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Sample records for diana lucia cristancho

  1. St. Lucia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnik, Victor

    1993-01-01

    Examines the impact of mining the dunes in Natal's Saint Lucia Park on the wetlands and lake to the west of the dunes. Discusses mining companies campaign to receive rights to mine, government neglect, and public education and opinion concerning the controversy. (MDH)

  2. St. Lucia.

    PubMed

    1987-06-01

    The population of St Lucia was 123,000 in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2%. The infant mortality rate stands at 22.2/1000 live births, and life expectancy is 70.3 years for males and 74.9 years for females. The literacy rate is 78%. St Lucia's labor force is allocated as follows: agriculture, 36.6%; industry and commerce, 20.1%; and services, 18.1%. The gross national product (GNP) was US$146 million in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 3% and a per capita GNP of $1071. St Lucia is a parliamentary democracy modeled on the British Westminster system. The island is divided into 16 parishes and 1 urban area (the capital, Castries). St Lucia is currently a politically stable country, although the high level of youth unemployment is a cause for concern. Ongoing stability may depend on the government's ability to provide services such as jobs and housing. The economy has evolved from a monocrop sugar plantation type to a diversified economy based on agriculture, industry, and tourism. Agriculture, dominated by the banana industry, is characterized by the participation of a large number of small and medium-sized enterprises. Industry is being encouraged through the provision of incentives such as tax rebates. The government is attempting to maintain a sound investment climate through a tripartite dialogue with the private sector and trade unions. Overall economic policy is predicated on the attraction of sound investments, by both local and foreign entities, to accelerate the rate of economic growth, solve the unemployment problem, and generate a solid balance-of-payments position.

  3. Meet EPA Scientist Diana Bless

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA chemical engineer Diana Bless works on sustainable materials management research for rare earth elements in consumer electronics and approaches related to characterization, source control and treatment of mining-influenced waters.

  4. Making a Way for Diana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shima, Kate; Gsovski, Barbara K.

    1996-01-01

    Although many parents and educators hesitate to involve children in a regular course of drug therapy, Ritalin often proves beneficial to Attention Deficit Disorder sufferers. Diana, an intelligent, easily distracted middle schooler, was helped by a team approach using evaluation, remediation, behavioral therapy, medication, and a supportive…

  5. Diana Leonard and Materialist Feminism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stevi

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to Diana Leonard focuses on her contribution to materialist feminism, both through bringing the work of key French theorists to the attention of an Anglophone audience and through her own sociological work on the family, marriage and childhood. In so doing it draws attention to the importance of her work as editor and…

  6. Social familiarity affects Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana diana) alarm call responses in habitat-specific ways

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Claudia; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Male Diana monkeys produce loud and acoustically distinct alarm calls to leopards and eagles that propagate over long distances, much beyond the immediate group. Calling is often contagious, with neighbouring males responding to each other’s calls, indicating that harem males communicate both to local group members and distant competitors. Here, we tested whether male Diana monkeys responding to each other’s alarm calls discriminated familiar from unfamiliar callers in two populations in Taï Forest (Ivory Coast) and on Tiwai Island (Sierra Leone). At both sites, we found specific acoustic markers in male alarm call responses that discriminated familiar from unfamiliar callers, but response patterns were site-specific. On Tiwai Island, males responded to familiar males’ eagle alarms with ‘standard’ eagle alarm calls, whereas unfamiliar males triggered acoustically atypical eagle alarms. The opposite was found in Taï Forest where males responded to unfamiliar males’ eagle alarm calls with ‘standard’ eagle alarms, and with atypical eagle alarms to familiar males’ calls. Moreover, only Taï, but not Tiwai, males also marked familiarity with the caller in their leopard-induced alarms. We concluded that male Diana monkeys encode not only predator type but also signaller familiarity in their alarm calls, although in population-specific ways. We explain these inter-site differences in vocal behaviour in terms of differences in predation pressure and population density. We discuss the adaptive function and implications of this behaviour for the origins of acoustic flexibility in primate communication. PMID:26998336

  7. The LUCIA beamline at SOLEIL.

    PubMed

    Vantelon, D; Trcera, N; Roy, D; Moreno, T; Mailly, D; Guilet, S; Metchalkov, E; Delmotte, F; Lassalle, B; Lagarde, Pierre; Flank, A-M

    2016-03-01

    Commissioned in May 2004 on the SLS machine, the LUCIA beamline was moved to the synchrotron SOLEIL during the summer of 2008. To take advantage of this new setting several changes to its design were introduced. Here, a review of the various improvements of the mechanics and, mostly, of the optics is given. Described in detail are the results of a new multilayer grating monochromator implemented on the Kohzu vessel already holding the two-crystal set-up. It consists of a grating grooved onto a multilayer (replacing the first crystal) associated to a multilayer (as a second crystal). It allows a shift of the low-energy limit of the beamline to around 500 eV with an energy resolution and a photon flux comparable with those of the previous couples of crystals (KTP and beryl).

  8. Diana Al-Hadid: Identity and Heritage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    Diana Al-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, Al-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…

  9. Free and Beautiful: Lucia Chen--New York Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article details the work of Lucia Chen of the New York Public Library. Lucia Chen combined her two passions--organization and beautification--in her recent project, creating an online version of the New York Public Library's (NYPL) legendary picture collection. Artists ranging from set designers to filmmakers have long used the collection,…

  10. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - St. Lucia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2015-02-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the electricity generation or reduction technologies, including solar hot water heating, available to Saint Lucia, one of six Caribbean countries that make up the Windward Islands - the southern arc of the Lesser Antilles chain - at the eastern end of the Caribbean Sea. Heating and transportation fuels are not addressed.

  11. Reducing Health Disparities and Improving Health Equity in Saint Lucia.

    PubMed

    Holden, Kisha; Charles, Lisa; King, Stephen; McGregor, Brian; Satcher, David; Belton, Allyson

    2015-12-22

    St. Lucia is an island nation in the Eastern Caribbean, with a population of 179,000 people, where chronic health conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are significant. The purpose of this pilot study is to create a model for community health education, tracking, and monitoring of these health conditions, research training, and policy interventions in St. Lucia, which may apply to other Caribbean populations, including those in the U.S. This paper reports on phase one of the study, which utilized a mixed method analytic approach. Adult clients at risk for, or diagnosed with, diabetes (n = 157), and health care providers/clinic administrators (n = 42), were recruited from five healthcare facilities in St. Lucia to assess their views on health status, health services, and improving health equity. Preliminary content analyses indicated that patients and providers acknowledge the relatively high prevalence of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, recognize the impact that socioeconomic status has on health outcomes, and desire improved access to healthcare and improvements to healthcare infrastructures. These findings could inform strategies, such as community education and workforce development, which may help improve health outcomes among St. Lucians with chronic health conditions, and inform similar efforts among other selected populations.

  12. Reducing Health Disparities and Improving Health Equity in Saint Lucia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Kisha; Charles, Lisa; King, Stephen; McGregor, Brian; Satcher, David; Belton, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    St. Lucia is an island nation in the Eastern Caribbean, with a population of 179,000 people, where chronic health conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, are significant. The purpose of this pilot study is to create a model for community health education, tracking, and monitoring of these health conditions, research training, and policy interventions in St. Lucia, which may apply to other Caribbean populations, including those in the U.S. This paper reports on phase one of the study, which utilized a mixed method analytic approach. Adult clients at risk for, or diagnosed with, diabetes (n = 157), and health care providers/clinic administrators (n = 42), were recruited from five healthcare facilities in St. Lucia to assess their views on health status, health services, and improving health equity. Preliminary content analyses indicated that patients and providers acknowledge the relatively high prevalence of diabetes and other chronic illnesses, recognize the impact that socioeconomic status has on health outcomes, and desire improved access to healthcare and improvements to healthcare infrastructures. These findings could inform strategies, such as community education and workforce development, which may help improve health outcomes among St. Lucians with chronic health conditions, and inform similar efforts among other selected populations. PMID:26703647

  13. Geographical variation of St. Lucia Parrot flight vocalizations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleeman, Patrick M.; Gilardi, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Parrots are vocal learners and many species of parrots are capable of learning new calls, even as adults. This capability gives parrots the potential to develop communication systems that can vary dramatically over space. St. Lucia Parrot (Amazona versicolor) flight vocalizations were examined for geographic variation between four different sites on the island of St. Lucia. Spectrographic cross-correlation analysis of a commonly used flight vocalization, the p-chow call, demonstrated quantitative differences between sites. Additionally, the similarity of p-chows decreased as the distance between sites increased. Flight call repertoires also differed among sites; parrots at the Des Bottes and Quilesse sites each used one flight call unique to those sites, while parrots at the Barre de L'Isle site used a flight call that Quilesse parrots gave only while perched. It is unclear whether the vocal variation changed clinally with distance, or whether there were discrete dialect boundaries as in a congener, the Yellow-naped Parrot (Amazona auropalliata, Wright 1996). The geographical scale over which the St. Lucia Parrot's vocal variation occurred was dramatically smaller than that of the Yellow-naped Parrot. Similar patterns of fine-scale vocal variation may be more widespread among other parrot species in the Caribbean than previously documented.

  14. IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM GENAVENSE IN A DIANA MONKEY (CERCOPITHECUS DIANA) BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION AND HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kathleen M; Wack, Allison N; Bradway, Dan; Simons, Brian W; Bronson, Ellen; Osterhout, Gerard; Parrish, Nicole M; Montali, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    A 25-yr-old Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana) with a 1.5-yr history of chronic colitis and diarrhea was found to have disseminated granulomatous disease with intralesional acid fast bacilli. Bacilli were identified as Mycobacterium genavense by polymerase chain reaction, sequencing of the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer (ITS) gene, and mycolic acid analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Mycobacterium genavense is a common cause of mycobacteriosis in free-ranging and captive birds. In addition, recognition of opportunistic infection in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients is increasing. Disease manifestations of M. genavense are similar to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) and include fever, wasting, and diarrhea with disseminated disease. Similar clinical signs and lesions were observed in this monkey. Mycobacterium genavense should be considered as a differential for disseminated mycobacterial disease in nonhuman primates as this agent can mimic MAC and related mycobacteria.

  15. Evaluation of the St. Lucia geothermal resource: macroeconomic models

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, A.E.; Trocki, L.K.; Yeamans, M.K.; Kolstad, C.D.

    1984-08-01

    A macroeconometric model describing the St. Lucian economy was developed using 1970 to 1982 economic data. Results of macroeconometric forecasts for the period 1983 through 1985 show an increase in gross domestic product (GDP) for 1983 and 1984 with a decline in 1985. The rate of population growth is expected to exceed GDP growth so that a small decline in per capita GDP will occur. We forecast that garment exports will increase, providing needed employment and foreign exchange. To obtain a longer-term but more general outlook on St. Lucia's economy, and to evaluate the benefit of geothermal energy development, we applied a nonlinear programming model. The model maximizes discounted cumulative consumption.

  16. Pertussis: herd immunity and vaccination coverage in St Lucia.

    PubMed

    Cooper, E; Fitch, L

    1983-11-12

    In a single complete epidemic in St Lucia, an island too small to support constant clinical pertussis, the pertussis case rates in small communities (villages and small towns) with differing levels of vaccination coverage of young children were compared. The association between greater vaccination coverage and greater herd immunity was clear, despite the imperfect protection given to individuals. An analysis in terms of population dynamics is evidence against the theory that endemic subclinical pertussis maintains transmission in a highly vaccinated population. We suggest that with a homogeneous vaccination coverage of 80% of 2-year-old children pertussis might be eradicated from the island, and that this is a practicable experiment.

  17. Tamarugite from Diana Cave (SW Romania) -first true karst occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pušcaš, C. M.; Onac, B. P.; Effenberger, H. S.; Povarǎ, I.

    2012-04-01

    Diana Cave is located within the town limits of Baile Herculane (SW Romania) and develops as a 14 m long, westward oriented, unique passage guided by the Diana fault [1]. At the far end of the cave, the thermo-mineral Diana Spring wells forth. In the early 1970s a mine gallery that intersected the cave was created to drain the water into a pumping station and the original cave passage was somewhat altered and reinforced with concrete. Today the concrete and the silty limestone cave walls are heavily corroded by H2SO4 outgassing from the hot water (ca. 50°C) and display abundant gypsum crusts, soggy aggregates of native S, and a variety of more exotic sulfates. Among them, a mineral that has been previously identified in caves only in connection to volcanic activity, either as thermal springs or fumaroles [2]: tamarugite [NaAl(SO4)26H2O]. It was [3] that first mentioned the occurrence of this Na and Al sulfate in Diana Cave, our research aiming to give a detailed description of this mineral, its paragenesis, and mechanisms of precipitation. Recently, tamarugite has also been identified in a sulfuric acid cave from Greece [4]. Along with powder X-ray diffractions coupled with Rietveld refinement, scanning electron microscope, and electron probe micro-analysis, δ18O and δ34S compositions of the sulfate mineral as well as precipitates from the water were analyzed to identify and better constrain the genesis of this rare sulfate. Regrettably, the crystal size of our specimens is inappropriate for identification by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. Physical and chemical parameters of Diana Spring were as well measured on several occasions. Geochemical analysis suggests that the minute, white tamarugite flakes precipitated in Diana Cave as a result of the interactions between the thermo-mineral water or water vapor and the original limestone bedrock and concrete that blankets the mine gallery. [1] Povara, I., Diaconu, G., Goran, C. (1972). Observations pr

  18. Geologic Map of the Diana Chasma Quadrangle (V-37), Venus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, V.L.; DeShon, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Diana Chasma quadrangle hosts some of the steepest topography on Venus. Altimetry measurements range from -2.5 to 4.7 km (0.0 = mean planetary radius), with a surface mean of 0.6 km. Fractures and faults within the central fracture/rift zone create large blocks of down-dropped material, especially along the east-central edge of the map area. The Dali and Diana chasmata display slopes of >30°, the steepest and deepest trenches on Venus. Both chasmata host landslide deposits presumably sourced from the steep chasmata walls. The tessera inlier, coronae, and ridge belts sit topographically above Rusalka and Zhibek planitiae. Rusalka Planitia topography describes broad undulations having northwest-trending ridges spaced ~200 km apart. The most distinctive ridge, Vetsorgo Dorsum, centered at 6.5° S., 163° E., is a Class I ridge belt owing to its simple arch morphology. The central interior of Markham crater sits topographically lower than the surrounding region, which slopes downward to the east.

  19. Psychoanalytic and musical perspectives on shame in Donizetti's Lucia Di Lammermoor.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Julie Jaffee

    2008-06-01

    Two disciplines, psychoanalysis and music, are synthesized here with an eye to the origins and vicissitudes of shame and guilt as seen in the emotional disintegration of the eponymous heroine of Donizetti's opera Lucia di Lammermoor. Lucia's affects and her intrapsychic and interpersonal dynamics are heard in the music itself. A psychoanalytic and musical analysis of the opera, taking Lucia's dynamics as a quasi-substitute for clinical material, illuminates the intersections between certain theoretical aspects of the two disciplines. Both manifest and latent themes are expressed through the music of Donizetti's score.

  20. DIANA: nuclear astrophysics with a deep underground accelerator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemut, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Current stellar model simulations are at a level of precision such that nuclear reaction rates represent a major source of uncertainty for theoretical predictions and for the analysis of observational signatures. To address several open questions in cosmology, astrophysics, and non-Standard-Model neutrino physics, new high precision measurements of direct-capture nuclear fusion cross sections are essential. Experimental studies of nuclear reaction of astrophysical interest are hampered by the exponential drop of the cross-section. The extremely low value of σ (E) within the Gamow peak prevents measurement in a laboratory at the earth surface. The signal to noise ratio would be too small, even with the highest beam intensities presently available from industrial accelerators, because of the cosmic ray interactions with the detectors and surrounding materials. An excellent solution is to install an accelerator facility deep underground where the cosmic rays background into detectors is reduced by several order of magnitude, allowing the measurements to be pushed to far lower energies than presently possible. This has been clearly demonstrated at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA) by the successful studies of critical reactions in the pp-chains and first reaction studies in the CNO cycles. However many critical reactions still need high precision measurements, and next generation facilities, capable of very high beam currents over a wide energy range and state of the art target and detection technology, are highly desirable. The DIANA accelerator facility is being designed to achieve large laboratory reaction rates by delivering high ion beam currents (up to 100 mA) to a high density (up to 1018 atoms/cm2), super-sonic jet-gas target as well as to a solid target. DIANA will consist of two accelerators, 50-400 kV and 0.4-3 MV, that will cover a wide range of ion beam intensities, with sufficient energy overlap to consistently connect the

  1. Functional Analysis of miRNAs Using the DIANA Tools Online Suite.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2017-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are central regulators of gene expression. They are actively studied for their involvement in numerous physiological and pathological conditions but also as diagnostic biomarkers or promising therapeutic targets. The increased complexity of the miRNA interactomes hinders straightforward interpretation of miRNA expression differences between states and conditions. To this end, functional analysis web servers process and combine experimental and in silico data, enabling researchers to uncover targeted pathways and transcriptional mechanisms that are hidden within numerous interactions and vast expression datasets. DIANA-tools ( www.microrna.gr ) is a web server hosting state-of-the-art utilities and databases for miRNA functional investigation. Available utilities cover a wide scope of different needs and research scenarios, rendering DIANA website a one-stop-shop for miRNA analyses. The most commonly utilized databases and algorithms include DIANA-microT-CDS, DIANA-TarBase v7.0, DIANA-lncBase v2.0, DIANA-miRGen v3.0, DIANA-miRPath v3.0, and DIANA-mirExTra v2.0.In the presented protocol, we will utilize different online tools in order to explore miRNA functions and to identify probable targets of interest for downstream analyses and wet lab experiments. The combined use of different applications from the DIANA suite can shed light to numerous different aspects of miRNA regulation and regulatory function, without the necessity for extensive bioinformatics expertise or computational infrastructure.

  2. DNA-linked Inhibitor Antibody Assay (DIANA) for sensitive and selective enzyme detection and inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Navrátil, Václav; Schimer, Jiří; Tykvart, Jan; Knedlík, Tomáš; Vik, Viktor; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Human diseases are often diagnosed by determining levels of relevant enzymes and treated by enzyme inhibitors. We describe an assay suitable for both ultrasensitive enzyme quantification and quantitative inhibitor screening with unpurified enzymes. In the DNA-linked Inhibitor ANtibody Assay (DIANA), the target enzyme is captured by an immobilized antibody, probed with a small-molecule inhibitor attached to a reporter DNA and detected by quantitative PCR. We validate the approach using the putative cancer markers prostate-specific membrane antigen and carbonic anhydrase IX. We show that DIANA has a linear range of up to six logs and it selectively detects zeptomoles of targets in complex biological samples. DIANA's wide dynamic range permits determination of target enzyme inhibition constants using a single inhibitor concentration. DIANA also enables quantitative screening of small-molecule enzyme inhibitors using microliters of human blood serum containing picograms of target enzyme. DIANA's performance characteristics make it a superior tool for disease detection and drug discovery. PMID:27679479

  3. Genetics and shell morphometrics of assimineids (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Truncatelloidea) in the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nelson A F; van Rooyen, Ryan; MacDonald, Angus; Ponder, Winston; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa. These snails often occur in great numbers and are ecologically important to the St Lucia Estuary, which forms a crucial part of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Genetic and shell morphometric analyses were conducted on individuals collected from nine localities distributed from the northern lake regions to the southern lake and the mouth of the St Lucia estuarine lake. Mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S) DNA was used to construct Bayesian Inference, Neighbour-joining, Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood trees. Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were performed on standard shell parameter data. Results indicate that two different taxa are present in St Lucia. The taxon comprising individuals from the South Lake and St Lucia Estuary Mouth is identified as Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch, in accordance with the latest taxonomic consensus. The taxon comprising assimineid individuals from False Bay, North Lake and South Lake, is here tentatively named "Assiminea" aff. capensis (Sowerby). These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity. The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

  4. Micro-Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy with the LUCIA Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarde, P.; Flank, A.-M.; Vantelon, D.; Janousch, M.

    2007-02-02

    With the development of new synchrotron radiation machines, which have seen, in the last ten years, the emittance of the beam decreased by several orders of magnitude, new beamlines have been developed which make full use of these improvements. We describe here the LUCIA beamline, which has been implemented at the Swiss Light Source in a collaboration between PSI, SOLEIL and the CNRS.

  5. An annotated checklist of scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) of Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles .

    PubMed

    Malumphy, Chris

    2014-07-31

    An annotated list of 83 scale insect species (Hemiptera: Sterorrhyncha: Coccoidea) recorded from Saint Lucia is presented, based on data gathered from UK quarantine interceptions, samples collected in an urban coastal habitat in the North West of the Island in 2013, and published records. Thirty-three species (40%) are recorded for the first time for the country, including Dysmicoccus joannesiae (Costa Lima), a South American mealybug, and Poliaspoides formosana (Takahashi), an Asian armoured scale insect pest of bamboo, which are new for the Caribbean region. The economic, environmental and social impacts caused by introduced exotic species of scale insect are discussed. Two predatory midges Diadiplosis ?coccidivora (Felt) and Diadiplosis multifila (Felt) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) are recorded for the first time from Saint Lucia. The latter species was observed causing 90% mortality of a large infestation of passion vine mealybug Planococcus minor (Maskell) on soursop fruit. 

  6. Anthropogenic impacts on the water and salt budgets of St Lucia estuarine lake in South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, Robynne A.; Stretch, Derek D.

    2011-05-01

    Lake St Lucia in South Africa is part of a UNESCO World Heritage site and a Ramsar wetland of international importance. Like many coastal wetlands worldwide, anthropogenic activities including catchment land-use changes, water diversions/abstractions, and manipulation of the mouth state have significantly affected its functioning over the past century. Questions concerning its sustainability have motivated a re-evaluation of management decisions made in the past and of options for the future. A model for the water and salt budgets has therefore been used to investigate "what if" scenarios in terms of past anthropogenic interventions. In particular, simulations allow us to evaluate the effects of diverting the Mfolozi river from St Lucia on the functioning of the system and on the occurrence of various water level/salinity states that drive the biological functioning of the ecosystem. In the past, when the St Lucia estuary and the Mfolozi river had a combined inlet, the mouth was predominantly open. The lake had relatively stable water levels but variable salinities that increased during dry conditions due to evaporative losses and saltwater inflows from the sea. If the mouth closed, the Mfolozi flow was diverted into the lake which reduced salinities and maintained or increased water levels. Simulations indicate that without a link to the Mfolozi the lake system would naturally have a mainly closed inlet with lower average salinities but more variable water levels. During dry conditions water levels would reduce and result in desiccation of large areas of the lake as has recently occurred. We conclude that the artificial separation of the St Lucia and Mfolozi inlets underpins the most significant impacts on the water & salt budget of the lake and that its reversal is key to the sustainability of the system.

  7. 78 FR 6173 - Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Diana Del Grosso, Ray Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen... Smith, Joseph Hatch, Cheryl Hatch, Kathleen Kelley, Andrew Wilklund, and Richard Kosiba...

  8. Kudoa dianae sp. n. (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida), a new parasite of bullseye puffer, Sphoeroides annulatus (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae).

    PubMed

    Dyková, Iva; Fajer Avila, Emma Josefina; Fiala, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    A new multivalvulid myxosporean species, Kudoa dianae sp. n., is described from bullseye puffer, Sphoeroides annulatus (Jenyns) (Tetraodontiformes: Tetraodontidae). Plasmodia develop in extramuscular sites, in the wall of oesophagus and less frequently on mesenteries. Mature spores can reach lumen of the digestive tract directly by disruption of plasmodial wall or via macrophage transport to the oesophageal epithelium. New species is characterised by morphology of spores and by the complete sequence of SSU rRNA gene that differs from all hitherto known sequences of Kudoa species. Spore morphology (moderate-sized, simple non-ornate spores, quadrate in apical view) clusters with that of Kudoa scienae, K. cerebralis, K. chilkaensis, K. leiostomi, K. finduli, K. cascasia and K. ovivora. Analysis of phylogenetic relationships (using SSU rRNA gene sequences) among five Kudoa species, the molecular data of which are available thus far, revealed that K. dianae is distinguishable from these five species and that its closest relation is with K. miniauiriculata.

  9. Diversity and distribution of polyphagan water beetles (Coleoptera) in the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Matthew S.; Bilton, David T.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Water beetles belonging to the suborder Polyphaga vary greatly in larval and adult ecologies, and fulfil important functional roles in shallow-water ecosystems by processing plant material, scavenging and through predation. This study investigates the species richness and composition of aquatic polyphagan assemblages in and around the St Lucia estuarine lake (South Africa), within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. A total of 32 sites were sampled over three consecutive collection trips between 2013 and 2015. The sites encompassed a broad range of aquatic habitats, being representative of the variety of freshwater and estuarine environments present on the St Lucia coastal plain. Thirty-seven polyphagan taxa were recorded during the dedicated surveys of this study, in addition to seven species-level records from historical collections. Most beetles recorded are relatively widespread Afrotropical species and only three are endemic to South Africa. Samples were dominated by members of the Hydrophilidae (27 taxa), one of which was new to science (Hydrobiomorpha perissinottoi Bilton, 2016). Despite the fauna being dominated by relatively widespread taxa, five represent new records for South Africa, highlighting the poor state of knowledge on water beetle distribution patterns in the region. Wetlands within the dense woodland characterising the False Bay region of St Lucia supported a distinct assemblage of polyphagan beetles, whilst sites occurring on the Eastern and Western Shores of Lake St Lucia were very similar in their beetle composition. In line with the Afrotropical region as a whole, the aquatic Polyphaga of St Lucia appear to be less diverse than the Hydradephaga, for which 68 species were recorded during the same period. However, the results of the present study, in conjunction with those for Hydradephaga, show that the iSimangaliso Wetland Park contains a high beetle diversity. The ongoing and future ecological protection

  10. U-Pb age of the Diana Complex and Adirondack granulite petrogenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basu, A.R.; Premo, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    U-Pb isotopic analyses of eight single and multi-grain zircon fractions separated from a syenite of the Diana Complex of the Adirondack Mountains do not define a single linear array, but a scatter along a chord that intersects the Concordia curve at 1145 ?? 29 and 285 ?? 204 Ma. For the most concordant analyses, the 207Pb/206Pb ages range between 1115 and 1150 Ma. Detailed petrographic studies revealed that most grains contained at least two phases of zircon growth, either primary magmatic cores enclosed by variable thickness of metamorphic overgrowths or magmatic portions enclosing presumably older xenocrystic zircon cores. The magmatic portions are characterized by typical dipyramidal prismatic zoning and numerous black inclusions that make them quite distinct from adjacent overgrowths or cores when observed in polarizing light microscopy and in back-scattered electron micrographs. Careful handpicking and analysis of the "best" magmatic grains, devoid of visible overgrowth of core material, produced two nearly concordant points that along with two of the multi-grain analyses yielded an upper-intercept age of 1118 ?? 2.8 Ma and a lower-intercept age of 251 ?? 13 Ma. The older age is interpreted as the crystallization age of the syenite and the younger one is consistent with late stage uplift of the Appalachian region. The 1118 Ma age for the Diana Complex, some 35 Ma younger than previously believed, is now approximately synchronous with the main Adirondack anorthosite intrusion, implying a cogenetic relationship among the various meta-igneous rocks of the Adirondacks. The retention of a high-temperature contact metamorphic aureole around Diana convincingly places the timing of Adirondack regional metamorphism as early as 1118 Ma. This result also implies that the sources of anomalous high-temperature during granulite metamorphism are the syn-metamorphic intrusions, such as the Diana Complex.

  11. The effect of a Lucia jig for 30 minutes on neuromuscular re-programming, in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Mariangela Salles Pereira; Palinkas, Marcelo; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak; Sousa, Luiz Gustavo de; Siéssere, Selma; Semprini, Marisa; Bataglion, Cristiane; Bataglion, César

    2012-01-01

    The Lucia jig is a technique that promotes neuromuscular reprogramming of the masticatory system and allows the stabilization of the mandible without the interference of dental contacts, maintaining the mandible position in harmonic condition with the musculature in normal subjects or in patients with temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). This study aimed to electromyographically analyze the activity (RMS) of the masseter and temporal muscles in normal subjects (control group) during the use of an anterior programming device, the Lucia jig, in place for 0, 5, 10, 20 and 30 minutes to demonstrate its effect on the stomatognathic system. Forty-two healthy dentate individuals (aged 21 to 40 years) with normal occlusion and without parafunctional habits or temporomandibular dysfunction (RDC/TMD) were evaluated on the basis of the electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporal muscles before placement of a neuromuscular re-programming device, the Lucia jig, on the upper central incisors. There were no statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles in the different time periods. The Lucia jig changed the electromyographic activity by promoting a neuromuscular reprogramming. In most of the time periods, it decreased the activation of the masticatory muscles, showing that this device has wide applicability in dentistry. The use of a Lucia jig over 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 minutes did not promote any statistically significant increase in muscle activity despite differences in the data, thus showing that this intra-oral device can be used in dentistry.

  12. Biodiversity census of Lake St Lucia, iSimangaliso Wetland Park (South Africa): Gastropod molluscs.

    PubMed

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Miranda, Nelson A F; Raw, Jacqueline L; Peer, Nasreen

    2014-01-01

    The recent dry phase experienced by the St Lucia estuarine system has led to unprecedented desiccation and hypersaline conditions through most of its surface area. This has changed only recently, at the end of 2011, with the onset of a new wet phase that has already caused a major shift to oligo- and mesohaline conditions. The estuary mouth, however, remains closed to the ocean, making the weak connection recently established between the St Lucia and the Mfolozi estuaries the only conveyance for marine recruitment. As a result, only 10 indigenous and two alien aquatic gastropod species are currently found living in the St Lucia estuarine lake. This is out of a total of 37 species recorded within the system since the earliest survey undertaken in 1924, half of which have not been reported in the literature before. The tick shell, Nassarius kraussianus, which was consistently found in large abundance prior to the recent dry phase, appears to have temporarily disappeared from the system, probably as a result of the extinction of Zostera marine grasses inside the lake. Population explosions of the bubble shell Haminoea natalensis, with its distinct egg masses, were recorded seasonally until 2009, but the species has subsequently not been observed again. A molecular DNA analysis of the various populations previously reported as belonging to the same assimineid species, variably referred to as Assiminea capensis, A. ovata, or A. bifasciata, has revealed that the St Lucia assemblage actually comprises two very distinct taxa, A. cf. capensis and a species provisionally referred to here as "A." aff. capensis or simply Assimineidae sp. In the mangroves, the climbing whelk Cerithidea decollata is still found in numbers, while ellobiids such as Cassidula labrella, Melampus semiaratus and M. parvulus are present in low abundances and all previously recorded littorinids have disappeared. A number of alien freshwater species have colonized areas of the system that have remained

  13. The biology of Solea bleekeri (Teleostei) in Lake St Lucia on the southeast coast of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, D. P.

    Several aspects of the biology of Solea bleekeri in Lake St Lucia were investigated, these included occurrence, distribution, reproduction and recruitment, food and feeding, size frequency distribution and the role of estuaries in the species' life cycle. Solea bleekeri was found to occur throughout the system in muddy turbid areas and was largely absent from the eastern shores of the lake where clear water sandy substrata occur. The preferred diet of the species was bivalve siphon tips of the species Solon cylindraceus, when these were in abundant supply. However, when numbers of large (length > 20 mm) specimens were not available then S. bleekeri fed on whatever prey was available in or near the substratum. Analysis of stomach contents under the latter conditions showed that food consumption reflected the composition of the benthos. Large numbers of S. bleekeri spend their entire post-larval and juvenile phases as well as the greater part of their adult life within estuaries. Evidence is presented to support the idea that S. bleekeri breeds in certain areas of the lake and that spawning takes place between September and November. The current data suggest that there may be two populations in St Lucia: one migrates from the system to spawn at sea during winter along with the other marine fish species which utilize estuaries as nursery areas, while the other population breeds within the system. Alternatively there may simply be a single population which normally breeds at sea, but which may breed within the system when conditions are suitable. Recruitment of S. bleekeri into the St Lucia estuarine system takes place from the muddy offshore marine banks and possibly from within the system as well. Solea bleekeri appears not to be totally dependent on estuaries for the completion of its life cycle. The advantages of utilizing these systems for their development relate to the shallow, calm, turbid food-rich areas which estuaries offer. The fact that breeding takes

  14. Biodiversity census of Lake St Lucia, iSimangaliso Wetland Park (South Africa): Gastropod molluscs

    PubMed Central

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Miranda, Nelson A.F.; Raw, Jacqueline L.; Peer, Nasreen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The recent dry phase experienced by the St Lucia estuarine system has led to unprecedented desiccation and hypersaline conditions through most of its surface area. This has changed only recently, at the end of 2011, with the onset of a new wet phase that has already caused a major shift to oligo- and mesohaline conditions. The estuary mouth, however, remains closed to the ocean, making the weak connection recently established between the St Lucia and the Mfolozi estuaries the only conveyance for marine recruitment. As a result, only 10 indigenous and two alien aquatic gastropod species are currently found living in the St Lucia estuarine lake. This is out of a total of 37 species recorded within the system since the earliest survey undertaken in 1924, half of which have not been reported in the literature before. The tick shell, Nassarius kraussianus, which was consistently found in large abundance prior to the recent dry phase, appears to have temporarily disappeared from the system, probably as a result of the extinction of Zostera marine grasses inside the lake. Population explosions of the bubble shell Haminoea natalensis, with its distinct egg masses, were recorded seasonally until 2009, but the species has subsequently not been observed again. A molecular DNA analysis of the various populations previously reported as belonging to the same assimineid species, variably referred to as Assiminea capensis, A. ovata, or A. bifasciata, has revealed that the St Lucia assemblage actually comprises two very distinct taxa, A. cf. capensis and a species provisionally referred to here as “A.” aff. capensis or simply Assimineidae sp. In the mangroves, the climbing whelk Cerithidea decollata is still found in numbers, while ellobiids such as Cassidula labrella, Melampus semiaratus and M. parvulus are present in low abundances and all previously recorded littorinids have disappeared. A number of alien freshwater species have colonized areas of the system that

  15. The age of infection with varicella-zoster virus in St Lucia, West Indies.

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, G. P.; Cox, M. J.; Bundy, D. A.; Didier, J. M.; St Catharine, J.

    1993-01-01

    Sera from an age-stratified sample of 1810 people from the Caribbean island of St Lucia were tested for antibodies against varicella-zoster virus. The results indicate that very few infections occur in childhood, which agrees with clinical survey data from other tropical countries, but contrasts with the observed high case rate in children in temperate countries. The alternative hypotheses which may explain these results are discussed, and it is suggested that high ambient temperatures interfere with the transmission of the virus. Irrespective of the cause, the pattern of varicella incidence observed has important implications for any vaccination policy adopted in tropical countries. PMID:8386097

  16. Tamarugite in the Steam-Condensate Alteration Paragenesis in Diana Cave (SW Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puscas, C. M.; Onac, B. P.; Effenberger, H. S.; Povară, I.

    2012-12-01

    The double-salt hydrate tamarugite [NaAl(SO4)2 6H2O] is an uncommon mineral in the cave environment, forming as a result of chemical reactions between water and bedrock only under very specific conditions. The Diana Cave hosts a unique tamarugite occurrence, the first one to be reported from a typical karst environment. The cave is located within the limits of Băile Herculane township in the Cerna Mountains, SW Romania. It consists of a 14 m long, westward-oriented single passage, developed along the Diana Fault. In 1974 a concrete-clad mine gallery was created to channel the thermal water (Diana 1+2 Spring) flowing through the cave to a pumping station. The spring's chemical and physical parameters fluctuated through time, averaging 51.98° C, discharge of 0.96 Ls-1, pH of 7.46, 5768.66 ppm TDS, 9303 μScm-1 conductivity, 5.02 salinity. The major chemical components of the thermo-mineral water in Diana Cave are, Na+ (1392.57 ppm), K+ (58.55 ppm), Ca2+ (725.16 ppm), Mg2+ (10.78 ppm), Cl- (3376.83 ppm), and SO42- (92.27 ppm), and H2S (24.05 ppm), with traces of Si, Fe2+, Br+, I-, and Li+. The general air circulation pattern within the cave is fairly simple: cold air from the outside sweeps into the cave along the floor, heats up at the contact with the thermo-mineral water, ascends, and exists the cave along the ceiling. At the contact with the cold walls of the Diana Cave, the hot steam condenses and gives rise to a rich and exotic sulfate-mineral paragenesis (including halotrichite-series minerals, gypsum, bassanite, anhydrite, epsomite, alunite, halite, native sulfur, etc.). The most exotic minerals precipitate at or below the contact between the Tithonic - Neocomian limestone and the overlaying Cretaceous shaly limestone, as a result of steam-condensate alteration. Minerogenetic mechanisms responsible for the peculiar sulfate mineral assemblage in Diana Cave are evaporation, oxidation, hydrolysis, double exchange reactions, and deposition from vapours or

  17. Modelling reef zonation in the Greater St Lucia Wetland Park, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleyer, Michael H.; Celliers, Louis

    2005-05-01

    East Africa has a rich coral fauna that extends to Maputaland in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. At this latitude, considered high and marginal for coral distribution and development, they form a veneer on limited, late Pleistocene reefs rather than forming the accretive, aragonite structures known as coral reefs. It is thus more appropriate to refer to them in this region as coral communities, the environment being rendered marginal for their development by reduced temperatures, light and aragonite saturation state. Subsequent to their discovery, the reefs were afforded protection within two Marine Protected Areas (the St Lucia and Maputaland Marine Reserves). They are found primarily within three reef complexes, with only the central complex being readily accessible to the public for ecotourism at present. With the creation of the Greater St Lucia Wetland Park, a World Heritage Site, and the expectation of an accompanying increase in ecotourism, the status quo seems set to change. The reefs are thus the current focus of a modelling initiative to provide decision support in their management. This paper examines the unique nature of the South African communities, their vulnerability and importance in the regional and global context, and, using representative data from the model, how an anticipated increase in their use could affect their sustainability. The case for scientifically based zonation for their use is presented.

  18. Effects of Protection and Sediment Stress on Coral Reefs in Saint Lucia

    PubMed Central

    Bégin, Chantale; Schelten, Christiane K.; Nugues, Maggy M.; Hawkins, Julie; Roberts, Callum; Côté, Isabelle M.

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) benefit corals is contentious. On one hand, MPAs could enhance coral growth and survival through increases in herbivory within their borders; on the other, they are unlikely to prevent disturbances, such as terrestrial runoff, that originate outside their boundaries. We examined the effect of spatial protection and terrestrial sediment on the benthic composition of coral reefs in Saint Lucia. In 2011 (10 to 16 years after MPAs were created), we resurveyed 21 reefs that had been surveyed in 2001 and analyzed current benthic assemblages as well as changes in benthic cover over that decade in relation to protection status, terrestrial sediment influence (measured as the proportion of terrigenous material in reef-associated sediment) and depth. The cover of all benthic biotic components has changed significantly over the decade, including a decline in coral and increase in macroalgae. Protection status was not a significant predictor of either current benthic composition or changes in composition, but current cover and change in cover of several components were related to terrigenous content of sediment deposited recently. Sites with a higher proportion of terrigenous sediment had lower current coral cover, higher macroalgal cover and greater coral declines. Our results suggest that terrestrial sediment is an important factor in the recent degradation of coral reefs in Saint Lucia and that the current MPA network should be complemented by measures to reduce runoff from land. PMID:26845451

  19. Effects of Protection and Sediment Stress on Coral Reefs in Saint Lucia.

    PubMed

    Bégin, Chantale; Schelten, Christiane K; Nugues, Maggy M; Hawkins, Julie; Roberts, Callum; Côté, Isabelle M

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) benefit corals is contentious. On one hand, MPAs could enhance coral growth and survival through increases in herbivory within their borders; on the other, they are unlikely to prevent disturbances, such as terrestrial runoff, that originate outside their boundaries. We examined the effect of spatial protection and terrestrial sediment on the benthic composition of coral reefs in Saint Lucia. In 2011 (10 to 16 years after MPAs were created), we resurveyed 21 reefs that had been surveyed in 2001 and analyzed current benthic assemblages as well as changes in benthic cover over that decade in relation to protection status, terrestrial sediment influence (measured as the proportion of terrigenous material in reef-associated sediment) and depth. The cover of all benthic biotic components has changed significantly over the decade, including a decline in coral and increase in macroalgae. Protection status was not a significant predictor of either current benthic composition or changes in composition, but current cover and change in cover of several components were related to terrigenous content of sediment deposited recently. Sites with a higher proportion of terrigenous sediment had lower current coral cover, higher macroalgal cover and greater coral declines. Our results suggest that terrestrial sediment is an important factor in the recent degradation of coral reefs in Saint Lucia and that the current MPA network should be complemented by measures to reduce runoff from land.

  20. The hidden impact of conspiracy theories: perceived and actual influence of theories surrounding the death of Princess Diana.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Karen M; Sutton, Robbie M

    2008-04-01

    The authors examined the perceived and actual impact of exposure to conspiracy theories surrounding the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. One group of undergraduate students rated their agreement and their classmates' perceived agreement with several statements about Diana's death. A second group of students from the same undergraduate population read material containing popular conspiracy theories about Diana's death before rating their own and others' agreement with the same statements and perceived retrospective attitudes (i.e., what they thought their own and others' attitudes were before reading the material). Results revealed that whereas participants in the second group accurately estimated others' attitude changes, they underestimated the extent to which their own attitudes were influenced.

  1. Negligencia en la Educacion de Estudiantes Mexico-Americanos en el Distrito Escolar Unificado Lucia Mar, Pismo Beach, California. (Educational Neglect of Mexican-American Students in Lucia Mar Unified School District, Pismo Beach, California.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

    California State Advisory Committee (SAC) of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights held hearings in Santa Maria, California (May 20, 1972) to collect information on civil rights problems of Mexican American students in the Lucia Mar School District. Major issues were community complaints about the arrest of 26 Mexican American students and some…

  2. Situation Report--Antigua, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in nine foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are: Antigua, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Philippines, Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa), St. Lucia, and St. Vincent. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning…

  3. Situation Report--Algeria, Ecuador, New Zealand, Peru, Rhodesia, St. Lucia, and U.A.R. (Egypt).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in seven foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Algeria, Ecuador, New Zealand, Peru, Rhodesia, St. Lucia and U. A. R. (Egypt). Information is provided, where appropriate and available, under two topics, general background and family planning situation.…

  4. St. Lucia, West Indies Ministry of Education. School Library and Information Services: A Status Report with Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald R., Comp.

