and thin film transistors with varying degrees of success. A brief review of work carried out on the use of DLCs in solar cell manufacture will also be presented but it seems at this early stage in their development that the most promising area for future development will be in the field of microelectromechanical structures where their friction, stiction and wear properties make them prime candidates for use in moving mechanical assemblies.

  1. Conductive polycrystalline diamond probes for local anodic oxidation lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, A. J.; Radadia, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    This is the first report characterizing local anodic oxidation (LAO) lithography performed using conductive monolithic polycrystalline diamond (MD) and conductive polycrystalline diamond-coated (DC) tips and comparing it to the diamond-like carbon-coated and metal-coated silicon tips. The range and the rate of increase in the lithographic linewidth and height with tip bias (dw/dV and dh/dV) differed based on the tip material. The DC tips resulted in wider and taller lines and a higher dw/dV and dh/dV compared to metal-coated tips with a similar force constant (k Avg). The metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k Avg showed comparable threshold voltages, whereas the MD tips with similar k Avg showed a higher threshold voltage. The MD tips exhibited less than half the height and nearly half the dw/dV and dh/dV obtained with the metal-coated tips with similar k Avg, thus also resulting in a smaller width at -10 V. The linewidths were found to be proportional to the inverse of the log of write speed (v) for all the tips; however, the proportionality constant varied with tip material; the DC tips had larger values, and the MD and the metal-coated tips had comparable values. When varying the speed, the height was found to be a sigmoidal function of width, with the MD probes achieving lower height compared to the metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k Avg. This study expands the application of monolithic conductive polycrystalline diamond (PCD) probes with outstanding wear resistance to fine LAO lithography.

  2. Conductive polycrystalline diamond probes for local anodic oxidation lithography.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, A J; Radadia, A D

    2015-11-20

    This is the first report characterizing local anodic oxidation (LAO) lithography performed using conductive monolithic polycrystalline diamond (MD) and conductive polycrystalline diamond-coated (DC) tips and comparing it to the diamond-like carbon-coated and metal-coated silicon tips. The range and the rate of increase in the lithographic linewidth and height with tip bias (dw/dV and dh/dV) differed based on the tip material. The DC tips resulted in wider and taller lines and a higher dw/dV and dh/dV compared to metal-coated tips with a similar force constant (k(Avg)). The metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k(Avg) showed comparable threshold voltages, whereas the MD tips with similar k(Avg) showed a higher threshold voltage. The MD tips exhibited less than half the height and nearly half the dw/dV and dh/dV obtained with the metal-coated tips with similar k Avg, thus also resulting in a smaller width at -10 V. The linewidths were found to be proportional to the inverse of the log of write speed(v) for all the tips; however, the proportionality constant varied with tip material; the DC tips had larger values, and the MD and the metal-coated tips had comparable values. When varying the speed, the height was found to be a sigmoidal function of width, with the MD probes achieving lower height compared to the metal-coated and the DC tips with comparable k(Avg). This study expands the application of monolithic conductive polycrystalline diamond (PCD) probes with outstanding wear resistance to fine LAO lithography.

  3. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  4. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  5. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOEpatents

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  6. Wear of aluminum and hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys in boundary-lubricated pin-on disk sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Brainard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The friction and wear of pure aluminum and a number of hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys (with 3 to 12 wt %Si) were studied with a pin-on-disk apparatus. The contacts were lubricated with mineral oil and sliding was in the boundary-lubrication regime at 2.6 cm/sec. Surfaces were analyzed with photomicrographs, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive analysis, and diamond pyramid hardness measurements. There were two wear regimes for the alloys - high and low - whereas pure aluminum exhibited a high wear rate throughout the test period. Wear rate decreased and the transition stress from high to low wear increased with increasing hardness. There was no correlation between friction coefficient and hardness. A least squares curve fit indicated a wear-rate dependence greater than the inverse first power of hardness. The lower wear rates of the alloys may be due to the composites of silicon platelets in aluminum resulting in increased hardness and thus impairing the shear of the aluminum.

  7. A review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syazwani, H.; Mebrahitom, G.; Azmir, A.

    2016-02-01

    This paper discusses a review on nozzle wear in abrasive water jet machining application. Wear of the nozzle becomes a major problem since it may affect the water jet machining performance. Design, materials, and life of the nozzle give significance effect to the nozzle wear. There are various parameters that may influence the wear rate of the nozzle such as nozzle length, nozzle inlet angle, nozzle diameter, orifice diameter, abrasive flow rate and water pressure. The wear rate of the nozzle can be minimized by controlling these parameters. The mechanism of wear in the nozzle is similar to other traditional machining processes which uses a cutting tool. The high pressure of the water and hard abrasive particles may erode the nozzle wall. A new nozzle using a tungsten carbide-based material has been developed to reduce the wear rate and improve the nozzle life. Apart from that, prevention of the nozzle wear has been achieved using porous lubricated nozzle. This paper presents a comprehensive review about the wear of abrasive water jet nozzle.

  8. Mo2C coating on diamond: Different effects on thermal conductivity of diamond/Al and diamond/Cu composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Songdi; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; He, Fang; Ma, Liying

    2017-04-01

    Mo2C submicron layer coated diamond particles prepared by a molten salts route with Mo powder as the starting material were used as the filler in Cu- and Al- matrix composites. The microstructure and thermal property of the composites prepared by a vacuum pressure infiltration method were investigated. When introducing a 500 nm thick Mo2C layer, the thermal conductivity of the composites with different matrix presented different performance. A high thermal conductivity (657 W m-1 K-1) was obtained in diamond/Cu composites owing to the improved interfacial bonding and lower interfacial thermal resistance, while the thermal conductivity of diamond/Al composites decreased from 553 W m-1 K-1 to 218 W m-1 K-1 when introducing the Mo2C layer, which can be attributed to the formation of harmful granule-phase (Al12Mo) at the interface of diamond and aluminum. This work provides a promising approach to improve performance of diamond reinforced metal matrix composites by selecting carbide as an interface modifier.

  9. Fractal characterization of wear-erosion surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.

    1999-12-01

    Wear erosion is a complex phenomenon resulting in highly distorted and deformed surface morphologies. Most wear surface features have been described only qualitatively. In this study wear surfaces features were quantified using fractal analysis. The ability to assign numerical values to wear-erosion surfaces makes possible mathematical expressions that will enable wear mechanisms to be predicted and understood. Surface characterization came from wear-erosion experiments that included varying the erosive materials, the impact velocity, and the impact angle. Seven fractal analytical techniques were applied to micrograph images of wear-erosion surfaces. Fourier analysis was the most promising. Fractal values obtained were consistent with visual observations and provided a unique wear-erosion parameter unrelated to wear rate.

  10. Wearing-off scales in Parkinson's disease: critique and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Angelo; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Chaudhuri, Ray K; Merello, Marcelo; Hauser, Robert; Katzenschlager, Regina; Odin, Per; Stacy, Mark; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Poewe, Werner; Rascol, Oliver; Sampaio, Cristina; Schrag, Anette; Stebbins, Glenn T; Goetz, Christopher G

    2011-10-01

    Wearing-off occurs in the majority of patients with Parkinson's disease after a few years of dopaminergic therapy. Because a variety of scales have been used to estimate wearing-off, the Movement Disorder Society commissioned a task force to assess their clinimetric properties. A systematic review was conducted to identify wearing-off scales that have either been validated or used in Parkinson's patients. A scale was designated "Recommended" if it had been used in clinical studies beyond the group that developed it, if it had been specifically used in Parkinson's disease reports, and if clinimetric studies had established that it is valid, reliable, and sensitive. "Suggested" scales met 2 of the above criteria, and those meeting 1 were "Listed." We identified 3 diagnostic and 4 severity rating scales for wearing-off quantification. Two questionnaires met the criteria to be Recommended for diagnostic screening (questionnaires for 19 and 9 items), and 1 was Suggested (questionnaire for 32 items). Only the patient diaries were Recommended to assess wearing-off severity, with the caveat of relatively limited knowledge of validity. Among the other severity assessment tools, the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale version 3 and the version revised from the Movement Disorders Society were classified as Suggested, whereas the Treatment Response Scale was Listed.