    This research report addresses the scope of school library and information services programs as demonstrated in secondary schools in St. Lucia, West Indies. Most schools were found seriously lacking in all three areas: Independent Learning Skills; Literacy/Literary and Cultural Appreciation; and Organization and Administration. Library staff…

  5. A Proposed Community Network For Monitoring Volcanic Emissions In Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Robertson, R. E.; Latchman, J. L.; Edwards, S.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic geochemical monitoring of volcanic systems in the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles was initiated by the UWI Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in 2000, as part of its volcanic surveillance programme for the English-speaking islands of the Lesser Antilles. This programme provided the first time-series observations used for the purpose of volcano monitoring in Dominica and Saint Lucia, permitted the characterization of the geothermal fluids associated with them, and established baseline studies for understanding of the hydrothermal systems during periods of quiescence (Joseph et al., 2011; Joseph et al., 2013). As part of efforts to improve and expand the capacity of SRC to provide volcanic surveillance through its geothermal monitoring programme, it is necessary to develop economically sustainable options for the monitoring of volcanic emissions/pollutants. Towards this effort we intend to work in collaboration with local authorities in Saint Lucia, to develop a monitoring network for quantifying the background exposure levels of ambient concentrations of volcanic pollutants, SO2 in air and As in waters (as health significant marker elements in the geothermal emissions) that would serve as a model for the emissions monitoring network for other volcanic islands. This programme would facilitate the building of local capacity and training to monitor the hazardous exposure, through the application and transfer of a regionally available low-cost and low-technology SO2 measurement/detection system in Saint Lucia. Existing monitoring technologies to inform evidence based health practices are too costly for small island Caribbean states, and no government policies or health services measures currently exist to address/mitigate these influences. Gases, aerosols and toxic elements from eruptive and non-eruptive volcanic activity are known to adversely affect human health and the environment (Baxter, 2000; Zhang et al., 2008). Investigations into the

  6. A socioecological approach to the control of Schistosoma mansoni in St Lucia

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Peter R.

    1976-01-01

    Systematic observations of man/water contact in a valley endemic for S. mansoni in St Lucia were carried out prior to the introduction of a household water supply. The observations indicated that exposure of the population to cercaria-infested rivers and streams could be broken down into different types related to distinct and measurable domestic and economic activities. The number and duration of daily contacts with water played an important role in determining the relative risk of infection and correlated significantly with the number of infected persons by age in a survey conducted immediately following the observations. Consideration should be given to measuring and assessing the relative importance of different activities involving contact with water in relation to transmission and the formulation of control strategies. PMID:1088407

  7. Mate-locating behavior of the butterfly Lethe diana (Lepidoptera: Satyridae): do males diurnally or seasonally change their mating strategy?

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    The mate-locating behavior of male butterflies has been classified into two major types, territorial and patrolling. Territorial males defend a specific site, whereas patrolling males fly around a wider area without having to defend a site. In this study, I investigated the use of these tactics by males of the satyrine butterfly, Lethe diana. A previous study suggested that the males of L. diana change their mate-locating behavior during the day (they patrol in the morning and defend territories in the afternoon) and that patrolling is the primary mating strategy, whereas defending territories is a supplementary one. In the present study, I found that the daily activity pattern of the males of L. diana was similar to that described in the previous study: males often flew around in the morning and competed for territories in the afternoon. However, contrary to the previous study, all courtships and copulations were performed within male territories during their territorial activity. Closer observations revealed that copulations found in male territories were achieved by the owner of the territory. Males tended to feed in the morning, suggesting that the males flying in the morning searched for food rather than females. I conclude that territory holding is the primary male matelocating tactic in L. diana. I further found that, in summer, males exhibited territorial behavior later than in spring or autumn, which may be a strategy for preventing heat stress.

  8. A Collaborative Approach to Monitoring Ambient Volcanogenic Pollution at Sulphur Springs, Saint Lucia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Cox, L.; Jackson, V. B.; Alexander, D.

    2015-12-01

    The role of volcano tourism is recognized as an important contributor to the economy of volcanic islands in the Lesser Antilles. However, if it is to be promoted as a sustainable sector of the tourism industry, visitors, tour operators, and vendors must be made aware of the potential health hazards facing them in volcanic environments. Volcanogenic air pollutants are of primary concern in this setting. In general, no warning signs, guidelines for recreational use, or emissions monitoring currently exists to provide warning to the public to decrease their vulnerability to the potential risks, or to minimize the liability of the agencies managing these areas. Sulphur Springs Park in Saint Lucia is a popular international destination, and concerns about the volcanic emissions and its possible health effect have been raised by visitors, staff, and management of the Park. As part of the responsibility of the UWI, Seismic Research Centre (SRC) to provide volcanic surveillance through its geothermal monitoring programme, a network was established for quantifying the ambient SO2 concentrations at Sulphur Springs in order to assess the potential risk of unsafe exposure. This effort required collaboration with the National Emergency Management Organization (NEMO) of Saint Lucia, as well as the staff and management of the Soufrière Regional Development Foundation (SRDF). Local personnel were trained in the active field sampling and analytical techniques required for the assessment of ambient SO2 concentrations over the monitoring period, thereby contributing to an active community-based effort. This type of approach was also thought to be an effective option for scientists to engage communities as partners in disaster risk reduction. Lessons learnt from this experience are presented for the benefit of other citizen monitoring projects, including its use as a tool for promoting volcanic hazard education, and enhancing communication and understanding between geoscientists and

  9. Monitoring Persistent Volcanic Emissions from Sulphur Springs, Saint Lucia: A Community Approach to Disaster Risk Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, E. P.; Beckles, D. M.; Cox, L.; Jackson, V. B.; Alexander, D.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal emissions are known natural sources of volatiles to the atmosphere. Volcanogenic air pollutants known to cause the most serious impact are carbon dioxide (CO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen chloride (HCl) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Some studies into the potential for volcanic emissions to produce chronic diseases in humans indicate that areas of major concern include respiratory problems, particularly silicosis (Allen et al. 2000; Baxter et al. 1999; Buist et al. 1986), psychological stress (Shore et al. 1986), and chemical impacts of gas or ash (Giammanco et al. 1998). Sulphur Springs Park in Saint Lucia has a very high recreational value with >200,000 visitors annually, while the nearby town of Soufrière has >8,400 residents. Residents and visitors have raised concerns about the volcanic emissions and its health effects. As part of the volcanic surveillance programme undertaken by the UWI, Seismic Research Centre (SRC) in Saint Lucia, a new monitoring network has been established for quantifying the ambient SO2 in air, to which staff and visitors at the volcanic park are exposed to. The implementation and continued operation of this network has involved the training of local personnel in the active field sampling and analytical techniques required for the assessment of ambient SO2 concentrations, using a low cost monitor as well as commercial passive samplers. This approach recognizes that environmental hazards are a usual part of life and productive livelihoods, and to minimize post-disaster response and recovery it is beneficial to promote preparedness and mitigation, which is best achieved at the local level with community involvement. It is also intended that the volcanic emissions monitoring network could be used as a method to establish and maintain community-based initiatives that would also be helpful when volcanic threat manifests.

  10. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-04

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads.

  11. 3DIANA: 3D Domain Interaction Analysis: A Toolbox for Quaternary Structure Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Joan; Sanchez-Garcia, Ruben; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Cuenca-Alba, Jesus; Sorzano, Carlos Oscar S.; Carazo, Jose Maria

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy (EM) is experiencing a revolution with the advent of a new generation of Direct Electron Detectors, enabling a broad range of large and flexible structures to be resolved well below 1 nm resolution. Although EM techniques are evolving to the point of directly obtaining structural data at near-atomic resolution, for many molecules the attainable resolution might not be enough to propose high-resolution structural models. However, accessing information on atomic coordinates is a necessary step toward a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow proteins to perform specific tasks. For that reason, methods for the integration of EM three-dimensional maps with x-ray and NMR structural data are being developed, a modeling task that is normally referred to as fitting, resulting in the so called hybrid models. In this work, we present a novel application—3DIANA—specially targeted to those cases in which the EM map resolution is medium or low and additional experimental structural information is scarce or even lacking. In this way, 3DIANA statistically evaluates proposed/potential contacts between protein domains, presents a complete catalog of both structurally resolved and predicted interacting regions involving these domains and, finally, suggests structural templates to model the interaction between them. The evaluation of the proposed interactions is computed with DIMERO, a new method that scores physical binding sites based on the topology of protein interaction networks, which has recently shown the capability to increase by 200% the number of domain-domain interactions predicted in interactomes as compared to previous approaches. The new application displays the information at a sequence and structural level and is accessible through a web browser or as a Chimera plugin at http://3diana.cnb.csic.es. PMID:26772592

  12. Prevalence of Risk Factors for the Metabolic Syndrome in the Middle Income Caribbean Nation of St. Lucia

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Colleen O'Brien; Serieux, Elizabeth; Didier, Martin; Nuttal, Mary Elizabeth; Schuster, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to measure the presence of metabolic syndrome risk factors in a sample population in the middle income Caribbean nation of St. Lucia and to identify the demographic and behavioral factors of metabolic syndrome among the study participants. Interviews and anthropometric measures were conducted with 499 St. Lucians of ages 18–99. Descriptive statistics were used for the analysis. Fifty-six percent of females and 18 percent of males had a waist size equal to or above the indicator for the metabolic syndrome. Behavioral risk factors such as sedentary lifestyle, smoking, and alcohol consumption varied by gender. Thirty-six percent of women and 22% of men reported a sedentary lifestyle and 43% of women and 65% of men reported any alcohol consumption. More research should be done to determine the cultural norms and gender differences associated with modifiable risk behaviors in St. Lucia. PMID:25309758

  13. Cephenemyia stimulator and Hypoderma diana infection of roe deer in the Czech Republic over an 8-year period.

    PubMed

    Salaba, Ondrej; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Petrtyl, Miloslav; Valek, Petr; Kudrnacova, Marie; Jankovska, Ivana; Bartak, Miroslav; Sulakova, Hana; Langrova, Iva

    2013-04-01

    A survey of naso-pharyngeal and subcutaneous myiasis affecting roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) was conducted in the Czech Republic over an 8-year period (1999-2006). A total of 503 bucks and 264 does from six hunting localities were examined. The sampling area comprised predominantly agricultural lowlands and a mountain range primarily covered by forest. Since 1997, the deer have been treated each winter across the board with ivermectin (150 mg/kg, CERMIX® pulvis, Biopharm, CZ). Parasites found were the larvae of Hypoderma diana and Cephenemyia stimulator. There were no significant differences in warble fly infection among captured animals in the individual hunting localities. Overall, 146 (28.8%) of 503 animals (bucks) were infected with Cephenemyia stimulator larvae; body size of the second instar larva reached 13-18 mm. The prevalence ranged from 16.1 to 42.9% per year, and the mean intensity from 6 to 11 larvae per animal. Additionally, a total of 264 roe deer (does) were examined for H. diana larvae, and 77 (29.1%) were found to be positive; body size of the second instar larva reached 17 mm. The prevalence ranged from 18.8 to 50.0% per year, and the mean intensity from 13 to 22 larvae per animal. The results showed that the bot flies, Cephenemyia stimulator as well as H. diana, are common parasites in roe deer in the Czech Republic, and that through the help of treatment (ivermectin), it is possible to keep parasite levels low. The body weights of infected and non-infected H. diana deer did not differ significantly.

  14. An account of the life and achievements of Miss Diana Beck, neurosurgeon (1902-1956).

    PubMed

    Gilkes, Catherine E

    2008-03-01

    DIANA BECK (1902-1956) WAS probably the first female neurosurgeon in the world and played a large part in establishing neurosurgery in the United Kingdom. She served as the consultant advisor in neurosurgery for the Emergency Medical Service in the southwest region during the Second World War and subsequently set up the neurosurgical unit at Frenchay Hospital in Bristol before becoming a consultant at The Middlesex Hospital in London in 1947. There, she was the first woman to be given charge of men in a consultant capacity in a major London teaching hospital. During her 31-year career, she was the only female neurosurgeon in Western Europe and the United States. Miss Beck came to the attention of the general public when she operated on Alan Alexander Milne in 1952. However, she was better known in neurosurgical circles for her interest in intracranial hemorrhage. In this article, some of her original research, case reports, and her seminal paper on the surgical treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage are presented. They are a stark reminder of the limited investigations available at that time. In addition to her neurosurgical achievements, Miss Beck was a remarkable character and teacher. Her Saturday ward rounds proved so popular that they competed successfully with the students' weekend plans. In a specialty in which women continue to represent a disproportionately small percentage of the workforce, Miss Beck was one of our earliest role models.

  15. Diversity and morphological structure of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (Budapest, Hungary).

    PubMed

    Anda, Dóra; Büki, Gabriella; Krett, Gergely; Makk, Judit; Márialigeti, Károly; Erőss, Anita; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit; Borsodi, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The Buda Thermal Karst System is an active hypogenic karst area that offers possibility for the analysis of biogenic cave formation. The aim of the present study was to gain information about morphological structure and genetic diversity of bacterial communities inhabiting the Diana-Hygieia Thermal Spring (DHTS). Using scanning electron microscopy, metal accumulating and unusual reticulated filaments were detected in large numbers in the DHTS biofilm samples. The phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were represented by both bacterial strains and molecular clones but phyla Acidobacteria, Chlorobi, Chlorofexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Nitrospirae and Thermotogae only by molecular clones which showed the highest similarity to uncultured clone sequences originating from different environmental sources. The biofilm bacterial community proved to be somewhat more diverse than that of the water sample and the distribution of the dominant bacterial clones was different between biofilm and water samples. The majority of biofilm clones was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and Nitrospirae while the largest group of water clones was related to Betaproteobacteria. Considering the metabolic properties of known species related to the strains and molecular clones from DHTS, it can be assumed that these bacterial communities may participate in the local sulphur and iron cycles, and contribute to biogenic cave formation.

  16. Condolence books: language and meaning in the mourning for Hillsborough and Diana.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article reports empirical research into public books of condolence signed following two key mourning events within British culture: the 1989 Hillsborough soccer stadium disaster and the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, in 1997. The author suggests that not only do condolence books provide valuable historical record of the way contemporary society mourns, but also that they reflect attempts to language loss in ways that can be used to evaluate the extent of society's engagement with death. In so doing, he points to ways in which condolence messages signed following these events oscillate between "conservative structures of meaning" (Marris, 1974) and contemporary "structures of feeling" (Williams, 1971). In turn he suggests that such distinctions--between public and private, modernity and tradition--are destabilized by the postmodern cultural forms that these events appeared to inaugurate. In addition, and in the purported absence of expressivist mourning rituals (Gorer, 1965), the author suggests that condolence books may provide a useful social platform for the social expression of grief.

  17. Ancient parasites from endemic deer from "CUEVA PARQUE DIANA" archeological site, Patagonia, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, María Ornela; Tietze, Eleonor; Pérez, Alberto Enrique; Bellusci, Agustín; Sardella, Norma Haydée

    2017-03-24

    The narrow Andean-Patagonian temperate rainforest strip in the west of southern South America is inhabited by two endemic species of cervids, the southern pudu (Pudu puda) and the huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus), both cataloged as near threatened and threatened species, respectively. One of the possible causes of their declined number is the susceptibility to livestock diseases. Significant zooarchaeological records of both deer have been found throughout the Holocene from Patagonia. The present contribution reports the first paleoparasitological results obtained from coprolites of endemic deer from the archeological site "Cueva Parque Diana," Neuquén Province, Argentina, and discusses the possible diseases found in ancient times. Thirty-four coprolites were fully processed, rehydrated, homogenized, sieved, subjected to spontaneous sedimentation, and examined by light microscopy. Thirty samples contained parasite remains. The presence of diverse parasitic diseases such as trematodioses, metastrongylosis, trichuriosis, strongylida gastroenteritis, dioctophymosis, and coccidiosis which could cause diseases in deer previous to the arrival of European livestock and the presence of zoonotic diseases in the hunters-gatherers and fishermen are discussed.

  18. Broadcasting the royal role: constructing culturally situated identities in the Princess Diana Panorama interview.

    PubMed

    Abell, J; Stokoe, E H

    2001-09-01

    We examine critically the two traditions of work that have informed discursive approaches to identity: social constructionism and conversation analysis. Within both strands, identity is theorized as a flexible phenomenon that is situated in conversations. But although constructionists locate identity within the social, such work remains at a theoretical and rather abstract level and often fails to interrogate the discursive practices through which identity is constituted. Conversely, this attention to the occasioning of identity in everyday talk is precisely the focus of the second, conversation analytic strand of work. Whereas constructionists attend to the wider cultural positioning of identities, conversation analysts resist commenting upon the social significance of what is constructed in interaction. Conversation analysis is therefore limited by its restricted notion of culture in the study of the situated social self. Despite the apparent conflict between these approaches, we suggest that a synthesis of the two provides a comprehensive framework for analysing identity. Drawing upon the BBC Panorama interview between Martin Bashir and Princess Diana, we explore how culturally situated identities are located in this conversational context. We conclude that analysts must not only attend to the micro-level organization of identities but also engage in a wider understanding of the cultural framework within which they are located.

  19. Do Zircon age Spectra Record Magmatic Cyclicity at Soufrière (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, A. K.; Stockli, D. F.; Lindsay, J. M.

    2007-12-01

    The Soufrière Volcanic Center (Saint Lucia, Lesser Antilles) is a long-lived arc-volcanic system that evolved over the past 5 - 6 Ma. Its most recent volcanic activity between 20 and 40 ka was concentrated within the prominent Qualibou topographic depression and produced two voluminous pyroclastic deposits: Choiseul and the overlying Belfond. In addition, several dacitic lava domes exist within the Qualibou depression. Because evidence of earlier volcanic activity in long-lived magma systems is frequently obliterated by subsequent eruptive or volcano-tectonic events, high spatial resolution U-Th dating of zircon combined with (U-Th)/He dating is a powerful tool to identify magma crystallization episodes at depth and to link these to the eruptive record. U-Th model ages and disequilibrium corrected U-Pb ages for 56 individual zircons from Soufrière lavas (Morne Bonin, Belfond, Terre Blanche) and pumice (Choiseul, Belfond) were determined by secondary ionization mass spectrometry. The majority of results is on unpolished zircons where analysis pits integrate over the outermost ~10 μm of individual grains with a lateral spatial resolution of ~40 μm. Selected grains were subsequently analyzed by (U-Th)/He methods. Belfond and Terre Blanche (U-Th)/He zircon ages (~20 ka) agree with previous 14C charcoal ages, whereas Morne Bonin ages are much older (~250 ka). Overall, the U-Th zircon crystallization age spectrum reveals a remarkable range between ~20 and ~600 ka and displays multiple peaks, among which the most prominent are tentatively identified at ~40 ka, ~80 ka, ~130 ka, ~200 ka and ~500 ka. The distribution of rim ages indicates that most zircons lack overgrowth dating from just prior to the eruption, but the youngest ages for each sample overlap with the eruption ages. Soufrière zircons thus reveal magma intrusion, cooling, and crystallization cycles within the underlying plutonic system for which the volcanic stratigraphic record is sketchy.

  20. Microalgal productivity in an estuarine lake during a drought cycle: The St. Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan S.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-03-01

    The St. Lucia estuarine lake on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the largest estuarine systems in Africa and of unique importance for the adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The area regularly experiences periods of drought, resulting in hypersaline conditions in its shallow lakes and the closure of the estuarine mouth. This study aimed to assess the primary production rates of phytoplankton and microphytobenthos throughout an annual cycle of this drought phase. Primary production rates were assessed at representative sites, namely the Mouth, Narrows, South and North Lakes from June 2006 to May 2007. Because of the drought, the salinity gradient from the mouth to the head of the estuary was reversed by comparison to estuarine systems with a steady freshwater inflow and regular marine exchange. In March 2007, during the study, the mouth opened as a result of rough seas, and the marine influence broke the existing reversed gradient, producing a marine salinity throughout the system. Microphytobenthic primary productivity varied between 0 and 34 mg C m -2 h -1 and showed strong correlations with salinity, DIN:DIP ratios and irradiance. Benthic productivity was high across the system after breaching of the mouth. Pelagic primary productivity (between 0 and 180 mg C m -2 h -1), showed a correlation with temperature and irradiance and was highest across the system in February 2007 when the mouth was still closed. There was no significant correlation between production rates and biomass (chl-a) in either the benthic or pelagic habitats. The negative correlation between DIN:DIP ratio and benthic primary productivity indicated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. This study shows that salinity, along with seasonally dependent parameters such as temperature and irradiance, correlates with the rate of microalgal production. Hence, in these shallow lakes, the largest primary productivity can occur in either the pelagic or benthic

  1. Development of a Halotolerant Community in the St. Lucia Estuary (South Africa) during a Hypersaline Phase

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Background The St. Lucia Estuary, Africa's largest estuarine lake, is currently experiencing unprecedented freshwater deprivation which has resulted in a northward gradient of drought effects, with hypersaline conditions in its northern lakes. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the changes that occurred in the biotic communities at False Bay from May 2010 to June 2011, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning in hypersaline habitats. Few zooplankton taxa were able to withstand the harsh environmental conditions during 2010. These were the flatworm Macrostomum sp., the harpacticoid copepod Cletocamptus confluens, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops cf. dengizicus and the ciliate Fabrea cf. salina. In addition to their exceptional salinity tolerance, they were involved in a remarkably simple food web. In June 2009, a bloom of an orange-pigmented cyanobacterium (Cyanothece sp.) was recorded in False Bay and persisted uninterruptedly for 18 months. Stable isotope analysis suggests that this cyanobacterium was the main prey item of F. cf. salina. This ciliate was then consumed by A. cf. dengizicus, which in turn was presumably consumed by flamingos as they flocked in the area when the copepods attained swarming densities. On the shore, cyanobacteria mats contributed to a population explosion of the staphylinid beetle Bledius pilicollis. Although zooplankton disappeared once salinities exceeded 130, many taxa are capable of producing spores or resting cysts to bridge harsh periods. The hypersaline community was disrupted by heavy summer rains in 2011, which alleviated drought conditions and resulted in a sharp increase in zooplankton stock and diversity. Conclusions/Significance Despite the current freshwater deprivation crisis, the False Bay region has shown to be resilient, harboring a unique biodiversity with species that are capable of enduring harsh environmental conditions. However, further freshwater deprivation may extend beyond the

  2. Santa Lucia (2008) (L6) Chondrite, a Recent Fall: Composition, Noble Gases, Nitrogen and Cosmic Ray Exposure Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Ramakant R.; Varela, Maria Eugenia; Joron, Jean Louis

    2016-04-01

    The Santa Lucia (2008)—one the most recent Argentine meteorite fall, fell in San Juan province, Argentina, on 23 January 2008. Several masses (total ~6 kg) were recovered. Most are totally covered by fusion crust. The exposed interior is of light-grey colour. Chemical data [olivine (Fa24.4) and low-Ca pyroxene (En77.8 Fs20.7 Wo1.6)] indicate that Santa Luica (2008) is a member of the low iron L chondrite group, corresponding to the equilibrated petrologic type 6. The meteorite name was approved by the Nomenclature Committee (NomCom) of the Meteoritical Society (Meteoritic Bulletin, no. 97). We report about the chemical composition of the major mineral phases, its bulk trace element abundance, its noble gas and nitrogen data. The cosmic ray exposure age based on cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne, and 38Ar around 20 Ma is comparable to one peak of L chondrites. The radiogenic K-Ar age of 2.96 Ga, while the young U, Th-He are of 1.2 Ga indicates that Santa Lucia (2008) lost radiogenic 4He more recently. Low cosmogenic (22Ne/21Ne)c and absence of solar wind noble gases are consistent with irradiation in a large body. Heavy noble gases (Ar/Kr/Xe) indicated trapped gases similar to ordinary chondrites. Krypton and neon indicates irradiation in large body, implying large pre-atmospheric meteoroid.

  3. Donizetti and the music of mental derangement: Anna Bolena, Lucia di Lammermoor, and the composer's neurobiological illness.

    PubMed Central

    Peschel, E.; Peschel, R.

    1992-01-01

    The composer Gaetano Donizetti, who died in a state of mental derangement due to neurosyphilis, created some of opera's greatest scenes of psychosis. His letters reveal the clinical progression of his neurobiological illness, which was confirmed by autopsy. One can hypothesize that the composer's brain disease, which led to his psychosis and death, may have had an influence on his ability to create the powerful and unforgettable scenes of psychosis in his operas. In Anna Bolena, he captured in musical and dramatic terms Anne Boleyn's historically corroborated mental disorder during her imprisonment in the Tower of London. Sixteen years after having composed Anna Bolena, Donizetti himself would be locked up, against his will, in a mental institution. In Lucia di Lammermoor, Donizetti portrayed a girl given to hallucinations who, in her unforgettable "mad" scene, comes on stage, a pathetic embodiment of a human being in the throes of psychosis. Thirteen years after Lucia's première, Donizetti would die, psychotic and paralyzed, of untreated neurosyphilis. Studying Donizetti's neurosyphilis and the portrayals of psychosis in his operas can help one to appreciate the pain of human beings trapped in the prison of a brain subjected to the devastation of mental derangement. PMID:1285447

  4. DIANA: A multi-phase, multi-component hydrodynamic model for the analysis of severe accidents in heavy water reactors with multiple-tube assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Tentner, A.M.

    1994-03-01

    A detailed hydrodynamic fuel relocation model has been developed for the analysis of severe accidents in Heavy Water Reactors with multiple-tube Assemblies. This model describes the Fuel Disruption and Relocation inside a nuclear fuel assembly and is designated by the acronym DIANA. DIANA solves the transient hydrodynamic equations for all the moving materials in the core and treats all the relevant flow regimes. The numerical solution techniques and some of the physical models included in DIANA have been developed taking advantage of the extensive experience accumulated in the development and validation of the LEVITATE (1) fuel relocation model of SAS4A [2, 3]. The model is designed to handle the fuel and cladding relocation in both voided and partially voided channels. It is able to treat a wide range of thermal/ hydraulic/neutronic conditions and the presence of various flow regimes at different axial locations within the same hydrodynamic channel.

  5. A modelling study of the effects of land management and climatic variations on groundwater inflow to Lake St Lucia, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Været, Lars; Kelbe, Bruce; Haldorsen, Sylvi; Taylor, Richard H.

    2009-12-01

    Over the past few years groundwater has been recognized as an important contributor of freshwater to Lake St Lucia, South Africa during periods of prolonged drought. This has led to a management strategy aiming at increasing the groundwater recharge and minimizing groundwater use through active manipulation of the vegetation. For the Eastern Shores on the edge of Lake St Lucia, the replacement of vast areas of pine ( Pinus elliottii) plantations with grassland over the past decade, combined with a strict burning regime, has led to a general rise of the water table, which has increased the groundwater seepage to Lake St Lucia. A numerical groundwater model has been applied to assess the effects of local management strategies on the mass balance of a shallow aquifer and these are compared to the effects of predicted climate and sea-level change for this area. The simulations indicate that local management actions that are being applied to the Eastern Shores have positive effects on the groundwater flux into Lake St Lucia and that they outweigh potential negative effects of future climate and sea-level change predicted for this area.

  6. The Relevance and Appropriateness of Positivist and Interpretative Approaches for Exploring Quality Education in Schools in St. Lucia, a Small Caribbean State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caesar, Chryselda

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the definition of research, purpose and influence of educational research on policy and its practitioners, the distinguishing features of positivist and interpretative approaches as complementary research paradigms, and to debate their relevance in exploring quality education in schools in St. Lucia, a small Caribbean Island.…

  7. DIANA-TarBase v7.0: indexing more than half a million experimentally supported miRNA:mRNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Kanellos, Ilias; Anastasopoulos, Ioannis-Laertis; Maniou, Sofia; Karathanou, Konstantina; Kalfakakou, Despina; Fevgas, Athanasios; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA species, which act as potent gene expression regulators. Accurate identification of miRNA targets is crucial to understanding their function. Currently, hundreds of thousands of miRNA:gene interactions have been experimentally identified. However, this wealth of information is fragmented and hidden in thousands of manuscripts and raw next-generation sequencing data sets. DIANA-TarBase was initially released in 2006 and it was the first database aiming to catalog published experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/tarbase) aims to provide for the first time hundreds of thousands of high-quality manually curated experimentally validated miRNA:gene interactions, enhanced with detailed meta-data. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 enables users to easily identify positive or negative experimental results, the utilized experimental methodology, experimental conditions including cell/tissue type and treatment. The new interface provides also advanced information ranging from the binding site location, as identified experimentally as well as in silico, to the primer sequences used for cloning experiments. More than half a million miRNA:gene interactions have been curated from published experiments on 356 different cell types from 24 species, corresponding to 9- to 250-fold more entries than any other relevant database. DIANA-TarBase v7.0 is freely available.

  8. Estimating the Burden of Acute Gastrointestinal Illness: A Pilot Study of the Prevalence and Underreporting in Saint Lucia, Eastern Caribbean

    PubMed Central

    Jaime, Alina; Mckensie, Martin; Auguste, Ava; Pérez, Enrique; Indar, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Saint Lucia was the first country to conduct a burden of illness study in the Caribbean to determine the community prevalence and underreporting of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). A retrospective cross-sectional population survey on AGE-related illness was administered to a random sample of residents of Saint Lucia in 20 April–16 May 2008 and 6-13 December 2009 to capture the high- and low-AGE season respectively. Of the selected 1,150 individuals, 1,006 were administered the survey through face-to-face interviews (response rate 87.4%). The overall monthly prevalence of AGE was 3.9%. The yearly incidence rate was 0.52 episodes/person-year. The age-adjusted monthly prevalence was 4.6%. The highest monthly prevalence of AGE was among children aged <5 years (7.5%) and the lowest in persons aged 45-64 years (2.6%). The average number of days an individual suffered from diarrhoea was 3.8 days [range 1-21 day(s)]. Of the reported AGE cases, only seven (18%) sought medical care; however, 83% stayed at home due to the illness [(range 1-16 day(s), mean 2.5]; and 26% required other individuals to take care of them. The estimated underreporting of syndromic AGE and laboratory-confirmed foodborne disease pathogens was 81% and 99% respectively during the study period. The economic cost for treating syndromic AGE was estimated at US$ 3,892.837 per annum. This was a pilot study on the burden of illness (BOI) in the Caribbean. The results of the study should be interpreted within the limitations and challenges of this study. Lessons learnt were used for improving the implementation procedures of other BOI studies in the Caribbean.

  9. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications

    PubMed Central

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S.; Bilton, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this

  10. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S; Bilton, David T

    2016-01-01

    Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this biodiverse

  11. Persistent Phytoplankton Bloom in Lake St. Lucia (iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa) Caused by a Cyanobacterium Closely Associated with the Genus Cyanothece (Synechococcaceae, Chroococcales) ▿

    PubMed Central

    Muir, David G.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Lake St. Lucia, iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, is the largest estuarine lake in Africa. Extensive use and manipulation of the rivers flowing into it have reduced freshwater inflow, and the lake has also been subject to a drought of 10 years. For much of this time, the estuary has been closed to the Indian Ocean, and salinities have progressively risen throughout the system, impacting the biotic components of the ecosystem, reducing zooplankton and macrobenthic biomass and diversity in particular. In June 2009, a bloom of a red/orange planktonic microorganism was noted throughout the upper reaches of Lake St. Lucia. The bloom persisted for at least 18 months, making it the longest such bloom on record. The causative organism was characterized by light and electron microscopy and by 16S rRNA sequencing and was shown to be a large, unicellular cyanobacterium most strongly associated with the genus Cyanothece. The extent and persistence of the bloom appears to be unique to Lake St. Lucia, and it is suggested that the organism's resistance to high temperatures, to intense insolation, and to hypersalinity as well as the absence of grazing pressure by salinity-sensitive zooplankton all contributed to its persistence as a bloom organism until a freshwater influx, due to exceptionally heavy summer rains in 2011, reduced the salinity for a sufficient length of time to produce a crash in the cyanobacterium population as a complex, low-salinity biota redeveloped. PMID:21742912

  12. Community-based participatory research to improve life quality and clinical outcomes of patients with breast cancer (DianaWeb in Umbria pilot study)

    PubMed Central

    Villarini, Milena; Lanari, Chiara; Nucci, Daniele; Gianfredi, Vincenza; Marzulli, Tiziana; Berrino, Franco; Borgo, Alessandra; Bruno, Eleonora; Gargano, Giuliana; Moretti, Massimo; Villarini, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent cancer in Europe and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has estimated over 460 000 incident cases per year. Survival among patients with BC has increased in the past decades and EUROCARE-5 has estimated a 5-year relative survival rate of 82% for patients diagnosed in 2000–2007. There is growing evidence that lifestyle (such as a diet based on Mediterranean principles associated with moderate physical activity) may influence prognosis of BC; however, this information is not currently available to patients and is not considered in oncology protocols. Only a few epidemiological studies have investigated the role of diet in BC recurrence and metastasis. Methods and analysis DianaWeb is a community-based participatory research dedicated to patients with BC and represents a collaborative effort between participants and research institutions to determine if specified changes in lifestyle would result in improved outcomes in terms of quality of life or survival. The aim of the study is to recruit a large number of participants, to monitor their lifestyle and health status over time, to provide them tips to encourage sustainable lifestyle changes, to analyse clinical outcomes as a function of baseline risk factors and subsequent changes, and to share with patients methodologies and results. DianaWeb uses a specific interactive website (http://www.dianaweb.org/) and, with very few exceptions, all communications will be made through the web. In this paper we describe the pilot study, namely DianaWeb in Umbria. Ethics and dissemination DianaWeb does not interfere with prescribed oncological treatments; rather, it recommends that participants should follow the received prescriptions. The results will be used to plan guidelines for nutrition and physical activity for patients with BC. The pilot study was approved by the ethics committee of the University of Perugia (reference number 2015-002), and is

  13. National survey of the prevalence and risk factors of glaucoma in St. Lucia, West Indies. Part I. Prevalence findings.

    PubMed

    Mason, R P; Kosoko, O; Wilson, M R; Martone, J F; Cowan, C L; Gear, J C; Ross-Degnan, D

    1989-09-01

    Although blacks appear to be at higher risk for blindness from glaucoma, there is little information available on the epidemiology of this disease in this population. Using a cluster sampling technique with systematic allocation of clusters, the authors conducted a national survey of black individuals 30 years of age and older, in St. Lucia. A total of 1679 individuals underwent a screening examination that included visual acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement, and cup/disc (C/D) evaluation. Every third person had a screening field on the Humphrey field analyzer. Individuals with either elevated IOP, abnormal C/D ratio, or an abnormal screening visual field were referred for a definitive examination and threshold visual fields. A total of 520 people were referred. Identified by stringent criteria for the diagnosis of glaucoma, which required reliable threshold visual fields abnormal by the mirror image method, 147 individuals had glaucoma for a prevalence of 8.8% in the 30 years of age and older population.

  14. Nest predation and maternal care in the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) at Lake St Lucia, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Combrink, Xander; Warner, Jonathan K; Downs, Colleen T

    2016-12-01

    Information regarding nest predation, nest abandonment, and maternal care in the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) is largely restricted to anecdotal observations, and has not been studied quantitatively. Consequently, we investigated their nesting biology using camera-traps over four years at Lake St Lucia, South Africa. We obtained 4305 photographs (daylight captures=90.1%, nocturnal=9.9%) of 19 nest-guarding females. Of 19 monitored nests, 37% were raided by predators (mean=12.1±6.2days subsequent to camera placement). All females returned to their nests following first predation, and on average returned three times between predator raids before nest abandonment. Water monitors (Varanus niloticus) and marsh mongoose (Atilax paludinosus) were the main egg predators. Nesting raids lasted 5.9±1.6days. Diurnally females were seldom on the nest, except during cool/cloudy weather or rain, preferring to guard from nearby shade. Females defended nests aggressively against non-human intruders. Five Nile crocodile females were observed liberating their hatchlings from nests. A detailed sequence of a mother excavating and transporting hatchlings revealed 13 excursions between nest and water over 32.5h. This, after months of continual nest attendance and defence, is illustrative of the high level of maternal care in Nile crocodiles. Camera-trapping is an effective, non-invasive method for further crocodile nesting behaviour research.

  15. The elusive character of discontinuous deep-water channels: New insights from Lucia Chica channel system, offshore California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maier, K.L.; Fildani, A.; Paull, C.K.; Graham, S.A.; McHargue, T.R.; Caress, D.W.; McGann, M.

    2011-01-01

    New high-resolution autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) seafloor images, with 1 m lateral resolution and 0.3 m vertical resolution, reveal unexpected seafloor rugosity and low-relief (<10 m), discontinuous conduits over ~70 km2. Continuous channel thalwegs were interpreted originally from lower-resolution images, but newly acquired AUV data indicate that a single sinuous channel fed a series of discontinuous lower-relief channels. These discontinuous channels were created by at least four avulsion events. Channel relief, defined as the height from the thalweg to the levee crest, controls avulsions and overall stratigraphic architecture of the depositional area. Flowstripped turbidity currents separated into and reactivated multiple channels to create a distributary pattern and developed discontinuous trains of cyclic scours and megaflutes, which may be erosional precursors to continuous channels. The diverse features now imaged in the Lucia Chica channel system (offshore California) are likely common in modern and ancient systems with similar overall morphologies, but have not been previously mapped with lower-resolution detection methods in any of these systems. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  16. First paleoparasitological record of digenean eggs from a native deer from Patagonia Argentina (Cueva Parque Diana archaeological site).

    PubMed

    María Ornela, Beltrame; Eleonor, Tietze; Alberto Enrique, Pérez; Norma Haydeé, Sardella

    2017-02-15

    Eggs representative of a digenean species were found in coprolites belonged to an endemic deer from Patagonia. Samples were collected from the archaeological site named "Cueva Parque Diana". This site is a cave located at the Lanín National Park, Neuquén Province, Argentina. The coprolites were dated from 2370±70 to 580±60 years B.P. The eggs were ellipsoidal, operculated, yellowish and thin-shelled. Measurements (n=65) ranged from 120.0 to 142.5 (133.2±6.53) μm long and 62.5 to 87.5 (72.6±6.15) μm wide. Eggs were well-preserved and were identified as belonged to Class Trematoda, Subclass Digenea, similar to those of Fasciola hepatica or with another species not identified at present from Patagonia. This is the first report of digenean eggs from ancient deer worldwide. The present study confirms the presence of representatives of digenean species in endemic deer from Patagonia in ancient times and the presence of a trematode disease prior to the arrival of European cattle.

  17. The MADS domain protein DIANA acts together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to specify the central cell in Arabidopsis ovules.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C

    2008-08-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein-beta-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt.

  18. Crocodiles count on it: Regulation of discharge to Lake St Lucia Estuary by a South African peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J. S.; Grundling, P.; Grootjans, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Mfabeni mire is located within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park in north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province on the Indian Ocean sea-board of South Africa. This mire complex includes open peatland with occurrences of sedge communities, Sphagnum (rare in South Africa), and swamp forest which is common in the region (but rare in South Africa). It is one of the largest (1650 ha), thickest (10.8 m of peat) and the oldest (~45,000 years Before Present) known peatlands in South Africa. The mire is almost pristine, with very few disturbances. In the past the surrounding area supported pine plantations but these alien trees were recently removed, with conservation and tourism the primary designated activities. Surface and groundwater exchanges to and within the mire and its surrounding coastal dune landscape were studied. Profiles of electrical conductivity and major cations and anions, as well as natural isotopes (δ2H and δ18O) in water samples of ground and surface water were also analysed to develop a conceptual model of the system’s hydrological function. Water efflux from an inland dune complex provides substantial recharge towards Mfabeni, while coastward hydraulic gradients from the dune complex through the wetland are evident. Consequently, the linkages between the dune system and Mfabeni, and the peatland’s water regulation function, dictate the nature and magnitude of the local freshwater discharge to the estuary, and internal water exchanges that control peatland ecological function. The hydrograph from the stream outlet indicate an initial rapid response in increased flows after major rainfall events but with a delayed drawdown over time reflecting the contribution of the relatively large size of the mire (comprising 38% of the catchment) in attenuating flood events and ensuring sustained flow to the estuary. Freshwater discharge from the Mfabeni mire to the St. Lucia estuary, which has provided refuge for aquatic species during periods of drought, may become

  19. Volcanic Stratigraphy and Geochemistry of the Soufrière Volcanic Centre, Saint Lucia with Implications for Volcanic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, J. M.; Schmitt, A. K.; Trumbull, R. B.; Stockli, D. F.; Shane, P. A.; Howe, T. M.; Kislitsyn, R.; Robertson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive pyroclastic flow deposits, lava flows, domes and block-and-ash-flow deposits from the Soufriere Volcanic Complex (SVC), Saint Lucia, collectively represent one of the largest silicic centers in the Lesser Antilles arc. They occur within and around the Qualibou Depression, a ~10 km diameter ampitheater-shaped sector collapse structure that formed sometime 250-100 ka ago. Vent locations for SVC pyroclastic flow deposits and their relationship to the sector collapse remain unclear because stratigraphic correlation is difficult and there are only sparse radiometric ages for SVC domes and pyroclastic rocks. Compositionally, SVC rocks are uniformly medium-K, calc-alkaline rocks with 61.6 to 67.7 wt.% SiO2. Whole-rock trace element abundances are equally uniform whereas mineral chemistry only subtly differs between units. Combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon together with 14C dating and mineral fingerprinting reveals significant explosive eruptions at ~300, 265, 104, 60 and 40 ka (producing deposits previously grouped together as the "Choisuel" unit) and at ~20 ka (Belfond unit). Dacitic lava domes similar in geochemical composition to the pyroclastic flow deposits yield (U-Th)/He eruption ages for zircon ranging from 273 ka (Morne Bonin) to 14 ka (Belfond dome). Zircon crystal rim ages in the most recently erupted volcanic rocks, including the domes, match those of co-erupted plutonic inclusions, whereas crystal interiors are equivalent to the cumulative distribution of zircon ages from older eruptions. This, together with their geochemical characteristics, suggests that the silicic lava domes and pyroclastic flows of the SVC share a common source beneath the Qualibou depression, which we consider the most likely location for future activity.

  20. New Peak Temperature Constraints Using RSCM Geothermometry on Lucia Subterrane in Franciscan Complex (California, USA): Detection of Thermal Anomalies in Gold-Bearing Quartz Veins Surrounding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahfid, A.; Delchini, S.; Lacroix, B.