  11. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation.

  12. 3D Simulation Modeling of the Tooth Wear Process

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ning; Hu, Jian; Liu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Severe tooth wear is the most common non-caries dental disease, and it can seriously affect oral health. Studying the tooth wear process is time-consuming and difficult, and technological tools are frequently lacking. This paper presents a novel method of digital simulation modeling that represents a new way to study tooth wear. First, a feature extraction algorithm is used to obtain anatomical feature points of the tooth without attrition. Second, after the alignment of non-attrition areas, the initial homogeneous surface is generated by means of the RBF (Radial Basic Function) implicit surface and then deformed to the final homogeneous by the contraction and bounding algorithm. Finally, the method of bilinear interpolation based on Laplacian coordinates between tooth with attrition and without attrition is used to inversely reconstruct the sequence of changes of the 3D tooth morphology during gradual tooth wear process. This method can also be used to generate a process simulation of nonlinear tooth wear by means of fitting an attrition curve to the statistical data of attrition index in a certain region. The effectiveness and efficiency of the attrition simulation algorithm are verified through experimental simulation. PMID:26241942

  13. Tribological Evaluation of Nanostructured Diamond Coatings and CoCr against Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Michael R.; Catledge, Shane A.; Konovalov, Valeriy; Clem, William C.; Chowdhury, Shafiul A.; Etheridge, Brandon S.; Stanishevsky, Andrei; Lemons, Jack E.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Eberhardt, Alan W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Some loss of joint prostheses has been attributed to osteolytic phenomena leading to loosening and associated with debris from wear of polyethylene articulating against metal alloys. Reduced polyethylene wear has been reported with ceramics serving as an alternative counterface. Methods Nanostructured Diamond (NSD) coatings were deposited onto Ti6A14V by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition, with both hydrogen-rich (H-NSD) and helium-rich (He-NSD) feedgas mixtures. Pin-on-disk wear tests of polyethylene against NSD and CoCr were performed in serum lubrication at body temperature. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine surface morphology, and nanoindentation was used to determine hardness and modulus of the polyethylene pins. Raman spectroscopy, surface roughness, and wettability analyses of NSD coatings were performed. Results Raman spectroscopy confirmed sp2 and sp3 bonded carbon. No significant differences in wear factors were found between polyethylene on H-NSD, He-NSD, and CoCr, despite higher roughness and friction coefficient for the He-NSD and H-NSD coatings, compared to CoCr. Contact angles for the diamond coatings were reduced following the wear tests, indicating that these surfaces became more hydrophilic. Multiple pimples were observed on pins articulated against CoCr, and a single, large protuberance was observed in polyethylene-on-NSD These features were conjectured to be re-consolidated polyethylene particles. Nanoindentation modulus and hardness of the worn polyethylene surfaces were lower for polyethylene-on-diamond than for polyethylene-on-CoCr. Conclusions As a counterface to polyethylene, the NSD coatings produced wear factors comparable to CoCr in the present pin-on-disk tests. Thus, NSD-coated Ti6A14V shows promise for use in joint replacement bearing applications. PMID:17853416

  14. Diamonds: Exploration, mines and marketing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, George H.; Janse, A. J. A. (Bram)

    2009-11-01

    The beauty, value and mystique of exceptional quality diamonds such as the 603 carat Lesotho Promise, recovered from the Letseng Mine in 2006, help to drive a multi-billion dollar diamond exploration, mining and marketing industry that operates in some 45 countries across the globe. Five countries, Botswana, Russia, Canada, South Africa and Angola account for 83% by value and 65% by weight of annual diamond production, which is mainly produced by four major companies, De Beers, Alrosa, Rio Tinto and BHP Billiton (BHPB), which together account for 78% by value and 72% by weight of annual diamond production for 2007. During the last twelve years 16 new diamond mines commenced production and 4 re-opened. In addition, 11 projects are in advanced evaluation and may begin operations within the next five years. Exploration for diamondiferous kimberlites was still energetic up to the last quarter of 2008 with most work carried out in Canada, Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and Botswana. Many kimberlites were discovered but no new economic deposits were outlined as a result of this work, except for the discovery and possible development of the Bunder project by Rio Tinto in India. Exploration methods have benefitted greatly from improved techniques of high resolution geophysical aerial surveying, new research into the geochemistry of indicator minerals and further insights into the formation of diamonds and the relation to tectonic/structural events in the crust and mantle. Recent trends in diamond marketing indicate that prices for rough diamonds and polished goods were still rising up to the last quarter of 2008 and subsequently abruptly sank in line with the worldwide financial crisis. Most analysts predict that prices will rise again in the long term as the gap between supply and demand will widen because no new economic diamond discoveries have been made recently. The disparity between high rough and polished prices and low share prices of publicly

  15. Adhesion and wear behaviour of NCD coatings on Si3N4 by micro-abrasion tests.

    PubMed

    Silva, F G; Neto, M A; Fernandes, A J S; Costa, F M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings offer an excellent alternative for tribological applications, preserving most of the intrinsic mechanical properties of polycrystalline CVD diamond and adding to it an extreme surface smoothness. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramics are reported to guarantee high adhesion levels to CVD microcrystalline diamond coatings, but the NCD adhesion to Si3N4 is not yet well established. Micro-abrasion tests are appropriate for evaluating the abrasive wear resistance of a given surface, but they also provide information on thin film/substrate interfacial resistance, i.e., film adhesion. In this study, a comparison is made between the behaviour of NCD films deposited by hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) and microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (MPCVD) techniques. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic discs were selected as substrates. The NCD depositions by HFCVD and MPCVD were carried out using H2-CH4 and H2-CH4-N2 gas mixtures, respectively. An adequate set of growth parameters was chosen for each CVD technique, resulting in NCD films having a final thickness of 5 microm. A micro-abrasion tribometer was used, with 3 microm diamond grit as the abrasive slurry element. Experiments were carried out at a constant rotational speed (80 r.p.m.) and by varying the applied load in the range of 0.25-0.75 N. The wear rate for MPCVD NCD (3.7 +/- 0.8 x 10(-5) mm3 N(-1) m(-1)) is compatible with those reported for microcrystalline CVD diamond. The HFCVD films displayed poorer adhesion to the Si3N4 ceramic substrates than the MPCVD ones. However, the HFCVD films show better wear resistance as a result of their higher crystallinity according to the UV Raman data, despite evidencing premature adhesion failure.

  16. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Krauss, A. R.; Gruen, D. M.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Molodvan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busman, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-08-24

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors. However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAs) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure nanocrystalline diamond with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. The authors have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making nanocrystalline diamond a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  17. The protective properties of ultra-thin diamond like carbon films for high density magnetic storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Zhang, Chenhui; Luo, Jianbin; Lu, Xinchun

    2009-10-01

    With the increase of magnetic storage density, the thickness of the protective diamond like carbon (DLC) film on the surfaces of head and disk is required as thin as possible. In this paper, the structure, mechanical properties and corrosion and oxidation resistance of ultra-thin DLC films are investigated. The ultra-thin DLC films were deposited by using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The exact thickness of the ultra-thin DLC film was determined by high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Raman analysis indicates that the ultra-thin DLC film presents ta-C structure with high sp 3 fraction. In the wear test, a diamond tip was used to simulate a single-asperity contact with the film surface and the wear marks were produced on the film surface. The wear depths decrease with film thickness increasing. If the film thickness was 1.4 nm or above, the wear depth was much lower than that of Si substrate. This indicates that the ultra-thin DLC film with thickness of 1.4 nm shows excellent wear resistance. Corrosion tests in water and oxidation tests in air were carried out to investigate the diffusion barrier effect of the ultra-thin DLC films. The results show that the DLC film with thickness of 1.4 nm provides adequate coverage on the substrate and has good corrosion and oxidation resistance.