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of deposits hosted by carbonaceous materials-rich metasediments is widespread. Therefore, we aims in this study to investigate the potential of the Raman Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Material (RSCM) geothermometry to detect thermal anomalies in hydrothermal ore deposits environment and to demonstrate the ability of warm fluids, migrating through the sedimentary sequence to locally disturb the thermal gradient and associated peak temperatures. For this purpose, we have chosen the Lucia subterrane in the Franciscan Complex (California, USA), which includes gold-bearing quartz veins that witness a hydrothermal overprint (Underwood et al., 1995).The sediments in this zone essentially comprise greywacke and shale-matrix mélange (e.g. Frey and Robinson, 1999), which have undergone high-pressure, low-temperature metamorphism. The thermal history of the Lucia subterrane has been previously proposed by Underwood et al. (1995), essentially using vitrinite reflectance method (Rm). Rm values increase from the south to the north; they vary between 0.9 and 3.7 % (~150-280°C). All these results suggest that the Lucia subterrane underwent a regional increase of thermal gradient toward the north. Anomalous Rm values from 4.5% to 4.9% (~305-315°C) are recorded near Cape San Martin. These highest temperatures estimated are likely, associated with a late hydrothermal event (Underwood et al., 1995). Estimated Raman temperatures 1) confirmed the increase in the metamorphic grade towards the north already shown by Underwood et al. (1995), using classical methods like mineralogy and vitrinite reflectance and 2) exhibit anomalous values (temperatures reach 350°C). These anomalies are probably due to the later hydrothermal event. This result suggests that RSCM could be used as a reliable tool to determine thermal anomalies caused by hot fluid-flow.

  1. DianaHealth.com, an On-Line Database Containing Appraisals of the Clinical Value and Appropriateness of Healthcare Interventions: Database Development and Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bonfill, Xavier; Osorio, Dimelza; Solà, Ivan; Pijoan, Jose Ignacio; Balasso, Valentina; Quintana, Maria Jesús; Puig, Teresa; Bolibar, Ignasi; Urrútia, Gerard; Zamora, Javier; Emparanza, José Ignacio; Gómez de la Cámara, Agustín; Ferreira-González, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the development of a novel on-line database aimed to serve as a source of information concerning healthcare interventions appraised for their clinical value and appropriateness by several initiatives worldwide, and to present a retrospective analysis of the appraisals already included in the database. Methods and Findings Database development and a retrospective analysis. The database DianaHealth.com is already on-line and it is regularly updated, independent, open access and available in English and Spanish. Initiatives are identified in medical news, in article references, and by contacting experts in the field. We include appraisals in the form of clinical recommendations, expert analyses, conclusions from systematic reviews, and original research that label any health care intervention as low-value or inappropriate. We obtain the information necessary to classify the appraisals according to type of intervention, specialties involved, publication year, authoring initiative, and key words. The database is accessible through a search engine which retrieves a list of appraisals and a link to the website where they were published. DianaHealth.com also provides a brief description of the initiatives and a section where users can report new appraisals or suggest new initiatives. From January 2014 to July 2015, the on-line database included 2940 appraisals from 22 initiatives: eleven campaigns gathering clinical recommendations from scientific societies, five sets of conclusions from literature review, three sets of recommendations from guidelines, two collections of articles on low clinical value in medical journals, and an initiative of our own. Conclusions We have developed an open access on-line database of appraisals about healthcare interventions considered of low clinical value or inappropriate. DianaHealth.com could help physicians and other stakeholders make better decisions concerning patient care and healthcare systems sustainability

  2. The role of water and sediment connectivity in integrated flood management: a case study on the island of Saint Lucia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetten, Victor; van Westen, Cees; Ettema, Janneke; van den Bout, Bastian

    2016-04-01

    Disaster Risk Management combines the effects of natural hazards in time and space, with elements at risk, such as ourselves, infrastructure or other elements that have a value in our society. The risk in this case is defined as the sum of potential consequences of one or more hazards and can be expressed as potential damages. Generally, we attempt to reduce risk by better risk management, such as increase of resilience, protection and spatial planning. Caribbean islands are hit by hurricanes and tropical storms with a frequency of 1 to 2 every 10 years, with devastating consequences in terms of flash floods and landslides. The islands basically consist of a central (volcanic) mountain range, with medium and small sized catchments radiating outward towards the ocean. The coastal zone is inhabited, while the ring road network is essential for functioning of the island. An example of a case study is given for the island of Saint Lucia. Recorded rainfall intensities during tropical storms of 12 rainfall stations surpass 200 mm/h, causing immediate flash floods. Very often however, sediment is a forgotten variable in flash flood management: protection and mitigation measures as well as spatial planning all focus on the hydrology, the extent and depth of flood water, and sometimes of flood velocities. With recent developments, the opensource model LISEM includes hydrology and runoff, flooding, and erosion, transport and deposition both in runoff, channel flow and flood waters. We will discuss the practical solutions we implemented in connecting slopes, river channels and floodplains in terms of water and sediment, and the strength and weaknesses we have encountered so far. Catchment analysis shows two main effects: on the one hand in almost all cases upstream flooding serves as a temporary water storage that prevents further damage downstream, while on the other hand, erosion upstream often blocks bridges and decreases channel storage downstream, which increases the

  3. Evidence of El Niño driven desiccation cycles in a shallow estuarine lake: The evolution and fate of Africa's largest estuarine system, Lake St Lucia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, M. S.; Green, A. N.; Finch, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Projections of an increase in drought frequency and intensity over the next century are expected to have severe implications for a number of globally important coastal ecosystems. In this paper, we present geochemical data from three sediment cores extracted from the main depositional basins of Lake St Lucia, Africa's largest estuarine system. Lake St Lucia is subject to extreme natural variations in salinity. The sedimentary record documents the evolution of the system from a relatively deep-water, open lagoon to a confined, shallow estuarine lake that today is highly sensitive to changes in freshwater supply. This is particularly evident in the northern portions of the system, where the presence of distinct halite-enriched horizons document episodes of prolonged drought. The lateral persistence of these halite layers, as revealed by seismic profiling, point to a system-wide onset of desiccation associated with a major shift in the regional hydroclimate. The most severe drought events identified, which may have lasted several years, occur at 1100 and 1750 cal year BP, and are associated with known peaks in El Niño frequency and intensity. Our analyses suggest that past cycles of desiccation and hyper-salinity have been controlled by climatic changes related to ENSO intensification. This study provides a valuable new record from a key ENSO-sensitive region of the Southern Hemisphere. Our findings have important relevance for understanding ENSO variability across the Indo-Pacific region and the influence exerted on systems sensitive to changes in moisture balance.

  4. [RESPECT FOR AUTONOMY AND CONFIDENTIALITY, BETWEEN "ETHICAL NORMS' AND "LOCAL MORALITY". AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF ETHICS OF CARE IN ST LUCIA].

    PubMed

    Meudec, Marie

    2015-10-01

    This article considers the difficulty of applying ethical norms as part of an anthropological research on moralities and ethics of healing practices in St. Lucia (Caribbean). This reflection is based on the moral evaluations related to obeah, locally conceived as a set of magical, religious and witchcraft practices that helps to manage disease and misfortune. Through the analysis of local conceptions surrounding the ethical notions of autonomy and confidentiality, I call attention to potential nuisance caused by the application of principles of beneficence and respect for the individual. Indeed, local idioms that are moral discretion and self-sufficiency, which can respectively refer to the concepts of autonomy and confidentiality, are, paradoxically, both valued and likely to be associated with dubious morality. I will demonstrate that the fact of applying these principles in all ethnographic relationship may harm interlocutors by increasing, in the case of St. Lucia, the risk of witchcraft accusations and derogatory moral attributions. The anthropological field experience presented here questions the principles of beneficence and respect for the individual as defined in the field of research ethics; it also imposes the need to think about their adaptation to suit local representations. This leads to recommend a pragmatic and emerging ethics of anthropological research/practice.

  5. Volcanic stratigraphy and geochemistry of the Soufrière Volcanic Centre, Saint Lucia with implications for volcanic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Jan M.; Trumbull, Robert B.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Shane, Phil A.; Howe, Tracy M.

    2013-05-01

    The Soufrière Volcanic Complex (SVC), Saint Lucia, represents one of the largest silicic centres in the Lesser Antilles arc. It comprises extensive pumiceous pyroclastic flow deposits, lava flows as well as Peléan-style domes and dome collapse block-and-ash-flow deposits. These deposits occur within and around the Qualibou Depression, a ~ 10-km diameter wide sector collapse structure. To date, vent locations for SVC pyroclastic deposits and their relationship to the sector collapse have been unclear because of limited stratigraphic correlation and few radiometric ages. In this study we reconstruct the geologic history of the SVC in light of new and recently published (U-Th)/He, U-Th and U-Pb zircon chronostratigraphic data, aided by mineralogical and geochemical correlation. Compositionally, SVC deposits are monotonous medium-K, calc-alkaline rocks with 61.6 to 67.7 wt.% SiO2 and display similar trace element abundances. Combined U-Th and (U-Th)/He zircon dating together with 14C ages and mineral fingerprinting reveals significant explosive eruptions at 640, 515, 265, 104, 60 and 40 ka (producing deposits previously grouped together as the "Choiseul" unit) and at 20 ka (Belfond unit). The mineralogically and geochemically distinct Belfond unit is a large, valley-filling pumiceous pyroclastic flow deposit distributed to the north, northeast, south and southeast of the Qualibou Depression that was probably deposited during a single plinian eruption. The unit previously referred to as ‘Choiseul tuff' is much less well defined. The typical Choiseul unit comprises a series of yellowish-white, crystal-poor, non-welded pumiceous pyroclastic deposits cropping out to the north and southeast of the Qualibou depression; however its age is poorly constrained. A number of other units previously mapped as Choiseul can be distinguished based on age, and in some cases mineral and whole rock chemistry. Pyroclastic deposits at Micoud (640 ± 19 ka), Bellevue (264 ± 8 ka), Anse

  6. Exercise training improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer: findings from the Diana-5 dietary intervention study.

    PubMed

    Giallauria, Francesco; Vitelli, Alessandra; Maresca, Luigi; Santucci De Magistris, Maria; Chiodini, Paolo; Mattiello, Amalia; Gentile, Marco; Mancini, Maria; Grieco, Alessandra; Russo, Angelo; Lucci, Rosa; Torella, Giorgio; Berrino, Franco; Panico, Salvatore; Vigorito, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether exercise training (ET) improves cardiopulmonary and endothelial function in women with breast cancer (BC). Fifty-one female patients (aged between 39 and 72 years) with a history of primary invasive BC within the previous 5 years and enrolled in the Mediterranean diet-based DIANA (diet and androgens)-5 Trial were subdivided into 2 groups: an ET group (n = 25) followed a formal ET program of moderate intensity (3 session/week on a bicycle at 60-70 % VO2peak for 3 months, followed by one session/week until 1-year follow-up), while a control group (n = 26) did not perform any formal ET. At baseline and at 1-year follow-up, all patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise stress test (CPET) and measurements of vascular endothelial function by peripheral artery tonometry (Reactive Hyperemia Index, RHI). There were no significant differences between the groups in baseline anthropometrical, BC characteristics, and metabolic profile. No differences in baseline CPET and RHI parameters were found. Peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) significantly increased in ET group (from 12.4 ± 2.9 to 14.3 ± 3.3 mL/kg/min, p < 0.001) compared to the control group (from 12.8 ± 2.5 to 12.6 ± 2.8 mL/kg/min, p = 0.55; p < 0.001 between groups). Compared to the control group (from 2.0 ± 0.4 to 1.9 ± 0.4, p = 0.62), the ET group showed a significant improvement of RHI after 1 year (from 2.1 ± 0.7 to 2.5 ± 0.8, p < 0.001). Changes in VO2peak were correlated with changes in RHI (ΔVO2peak vs. ΔRHI: r = 0.47, p = 0.017). In BC survivors, ET program improves cardiopulmonary functional capacity and vascular endothelial function after 12 months. Whether these changes may favorably modulate some of the pathophysiological mechanisms implied in cancer evolution should be investigated.

  7. New Emphases for Adult Education in the Caribbean in the Eighties. Final Report on a Meeting of Experts from Adult Education Institutions in the Caribbean (Castries, St. Lucia, September 1-6, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and Caribbean.

    A meeting was held in St. Lucia in September, 1980, at which representatives of Caribbean countries discussed the present state and future progress of adult education in the region. The meeting viewed adult education as a vital part of national and regional development. Meeting participants stressed the following four themes: (1) political changes…

  8. An evaluation of ambient sulphur dioxide concentrations from passive degassing of the Sulphur Springs, Saint Lucia geothermal system: Implications for human health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Erouscilla P.; Beckles, Denise M.; Cox, Leonette; Jackson, Viveka B.; Alexander, Dominic

    2015-10-01

    Sulphur Springs Park in Saint Lucia is a site of energetic geothermal activity associated with the potentially active Soufrière Volcanic Centre. The Park is one of Saint Lucia's most important tourist attractions, and is marketed as the 'world's only drive-in volcano'. It has an on-site staff of tour guides and vendors, as well as over 200,000 visitors annually. There are also a number of residents living in the areas bordering the Park. Recreational use is made of the geothermal waters for bathing, application of mud masques, and in some cases drinking. As part of the University of the West Indies, Seismic Research Centre's (UWI-SRC's) overall volcano monitoring programme for Saint Lucia, the volcanic emissions at Sulphur Springs (hot springs, mud pools and fumaroles) have been regularly monitored since 2001. In recent years, visitors, staff, and management at the Park have expressed concern about the health effects of exposure to volcanic emissions from the hydrothermal system. In response to this, SRC has expanded its regular geothermal monitoring programme to include a preliminary evaluation of ambient sulphur dioxide (SO2) concentrations in and around the Park, to assess the possible implications for human health. Passive diffusion tubes were used to measure the atmospheric SO2 concentrations at various sites in Sulphur Springs Park (SSP), in the town of Soufrière and in the capital of Castries. Measurements of average monthly ambient SO2 with the passive samplers indicated that during the dry season period of April to July 2014 concentration at sites closest to the main vents at SSP (Group 1), which are routinely used by staff and visitors, frequently exceeded the WHO 10-minute AQG for SO2 of 500 μg/m3. However, for sites that were more distal to the main venting area (Groups 2 and 3), the average monthly ambient SO2 did not exceed the WHO 10-minute AQG for SO2 of 500 μg/m3 during the entire monitoring period. The measured concentrations and dispersion

  9. Comparative reproductive biology of the social parasite Acromyrmex ameliae de Souza, Soares & Della Lucia and of its host Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Soares, Ilka M F; Della Lucia, Terezinha M C; Pereira, Alice S; Serrão, José E; Ribeiro, Myriam M R; De Souza, Danival J

    2010-01-01

    Social parasites exhibit several characteristics that allow them to exploit their host species efficiently. The smaller size of parasite species is a trait commonly found in ants. In this work, we investigated several aspects of the reproductive biology of Acromyrmex ameliae De Souza, Soares & Della Lucia, a recently discovered parasite of Acromyrmex subterraneus subterraneus Forel. Sexuals of A. ameliae are substantially smaller than those from host species. Parasite queens laid significantly less worker eggs than host queens and inhibit sexual production of the host. The sex ratio of parasite species is highly female biased. Interestingly, we have observed parasite coupling on the laboratory, inside the nests and in the ground, opening the possibility to use controlled mating to study genetic approaches of parasitism in the ants.

  10. Operational use of environmental satellite remote sensing and satellite communications technology for global food security and locust control by FAO: The ARTEMIS and DIANA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hielkema, J. U.; Snijders, F. L.

    implementing during 1989-1992 a dedicated satellite communications system, DIANA (Direct Information Access Network for Africa), which allows real-time transmission of high volume ARTEMIS digital products to user terminals in Nairobi, Kenya: Accra, Ghana and Harare, Zimbabwe. The DIANA system, which operates through the Intelsat satellite over the Indian Ocean and the italian Intelsat groundstation of Telespazio in Fucino, is currently being tested and demonstrated for a wide variety of applications of an operational, technical and administrative nature.

  11. Geologic framework and hydrogeologic characteristics in the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area, northern Bexar County, Texas, 2008-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Allan K.; Morris, Robert R.

    2011-01-01

    The area designated by the city of San Antonio as the Rancho Diana Natural Area is in northern Bexar County, near San Antonio, Texas. During 2008-10, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of San Antonio, documented the geologic framework and mapped the hydrogeologic characteristics for the southern part of the Rancho Diana Natural Area. The geologic framework of the study area and its hydrogeologic characteristics were documented using field observations and information from previously published reports. Many of the geologic and hydrogeologic features were found by making field observations through the dense vegetation along gridlines spaced approximately 25 feet apart and documenting the features as they were located. Surface geologic features were identified and hydrogeologic features such as caves, sinkholes, and areas of solutionally enlarged porosity were located using hand-held Global Positioning System units. The location data were used to create a map of the hydrogeologic subdivisions and the location of karst features. The outcrops of the Edwards and Trinity aquifer recharge zones were mapped by using hydrogeologic subdivisions modified from previous reports. All rocks exposed within the study area are of sedimentary origin and Lower Cretaceous in age. The valley floor is formed in the cavernous member of the upper Glen Rose Limestone of the Trinity Group. The hills are composed of the basal nodular member, dolomitic member, Kirschberg evaporite member, and grainstone member of the Kainer Formation of the Edwards Group. Field observations made during this study of the exposed formations and members indicate that the formations and members typically are composed of mudstones, wackestones, packstones, grainstones, and argillaceous limestones, along with marls. The upper Glen Rose Limestone is approximately 410 to 450 feet thick but only the upper 70 feet is exposed in the study area. The Kainer Formation is approximately 255 feet thick in

  12. The MADS Domain Protein DIANA Acts Together with AGAMOUS-LIKE80 to Specify the Central Cell in Arabidopsis Ovules[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2008-01-01

    MADS box genes in plants consist of MIKC-type and type I genes. While MIKC-type genes have been studied extensively, the functions of type I genes are still poorly understood. Evidence suggests that type I MADS box genes are involved in embryo sac and seed development. We investigated two independent T-DNA insertion alleles of the Arabidopsis thaliana type I MADS box gene AGAMOUS-LIKE61 (AGL61) and showed that in agl61 mutant ovules, the polar nuclei do not fuse and central cell morphology is aberrant. Furthermore, the central cell begins to degenerate before fertilization takes place. Although pollen tubes are attracted and perceived by the mutant ovules, neither endosperm development nor zygote formation occurs. AGL61 is expressed in the central cell during the final stages of embryo sac development. An AGL61:green fluorescent protein–β-glucoronidase fusion protein localizes exclusively to the polar nuclei and the secondary nucleus of the central cell. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that AGL61 can form a heterodimer with AGL80 and that the nuclear localization of AGL61 is lost in the agl80 mutant. Thus, AGL61 and AGL80 appear to function together to differentiate the central cell in Arabidopsis. We renamed AGL61 DIANA, after the virginal Roman goddess of the hunt. PMID:18713950

  13. Diana Reference Manual. Revision 3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-28

    Lterale - yno 2.3 - not of Interest for Diane 10 :.a OEF-10I I USMD....D OP : : x OEP..OP I USMDOP; DEI 3NATOR : :z 10 1 Or; OEPOCCJRRENC :: EP_ID I... Ideferred constant; -deterred constant~declaraton (7.4) DCI pragma; -pregmea lowe as declaration ADA Section 2. 3 Page 34 / teCtIOfl 2 otAIA Rteference...osat -see rationale Section 3.5.2.14 csao fdeerdcosat const-id I X -Srcpoe : ort..positiofl. Ix...commelnfts comments. Ix-sym rep :symbol rep; cosstd

  14. Probing the structure of the sub-Salinia mantle lithosphere using spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Crystal Knob, Santa Lucia Range, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, D. P.; Saleeby, J.; Ducea, M. N.; Luffi, P. I.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first petrogenetic analysis of a suite of peridotite xenoliths from the Crystal Knob volcanic neck in the Santa Lucia Range, California. The neck was erupted during the Plio-Pleistocene through the Salinia terrane, a fragment of the Late Cretaceous southern Sierra-northwest Mojave supra-subduction core complex that was displaced ~310 km in the late Cenozoic along the dextral San Andreas fault. The marginal tectonic setting makes these xenoliths ideal for testing different models of upper-mantle evolution along the western North American plate boundary. Possible scenarios include the early Cenozoic underplating of Farallon-plate mantle lithosphere nappes (Luffi et al., 2009), Neogene slab window opening (Atwater and Stock, 1998), and the partial subduction and stalling of the Monterey microplate (Pisker et al., 2012). The xenoliths from Crystal Knob are spinel lherzolites, which sample the mantle lithosphere underlying Salinia, and dunite cumulates apparently related to the olivine-basalt host. Initial study is focused on the spinel lherzolites: these display an allotriomorphic granular texture with anisotropy largely absent. However, several samples exhibit a weak shape-preferred orientation in elongate spinels. Within each xenolith, the silicate phases are in Fe-Mg equilibrium; between samples, Mg# [molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)*100] ranges from 87 to 91. Spinels have Cr# [molar Cr/(Cr+Al)*100] ranging from 10 to 27. Clinopyroxene Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd radiogenic isotope data show that the lherzolites are depleted in large-ion lithophile (LIL) elements, with uniform enrichment in 143Nd (ɛNd from +10.3 to +11.0) and depletion in 87Sr (87/86Sr of .702). This data rules out origin in the continental lithosphere, such as that observed in xenoliths from above the relict subduction interface found at at Dish Hill and Cima Dome in the Mojave (Luffi et al., 2009). The Mesozoic mantle wedge, which is sampled by xenoliths from beneath the southern Sierra Nevada batholith

  15. 27 CFR 9.139 - Santa Lucia Highlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (photorevised 1984) (5) Soledad, Calif., 1955 (photorevised 1984) (6) Sycamore Flat, Calif., 1956 (photorevised... the junction of Foothill and Paraiso Roads on the Soledad, California U.S.G.S. map. (8) Then...

  16. Diana's Eulogy: Breaking New Ground in Epideictic Rhetoric?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, David K.

    A speech in response to an individual's death is by nature a recurring form of rhetoric. Based on audience expectations and needs, certain generic aspects have emerged to characterize eulogies. The funeral oration has generally been recognized as a form of epideictic rhetoric. Modern scholars have generally broadly defined epideictic rhetoric to…

  17. Osmoregulation of the Nile crocodile, Crocodylus niloticus, in Lake St. Lucia, Kwazulu/Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Leslie, A J; Spotila, J R

    2000-07-01

    Nile crocodiles of three age classes, hatched in captivity and reared in fresh water, when exposed acutely to water of 17 and 35 ppt NaCl, suffered marked dehydration, were lethargic, ceased to feed and lost mass. When exposed to gradually increasing salinities (3-35 ppt), with a short acclimation period at each salinity, crocodiles survived, continued to feed and increased in mass and size. All age classes had a relatively constant plasma osmolality across the salinity spectrum. Cloacal urine osmolality varied throughout the acclimation experiment, but did not increase with increasing salinity. No significant increase was found in plasma concentrations of any of the osmolytes. There was a trend of decreasing cloacal urine [Na(+)] and [Cl(-)] and increasing cloacal urine [K(+)] with increased salinity, indicating that urine was not an important route for Na(+) and Cl(-) excretion. Crocodiles exposed to saline conditions maintained relatively constant plasma uric acid concentrations, but urinary uric acid concentrations increased markedly with increasing salinities. This suggests that uric acid is the main constituent of nitrogenous waste excretion in saline exposed Nile crocodiles. As in Crocodylus porosus, C.niloticus has the physiological ability to survive and thrive in periodically hyper-osmotic environments. However, its euryhalinity is restricted, in that acute exposure to sea water leads to dehydration, but with an acclimation period at lower salinities, it survives and thrives in sea water.

  18. A new genus of mimetic longhorned beetle from St. Lucia, Lesser Antilles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Rhinotragini)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A species originally described as Fortuneleptura romei Touroult 2011 (Lepturinae) is placed in a new genus, Iyanola Lingafelter & Ivie (Cerambycinae: Rhinotragini). Along with the new genus description, the species is redescribed and additional collection data is recorded. A key to the genera and ...

  19. Curriculum/Resource Development: The "C.A.R.E for St. Lucia" Resource Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Michelle

    1993-01-01

    Describes a resource packet that utilizes a four-point approach to make environmental action concerning land use more accessible to teachers. The points are construct a map of the area under consideration; assess the impact of historical development, natural cycles, mining, and eco-tourism on the problem; research land use options; and encourage…

  20. The Santa Lucia-Aiguá-Merin rifting (Uruguay): an early aborted branch of the South Atlantic break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossello, E.; López-Gamundí, O. R.; Veroslavsky, G.; de Santa Ana, H.

    2012-04-01

    The Santa Lucía-Aigua-Merin (SaLAM) rift is emplaced in the cratonic basement of SE Uruguay. It covers 450 km from the Rio de La Plata to the southwest to Laguna Merin to the northeast running broadly parallel to the South American plate boundary. It is a narrow, pull apart trough trending N 70° with two distinct depocenters (Santa Lucía and Merin) filled predominantly by Mesozoic volcaniclastic sediments. Alkaline magmatic rocks have been identified in the Minas-Aigua-Lescano uplifted segment that separates both depocenters. The Santa Lucía depocenter or sub basin was filled with a up to 2,500 m thick column of upper Jurassic to Cenozoic volcaniclastic sediments that rest on the structured Precambrian basement. The Merin sub basin is dominated by a thick volcanic sequence associated with a significant gravity anomaly. The SaLAM rift joins southwestard into a triple-junction configuration with the NW-SE trending Salado Basin is was buried by Lower Tertiary to Recent sediments. The SaLAM trough can be interpreted as an aborted branch of the South Atlantic break up; its orientation was probably controlled, at least partially, by the structural grain of the pre-existing Gondwana crystalline basement. Its accessible outcrops provide an excellent opportunity to study the sedimentary, magmatic and tectonic evolution of the early stages of the South Atlantic break up and its potential reactivation during the Andean orogeny that seemed to have affected significant parts of the adjacent large continental platform of Uruguay and Argentina.

  1. Seeking a "Mexicana/Mestiza" Critical Feminist Ethic of Care: Diana's "Revolución" of Body and Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa-Provencio, Mia Angélica

    2016-01-01

    This Chicana Critical Feminist Testimonio reveals a Mexican/Mexican-American Ethic of Care and Testimonios of struggle and survival informing curriculum and pedagogy of one Mexican/Mexican-American female educator of predominantly Mexican/Mexican-American students. This work is part of a larger ethnographic study conducted through multiple…

  2. Map showing thermal-alteration indicies in roadless areas and the Santa Lucia Wilderness in the Los Padres National Forest, Southwestern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1985-01-01

    South of the Santa Ynez fault, the TAI's of exposed rocks near the fault are mainly between 2+ and 3– (2+/3–) to 3 and are generally in the early stage of thermal maturity with respect to the possible generation of oil. North of the Santa Ynez fault, the exposed rocks have TAI's mostly of 2 to 2+ and are mainly immature or transitional from immature to mature. However, Jurassic(?) and Lower Cretaceous samples from the central San Rafael Mountains have distinctly higher TAI's, similar to those of rocks south of the Santa Ynez fault.

  3. De-Creolization and Re-Creolization: A Preliminary Report on the Sociolinguistic Survey of Multilingual Communities Stage II: St. Lucia. York Papers in Linguistics, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Page, R. B.

    This study continues a series of reports on the work of the team which has carried out a sociolinguistic survey of multilingual communities. This study deals with an early sample of the results of the St. Lucian survey, and in particular with the extent to which they provide support for the theoretical model of linguistic choice and change, and…

  4. Long-term community changes on a high-latitude coral reef in the Greater St Lucia Wetland Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, Michael H; Kruger, Alke; Celliers, Louis

    2008-03-01

    South African coral reefs are limited in size but, being marginal, provide a model for the study of many of the stresses to which these valuable systems are being subjected globally. Soft coral cover, comprising relatively few species, exceeds that of scleractinians over much of the reefs. The coral communities nevertheless attain a high biodiversity at this latitude on the East African coast. A long-term monitoring programme was initiated in 1993, entailing temperature logging and image analysis of high resolution photographs of fixed quadrats on representative reef. Sea temperatures rose by 0.15 degrees C p.a. at the site up to 2000 but have subsequently been decreasing by 0.07 degrees C p.a. Insignificant bleaching was encountered in the region during the 1998 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event, unlike elsewhere in East Africa, but quantifiable bleaching occurred during an extended period of warming in 2000. Peak temperatures on the South African reefs thus appear to have attained the coral bleaching threshold. While this has resulted in relatively little bleaching thus far, the increased temperatures appear to have had a deleterious effect on coral recruitment success as other anthropogenic influences on the reefs are minimal. Recruitment success diminished remarkably up to 2004 but appears again to be improving. Throughout, the corals have also manifested changes in community structure, involving an increase in hard coral cover and reduction in that of soft corals, resulting in a 5.5% drop in overall coral cover. These "silent" effects of temperature increase do not appear to have been reported elsewhere in the literature.

  5. Operations MANDREL and GROMMET Events MINUTE STEAK, DIESEL TRAIN, DIANA MIST, MINT LEAF, HUDSON MOON, DIAGONAL LINE, and MISTY NORTH, 12 September 1969 to 2 May 1972

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-30

    Test Site Organization (NTSO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE 207 207 210 210 211 213 217 245 249 263 285 xx LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS...measuring 180 feet by 210 feet, and the axis was oriented on a northeast-southwest line. The crater was estimated to be 56 feet deep at its deepest...breathing apparatus. Standard safety rules and practices, as spelled out in the "U.S. Bureau of Mines Manual," were observed. 210 All explosives

  6. An Investigation of School Psychology Training Pertaining to Bilingual Psycho-Educational Assessment of Primarily Hispanic Students: Twenty-five Years after Diana v. California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochoa, Salvador Hector; Rivera, Bernadette; Ford, Laurie

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 1,507 school psychologists found that those who conduct bilingual psycho-educational assessment do not believe that they have received adequate training. Respondents identified only one program as having provided adequate training in all competencies identified. Indicates that the amount of training provided by the programs does not…

  7. Operations CROSSTIE and BOWLINE Events DOOR MIST, DORSAL FIN, MILK SHAKE, DIANA MOON, HUDSON SEAL, and MING VASE, 31 August 1967 - 20 November 1968

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-15

    300 feet at 180" azimuth from es portal 300 feet at 237 " azimuth from es portal 300 feet at 286" azimuth from es portal Filter Blower Stack...Molybdenum (42) ............ Neodymium (60) ............. Neptunium (93) ............. Nickel (28) ................ Niobium...197m . . . Hg 197 . . . . Hg 203 . . . . MO 99 . . . . . Nd 144 . . . . Nd 147 . . . . Nd 149 . . . . Np 237 . . . . Np 239 . . . . Ni 59

  8. Hydrological processes controlling ground and surface water flow from a hypermaritime forest-peatland complex, Diana Lake Provincial Park, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, Lisa A.; Price, Jonathan S.

    2006-08-01

    The proposed harvesting of previously undeveloped forests in north coastal British Columbia requires an understanding of hydrological responses. Hydrometric and isotopic techniques were used to examine the hydrological linkages between meteoric inputs to the surface-groundwater system and runoff response patterns of a forest-peatland complex. Quickflow accounted for 72-91% of peak storm discharge. The runoff ratio was lowest for open peatland areas with thick organic horizons (0.02-0.05) due to low topographic gradients and many surface depressions capable of retaining surface water. Runoff ratio increased comparatively for ephemeral surface seep flows (0.06-0.40) and was greatest in steeply sloping forest communities with more permeable soils (0.33-0.69). The dominant mechanism for runoff generation was saturated shallow subsurface flow. Groundwater fluxes from the organic horizon of seeps (1.70-1.72 m3 day-1 m-1) were an important component of quickflow. The homogeneous 2H18O composition of groundwater indicated attenuation of the seasonal rainfall signal by mixing during recharge. The positive correlation (r2 = 0.64 and 0.38, α = 0.05) between slope index and δ18O values in groundwater suggests that the spatial pattern in the δ18O composition along the forest-peatland complex is influenced by topography and provides evidence that topographic indices may be used to predict groundwater residence time.

  9. Review of a West Indian genus Monotalla Bechyne (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini) with description of five new species.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The previously monotypic West Indian genus Monotalla Bechyne is reviewed, redescribed and illustrated. Five new species are added: Monotalla dominica (Dominica); M. lecticafolium (St. Lucia); M. maierae (St. Lucia); M. obrienorum (Grenada); and M. viridis (St. Lucia). A key to Monotalla species is p...

  10. 77 FR 36994 - Questa Ranger District, Carson National Forest; Taos County, NM; Taos Ski Valley's 2010 Master...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... Supervisor Diana Trujillo, Carson National Forest. ADDRESSES: Send written comments to Carson National Forest... can be reached at 575-758-6200. Dated: June 13, 2012. Diana M. Trujillo, Acting Carson National...

  11. 77 FR 60477 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... 31, 2012. Permit Application: 2013-023 Applicant: Diana H. Wall, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory... soils and associated terrestrial invertebrates found in ornithogenic soils from penguin rookeries....

  12. 76 FR 66954 - Endangered Species; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... period. Applicant: Alan Ong, Fremont, CA; PRT-56735A The applicant requests a captive-bred wildlife... (Cercopithecus diana). Mandrill (Papio sphinx). lar gibbon (Hylobates lar). Indian rhinoceros...

  13. Development of a Distance Education Network in the OECS. Feasibility Study. Filling a Gap in a Way that Makes Sense. Report of a Consultancy to the Commonwealth of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Judy

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a distance education network in the Eastern Caribbean. Two types of consultations were completed: a brief site survey of four Eastern Caribbean states (Grenada, Dominica, Antigua, and Saint Lucia) and a workshop in Saint Lucia to which education officials from government agencies and higher…

  14. Building a Capabilities Network to Improve Disaster Preparation Efforts in the Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) Area of Responsibility (AOR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-14

    Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador , Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Lucia (American Red Cross, n.d.c) 3...Dominican Republic, El Salvador , Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Panama, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent...previously involved in SOUTHCOM: Antigua, Belize, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador , Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica

  15. Assessing Security Cooperation as a Preventive Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    reported in 15 Francisco Gutierrez, Diana Buitrago , Andrea Gonzalez, and Camila Lozano, Measur- ing Poor State Performance: Problems, Perspectives...No. 1, January 2010, pp. 190–208. Gutierrez, Francisco, Diana Buitrago , Andrea Gonzalez, and Camila Lozano, Measuring Poor State Performance

  16. Interspecies semantic communication in two forest primates.

    PubMed Central

    Zuberbühler, K

    2000-01-01

    West African Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana) and Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) frequently form mixed-species associations. Males of both species produce acoustically distinct alarm calls to crowned eagles (Stephanoaetus coronalus) and leopards (Panthera pardus), two of their main predators. Field playback experiments were conducted to investigate whether Diana monkeys respond to Campbell's alarm calls and whether they understand the calls' semantic content. Diana monkeys responded to playback of Campbell's leopard or eagle alarm calls as though the original predator were present. In a second experiment, Diana monkeys were primed with either Campbell's eagle or leopard alarm calls and then subsequently probed with the vocalizations of a crowned eagle or a leopard. Results showed that monkeys used the semantic information conveyed by the Campbell's alarm calls to predict the presence of a predator. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that non-human primates are able to use acoustic signals of diverse origin as labels for underlying mental representations. PMID:10821618

  17. Cheek pouch use in relation to interspecific competition and predator risk for three guenon monkeys (Cercopithecus spp.).

    PubMed

    Buzzard, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    Forest guenons (Cercopithecus spp.) are often found in polyspecific associations that may decrease predator risk while increasing interspecific competition for food. Cheek pouch use may mitigate interspecific competition and predator risk by reducing the time spent in areas of high competition/predator risk. I investigated these ideas in three forest guenons: Campbell's monkey (Cercopithecus campbelli), spot-nosed monkey (C. petaurista), and Diana monkey (C. diana). I present 13 months of scan sample data from Taï Forest, Côte d'Ivoire, including 3,675, 3,330, and 5,689 records of cheek pouch distention, to quantify cheek pouch use, for Campbell's, spot-nosed, and Diana monkeys, respectively. Cheek pouches are often used to hold fruit, so I first predicted that the most frugivorous species, Diana monkeys, would have the most cheek pouch distension. Spot-nosed monkeys ate the least amount of fruit over the study period and had the least distended cheek pouches, suggesting the importance of frugivory in relation to cheek pouch distension for this species. This was not a sufficient explanation for Campbell's monkeys; Campbell's ate fruit less than Diana monkeys, but had more distended cheek pouches, suggesting that cheek pouch use was not simply a reflection of high frugivory. From the interspecific competition hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's monkeys would have more distended cheek pouches than Diana and spot-nosed monkeys, and more distended cheek pouches when associated with Diana because Campbell's monkeys have the highest potential for interspecific competition with dominant Diana monkeys. From the predator risk hypothesis, I predicted that Campbell's would have more distended cheek pouches when not associated with highly vigilant Diana monkeys. Campbell's monkeys had the most distended cheek pouches overall, but had more distended cheek pouches when not in association with Diana, suggesting the greater importance of predator risk rather than

  18. 50 CFR 660.130 - Trawl fishery-management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... selective flatfish trawl net is provided as Figure 1 of part 660, subpart D. (ii) (6) Midwater (or pelagic... San Lucia Bank, Point Conception, Hidden Reef/Kidney Bank (within Cowcod Conservation Area...

  19. 50 CFR 660.130 - Trawl fishery-management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Figure 1 of part 660, subpart D. (ii) (6) Midwater (or pelagic) trawl gear. Midwater trawl gear must have... Luis, East San Lucia Bank, Point Conception, Hidden Reef/Kidney Bank (within Cowcod Conservation...

  20. 50 CFR 660.381 - Limited entry trawl fishery management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Figure 1 of part 660, subpart G. (ii) (6) Midwater (or pelagic) trawl gear. Midwater trawl gear must have..., Point Sur Deep, Big Sur Coast/Port San Luis, East San Lucia Bank, Point Conception, Hidden...

  1. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models.

  2. ASSESSING CONTAMINANT SENSITIVITY OF ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES: EFFLUENT TOXICITY TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicity tests using standard effluent test procedures were conducted (EPA 1994) with Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnows and four endangered fish species: bonytail chub (Gila elegans), Colorado squawfish (Ptychocheilus lucias ), razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) and Gila t...

  3. 76 FR 24030 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Funding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... for More Information: Diana Bartlett, M.P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, NE., Mailstop D-72, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, Telephone: (404) 639-4938. The Director, Management Analysis...

  4. Investigating the Causes of Chronic Itch: New Advances Could Bring Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... understood itch pathway initiates with immune molecules called histamines. Histamines normally serve a protective immune function by helping ... itch has centered on indirect immune triggers like histamines, Diana Bautista, Ph.D., a professor at the ...

  5. Travelers' Health: Scabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Salmonellosis (Nontyphoidal) Chapter 3 - Schistosomiasis Scabies Diana L. Martin ... 2009 May;7(3):125–46. Chapter 3 - Salmonellosis (Nontyphoidal) Chapter 3 - Schistosomiasis File Formats Help: How ...

  6. Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis from Volunteer Observatory December 2006 to April 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleenor, Michael L.

    2007-09-01

    Lightcurve period and amplitude results for eight asteroids observed at Volunteer Observatory during December 2006 to April 2007 are reported: 78 Diana, 623 Chimaera, 888 Parysatis, 1502 Arenda, 1602 Indiana, 3497 Innanen, 4374 Tadamori, and (34777) 2001RH.

  7. The USAF Manufacturing Technology: Program Status Report. Spring 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    modernization, also sat on the Technical Track Highlights panel. More than 70 government and industry exhib- Diana Carlin moderated a session on Composites...MT’s For more information or to register, contact IBP programs have made major strides in Tracy Tapia at Universal Technology Corporation, transitioning...Corporation Diana Carlin Preferred Spares (MATCOPS) El Segundo, CA (937) 255-7277 F33615-91-C-5717 March 1997 Design and Manufacture of Low Cost Boeing Company

  8. Optimized Deposition Parameters & Coating Properties of Cobalt Phosphorus Alloy Electroplating for Technology Insertion Risk Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    TECHNOLOGY INSERTION RISK REDUCTION (ESTCP Project WP-0411) Ruben Prado & John Benfer Naval Air Systems Command Diana Facchini Integran...Phosphorus Alloy Electroplating for Technology Insertion Risk Reduction" Ruben Prado, John Benfer, Diana Facchini, Keith Legg NAVAIR ISSC/FRC-SE NAS...coating. Attempts were then made to pry the coating with a sharp blade to assess whether there was any lift off of the coating which would indicate

  9. [The height target prediction by the Tanner method infra evaluates the final height in youths from the rural area of South East Spain].

    PubMed

    Ríos, Rafael; Bosch, Vicente; Santonja, Fernando; López, José Manuel; Garaulet, Marta

    2014-10-16

    Introducción: Conocer la talla final de un individuo antes de finalizar el crecimiento presenta utilidad clínica para el seguimiento de la salud infantil. Objetivo: Calcular la talla diana de una población rural del sudeste de España y comparar con la talla final alcanzada. Métodos: Fueron incluidos 50 jóvenes de 18 a 22 años (44% hombres) y 100 progenitores. La selección de los jóvenes se realizó en 2 fases: 1. Estudio retrospectivo a partir de historias clínicas. 2. Estudio prospectivo: reclutamiento y determinaciones antropométricas. Se calculó talla diana y el desvío de talla. Resultados: La talla final de los chicos fue de 4,44 cm superior a la talla diana (p.

  10. Sofia Ionescu, the first woman neurosurgeon in the world.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, Alexandru-Vlad; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Mohan, Dumitru

    2013-11-01

    The authors present the activity of Mrs. Sofia Ionescu, the one female surgeon who was nominated as the first woman neurosurgeon in the world. Sofia Ionescu worked in the field of neurosurgery for 47 years, performing all the known neurosurgical procedures of the time. She made herself known through her incredible surgical skill and her enormous work power. Due to her incredible modesty and workload, she never participated at international congresses or manifestations. The nomination as first woman neurosurgery took place in Marrakech, Morocco, during the 2005 WFNS Congress. Although some claim that Diana Beck was the first woman neurosurgeon in the world, our theory suggests otherwise. The first documented surgical intervention performed by Diana Beck dates to 1952. Sofia Ionescu operated for the first time on a human brain as early as 1944. Furthermore, Diana Beck's actions surfaced in the year 1947, long after the war had ended and Sofia Ionescu had become a neurosurgeon.