  18. High temperature diamond film deposition on a natural diamond anvil

    SciTech Connect

    McCauley, T.S.; Vohra, Y.K.

    1995-12-31

    We report on the growth and characterization of a 100 {mu}m thick by 350 {mu}m diameter diamond layer on the culet of a type Ia brilliant cut natural diamond anvil by microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD). While our previous work [1] on diamond anvils resulted in homoepitaxial film growth at a rate of approximately 20 {mu}m/hr, the present 100 {mu}m thick diamond layer grew in less than 2 hours. This unprecedented growth rate of {approximately} 50 {mu}m/hr is believed to be the result of the extremely high substrate temperature (1800{degrees}-2100{degrees}C) during deposition. The translucent diamond layer was characterized by micro-Raman, low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman analysis shows the deposit to be of high quality. The PL spectra show numerous features, including prominent emission bands at 575 nm (2.16 eV), 636 nm (1.95 eV), 735 nm (1.68 eV) and 777 run, (1.60 eV).

  19. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices

    PubMed Central

    López-Frías, Francisco J.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction. PMID:24558525

  20. Clinical measurement of tooth wear: Tooth wear indices.

    PubMed

    López-Frías, Francisco J; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Martín-González, Jenifer; Llamas-Carreras, José M; Segura-Egea, Juan J

    2012-02-01

    Attrition, erosion, and abrasion result in alterations to the tooth and manifest as tooth wear. Each classification corresponds to a different process with specific clinical features. Classifications made so far have no accurate prevalence data because the indexes do not necessarily measure a specific etiology, or because the study populations can be diverse in age and characteristics. Tooth wears (attrition, erosion and abrasion) is perceived internationally as a growing problem. However, the interpretation and comparison of clinical and epidemiological studies, it is increasingly difficult because of differences in terminology and the large number of indicators/indices that have been developed for the diagnosis, classification and monitoring of the loss of dental hard tissue. These indices have been designed to identify increasing severity and are usually numerical, none have universal acceptance, complicating the evaluation of the true increase in prevalence reported. This article considers the ideal requirements for an erosion index. A literature review is conducted with the aim of analyzing the evolution of the indices used today and discuss whether they meet the clinical needs and research in dentistry. Key words:Tooth wear, tooth wear indices, attrition, erosion, abrasion, abfraction.

  1. Impact wear of iron rich superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, S. F.; Nowotny, H.; Rice, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    The impact-sliding wear resistance of chill cast and aligned eutectic Fe-base superalloys against M42 and 17-4 PH steel counterface materials is examined. The aligned material tests were run with carbide fibers perpendicular to the counterface contact surface and the characterization focused on fracture processes as observed in the subsurface microstructure of the worn materials. Metallographic analyses were performed on specimens exposed to various numbers of repetitive impact load cycles, and for comparison, two other aligned composites were tested with the same fiber orientation under identical test conditions against hardened M42 tool steel. A strong improvement was found in wear resistance of an aligned eutectic structure as compared to the corresponding randomized chill cast structure. Experiments with the softer 17-4 counterface were characterized by transfer onto the Fe-base superalloy, and the cracks formed were oriented transverse to the relative sliding direction and occurred in a periodic fashion. Observations in subsurface regions of the worn materials indicated crack intergranularity with an occasional transgranular fracture of the M7C3 carbide phase.

  2. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the performance of centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Li, Y. B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, J. P.; Wu, G. X.

    2012-11-01

    In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump. The existence of wear-ring not only has an effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump. Relative to the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some advantages, such as low cost, fast and efficient, and easy to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the performance of centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump was simulated with three variable styles of the wear-rings: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Numerical results agree well with the experimental results. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the performance of centrifugal pump.

  3. Tiny radio is based on diamond effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-02-01

    You could soon be tuning into “Diamond FM”, thanks to a new radio receiver based on atomic-scale defects in diamond, unveiled by physicists at Harvard University in the US and Element Six in the UK.

  4. Diamond radiation detectors I. Detector properties for IIa diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kania, D.R.

    1997-05-16

    The detector properties and carrier dynamics of type IIa diamonds are reasonably well understood. The trends in the electron and hole mobilities have been characterized as a function of temperature, impurity content, electric field and carrier density. The carrier lifetimes are coupled through the nitrogen impurity. This leaves us with typical samples with collection distances of 20 to 50 micrometers. The detailed dynamics of the carriers can be modeled using a rate equation analysis. Much progress has been made in understanding the detector properties of diamond, but continued progress has been limited by the geologic processes used to make the material, for example sample size and no synthesis control. CVD diamond promises to eliminate these restrictions.

  5. Critical length scale controls adhesive wear mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Aghababaei, Ramin; Warner, Derek H.; Molinari, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    The adhesive wear process remains one of the least understood areas of mechanics. While it has long been established that adhesive wear is a direct result of contacting surface asperities, an agreed upon understanding of how contacting asperities lead to wear debris particle has remained elusive. This has restricted adhesive wear prediction to empirical models with limited transferability. Here we show that discrepant observations and predictions of two distinct adhesive wear mechanisms can be reconciled into a unified framework. Using atomistic simulations with model interatomic potentials, we reveal a transition in the asperity wear mechanism when contact junctions fall below a critical length scale. A simple analytic model is formulated to predict the transition in both the simulation results and experiments. This new understanding may help expand use of computer modelling to explore adhesive wear processes and to advance physics-based wear laws without empirical coefficients. PMID:27264270

  6. Precision magnetometry using NV centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Sage, David; Pham, Linh My; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Arai, Keigo; Walsworth, Ronald

    2012-06-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond promises to be an extremely useful tool for precise optical magnetometry. Individual NV centers can function as atomic-scale magnetometers, for high spatial-resolution measurements, with close proximity between the field source and sensor. Improved sensitivities may be achieved by averaging the signal from many NV centers, with a resulting trade-off between sensitivity and spatial resolution. Here, we report the best magnetic field sensitivity that has thus far been achieved using a large ensemble of NV centers. These results take advantage of many recent developments, including a technique to dramatically improve the fluorescence photon collection efficiency, dynamical decoupling of the NV spins from their spin-bath environment, and improved diamond engineering to reduce magnetic impurities and increase the density of NV centers. These ongoing efforts suggest that, with additional improvements, NV magnetometers may achieve comparable sensitivities to the best magnetometers that presently exist, with the added practical benefits associated with being a robust, solid-state, room-temperature device.

  7. Diagnostic Tools for Learning Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Raili

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Organization Diamond Tool was designed for holistic analysis of 10 learning organization elements at the individual and organizational levels. A test in 25 Finnish organizations established validity. Comparison with existing tools showed that differences derive from their different purposes. (Contains 33 references.) (SK)

  8. Ohmic contacts to semiconducting diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidler, James R.; Taylor, M. J.; Zeisse, Carl R.; Hewett, C. A.; Delahoussaye, Paul R.

    1990-10-01

    Work was carried out to improve the electron beam evaporation system in order to achieve better deposited films. The basic system is an ion pumped vacuum chamber, with a three-hearth, single-gun e-beam evaporator. Four improvements were made to the system. The system was thoroughly cleaned and new ion pump elements, an e-gun beam adjust unit, and a more accurate crystal monitor were installed. The system now has a base pressure of 3 X 10(exp -9) Torr, and can easily deposit high-melting-temperature metals such as Ta with an accurately controlled thickness. Improved shadow masks were also fabricated for better alignment and control of corner contacts for electrical transport measurements. Appendices include: A Thermally Activated Solid State Reaction Process for Fabricating Ohmic Contacts to Semiconducting Diamond; Tantalum Ohmic Contacts to Diamond by a Solid State Reaction Process; Metallization of Semiconducting Diamond: Mo, Mo/Au, and Mo/Ni/Au; Specific Contact Resistance Measurements of Ohmic Contracts to Diamond; and Electrical Activation of Boron Implanted into Diamond.