  11. A Literature Survey of Reverberation Modeling: With Emphasis on Bellhop Compatibility for Operational Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    necessarily have the approval or endorsement of Defence R&D Canada. Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract number: W7707...McCammon Acoustical Consulting 475 Baseline Road Waterville, NS B0P 1V0 Contract Project Manager: Diana McCammon, 902-538-3003 Contract Number...in some cases, the scattering area. Some of the older models of reverberation are the Generic Sonar Model (GSM), Cass/Grab, BiRasp, and ASTRAL . A

  12. "The black and white of it": Barbara Grier editing and publishing women of color.

    PubMed

    Enszer, Julie R

    2014-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, lesbian-feminist writing and publishing expressed new theoretical insights about race and envisioned new, intersectional identities. Using texts published and edited by Grier in The Ladder and subsequent Ladder anthologies published by Diana Press, archival documents from Diana Press, and the Grier-Naiad Press papers, this article explores Grier's editorial practices and compares Grier's work to other lesbian-feminist editors and publishers to illuminate different generational understandings of racial-ethnic and class formations within lesbianism and feminism and highlight some of the strategies that White publishers like Grier utilized to realize a vision of multicultural publishing.

  13. Play, Language, and Stories: The Development of Children's Literate Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galda, Lee, Ed.; Pellegrini, Anthony D., Ed.

    The question of the relationship between children's play and more formal, literate uses of language is explored in the 9 studies described in this volume. Chapter titles and authors are as follows: (1) "The Influence of Discourse Content and Context on Preschoolers' Use of Language" (Lucia A. French, Joan Lucariello, Susan Seidman, and Katherine…

  14. Physical Education Guide for Secondary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Education, Culture & Labour, Castries (St. Lucia).

    This collaboration between teachers in Saint Lucia (West Indies) and Peace Corps volunteers offers a comprehensive physical education program for children and youth ages 10-18 years, including lesson plans, evaluation and assessment techniques, and psychological and physical growth and development characteristics for this age group. The program is…

  15. The DISAM Journal of International Security Assistance Management. Volume 26, Number 1, Fall 2003

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Nicaragua Panama Paraguay Peru St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent Suriname Trinidad Turks and Caicos Venezuela...Corps military occupational specialties, from aviation to supply and included most Marine Corps weapons systems, from assault amphibian vehicle to non

  16. Developing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines to Promote Healthy Diets and Lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Janice L.; Samuda, Pauline M.; Molina, Veronika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the…

  17. Non-Formal Education and Empowerment of Women: Report of a Study in the Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Patricia

    A participatory research approach was used to determine the extent to which nonformal education (NFE) programs have contributed to the empowerment of women living on four Caribbean islands. Twelve agencies/organizations/providers on the islands of Barbados, Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent that have offered NFE programs to women between 1992…

  18. The Emergence of Community, State, and National Colleges in the OECS Member Countries: An Institutional Analysis. ISER (EC) Monograph Series No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Bevis F.

    This monograph describes and analyzes recent developments in national tertiary education institutions in the seven countries of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS): Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Monserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Following prefatory materials, chapter 1 asks if…

  19. The Current Status of Prison Education in Some Caribbean States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niles, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Discusses a study of prison education in six Caribbean states (Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad), looks at how the programs fit into United Nations rules for treating prisoners, and makes recommendations for the improvement of those programs. (JOW)

  20. Workforce Development for Communities in Crisis and Transition: A Case Study of the Windward Islands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, L. Alfons

    The Windward Islands (Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines) have taken several approaches to educate the work force and prepare for the technology-driven society of the future. These approaches include government initiatives, such as the governments' commitment to primary education and more recently to secondary…

  1. OCOD-CTTP Test Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorey, Leonard

    Tests in social studies and integrated science given in Saint Vincent, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica were analyzed by the Organization for Co-operation in Overseas Development (OCOD) Comprehensive Teacher Training Program (CTTP) for discrimination, difficulty, and reliability, as well as other characteristics. There were 767 examinees for the…

  2. Educational Deficits in the Caribbean. Atlas Series No. 2. Collection of Monographs and Studies of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organization of American States, Washington, DC. Dept. of Educational Affairs.

    This atlas supplies data on the educational situation of Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Santa Lucia, Dominican Republic, Surinam, and Trinidad and Tobago. Chapter 1 shows a global panorama consolidated at the regional level of the illiteracy problem for the population from ten years of age and over and of the groups without…

  3. Conceptualizing Gender Performance in Higher Education: Exploring Regulation of Identity Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fellabaum, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    While many higher education scholars have considered gender (e.g., Dawson-Threat & Huba, 1996; DeLucia-Waack, Gerrity, Taub, & Baldo, 2001; Jacobs, 1995; Knox, Zusman, & Mcneely, 2004; Lackland & De Lisi, 2001; Massey & Christensen, 1990), most of the literature uses modernistic theories to examine gender roles or gendered differences among…

  4. Old Books Bring New Life to the Brick and Mortar Library

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Coniunctionibus, Annorum Revolutionibus. He was the leading astrologer in the Muslim world who lived in the 9th century. It was also printed by...and astrology . I show you this book because of the beautiful illustrations from 524 years ago. Pacioli The Summa de Arithmetica by Lucia

  5. A review of the Paectes arcigera (Guenée)(Lepidoptera, Eutellidae) species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five new species of Paectes Hübner [1818] related to Paectes arcigera (Guenée) (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Guadeloupe, Donimica, St. Lucia, Trinidad) and P. longiformis Pogue (Brazil) are described: P. asper n.sp. (Florida, Bahamas, Cuba, Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Haiti...

  6. Parks and Recreation: Resource Limitations Affect Condition of Forest Service Recreation Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    hereafter called districts.2 The Forest Service manages 149 national forests in the United State3 and Puerto Rico . Because the Forest Service’s day-to-day...meet the needs of people with disabilities. According to the questionnaire respondent in the Santa Lucia district of the Los Padres National Forest in

  7. Report on Teaching: Analysis of Some of the Most Notable Improvements in Amesican Undergraduate Teaching. No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Change Magazine, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The fourth in a series of reports on undergraduate teaching contains articles on three disciplines: (1) geography (William D. Pattison, Salvatore J. Natoli, Peter Binzen, Charles J. Sugnet, Edwin Kiester, Jr., Sally Valente Kiester, Evan Jenkins, Peter Kakela, David Lanegran, Paul W. English, Peter Gould, and Alan DeLucia); (2) music (Theodore A.…

  8. 15 CFR 2013.1 - Designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines South Africa St. Kitts & Nevis St. Lucia St. Vincent.... Afr. Rep. Chad Congo Côte d'Ivoire Dem. Rep. of the Congo Djibouti Egypt Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea... Macao Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Qatar Singapore Spain Sweden Switzerland...

  9. 15 CFR 2013.1 - Designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines South Africa St. Kitts & Nevis St. Lucia St. Vincent.... Afr. Rep. Chad Congo Côte d'Ivoire Dem. Rep. of the Congo Djibouti Egypt Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea... Macao Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Qatar Singapore Spain Sweden Switzerland...

  10. 15 CFR 2013.1 - Designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines South Africa St. Kitts & Nevis St. Lucia St. Vincent.... Afr. Rep. Chad Congo Côte d'Ivoire Dem. Rep. of the Congo Djibouti Egypt Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea... Macao Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Qatar Singapore Spain Sweden Switzerland...

  11. 15 CFR 2013.1 - Designations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines South Africa St. Kitts & Nevis St. Lucia St. Vincent.... Afr. Rep. Chad Congo Côte d'Ivoire Dem. Rep. of the Congo Djibouti Egypt Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea... Macao Mexico Netherlands New Zealand Norway Portugal Qatar Singapore Spain Sweden Switzerland...

  12. Income Tax Act, 1989 (No. 1 of 1989), 6 April 1989.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This Saint Lucia Act revises and consolidates the law relating to income tax. It contains the following provisions, among others: 1) income accrued to a married woman is to be taxed in her own name; 2) the spousal deduction is set at $1500; and 3) the child deduction is set at $1000.

  13. Playing to Win in Nicaragua

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-30

    Miranda served as Chief of Staff to Humberto Ortega, the Sandinistan Defense Minister. Miranda has reinforced the charge that the Sandinistas agreed... Lucia Annunziata, "Democrats and the Arias Plan," The Nation, Vol. 197, 18 April 1987, pp. 503-505. 11. Elliott Abrams, "Central America: What Are

  14. Hypohydration Reduces Vertical Ground Reaction Impulse But Not Jump Height

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    8%).] Eur J Appl Physiol (2010) 109:1163–1170 1169 123 Author’s personal copy Chicharro JL, Lopez -Mojares LM, Lucia A, Alvarez J, Calvo F, Vaquero...substantially impair ( Chicharro et al. 1998; Welsh et al. 2008) vertical jump performance. This reflects that the trade-off between lost strength and

  15. Raoiella indica Hirst (Acari: Tenuipalpidae): An island-hopping mite pest in the Caribbean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major infestations of the flat mite species Raoiella indica Hirst have been reported from the Caribbean islands of Dominica, Martinique, and Saint Lucia. Specimens from these localities were examined using traditional light microscopy and low-temperature scanning electron microscopy (LTSEM) techniqu...

  16. What Azure blues occur in Canada? A re-assessment of Celastrina Tutt species (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, B. Christian; Layberry, Ross A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The identity of Celastrina species in eastern Canada is reviewed based on larval host plants, phenology, adult phenotypes, mtDNA barcodes and re-assessment of published data. The status of the Cherry Gall Azure (Celastrina serotina Pavulaan & Wright) as a distinct species in Canada is not supported by any dataset, and is removed from the Canadian fauna. Previous records of this taxon are re-identified as Celastrina lucia (Kirby) and Celastrina neglecta (Edwards). Evidence is presented that both Celastrina lucia and Celastrina neglecta have a second, summer-flying generation in parts of Canada. The summer generation of Celastrina lucia has previously been misidentified as Celastrina neglecta, which differs in phenology, adult phenotype and larval hosts from summer Celastrina lucia. DNA barcodes are highly conserved among at least three North American Celastrina species, and provide no taxonomic information. Celastrina neglecta has a Canadian distribution restricted to southern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and easternmost Alberta. The discovery of museum specimens of Celastrina ladon (Cramer) from southernmost Ontario represents a new species for the Canadian butterfly fauna, which is in need of conservation status assessment. PMID:27199600

  17. Ohio State University Extension Competency Study: Developing a Competency Model for a 21st Century Extension Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Graham Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The literature on competency-based human resource (HR) management provides a strong case for moving from a jobs-based to a competency-based approach to human resources. There is agreement in the literature (Dubois, Rothwell, Stern, & Kemp, 2004; Lucia & Lepsinger, 1999) on the benefits of using competencies throughout HR systems and impact…

  18. Leader Development for a Transforming Army

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-15

    Peter Drucker and Tom Peters to condemn the practice.”69 Some authors advocate the use of multirater feedback only for developmental purposes and not...1998, 3. 60 Wilson, 44. 61 Church, 81. 62 Church, 83. 63 Jones B., 9. 64 Ibid, 82. 65 Ibid. 66 Ibid, 84. 67 Richard Lepsinger and Antoinette D. Lucia

  19. A Case for Community-Run Pre-Schools and Daycare Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renard, Rosamunde

    This booklet advocates and describes the establishment of community run preschool and day care centers. The type described is based on the Laborie Community Education Centre in Saint Lucia, West Indies. Chapter 1 advocates establishing small, local institutions that are community managed, community owned, concerned with quality, and sustainable.…

  20. Gender Differences in Caribbean Students' Performance on a Test of Errors in Biological Labelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the performance of 11th-grade students from Barbados, Belize, Jamaica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Trinidad (n=1216) on an Errors in Biological Labeling Test (EBLT). Concludes that performance was low in six categories of errors, and that girls performed significantly better on each category of error than did boys. Contains 15…

  1. What Azure blues occur in Canada? A re-assessment of Celastrina Tutt species (Lepidoptera, Lycaenidae).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, B Christian; Layberry, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    The identity of Celastrina species in eastern Canada is reviewed based on larval host plants, phenology, adult phenotypes, mtDNA barcodes and re-assessment of published data. The status of the Cherry Gall Azure (Celastrina serotina Pavulaan & Wright) as a distinct species in Canada is not supported by any dataset, and is removed from the Canadian fauna. Previous records of this taxon are re-identified as Celastrina lucia (Kirby) and Celastrina neglecta (Edwards). Evidence is presented that both Celastrina lucia and Celastrina neglecta have a second, summer-flying generation in parts of Canada. The summer generation of Celastrina lucia has previously been misidentified as Celastrina neglecta, which differs in phenology, adult phenotype and larval hosts from summer Celastrina lucia. DNA barcodes are highly conserved among at least three North American Celastrina species, and provide no taxonomic information. Celastrina neglecta has a Canadian distribution restricted to southern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and easternmost Alberta. The discovery of museum specimens of Celastrina ladon (Cramer) from southernmost Ontario represents a new species for the Canadian butterfly fauna, which is in need of conservation status assessment.

  2. 77 FR 2346 - Actions Taken Pursuant to Executive Order 13382 Related to the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Republic of Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL) AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice..., Iran; Business Registration Document C31530 (Malta); Web site www.iranohind.com ISIM AMIN LIMITED, 147... of Park Mellat, Vali-e-Asr Ave., Tehran, Iran; 147/1 St. Lucia Street, Valletta VLT 1185,...

  3. Worldwide Report Telecommunications Policy, Research and Development No. 274.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Text] [Lima EL COMERCIO in Spanish 27 Apr 83 p 3] 8143 CSO: 5500/2071 ARGENTINA BRIEFS SATELLITE GROUND STATION—Buenos Aires, 5 May (TELAM...Iquitos, Arequipa, lea, Huaraz, Cuzco and Tacna. [TextJ [.Lima EL COMERCIO in Spanish 3 May 83 p a 8 PY] CSO; 5500/2074 ST LUCIA DETAILED REVIEW OF

  4. School Counselors' Perceptions of Their Academic Preparedness for Job Activities and Actual Job Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman-Scott, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The school counseling field has evolved over the years and increasingly clarified school counselors' job roles and activities (Burnham & Jackson, 2000; Cervoni & DeLucia-Waack, 2011; Shillingford & Lambie, 2010; Trolley, 2011); however, school counselors' job roles and activities remain inconsistently understood and practiced (Burnham…

  5. Construyendo Puentes (Building Bridges): Concepts and Models for Service-Learning in Spanish. AAHE's Series on Service-Learning in the Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellebrandt, Josef, Ed.; Varona, Lucia T., Ed.

    This volume is part of a series of 18 monographs on service learning and the academic disciplines. It is designed to help teachers, administrators, and students realize the potential of service learning in Spanish. Following a Foreword by Carmen Chaves Tesser and an Introduction by Josef Hellebrandt and Lucia T. Varona, the four essays in Part 1,…

  6. The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    DeLucia, Evan

    2016-07-12

    Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  7. Dual Career Families within the Coast Guard Officer Corps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    called this trend "the single most outstanding phenomenon of our cen- tury... Its long term implications are absolutely unchartable" (Briggs, 1977:177-184...April 1979). Holahan , Carole K., and Lucia A. Gilbert, "Interrole Con- flict for Working Women: Careers Versus Jobs,"Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol

  8. Precious Knowledge: Teaching Solidarity with Tucson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carberry, Devin

    2013-01-01

    The author's class has been invited to speak on NPR's "Call-In-Radio" and two of her students, Omar and Diana, were elected to be their spokespeople regarding HB 2281, Arizona's controversial ethnic studies ban. Omar stressed that he and his classmates are engaged by this topic because they see what's happening in Arizona is wrong--that…

  9. Citizenship Education Research in Varied Contexts: Reflections and Future Possibilities. A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudball, Libby

    2015-01-01

    Three books are the subject of this review essay: (1) Avril Keating's (2014) publication, "Education for Citizenship in Europe: European Policies, National Adaptations and Young People's Attitudes"; (2) "The Political Classroom: Evidence and Ethics in Democratic Education", Diana Hess and Paula McAvoy (2015); and (3) "We…

  10. Alaska Inclusion Training Modules: Building Inclusive Classrooms and Schools. Modules 1-3. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Susan, Ed.; Kurka, Diana, Ed.

    This document presents three inservice training modules which focus on the inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education settings in Alaska schools. Module 1, "Setting our Sights on Inclusion," by Diana Kurka, is a three-hour inservice program which provides an introduction to inclusion via sections on: legal and…

  11. Flexible Learning Strategies in Higher and Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Diana, Ed.

    This book contains 15 papers written by contributors from all areas of Great Britain in further and higher education. The following papers are included: "Learning to Be Flexible" (Diana Thomas); "Managing Change: Towards a New Paradigm?" (Mac Stephenson, Timothy Lehmann); "Open Learning: Educational Opportunity or…

  12. Perceived Advantages and Disadvantages of Being a Female Graduate Student in the US and the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehta, Clare Marie; Keener, Emily; Shrier, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    We build on Diana Leonard's work on gender and graduate education by qualitatively investigating the perceived advantages and disadvantages of being a female graduate student in the USA and the UK. We interviewed six female students (ages 22-30) pursuing master's degrees in psychology or social sciences in the USA and the UK. Students from both…

  13. Penn Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 5, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Kathryn, Ed.

    The working papers contained in this volume include the following: "Research on Language Learning; How Can It Respond to Classroom Concerns?" (Teresa Pica); "Building Rapport Through Indirect Complaints: Implications for Language Learning" (Diana Boxer); "(Bi)literacy and Empowerment: Education for Indigenous Groups in…

  14. 75 FR 81211 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides educators an opportunity to gain first-hand experience with field... writing Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer, (202) 482-0266, Department of Commerce....gov ). Written comments and recommendations for the proposed ] information collection should be...

  15. International Workshop on Discrete Time Domain Modelling of Electromagnetic Fields and Networks (2nd) Held in Berlin, Germany on October 28 and 29, 1993. Program and Information

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    Program 0 Berlin, Germany, October 1993 Diana Lawton, Piano 0 W.A. Mozart Sonate d-dur, KV. 311 Allegro con spirito Andante con espressione Rondo II C...exhibiting a cause-to- effect (causality) relationship. The latter in turn gives rise to computational rules that exhibit the sequential nature needed for

  16. Recent Litigation in the Placement of Minority Group Children in the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra, Viola

    Reviewed are some of the legal challenges aimed against the misplacement of minority group children in low ability groups in southwestern states. Court cases covered include Ruiz vs. State Board of Education, Spangles vs. Board of Education, Diana vs. Board of Education, Arreola vs. Board of Education, Covarrubias vs. San Diego, Larry P. vs.…

  17. 78 FR 32099 - Garnishment of Accounts Containing Federal Benefit Payments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Specialist, at (202) 622-0570 or barbara.wiss@treasury.gov ; or Natalie H. Diana, Senior Counsel, Financial... concern that without any transparency into the deliberative process that a financial institution uses to... support enforcement agencies under 42 U.S.C. 659 are limited to payments based on remuneration...

  18. Introduction to "Multicultural Voices: Peer Tutoring and Critical Reflection in the Writing Center"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimm, Nancy Maloney

    2010-01-01

    In 1991 when Diana George, Ed Lotto, and the author were publishing their first issue as "WCJ" editors, this multivoiced essay struck her as a prime example of their editorial belief that writing centers could be "agents of change in the academy." As Gail Okawa and Tom Fox observe, "Most universities are inhospitable to more democratic definitions…

  19. DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD-BIOREACTORS USING THE BEST MODEL

    Marek H. Zaluski1,3, Brian T. Park1, Diana R. Bless2

    1 MSE Technology Applications; 200 Technology Way, Butte, Montana 59701, USA
    2 U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinna...

  20. AAHE Bulletin, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchese, Theodore J., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The 10 issues of this bulletin present reports, reviews and essays on issues concerning the advancement of higher education. Major articles include: "Learning, Teaching Technology"--an interview with Diana Laurillard of Britain's Open University; "Learning, Technology, and the Way We Work" (Russ Edgerton and Barbara Leigh…

  1. The Teacher Trainer, A Practical Journal Mainly for Modern Language Teacher Trainers, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Tessa, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The three issues of the journal on second language teacher education include these articles: "Monitoring and Evaluating the Production of Materials on a Large Scale Trainer Training Workshop" (R. Williams, Choong Kam Foong, Diana Lubelska); Sensory Channels in ESL Instruction" (Michael E. Rudder); "Using the In-Service Feedback…

  2. Using Group-Based Learning in Higher Education. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorley, Lin, Ed.; Gregory, Roy, Ed.

    The 26 papers in this collection from a British conference first provide an overview of group-based learning in higher education, offer a range of examples, and identify issues and trends. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction" (Roy Gregory and Lin Thorley); (2) "An Overview from Higher Education" (Diana M. R. Tribe); (3)…

  3. Missouri Assessment Program (MAP), Spring 2000: Intermediate Communication Arts, Released Items, Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri State Dept. of Elementary and Secondary Education, Jefferson City.

    This document deals with testing in intermediate communication arts for seventh graders in Missouri public schools. The document contains the following items from the Session 1 Test Booklet: "Swimming in Snow" (Diana C. Conway) (Items 1, 2, and 5); "Discovery" (Marion Dane Bauer) (Item 13); writing prompt; and a writer's…

  4. The Puerto Ricans: Their History, Culture, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Adalberto, Ed.

    Articles in this book cover Puerto Rican history from the Spanish colonization to the present day experience of Puerto Ricans in the United States. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical issues are addresed by the following authors: Edna Acosta-Belen, Frank Bonilla, Juan Manuel Carrion, Diana Christopulos, Sandra Messinger Cypess,…

  5. Adult Education and Social Transformation: On Gramsci, Freire, and the Challenge of Comparing Comparisons. Essay Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schugurensky, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Reviews three books that critique and compare the ideas of Gramsci and Freire: "Revolutionary Social Transformation: Democratic Hopes, Political Possibilities and Critical Education" (Paula Allman); "Radical Heroes: Gramsci, Freire and the Politics of Adult Education" (Diana Coben); and "Gramsci, Freire and Adult…

  6. Republic of Noise: The Loss of Solitude in Schools and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2011-01-01

    In "Republic of Noise," Diana Senechal confronts a culture that has come to depend on instant updates and communication at the expense of solitude. Where once it was common wisdom that the chatter of the present, about the present, could not always grasp the present, today we treat "real time" as though it were the only real time. Schools…

  7. Los biocombustibles y el futuro

    NASA Video Gallery

    ¿Cómo podremos utilizar los biocombustibles en el futuro? La ingeniera aeroespacial de la NASA, Diana Centeno Gómez nos explica el futuro de los biocombustibles y cómo un día podrías trabajar con d...

  8. Teaching Creative Writing: That Is, Teaching Something Other Than the Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teichmann, Sandra Gail

    Recent articles by August Kleinzahler, Joseph Epstein, and Diana Gioia question the value of contemporary poetry, particularly that which comes from graduate and undergraduate creative writing programs. Ron McFarland, in a recent issue of "College English," argues against these articles and advocates teaching craft as the only essential…

  9. Worldwide Emerging Environmental Issues Affecting the U.S. Military. January 2007 Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    environment/eu-seeks-global-mercury-ban/article-160845 Halting the Child Brain Drain. Why we need to tackle global mercury contamination http://www.env...by the Parties. Among them there are 3 NGO representatives: Diana Iskreva- Indigo , NGO "Earth forever", Bulgaria, nominated by Switzerland; Sergey

  10. Mini-Portfolio on Math and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching PreK-8, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Presents six articles dealing with math and science education: "Sneaker Geometry" (Jack George), "Fairs with a Flair" (Diane McCarty), "Generating Excitement with Math Projects" (Jeffrey Kostecky and Louis Roe), "Playing with Numbers" (Diana Smith), "When Student Teachers Want to Do Hands-On Science" (Betsy Feldkamp-Price), and "Science ala Carte"…

  11. Otherness through Elves: Into Elfland and Beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamazaki, Akiko

    2008-01-01

    This article examines three novels which use stories of elves--especially the ballad "Tam Lin"--as pre-texts, and contemplates how they explore the issue of Otherness. The three novels are "The Sterkarm Handshake" by Susan Price, "Cold Tom" by Sally Prue, and "Fire and Hemlock" by Diana Wynne Jones. Although the novels seem to be about elves as…

  12. Assessing Individuals with Disabilities in Educational, Employment, and Counseling Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrom, Ruth B., Ed.; Smith, Douglas K., Ed.

    This book is designed to assist testing professionals as they face the challenge of how best to assess and test people with disabilities. Chapters include: (1) "Testing Individuals with Disabilities: Reconciling Social Science and Social Policy" (Diana Pullin); (2) "The Psychometrics of Testing Individuals with Disabilities"…

  13. Suffixation influences receivers' behaviour in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Coye, Camille; Ouattara, Karim; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lemasson, Alban

    2015-01-01

    Compared to humans, non-human primates have very little control over their vocal production. Nonetheless, some primates produce various call combinations, which may partially offset their lack of acoustic flexibility. A relevant example is male Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli), which give one call type (‘Krak’) to leopards, while the suffixed version of the same call stem (‘Krak-oo’) is given to unspecific danger. To test whether recipients attend to this suffixation pattern, we carried out a playback experiment in which we broadcast naturally and artificially modified suffixed and unsuffixed ‘Krak’ calls of male Campbell's monkeys to 42 wild groups of Diana monkeys (Cercopithecus diana diana). The two species form mixed-species groups and respond to each other's vocalizations. We analysed the vocal response of male and female Diana monkeys and overall found significantly stronger vocal responses to unsuffixed (leopard) than suffixed (unspecific danger) calls. Although the acoustic structure of the ‘Krak’ stem of the calls has some additional effects, subject responses were mainly determined by the presence or the absence of the suffix. This study indicates that suffixation is an evolved function in primate communication in contexts where adaptive responses are particularly important. PMID:25925101

  14. REVIEW OF REFLECTIONS IN BULLOUGH'S POND: ECONOMY AND ECOSYSTEM IN NEW ENGLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reflections in Bullough's Pond is a fascinating and eye opening chronicle of New England from pre-European settlement to present times. Author Diana Muir uses the history of the pond in her backyard to individualize the story she tells. It's a powerful device that makes her arg...

  15. Modeling of Cross-Plane Interface Thermal Conductance Between Graphene Nano-Ribbons (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-19

    Signature// //Signature// AJIT K. ROY DIANA M. CARLIN, Chief Nanoelectronic Materials Branch Nanoelectronic Materials Branch Functional ...Materials Division Functional Materials Division //Signature// TIMOTHY J. BUNNING, Chief Functional Materials Division Materials and...Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Functional Materials Division Vikas Varshney, Jonghoon Lee - Universal Technology Corporation 7

  16. On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuckerman, Diana, Ed.

    This publication presents interviews with 11 prominent women, representing different backgrounds, philosophies, and life experiences, in which they speak about their own experiences with work and family issues. The introduction, "On Common Ground: Prominent Women Talk about Work & Family" (Diana Zuckerman), provides an overview. The 11 interviews…

  17. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 5: Practical Issues in Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with practical aspects of meeting children's needs, this volume, the fifth of five on parenting, describes the nuts and bolts of parenting as well as the promotion of positive parenting practices. The volume consists of the following 19 chapters: (1) "The Ethics of Parenting" (Diana Baumrind and Ross A. Thompson; (2) "Parenting and…

  18. Student Learning Outcomes Assessment Materials Guidebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACPA College Student Educators International, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American College Personnel Association's (ACPA's) Sustainability Task Force partnered with the Commission on Assessment and Evaluation with the goal of creating assessment tools to help ACPA members effectively measure student learning around sustainability. Towards these ends, Kimberly Yousey-Elsener (StudentVoice), Diana Richter Keith…

  19. 77 FR 41260 - Second Amendment to July 14, 2011 Order for Swap Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... application of these provisions after July 16, 2011. Available at: http://www.cftc.gov/ucm/groups/public... 23, 2012), available at: http://www.cftc.gov/ucm/groups/public/@newsroom/documents/file...\\ \\21\\ Letter from Diana L. Preston, Vice President and Senior Counsel, Center for Securities,...

  20. Aglaopheniid hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa: Aglaopheniidae) from bathyal waters of the Flemish Cap, Flemish Pass, and Grand Banks of Newfoundland (NW Atlantic) .

    PubMed

    Altuna, Alvaro; Murillo, Francisco J; Calder, Dale R

    2013-11-22

    Five species of aglaopheniid hydroids (Aglaophenopsis cornuta, Cladocarpus diana, C. formosus, C. integer, and Nematocarpus ramuliferus) were collected from the Flemish Cap, Flemish Pass, and Grand Banks of Newfoundland during surveys with bottom trawls, rock dredges, and scallop gear. All are infrequently reported species, with C. diana being discovered for the first time since its original description from Iceland. We document here the southernmost collections of C. diana and N. ramuliferus, both previously unknown in the western Atlantic. Each of the five species is described and illustrated based on fertile material, a key is provided for their identification, and bathymetric distributions are noted. Known depth ranges are extended for A. cornuta, C. diana, and C. integer. Aglaophenopsis and Nematocarpus are recognized as genera distinct from the polyphyletic Cladocarpus, based on the unique structure of the phylactocarp in the former, and the existence of appendages with nematothecae (ramuli) on almost all thecate internodes of hydrocladia in the latter. These appendages occur even in the absence of gonothecae, and are here considered defensive structures that protect the hydranths. In differing from typical phylactocarps, we accept the contention that they are characters of generic value.

  1. 77 FR 66957 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... to the United States Transportation Command, Command Change Management, ATTN: Diana Roach, 508 Scott.... Mail: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive, East Tower, Suite 02G09... http://www.regulations.gov as they are received without change, including any personal identifiers...

  2. 77 FR 66956 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... to the United States Transportation Command, Command Change Management, ATTN: Diana Roach, 508 Scott.... Mail: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive, East Tower, Suite 02G09... http://www.regulations.gov as they are received without change, including any personal identifiers...

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Media Ethics Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Media Ethics division of the proceedings contains the following 6 papers: "A Masochist's Teapot: Where to Put the Handle in Media Ethics" (Thomas W. Hickey); "Stalker-razzi and Sump-pump Hoses: The Role of the Media in the Death of Princess Diana" (Elizabeth Blanks Hindman); "The Promise and Peril of Anecdotes in News…

  4. Technology, Education, and the Changing Nature of Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickard, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses information technology in higher education. Includes comments from Educom Medal Awards winners honored for contributions made to improving undergraduate education through information technology: Paul Velleman, Cornell; Diana Eck, Harvard; Richard Larson, Stony Brook; David Fulker, University Corporation; and Stephen Ressler, Military…

  5. Education, Diversity, and Inclusion in Burmese Refugee Camps in Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Su-Ann; van der Stouwe, Marc

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the "two faces" model of education through which Kenneth Bush and Diana Saltarelli (2000) describe the positive and negative roles that education can play in situations of ethnic conflict. The authors apply it more narrowly to analyze the effect of inclusion and diversity in education in a conflict situation. In…

  6. Connecting the Private and the Public: Pregnancy, Exclusion, and the Expansion of Schooling in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    In a number of countries in Africa, young women who become pregnant are excluded from school. This article presents a critique of policy and practice in this area drawing partly on Diana Leonard's scholarship concerning the relational dynamic of gender, generation, social division, and household forms. Much of the policy prescription of large…

  7. Making Matter Making Us: Thinking with Grosz to Find Freedom in New Feminist Materialisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Alecia Youngblood

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, I offer a very close reading of Grosz [2010. "Feminism, Materialism, and Freedom." In "New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics," edited by Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, 139-157. Durham, NC: Duke University Press] thinking with Bergson in order to re-conceptualise freedom, matter, and the subject in new…

  8. El Papel de los Padres en el Desarrollo de la Competencia Social (The Role of Parents in the Development of Peer Group Competence). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Shirley G.

    Among studies that have examined the relationship between parenting styles and children's development of social skills, the research of Diana Baumrind is noteworthy. In several studies, she has identified authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles, which differ on the dimensions of nurturance and parental control. Authoritarian…

  9. Perspectives on Adults Learning Mathematics: Research and Practice. Mathematics Education Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coben, Diana, Ed.; O'Donoghue, John, Ed.; FitzSimons, Gail E., Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers that are designed to situate research and practice in adults learning mathematics within the wider field of lifelong learning and lifelong education. The following papers are included: "Introduction" (Diana Coben, Gail E. FitzSimons, John O'Donoghue); "Review of Research on Adults Learning…

  10. The Spanish-Language Roundtable.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criticas: An English Speaker's Guide to the Latest Spanish Language Titles, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a meeting with a group of experts including Leylha Ahuile, Rene Alegria, Rueben Martinez, Diana Martinez Calice, Silvia Matute, Anne Messitte, and Teresa Mlawer from the Spanish language market for books. Topics include publishing; school and library markets; bookstores; the role of the Latino press and Latino authors; coverage in…

  11. JiaZhang Dui ErTong FaZhan TongBan GuanXi De ZuoYong (The Role of Parents in the Development of Peer Group Competence). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Shirley G.

    Among studies that have examined the relationship between parenting styles and children's development of social skills, the research of Diana Baumrind is noteworthy. In several studies, she has identified authoritarian, permissive, and authoritative parenting styles, which differ on the dimensions of nurturance and parental control. Authoritarian…

  12. Women and Technical Professions. Leonardo da Vinci Series: Good Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commission of the European Communities, Brussels (Belgium). Directorate-General for Education and Culture.

    This document profiles programs for women in technical professions that are offered through the European Commission's Leonardo da Vinci program. The following programs are profiled: (1) Artemis and Diana (vocational guidance programs to help direct girls toward technology-related careers); (2) CEEWIT (an Internet-based information and…

  13. Evaluation Strategies and Techniques for Public Library Children's Services: A Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Jane; And Others

    The 28 papers in this sourcebook relate to the evaluation of children's services in public libraries: (1) "Introduction to Evaluation" (Jane Robbins and Douglas Zweizig); (2) "Research and Measurement in Library Services to Children" (Adele Fasick); (3) "Evaluating Children's Services" (Diana Young); (4) "What Is Good about Children's Library…

  14. 77 FR 63314 - Change in Bank Control Notices; Acquisitions of Shares of a Bank or Bank Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ... Pearl Street, Dallas, Texas 75201-2272: 1. James Leon Bradley, Sr., individually and as Trustee of the Bradley 2012 Irrevocable Trust; The Bradley 2012 Irrevocable Trust; Diana McBay Bradley, James Leon... B. Flood, Jr., and Susan J. Flood- Dziubinski, co-trustees; James Flood, Medford, Wisconsin;...

  15. Rethinking "Harmonious Parenting" Using a Three-Factor Discipline Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenspan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Diana Baumrind's typology of parenting is based on a two-factor model of "control" and "warmth". Her recommended discipline style, labeled "authoritative parenting", was constructed by taking high scores on these two factors. A problem with authoritative parenting is that it does not allow for flexible and differentiated responses to discipline…

  16. 76 FR 69241 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ..., as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. DATES: Written comments must be submitted on or before January 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Diana Hynek, Departmental Paperwork... creation of a National Marine Sanctuary in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Since that time, the area...

  17. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  18. Enterprise Risk Management: The Way Ahead for DRDC within the DND Enterprise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Taleb Distributions, the Hurst Exponent (to deal with long time events), Life Extinction Events, Zero-Infinity Dilemmas (which characterize the...Time dependent Hurst exponent in financial time series”, Physica A 344 (2004) 267-271 35. Yoav Ben-Shlomo and Diana Koh, “A Life Course Approach to

  19. Should Teachers Help Students Develop Partisan Identities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Diana E.; McAvoy, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Five years ago, Diana Hess was teaching a graduate seminar called "Democratic Education." The purpose of the seminar was to critically analyze two seemingly simple, but actually very complex, questions: What is democracy? What is democratic education? Both are contested concepts, and the seminar was designed to help students understand…

  20. How Schools Can Support Children Who Experience Loss and Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John

    2008-01-01

    Scenes of public grieving such as followed the death of Princess Diana bear little resemblance to the "taboo" status of death and bereavement at an individual level. For schools and the support services with whom they work, responding to pupils' experiences of loss and death, especially of parents, is challenging. This paper draws on…

  1. Abraham Lincoln and the Pillars of Liberty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaub, Diana J.

    2002-01-01

    In this essay, Diana Schaub, associate professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Loyola College in Maryland, asserts that the 9/11 attack on America showed students the fallacy not of relativism, but of toleration. They are now aware that there are limits to toleration. By giving such a vivid display of the horrors of…

  2. 76 FR 9578 - Disease, Disability, and Injury Prevention and Control Special Emphasis Panel (SEP): Conducting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... for More Information: Diana Bartlett, M.P.H., Scientific Review Officer, CDC, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E...:30 p.m.-3 p.m., April 13, 2011 (Closed). Place: Teleconference. Status: The meeting will be closed to... Services Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. BILLING CODE 4163-18-P...

  3. Good/Bad Girls Read Together: Pre-Adolescent Girls' Co-Authorship of Feminine Subject Positions during a Shared Reading Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, Patricia E.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses reading with pre-teens Francine Pascal's "Sweet Valley Twins: Best Friends," one of a series of pre-romance novels featuring identical twin sisters. Interviews six girls using the Symbolic Representation Interview (SRI) about the good girl/bad girl dichotomy in novels and other media. Provides comments by Tom Romano and Diana Mitchell.…

  4. Legal Aspects: Civilians/Contractors in the War Zone And Disaster Relief Support Joint Center for Operational Analysis Journal, Volume 10, Issue 2, June 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    this mission and help those in need. I will remember them for the rest of my life.” -Diana Hardin , a volunteer with international health charity...www.uscg.mil Commandant (G-OPF) 2100 2nd St. S.W. Washington, D.C. 20593-0001 Offi ce of Command, Control, and Preparedness user name phone# CAPT Brian

  5. Mussolini's Marriage and a Game in the Playground: Using Analogy to Help Pupils Understand the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laffin, Diana; Wilson, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Diana Laffin and Maggie Wilson want their pupils to connect with people in the past and to experience some of their emotions. The emotional factor is a difficult one in history, both for pupils and professional historians. When studying Eden's actions at Suez, for example, what we lack is a proper insight into the immediate pressures he faced and…

  6. Teacher Preparation: Assessing Teacher Quality, Administrative Support, Standards-Based Teacher Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliakoff, Anne Rogers, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This collection of papers focuses on the preparation of teachers by university-based education programs. The papers are: "The STEPS That Support P-12 Learning and Achievement" (Diana Rigden), which describes the Standards-based Teacher Education Project (STEP) for improving student learning; "The Responsibility for Assessing Beginning Teachers"…

  7. Impeccable Advice: Supporting Women Academics through Supervision and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Suki; Coate, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    At the time when Diana was writing " A Woman's Guide to Doctoral Studies" (2001), she was supervising a number of female doctoral students. She drew on some of their experiences in the writing of the book, and they in return benefited from the extensive insights she had about the politics of academic life that she portrays in her…

  8. Rachel's Challenge: A Moral Compass for Character Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingshead, Barbara; Crump, Christi; Eddy, Rochelle; Rowe, Dina

    2009-01-01

    Though American life in 1923 was significantly different than the present day, authors John Dewey and Diana Brannon share similar concerns about character. Historically, educators as far back as the 1800s have felt an obligation to the community to transcend the primary purpose for schooling by including character education in their curricula.…

  9. Television Ceremonial Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Daniel; Katz, Elihu

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of televised ceremonies (such as the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana) as "media events" which allow viewers to vicariously enter into the ceremony. Compares them with cult movies that, over repeated viewing, encourage audience "participation." Focuses on the narrator's/commentator's role in shaping…

  10. You Are Embarked: How a Philosophy Curriculum Took Shape and Took Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senechal, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Diana Senechal teaches philosophy at Columbia Secondary School for Math, Science, and Engineering in New York City; in addition, she serves on the faculty of the Sue Rose Summer Institute for Teachers at the Dallas Institute of Humanities and Culture. In this article she states that if someone had told her five years ago that she would be a high…

  11. 78 FR 76886 - National Small Business Development Center Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... will be held on the following dates: Tuesday, January 21, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. EST ADDRESSES: This meeting will be held via.... Diana Doukas, Committee Management Officer. BILLING CODE 8025-01-M...

  12. The Rules of the Game: Women and the Leaderist Turn in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morley, Louise

    2013-01-01

    This paper engages with Diana Leonard's writing on how gender is constituted in the academy. It offers an international review of feminist knowledge on how gender and power interact with leadership in higher education. It interrogates the "leaderist turn" or how leadership has developed into a popular descriptor and a dominant social and…

  13. Language and Music as Communication: A Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Roger Brown, Diana Deutsch, Warren Benson, and Ruth Day comment on the similarities and differences between verbal language and music as forms of communication. This discussion occurred at the first session of the National Symposium on the Applications of Psychology to the Teaching and Learning of Music, Ann Arbor. (SJL)

  14. Analysis of Parental Involvement and Self-Esteem on Secondary School Students in Kieni West Sub-County, Nyeri County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wairimu, Mburu Josephine; Macharia, Susan M.; Muiru, Ann

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental involvement and the self-esteem among adolescents in secondary school students in Kieni West District in Nyeri County. It was guided by Self Determination Theory (SDT) by James William and Baumrind Theory of Parenting Styles by Diana Blumberg Baumrind. Some of the gaps identified in the…

  15. One-Stop Shopping: A Library-Based Corporate Information System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handman, Pamela L.; Ziegler, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Cetus Corporation library's online information system, called ISCLine (Information Services Center Line). Menu options are explained, system maintenance is described, the use of the system by employees and staff is examined, and future possibilities are considered. A sidebar by Diana L. Ziegler describes programing procedures for…

  16. SRD5A1 Genetic Variation and Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    finasteride (Makridakis, M, et al. 2004). In the prostate cancer prevention trial, daily oral dosing of finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk by...roughly 25%, while those that did develop cancer and who had taken finasteride were at a 6 fold higher risk for more aggressive, higher grade cancers...tissue. Oncogene (2004) 23, 7399-7405. Thompson IM, Goodman PJ, Tangen CM, Lucia MS, Miller GJ, Ford LC, et al. The influence of finasteride on the

  17. Coastal Modeling System (CMS) Users Manuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    AD-A268 830 , INSTRUCTION REPORT CERC-91-1 COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM ( CMS ) USER’S MANUAL by Mary A. Cialone, David J. Mark, Lucia W. Chou, David A...THE COASTAL MODELING SYSTEM USER’S MANUAL Supplement 1 Issued August 1992 Enclosed are additions and corrections to the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ...COVERED1 August 1992 Supplement I to September 1991 Manual 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) User’s Manual WU

  18. ANZUS in Revision: Changing Defense Features of Australia and New Zealand in the Mid-1980s

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    28 ; Brian L. Kavanagh, TheChanging Western Alliance in the South Pacific (Maxwell AFB, Ala . : Air University Press, 1987), 20. 52 . Ross Babbage ...68. 4. Ross Babbage , Rethinking Australia’s Defence (St. Lucia, Australia: University of Queensland Press, 1980), 217. 5 . The Bulletin survey was...34No 1-Most Testing Period Ahead," Pacific Defence Reporter 13, nos. 6/7 (December 1986-January 1987) : 200. 43 . Ross Babbage , "The Future of the

  19. The Role of HOX Proteins in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 14. ABSTRACT HOX genes encode a large family of transcription factors involved in key...Massachusetts. Abstract: HOX Gene Expression Modulates Androgen- and Vitamin D-Mediated Actions in Human Prostate Cancer Cells. Daddario SN, Lambert...JR, Lucia MS, Nordeen SK. Poster presentation at the 88th Annual Meeting of the Endocrine Society. June 2007. Toronto, Canada. Abstract: HOX Gene

  20. [Centric registration relation in dentate patients using bilateral manipulation--comparative analysis of three techniques].

    PubMed

    De Paiva, H J; Bonfante, G; Lins do Valle, A; Bonachela, W C

    1989-01-01

    Three techniques of centric relation registration were compared using the "Jig" (LUCIA), the "Leaf-Gauge" (LONG JUNIOR) and an wax anterior guide. The casts were mounted and analysed in a Whip-Mix articulador. The results permitted to conclude that, from the statistical viewpoint, did not occurred significant differences among techniques and centric relation occurred in an area not in a point. Because of facility and quickness the technique advocated by LON JUNIOR is recommended.

  1. Pulmonary Function in a Diving Population Aged Over 40 Years Old: A Cross-Sectional Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    diving are conditioned by exposure to a number of elements which are inherent in the subject’s - Inversion in the respiratory activity. Among these, we...activity. 13-5 12. LUCIA MULAS A. La ventilaci6n REFERENCES.- pulmonar durante el ejercicio . En L6pez Chicharro J. Fern-ndez Vaquero AX(eds.). 1...ADIVP -2 ALLIED GUIDE TO DIVING Fisiologia del ejercicio . la edicion. Madrid. MEDICAL DISORDERS. Publicacion Editorial Medica Panamericana S.A. 1995

  2. Harnessing the Transformative Tsunami: Fleet-wide 360-degree Feedback Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    concert with the tabulated results of each assessment when multi-rater feedback is used for developmental purposes ( Peters 1996; Seifert, McDonald...U.S. Labor Force Trends.” Population Bulletin 63, no. 2 (2008). Lepsinger, Richard and Antoinette D. Lucia. The Art and Science of 360° Feedback...PROFILOR®.” PDI Ninth House website. http://www.pdinh.com/sites/default/files/u20/Profilor_5.11.pdf, accessed March 2012. Peters , Helen. “Peer

  3. Model coupling methodology for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical numerical simulations in integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The integrated assessment of long-term site behaviour taking into account a high spatial resolution at reservoir scale requires a sophisticated methodology to represent coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes of relevance. Our coupling methodology considers the time-dependent occurrence and significance of multi-phase flow processes, mechanical effects and geochemical reactions (Kempka et al., 2014). Hereby, a simplified hydro-chemical coupling procedure was developed (Klein et al., 2013) and validated against fully coupled hydro-chemical simulations (De Lucia et al., 2015). The numerical simulation results elaborated for the pilot site Ketzin demonstrate that mechanical reservoir, caprock and fault integrity are maintained during the time of operation and that after 10,000 years CO2 dissolution is the dominating trapping mechanism and mineralization occurs on the order of 10 % to 25 % with negligible changes to porosity and permeability. De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in heterogeneous CO2 storage systems (2014) Geosci Model Dev Discuss 7:6217-6261. doi:10.5194/gmdd-7-6217-2014. Kempka, T., De Lucia, M., Kühn, M. Geomechanical integrity verification and mineral trapping quantification for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site by coupled numerical simulations (2014) Energy Procedia 63:3330-3338, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2014.11.361. Klein E, De Lucia M, Kempka T, Kühn M. Evaluation of longterm mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: an integrative approach using geo-chemical modelling and reservoir simulation. Int J Greenh Gas Con 2013; 19:720-730. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2013.05.014.

  4. Success in the TACP Training Program An Objective Method for Selecting Battlefield Airmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-23

    with elite performance in power sports. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2009Nov;107(5):565-9. Santiago C, Ruiz JR, Buxens A, Artieda M, Arteta D, Gonzalez- Freire ...ApplPhysiol. 2009 Aug;106(6):785- 90. 20    Ruiz JR, Gómez-Gallego F, Santiago C, González- Freire M, Verde Z, Foster C,Lucia A. Is there an optimum

  5. Unification of Larch and Z-Based Object Models to Support Algebraically-Based Design Refinement; The Z Perspective.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    the following criteria (50): "* Support writing specifications "* Support reading specifications "• Prove properties of a specification "* Perform...capture what each process actually does, it is necessary to provide a specification of each transformation’s processes. Using Z, it is possible to write ...Steve Powell. Z Guide for Beginners. Blackwell Scientific Publications, 1993. 28. Meira, Silvio Lemos and Ana Lucia C. Cavalcanti. "MooZ Case Studies

  6. Rebuilding Institutional Legitimacy in Post-Conflict Societies: An Asia-Pacific Case Study, Interphase 1-2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-12

    Research), University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane. 4 Chief Scientist, Leximancer , http://www.leximancer.com; (andrew@leximancer.com). Report...textual analysis of various sources using Leximancer in order to inform fieldwork site selection, the development of a theoretical model, survey instrument...design and the publication of preliminary results. Results from this Leximancer analysis allowed us to map factors associated with post-conflict

  7. Contributions of the American Entomological Institute. Volume 27. Number 2. 1992. Catalog and Illustrated Review of the Subgenus Melanoconion of Culex (Diptera: Culicidae)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Institution, Washington, DC, USA PIG Institut Pasteur, French Guiana PIP Institut Pasteur, Paris, France STMPR School of Tropical Medicine, San Juan, Puerto ...Knab 1913: Fig. 92 (6* L*); Howard, Dyar and Knab 1915:388 (d 9 L); Root 1922: 400 ( Puerto Rico); Dyar 1923d: 187 (d*); Bonne and Bonne-Wepster 1925...Montserrat, Nevis, Panama, Puerto Rico, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad, United States, Virgin Islands. fauiator Dyar and Knab, 1909c: 257 (A). Lectotype

  8. The U.S. Navy, the Neutrality Patrol, and Atlantic Fleet Escort Operations, 1939-1941

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-13

    United States ninety-nine year leases on bases in Newfoundland, Bermuda, the Bahamas, Jamaica, Antigua, St. Lucia, Trinidad, and British Guiana . One day...depth charges used in prosecuting attacks. Six to seven was standard throughout 1940, but HMS Highlander deviated from this policy on 30 October 1940...after an unsuccessful attack with a six-charge pattern, the Highlander circled again and dropped fourteen charges in the vicinity of the U- I 188 boat

  9. Program and Abstracts of the 40th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene Held in Boston, Massachusetts on 1-5 December 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Mexico City, Mexico Dr. Claudio Ribeiro Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Dr. Lucia Braga Charlottesville, Virginia Dr. Hassan El Bushra Los Angeles, California...RADIOLOGIC AND EPIDEMIOLOGIC CORRELATIONS OF ELISA AND IMMUNOBLOT ASSAYS FOR TAENIA SOLIUM CYSTICERCOSIS IN TWO POPULATIONS IN MEXICO . Schantz PM*, Sarti...Atlanta, GA; Direccion General De Epidemiologia, Secretaria de Salud, Mexico D.F., Mexico ; Departamento de Immunologia, Instituto de Investigaciones

  10. Convergent validity of a novel method for quantifying rowing training loads.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jacqueline; Rice, Anthony J; Main, Luana C; Gastin, Paul B

    2015-01-01

    Elite rowers complete rowing-specific and non-specific training, incorporating continuous and interval-like efforts spanning the intensity spectrum. However, established training load measures are unsuitable for use in some modes and intensities. Consequently, a new measure known as the T2minute method was created. The method quantifies load as the time spent in a range of training zones (time-in-zone), multiplied by intensity- and mode-specific weighting factors that scale the relative stress of different intensities and modes to the demands of on-water rowing. The purpose of this study was to examine the convergent validity of the T2minute method with Banister's training impulse (TRIMP), Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE when quantifying elite rowing training. Fourteen elite rowers (12 males, 2 females) were monitored during four weeks of routine training. Unadjusted T2minute loads (using coaches' estimates of time-in-zone) demonstrated moderate-to-strong correlations with Banister's TRIMP, Lucia's TRIMP and Session-RPE (rho: 0.58, 0.55 and 0.42, respectively). Adjusting T2minute loads by using actual time-in-zone data resulted in stronger correlations between the T2minute method and Banister's TRIMP and Lucia's TRIMP (rho: 0.85 and 0.81, respectively). The T2minute method is an appropriate in-field measure of elite rowing training loads, particularly when actual time-in-zone values are used to quantify load.

  11. Marine deep seismic reflection profiles off central California

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, J. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX ); Talwani, M. Houston Advanced Research Center, The Woodlands, TX )

    1991-04-10

    A strong reflection horizon at two-way travel time of approximately 6 s is observed in a deep seismic profile across the outer continental shelf of central California. It is interpreted as the seismic image of subducted oceanic crust emplaced prior to the change from principally convergent to principally transcurrent motion between the Pacific and North American plates during the late Paleogene. The reflector dips landward at a very shallow angle and is at a depth of 14-15 km under Santa Lucia Bank. The reflection is not observed, or at best is very discontinuous, under the inner shelf (Santa Maria Basin). This suggests that tectonic or other processes have produced significantly different structural styles or compositions on the two sides of the Santa Lucia Bank fault. Under the outer shelf a prominent, apparently deeper (later arrival time) horizon dips more steeply and diverges from the 6-s reflector. The deep horizon is at least partially composed of diffracted energy but is nearly linear after migration. Possible interpretations are that the horizon indicates crustal imbrication or out-of-plane diffractions. Alternatively, it is a relict feature imparted to the crust at the now inactive Pacific-Farallon spreading ridge. Reflective zones at intermediate depths are observed in apparently accreted sediments in parts of the Santa Lucia and Santa Maria basins. These features could represent tectonically induced fabrics within the accretionary complex, or they could be coherent depositional sequences.

  12. Rickettsia africae in Amblyomma variegatum and domestic ruminants on eight Caribbean islands.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Patrick; Lucas, Helene; Beati, Lorenza; Yowell, Charles; Mahan, Suman; Dame, John

    2010-12-01

    We used PCRs with omp A primers to determine if spotted fever group rickettsiae occurred in Amblyomma variegatum from 6 Caribbean islands. Positive amplicons were obtained from ticks from the U.S. Virgin Islands (9/18; 50%), Dominica (39/171; 30%), Montserrat (2/5; 40%), Nevis (17/34; 50%), St. Kitts (46/227; 20%), and St. Lucia (1/14; 7%). Sequences for a convenience sample of reaction products obtained from A. variegatum on St. Kitts (7), American Virgin Islands (4), Montserrat (2), and St. Lucia (1) were 100% homologous with that of Rickettsia africae , the agent of African tick-bite fever. To determine if transmission of R. africae occurred, we used Rickettsia rickettsii antigen in IFA tests and found positive titers (≥ 1/80) with sera from cattle, goats, and sheep from Dominica (24/95 [25%], 2/136 [2%], 0/58 [0%]), Nevis (12/45 [27%], 5/157 [3%], 0/90 [0%]), St. Kitts (2/43 [5%], 1/25 [4%), 1/35 [3%]), and St. Lucia (6/184 [3%] cattle), respectively. No seropositive animals were found in Grenada (0/4, 0/98/, 0/86), Montserrat (0/12, 0/26, 0/52), or Puerto Rico (0/80 cattle). Our study indicates that R. africae and African tick-bite fever are widespread in the Caribbean.

  13. Crustal structure of norther Oaxaca terrane; The Oaxaca and caltepec faults, and the Tehuacan Valley. A gravity study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enriquez, J. O.; Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Ramón, V. M.; Belmonte, S.

    2014-12-01

    Northern Oaxaca terrane, southern Mexico, is bound by the Caltepec and Oaxaca faults to the west and east, respectively. These faults juxtapose the Oaxaca terrane against the Mixteca and Juarez terranes, respectively. The Oaxaca Fault also forms the eastern boundary of the Cenozoic Tehuacan depression. Several gravity profiles across these faults and the Oaxaca terrane (including the Tehuacan Valley) enables us to establish the upper crustal structure of this region. Accordingly, the Oaxaca terrane is downward displaced to the east in two steps. First the Santa Lucia Fault puts into contact the granulitic basamental rocks with Phanerozoic volcanic and sedimentary rocks. Finally, the Gavilan Fault puts into contact the Oaxaca terrane basement (Oaxaca Complex) into contact with the volcano-sedimentary infill of the valley. This gravity study reveals that the Oaxaca Fault system gives rise to a series of east tilted basamental blocks (Oaxaca Complex?). A structural high at the western Tehuacan depression accomadates the east dipping faults (Santa Lucia and Gavilan faults) and the west dipping faults of the Oaxaca Fault System. To the west of this high structural we have the depper depocenters. The Oaxaca Complex, the Caltepec and Santa Lucia faults continue northwestwards beneath Phanerozoic rocks. The faults are regional tectonic structures. They seem to continue northwards below the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A major E-W to NE-SW discontinuity on the Oaxaca terrane is inferred to exist between profiles 1 and 2. The Tehuacan Valley posses a large groundwater potential.

  14. PREFACE: Conference Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-02-01

    ORGANISING COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov - Chairman, Kiril Blagoev - Vice-Chairman, Margarita Grozeva - Scientific secretary, Kostadinka Gesheva, Anna Szekeres, Hassan Chamati, Diana Nesheva, Peter Rafailov, Yordan Marinov, Emilia Dimova, Tatyana Ivanova, Radostina Kamburova, Ekaterina Iordanova, Julia Genova, Alexander Donkov, Emilia Vlaikova SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE: Alexander Petrov, Bulgaria; Nikola Sabotinov, Bulgaria; Kiril Blagoev, Bulgaria; Nicholay Tonchev, Bulgaria; Hassan Chamati, Bulgaria; Marin Gospodinov, Bulgaria; Peter Rafailov, Bulgaria; Emil Vlakhov, Bulgaria; Kostadinka Gesheva, Bulgaria; Anna Szekeres, Bulgaria; Diana Nesheva, Bulgaria; Albena Paskaleva, Bulgaria; Tatyana Ivanova, Bulgaria; Alexander Dreischuh, Bulgaria; Evgenia Valcheva, Bulgaria; Miglena Nikolaeva-Dimitrova, Bulgaria; Sanka Gateva, Bulgaria; Frank Hamelmann, Germany; Nicola Scaramuzza, Italy; G.M.W. Kroesen, Netherlands; Jan van Dijk Netherlands; Andrzej Szewczyk, Poland; Henryk Szymczak, Poland; Krzistof Rogacki, Poland; Ion Mihailescu, Romania; Claes-Goran Granqvist, Sweden; Mikael Jonsson, Sweden; Andrew Livingston, UK; Ludmila Peeva, UK

  15. [Anesthesiological systems "Polinarkon-Vita" with microprocessor for artificial lung ventilation apparatuses and monitoring].

    PubMed

    Trushin, A I; Uliakov, G I; Reĭderman, E N

    2005-01-01

    The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita for adults and children are described. These systems were developed at VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. on the basis of basic model of the anesthesiological system Polinarkon-E-Vita. The following new important units of the fifth generation apparatuses for inhalation anesthesia (IA) are described: Anestezist-4 monocomponent evaporator for liquid anesthetics (enfluran and isofluran); Diana, Diana-Det, and Elan-NR apparatuses for mechanical lung ventilation (MLV); dosimeters of medical gases, etc. These systems implement monitoring of vitally important functions of patient and parameters of IN and MLV. The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita are recommended for medical practice and commercially available from VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. as small lots.

  16. A Model for Understanding the Relationship Between Transaction Costs and Acquisition Cost Breaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-30

    John Dillard, Chip Franck , and Francois Melese. 2007. Applying Insights from Transaction Cost Economics (TCE) to Improve DoD Cost Estimation. NPS...GSBPP-07-008. Monterey, CA: Naval Postgraduate School. Angelis, Diana, John Dillard, Chip Franck , and Francois Melese. 2008. Measuring Transaction...Jeffrey A. Drezner, James Dryden, Kenneth Horn, James G. Kallimani, Martin C. Libicki, Megan McKernan, Roger C. Molander, Charles Nemfakos, Chad J.R

  17. Archaeological Data Recovery in the Abiquiu Reservoir Multiple Resource Area, New Mexico,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    reservations in southern Colorado, and in 1681, the Apache were moved to the Jicarilla Reservation near Dulce , New Mexico (Schaafsma 1977). Ute sites...AD-A127 143 ARCHAEOLOGICAL DATA RECOVERY IN THE AR QUIJU RESERVOI R is MULTIPLE RESOURCE AREA NEW MEXICO (U NICKENS AND ASSOCIATES MONTROSE CO A D...MULTIPLE RESOURCE AREA, NEW MEXICO by 44 Alan D. Reed Susan M. Chandler Kim Kreut.zer and~ Diana Christensen N IC NICKENS ASSOCIATESn < 1 L..PO Box

  18. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Human Resources Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-02-01

    Sticha, Robert Sadacca, Ani S. Di fazio, C. Manzi Knerr, Paul F . Hogan, and Diana Marissa. Personnel Tempo: Definition, Measurement, and Effects on...retention ( A & R ) pays (which include enlistment and reenlistment bonuses) and special and incentive (S&I) pays. In FY 2000, these pays combined totaled $2.67...differentiation of pay in the future and that A & R and S&I pays must grow relative to basic pay. As these special pays grow in relative importance

  19. Defense Acquisition Research Journal. Volume 21, Number 3, Issue 70

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    System Development,” by Diana I. Angelis; David N. Ford; and COL John T. Dillard, USA (Ret.), explains how the use of a finan- cial tool called the...emergence is the employment of tradespace exploration tools by both the Army Whole System Trades Analysis (WSTAT) (Edwards, 2012) and the Marine Corps...3D printers, computer-assisted milling machines, and laser, plasma, and water cutters, along with common tools like saws and welding gear (Hill

  20. Pro: Licensure necessary in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mass, Diana

    2006-01-31

    The myths surrounding the licensure of clinical laboratory personnel are numerous, but many licensure detractors skew the facts in an attempt to convince both laboratorians and the general public that licensure of lab personnel is unnecessary. In her argument in favor of national licensure, longtime laboratory manager Diana Mass presents her case that debunks many of the so-called truths surrounding the negative impact of licensure.

  1. Federal Trade Commission: Information on Proposed Regional Restructuring Effort.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-02-01

    Jeffords The Honorable John F. Kerry The Honorable Olympia J. Snowe United States Senate The Honorable Scott Mclnnis The Honorable Diana DeGette...court or before agency administrative law judges. BC is also responsible for reviewing certain mergers and acquisitions under the Hart- Scott - Rodino... Scott - Rodino Work The HSR Act’s Requirements and FTC’s Process to Address HSR Act Work HSR Mergers Have Increased Merger Activity and Associated HSR

  2. Governing Geoengineering Research: A Political and Technical Vulnerability Analysis of Potential Near-Term Options

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    weather events, or the spread of tropical diseases into North America. The net A Vulnerability-and-Response-Option Analysis Framework for a Risk...Avoidable Surprises, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Doney, Scott C., Victoria J. Fabry , Richard A. Feely, and Joan A. Kleypas, “Ocean...Falkenmark, Louise Karlberg, Robert W. Corell, Victoria J. Fabry , James Hansen, Brian Walker, Diana Liverman, Katherine Richardson, Paul Crutzen, and

  3. Understanding and Responding to Persistently High Unemployment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Jin provided valuable research and production assistance. Diana Furchtgott-Roth of the Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, Harry Holzer of...owners are “ underwater ”—that is, their houses are worth less than what they owe on their mortgages. Some ana- lysts suggest that homeowners who are... underwater may be unable to move to locales where labor demand is stronger and where they might find work. Whether that is occurring is unclear

  4. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-02

    through the use of a single intermediate language. However, certain evolutionary paths, i.e., translators and funtional interfaces, must be established...Systems Ada compiler beginning in December 1984 and was presented at an Arcadia consortium meeting held in December 1984. Iris concepts and a grammar ...Page 11 2 November 1990 STARS-RC-01430/001/00 o An LALR parser generator and an Ada grammar , used to produce the parse phase of the Ada-to-DIANA

  5. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA)/IMVAMUNE (registered trademark) Against Aerosolized Rabbitpox Virus in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    rabbitpox virus in a rabbit model icole L. Garzaa, Josh M. Hatkina, Virginia Livingstona, Donald K. Nicholsb, aul J. Chaplind, Ariane Volkmannd, Diana...eywords: abbitpox virus a b s t r a c t Infection of rabbitswith aerosolized rabbitpox virus (RPXV) produces a disease similar tomonkeypox and smallpox...irus, amember of the genusOrthopoxvirus in the family Poxviridae. ther orthopoxviruses that can infect humans include monkeypox irus, cowpox virus , and

  6. What All Teachers Hope for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author relates how he had touched the life of one of his troubled students. He relates how he had helped Diana, his student, make her life a little smoother after her mother's suicide. He relates that this is the very reason why he had loved teaching for most of his 40-year career as an educator. The author states that the…

  7. Democracy Assistance in the Gulf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply...Assistance in the Gulf 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel Diana M. Holland Colon 5d...democratic community.14 George W. Bush continued his predecessors’ interest in encouraging democracy, and even justified regime change in certain cases

  8. The Collaborative Capacity of the NYPD, FDNY, and EMS in New York City: A Focus on the First Line Officer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to my two wonderful daughters, Diana and Nicole, who inspire me every day to make our community a great place in which to live. This paper is...collaborative capacity is also influenced by cultural factors such as a unique language of terms, codes, and acronyms that facilitates communication ...within a particular agency; however, since communication is agency specific, it makes it difficult for different agencies to communicate together

  9. Spring Research Festival and NICBR Collaboration Winners Announced | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer, and Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer The winners of the 2014 Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 7 and 8, were recognized on July 2, and included 20 NCI at Frederick researchers: Matthew Anderson, Victor Ayala, Matt Bess, Cristina Bergamaschi, Charlotte Choi, Rami Doueiri, Laura Guasch Pamies, Diana Haines, Saadia Iftikhar, Maria Kaltcheva, Wojciech Kasprzak, Balamurugan Kuppusamy, James Lautenberger, George Lountos, Megan Mounts, Uma Mudunuri, Martha Sklavos, Gloriana Shelton, Alex Sorum, and Shea Wright.

  10. Zooplankton community structure during a transition from dry to wet state in a shallow, subtropical estuarine lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2015-12-01

    Lake St Lucia is among the most important shallow ecosystems globally and Africa's largest estuarine lake. It has long been regarded as a resilient system, oscillating through periods of hypersalinity and freshwater conditions, depending on the prevailing climate. The alteration of the system's catchment involving the diversion of the Mfolozi River away from Lake St Lucia, however, challenged the resilience of the system, particularly during the most recent drought (2002-2011), sacrificing much of its biodiversity. This study reports on the transition of the St Lucia zooplankton community from a dry hypersaline state to a new wet phase. Sampling was undertaken during routine quarterly surveys at five representative stations along the lake system from February 2011 to November 2013. A total of 54 taxa were recorded during the study period. The zooplankton community was numerically dominated by the calanoid copepods Acartiella natalensis and Pseudodiaptomus stuhlmanni and the cyclopoid copepod Oithona brevicornis. While the mysid Mesopodopsis africana was still present in the system during the wet phase, it was not found in the swarming densities that were recorded during the previous dry phase, possibly due to increased predation pressure, competition with other taxa and or the reconnection with the Mfolozi River via a beach spillway. The increase in zooplankton species richness recorded during the present study shows that the system has undergone a transition to wet state, with the zooplankton community structure reflecting that recorded during the past. It is likely, though, that only a full restoration of natural mouth functioning will result in further diversity increases.

  11. Strategy for the Successful Implementation of U.S. Southern Command’s Environmental Security Supplement to USCINCSO Theater Engagement Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-01

    27 percent of all mammals, 34 percent of all flowering plants, 37 percent of all reptiles, 43 percent of all birds, and 47 percent of all amphibians ...the Grenadines 115,461 0.43% Suriname 431,303 0.65% Trinidad and Tobago 1,175,523 -0.43% Uruguay 3,334,074 0.77% Venezuela 23,542,649 1.6% Source...Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Suriname , and Trinidad-Tobago in the Caribbean; Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala

  12. Indigenous peoples' food systems for health: finding interventions that work.

    PubMed

    Kuhnlein, Harriet; Erasmus, Bill; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Englberger, Lois; Okeke, Chinwe; Turner, Nancy; Allen, Lindsay; Bhattacharjee, Lalita

    2006-12-01

    This is a short report of a 'safari' held in conjunction with the International Congress of Nutrition in September 2005, in Futululu, St. Lucia, South Africa. Participants were several members of the International Union of Nutritional Sciences Task Force on Indigenous Peoples' Food Systems and Nutrition, other interested scientists and members of the Kwa Zulu indigenous community. The paper describes the rationale for and contributions towards understanding what might be successful interventions that would resonate among indigenous communities in many areas of the world. A summary of possible evaluation strategies of such interventions is also given.

  13. Large carpenter bees in Argentina: systematics and notes on the biology of Xylocopa subgenus Neoxylocopa (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Lucia, Mariano; Alvarez, Leopoldo J; Abrahamovich, Alberto H

    2014-01-15

    A systematic revision of the species of the genus Xylocopa subgenus Neoxylocopa in Argentina is provided. Seven species are included: X. atamisquensis Lucia & Abrahamovich, X. augusti Lepeletier, X. eximia Pérez, X. frontalis (Olivier), X. mendozana Enderlein, X. nigrocincta Smith and X. tacanensis Moure. The males of X. eximia and X. nigrocincta are described for the first time. Xylocopa jujuyensis Brèthes is a new junior synonym of X. nigrocincta. Photographs, occurrence maps, and identification keys for the species are presented. Information on the nest architecture and substratum preference are also given.

  14. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Capabilities and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    hardness) to the ratio of the intensities of an ionized calcium atomic emission line, Ca II (396.8 nm) and a calcium atomic emission line, Ca I (422.6 nm...N.; McManus, C.; Harmon, R.; De Lucia, F.; Miziolek, A. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Analysis of Complex Silicate Minerals—Beryl. Anal...Analysis of Minerals: Carbonates and Silicates . Spectrochim. Acta, Part B 2007, 62B (12), 1528–1536. 30. Harmon, R. S.; Remus, J.; McMillan, N. J

  15. Ecology. Food fight drives evolution.

    PubMed

    Brown, K

    2000-07-21

    On page 441 of this issue, evolutionary biologists showcase the purple-throated carib hummingbird as a rare example of food supply--in this case, flower shape--spurring the evolution of a sexual dimorphism, or a feature that differs between males and females. On St. Lucia, an island in the West Indies, female caribs sport bills a third longer and twice as curved as those of their male counterparts--one of the most extreme bill differences between the sexes in any hummingbird species. In the paper, the researchers link these "whoppingly dimorphic bills" to the specific flowers the male and female caribs frequent.

  16. Discrimination of Biological and Chemical Threat Simulants in Residue Mixtures on Multiple Substrates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-18

    potential. Appl Opt 42(30):6205–6209 8. Kim DS, Oh B, Lee H (2004) Effect of liquid film on near- threshold laser ablation of a solid surface. Appl ...cultures and sample dilution on bacterial identification. Appl Opt 49(13):C27–C35 19. Gottfried JL, De Lucia Jr FC, Munson CA, Miziolek AW (2009) Laser... effects of ambient gases. J Appl Phys 97 (11):113103/1-113103/5 39. Ralchenko Y, Kramida AE, Reader J, TeamNA (2008) NISTAtomic Spectra Database (version

  17. Developing food-based dietary guidelines to promote healthy diets and lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Albert, Janice L; Samuda, Pauline M; Molina, Verónika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the general population in each of these countries. This paper reports on the comprehensive process of developing the guidelines through consensus building among stakeholders, technical assessments and priority setting, and use of qualitative methods to field test messages to ensure public understanding and motivation. Nutritionists in each country received training and support from the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Pan American Health Organization's nutritionists.

  18. Foundation of a Knowledge Representation System for Image Understanding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    FOUNDATION OF A KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION SYSTEM FOR IMAGE UNDER-ETC(U) OCT GO L VAINA, S CUSHING N00039-79-C-0457 UNCLASSIFIED HOS-TR-27 NL...Understanding W a l ~i gI 8, _ ..... ... G. _VA RF"RMINGii)RG. -REPORT NUM6 -7.𔃾 UTHOR(,,-.- 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERfs) Lucia Vainai Steven/Cushing 4...821739-79-C-� . 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT TASK Higher Order Software, Inc./ AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS

  19. Wavelength tunable, 264 J laser diode array for 10 Hz/1ms Yb:YAG pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanteloup, J.-C.; Albach, D.; Assémat, F.; Bahbah, S.; Bourdet, G.; Piatti, P.; Pluvinage, M.; Vincent, B.; LeTouzé, G.; Mattern, T.; Biesenbach, J.; Müntz, H.; Noeske, A.; Venohr, R.

    2008-05-01

    The Lucia [1,2] Laser program, under development at the LULI laboratory, aims at delivering a 1030 nm, 100J, 10 Hz, 10 ns pulse train. The two laser heads used in the amplification stage relies on water-cooled mm-thick Yb:YAG disks, each of them pumped by a 34×13 cm2 Laser Diode Array (LDA). For each LDA, the 88 QCW diodes stacks manufactured by DILAS GmbH will be tiled in an 8×11 arrangement. Fine wavelength tuning is performed through bias current adjustment, water temperature control and conductivity adjustment. Wavelength homogeneity experimental verification has been validated.

  20. Towards the Batch Synthesis of Long DNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    MISMATCHES In a series of papers,136 the SantaLucia NN model137 of Watson - Crick paired DNA thermodynamics was successfully extended to incorporate...generally indicate a- helix coding or structural motifs for DNA incorporation into chromatin. Trifonov, E. N., “3-,!10.5-, 200- and 400-base...double-stranded DNA , is well-described by Hearst’s “weakly bending rod” model with 3.4 Å rise/bp and 13 Å radius for the helix ; its persistence length39

  1. Kinetic Model of C/H/N/O Emissions in Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Organic Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    the excited, emitting C/H/N/O atomic levels. In previous work, we carried out similar studies of LIBS of metallic lead in air and argon atmospheres...assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium to derive the tem- perature as a function of time. In this analysis, the line intensities were computed as areas...induced breakdown spectroscopy plume from metallic lead,” Appl. Opt. 42, 5947–5962 (2003). 7. V. I. Babushok, F. C. DeLucia, Jr., P. J. Dagdigian

  2. Individual household water supplies as a control measure against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Unrau, G. O.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a programme to evaluate single control measures for reducing the transmission of Schistosoma mansoni, household water supplies were installed in 5 rural settlements in the Riche Fond Valley of St Lucia. About 2 000 persons who previously were dependent on rivers and streams are now receiving safe water at their homes. The systems provide useful design data on individual water requirements in rural areas. This experience suggests that future rural water systems can be designed more economically and efficiently by using consumption rates that are closer to the actual requirements and by eliminating water wastage at the taps. PMID:1082378

  3. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  4. Shimoda 1854: Historical Consequences of a Natural Disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, A.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of 1854 - beginning of 1855 Japan was struck by a series of powerful earthquakes known as the Ansei Great Earthquakes. The first one, Ansei-Tōkai Quake, occurred on 23 December, 1854. It had a magnitude of 8.4; the epicenter ranged from the centre of Suruga Bay to the south-east into the ocean. It was followed by the Ansei-Nankai Quake on 24 December. The earthquakes with the following tsunami caused a huge damage in several regions of Japan: more than 20,000 buildings were destroyed, about 30,000 casualties caused. This natural disaster was witnessed by a Russian diplomatic mission led by admiral Yevfimy Putyatin. His flagship, frigate Diana, stayed at Shimoda, and Putyatin was conducting long and difficult negotiations trying to convince Japan of signing a commercial treaty with Russia, when Shimoda was hit by the tsunami. Several members of the mission described their impressions in their memoirs. The city was almost completely destroyed (only 16 houses survived the disaster). Diana was also badly damaged and sank in a storm while sailing to Heda for repairs. It was decided to build a new ship for the Russian mission. Works were carried out in Heda with the help of plans salvaged from the Diana, and required a cooperation of Russian sailors and Japanese carpenters. In about two months a two-masted schooner was built, which was christened Heda in honour of the city that helped with its construction. The Heda was the first western-style ship built in Japan, and thus can be called a "grandfather" of a Japanese oceanic navy. On 26 January, 1855 the Russian-Japanese negotiations were successfully concluded, and the Treaty of Shimoda was signed, marking the start of official relations between Russia and Japan. Thus a terrible natural disaster framed one of the most vivid pages in history of the Japanese-Russian relationship.

  5. Venus - Volcanism and rift formation in Beta Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. B.; Harmon, J. K.; Hine, A. A.; Head, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A new high-resolution radar image of Beta Regio, a Venus highland area, confirms the presence of a major tectonic rift system and associated volcanic activity. The lack of identifiable impact craters, together with the apparent superposition of the Theia Mons volcanic structure on the rift system, suggest that at least some of the volcanic activity occurred in relatively recent geologic time. The presence of topographically similar highland areas elsewhere on Venus (Aphrodite Terra, Dali Chasma, and Diana Chasma) suggests that rifting and volcanism are significant processes on Venus.

  6. A computer graphics based model for scattering from objects of arbitrary shapes in the optical region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, Narendra S.; Rozehnal, Ivan; Thompson, Richard L.

    1991-01-01

    A computer-graphics-based model, named DIANA, is presented for generation of objects of arbitrary shape and for calculating bidirectional reflectances and scattering from them, in the visible and infrared region. The computer generation is based on a modified Lindenmayer system approach which makes it possible to generate objects of arbitrary shapes and to simulate their growth, dynamics, and movement. Rendering techniques are used to display an object on a computer screen with appropriate shading and shadowing and to calculate the scattering and reflectance from the object. The technique is illustrated with scattering from canopies of simulated corn plants.

  7. An Integrated Science-based methodology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The data is secondary in nature. Meaning that no data was generated as part of this review effort. Rather, data that was available in the peer-reviewed literature was used.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Tolaymat , T., A. El Badawy, R. Sequeira, and A. Genaidy. An integrated science-based methodology to assess potential risks and implications of engineered nanomaterials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 298: 270-281, (2015).

  8. The Perseids Aug 11-12, 1996 in Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojurova, E.; Trukchev, I.

    As every year Astroclub "Canopus" organized an extended Perseid observing campaign. Members of the club took part in expedition to Avren village near Varna, at the National Astronomical Observatory (Rojen) and at the National Yought Astronomical Camp in Belite Brezi (South Bulgaria). Here we present some results derived on the basis of data obtained by Biliana Ognianova, Diana Tisheva, Diliana Antonova, Eva Bojurova, Elena Surbinska, Irena Stavreva, Katia Koleva, Lilia Porojanova, Anton Antonov, Denis Mechmedov, Doichin Docinski, Galin Genchev, Ivan Trukhchev, Valentin Velkov. More than 2000 Perseids were recorded. Some other showers were also observed.

  9. Water Quality Changes Caused by Extension of the Winter Navigation Season on the Detroit - St. Clair River System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    I..1Fli F c P, Special ReDort 88-10 M US Army CorpsJuly 1988 of Engineers AD-A200 535 Cold RegisResearch & Engineering Laboratory Water quality...readable. Field and laboratory work by Carl Diener and Patricia Weyrick, both of CRREL, and data analysis by Diana Seely, formerly of CRREL, also...tation of brand names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. F Slot) For NTIS CRA&I ",?, U

  10. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of the Hemagglutinin 1 Protein of Human Influenza A Virus Subtype H1N1 Circulating in Kenya During 2007-2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Subtype H1N1 Circulating in Kenya During 2007–2008 Wallace D. Bulimo,1,2 Rachel A. Achilla,1 Janet Majanja,1 Silvanos Mukunzi,1 Meshack Wadegu,1 Finnley... Alfred Odindo,1 Charles Adega,1 Jeremiah Kiponda,1 Ruth Mupa,1 Frida Munyazi,1 George Kissinger,1 Mohammed Mwakuzimu,1 Diana Kamola,1 Elias Muhidin,1...Correspondence: Wallace Bulimo, PhD, US Army Medical Research Unit– Kenya, Box 606, Village Market, 00621 Nairobi, Kenya (wbulimo@wrp-nbo.org). The Journal of

  11. A Electronic Voting Scheme Achieved by Using Quantum Proxy Signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Ding, Li-Yuan; Yu, Yao-Feng; Li, Peng-Fei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new electronic voting scheme using Bell entangled states as quantum channels. This scheme is based on quantum proxy signature. The voter Alice, vote management center Bob, teller Charlie and scrutineer Diana only perform single particle measurement to realize the electronic voting process. So the scheme reduces the technical difficulty and increases operation efficiency. It can be easily realized. We use quantum key distribution and one-time pad to guarantee its unconditional security. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to guarantee its anonymity, verifiability, unforgetability and undeniability.

  12. Isostatic gravity map of the Point Sur 30 x 60 quadrangle and adjacent areas, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, J.T.; Morin, R.L.; Langenheim, V.E.

    2011-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of a regional effort to investigate the tectonics and water resources of the central Coast Range. This map serves as a basis for modeling the shape of basins and for determining the location and geometry of faults in the area. Local spatial variations in the Earth's gravity field (after removing variations caused by instrument drift, earth-tides, latitude, elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure), as expressed by the isostatic anomaly, reflect the distribution of densities in the mid- to upper crust, which in turn can be related to rock type. Steep gradients in the isostatic gravity field often indicate lithologic or structural boundaries. Gravity highs reflect the Mesozoic granitic and Franciscan Complex basement rocks that comprise both the northwest-trending Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges, whereas gravity lows in Salinas Valley and the offshore basins reflect the thick accumulations of low-density alluvial and marine sediment. Gravity lows also occur where there are thick deposits of low-density Monterey Formation in the hills southeast of Arroyo Seco (>2 km, Marion, 1986). Within the map area, isostatic residual gravity values range from approximately -60 mGal offshore in the northern part of the Sur basin to approximately 22 mGal in the Santa Lucia Range.

  13. Logging system adds value to field rejuvenation efforts

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, D.; Bartenhagen, K.; Santolamazza, A.

    1997-11-01

    As with any rejuvenation scheme, the first step is always identification and evaluation of potential producible reserves. But economic and physical factors made evaluation using traditional logging techniques problematic. The constraints that inhibited earlier logging tools have been addressed by a new, compact integrated system called Platform Express (PEX). Oil companies operating in two of the most mature producing regions of the US, the Hugoton-Panhandle Field and the Southwest Nena Lucia Field in West Texas, discuss the physical and economic advantages they are reaping using PEX technologies. Hugoton-Panhandle Field, discovered around 1920, sprawls across parts of three south-central states and has been one of the world`s largest gas producers. Despite continuing pressure declines in this aging gas giant, the entire region has undergone restoration in the last few years. In its Kansas portions, a modest oil production has almost doubled since 1990 and a steep gas decline has been completely turned around. These production gains have come from an active program of recompletions, the deepening of old holes and new drilling. The story in the southwest Nena Lucia Field is much the same. Operator Oryx Energy has been active in the field, located west of Abilene, Texas, since its discovery in the 1950s. The goal with this field is to use advanced technologies to reverse the production declines that began years ago. Such a reversal began in mid-1996 and has been sustained thus far.

  14. Race, ethnicity and prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Gong, Gordon; Haynatzki, Gleb; Wilson, M. Roy

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, some authors pooled data from studies on the Dutch, Australians and Americans of European origin in an attempt to predict the prevalence of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in the United States. PURPOSE: To examine potential ethnic diversity in the prevalence of POAG among populations of the "same race." Methods: Medical literature was searched, and 11 population-based studies on populations of African origin and five on populations of European origin were identified. RESULTS: The prevalence of POAG was significantly higher in white Australians than in the Dutch (p<0.001) and was significantly lower (p<0.001) among black populations in South Africa, Nigeria, Tanzania and the United States than in Ghana, St. Lucia or Barbados. Notably, the prevalence was significantly lower in Afro Caribbeans living in London than in St. Lucia or Barbados (p<0.001). There was, however, inconsistency in the definition of POAG among the different studies. CONCLUSIONS: There is a wide range in the prevalence of POAG among populations of the same "race," which might be attributed to the different methodology and definition of POAG; potential difference in social, behavioral and environmental factors; and/or genetic predisposition. Scrutiny is warranted when pooling data from different ethnic groups of the "same race" in meta-analyses. PMID:17052053

  15. Rb-Sr whole-rock and mineral ages, K-Ar, 40Ar/39Ar, and U-Pb mineral ages, and strontium, lead, neodymium, and oxygen isotopic compositions for granitic rocks from the Salinian Composite Terrane, California:

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Champion, D.E.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes new and published age and isotopic data for whole-rocks and minerals from granitic rocks in the Salinian composite terrane, California. Rubidium-strontium whole-rock ages of plutons are in two groups, Early Cretaceous (122 to 100 Ma) and Late Cretaceous (95 to 82 Ma). Early Cretaceous plutons occur in all granitic rock exposures from Bodega Head in the north to those from the Santa Lucia and Gabilan Ranges in the central part of the terrane. Late Cretaceous plutons have been identified in the Point Reyes Peninsula, the Santa Lucia and the Gabilan Ranges, and in the La Panza Range in the southern part of the terrane. Ranges of initial values of isotopic compositions are 87Sr/86Sr, 0.7046-0.7147, δ18O, +8.5 to +12.5 per mil, 206Pb/204Pb, 18.901-19.860, 207Pb/204Pb, 15.618-15.814, 208Pb/204Pb, 38.569- 39.493, and εNd, +0.9 to -8.6. The initial 87Sr/86Sr=0.706 isopleth is identified in the northern Gabilan Range and in the Ben Lomond area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, in Montara Mountain, in Bodega Head, and to the west of the Farallon Islands on the Cordell Bank. This isotopic boundary is offset about 95 miles (160km) by right-lateral displacements along the San Gregorio-Hosgri and San Andreas fault systems.