  9. Organophosphonate biofunctionalization of diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Caterino, R; Csiki, R; Wiesinger, M; Sachsenhauser, M; Stutzmann, M; Garrido, J A; Cattani-Scholz, A; Speranza, Giorgio; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K

    2014-08-27

    The modification of the diamond surface with organic molecules is a crucial aspect to be considered for any bioapplication of this material. There is great interest in broadening the range of linker molecules that can be covalently bound to the diamond surface. In the case of protein immobilization, the hydropathicity of the surface has a major influence on the protein conformation and, thus, on the functionality of proteins immobilized at surfaces. For electrochemical applications, particular attention has to be devoted to avoid that the charge transfer between the electrode and the redox center embedded in the protein is hindered by a thick insulating linker layer. This paper reports on the grafting of 6-phosphonohexanoic acid on OH-terminated diamond surfaces, serving as linkers to tether electroactive proteins onto diamond surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the formation of a stable layer on the surface. The charge transfer between electroactive molecules and the substrate is studied by electrochemical characterization of the redox activity of aminomethylferrocene and cytochrome c covalently bound to the substrate through this linker. Our work demonstrates that OH-terminated diamond functionalized with 6-phosphonohexanoic acid is a suitable platform to interface redox-proteins, which are fundamental building blocks for many bioelectronics applications.

  10. Should School Nurses Wear Uniforms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper questions whether school nurses should wear uniforms (specifically, white uniforms). It concludes that white uniforms are often associated with the treatment of ill people, and since many people have a fear reaction to them, they are not necessary and are even undesirable. Since school nurses are school staff members, they should…

  11. Rigid gas permeable extended wear.

    PubMed

    Maehara, J R; Kastl, P R

    1994-04-01

    We have reviewed the pertinent literature on rigid gas permeable (RGP) extended wear contact lenses, and we discuss the benefits and adverse reactions of this contact lens modality, drawing conclusions from reviewed studies. We suggest parameters for success with these lenses and guidelines for the prevention of adverse reactions.

  12. Use of Diamond as an Optical Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-27

    New polishing methods hpve yielded smooth surfaces in reasonable polishing times. Recent research hclds promise for large optics made from single... forced to the surface , precipitating on the surface as a diamond layer. A halogen-assisted CVD method has recently been discovered for producing...diamond [24]; however, this research is in an early stage and has not yet resulted in good quality diamond films. Optical Properties of CVD Diamond. Many

  13. Ultimate Atomic Bling: Nanotechnology of Diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, Jeremy

    2010-05-25

    Diamonds exist in all sizes, from the Hope Diamond to minuscule crystals only a few atoms across. The smallest of these diamonds are created naturally by the same processes that make petroleum. Recently, researchers discovered that these 'diamondoids' are formed in many different structural shapes, and that these shapes can be used like LEGO blocks for nanotechnology. This talk will discuss the discovery of these nano-size diamonds and highlight current SLAC/Stanford research into their applications in electronics and medicine.

  14. Diamond and diamond-like films for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of transparency templates which describe the goals of the Office of Transportation Materials (OTM) Tribology Program. The positions of personnel on the OTM are listed. The role and mission of the OTM is reviewed. The purpose of the Tribology Program is stated to be `to obtain industry input on program(s) in tribology/advanced lubricants areas of interest`. The objective addressed here is to identify opportunities for cost effective application of diamond and diamond-like carbon in transportation systems.

  15. Chemical vapor deposition of highly adherent diamond coatings onto co-cemented tungsten carbides irradiated by high power diode laser.

    PubMed

    Barletta, M; Rubino, G; Valle, R; Polini, R

    2012-02-01

    The present investigation deals with the definition of a new eco-friendly alternative to pretreat Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates before diamond deposition by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD). In particular, WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates were submitted to a thermal treatment by a continuous wave-high power diode laser to reduce surface Co concentration and promote the reconstruction of the WC grains. Laser pretreatments were performed both in N(2) and Ar atmosphere to prevent substrate oxidation. Diamond coatings were deposited onto the laser pretreated substrates by HFCVD. For comparative purpose, diamond coatings were also deposited on WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates chemically etched by the well-known two-step pretreatment employing Murakami's reagent and Caro's acid. Surface morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of the WC-5.8 wt %Co substrates after the different pretreatments and the deposition of diamond coatings were assessed by surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses. Wear performance of the diamond coatings was checked by dry sliding linear reciprocating tribological tests. The worn volume of the diamond coatings deposited on the laser pretreated substrates was always found lower than the one measured on the chemically etched substrates, with the N(2) atmosphere being particularly promising.

  16. X-ray topographic study of a diamond from Udachnaya: Implications for the genetic nature of inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrosì, Giovanna; Nestola, Fabrizio; Tempesta, Gioacchino; Bruno, Marco; Scandale, Eugenio; Harris, Jeff

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, several studies have focused on the growth conditions of the diamonds through the analysis of the mineral inclusions trapped in them. In these studies, it is crucial to distinguish between protogenetic, syngenetic and epigenetic inclusions. X-ray topography (XRDT) can be a helpful tool to verify, in a non-destructive way, the genetic nature of inclusions in diamond. With this aim, a diamond from the Udachnaya kimberlite, Siberia, was investigated. The diamond, previously studied by Nestola et al. (2011), has anomalous birefringence and the two largest olivines have typical "diamond-imposed" shapes. The study of the topographic images shows that the diamond exhibits significant deformation fields related to post growth plastic deformation. The absence of dislocations starting from the olivine inclusions, and the dark contrasts around them represent the main results obtained by XRDT, contributing to the elucidation of the relationships between the diamond and the olivines at the micron-meter scale. The dark halo surrounding the inclusions was likely caused by the effect of different thermo-elastic properties between the diamond and the inclusions. The absence of dislocations indicates that the diamond-imposed morphology did not produce the volume distortion commonly associated with the entrapment of the full-grown inclusions and, thus, only based on such evidence, a syngenetic origin could be proposed. In addition, stepped figures optically observed at the interface between diamond and one of the olivines suggest processes of selective partial dissolution that would contribute to a change in the final morphology of inclusions. These results show that a diamond morphology may be imposed to a full-grown (protogenetic) olivine during their encapsulation, suggesting that the bulk of the inclusion is protogenetic, whereas its more external regions, close to the diamond-inclusion interface, could be syngenetic.

  17. Wear particle analysis using the ferrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The use of the Ferrograph in analyzing wear particles from a variety of different sources is reported. Examples of wear particles from gas turbine engines, bearing tests, friction and wear tests, hydraulic systems, and human joints are illustrated. In addition, the separation of bacteria and human cells is described.

  18. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  19. Diamond Drilling Specification Manual and Course Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This publication presents the standards required of a person practicing diamond drilling in western Canada and provides an outline for teaching the skills and knowledge. It is divided into two parts. The Diamond Drilling Specification Manual establishes the levels of skill and knowledge required in the four certified levels of diamond drilling.…

  20. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  1. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  2. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  3. Ultratough single crystal boron-doped diamond

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Mao, Ho-Kwang [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Yan, Chih-Shiue [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC ; Liang, Qi [Carnegie Inst. for Science, Washington, DC

    2015-05-05

    The invention relates to a single crystal boron doped CVD diamond that has a toughness of at least about 22 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing single crystal boron doped CVD diamond. The growth rate of the diamond can be from about 20-100 .mu.m/h.

  4. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  5. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  6. Annealing Behaviour of Hydrogenated and Oxidized Nanocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, J. A.; Neumann, A.; Uhlig, J.; Finsterbusch, M.; Eremtchenko, M.; Ahmed, S. I.-U.; Garrido, J. A.; Stutzmann, M.

    2007-03-01

    Hydrogenated and oxidized nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) is a very promising material for future electronic, especially bioelectronic applications. In the past it has been shown that hydrogen, oxygen, and gases from the ambient environment as well as water can be responsible for causing drastic changes in surface conductivity and wettability (hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity), friction, wear, etc. In this contribution we have investigated differently prepared NCDs as function of the annealing temperature under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (UHV) with various electron spectroscopies like UPS and XPS as well as High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS). We were able to identify the thermal stability of a number of different species at the interface, which are related to different characteristics of C-H, O-H, C-O, and C-C bonding. Finally, a carbonization of the interface appeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  7. Underground at Black Diamond Mines

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.T.

    1989-10-01

    Although California is noted for its mining history and annually leads the nation in total monetary value of minerals produced, there a few opportunities for the public to tour underground mines. One reason is that nearly all mining in the state today is done above ground in open pits. Another reason is that active underground mines are not commonly favorable to public tours. There is one place, Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve, where the public can safely tour a formerly active underground mine. Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve is a 3,600-acre parkland about 5 miles southwest of Antioch in Contra Costa County. The Preserve was established in the early 1970s and is administered by the East Bay Regional Park District. Black Diamond Mines Preserve is noteworthy for its mining history as well as its natural history, both of which are briefly described here.

  8. Diamond drumhead crystals (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziej, Tomasz; Vodnala, Preeti; Terentyev, Sergey A.; Blank, Vladimir D.; Shvyd'ko, Yuri V.

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-thin (< 100 um) diamond single crystals are essential for the realization of numerous next generation x-ray optical devices. Fabrication and handling of such ultra-thin crystal components without introducing damage and strain is a challenge. Drumhead crystals, monolithic crystal structures comprised of a thin membrane furnished with a surrounding solid collar would be a solution for the proper handling ensuring mechanically stable and strain-free mount of the membranes with efficient thermal transport. However, diamond being one of the hardest and chemically inert materials poses insurmountable difficulties in the fabrication. Here we report on a successful manufacturing of the diamond drumhead crystals using picosecond laser milling. Subsequent temperature treatment appears to be crucial for the membranes to become defect-free and unstrained, as revealed by x-ray double-crystal topography on an example of drumhead crystals with 1-mm in diameter and 28 um to 47 um-thick membranes in the (100) orientation.

  9. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  10. A multilayer innovative solution to improve the adhesion of nanocrystalline diamond coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulon-Quintin, A.; Faure, C.; Teulé-Gay, L.; Manaud, J. P.

    2015-03-01

    Nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) films grown under negative biased substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) are widely used as surface overlay coating onto cermet WC-Co cutting tools to get better performances. To improve the diamond adhesion to the cermet substrate, suitable multi-layer systems have been added. They are composed of a cobalt diffusion barrier close to the substrate (single and sequenced nitrides layers) coated with a nucleation extra layer to improve the nucleus density of diamond during CVD processing. For all systems, before and after diamond deposition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been performed for a better understanding of the diffusion phenomena occurring at the interfaces and to evaluate the presence of graphitic species at the interface with the diamond. Innovative multilayer system dedicated to the regulation of cobalt diffusion coated with a bilayer system optimized for the carbon diffusion control, is shown as an efficient solution to significantly reduce the graphite layer formation at the interface with the diamond down to 10 nm thick and to increase the adhesion of NCD diamond layer as scratch-tests confirm.

  11. Diamonds on Diamond: structural studies at extreme conditions on the Diamond Light Source.

    PubMed

    McMahon, M I

    2015-03-06

    Extreme conditions (EC) research investigates how the structures and physical and chemical properties of materials change when subjected to extremes of pressure and temperature. Pressures in excess of one million times atmospheric pressure can be achieved using a diamond anvil cell, and, in combination with high-energy, micro-focused radiation from a third-generation synchrotron such as Diamond, detailed structural information can be obtained using either powder or single-crystal diffraction techniques. Here, I summarize some of the research drivers behind international EC research, and then briefly describe the techniques by which high-quality diffraction data are obtained. I then highlight the breadth of EC research possible on Diamond by summarizing four examples from work conducted on the I15 and I19 beamlines, including a study which resulted in the first research paper from Diamond. Finally, I look to the future, and speculate as to the type of EC research might be conducted at Diamond over the next 10 years.

  12. Prospects of bipolar diamond devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksov, A.; Denisenko, A.; Kohn, E.

    2000-02-01

    The prospects of diamond bipolar devices are analysed theoretically and experimentally in respect to the problem of deep doping, especially the deep donor in diamond. For this purpose a set of p- n- p bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is fabricated on p-type diamond substrates by epitaxial growth using boron ( EA=0.4 eV) and nitrogen ( ED=1.7 eV) as the p- and n-type dopants respectively. It is shown that at the boron/nitrogen junction a p- n junction is formed. The built-in potential of the junction is determined by the ionised boron/nitrogen impurities. The specific features of the fabricated devices are the high resistivity of the nitrogen doped base (10 GΩ·cm at 20°C) and a significant leakage current of the reverse biased p- n junctions. These factors limit the transistor action to d.c.-operation in the nA-current range and to temperatures below 200°C where leakage starts to dominate. The values of the static current gain IC/ IB are measured in the common base mode 200 and in the common emitter mode 1.1. The theoretical section of the paper deals with the calculation of the static current gain of diamond pnp transistor structures in dependence of the donor energy level, temperature and frequency. Both the theoretical and the experimental results indicate that diamond bipolar transistors with a nitrogen doped n-type base can exhibit a current gain β of up to 30,000 in the d.c.-regime provided the leakage of the p- n junctions is sufficiently low. High-gain diamond transistors operating in GHz-frequency can be expected as soon as n-doping by shallow donor like phosphorous ( ED<0.5 eV) becomes available.

  13. Using Raman Spectroscopy to Study Diamond Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Zwicker, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    Diamond thin films (DTF), due to their extreme hardness, low electrical conductivity and chemical inertness, have various applications in semiconductor and machining industry. DTF strengthen machining and cutting tools that demand more precision and resist chemical corrosions as electrodes. The DTF created in this investigation were produced using a hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition process in an electron cyclotron resonance sputter source. The samples formed can be amorphous carbon, graphite, or diamond. A method to test whether the sputter source successfully created diamond is Raman spectroscopy, a non-invasive technique that utilizes photo excitation and Raman scattering of monochromatic light. A sharp peak at 1332 inverse cm indicates the signature Raman shift of the sp3 C-C bond of pure diamond in these spectra. Graphite and amorphous carbon have their signature peaks near 1580 inverse cm and 1343 inverse cm. The technique is used to study wafer quality as a function of plasma parameters. Results will ultimately be benchmarked against Raman spectroscopy system at The College of New Jersey, and more samples will be produced to ensure the uniformity of the sputter source.

  14. Large piezoresistive effect in surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, S. D. Haenen, K.; Drijkoningen, S.

    2014-09-08

    Surface conductivity in hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond is an intriguing phenomenon for fundamental reasons as well as for application driven research. Surface conductivity is also observed in hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond although the electronic transport mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, the piezoresistive properties of intrinsic surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond are investigated. A gauge factor of 35 is calculated from bulging a diamond membrane of 350 nm thick, with a diameter of 656 μm and a sheet resistance of 1.45 MΩ/sq. The large piezoresistive effect is reasoned to originate directly from strain-induced changes in the resistivity of the grain boundaries. Additionally, we ascribe a small time-dependent fraction of the piezoresistive effect to charge trapping of charge carriers at grain boundaries. In conclusion, time-dependent piezoresistive effect measurements act as a tool for deeper understanding the complex electronic transport mechanisms induced by grain boundaries in a polycrystalline material or nanocomposite.