  16. Methods Development for Spectral Simplification of Room-Temperature Rotational Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Erin B.; Shipman, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Room-temperature rotational spectra are dense and difficult to assign, and so we have been working to develop methods to accelerate this process. We have tested two different methods with our waveguide-based spectrometer, which operates from 8.7 to 26.5 GHz. The first method, based on previous work by Medvedev and De Lucia, was used to estimate lower state energies of transitions by performing relative intensity measurements at a range of temperatures between -20 and +50 °C. The second method employed hundreds of microwave-microwave double resonance measurements to determine level connectivity between rotational transitions. The relative intensity measurements were not particularly successful in this frequency range (the reasons for this will be discussed), but the information gleaned from the double-resonance measurements can be incorporated into other spectral search algorithms (such as autofit or genetic algorithm approaches) via scoring or penalty functions to help with the spectral assignment process. I.R. Medvedev, F.C. De Lucia, Astrophys. J. 656, 621-628 (2007).

  17. Genetically engineered Mengo virus vaccination of multiple captive wildlife species.

    PubMed

    Backues, K A; Hill, M; Palmenberg, A C; Miller, C; Soike, K F; Aguilar, R

    1999-04-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV), has caused the deaths of many species of animals in zoological parks and research institutions. The Audubon Park Zoo, (New Orleans, Louisiana, USA) attempted vaccination of several species with a killed EMCV vaccine with mixed results. This paper reports an attempt at vaccination against EMCV using a genetically engineered, live attenuated Mengo virus (vMC0) at the Audubon Park Zoo and Miami Metro Zoo, (Miami, Florida, USA) from December 1996 to June 1997. Several species of animals were vaccinated with vMC0, which is serologically indistinguishable from the field strain of EMCV. Serum samples were taken at the time of vaccination and again 21 days later, then submitted for serum neutralization titers against EMCV. The vaccinate species included red capped mangebey (Cercocebus torquatus), colobus (Colobus guereza), angolan colobus (Colobus angolensis), ruffed lemur (Lemur variegatus ruber and Lemur variegatus variegatus), back lemur (Lemur macaco), ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), siamang (Hylobates syndactylus), diana guenon (Cercopithicus diana), spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), talapoin monkey (Cercopithecus talapoin), Brazilian tapir (Tapirus terrestris), Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii), Malayan tapir (Tapirus indicus), dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius), bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), gerenuk (Litocranius walleri), guanaco (Lama glama guanicoe), black duiker (Cephalophus niger), Vietnamese potbellied pig (Sus scrofa), babirusa (Babyrousa babyrussa), collard peccary (Tayass tajacu), and African crested porcupine (Hystrix africaeaustralis). The vaccine response was variable, with high virus neutralizing antibody titer responses in some primate species and mixed to poor responses for other species. No ill effects were seen with vaccination.

  18. Profile: Manhiça Health Research Centre (Manhiça HDSS).

    PubMed

    Sacoor, Charfudin; Nhacolo, Ariel; Nhalungo, Delino; Aponte, John J; Bassat, Quique; Augusto, Orvalho; Mandomando, Inácio; Sacarlal, Jahit; Lauchande, Natu; Sigaúque, Betuel; Alonso, Pedro; Macete, Eusébio; Munguambe, Khátia; Guinovart, Caterina; Aide, Pedro; Menendez, Clara; Acácio, Sozinho; Quelhas, Diana; Sevene, Esperança; Nhampossa, Tacilta

    2013-10-01

    The Manhiça Health Research Centre, established in 1996 in a rural area of southern Mozambique, currently follows around 92 000 individuals living in approximately 20 000 enumerated and geo-positioned households. Its main strength is the possibility of linking demographic data and clinical data to promote and conduct biomedical research in priority health areas. Socio-demographic data are updated twice a year and clinical data are collected on a daily basis. The data collected in Manhiça HDSS comprises household and individual characteristics, household socio-economic assets, vital data, migration, individual health history and cause of death, among others. Studies conducted in this HDSS contributed to guide the health authorities and decision-making bodies to define or adjust health policies such as the introduction of Mozambique's expanded programme of immunization with different vaccines (Haemophilus influenzae type b, Pneumococcus) or the development of the concept of Intermittent Preventive Treatment for Infants (IPTi) that led to the World Health Organization recommendation of this method as best practice for the control of malaria among infants. Manhiça's data can be accessed through a formal request to Diana Quelhas (diana.quelhas@manhica.net) accompanied by a proposal that will be analysed by the Manhiça HDSS internal scientific and ethics committees.

  19. Diversity and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in seven non-human primates of the Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Kouassi, Roland Yao Wa; McGraw, Scott William; Yao, Patrick Kouassi; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Brunet, Julie; Pesson, Bernard; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N’goran, Eliezer Kouakou; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2015-01-01

    Parasites and infectious diseases are well-known threats to primate populations. The main objective of this study was to provide baseline data on fecal parasites in the cercopithecid monkeys inhabiting Côte d’Ivoire’s Taï National Park. Seven of eight cercopithecid species present in the park were sampled: Cercopithecus diana, Cercopithecus campbelli, Cercopithecus petaurista, Procolobus badius, Procolobus verus, Colobus polykomos, and Cercocebus atys. We collected 3142 monkey stool samples between November 2009 and December 2010. Stool samples were processed by direct wet mount examination, formalin-ethyl acetate concentration, and MIF (merthiolate, iodine, formalin) concentration methods. Slides were examined under microscope and parasite identification was based on the morphology of cysts, eggs, and adult worms. A total of 23 species of parasites was recovered including 9 protozoa (Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Entamoeba hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba butschlii, Chilomastix mesnili, Giardia sp., Balantidium coli, and Blastocystis sp.), 13 nematodes (Oesophagostomum sp., Ancylostoma sp., Anatrichosoma sp., Capillariidae Gen. sp. 1, Capillariidae Gen. sp. 2, Chitwoodspirura sp., Subulura sp., spirurids [cf Protospirura muricola], Ternidens sp., Strongyloides sp., Trichostrongylus sp., and Trichuris sp.), and 1 trematode (Dicrocoelium sp.). Diversity indices and parasite richness were high for all monkey taxa, but C. diana, C. petaurista, C. atys, and C. campbelli exhibited a greater diversity of parasite species and a more equitable distribution. The parasitological data reported are the first available for these cercopithecid species within Taï National Park. PMID:25619957

  20. Collaboration on SEP Missions to the Moon and Small Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pieters, C. M.

    1997-01-01

    In response to the Discovery announcement of opportunity a team consisting of TRW Lewis Research Center, JPL and UCLA with scientific co-investigators from government and University laboratories have proposed to fly the first planetary solar electric propulsion (SEP) mission. Diana is designed to carry an X-ray and gamma ray spectrometer, and imaging spectrometer, a framing camera, a laser altimer an ion spectrometer and a magnetometer. In order to obtain lunar gravity data from the far side of the moon a relay satellite is placed into high polar orbit about the moon to relay the Doppler-shifted telemetry to Earth. Diana will spend two months in a 700 km polar orbit obtaining mineralogical data from a full spectral map of the lunar surface, and then spend a year in a 100 km (or below) polar orbit mapping the lunar elemental composition, its topography, gravity field, ions from its atmosphere and its permanent and induced magnetic fields. After the low altitude mapping phase the ion thrusters propel the spacecraft out of the lunar sphere of influence and onto a heloioscentric trajectory to rendezvous with dormant comet Wilson-Harrington. The ground truth provided by the returned lunar samples to validate the remote sensing instruments for lunar studies will also serve to validate the Wilson-Harrington observations since the same instruments will be used at both bodies.

  1. Malagasyprinus, a new genus of the Saprininae from Madagascar with description of two new species (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Saprininae) (First contribution to the knowledge of the Histeridae of Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Lackner, Tomáš; Gomy, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Based on the results of recent phylogenetic analysis of the higher taxa of the Saprininae as well as external morphological characters, especially the presence of deep and large prosternal foveae, and the shape and position of the sensory organs of the antennal club, the species Saprinus (s.str.) caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is excluded from the genus Saprinus and a new genus Malagasyprinus, exclusive to Madagascar, is established for it. The new genus shows mainly characters that are apomorphic for the subfamily and contains another two, highly similar allopatric species Malagasyprinus perrieri sp. n., and Malagasyprinus diana sp. n., described herein. The three species are best separated from each other by the structure of the prosternum and male terminalia, especially the shape of the aedeagus. We re-describe Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. and provide Malagasyprinus perrieri and Malagasyprinus diana with brief differential diagnoses. All taxon descriptions are accompanied with color habitat photographs, SEM micrographs and drawings of their male genitalia. A key to the species of Malagasyprinus is given. Sensory structures of the antenna of Malagasyprinus caeruleatus comb. n. are likewise depicted herein. The systematic position of the newly erected genus is discussed. A lectotype of Saprinus caeruleatus Lewis, 1905 is designated.

  2. Coupling of geochemical and multiphase flow processes for validation of the MUFITS reservoir simulator against TOUGHREACT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Afanasyev, Andrey; Melnik, Oleg; Kühn, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Coupled reactive transport simulations, especially in heterogeneous settings considering multiphase flow, are extremely time consuming and suffer from significant numerical issues compared to purely hydrodynamic simulations. This represents a major hurdle in the assessment of geological subsurface utilization, since it constrains the practical application of reactive transport modelling to coarse spatial discretization or oversimplified geological settings. In order to overcome such limitations, De Lucia et al. [1] developed and validated a one-way coupling approach between geochemistry and hydrodynamics, which is particularly well suited for CO2 storage simulations, while being of general validity. In the present study, the models used for the validation of the one-way coupling approach introduced by De Lucia et al. (2015), and originally performed with the TOUGHREACT simulator, are transferred to and benchmarked against the multiphase reservoir simulator MUFITS [2]. The geological model is loosely inspired by an existing CO2 storage site. Its grid comprises 2,950 elements enclosed in a single layer, but reflecting a realistic three-dimensional anticline geometry. For the purpose of this comparison, homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios in terms of porosity and permeability were investigated. In both cases, the results of the MUFITS simulator are in excellent agreement with those produced with the fully-coupled TOUGHREACT simulator, while profiting from significantly higher computational performance. This study demonstrates how a computationally efficient simulator such as MUFITS can be successfully included in a coupled process simulation framework, and also suggests ameliorations and specific strategies for the coupling of chemical processes with hydrodynamics and heat transport, aiming at tackling geoscientific problems beyond the storage of CO2. References [1] De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., and Kühn, M. A coupling alternative to reactive transport simulations

  3. Regional strategy tested in Caribbean.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia have joined forces in the world's 1st regional Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) effort -- the Caribbean CSM. The Barbados Family Planning Association (BFPS) is overseeing the operation, which begins selling 2 contraceptive pills and a condom in early February. Costs and start-up times were shaved by adopting brand names and advertising materials from Jamaica's highly successful CSM project. Jamaica's popular "Panther" condom and "Perle" oral contraceptive (OC) are being used by the Caribbean CSM project. Perle's 9-year-old package has been redesigned and the Caribbean CSM project also is selling a 2nd, low-dose version called "Perle-LD." The products are manufactured in the US by Syntex as Noriday and Norminest, respectively. But the regional approach's financial gains also had a debit side, most notably a tripling of bureaucratic procedures. Part of project difficulties stem from differences among the 3 Caribbean countries. While sharing a common cultural heritage, St. Lucians speak a patois dialect in addition to the English prevalent on the other islands. The biggest hurdle was overcoming an economic disparity between Barbados and its less affluent neighbors, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. The CSM project decided to try a 2-tier product pricing strategy. In US currency, prices run $1.75 per cycle for both OCs on Barbados, but $1.26 on St. Vincent and St. Lucia. A Panther 3-pack costs 75 cents on Barbados and 42 cents on the othe 2 islands. The project is being promoted with generic family planning media advertisements. The project also has held physician orientation seminars on each island. The pilot program will be accompanied by retailer training seminars. In addition the project may introduce a spermicidal foaming tablet, once the US Food and Drug Administration approvs a new American-made product. The unique Caribbean CSM project may spread an idea as potent as the family planning message. Its success could transmit the

  4. Epilepsy care in the southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Gregory; Sandy, Sherry; Corbin, David O C; Bird-Compton, Jacqueline; Jack, Frances; Nelson, Beverly; Jalonen, Tuula O; Ali, Amza; Fortuné, Taryn; Clarke, Dave; Okolie, Jacqueline; Cervenka, Mackenzie C

    2015-10-01

    Very little has been reported about the health resources available for patients with epilepsy in the five English-speaking southern Caribbean countries of Trinidad and Tobago, Barbados, Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Saint Lucia. There is no comprehensive resource describing their health systems, access to specialty care, antiepileptic drug (AED) use, and availability of brain imaging and EEG. The purpose of this study was to profile epilepsy care in these countries as an initial step toward improving the standard of care and identifying gaps in care to guide future policy changes. In each southern Caribbean country, we conducted study visits and interviewed health-care providers, government health ministers, pharmacy directors, hospital medical directors, pharmacists, clinic staff, radiologists, and radiology and EEG technicians. Health-care providers completed extensive epilepsy care surveys. The five countries all have integrated government health systems with clinics and hospitals that provide free or heavily subsidized care and AEDs for patients with epilepsy. Only Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados, however, have neurology specialists. The three smaller countries lack government imaging and EEG facilities. Trinidad had up to one-year waits for public MRI/EEG. Government formularies in Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Saint Lucia are limited to first-generation AEDs. One or more second-line agents are formulary in Trinidad and Barbados. Nonformulary drugs may be obtained for individual patients in Barbados. Grenada, Saint Lucia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines participate in an Organization of Eastern Caribbean States formulary purchasing system, which added levetiracetam following the survey. Newer generic AED formulations with the lowest risks for pregnancy malformation were not in use. In conclusion, patients with epilepsy in the southern Caribbean have excellent access to government clinics and hospitals, but AED choices

  5. Mm-Wave Spectroscopic Sensors, Catalogs, and Uncatalogued Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Ivan; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2014-06-01

    Analytical chemical sensing based on high resolution rotational molecular spectra has been recognized as a viable technique for decades. We recently demonstrated a compact implementation of such a sensor. Future generations of these sensors will rely on automated algorithms for quantification of chemical dilutions based on their spectral libraries, as well as identification of spectral features not present in spectral catalogs. Here we present an algorithm aimed at detection of unidentified lines in complex molecular species based on spectroscopic libraries developed in our previous projects. We will discuss the approaches suitable for data mining in feature-rich rotational molecular spectra. Neese, C.F., I.R. Medvedev, G.M. Plummer, A.J. Frank, C.D. Ball, and F.C. De Lucia, "A Compact Submillimeter/Terahertz Gas Sensor with Efficient Gas Collection, Preconcentration, and ppt Sensitivity." Sensors Journal, IEEE, 2012. 12(8): p. 2565-2574

  6. Comparative oceanography of coastal lagoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjerfve, Bjorn

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that physical lagoon characteristics and variability depend on the channel connecting the lagoon to the adjacent coastal ocean is evaluated. The geographical, hydrological, and oceanographic characteristics of 10 lagoon systems are described and analyzed; these oceanographic features are utilized to classify the lagoon systems. Choked lagoons (Laguna Joyuda, Coorong, Lake St.Lucia, Gippsland Lakes, Lake Songkla/Thale Luang/Thale Noi, and Lagoa dos Patos) are prevalent on coasts with high wave energy and low tidal range; restricted lagoons (Lake Pontchartrain and Laguna de Terminos) are located on low/medium wave energy coasts with a low tidal range; and leaky lagoons (Mississippi Sound and Belize Lagoon/Chetumal Bay) are connected to the ocean by wide tidal passes that transmit oceanic effects into the lagoon with a minimum of resistance. The data support the hypothesis that the nature of the connecting channel controls system functions.

  7. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Spectrum of Methyl Cyanide Between 200 and 277 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, James P.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2016-06-01

    We have studied methyl cyanide, one of the so-called 'astronomical weeds', in the 200--277 GHz band. We have experimentally gathered a set of intensity calibrated, complete, and temperature resolved spectra from across the temperature range of 231--351 K. Using our previously reported method of analysis, the point by point method, we are capable of generating the complete spectrum at astronomically significant temperatures. Lines, of nontrivial intensity, which were previously not included in the available astrophysical catalogs have been found. Lower state energies and line strengths have been found for a number of lines which are not currently present in the catalogs. The extent to which this may be useful in making assignments will be discussed. J. McMillan, S. Fortman, C. Neese, F. DeLucia, ApJ. 795, 56 (2014)

  8. San Jose Accord: energy aid or petroleum-marketing strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-30

    The San Jose Accord was signed in San Jose, Costa Rica on August 3, 1980 by the Presidents of Venezuela and Mexico, whereby the two countries mutually committed to supply the net imported domestic oil consumption of several Central American and Caribbean countries. Countries initially participating in the program are: Barbados, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Nicaragua, and Panama. Seven eastern Caribbean countries were to meet on October 7 to petition for inclusion in the Accord, namely: Antigua, St. Kitt/Nevis, Montserrat, Dominica, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, and Grenada. The official language of the Accord is presented, and the operative status of the Accord two years after signing is discussed. Specific briefs about some of the individual countries in the Accord are included. The fuel price/tax series for the Western Hemisphere countries is updated.

  9. Seroprevalence of seven zoonotic pathogens in pregnant women from the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Wood, Heidi; Drebot, Michael A; Dewailly, Eric; Dillon, Liz; Dimitrova, Kristina; Forde, Martin; Grolla, Allen; Lee, Elise; Loftis, Amanda; Makowski, Kai; Morrison, Karen; Robertson, Lyndon; Krecek, Rosina C

    2014-09-01

    Studies examining the prevalence of zoonotic agents in the Caribbean are very limited. The objective of this study was to examine the seroprevalence of seven zoonotic agents among individuals residing on 10 English-speaking Caribbean countries. Sera from healthy, pregnant women were collected from Antigua-Barbuda, Belize, Bermuda, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. Kitts-Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent-Grenadines and tested for the presence of IgG antibodies to dengue virus, hepatitis E virus, hantaviruses, leptospiral agents, spotted fever group rickettsiae (SFGR), typhus group rickettsiae (TGR), and Coxiella burnetii (Q fever). The highest seroprevalence values were observed for dengue virus, SFGR, and leptospirosis, although the lowest seroprevalence values were observed for hepatitis E virus, C. burnetii, and TGR. Antibodies to hantaviruses were not detected in any individuals.

  10. Adaptation in a plant-hummingbird association.

    PubMed

    Temeles, Ethan J; Kress, W John

    2003-04-25

    Sexual dimorphism in bill morphology and body size of the Caribbean purple-throated carib hummingbird is associated with a reversal in floral dimorphism of its Heliconia food plants. This hummingbird is the sole pollinator of H. caribaea and H. bihai, with flowers of the former corresponding to the short, straight bills of males, the larger sex, and flowers of the latter corresponding to the long, curved bills of females. On St. Lucia, H. bihai compensates for the rarity of H. caribaea by evolving a second color morph with flowers that match the bills of males, whereas on Dominica, H. caribaea evolves a second color morph with flowers that match the bills of females. The nectar rewards of all Heliconia morphs are consistent with each sex's choice of the morph that corresponds to its bill morphology and energy requirements, supporting the hypothesis that feeding preferences have driven their coadaptation.

  11. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  12. A New Approach to Modeling Densities and Equilibria of Ice and Gas Hydrate Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Lucia, A.; Lewis, K. C.

    2011-12-01

    The Gibbs-Helmholtz Constrained (GHC) equation is a new cubic equation of state that was recently derived by Lucia (2010) and Lucia et al. (2011) by constraining the energy parameter in the Soave form of the Redlich-Kwong equation to satisfy the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation. The key attributes of the GHC equation are: 1) It is a multi-scale equation because it uses the internal energy of departure, UD, as a natural bridge between the molecular and bulk phase length scales. 2) It does not require acentric factors, volume translation, regression of parameters to experimental data, binary (kij) interaction parameters, or other forms of empirical correlations. 3) It is a predictive equation of state because it uses a database of values of UD determined from NTP Monte Carlo simulations. 4) It can readily account for differences in molecular size and shape. 5) It has been successfully applied to non-electrolyte mixtures as well as weak and strong aqueous electrolyte mixtures over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and composition to predict liquid density and phase equilibrium with up to four phases. 6) It has been extensively validated with experimental data. 7) The AAD% error between predicted and experimental liquid density is 1% while the AAD% error in phase equilibrium predictions is 2.5%. 8) It has been used successfully within the subsurface flow simulation program FEHM. In this work we describe recent extensions of the multi-scale predictive GHC equation to modeling the phase densities and equilibrium behavior of hexagonal ice and gas hydrates. In particular, we show that radial distribution functions, which can be determined by NTP Monte Carlo simulations, can be used to establish correct standard state fugacities of 1h ice and gas hydrates. From this, it is straightforward to determine both the phase density of ice or gas hydrates as well as any equilibrium involving ice and/or hydrate phases. A number of numerical results for mixtures of N2, O2, CH4, CO2, water

  13. Cholera in Haiti and Other Caribbean Regions, 19th Century

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Medical journals and other sources do not show evidence that cholera occurred in Haiti before 2010, despite the devastating effect of this disease in the Caribbean region in the 19th century. Cholera occurred in Cuba in 1833–1834; in Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, Nevis, Trinidad, the Bahamas, St. Vincent, Granada, Anguilla, St. John, Tortola, the Turks and Caicos, the Grenadines (Carriacou and Petite Martinique), and possibly Antigua in 1850–1856; and in Guadeloupe, Cuba, St. Thomas, the Dominican Republic, Dominica, Martinique, and Marie Galante in 1865–1872. Conditions associated with slavery and colonial military control were absent in independent Haiti. Clustered populations, regular influx of new persons, and close quarters of barracks living contributed to spread of cholera in other Caribbean locations. We provide historical accounts of the presence and spread of cholera epidemics in Caribbean islands. PMID:22099117

  14. First records of Gastrotricha from South Africa, with description of a new species of Halichaetonotus (Chaetonotida, Chaetonotidae)

    PubMed Central

    Todaro, M. Antonio; Zotto, Matteo Dal; Bownes, Sarah J.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During a survey of the biota of the St. Lucia Estuary in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, a number of Gastrotricha were found among samples of meiofauna. Fresh, marine sediment yielded several specimens belonging to a total of seven species. Of these, two are already known from other regions (i.e., Dactylopodola australiensis and Heteroxenotrichula squamosa), one is described as new to science (Halichaetonotus sanctaeluciae sp. n.), while the remaining four (Pseudostomella sp., Halichaetonotus sp.1, Halichaetonotus sp. 2, Xenotrichula sp.) require further collections and analysis, in order to establish the extent of their affiliation to species already described. General appearance, shape of hydrofoil scale and the occurrence of three long spines on the dorsal side make the new species most closely related to Halichaetonotus australis and Halichaetonotus marivagus. The key differences from these taxa and between Halichaetonotus sanctaeluciae sp. n. and Halichaetonotus aculifer are discussed. PMID:22144860

  15. First records of Gastrotricha from South Africa, with description of a new species of Halichaetonotus (Chaetonotida, Chaetonotidae).

    PubMed

    Todaro, M Antonio; Zotto, Matteo Dal; Bownes, Sarah J; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-01-01

    During a survey of the biota of the St. Lucia Estuary in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, a number of Gastrotricha were found among samples of meiofauna. Fresh, marine sediment yielded several specimens belonging to a total of seven species. Of these, two are already known from other regions (i.e., Dactylopodola australiensis and Heteroxenotrichula squamosa), one is described as new to science (Halichaetonotus sanctaeluciae sp. n.), while the remaining four (Pseudostomella sp., Halichaetonotus sp.1, Halichaetonotus sp. 2, Xenotrichula sp.) require further collections and analysis, in order to establish the extent of their affiliation to species already described. General appearance, shape of hydrofoil scale and the occurrence of three long spines on the dorsal side make the new species most closely related to Halichaetonotus australis and Halichaetonotus marivagus. The key differences from these taxa and between Halichaetonotus sanctaeluciae sp. n. and Halichaetonotus aculifer are discussed.

  16. Effects of an 8-month exercise intervention on physical capacity, NT-proBNP, physical activity levels and quality of life data in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension by NYHA class.

    PubMed

    Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Sanz-Ayan, Paz; González-Saiz, Laura; Quezada-Loaiza, Carlos A; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Flox-Camacho, Angela; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego; Santalla, Alfredo; Morán, María; Escribano-Subías, Pilar; Lucia, Alejandro

    2017-06-01

    This article provides descriptive detailed (pre and post) values of physical capacity variables, NT-proBNP, physical activity levels and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) (both, intervention and control group) by New York Heart Association (NYHA) class before and after an 8-month exercise intervention. The data are supplemental to our original Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) entitled "Benefits of skeletal-muscle exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension: The WHOLEi+12 trial" (L. González-Saiz, C. Fiuza-Luces, F. Sanchis-Gomar, A. Santos-Lozano, C.A. Quezada-Loaiza, A. Flox-Camacho, D. Munguía-Izquierdo, I. Ara, A. Santalla, M. Morán, P. Sanz-Ayan, P. Escribano-Subías, A. Lucia A, 2017) [1].

  17. Complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David

    2003-01-01

    The 13th International Prostate Cancer Update was held in Vail, Colorado, in February 2003. This article provides an overview of the high points in the areas of complementary medicine, chemoprevention, and staging that were discussed at this meeting. M. Scott Lucia, MD, addressed the use of various hormonal agents, antiproliferative or differentiating agents, antiinflammatory agents, and antioxidants in patients with prostate cancer. Wael A. Sakr, MD, provided an overview of prognostic markers for this disease. Arturo Mendoza-Valdes, MD, explored the potential role of exercise for patients with prostate cancer, and Bruce Sodee, MD, described some exciting new developments in prostate imaging. E. David Crawford, MD, discussed the ongoing Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

  18. Interpretation of gravity profiles across the northern Oaxaca terrane, its boundaries and the Tehuacán Valley, southern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Enríquez, J. O.; Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Keppie, J. D.; Belmonte-Jiménez, S. I.; Ramón-Márquez, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    A gravity study was conducted across the northern Oaxaca terrane and its bounding faults: the Caltepec and Oaxaca Faults to the west and east, respectively. These faults juxtapose the Oaxaca terrane against the Mixteca and Juarez terranes, respectively. The Oaxaca Fault also forms the eastern boundary of the Cenozoic Tehuacán depression. On the west, at depth, the Tehuacán valley is limited by the normal buried Tehuacán Fault. This gravity study reveals that the Oaxaca Fault system gives rise to a series of east tilted basamental blocks (Oaxaca Complex). The tectonic depression is filled with Phanerozoic rocks and has a deeper depocenter to the west. The gravity data also indicate that on the west, the Oaxaca Complex, the Caltepec and Santa Lucia faults continue northwestwards beneath Phanerozoic rocks. A major E-W to NE-SW discontinuity is inferred to exist between profiles 1 and 2.

  19. Blood lead concentrations in free-ranging Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Warner, Jonathan K; Combrink, Xander; Myburgh, Jan G; Downs, Colleen T

    2016-07-01

    Generally crocodilians have received little attention with regard to the effects of lead toxicity despite their trophic status as apex, generalist predators that utilize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats, thereby exposing them to a potentially wide range of environmental contaminants. During July-October 2010 we collected whole blood from 34 sub-adult and adult free-ranging Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) from three separate populations in northeastern South Africa in order to analyze their blood lead concentrations (BPb). Concentrations ranged from below detectability (<3 μg/dL, n = 8) to 960 μg/dL for an adult male at the Lake St Lucia Estuary. Blood lead concentrations averaged 8.15 μg/dL (SD = 7.47) for females and 98.10 μg/dL (SD = 217.42) for males. Eighteen individuals (53 %) had elevated BPbs (≥10 μg/dL). We assessed 12 general linear models using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) and found no significant statistical effects among the parameters of sex, crocodile size and population sampled. On average, crocodiles had higher BPbs at Lake St Lucia than at Ndumo Game Reserve or Kosi Bay, which we attribute to lead sinker ingestion during normal gastrolith acquisition. No clinical effects of lead toxicosis were observed in these crocodiles, even though the highest concentration (960 μg/dL) we report represents the most elevated BPb recorded to date for a free-ranging vertebrate. Although we suggest adult Nile crocodiles are likely tolerant of elevated Pb body burdens, experimental studies on other crocodilian species suggest the BPb levels reported here may have harmful or fatal effects to egg development and hatchling health. In light of recent Nile crocodile nesting declines in South Africa we urge further BPb monitoring and ecotoxicology research on reproductive females and embryos.

  20. Tsunami hazard in the Caribbean: Regional exposure derived from credible worst case scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbitz, C. B.; Glimsdal, S.; Bazin, S.; Zamora, N.; Løvholt, F.; Bungum, H.; Smebye, H.; Gauer, P.; Kjekstad, O.

    2012-04-01

    The present study documents a high tsunami hazard in the Caribbean region, with several thousands of lives lost in tsunamis and associated earthquakes since the XIXth century. Since then, the coastal population of the Caribbean and the Central West Atlantic region has grown significantly and is still growing. Understanding this hazard is therefore essential for the development of efficient mitigation measures. To this end, we report a regional tsunami exposure assessment based on potential and credible seismic and non-seismic tsunamigenic sources. Regional tsunami databases have been compiled and reviewed, and on this basis five main scenarios have been selected to estimate the exposure. The scenarios comprise two Mw8 earthquake tsunamis (north of Hispaniola and east of Lesser Antilles), two subaerial/submarine volcano flank collapse tsunamis (Montserrat and Saint Lucia), and one tsunami resulting from a landslide on the flanks of the Kick'em Jenny submarine volcano (north of Grenada). Offshore tsunami water surface elevations as well as maximum water level distributions along the shore lines are computed and discussed for each of the scenarios. The number of exposed people has been estimated in each case, together with a summary of the tsunami exposure for the earthquake and the landslide tsunami scenarios. For the earthquake scenarios, the highest tsunami exposure relative to the population is found for Guadeloupe (6.5%) and Antigua (7.5%), while Saint Lucia (4.5%) and Antigua (5%) have been found to have the highest tsunami exposure relative to the population for the landslide scenarios. Such high exposure levels clearly warrant more attention on dedicated mitigation measures in the Caribbean region.

  1. Submarine evidence for large-scale debris avalanches in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deplus, Christine; Le Friant, Anne; Boudon, Georges; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Villemant, Benoit; Harford, Chloe; Ségoufin, Jacques; Cheminée, Jean-Louis

    2001-10-01

    Results from a recent marine geophysical survey demonstrate the importance of the process of flank collapse in the growth and evolution of volcanoes along an island arc. The Aguadomar cruise, aboard the French R/V L'Atalante, surveyed the flanks of the Lesser Antilles Arc between the islands of Montserrat and St. Lucia. Analysis of the data shows that flank collapse events occurred on active volcanoes all along the arc and resulted in debris avalanches, some of them being of large magnitude. The debris avalanche deposits display hummocky topography on the swath bathymetry, speckled pattern on backscatter images, hyperbolic facies on 3.5 kHz echosounder data and chaotic units on air gun seismic profiles. They extend from horseshoe-shaped structures previously identified on the subaerial part of the volcanoes. In the southern part of the arc, large-scale debris avalanche deposits were identified on the floor of the Grenada Basin west of active volcanoes on Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia. The extent of debris avalanche deposits off Dominica is about 3500 km 2. The debris avalanches have resulted from major flank collapse events which may be mainly controlled by the large-scale structure of the island arc and the presence of the deep Grenada Basin. In the northern part of the arc, several debris avalanche deposits were also identified around the island of Montserrat. With smaller extent (20-120 km 2), they are present on the east, south and west submarine flanks of Soufriere Hills volcano which has been erupting since July 1995. Flank collapse is thus a recurrent process in the recent history of this volcano. The marine data are also relevant for a discussion of the transport mechanisms of debris avalanches on the seafloor surrounding a volcanic island arc.

  2. Radiometric Dating of Large Volume Flank Collapses in The Lesser Antilles Arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quidelleur, X.; Samper, A.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; Komorowski, J.

    2004-12-01

    It is now admitted that flank collapses, probably triggered by magmatic inflation and/or gravitational collapses, is a recurrent process of the evolution of the Lesser Antilles Arc volcanoes. Large magnitude debris avalanche deposits have been identified offshore, in the Grenada basin (Deplus et al., 2001; Le Friant et al., 2001). The widest extensions have been observed off the coast of Dominica and St Lucia, with associated volumes up to 20 km3. Another large-scale event, with marine evidences probably covered by sediments and latter flank collapses, has been inferred onland from morphological evidences and characteristic deposits of the Carbets structure in Martinique. We present radiometric dating of these three major events using the K-Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique performed on selected groundmass. Both volcanic formations preceding flank collapses (remnants of the horseshoe shaped structures or basal lava flows) and following landslides (lava domes) have been dated. In the Qualibou depression of St. Lucia, the former structure has been dated at 1096+-16 ka and the collapse constrained by dome emplacement prior to 97+-2 ka (Petit Piton). In Dominica, several structures have been associated with repetitive flank collapse events inferred from marine data (Le Friant et al., 2002). The Plat-Pays event probably occurred after 96+-2 ka. Inside the inherited depression, Scotts Head, which is interpreted as a proximal pluri-kilometric megabloc from the Soufriere avalanche, has been dated at 14+-1 ka, providing an older bound for this event. In Martinique Island, three different domes within the Carbets structure have been dated at 335+-5 ka. Assuming a rapid magma emplacement following pressure release due to deloading, this constrains the age of this high magnitude event. Finally, these results obtained from three of the most voluminous flank collapses provide constraints to estimate the recurrence of these events, which represent one of the major hazards associated

  3. Survey of Salmonella contamination in chicken layer farms in three Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, Abiodun; Webb, Lloyd; Musai, Lisa; Louison, Bowen; Joseph, George; Stewart-Johnson, Alva; Samlal, Sannandan; Rodrigo, Shelly

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the demography, management, and production practices on layer chicken farms in Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and St. Lucia and the frequency of risk factors for Salmonella infection. The frequency of isolation of Salmonella from the layer farm environment, eggs, feeds, hatchery, and imported day-old chicks was determined using standard methods. Of the eight risk factors (farm size, age group of layers, source of day-old chicks, vaccination, sanitation practices, biosecurity measures, presence of pests, and previous disease outbreaks) for Salmonella infection investigated, farm size was the only risk factor significantly associated (P = 0.031) with the prevalence of Salmonella; 77.8% of large farms were positive for this pathogen compared with 33.3 and 26.1% of medium and small farms, respectively. The overall isolation rate of Salmonella from 35 layer farms was 40.0%. Salmonella was isolated at a significantly higher rate (P < 0.05) from farm environments than from the cloacae. Only in Trinidad and Tobago did feeds (6.5% of samples) and pooled egg contents (12.5% of samples) yield Salmonella; however, all egg samples from hotels, hatcheries, and airports in this country were negative. Salmonella Anatum, Salmonella group C, and Salmonella Kentucky were the predominant serotypes in Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and St. Lucia, respectively. Although Salmonella infections were found in layer birds sampled, table eggs appear to pose minimal risk to consumers. However, the detection of Salmonella -contaminated farm environments and feeds cannot be ignored. Only 2.9% of the isolates belonged to Salmonella Enteritidis, a finding that may reflect the impact of changes in farm management and poultry production in the region.

  4. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the Lesser Antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Soest, M.C. van; Hilton, D.R. |; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors report helium and carbon isotope and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium ({approximately}8R{sub A} where R{sub A} = air {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He) and occur towards the center of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R{sub A}. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have {delta}{sup 13}C(CO{sub 2}) values between {minus}2{per_thousand} and {minus}4{per_thousand} (vs PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB ({minus}4 to {minus}9{per_thousand}). The south of the arc (Grenada to St. Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centered on {minus}6{per_thousand}). CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value ({approximately}2 {times} 10{sup 9}) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10{sup 10} whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10{sup 10}--10{sup 13}.

  5. Impact of a major cyclone on a southeast African estuarine lake system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, A. T.; Cyrus, D. P.

    The St Lucia lake and estuarine system in northern Natal, South Africa was struck by Cyclone Domoina on 31 January 1984. This is the only cyclone known to have traversed part of South Africa. The ensuing flood levels in the St Lucia system (which have been exceeded perhaps only one other time in recorded history) provided an opportunity to assess the effect of a major disturbance on a subtropical estuarine system. Major geomorphological changes occurred in the mouth area where all man-made structures were obliterated. The two river channels were scoured from 2-3 m to 10-14 m in depth and widened by up to 300 m, while the shoreline between the two channels retreated in places up to 100 m. An estimated 16∗10 6 m 3 of sediment were removed from the lower reaches of the system including areas of mangrove and Phragmites australis swamp. One-metre tall mangrove saplings died following inundation lasting days to weeks. Effects on the fauna included redistribution of the tanaid Apseudes digitalis, the mysid Mesopodopsis africana, the copepod Pseudodiaptomus stuhlmanni, the polychaete Scololepis squamata and the bivalve Solen cylindraceus, all typical lake species which appeared in the tidal channel linking the lake with the sea. Responses of other species such as the penaeid prawns, the crab Scylla serrata and the sole Solea bleekeri suggested that physiological tolerance, extended larval or juvenile recruitment periods and prey switching minimized long-term flood effects. No large-scale mortalities were noted, and the absence of a temperature shock is considered to be a significant feature.

  6. Early Proterozoic ties between two suspect terranes and the Mojave crustal block of the Southwestern U.S

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, E. Erik; Morrison, Jean; Anderson, J. Lawford; Wooden, Joseph L.

    1993-01-01

    Southern California and adjacent areas contain two suspect or exotic terranes comprised largely of ancient continental crust, namely the Tujunga (San Gabriel) and Joshua Tree terranes, that have been considered part of a larger displaced terrane, the Santa Lucia-Orocopia allochthon. Paleomagnetic data for the allochthon indicate northward transport in excess of 2000 km and, thus, an origin extraneous to North America. However, Early Proterozoic plutons of the Mojave crustal block and the Joshua Tree and Tujunga terranes have strikingly comparable features, including: (1) crystallization ages of 1.63 to 1.68 Ga; (2) biotite + sphene + magnetite hornblende garnet mineralogy; (3) high LIL and enriched HFS elemental composition; (4) WPG (within-plate granite) trace element chemistry; (5) similar and unique oxygen isotopic compositions; and (6) distinct Pb and Nd isotopic signatures. These features of the Mojave block, which clearly originated as part of native North America, nevertheless distinguish it from crust elsewhere in North America. On the basis of data presented here, we conclude that the Tujunga terrane is a disrupted portion of the Mojave crustal block and is neither far-traveled nor exotic to North America. Its apparent "exotic" nature stems from derivation out of the middle crust. We also conclude that the Joshua Tree terrane is correlative to the Mojave block. We have found no significant evidence for its displacement and consider Joshua Tree to be contiguous with the Mojave block and thus not a valid terrane. The Tujunga (San Gabriel) and Joshua Tree terranes should not be considered as part of, or having shared the same transport as, the Santa Lucia-Orocopia allocthon.

  7. Deep structure and structural inversion along the central California continental margin from EDGE seismic profile RU-3

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, K.D.; Reed, D.L.; Silver, E.A. ); Meltzer, A.S. )

    1991-04-10

    Deep-penetration seismic reflection profile RU-3 reveals a subducted oceanic plate, a modified accretionary prism, and complex structures of the overlying sedimentary basins. This structural framework was established by subduction processes during Paleogene and earlier time and subsequently was modified by Neogene transform motion combined with apparent components of extension and compression. Subducted rocks are indicated by deep, gently dipping reflectors that extend beneath the continental margin for at least 38 km at a depth of about 15 km. The authors interpret the subducted crust as either a part of the Pacific plate or, more likely, a subducted fragment derived from the Farallon plate. A set of more steeply dipping, deep events may indicate faulting within the subducted plate or its boundary with a no-slab zone. The overlying, largely nonreflective layer of accreted material rapidly reaches 10 km in thickness landward of the paleotrench and increases to 15 km in thickness near the coast. The Santa Lucia Basin, landward of the steep continental slope, originated as a slope basin during Paleogene subduction. The lower strata of this basin were deposited onto and partially incorporated into the accretionary complex. The offshore Santa Maria Basin exhibits a variety of compressional structures that formed in the last 3.5 m.y. and whose locations correspond to an earlier framework of extensional faults. Structural inversion has occurred in Miocene depocenters adjacent to the Santa Lucia Bank fault and at the Queenie structure. Miocene and lower Pliocene strata also thicken toward the Hosgri fault zone where subsequent compression is characterized by low-angle thrusts and folding.

  8. Radiometric dating of three large volume flank collapses in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samper, A.; Quidelleur, X.; Boudon, G.; Le Friant, A.; Komorowski, J. C.

    2008-10-01

    It is now recognised that flank collapses are a recurrent process in the evolution of the Lesser Antilles Arc volcanoes. Large magnitude debris-avalanche deposits have been identified off the coast of Dominica, Martinique and St. Lucia, with associated volumes up to 20 km 3 [Deplus, C., Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Komorowski, J.-C., Villemant, B., Harford, C., Ségoufin, J., Cheminée, J.-L., 2001. Submarine evidence for large-scale debris avalanches in the Lesser Antilles Arc. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 192: 145-157.]. We present new radiometric dating of three major events using the K-Ar Cassignol-Gillot technique. In the Qualibou depression of St. Lucia, a collapse has been constrained by dome emplacement prior to 95 ± 2 ka. In Dominica, where repetitive flank collapse events have occurred [Le Friant, A., Boudon, G., Komorowski, J.-C., Deplus, C., 2002. L'île de la Dominique, à l'origine des avalanches de débris les plus volumineuses de l'arc des Petites Antilles. C.R. Geoscience, 334: 235-243], the Plat Pays event probably occurred after 96 ± 2 ka. Inside the depression caused by this event, Scotts Head, which is interpreted as a proximal megabloc from the subsequent Soufriere avalanche event has been dated at 14 ± 1 ka, providing an older bound for this event. On Martinique three different domes within the Carbets structure dated at 337 ± 5 ka constrain the age of this high magnitude event. Finally, these results obtained from three of the most voluminous flank collapses provide constraints to estimate the recurrence of these events, which represent one of the major hazards associated with volcanoes of the Lesser Antilles Arc.