  15. Laser-based gluing of diamond-tipped saw blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennigs, Christian; Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Kaierle, Stefan; Hustedt, Michael; Brand, Helmut; Wloka, Richard; Zobel, Frank; Dültgen, Peter

    2016-03-01

    To process natural stone such as marble or granite, saw blades equipped with wear-resistant diamond grinding segments are used, typically joined to the blade by brazing. In case of damage or wear, they must be exchanged. Due to the large energy input during thermal loosening and subsequent brazing, the repair causes extended heat-affected zones with serious microstructure changes, resulting in shape distortions and disadvantageous stress distributions. Consequently, axial run-out deviations and cutting losses increase. In this work, a new near-infrared laser-based process chain is presented to overcome the deficits of conventional brazing-based repair of diamond-tipped steel saw blades. Thus, additional tensioning and straightening steps can be avoided. The process chain starts with thermal debonding of the worn grinding segments, using a continuous-wave laser to heat the segments gently and to exceed the adhesive's decomposition temperature. Afterwards, short-pulsed laser radiation removes remaining adhesive from the blade in order to achieve clean joining surfaces. The third step is roughening and activation of the joining surfaces, again using short-pulsed laser radiation. Finally, the grinding segments are glued onto the blade with a defined adhesive layer, using continuous-wave laser radiation. Here, the adhesive is heated to its curing temperature by irradiating the respective grinding segment, ensuring minimal thermal influence on the blade. For demonstration, a prototype unit was constructed to perform the different steps of the process chain on-site at the saw-blade user's facilities. This unit was used to re-equip a saw blade with a complete set of grinding segments. This saw blade was used successfully to cut different materials, amongst others granite.

  16. Corrosive Wear in Wet Ore Grinding Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Denny A.

    1985-06-01

    Wear processes in ball and rod mills have recently received increased attention in order to increase efficiency and conserve grinding media. Direct removal of metal from the grinding media surface by abrasive wear occurs in both dry and wet grinding. Additional corrosive wear is apparent during wet grinding, in which less resistant corrosion product films are abraded away. Inhibitors and higher pH solutions, in which corrosion product films are more tenacious, improve wear resistance during wet grinding. Softer surfaces are less resistant to corrosive wear, suggesting that film formation and subsequent film abrasion on newly furrowed surfaces must be a factor.

  17. Crystallographic orientations of olivine inclusions in diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, S.; Nestola, F.; Angel, R. J.; Nimis, P.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report for the first time the crystallographic orientations of olivine inclusions trapped in diamonds from the Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and analyze them together with all available data in the literature. The overall data set indicates no preferred orientation of the olivine inclusions with respect to their diamond hosts. However, diamonds containing multiple olivine inclusions sometimes show clusters of olivines with the same orientation in the same diamond host. We conclude that such clusters can only be interpreted as the remnants of single olivine crystals pre-dating the growth of the host diamonds.

  18. Diamond Ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Mirkarimi, P B; Tringe, J W; Baker, S L; Wang, Y M; Kucheyev, S O; Teslich, N E; Wu, K J; Hamza, A V; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Koidl, P; Bruehne, K; Fecht, H

    2005-06-21

    Diamond has a unique combination of physical properties for the inertial confinement fusion ablator application, such as appropriate optical properties, high atomic density, high yield strength, and high thermal conductivity. Here, we present a feasible concept to fabricate diamond ablator shells. The fabrication of diamond capsules is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on silicon mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removing of the silicon mandrel by an etch process. We also discuss the pros and cons of coarse-grained optical quality and nanocrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond films for the ablator application.

  19. Electron Microscopy of Natural and Epitaxial Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posthill, J. B.; George, T.; Malta, D. P.; Humphreys, T. P.; Rudder, R. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Thomas, R. E.; Markunas, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiconducting diamond films have the potential for use as a material in which to build active electronic devices capable of operating at high temperatures or in high radiation environments. Ultimately, it is preferable to use low-defect-density single crystal diamond for device fabrication. We have previously investigated polycrystalline diamond films with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and homoepitaxial films with SEM-based techniques. This contribution describes some of our most recent observations of the microstructure of natural diamond single crystals and homoepitaxial diamond thin films using TEM.

  20. Thermal Conductivity Of Natural Type IIa Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandersande, Jan; Vining, Cronin; Zoltan, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Report describes application of flash diffusivity method to measure thermal conductivity of 8.04 x 8.84 x 2.35-mm specimen of natural, white, type-IIa diamond at temperatures between 500 and 1,250 K. Provides baseline for comparison to isotopically pure (12C) diamond. Results used as reference against which diamond films produced by chemical-vapor deposition at low pressures can be compared. High thermal conductivity of diamond exploited for wide variety of applications, and present results also used to estimate heat-conduction performances of diamond films in high-temperature applications.

  1. Wear mechanisms in a nonrotating wire rope

    SciTech Connect

    Schrems, K.K.; Dogan, C.P.; Hawk, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    A nonrotating wire rope used in main hoist operations is being examined by the US Bureau of Mines to determine operative wear mechanisms. Typically, bending and loading the ropes during service cause small, localized movements at interwire contacts, leading to material loss through wear.The cumulative effect of both material loss by wear and wire breakage by fatigue failure accelerates rope retirement. If the macroscopic mechanics of wire rope failure are to be understood, microscopic deformation and degradation processes must be identified and quantified. As a first step in this study, interwire wear and deformation were studied using a combination of scanning electron microscopy and hardness measurements. Both fretting and abrasive wear were identified as wear mechanisms. Preferential sites for fretting and abrasive wear were identified and are discussed regarding rope construction and geometry and the tribo-system.

  2. Wear testing of crosslinked polyethylene: wear rate variability and microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J-M; Vecherya, A; Guenther, L E; Koval, S F; Petrak, M J; Bohm, E R; Wyss, U P

    2014-06-01

    The wear performance of two types of crosslinked polyethylene (Marathon™ and XLK™, DePuy Synthes Inc., Warsaw, IN) was evaluated in a pin-on-disc wear tester, a hip wear simulator, and a knee wear simulator. Sodium azide was used as the microbial inhibitor in the calf serum-based lubricant. In the pin-on-disc wear tester, the Marathon wear rate of 5.33±0.54mm(3)/Mc was significantly lower (p=0.002) than the wear rate of 6.43±0.60mm(3)/Mc for XLK. Inversely, the Marathon wear rate of 15.07±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the hip wear simulator was 2.2-times greater than the XLK wear rate of 6.71±1.03mm(3)/Mc from the knee wear simulator. Differences in implant design, conformity, GUR type, and kinematic test conditions were suggested to account for the difference between the wear rates generated in the different types of wear testing apparati. In all wear tests, sodium azide was ineffective at inhibiting microbial growth in the lubricant. Eight different organisms were identified in the lubricant samples from the wear tests, which suggested the necessity of using an alternative, more effective microbial inhibitor. Careful sample preparation and thorough cleaning has shown to improve the consistency of the wear results. The wear rates generated in the hip and knee wear simulators closely reflected the wear behaviour of Marathon and XLK reported in published data that were tested under similar conditions.