  9. Description of the oocysts of three new species of Eimeria (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from iguanid lizards (Sauria: Iguanidae) of Central and South America.

    PubMed

    Daszak, P; Ball, S J

    1998-01-01

    Three new species of Eimeria are described from iguanid lizards of Central and South America. The oocysts of each species have no micropyles or residua and the sporocysts lack Stieda bodies, but all have a sporocyst residuum. Eimeria sanctaluciae n.sp. was found in the St. Lucia tree lizard, Anolis luciae, collected from the Maria Islands, Lesser Antilles. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, averaging 17.3 x 16.5 microns, with a single layered colourless wall; about 60% contain polar granules. The sporocysts are ellipsoidal and average 7.7 x 5.5 microns. Eimeria liolaemi n.sp. was recovered from the blue-gold swift, Liolaemus taenius, from Chile. The oocysts are spherical to subspherical, measuring 21 x 20.1 microns with a single-layered colourless wall. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 7.4 x 6.8 microns. Eimeria caesicia n.sp. is described from the Brazilian collared iguanid, Tropidurus torquatus. The oocysts measure 27.4 x 23.7 microns, are spherical to subspherical, with a bilayered wall, the outer surface of which appears pale blue in colour, the thin, inner wall appearing brown, when viewed by direct light under the optical microscope. The sporocysts are subspherical and average 9.4 x 7.2 microns. Unnamed polysporocystid oocysts with dizoic sporocysts are reported from the faeces of the lesser St. Vincent tree lizard, Anolis trinitatis and the possibility of spurious parasitism briefly discussed. In addition, oocysts of an unnamed Isospora sp. with a smooth oocyst wall which closely resembles I. reui were recovered from A. trinitatis.

  10. Hornblende-rich, high grade metamorphic terranes in the southernmost Sierra Nevada, California, and implications for crustal depths and batholith roots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, Donald Clarence

    1983-01-01

    The southernmost Sierra Nevaaa widely exposes hornblende-rich, gneissic to granoblastic, amphibolite- to granulite-grade, metamorphic rocks and associated magmatic rocks, all of mid-Cretaceous age. Locally, red garnet, in part in euhedral crystals as large as 10 cm, as well as strongly pleochroic hyperstnene, characterize these rocks. These hornblende-rich rocks dominate the north slopes of the southern tail of the Sierra Nevada, but are also present as inclusion masses of various sizes in the dominantly granitic terrane to She northeast. The mafic, hornblende-rich rocks reflect a deeper crustal level than the dominantly granitic terrane to the northeast based on: 1) 'index' minerals (presence of hypersthene, coarse garnet, and brown hornblende; 2) textures (considerable ambivalence of whether individual samples are metamorphic or magmatic, 3) metamorphic grade (at least local granulite facies); and 4) the presence of migmatite, and the eviaence of local melting and mobilization. These rocks may be exposures of the upper part of the root zone and metamorphic substrate of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Xenoliths of gneiss, amphibolite, and granulite from sub-batholithic levels, that have been transported upward and preserved in volcanic rocks in the central Sierra Nevada, are similar to some exposed rocks of the southernmost Sierra Nevada. Hypersthene-bearing granulite and tonalite, as well as distinctive granofels of mid-Cretaceous age, are exposed in the western part of the Santa Lucia Range (some 300 km to the northwest across the San Andreas fault). These rocks have much in common with some of the metamorphic and magmatic rocks in the southernmost Sierra Nevada, suggesting that the two areas record similar metamorphic conditions and crustal depth. Mid-Cretaceous hypersthene granulite is rare, which makes correlation of the Santa Lucia Range and the southernmost Sierra Nevada seem attractive. Nevertheless, possibly significant petrographic anm rock distribution

  11. Use of multiple cluster analysis methods to explore the validity of a community outcomes concept map.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Concept mapping is now a commonly-used technique for articulating and evaluating programmatic outcomes. However, research regarding validity of knowledge and outcomes produced with concept mapping is sparse. The current study describes quantitative validity analyses using a concept mapping dataset. We sought to increase the validity of concept mapping evaluation results by running multiple cluster analysis methods and then using several metrics to choose from among solutions. We present four different clustering methods based on analyses using the R statistical software package: partitioning around medoids (PAM), fuzzy analysis (FANNY), agglomerative nesting (AGNES) and divisive analysis (DIANA). We then used the Dunn and Davies-Bouldin indices to assist in choosing a valid cluster solution for a concept mapping outcomes evaluation. We conclude that the validity of the outcomes map is high, based on the analyses described. Finally, we discuss areas for further concept mapping methods research.

  12. Linear Combination Fitting (LCF)-XANES analysis of As speciation in selected mine-impacted materials

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This table provides sample identification labels and classification of sample type (tailings, calcinated, grey slime). For each sample, total arsenic and iron concentrations determined by acid digestion and ICP analysis are provided along with arsenic in-vitro bioaccessibility (As IVBA) values to estimate arsenic risk. Lastly, the table provides linear combination fitting results from synchrotron XANES analysis showing the distribution of arsenic speciation phases present in each sample along with fitting error (R-factor).This dataset is associated with the following publication:Ollson, C., E. Smith, K. Scheckel, A. Betts, and A. Juhasz. Assessment of arsenic speciation and bioaccessibility in mine-impacted materials. Diana Aga, Wonyong Choi, Andrew Daugulis, Gianluca Li Puma, Gerasimos Lyberatos, and Joo Hwa Tay JOURNAL OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 313: 130-137, (2016).

  13. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:28286759

  14. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals MicroRNAs Regulating Biological Pathways in Exercise-Induced Cardiac Physiological Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiahong; Liu, Yang; Xie, Yuan; Zhao, Cuimei; Wang, Hongbao

    2017-01-01

    Exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy is generally considered to be a type of adaptive change after exercise training and is beneficial for cardiovascular diseases. This study aims at investigating exercise-regulated microRNAs (miRNAs) and their potential biological pathways. Here, we collected 23 miRNAs from 8 published studies. MirPath v.3 from the DIANA tools website was used to execute the analysis, and TargetScan was used to predict the target genes. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Gene Ontology (GO) analyses were performed to identify potential pathways and functional annotations associated with exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy. Various miRNA targets and molecular pathways, such as Fatty acid elongation, Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC), and ECM-receptor interaction, were identified. This study could prompt the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

  15. Formation of a narrow baryon resonance with positive strangeness in K{sup +} collisions with Xe nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the charge-exchange reaction K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}pXe', obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, are reanalyzed using increased statistics and updated selections. Our previous evidence for formation of a narrow pK{sup 0} resonance with mass near 1538 MeV is confirmed. The statistical significance of the signal reaches some 8{sigma} (6{sigma}) standard deviations when estimated as S/{radical}B (S/{radical}B + S. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Theta}{sup +} baryon are measured as m = 1538 {+-} 2 MeV and {Gamma} = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV.

  16. Resistance to hurricane disturbance of an epifaunal community on the continental shelf off North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby-Smith, William W.; Ustach, Joseph

    1986-10-01

    Hurricane Diana was stalled over the continental shelf of central North Carolina on 11-13 September 1984 in the vicinity of a previously studied epifaunal community (30 m depth). Two research cruises following the hurricane used still camera and TV transects to obtain data which allowed an evaluation of stormrelated effects on taxa of algae, sponges, corals, echinoderms and fish. Analysis of 35-mm slides suggested no effects attributable to the hurricane except observations of damaged coral heads and dead mussels. Analysis of television transects indicated no storm related changes from the previous study in frequency of occurrence of large epibenthic taxa. Hurricane damage was much less than anticipated and it is hypothesized that these coral reef-type communities are adapted to or structured by strong bottom currents generated by the frequent passage of gales and that the passage of hurricanes causes little additional stress.

  17. Evidence for retrograde lithospheric subduction on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, David T.; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Annular moats and outer rises around large Venus coronas such as Artemis, Latona, and Eithinoha are similar in arcuate planform and topography to the trenches and outer rises of terrestrial subduction zones. On earth, trenches and outer rises are modeled as the flexural response of a thin elastic lithosphere to the bending moment of the subducted slab; this lithospheric flexure model also accounts for the trenches and outer rises outboard of the major coronas on Venus. Accordingly, it is proposed that retrograde lithospheric subduction may be occurring on the margins of the large Venus coronas while compensating back-arc extension is occurring in the expanding coronas interiors. Similar processes may be taking place at other deep arcuate trenches or chasmata on Venus such as those in the Dali-Diana chasmata area of aestern Aphrodite Terra.

  18. Comparison of satellite IR rain estimates with radar rain observations in hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, K. Robert; Negri, Andrew J.; Adler, Robert F.

    1988-01-01

    Radar-observed rainrates and rain areas obtained for the Hurricanes Frederic (1979), Alicia (1983), and Diana (1984) were used in conjunction with GOES IR data to examine the validity of three satellite IR rain estimation techniques: the Arkin (1983) method, the Negri-Adler-Wetzel (1984) technique, and the convective-stratiform technique of Adler and Negri (1987). The Alicia hurricane was also monitored using the subjective manual technique of Spayd and Scofield (1984). It is shown that the success of IR techniques in identifying areas of rainfall depends on the hurricane feature being addressed. Thus, the three objective IR techniques were unable to identify the locations of radar-observed eyewall and inner band precipitation areas because of strong vertical wind shear in the eyewall and the lack of the vertical extent of stratiform precipitation beneath the central dense overcast.

  19. Cassiopeia A: Supernova explosion and expansion simulations under strong asymmetry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhin, R. A.; Rozanov, V. B.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Stepanov, R. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a model for the explosion of a supernova and the expansion of its ejecta in the presence of a strong initial asymmetry (at the explosion time) in the central part of the star (core) and a possible smallscale asymmetry in the peripheral regions. The Chandra and NuSTAR observations of ejecta in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant are analyzed. Based on our 1D and 2D numerical simulations performed using the DIANA and NUTCY codes, we propose a model for the explosion and expansion of ejecta that explains the observed experimental data where the materials initially located in the central region of the star end up on the periphery of the cloud of ejecta.

  20. Physician involvement enhances coding accuracy to ensure national standards: an initiative to improve awareness among new junior trainees.

    PubMed

    Nallasivan, S; Gillott, T; Kamath, S; Blow, L; Goddard, V

    2011-06-01

    Record Keeping Standards is a development led by the Royal College of Physicians of London (RCP) Health Informatics Unit and funded by the National Health Service (NHS) Connecting for Health. A supplementary report produced by the RCP makes a number of recommendations based on a study held at an acute hospital trust. We audited the medical notes and coding to assess the accuracy, documentation by the junior doctors and also to correlate our findings with the RCP audit. Northern Lincolnshire & Goole Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust has 114,000 'finished consultant episodes' per year. A total of 100 consecutive medical (50) and rheumatology (50) discharges from Diana Princess of Wales Hospital from August-October 2009 were reviewed. The results showed an improvement in coding accuracy (10% errors), comparable to the RCP audit but with 5% documentation errors. Physician involvement needs enhancing to improve the effectiveness and to ensure clinical safety.

  1. A microclimate study on hypogea environments of ancient roman building.

    PubMed

    Scatigno, C; Gaudenzi, S; Sammartino, M P; Visco, G

    2016-10-01

    Roman hypogea, vernacular settlements or crypts, are underground places characterised by specific and unique challenges (RH<90% and almost constant temperature throughout the whole year) related to their relative isolation from the outdoor environment. These sites often require adequate monitoring tools providing complete environmental information in order to carry out appropriate strategies for scheduling routine maintenance and designing suitable layouts for their preservation. In this work we present the results of a carefully planned thermo-hygrometric monitoring campaign conducted in a peculiar Roman building (130CE), the "Casa di Diana" Mithraeum, sited in Ostia Antica (archaeological site, Rome-Italy), with the aim of characterising the indoor environment as the structure suffers of several conservation problems (biocolonisation, efflorescences, evaporating and condensing cycle for wall-building materials). The campaign involving multipoint continuous measurement was carefully planned to better describe this micro-clime. In addition to underground environmental data available in literature, we have also performed, as a checkpoint control, a thermo-hygrometric monitoring campaign in the "Terme di Mitra" Hypogeum, a few meters from the "Casa di Diana". The recorded data was analysed by multivariate statistical and chemometric analyses. The results brought to light the presence of different microclimates (three areas) within a single Mithraeum: a room (pre-Mithraeum) and an area (Mithraeum: 2-4m) present a thermo-hygrometric environmental behaviour in accordance with a semi-confined environment, another area (Mithraeum: 1-2m) behaves accordingly with underground environments (although it cannot be described as such), and the last area (Mithraeum: 0-1m) where was recording RH values close to saturation (96-99%), associated with non-ventilated areas where the rising damp is "held" and not dispersed, describing an own micro-clime, comparable to a "small greenhouse

  2. Optimal lunar trajectories for a combined chemical-electric propulsion spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kluever, Craig A.

    1995-01-01

    Spacecraft which utilize electric propulsion (EP) systems are capable of delivering a greater payload fraction compared to spacecraft using conventional chemical propulsion systems. Several researchers have investigated numerous applications of low-thrust EP including a manned Mars mission, scientific missions to the outer planets, and lunar missions. In contrast, the study of optimal combined high and low-thrust spacecraft trajectories has been limited. In response to the release of NASA's 1994 Announcement of Opportunity (AO) for Discovery class interplanetary exploration missions, a preliminary investigation of a lunar comet rendezvous mission using a solar electric propulsion (SEP) spacecraft was performed. The Discovery mission (eventually named Diana) was envisioned to be a two-phase scientific exploration mission: the first phase involved exploration of the moon and second phase involved rendezvous with a comet. The initial phase began with a chemical propulsion translunar injection and chemical insertion into a lunar orbit, followed by a low-thrust SEP transfer to a circular, polar, low-lunar orbit (LLO). After scientific data was collected at the moon, the SEP spacecraft performed a spiral lunar escape maneuver to begin the interplanetary leg of the mission. After escape from the Earth-moon system, the SEP spacecraft maneuvered in interplanetary space and performed a rendezvous with a short period comet. An initial study that demonstrated the feasibility of using EP for the lunar and comet orbit transfer was performed under the grant NAG3-1581. This final report is a continuation of the initial research efforts in support of the Discovery mission proposal that was submitted to NASA Headquarters in October 1994. Section 2 discusses the lunar orbit transfer phase of the Diana mission which involves both chemical and electric propulsion stages. Section 3 discusses the chemical lunar orbit insertion (LOI) burn optimization. Finally, section 4 presents the

  3. Map of the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones, Salinas River Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberg, Lewis I.; Clark, Joseph C.

    2009-01-01

    The Rinconada Fault and its related faults constitute a major structural element of the Salinas River valley, which is known regionally, and referred to herein, as the 'Salinas Valley'. The Rinconada Fault extends 230 km from King City in the north to the Big Pine Fault in the south. At the south end of the map area near Santa Margarita, the Rinconada Fault separates granitic and metamorphic crystalline rocks of the Salinian Block to the northeast from the subduction-zone assemblage of the Franciscan Complex to the southwest. Northwestward, the Rinconada Fault lies entirely within the Salinian Block and generally divides this region into two physiographically and structurally distinct areas, the Santa Lucia Range to the west and the Salinas Valley to the east. The Reliz Fault, which continues as a right stepover from the Rinconada Fault, trends northwestward along the northeastern base of the Sierra de Salinas of the Santa Lucia Range and beyond for 60 km to the vicinity of Spreckels, where it is largely concealed. Aeromagnetic data suggest that the Reliz Fault continues northwestward another 25 km into Monterey Bay, where it aligns with a high-definition magnetic boundary. Geomorphic evidence of late Quaternary movement along the Rinconada and Reliz Fault Zones has been documented by Tinsley (1975), Dibblee (1976, 1979), Hart (1976, 1985), and Klaus (1999). Although definitive geologic evidence of Holocene surface rupture has not been found on these faults, they were regarded as an earthquake source for the California Geological Survey [formerly, California Division of Mines and Geology]/U.S. Geological Survey (CGS/USGS) Probabilistic Seismic Hazards Assessment because of their postulated slip rate of 1+-1 mm/yr and their calculated maximum magnitude of 7.3. Except for published reports by Durham (1965, 1974), Dibblee (1976), and Hart (1976), most information on these faults is unpublished or is contained in theses, field trip guides, and other types of reports

  4. The Thz Spectrum of Glycolaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubet, Manuel; Huet, Therese R.; Haykal, Imane; Margules, Laurent; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2011-06-01

    The vibration-rotation spectrum of the ν_1-0, ν_2-0 and ν_3-0 bands of glycolaldehyde was recorded up to 12 THz, using the far-infrared beamline AILES at the synchrotron SOLEIL and a Fourier transform spectrometer coupled to a multipass cell. More than eight thousands lines were assigned, revealing the rotation structure up to J=80, K_a=38 for the ground state. The THz data were fitted simultaneously with pure rotational transitions of better accuracy observed in the microwave (1), in the millimeter-wave (2) and in the sub-millimeter-wave (3) range. In addition new data were recorded at Lille in the 150-300 GHz and 750-950 GHz range. The THz lines and the microwave - (sub)-millimeterwave lines are reproduced with a standard deviation of 2 10-4 Cm-1 and 40 KHz, respectively. Glycolaldehyde has been identified toward the galactic center (4). The vibrational state partition function can be re-evaluated according to the bands origins associated with ν_1, ν_2, and ν_3, which are observed experimentally for the first time. This work is supported by the Programme National de Physico-Chimie du Milieu Interstellaire (PCMI-CNRS) and by the contract ANR-08-BLAN-0054. 1. M. Rey, J.-R. Aviles-Moreno and T. R. Huet, Chem. Phys. Lett. 430(2006) 121 ; K.-M. Marstokk and H. Mollendal, J. Mol. Struct. 5 (1970) 205. 2. R. A. H. Butler, F. C. De Lucia, D. T. Petkie, H. Mollendal, A. Horn, and E. Herbst, ApJS 134 (2001) 319. ; S. L. Widicus-Weaver, R. A. H. Butler, B. J. Drouin, D. T. Petkie, K. A. Dyl, F. C. De Lucia, and G. A. Blake, ApJ 158(2005)188. 3. P. B. Carroll, B. J. Drouin, and S. L. Widicus-Weaver, ApJ 723 (2010) 845. 4. J. M. Hollis, S. N. Vogel, L. E. Snyder, P. R. Jewell, and F. J. Lovas, ApJ 554 (2001) L81. ; M.T. Beltran, C. Codella, S. Viti, R. Niri, R. Cesaroni, ApJ 690 (2009) L93.

  5. Accessory Mineral Depth-Profiling Applied to the Corsican Lower Crust: A Continuous Thermal History of Mesozoic Continental Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, N. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Beltrando, M.; Smye, A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in understanding the structural development of hyperextended magma-poor rift margins, the temporal and thermal evolution of lithospheric hyperextension during rifting remains only poorly understood. In contrast to classic pure-shear models, multi-stage rift models that include depth-dependent thinning predict significant lower-crustal reheating during the necking phase due to buoyant rise of the asthenosphere. The Santa Lucia nappe of NE Corsica is an ideal laboratory to test for lower-crustal reheating as it preserves Permian lower crust exhumed from granulitic conditions during Mesozoic Tethyan rifting. This study presents the first use of apatite U-Pb depth-profile thermochronology in conjunction with novel rutile U-Pb and zircon U-Pb thermo- and geochronology to reconstruct a continuous t-T path to constrain the syn-rift thermal evolution of this exposed lower-crustal section. LASS-ICP-MS depth-profile analyses of zircon reveal thin (<10 μm) ~210-180 Ma overgrowths on 300-270 Ma cores in lower-crustal lithologies, indicative of renewed thermal activity during Mesozoic rifting. Cooling due to rapid rift margin exhumation is recorded by the topology of rutile and apatite depth profiles caused by thermally-activated volume diffusion at T >400°C. Lower-crustal rutile reveal a rounded progression from core plateaus at ~170 Ma to 150-145 Ma at the outer 8-10 μm of grains while middle-crustal apatite records 170 Ma cores grading to 140-135 Ma rims. Inverse modeling of rutile profiles suggests the lower crust cooled from 700°C at 200 Ma to 425°C at 140 Ma. Middle-crustal apatite yield a two-stage history, with rapid cooling from 500°C at 200 Ma to 420°C at ~180 Ma followed by slow cooling to 400°C by 160 Ma. Combined with zircon overgrowth ages, these data indicate the Santa Lucia nappe underwent a thermal pulse in the late Triassic-early Jurassic associated with depth-dependent thinning and hyperextension of the Corsican margin.

  6. Permanent Habitats in Earth-Sol/Mars-Sol Orbit Positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenspon, J.

    Project Outpost is a manned Earth-Sol/Mars-Sol platform that enables permanent occupation in deep space. In order to develop the program elements for this complex mission, Project Outpost will rely primarily on existing/nearterm technology and hardware for the construction of its components. For the purposes of this study, four mission requirements are considered: 1. Outpost - Man's 1st purpose-produced effort of space engineering, in which astructure is developed/constructed in an environment completely alien to currentpractices for EVA guidelines. 2. Newton - a concept study developed at StarGate Research, for the development ofa modified Hohmann personnel orbital transport operating between Earth andMars. Newton would serve as the primary crew delivery apparatus throughrepeatable transfer scheduling for all Earth-Lpoint-Mars activities. Thispermanent "transit system" would establish the foundations for Solar systemcolonization. 3. Cruis - a concept study developed at StarGate Research, for the development of amodified Hohmann cargo orbital transport operating between Earth and Mars.Cruis would serve as the primary equipment delivery apparatus throughrepeatable transfer scheduling for all Earth-Lpoint-Mars activities. Thispermanent "transit system" would establish the foundations for Solar systemcolonization, and 4. Ares/Diana - a more conventional space platform configuration for Lunar andMars orbit is included as a construction baseline. The operations of these assetsare supported, and used for the support, of the outpost. Outpost would be constructed over a 27-year period of launch opportunities into Earth-Sol or Mars-Sol Lagrange orbit (E-S/M-S L1, 4 or 5). The outpost consists of an operations core with a self-contained power generation ability, a docking and maintenance structure, a Scientific Research complex and a Habitation Section. After achieving initial activation, the core will provide the support and energy required to operate the outpost in a 365

  7. Tensiometer-Based Irrigation Management of Subirrigated Soilless Tomato: Effects of Substrate Matric Potential Control on Crop Performance

    PubMed Central

    Montesano, Francesco F.; Serio, Francesco; Mininni, Carlo; Signore, Angelo; Parente, Angelo; Santamaria, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Automatic irrigation scheduling based on real-time measurement of soilless substrate water status has been recognized as a promising approach for efficient greenhouse irrigation management. Identification of proper irrigation set points is crucial for optimal crop performance, both in terms of yield and quality, and optimal use of water resources. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of irrigation management based on matric potential control on growth, plant–water relations, yield, fruit quality traits, and water-use efficiency of subirrigated (through bench system) soilless tomato. Tensiometers were used for automatic irrigation control. Two cultivars, “Kabiria” (cocktail type) and “Diana” (intermediate type), and substrate water potential set-points (−30 and −60 hPa, for “Diana,” and −30, −60, and −90 hPa for “Kabiria”), were compared. Compared with −30 hPa, water stress (corresponding to a −60 hPa irrigation set-point) reduced water consumption (14%), leaf area (18%), specific leaf area (19%), total yield (10%), and mean fruit weight (13%), irrespective of the cultivars. At −60 hPa, leaf-water status of plants, irrespective of the cultivars, showed an osmotic adjustment corresponding to a 9% average osmotic potential decrease. Total yield, mean fruit weight, plant water, and osmotic potential decreased linearly when −30, −60, and −90 hPa irrigation set-points were used in “Kabiria.” Unmarketable yield in “Diana” increased when water stress was imposed (187 vs. 349 g·plant−1, respectively, at −30 and −60 hPa), whereas the opposite effect was observed in “Kabiria,” where marketable yield loss decreased linearly [by 1.05 g·plant−1 per unit of substrate water potential (in the tested range from −30 to −90 hPa)]. In the second cluster, total soluble solids of the fruit and dry matter increased irrespective of the cultivars. In the seventh cluster, in “Diana,” only a

  8. Meaning and emotion in animal vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Seyfarth, Robert M; Cheney, Dorothy L

    2003-12-01

    Historically, a dichotomy has been drawn between the semantic communication of human language and the apparently emotional calls of animals. Current research paints a more complicated picture. Just as scientists have identified elements of human speech that reflect a speaker's emotions, field experiments have shown that the calls of many animals provide listeners with information about objects and events in the environment. Like human speech, therefore, animal vocalizations simultaneously provide others with information that is both semantic and emotional. In support of this conclusion, we review the results of field experiments on the natural vocalizations of African vervet monkeys, diana monkeys, baboons, and suricates (a South African mongoose). Vervet and diana monkeys give acoustically distinct alarm calls in response to the presence of leopards, eagles, and snakes. Each alarm call type elicits a different, adaptive response from others nearby. Field experiments demonstrate that listeners compare these vocalizations not just according to their acoustic properties but also according to the information they convey. Like monkeys, suricates give acoustically distinct alarm calls in response to different predators. Within each predator class, the calls also differ acoustically according to the signaler's perception of urgency. Like speech, therefore, suricate alarm calls convey both semantic and emotional information. The vocalizations of baboons, like those of many birds and mammals, are individually distinctive. As a result, when one baboon hears a sequence of calls exchanged between two or more individuals, the listener acquires information about social events in its group. Baboons, moreover, are skilled "eavesdroppers:" their response to different call sequences provides evidence of the sophisticated information they acquire from other individuals' vocalizations. Baboon males give loud "wahoo" calls during competitive displays. Like other vocalizations, these

  9. Investigation of key miRNAs and target genes in bladder cancer using miRNA profiling and bioinformatic tools.

    PubMed

    Canturk, Kemal Murat; Ozdemir, Muhsin; Can, Cavit; Öner, Setenay; Emre, Ramazan; Aslan, Huseyin; Cilingir, Oguz; Ciftci, Evrim; Celayir, Fatih Mehmet; Aldemir, Ozgur; Özen, Mustafa; Artan, Sevilhan

    2014-12-01

    Despite the association of several miRNAs with bladder cancer, little is known about the miRNAs' regulatory networks. In this study, we aimed to construct potential networks of bladder-cancer-related miRNAs and their known target genes using miRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics tools and to investigate potential key molecules that might play roles in bladder cancer regulatory networks. Global miRNA expression profiles were obtained using microarray followed by RT-qPCR validation using two randomly selected miRNAs. Known targets of deregulated miRNAs were utilized using DIANA-TarBase database v6.0. The incorporation of deregulated miRNAs and target genes into KEGG pathways were utilized using DIANA-mirPath software. To construct potential miRNA regulatory networks, the overlapping parts of three selected KEGG pathways were visualized by Cytoscape software. We finally gained 19 deregulated miRNAs, including 5 ups- and 14 down regulated in 27 bladder-cancer tissue samples and 8 normal urothelial tissue samples. The enrichment results of deregulated miRNAs and known target genes showed that most pathways were related to cancer or cell signaling pathways. We determined the hub CDK6, BCL2, E2F3, PTEN, MYC, RB, and ERBB3 target genes and hub hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, hsa-miR-141-3p, hsa-miR-26a-5p, hsa-miR-23b-3p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p miRNAs of the constructed networks. These findings provide new insights into the bladder cancer regulatory networks and give us a hypothesis that hsa-let-7c, hsa-miR-195-5p, and hsa-miR-125b-5p, along with CDK4 and CDK6 genes might exist in the same bladder cancer pathway. Particularly, hub miRNAs and genes might be potential biomarkers for bladder cancer clinics.

  10. [Reintervention with percutaneous balloon angioplasty in patients with congenital heart disease with left-sided obstructions].

    PubMed

    Márquez-González, Horacio; López-Gallegos, Diana; Pérez-Velázquez, Nataly Alejandra; Yáñez-Gutiérrez, Lucelli

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: las obstrucciones izquierdas representan 15% de las cardiopatías congénitas (CC). El tratamiento en la edad adulta es quirúrgico; no obstante, la dilatación con balón puede paliar los síntomas en edad pediátrica para permitir que alcancen la talla diana. El objetivo fue determinar la sobrevida y los factores asociados a la reintervención en enfermos con CC con obstrucción izquierda tratados con plastía con balón. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de cohorte en pacientes entre 4 y 17 años con cardiopatías de obstrucción izquierda (estenosis valvular, supravalvular y coartación aórtica) tratados con angioplastía con balón exitosa. El seguimiento fue de 10 años y la variable de desenlace fue la reestenosis con criterios para reintervención. Se consideraron variables pronósticas la etapa pediátrica al momento del procedimiento, el estado nutricional, el gradiente residual y la presencia de síndromes genéticos. Se usaron medidas de tendencia central y dispersión. Se usó chi cuadrada en variables cualitativas y Kruskal-Wallis en variables cuantitativas. Resultados: fueron 110 pacientes; 40% presentó coartación aórtica, 35% estenosis valvular y 25% estenosis supravalvular aórtica. El 39% requirió reintervención y la frecuencia fue la siguiente: 80% en estenosis supravalvular, 35% en coartación aórtica y 14% en estenosis valvular aórtica. Conclusión: la intervención con balón es una medida paliativa que permite a los enfermos con obstrucciones izquierdas alcanzar la talla diana.

  11. The schistosomiasis problem in the world: results of a WHO questionnaire survey

    PubMed Central

    Iarotski, L. S.; Davis, A.

    1981-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the magnitude of the schistosomiasis problem throughout the world, and is based on information on schistosomiasis control programmes provided by 103 countries in reply to a questionnaire circulated by the World Health Organization in 1976. According to the data either given in these replies, published, or provided in internal reports to WHO, schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread parasitic infections of man. Some 500 million people are thought to be exposed to infection and four main species of schistosomes are prevalent, together with their various intermediate snail hosts, in 73 countries. Control programmes are operating in 41% of responding endemic countries although they are on a national scale only in Brazil, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Japan, Morocco, Puerto Rico, St Lucia, Tunisia, and Venezuela. It appears that a maximum of only 1-2% of all cases have been treated, the most frequently used drugs being niridazole and hycanthone. A small number of efficient molluscicides are in regular use but their high cost precludes large-scale application. Installation of water supplies and health education are the most frequently used non-specific control measures. Nearly 50% of endemic countries use more than three different methods of control simultaneously. The national schistosomiasis control programmes in Brazil, Egypt, Iran, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela are examples of combined approaches that have resulted in a significant decline in the prevalence of schistosomiasis. Finally, some specific needs in research, control, and training of personnel are discussed. PMID:6973414

  12. Interactions between St. Lucian Biomphalaria glabrata and Helisoma duryi, a possible competitor snail, in a semi-natural habitat.

    PubMed

    Christie, J D; Edward, J; Goolaman, K; James, B O; Simon, J; Dugat, P S; Treinen, R

    1981-12-01

    In artificial drains similar to those used in banana culture on St. Lucia, Helisoma duryi, the rams-horn snail, controlled Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of schistosomiasis on that island. Time required for elimination of B. glabrata depended on environmental temperature and numbers of H. duryi initially introduced in the drains. Best fit to the data was given by the equation for the logistic curve rather than by an equation for unlimited growth. Multiple regression analyses of natality and mortality rates of both species of snails indicated that populations of B. glabrata were regulated by temperature rather than by density-dependent means while numbers of H. duryi were strongly influenced by numbers of rams-horn snails already present in the drains. Fitting of snail shell growth to von Bertalanffy equations showed that H. duryi shell diameter was uninfluenced by environmental temperatures or presence of B. glabrata while growth of the intermediate host was strongly affected both by temperature and numbers of H. duryi.

  13. Gadè deceptions and lies told by the ill: The Caribbean sociocultural construction of truth in patient-healer encounters.

    PubMed

    Massé, Raymond

    2002-08-01

    A constructivist approach in medical anthropology suggests that the boundary between lies and truth in sickness narratives is thin. Based on fieldwork in the French (Martinique) and English (Saint-Lucia) Carribbean with gadé and quimboiseurs (local folk healers), this paper addresses the gap between naïve romanticism and radical cynicism in the anthropological analysis of patient-healer encounters. Is the sick person lying when she accuses evil spirits for her behaviour or sickness? Is the quimboiseur who is building a meaningful explanation or diagnosis simply a liar taking advantage of his client's credulity? The challenge for anthropology is not to determine whether or not a person is lying when attributing their ill fortune to witchcraft. Instead, in this paper, the author approaches lying as a language-game played by both patients and folk healers. Concepts of lying as games, tactical lies, pragmatic creativity, and constructive lies are introduced here as a perspective for a reconsideration of lying as a pertinent research object.

  14. Preliminary isostatic residual gravity anomaly map of Paso Robles 30 x 60 minute quadrangle, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McPhee, D.K.; Langenheim, V.E.; Watt, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    This isostatic residual gravity map is part of an effort to map the three-dimensional distribution of rocks in the central California Coast Ranges and will serve as a basis for modeling the shape of basins and for determining the location and geometry of faults within the Paso Robles quadrangle. Local spatial variations in the Earth\\'s gravity field, after accounting for variations caused by elevation, terrain, and deep crustal structure reflect the distribution of densities in the mid- to upper crust. Densities often can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in density commonly mark lithological or structural boundaries. High-density rocks exposed within the central Coast Ranges include Mesozoic granitic rocks (exposed northwest of Paso Robles), Jurassic to Cretaceous marine strata of the Great Valley Sequence (exposed primarily northeast of the San Andreas fault), and Mesozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of the Franciscan Complex [exposed in the Santa Lucia Range and northeast of the San Andreas fault (SAF) near Parkfield, California]. Alluvial sediments and Tertiary sedimentary rocks are characterized by low densities; however, with increasing depth of burial and age, the densities of these rocks may become indistinguishable from those of older basement rocks.

  15. Geologic and geophysical maps of the eastern three-fourths of the Cambria 30' x 60' quadrangle, central California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, R.W.; Langenheim, V.E.; Roberts, M.A.; McDougall, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The Cambria 30´ x 60´ quadrangle comprises southwestern Monterey County and northwestern San Luis Obispo County. The land area includes rugged mountains of the Santa Lucia Range extending from the northwest to the southeast part of the map; the southern part of the Big Sur coast in the northwest; broad marine terraces along the southwest coast; and broadvalleys, rolling hills, and modest mountains in the northeast. This report contains geologic, gravity anomaly, and aeromagnetic anomaly maps of the eastern three-fourths of the 1:100,000-scale Cambria quadrangle and the associated geologic and geophysical databases (ArcMap databases), as well as complete descriptions of the geologic map units and the structural relations in the mapped area. A cross section is based on both the geologic map and potential-field geophysical data. The maps are presented as an interactive, multilayer PDF, rather than more traditional pre-formatted map-sheet PDFs. Various geologic, geophysical, paleontological, and base map elements are placed on separate layers, which allows the user to combine elements interactively to create map views beyond the traditional map sheets. Four traditional map sheets (geologic map, gravity map, aeromagnetic map, paleontological locality map) are easily compiled by choosing the associated data layers or by choosing the desired map under Bookmarks.

  16. Description of the female of Haematonotus jenisi Krajcik, 2006 and placement of the species within the genus Atrichiana Distant, 1911 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae)

    PubMed Central

    Perissinotto, Renzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The male of Haematonotus jenisi Krajcik, 2006 was described on the basis of a sole holotype specimen. A number of new specimens have recently been collected from the False Bay area of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, in northeastern KwaZulu-Natal, including a number of females, thereby allowing the description of this sex for the first time. The new series also reveals that most morphological characters are actually typical for the genus Atrichiana Distant, 1911, rather than Haematonotus Kraatz, 1880. For this reason, it is here proposed that this species be placed within Atrichiana, thus becoming the second species of a genus that was previously regarded as monospecific, represented by the southern African endemic Atrichiana placida (Boheman, 1857). Like Atrichiana placida, Atrichiana jenisi exhibits a remarkable polymorphism, but also sexual dimorphism, particularly expressed at the level of the antennal clubs, which in the male are twice as long as in the female. Unfortunately, all specimens of the recent series were collected dead or drowning on the lake shores and therefore no further information on their life cycle and biology in general could be obtained. It seems that the species may represent a micro-endemism restricted to the Western Shores of Lake St Lucia, with habitat associated to Sand Forest and possibly also Northern Coastal Forest vegetation types. PMID:27006615

  17. Spectroscopic FITS to the Alma Science Verification Band 6 Survey of the Orion Hot Core and Compact Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Satyakumar; McMillan, James P.; Burkhardt, Andrew M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Remijan, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Individual spectral lines in astrophysical data are ordinarily assigned by comparison with line frequency and intensities predicted by catalogs. Here we seek to fit the spectra of specific sources within Orion KL that are first selected by ALMA's angular resolution and then by Doppler velocity class. For each molecule in this study, astrophysical reference lines are selected. Subsequent analyses of individual velocity components provide the astrophysical column density and temperature for these velocity regimes. These column densities and temperatures are then combined with results from the complete experimental spectra obtained from our laboratory spectra to model the molecule's contribution to the entire astrophysical spectrum [1]. Effects due to optical thickness and spectral overlap are included in the analyses. Examples for ethyl cyanide in the hot core and methanol in the compact ridge will be presented. [1] J. P. McMillan, S. M. Fortman, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, "The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experi- mental Spectrum of Methanol (CH3OH) between 214.6 and 265.4 GHz," Astrophys. J., vol. 795, pp. 56(1-9), 2014.

  18. Notes from the field: chikungunya virus spreads in the Americas - Caribbean and South America, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2014-06-06

    In December 2013, the World Health Organization reported the first local transmission of chikungunya virus in the Western Hemisphere, with autochthonous cases identified in Saint Martin. Since then, local transmission has been identified in 17 countries or territories in the Caribbean or South America (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Dominican Republic, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, Guyana, Haiti, Martinique, Puerto Rico, Saint Barthelemy, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and Sint Maarten). As of May 30, 2014, a total of 103,018 suspected and 4,406 laboratory-confirmed chikungunya cases had been reported from these areas. The number of reported cases nearly doubled during the previous 2 weeks. More than 95% of the cases have been reported from five jurisdictions: Dominican Republic (38,656 cases), Martinique (30,715), Guadeloupe (24,428), Haiti (6,318), and Saint Martin (4,113). The highest incidences have been reported from Saint Martin (115 cases per 1,000 population), Martinique (76 per 1,000), Saint Barthelemy (74 per 1,000), and Guadeloupe (52 per 1,000). Further expansion of these outbreaks and spread to other countries in the region is likely.

  19. From plantation agriculture to oil storage: economic development and social transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Koester, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines two separate concepts of development. At the macrolevel, development is viewed as an advance in the organization of production and the extension of capitalist relations of production. At the community level, it is viewed as a process leading to qualitative change in a people's say of life. Focusing on a rural coastal valley and bay ecosystem in St. Lucia, a Windward Island in the Lesser Antilles, this research distinguished three separate stages in this ecosystem's economic development and examines the consequences of these economic transitions on a single rural village and group of fisherman living within it. The economic stages described begin with the terminal era of sugar cane cultivation, followed by the rationalization of commercial agriculture under translational control and the introduction of bananas, and concludes with the breaking up of the valley plantation and the introduction of a petroleum transshipment terminal. Each of these enterprises defined the valley's resources differently and each had a distinct organization of production. The relationship between hillside households and these enterprises varied accordingly. Households went from being an essential part of the productive process to being marginalized by it. Fishermen also became excluded from this environment. For these rural St. Lucians, large-scale economic development has not lead to qualitative improvement in their lives.

  20. That Which Bends Up: A Case Report and Literature Review of Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Peper, Shana M; Monson, Benjamin J; Van Schooneveld, Trevor; Smith, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    We present a case of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) in a 39-year-old female who developed an acute febrile illness marked by polyarthralgia and rash after returning from Saint Lucia. This epidemic-prone pathogen is increasingly likely to be encountered by primary care and hospital physicians in the coming months. The virus was first locally transmitted in the Caribbean in December 2013 and has since spread to 44 countries and 47 US states, affecting a suspected 1.2 million people. A mosquito-borne virus, CHIKV causes a severe and symmetric polyarthralgia that can relapse for months to years, creating debilitating illness and profound socioeconomic consequences. Current treatment is limited to supportive measures, which are dependent on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Research into immunomodulatory agents, antiviral therapies, and vaccines is ongoing. Prevention remains key in slowing the spread of disease. Patient education should focus on personal protective measures, such as insect repellant and remaining indoors, while public health departments should implement strategies to control vector breeding grounds. Given the possibility of relapsing and debilitating disease, general internists should consider CHIKV in the differential diagnosis of a returning traveler with acute onset of fever, polyarthralgia, and rash.

  1. Development and Implementation of a Surveillance Network System for Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Caribbean (ARICABA)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, WonGyu Lewis; AnneDucharme, Chelsea; Bucher, Bernard Jean-Marie Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever, including dengue hemorrhagic fever, has become a re-emerging public health threat in the Caribbean in the absence of a comprehensive regional surveillance system. In this deficiency, a project entitled ARICABA, strives to implement a pilot surveillance system across three islands: Martinique, St. Lucia, and Dominica. The aim of this project is to establish a network for epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases, utilizing information and communication technology. This paper describes the system design and development strategies of a “network of networks” surveillance system for infectious diseases in the Caribbean. Also described are benefits, challenges, and limitations of this approach across the three island nations identified through direct observation, open-ended interviews, and email communications with an on-site IT consultant, key informants, and the project director. Identified core systems design of the ARICABA data warehouse include a disease monitoring system and a syndromic surveillance system. Three components comprise the development strategy: the data warehouse server, the geographical information system, and forecasting algorithms; these are recognized technical priorities of the surveillance system. A main benefit of the ARICABA surveillance system is improving responsiveness and representativeness of existing health systems through automated data collection, process, and transmission of information from various sources. Challenges include overcoming technology gaps between countries; real-time data collection points; multiple language support; and “component-oriented” development approaches. PMID:23569607

  2. New records of marine tardigrades from Moorea, French Polynesia, with the description of Styraconyx turbinarium sp. nov. (Arthrotardigrada, Halechiniscidae).