  3. Microplasma device architectures with various diamond nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Jothiramalingam Sankaran, Kamatchi; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I.-Nan

    2017-02-01

    Diamond nanostructures (DNSs) were fabricated from three different morphological diamonds, microcrystalline diamond (MCD), nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, using a reactive ion etching method. The plasma illumination (PI) behavior of microplasma devices using the DNSs and the diamond films as cathode were investigated. The Paschen curve approach revealed that the secondary electron emission coefficient (γ value) of diamond materials is similar irrespective of the microstructure (MCD, NCD, and UNCD) and geometry of the materials (DNSs and diamond films). The diamond materials show markedly larger γ-coefficient than conventional metallic cathode materials such as Mo that resulted in markedly better PI behavior for the corresponding microplasma devices. Moreover, the PI behavior, i.e. the voltage dependence of plasma current density (J pl‑V), plasma density (n e‑V), and the robustness of the devices, varied markedly with the microstructure and geometry of the cathode materials that was closely correlated to the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the cathode materials. The UNCD nanopillars, possessing good EFE properties, resulted in superior PI behavior, whereas the MCD diamond films with insufficient EFE properties led to inferior PI behavior. Consequently, enhancement of plasma characteristics is the collective effects of EFE behavior and secondary electron emission characteristics of diamond-based cathode materials.

  4. Low wear partially fluorinated polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Hady, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tribological studies were conducted on five different polyimide solid bodies formulated from the diamine 2,2-bis 4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl hexafluoropropane (4-BDAF) and the dianhydrides pyromellitic acid (PMDS) and benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid (BTDA). The following polyimides were evaluated 4-BDAF/PMDA, 4-BDAF/BTDA, 4-BDAF/80 mole percent PMDA, 20 mole percent BTDA, 4-BDAF/60 mole percent BTDA. Friction coefficients, polyimide wear rates, polyimide surface morphology and transfer films were evaluated at sliding speeds of 0.31 to 11.6 m/s and at temperatures of 25 C to 300 C. The results indicate that the tribological properties are highly dependent on the composition of the polyimide and on the experimental conditions. Two polyimides were found which produced very low wear rates but very high friction coefficients (greater than 0.85) under ambient conditions. They offer considerable potential for high traction types of application such as brakes.

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly wear sleeve

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwell, D.J.; Kmonk, S.

    1983-03-08

    An improved control rod guide tube for use in a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. The guide tube extends the complete length of the fuel assembly and has its upper end fastened in a cylindrical housing by swaging the guide tube material into grooves formed in the housing walls. To eliminate wear on the guide tube inner walls caused by hydraulic induced vibratory forces on a control rod adapted to move therein, a thin-walled chrome plated sleeve is threaded into the top end of the guide thimble and extends downwardly a distance sufficient to be engaged by the control rod during reactor operation. The sleeve serves as a highly resistant wear surface between the control rod and walls on the guide tube in the fuel assembly.

  6. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  7. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in the tribological uses of R.F.-sputtered and ion-plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear-resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides). The sputtering and ion-plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed are evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties of each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses and thickness and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and d.c. biasing. The ion-plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  8. In vitro studies on the effect of particle size on macrophage responses to nanodiamond wear debris

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Vinoy; Halloran, Brian A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured diamond coatings improve the smoothness and wear characteristics of the metallic component of total hip replacements and increase the longevity of these implants, but the effect of nanodiamond wear debris on macrophages needs to be determined to estimate the long-term inflammatory effects of wear debris. The objective was to investigate the effect of the size of synthetic nanodiamond particles on macrophage proliferation (BrdU incorporation), apoptosis (Annexin-V flow cytometry), metabolic activity (WST-1 assay) and inflammatory cytokine production (qPCR). RAW 264.7 macrophages were exposed to varying sizes (6, 60, 100, 250 and 500 nm) and concentrations (0, 10, 50, 100 and 200 μg ml−1) of synthetic nanodiamonds. We observed that cell proliferation but not metabolic activity was decreased with nanoparticle sizes of 6–100 nm at lower concentrations (50 μg ml−1), and both cell proliferation and metabolic activity were significantly reduced with nanodiamond concentrations of 200 μg ml−1. Flow cytometry indicated a significant reduction in cell viability due to necrosis irrespective of particle size. Nanodiamond exposure significantly reduced gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, chemokine Ccl2 and platelet-derived growth factor compared to serum-only controls or titanium oxide (anatase 8 nm) nanoparticles, with variable effects on chemokine Cxcl2 and vascular endothelial growth factor. In general, our study demonstrates a size and concentration dependence of macrophage responses in vitro to nanodiamond particles as possible wear debris from diamond-coated orthopedic joint implants. PMID:22342422

  9. Influence of WC and Co Contents in Cutting of Wear and Impact Resistant Cemented Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Takeshi; Heo, Sung Jung; Fujiwara, Junsuke; Hanasaki, Shinsaku

    To investigate the influence of the WC and Co contents, the cutting of five kinds of cemented carbides was carried out with the PCD tool. Moreover, one of them was the cemented carbides whose binder was Ni, and the influence of the binder was also found out. The tool wear width and the cutting forces were measured, and the worn flank was observed. Summary of results are shown as follows. (1) The tool wear didn’t always increased with increase of the Co content. (2) Not only the WC content but also the WC particle diameter influenced the tool life. (3) The adhesion could be found out in cutting every cemented carbides regardless of the content and composition. (4) The thrust forces were concerned with the flank wear.

  10. Adhesive bonding and brazing of nanocrystalline diamond foil onto different substrate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodes, Matthias A.; Sailer, Stefan; Rosiwal, Stefan M.; Singer, Robert F.

    2013-10-01

    Diamond coatings are used in heavily stressed industrial applications to reduce friction and wear. Hot-filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) is the favourable coating method, as it allows a coating of large surface areas with high homogeneity. Due to the high temperatures occurring in this CVD-process, the selection of substrate materials is limited. With the desire to coat light materials, steels and polymers a new approach has been developed. First, by using temperature-stable templates in the HFCVD and stripping off the diamond layer afterwards, a flexible, up to 150 μm thick and free standing nanocrystalline diamond foil (NCDF) can be produced. Afterwards, these NCDF can be applied on technical components through bonding and brazing, allowing any material as substrate. This two-step process offers the possibility to join a diamond layer on any desired surface. With a modified scratch test and Rockwell indentation testing the adhesion strength of NCDF on aluminium and steel is analysed. The results show that sufficient adhesion strength is reached both on steel and aluminium. The thermal stress in the substrates is very low and if failure occurs, cracks grow undercritically. Adhesion strength is even higher for the brazed samples, but here crack growth is critical, delaminating the diamond layer to some extent. In comparison to a sample directly coated with diamond, using a high-temperature CVD interlayer, the brazed as well as the adhesively bonded samples show very good performance, proving their competitiveness. A high support of the bonding layer could be identified as crucial, though in some cases a lower stiffness of the latter might be acceptable considering the possibility to completely avoid thermal stresses which occur during joining at higher temperatures.

  11. Science and technology of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) thin films for multifunctional devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Auciello, O.; Gruen, D. M.; Krauss, A. R.; Jayatissa, A.; Sumant, A.; Tucek, J.; Mancini, D.; Moldovan, N.; Erdemir, A.; Ersoy, D.; Gardos, M. N.; Busmann, H. G.; Meyer, E. M.

    2000-11-15

    MEMS devices are currently fabricated primarily in silicon because of the available surface machining technology. However, Si has poor mechanical and tribological properties, and practical MEMS devices are currently limited primarily to applications involving only bending and flexural motion, such as cantilever accelerometers and vibration sensors, However, because of the poor flexural strength and fracture toughness of Si, and the tendency of Si to adhere to hydrophyllic surfaces, even these simple devices have limited dynamic range. Future MEMS applications that involve significant rolling or sliding contact will require the use of new materials with significantly improved mechanical and tribological properties, and the ability to perform well in harsh environments. Diamond is a superhard material of high mechanical strength, exceptional chemical inertness, and outstanding thermal stability. The brittle fracture strength is 23 times that of Si, and the projected wear life of diamond MEMS moving mechanical assemblies (MEMS-MMAS) is 10,000 times greater than that of Si MMAs. However, as the hardest known material, diamond is notoriously difficult to fabricate. Conventional CVD thin film deposition methods offer an approach to the fabrication of ultra-small diamond structures, but the films have large grain size, high internal stress, poor intergranular adhesion, and very rough surfaces, and are consequently ill-suited for MEMS-MMA applications. A thin film deposition process has been developed that produces phase-pure ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) with morphological and mechanical properties that are ideally suited for MEMS applications in general, and MMA use in particular. We have developed lithographic techniques for the fabrication of diamond microstructure including cantilevers and multi-level devices, acting as precursors to micro-bearings and gears, making UNCD a promising material for the development of high performance MEMS devices.

  12. Hydraulic System Wear Debris Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-03

    drawn. Each one-=L sample was drawn with a clean plastic pipette of one-mL capacity. The samples were placed in clean Ferrogram preparation bottles ...and from cavities in a block which held linear seals into sampling bottles . Several photographs of this debris , which was deposited on Ferro- grams...silicon in the glass overshadowed the elements of the wear debris . To overcome this difficulty, the Ferrogram should be pre- pared on a carbon-filled

  13. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  14. Controlled tip wear on high roughness surfaces yields gradual broadening and rounding of cantilever tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorselen, Daan; Kooreman, Ernst S.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2016-11-01

    Tip size in atomic force microscopy (AFM) has a major impact on the resolution of images and on the results of nanoindentation experiments. Tip wear is therefore a key limitation in the application of AFM. Here we show, however, how wear can be turned into an advantage as it allows for directed tip shaping. We studied tip wear on high roughness polycrystalline titanium and diamond surfaces and show that tip wear on these surfaces leads to an increased tip size with a rounded shape of the apex. Next, we fitted single peaks from AFM images in order to track the changes in tip radius over time. This method is in excellent agreement with the conventional blind tip reconstruction method with the additional advantage that we could use it to demonstrate that the increase in tip size is gradual. Moreover, with our approach we can shape and control the tip size, while retaining identical chemical and cantilever properties. This significantly expands the reproducibility of AFM force spectroscopy data and is therefore expected to find a wide applicability.

  15. Interpretation of friction and wear in DLC film: role of surface chemistry and test environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polaki, S. R.; Kumar, N.; Madapu, K.; Ganesan, K.; Krishna, N. G.; Srivastava, S. K.; Abhaya, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of the large amount of tribological work carried out to explain the friction and wear mechanism in diamond-like carbon (DLC) films, some of the core issues relating to the evolution of reactive species across sliding interfaces and their role on the friction and wear mechanism remain unclear. The phase composition, film density and hydrogen content present in a DLC film can be tailored by substrate biasing during film deposition to achieve a nearly vanishing friction coefficient. Furthermore, nitrogen doping in DLC films significantly improves wear resistance, and sliding occurs in a nearly wearless regime. Undoped and nitrogen-doped DLC films exhibit a nearly frictionless value with ultra-low wear behavior when tests are performed in argon, nitrogen and methane atmospheres. The antifriction and antiwear properties of the DLC films were improved with the reduction of adsorbed oxygen impurities on the film surface. This behavior was understood by correlating the oxygen impurities present at the surface/subsurface region of the DLC film while using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and depth-resolved Auger electron spectroscopy.

  16. Controlled tip wear on high roughness surfaces yields gradual broadening and rounding of cantilever tips

    PubMed Central

    Vorselen, Daan; Kooreman, Ernst S.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.

    2016-01-01

    Tip size in atomic force microscopy (AFM) has a major impact on the resolution of images and on the results of nanoindentation experiments. Tip wear is therefore a key limitation in the application of AFM. Here we show, however, how wear can be turned into an advantage as it allows for directed tip shaping. We studied tip wear on high roughness polycrystalline titanium and diamond surfaces and show that tip wear on these surfaces leads to an increased tip size with a rounded shape of the apex. Next, we fitted single peaks from AFM images in order to track the changes in tip radius over time. This method is in excellent agreement with the conventional blind tip reconstruction method with the additional advantage that we could use it to demonstrate that the increase in tip size is gradual. Moreover, with our approach we can shape and control the tip size, while retaining identical chemical and cantilever properties. This significantly expands the reproducibility of AFM force spectroscopy data and is therefore expected to find a wide applicability. PMID:27833143

  17. Ultra-precision diamond milling of aspheric microlens array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Chien-Yao; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2013-06-01

    The applications of AMLA (aspheric micro lens array) have been frequently required in opto-electro industries, such as optical communication, contact image sensor (CIS) module of scanner, wafer level optics, etc. In addition to the typical requirements of aspheric lens, for instance form accuracy and surface roughness, the pitch error of each micro lens has been highly required. Three ultra-precision freeform machining methods have been widely applied for the manufacturing of AMLA, namely fast tool servo, slow tool servo and diamond milling. UPDM (Ultra-precision diamond milling) have the advantage with no tool interference problem in comparison with tool servo machining techniques. In this paper, the tool setting error compensation method and the tool path of UPDM has been developed for the fabrication of a 5 by 5 AMLA model. The form accuracy and surface roughness of each lenses of the AMLA was less than 0.2μm and 5nm, respectively. And the pitch error of each micro lens was less than 2μm in 25 micro lenses.

  18. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  19. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon coatings used for reduction of pole tip recession in magnetic tape heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, William W.; Bhushan, Bharat; Lakshmikumaran, Anand V.

    2000-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited using a commercial direct ion beam deposition technique on thin-film Al2O3-TiC inductive write heads. The coating thicknesses used were 5, 10, and 20 nm. Accelerated wear tests were conducted with metal particle tapes in a linear tape drive. Atomic force microscopy was used to image the thin-film regions to measure pole tip recession (PTR), relative wear of the pole tip with respect to the air bearing surface. It is found that the coating wears off of the head substrate to a significant extent in the first 1000 km of sliding distance. The coating is worn off the substrate long before it wears off of the thin-film region. The existence of the coating on the thin-film region provides close enough wear characteristics between the substrate and thin film that the two wear at similar rates. This results in little growth in pole tip recession. Early in the wear test, the coated substrate wears at a slightly higher rate than the DLC coated thin-film region due to the difference in tape contact pressure between the two materials; decreasing PTR is the result. As the coating on the substrate wears significantly, PTR begins to increase with sliding distance. Failure does not actually occur until the coating has worn off of the thin-film region. Near failure, the coating delaminates locally. Results indicate that coatings of 20 nm thickness may provide protection against PTR in future tape drives.

  20. Diamond Wire Saw for Precision Machining of Laser Target Components

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, M J; Bennett, D W

    2005-08-08

    The fabrication of precision laser targets requires a wide variety of specialized mesoscale manufacturing techniques. The diamond wire saw developed in this study provides the capability to precisely section meso-scale workpieces mounted on the assembly stations used by the Target Fabrication Group. This new capability greatly simplifies the fabrication of many types of targets and reduces the time and cost required to build the targets. A variety of materials are used to fabricate targets, including metals, plastics with custom designed chemical formulas, and aerogels of various densities. The materials are usually provided in the form of small pieces or cast rods that must be machined to the required shape. Many of these materials, such as metals and some plastics, can be trimmed using a parting tool on a diamond turning machine. However, other materials, such as aerogels and brittle materials, cannot be adequately cut with a parting tool. In addition, the geometry of the parts often requires that the workpieces be held in a special assembly station, which excludes the use of a parting tool. In the past, these materials were sectioned using a small, handheld coping saw that used a diamond-impregnated wire as a blade. This miniature coping saw was effective, but it required several hours to cut through certain materials. Furthermore, the saw was guided by hand and often caused significant damage to fragile aerogels. To solve these problems, the diamond wire saw shown in Figure 1 was developed. The diamond wire saw is designed to machine through materials that are mounted in the Target Fabrication Group's benchtop assembly stations. These assembly stations are the primary means of aligning and assembling target components, and there is often a need to machine materials while they are mounted in the assembly stations. Unfortunately, commercially available saws are designed for very different applications and are far too large to be used with the assembly stations