    PubMed

    Bartels, Paul J; Fontoura, Paulo; Nelson, Diane R

    2015-05-05

    Five marine arthrotardigrade species are recorded from Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia. Four were collected from coral sand; two, Dipodarctus anaholiensis Pollock, 1995 and Florarctus kwoni Chang & Rho, 1997, are new records for the region, and two, Halechiniscus perfectus Schulz, 1955 and Styraconyx kristenseni kristenseni Renaud-Mornant, 1981, have been previously reported. The fifth, a new species Styraconyx turbinarium sp. nov., is described and was collected from the drifting brown alga Turbinaria ornata. The new species is characterized by the presence of peduncles on all digits, an elongate primary clava, and the lateral cirrus A arising from a common pedestal and enveloped by a common membrane extending almost to the claval tip. The new species differs from the most similar species, Styraconyx tyrrhenus D'Addabbo Gallo, Morone De Lucia & de Zio Grimaldi, 1989, by having longer and differently shaped primary clavae which are elongated in the new species and club-shaped in S. tyrrhenus. By having a dorsal cuticle that is coarsely punctated but without folds or other ornamentations, the new species can be easily distinguished from S. craticulus (Pollock, 1983), a species with similar primary clavae, but with cuticular dorsal folds ornamented with a grid-like pattern.

  3. GPS geodesy in the northern Lesser Antilles: implications for arc kinematics and subduction zone dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, S. E.; Rodriguez, H.; Jansma, P. E.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2002-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles island arc extends from Grenada in the south to the island of Sombrero in the north and formed from the westward subduction of Atlantic lithosphere below the Caribbean plate. A break in the Wadati-Benioff zone occurs between Martinique and St. Lucia effectively splitting the island arc into a more seismically active north and lesser seismically active south. GPS geodesy has been conducted in the northern Lesser Antilles since 1998 when sites (number in parentheses) were established on Saba (4), St. Eustatius (4), St. Kitts (4), Nevis (4) and Antigua (2). Sites established in 2001 and 2002 include: St. Martin (2); Anguilla (2); Barbuda (1); and one additional site each in St. Kitts and Nevis. Islands with potentially active volcanoes (Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, and Nevis) have both tectonic and volcanic sites. Data from occupations in 1998, 2000, 2001, and 2002 have been processed with GIPSY-OASIS II with final orbit and clock parameters from JPL and recast into the Caribbean reference frame to assess 1) velocities of individual island sites relative to the stable Caribbean, 2) internal island deformation and 3) seismic coupling along the plate interface. Results from individual quiescent volcanoes demonstrate that they are deforming at several millimeters per year with respect to the stable Caribbean. The cause of the observed deformation is likely a combination of edifice failure and coupling along the plate interface. Simple 2D locking models have been investigated and will be presented.

  4. The ticks (Acari: Ixodida: Argasidae, Ixodidae) of Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Mastropaolo, Mariano; Beltrán-Saavedra, L Fabián; Guglielmone, Alberto A

    2014-03-01

    The tick species reported in Bolivia are reviewed here as (1) endemic or established: Ornithodoros echimys, O. guaporensis, O. hasei, O. kohlsi, O. mimon, O. peropteryx, O. rostratus, Otobius megnini, Amblyomma auricularium, A. cajennense, A. calcaratum, A. coelebs, A. dubitatum, A. humerale, A. incisum, A. longirostre, A. naponense, A. nodosum, A. oblongoguttatum, A. ovale, A. parvitarsum, A. parvum, A. pecarium, A. pseudoconcolor, A. rotundatum, A. scalpturatum, A. tigrinum, A. triste, Dermacentor nitens, Haemaphysalis juxtakochi, H. leporispalustris, I. boliviensis, I. cooleyi, I. luciae, Rhipicephalus microplus, R. sanguineus, and (2) erroneously reported: Ornithodoros puertoricensis, O. talaje, O. turicata, Amblyomma americanum, A. maculatum, A. multipunctum, Ixodes ricinus, I. scapularis, Rhipicephalus annulatus. Many of these records are lacking locality and/or host, and some of them need new findings for confirmation. Some of the species recorded may represent a threat for human and animal health, therefore would be of great value to make a countrywide survey of ticks in order to update the information presented in this work.

  5. View of the Salinas River Valley area south of Monterey Bay, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A vertical view of the Salinas River Valley area south of Monterey Bay, California area is seen in this Skylab 3 Earth Resources Experiments Package S190-B (five-inch earth terrain camera) photograph taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The valley is an irrigated agricultural area, as indicated by the dark-green and light-gray rectangular patterns in the center of the picture. The city of Salinas is barely visible under the cloud cover at the top (north) end of the valley. The dark mass on the left (west) side of the valley is the Santa Lucia mountain range. The Big Sur area is on the left and partly covered by clouds. The Diablo Range forms the dark mass in the lower right (southeast) corner of the photograph. The town of Hillister is the grey area in the dark-green rectangular farm tracts which occupy the floor of the San Benito Valley in the upper right (northeast) corner of the photograph. The Salinas River flows northwestward toward Monterey Bay. The towns of Soleda

  6. The effects of mesquite invasion on a southeastern Arizona grassland bird community

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lloyd, J.; Mannan, R.W.; DeStefano, S.; Kirkpatrick, C.

    1998-01-01

    We determined which vegetal features influenced the distribution and abundance of grassland birds at the Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. The density and distribution of mesquite (Prosopis velutina) exerted the strongest influence on the grassland bird community. Abundances of Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus; r2 = 0.363, P = 0.025) and Lucy's Warbler (Vermivora luciae; r2 = 0.348, P = 0.04), and total abundance of birds (r2 = 0.358, P = 0.04) were positively correlated with increasing density of mesquite (Prosopis velutina), whereas abundance of Cactus Wren (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus; r2 = 0.452, P = 0.02) was negatively correlated with increasing mesquite density. Abundance of Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus; r2 = 0.693, P < 0.001) was positively correlated with an increasing patchiness of mesquite. Shrub-dependent bird species dominated the community, accounting for 12 of the 18 species and 557 of the 815 individuals detected. Species relying on extensive areas of open grassland were largely absent from the study area, perhaps a result of the recent invasion of mesquite into this semi-desert grassland.

  7. Evidence for involvement of TRPA1 in the detection of vibrations by hair bundle mechanoreceptors in sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Janna L; Graugnard, Erin M; Mire, Patricia; Watson, Glen M

    2011-07-01

    A homolog of TRPA1 was identified in the genome of the anemone, Nematostella vectensis (nv-TRPA1a), and predicted to possess six ankyrin repeat domains at the N-terminus and an ion channel domain near the C-terminus. Transmembrane segments of the ion channel domain are well conserved among several known TRPA1 polypeptides. Inhibitors of TRPA1 including ruthenium red decrease vibration-dependent discharge of nematocysts in N. vectensis and Haliplanella luciae. Activators of TRPA1 including URB-597 and polygodial increase nematocyst discharge in the absence of vibrations. Co-immunoprecipitation yields a band on SDS-PAGE gels at the predicted mass of the nv-TRPA1a polypeptide among other bands. Co-immunoprecipitation performed in the presence of antigenic peptide decreases the yield of this and several other polypeptides. In untreated controls, anti-nv-TRPA1a primarily labels the base of the hair bundle with some labeling also distributed along the length of stereocilia. Tissue immunolabeled in the presence of the antigenic peptide exhibits reduced labeling. Activating chemoreceptors for N-acetylated sugars induce immunolabel to distribute distally in stereocilia. In anemones, activating chemoreceptors for N-acetylated sugars induce hair bundles to elongate among several other structural and functional changes. Taken together, these results are consistent with the possibility that nv-TRPA1a participates in signal transduction of anemone hair bundles.

  8. Analysis of 2ν3 Band of Hto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Maki, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Takuya; Hara, Masanori; Hatano, Yuji; Ozeki, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen. Tritium released into natural enviroment is said to be converted into mostly HTO. The detection of HTO is important from the viewpoint of basic science as well as its radioactivity. Spectroscopy is a good tool for detection, however, high-resolution spectroscopy studies are still limited. The microwave study were carried out and the molecular constants of the ground state were determined. All fundamental ν_1, ν_2 and the ν_3 bands of HTO were reported. At 1.38 micron region, overtone and combination bands are expected. In this study, we prepared a new double wall cell for safe handling of highly concentrated tritiated water and carried out the near-infrared measurement. More than 100 transitions were observed and most of them were assigned to belong to the 2ν_3 band based on the previous quantum chemical calculations. We will report the current status of the analysis. P. Helminger, F. C. De Lucia, W. Gordy, P. A. Staats and H. W. Morgan, Phys. Rev. A, 10, 1072 (1974). S. D. Cope, D. K. Russell, H. A. Fry, L. H. Jones, and J. E. Barefield, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 127, 464 (1988). P. P. Cherrier, P. H. Beckwith, and J. Reid, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 121, 69 (1987). M. Tine, D. Kobor, I. Sakho, and L. H. Coudert, J. Mod. Phys., 3, 1945 (2012). M. J. Down, J. Tennyson, M. Hara, Y. Hatano, and K. Kobayashi, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 289, 35 (2013).

  9. The tardigrade fauna of Australian marine caves: with descriptions of nine new species of Arthrotardigrada.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Aslak; Boesgaard, Tom M; Møbjerg, Nadja; Kristensen, Reinhardt M

    2014-05-28

    Marine caves are known to support a rich macrofauna; however, few studies have focused on meiofauna. Marine cave meiofaunal tardigrades have been reported from Japan and the Mediterranean Sea and a preliminary list of species including a redescription of Actinarctus neretinus Grimaldi de Zio, D'Addabbo Gallo, Morone De Lucia, Vaccarella and Grimaldi, 1982 was reported from Fish Rock Cave and Jim's Cave on the coast of Australia. This study is the fourth in a series describing the unique meiofauna in two Australian submarine caves located off the coast of New South Wales, describing nine new species.        Only 67 tardigrades were collected from the two caves, yet these contained a high diversity of at least 16 different species which are quite different in the two caves. The fauna includes nine arthrotardigrade genera: Actinarctus, Batillipes, Dipodarctus, Halechiniscus, Raiarctus, Styraconyx, Tanarctus, Tholoarctus, and Wingstrandarctus. This fauna is different from that reported for the high energy beaches along the East Coast of Australia.        We describe nine new species comprising a single batillipedid and eight halechiniscids: Batillipes solitarius nov. sp., Dipodarctus australiensis nov. sp., Dipodarctus susannae nov. sp., Raiarctus jesperi nov. sp., Raiarctus katrinae nov. sp., Tanarctus hirsutospinosus nov. sp., Tholoarctus oleseni nov. sp., Wingstrandarctus stinae nov. sp. and Wingstrandarctus unsculptus nov. sp.

  10. A new approach to assessment and management of the impact from medical liquid radioactive waste.

    PubMed

    Sundell-Bergman, S; de la Cruz, I; Avila, R; Hasselblad, S

    2008-10-01

    The Swedish regulations concerning disposal of clinical radioactive waste are currently under revision and a graded approach is proposed for risk limitation purposes. To assist the revision procedures, a screening study was performed to estimate public exposures from liquid releases from hospitals to public sewers. The results showed that doses to sewage workers were above the dose constraint of 100 microSv a(-1) especially for 131I and (99m)Tc. Hence, a dynamic model, LUCIA, was developed for realistic assessments in which radionuclide transportation in sewers was modelled. Probabilistic simulations were performed to obtain probability distributions of radionuclide concentrations in sludge. Concurrently, estimates of the effective doses to sewage workers decreased significantly and were below 10 microSv a(-1) except for 111In and 131I. However, the Kd-coefficients representing the partition of radioactivity between water and sludge in sewers are highly uncertain for 111In. As shown by sensitivity studies, these values are the major determinant of the exposures in sewers.

  11. Gaps, tears and seismic anisotropy around the subducting slabs of the Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlaphorst, David; Kendall, J.-Michael; Baptie, Brian; Latchman, Joan L.; Tait, Steve

    2017-02-01

    Seismic anisotropy in and beneath the subducting slabs of the Antilles is investigated using observations of shear-wave splitting. We use a combination of teleseismic and local events recorded at three-component broadband seismic stations on every major island in the area to map anisotropy in the crust, the mantle wedge and the slab/sub-slab mantle. To date this is the most comprehensive study of anisotropy in this region, involving 52 stations from 8 seismic networks. Local event delay times (0.21 ± 0.12 s) do not increase with depth, indicating a crustal origin in anisotropy and an isotropic mantle wedge. Teleseismic delay times are much larger (1.34 ± 0.47 s), with fast shear-wave polarisations that are predominantly parallel to trend of the arc. These observations can be interpreted three ways: (1) the presence of pre-existing anisotropy in the subducting slab; (2) anisotropy due to sub-slab mantle flow around the eastern margin of the nearly stationary Caribbean plate; (3) some combination of both mechanisms. However, there are two notable variations in the trench-parallel pattern of anisotropy - trench-perpendicular alignment is observed in narrow regions east of Puerto Rico and south of Martinique. These observations support previously proposed ideas of eastward sublithospheric mantle flow through gaps in the slab. Furthermore, the pattern of anisotropy south of Martinique, near Saint Lucia is consistent with a previously proposed location for the boundary between the North and South American plates.

  12. Biodiversity and distribution of the southern African sea cucumbers (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea).

    PubMed

    Thandar, Ahmed S

    2015-12-17

    The history of the southern African holothuroid fauna south of the tropic of Capricorn, is updated and the biodiversity and distribution of the fauna discussed. All five currently recognized orders are represented, distributed over 24 families, 74 genera and 163 species. As many as 117 species are shelf forms comprising the following faunistic components : 36% Indo-Pacific, 12% West Indian Ocean, 1% Atlantic and 51% endemic. Four faunistic provinces are recognized : tropical Indo-Pacific Province on the east coast, extending to St Lucia in northern KwaZulu-Natal; the Subtropical (Natal) province, from this point to Port St. Johns in the Eastern Cape Province; the Warm Temperate (Agulhas) Province from this point to Cape Point in the Western Cape Province; and the Cold Temperate (Namaqua) from Cape Point to Walvis Bay in Namibia. Vertical distribution of the approximately 90 species collected from more than one locality is also given. The origin of the holothuroid fauna is briefly discussed and reiterated that the Indo-Pacific component moved in from the north mostly by way of the Mozambique-Agulhas Current. The origin of the endemic component is obscure but surmised that it is perhaps also of Indo-Pacific origin with negligible contribution from the Atlantic.

  13. "How to stop choking to death": Rethinking lesbian separatism as a vibrant political theory and feminist practice.

    PubMed

    Enszer, Julie R

    2016-01-01

    In contemporary feminist discourses, lesbian separatism is often mocked. Whether blamed as a central reason for feminism's alleged failure or seen as an unrealistic, utopian vision, lesbian separatism is a maligned social and cultural formation. This article traces the intellectual roots of lesbian feminism from the early 1970s in The Furies and Radicalesbians through the work of Julia Penelope and Sarah Lucia Hoagland in the 1980s and 1990s, then considers four feminist and lesbian organizations that offer innovative engagements with lesbian separatism. Olivia Records operated as a separatist enterprise, producing and distributing womyn's music during the 1970s and 1980s. Two book distributors, Women in Distribution, which operated in the 1970s, and Diaspora Distribution, which operated in the 1980s, offer another approach to lesbian separatism as a form of economic and entrepreneurial engagement. Finally, Sinister Wisdom, a lesbian-feminist literary and arts journal, enacts a number of different forms of lesbian separatism during its forty-year history. These four examples demonstrate economic and cultural investments of lesbian separatism and situate its investments in larger visionary feminist projects. More than a rigid ideology, lesbian separatism operates as a feminist process, a method for living in the world.

  14. Comparison of condom breakage during human use with performance in laboratory testing.

    PubMed

    Russell-Brown, P; Piedrahita, C; Foldesy, R; Steiner, M; Townsend, J

    1992-05-01

    This paper combines results from a study of the determinants of condom quality and use conducted by The Population Council in two countries in the Caribbean with results from a condom breakage study conducted by Family Health International (FHI) in the United States. The studies, conducted two years apart, compared the breakage rates of condoms from the same lot during human use to their performance in laboratory test results. Breakage rates of 12.9% for Barbados, 10.1% for St. Lucia and 6.7% for the United States compared to passing ASTM laboratory tests suggest that existing laboratory tests as used with the current pass/fail standards are either not sufficiently sensitive or not well-defined to reliably predict condom performance during human use. The study also suggests that user behaviors and practices may be a factor in condom breakage. If the condom is to be an effective method against unplanned pregnancy and STD/HIV infection, and if consumer confidence is to be retained, condom breakage during sexual intercourse must be reduced.

  15. On the construction of a skill-based wheelchair navigation profile.

    PubMed

    Urdiales, Cristina; Pérez, Eduardo Javier; Peinado, Gloria; Fdez-Carmona, Manuel; Peula, Jose M; Annicchiarico, Roberta; Sandoval, Francisco; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Assisted wheelchair navigation is of key importance for persons with severe disabilities. The problem has been solved in different ways, usually based on the shared control paradigm. This paradigm consists of giving the user more or less control on a need basis. Naturally, these approaches require personalization: each wheelchair user has different skills and needs and it is hard to know a priori from diagnosis how much assistance must be provided. Furthermore, since there is no such thing as an average user, sometimes it is difficult to quantify the benefits of these systems. This paper proposes a new method to extract a prototype user profile using real traces based on more than 70 volunteers presenting different physical and cognitive skills. These traces are clustered to determine the average behavior that can be expected from a wheelchair user in order to cope with significant situations. Processed traces provide a prototype user model for comparison purposes, plus a simple method to obtain without supervision a skill-based navigation profile for any user while he/she is driving. This profile is useful for benchmarking but also to determine the situations in which a given user might require more assistance after evaluating how well he/she compares to the benchmark. Profile-based shared control has been successfully tested by 18 volunteers affected by left or right brain stroke at Fondazione Santa Lucia, in Rome, Italy.

  16. Continuation of the Pursuit of the Far-Infrared Spectrum of Ncncs, at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winnewisser, Manfred; Winnewisser, Brenda P.; De Frank, C. Lucia; Tokaryk, Dennis W.; Ross, Stephen C.; Billinghurst, Brant E.

    2013-06-01

    The molecule cyanogen iso-thiocyanate, NCNCS, has proved to be the most revealing model system for studying the effects of molecular quantum monodromy. In two previous measuring campaigns in May 2011 and May 2012 at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan we have obtained a rich collection of high-resolution infrared band systems for both S(CN)_{2} and its isomer NCNCS which is our target molecule. We found experimentally that NCNCS is the more stable isomer. Some results for S(CN)_{2} are reported in the adjacent talk in this session. However, the isomerization between S(CN)_{2} and NCNCS and other reaction products make the attainment of a pure sample of NCNCS difficult and time consuming. We have not yet obtained a satisfactory high-resolution recording of the quasi-linear bending mode in the far infrared in the two allotments of beam time so far available to us. Our theoretical preparations for the project include recent refinements of predictions of intensities in the low-lying bending mode band system, which will be shown. The experimental aspects of obtaining an optimal sample of NCNCS in order to observe the rotational resolved spectrum in the CLS campaign scheduled for May 2013, and an initial report of the results, will also be discussed. B. P. Winnewisser, M. Winnewisser, I. R. Medvedev, F. C. {De Lucia}, S. C. Ross and J. Koput, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., {12}, 8158 (2010)

  17. Development and Implementation of a Surveillance Network System for Emerging Infectious Diseases in the Caribbean (ARICABA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Wongyu Lewis; Anneducharme, Chelsea; Bucher, Bernard Jean-Marie Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Dengue fever, including dengue hemorrhagic fever, has become a re-emerging public health threat in the Caribbean in the absence of a comprehensive regional surveillance system. In this deficiency, a project entitled ARICABA, strives to implement a pilot surveillance system across three islands: Martinique, St. Lucia, and Dominica. The aim of this project is to establish a network for epidemiological surveillance of infectious diseases, utilizing information and communication technology. This paper describes the system design and development strategies of a "network of networks" surveillance system for infectious diseases in the Caribbean. Also described are benefits, challenges, and limitations of this approach across the three island nations identified through direct observation, open-ended interviews, and email communications with an on-site IT consultant, key informants, and the project director. Identified core systems design of the ARICABA data warehouse include a disease monitoring system and a syndromic surveillance system. Three components comprise the development strategy: the data warehouse server, the geographical information system, and forecasting algorithms; these are recognized technical priorities of the surveillance system. A main benefit of the ARICABA surveillance system is improving responsiveness and representativeness of existing health systems through automated data collection, process, and transmission of information from various sources. Challenges include overcoming technology gaps between countries; real-time data collection points; multiple language support; and "component-oriented" development approaches.

  18. Neogosseidae (Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida) from the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Todaro, M Antonio; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bownes, Sarah J

    2013-01-01

    Among the mostly benthic gastrotrichs, the Neogosseidae (Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida) are particularly interesting from an evolutionary point of view in virtue of their planktonic lifestyle; yet, they are poorly known and uncertainties concerning morphological traits hamper accurate in-group systematics. During a recent survey of meiofauna in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, two species of Neogosseidae were found in a freshwater pond near Charter's Creek on the Western Shores of Lake St Lucia. Based on morphological traits, one species has been identified as Neogossea acanthocolla, originally described from Brazil, while the other, affiliated to the genus Kijanebalola, is proposed as new to science. Using a combination of differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, fine anatomical details were observed and are here discussed in a larger taxonomic framework, especially regarding Kijanebalola devestiva sp. n. Results have also provided reasons for a revision of the diagnostic traits of Kijanebalola, Neogossea and the whole Family Neogosseidae. Besides expanding awareness about the biodiversity hosted by South Africa's first UNESCO World Heritage Site, our study will be beneficial to future phylogenetic studies of the Gastrotricha based on morphology, by allowing the selection and/or a more precise character coding of traits of phylogenetic relevance.

  19. Neogosseidae (Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida) from the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Todaro, M. Antonio; Perissinotto, Renzo; Bownes, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Among the mostly benthic gastrotrichs, the Neogosseidae (Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida) are particularly interesting from an evolutionary point of view in virtue of their planktonic lifestyle; yet, they are poorly known and uncertainties concerning morphological traits hamper accurate in-group systematics. During a recent survey of meiofauna in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, South Africa, two species of Neogosseidae were found in a freshwater pond near Charter’s Creek on the Western Shores of Lake St Lucia. Based on morphological traits, one species has been identified as Neogossea acanthocolla, originally described from Brazil, while the other, affiliated to the genus Kijanebalola, is proposed as new to science. Using a combination of differential interference contrast and scanning electron microscopy, fine anatomical details were observed and are here discussed in a larger taxonomic framework, especially regarding Kijanebalola devestiva sp. n. Results have also provided reasons for a revision of the diagnostic traits of Kijanebalola, Neogossea and the whole Family Neogosseidae. Besides expanding awareness about the biodiversity hosted by South Africa’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site, our study will be beneficial to future phylogenetic studies of the Gastrotricha based on morphology, by allowing the selection and/or a more precise character coding of traits of phylogenetic relevance. PMID:23878511

  20. Computational intelligence-based polymerase chain reaction primer selection based on a novel teaching-learning-based optimisation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Specific primers play an important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, and therefore it is essential to find specific primers of outstanding quality. Unfortunately, many PCR constraints must be simultaneously inspected which makes specific primer selection difficult and time-consuming. This paper introduces a novel computational intelligence-based method, Teaching-Learning-Based Optimisation, to select the specific and feasible primers. The specified PCR product lengths of 150-300 bp and 500-800 bp with three melting temperature formulae of Wallace's formula, Bolton and McCarthy's formula and SantaLucia's formula were performed. The authors calculate optimal frequency to estimate the quality of primer selection based on a total of 500 runs for 50 random nucleotide sequences of 'Homo species' retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The method was then fairly compared with the genetic algorithm (GA) and memetic algorithm (MA) for primer selection in the literature. The results show that the method easily found suitable primers corresponding with the setting primer constraints and had preferable performance than the GA and the MA. Furthermore, the method was also compared with the common method Primer3 according to their method type, primers presentation, parameters setting, speed and memory usage. In conclusion, it is an interesting primer selection method and a valuable tool for automatic high-throughput analysis. In the future, the usage of the primers in the wet lab needs to be validated carefully to increase the reliability of the method.

  1. Estimation of teaching-learning-based optimization primer design using regression analysis for different melting temperature calculations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Primers plays important role in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments, thus it is necessary to select characteristic primers. Unfortunately, manual primer design manners are time-consuming and easy to get human negligence because many PCR constraints must be considered simultaneously. Automatic programs for primer design were developed urgently. In this study, the teaching-learning-based optimization (TLBO), a robust and free of algorithm-specific parameters method, is applied to screen primers conformed primer constraints. The optimal primer frequency (OPF) based on three known melting temperature formulas is estimated by 500 runs for primer design in each different number of generations. We selected optimal primers from fifty random nucleotide sequences of Homo sapiens at NCBI. The results indicate that the SantaLucia's formula is better coupled with the method to get higher optimal primer frequency and shorter CPU-time than the Wallace's formula and the Bolton and McCarthy's formula. Through the regression analysis, we also find the generations are significantly associated with the optimal primer frequency. The results are helpful for developing the novel TLBO-based computational method to design feasible primers.

  2. Host Range of a Population of Pratylenchus vulnus in Commercial Fruit, Nut, Citrus, and Grape Rootstocks in Spain.

    PubMed

    Pinochet, J; Verdejo, S; Soler, A; Canals, J

    1992-12-01

    In a host-range study carried out under greenhouse conditions, a total of 37 commercial fruit tree, grape, and citrus rootstocks were tested for their reaction to a population of the lesion nematode, Pratylenchus vulnus, in Spain. Twenty-five rootstocks had a Pf/Pi > 1.5. These included almond (Desmayo Rojo, 1143), apple (EM-9, EM-106), avocado (Hass), cherry (Santa Lucia 64, Camil, M x M 14, Masto de Montafiana), grape (41-B, Fercal, Ritcher 110), hazelnut (Pauetet), loquat (Nadal), peach (Montclar, GF-305), pear (OHF-333), pistachio (P. atlantica, P. vera, P. terebinthus), plum (San Julian 655-2, Montizo, Pixy, Myrobalan 605), and walnut (Serf). The peach rootstock Nemaguard and the grape 161-49 had Pf/Pi between 1.0 and 1.5 (slightly higher than inoculation level). All the tested citrus (Alemow, rough lemon, Carrizo citrange, sour orange, Troyer citrange, Citrumelo), plus three grape (SO4, Vitis rupestris, 1103-P), and the olive rootstock Arbequina had a Pf/Pi < 1.0.

  3. Hydrothermal palygorskite and ferromanganese mineralization at a central California margin fracture zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibbs, A.E.; Hein, J.R.; Lewis, S.D.; McCulloch, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ferromanganese oxyhydroxide crusts and nodules associated with palygorskite were recovered from the Santa Lucia Escarpment where the Morro Fracture Zone intersects the central California continental margin. Palygorskite was found in pure, high-Mg, low-Al, boxwork-textured veins, and disseminated in poorly consolidated palygorskite-rich mudstone. The purity of the palygorskite boxwork blades and the boxwork structure suggest formation by direct precipitation rather than by diagenetic or detrital processes. Interaction of hydrothermal fluids with oceanic basalt and/or deeper ultramafic rocks produced a Mg-Si enriched fluid supersaturated with respect to palygorskite that precipitated directly from the fluid at or near the seafloor. The close association of Fe-Mn crusts and nodules with both the palygorskite-rich mudstone and boxwork-vein palygorskite suggests a genetic link between the three types of mineralization. Mixed origin hydrothermal-hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts, with up to 50% hydrothermal input, formed contemporaneously with and subsequent to palygorskite formation. Fe-Mn nodules collected in the same dredge are of combined hydrogenetic and diagenetic origin and appear to be unrelated to hydrothermal mineralization that produced the crusts and palygorskite. The thickness of the Fe-Mn crusts and rare diatom fragments within the mudstone suggest an age of formation between 13 and 5 Ma. ?? 1993.

  4. Host Range of a Population of Pratylenchus vulnus in Commercial Fruit, Nut, Citrus, and Grape Rootstocks in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Pinochet, J.; Verdejo, S.; Soler, A.; Canals, J.

    1992-01-01

    In a host-range study carried out under greenhouse conditions, a total of 37 commercial fruit tree, grape, and citrus rootstocks were tested for their reaction to a population of the lesion nematode, Pratylenchus vulnus, in Spain. Twenty-five rootstocks had a Pf/Pi > 1.5. These included almond (Desmayo Rojo, 1143), apple (EM-9, EM-106), avocado (Hass), cherry (Santa Lucia 64, Camil, M × M 14, Masto de Montafiana), grape (41-B, Fercal, Ritcher 110), hazelnut (Pauetet), loquat (Nadal), peach (Montclar, GF-305), pear (OHF-333), pistachio (P. atlantica, P. vera, P. terebinthus), plum (San Julian 655-2, Montizo, Pixy, Myrobalan 605), and walnut (Serf). The peach rootstock Nemaguard and the grape 161-49 had Pf/Pi between 1.0 and 1.5 (slightly higher than inoculation level). All the tested citrus (Alemow, rough lemon, Carrizo citrange, sour orange, Troyer citrange, Citrumelo), plus three grape (SO4, Vitis rupestris, 1103-P), and the olive rootstock Arbequina had a Pf/Pi < 1.0. PMID:19283047

  5. Interspecific Aggression and Habitat Partitioning in Garter Snakes

    PubMed Central

    Edgehouse, Michael; Latta, Leigh C.; Brodie, Edmund D.; Brodie, Edmund D.

    2014-01-01

    Defense of a limited resource, such as space or food, has recently been discovered in snakes and has been widely documented in lizards. Garter snakes (Thamnophis spp.) are historically considered generalist predators such that food is not a limiting resource. However, in this study we show that the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) and the aquatic garter snake (Thamnophis atratus) show a strong preference for amphibians as their primary food source at the Santa Lucia Preserve (SLP), Monterey County, California. This food preference forces these snake species at SLP to exploit aquatic habitats. Our principle goal was to investigate the aggressive behavior of T. sirtalis and the potential that this aggression displaces T. atratus from its preferred habitat. We found that when individuals from either species are alone, a 100% preference for aquatic or near aquatic habitat is observed. In contrast, when these species are together, T. sirtalis occupy the aquatic habitat and T. atratus occupy an area far removed from water. Thamnophis sirtalis often physically force T. atratus from the aquatic habitat through repeated biting and other displays of aggression. PMID:24465962

  6. Distribution of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata, intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni, within a St Lucian field habitat

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    A total of 6360 mud samples were obtained, in 62 collections made with an exhaustive sampling device, from banana drains on the West Indian island of St Lucia during fortnightly samplings over a 2½-year period. Analysis of counts of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata from these samples showed that this species had a contagious distribution. This finding is consistent with other evidence that banana drains form a rigorous habitat for B. glabrata. Its distribution was more contagious than that of Oncomelania quadrasi in certain Philippine habitats and several species of aquatic snail in various African irrigation canals. The exact transformation for normalizing the snail counts for standard statistical techniques was z = x0.287 but the more convenient cube root transformation is probably adequate. However, if too few snails are collected (15 or fewer per 100 samples) or if the frequency distribution of snail counts is discontinuous, with too many widely separated high frequency counts, neither transformation will be entirely satisfactory. PMID:1084797

  7. Effect of ethylic alcohol on attentive functions involved in driving abilities.

    PubMed

    Bivona, Umberto; Garbarino, Sergio; Rigon, Jessica; Buzzi, Maria Gabriella; Onder, Graziano; Matteis, Maria; Catani, Sheila; Giustini, Marco; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Formisano, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The burden of injuries due to drunk drivers has been estimated only indirectly. Indeed, alcohol is considered one of the most important contributing cause of car crash injuries and its effect on cognitive functions needs to be better elucidated. Aims of the study were i) to examine the effect of alcohol on attentive abilities involved while driving, and ii) to investigate whether Italian law limits for safe driving are sufficiently accurate to prevent risky behaviours and car crash risk while driving. We conducted a cross-over study at IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia Rehabilitation Hospital in Rome. Thirty-two healthy subjects were enrolled in this experiment. Participants were submitted to an attentive test battery assessing attention before taking Ethylic Alcohol (EA-) and after taking EA (EA+). In the EA+ condition subjects drank enough wine until the blood alcohol concentration, measured by means of Breath Analyzer, was equal to or higher than 0.5 g/l. Data analysis revealed that after alcohol assumption, tonic and phasic alertness, selective, divided attention and vigilance were significantly impaired when BAC level was at least 0.5 g/l. These data reveal that alcohol has a negative effect on attentive functions which are primarily involved in driving skills and that Italian law limits are adequate to prevent risky driving behaviour.

  8. Colonisation and Diversification of the Zenaida Dove (Zenaida aurita) in the Antilles: Phylogeography, Contemporary Gene Flow and Morphological Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Monceau, Karine; Cézilly, Frank; Moreau, Jérôme; Motreuil, Sébastien; Wattier, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    Caribbean avifaunal biogeography has been mainly studied based on mitochondrial DNA. Here, we investigated both past and recent island differentiation and micro-evolutionary changes in the Zenaida Dove (Zenaida aurita) based on combined information from one mitochondrial (Cytochrome c Oxydase subunit I, COI) and 13 microsatellite markers and four morphological characters. This Caribbean endemic and abundant species has a large distribution, and two subspecies are supposed to occur: Z. a. zenaida in the Greater Antilles (GA) and Z. a. aurita in the Lesser Antilles (LA). Doves were sampled on two GA islands (Puerto Rico and the British Virgin Islands) and six LA islands (Saint Barthélemy, Guadeloupe, Les Saintes, Martinique, Saint Lucia and Barbados). Eleven COI haplotypes were observed that could be assembled in two distinct lineages, with six specific to GA, four to LA, the remaining one occurring in all islands. However, the level of divergence between those two lineages was too moderate to fully corroborate the existence of two subspecies. Colonisation of the studied islands appeared to be a recent process. However, both phenotypic and microsatellite data suggest that differentiation is already under way between all of them, partly associated with the existence of limited gene flow. No isolation by distance was observed. Differentiation for morphological traits was more pronounced than for neutral markers. These results suggest that despite recent colonisation, genetic drift and/or restricted gene flow are promoting differentiation for neutral markers. Variation in selective pressures between islands may explain the observed phenotypic differentiation. PMID:24349217

  9. The high-redshift galaxy population in hierarchical galaxy formation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitzbichler, M. G.; White, S. D. M.

    2007-03-01

    We compare observations of the high-redshift galaxy population to the predictions of the galaxy formation model of Croton et al. and De Lucia & Blaizot. This model, implemented on the Millennium Simulation of the concordance Lambda cold dark matter cosmogony, introduces `radio mode' feedback from the central galaxies of groups and clusters in order to obtain quantitative agreement with the luminosity, colour, morphology and clustering properties of the present-day galaxy population. Here we construct deep light cone surveys in order to compare model predictions to the observed counts and redshift distributions of distant galaxies, as well as to their inferred luminosity and mass functions out to redshift 5. With the exception of the mass functions, all these properties are sensitive to modelling of dust obscuration. A simple but plausible treatment agrees moderately well with most of the data. The predicted abundance of relatively massive (~M*) galaxies appears systematically high at high redshift, suggesting that such galaxies assemble earlier in this model than in the real Universe. An independent galaxy formation model implemented on the same simulation matches the observed mass functions slightly better, so the discrepancy probably reflects incomplete or inaccurate galaxy formation physics rather than problems with the underlying cosmogony.

  10. Modelling the cosmological co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, F.; Bonoli, S.; Branchini, E.; Moscardini, L.; Springel, V.; White, S. D. M.

    2008-10-01

    We model the cosmological co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (BHs) within a semi-analytical framework developed on the outputs of the Millennium Simulation. This model, described in detail by Croton et al. and De Lucia and Blaizot, introduces a `radio mode' feedback from AGN at the centre of X-ray emitting atmospheres in galaxy groups and clusters. We investigate how well this model can reproduce the physical properties of BHs and AGN. We analyse the scaling relations, the fundamental plane and the mass function of BHs, and compare them with the most recent observational data. Moreover, we extend the semi-analytic model to follow the evolution of the BH mass accretion and its conversion into radiation, and compare the derived AGN bolometric luminosity function with the observed one. While we find for the most part a very good agreement between predicted and observed BH properties, the semi-analytic model underestimates the number density of luminous AGN at high redshifts, independently of the adopted Eddington factor and accretion efficiency. However, an agreement with the observations is possible within the framework of our model, provided it is assumed that the cold gas fraction accreted by BHs at high redshifts is larger than at low redshifts.

  11. G6PD deficiency in Latin America: systematic review on prevalence and variants

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Wuelton M; Val, Fernando FA; Siqueira, André M; Franca, Gabriel P; Sampaio, Vanderson S; Melo, Gisely C; Almeida, Anne CG; Brito, Marcelo AM; Peixoto, Henry M; Fuller, Douglas; Bassat, Quique; Romero, Gustavo AS; Maria Regina F, Oliveira; Marcus Vinícius G, Lacerda

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax radical cure requires the use of primaquine (PQ), a drug that induces haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient (G6PDd) individuals, which further hampers malaria control efforts. The aim of this work was to study the G6PDd prevalence and variants in Latin America (LA) and the Caribbean region. A systematic search of the published literature was undertaken in August 2013. Bibliographies of manuscripts were also searched and additional references were identified. Low prevalence rates of G6PDd were documented in Argentina, Bolivia, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, but studies from Curaçao, Ecuador, Jamaica, Saint Lucia, Suriname and Trinidad, as well as some surveys carried out in areas of Brazil, Colombia and Cuba, have shown a high prevalence (> 10%) of G6PDd. The G6PD A-202A mutation was the variant most broadly distributed across LA and was identified in 81.1% of the deficient individuals surveyed. G6PDd is a frequent phenomenon in LA, although certain Amerindian populations may not be affected, suggesting that PQ could be safely used in these specific populations. Population-wide use of PQ as part of malaria elimination strategies in LA cannot be supported unless a rapid, accurate and field-deployable G6PDd diagnostic test is made available. PMID:25141282

  12. Effect of the combination of basic fibroblast growth factor and cysteine on corneal epithelial healing after photorefractive keratectomy in patients affected by myopia

    PubMed Central

    Meduri, Alessandro; Scorolli, Lucia; Scalinci, Sergio Zaccaria; Grenga, Pier Luigi; Lupo, Stefano; Rechichi, Miguel; Meduri, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study sought to evaluate the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor eye drops and cysteine oral supplements on corneal healing in patients treated with photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients treated bilaterally with PRK for myopia were enrolled at one of two eye centers (Clinica Santa Lucia, Bologna, Italy and Department of Ophthalmology, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy) and were treated at the former center. Sixty patients included in the study group (Group 1) were treated postoperatively with topical basic fibroblast growth factor plus oral L-cysteine supplements, whereas 60 subjects included in the control group (Group 2) received basic fibroblast growth factor eye drops. We recorded the rate of corneal re-epithelialization and patients were followed-up every 30 days for 6 months. Statistical analyses were performed on the collected data. Results: The eyes in Group 1 demonstrated complete re-epithelialization at Day 5, whereas the eyes in Group 2 achieved this status on Day 6. No side-effects were reported. Conclusions: Patients treated with basic fibroblast growth factor eye drops and L-cysteine oral supplements benefit from more rapid corneal re-epithelialization. In human eyes, this combination treatment appeared to be safe and effective in accelerating corneal surfacing after surgery. Financial Disclosure: No author has any financial or proprietary interest in any material or method used in this study. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN73824458. PMID:24145571

  13. Total phenolic content, radical scavenging properties, and essential oil composition of Origanum species from different populations.

    PubMed

    Dambolena, José S; Zunino, María P; Lucini, Enrique I; Olmedo, Rubén; Banchio, Erika; Bima, Paula J; Zygadlo, Julio A

    2010-01-27

    The aim of this work was to compare the antiradical activity, total phenol content (TPC), and essential oil composition of Origanum vulgare spp. virens, Origanum x applii, Origanum x majoricum, and O. vulgare spp. vulgare cultivated in Argentina in different localities. The experiment was conducted in the research station of La Consulta (INTA-Mendoza), the research station of Santa Lucia (INTA-San Juan), and Agronomy Faculty of National University of La Pampa, from 2007 to 2008. The composition of the essential oils of oregano populations was independent of cultivation conditions. In total, 39 compounds were identified in essential oils of oregano from Argentina by means of GC-MS. Thymol and trans-sabinene hydrate were the most prominent compounds, followed by gamma-terpinene, terpinen-4-ol, and alpha-terpinene. O. vulgare vulgare is the only Origanum studied which is rich in gamma-terpinene. Among tested oregano, O. x majoricum showed the highest essential oil content, 3.9 mg g(-1) dry matter. The plant extract of O. x majoricum had greater total phenol content values, 19.36 mg/g dry weight, than the rest of oregano studied. To find relationships among TPC, free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), and climate variables, canonical correlations were calculated. The results obtained allow us to conclude that 70% of the TPC and FRSA variability can be explained by the climate variables (R(2) = 0.70; p = 8.3 x 10(-6)), the temperature being the most important climatic variable.

  14. Identification and interpretation of tectonic features from ERTS-1 imagery. [Coastal Ranges of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The transverse faults observed in the central Coast Ranges of California are believed to represent the remnants of a major system of shear faults older than the San Andreas system. The transverse shear system is believed to have developed in the Mesozoic when the Pacific Plate was advancing under the North American Plate. Shear faults thus developed due to unequal rates of underthrusting. This tectonic model indicates that the intrusive belt of the proto-Sierra Nevada and the belt of eugeosynclinal sedimentary belt (Franciscan group) which lay to the west were both subjected to regional left-handed shear. Later development of the San Andreas system as transform faults of the East Pacific Rise changes the tectonic style to right-lateral tangential. The model explains the peculiar distribution of the Franciscan rocks in the Diablo Range east of the San Andreas fault and in Santa Lucia Range west of Nacimiento fault and the presence of Sierra Nevada type granitic blocks in between the two faults in the Salinia block. This model is also consistent with an analysis of the Texas and Parras shears which indicates that the southwestern part of North America has been subjected to a major left-lateral regional shear before the development of the San Andreas fault system.

  15. Proteomic identification of hair cell repair proteins in the model sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Watson, Glen M

    2015-09-01

    Sea anemones have an extraordinary capability to repair damaged hair bundles, even after severe trauma. A group of secreted proteins, named repair proteins (RPs), found in mucus covering sea anemones significantly assists the repair of damaged hair bundle mechanoreceptors both in the sea anemone Haliplanella luciae and the blind cavefish Astyanax hubbsi. The polypeptide constituents of RPs must be identified in order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms by which repair of hair bundles is accomplished. In this study, several polypeptides of RPs were isolated from mucus using blue native PAGE and then sequenced using LC-MS/MS. Thirty-seven known polypeptides were identified, including Hsp70s, as well as many polypeptide subunits of the 20S proteasome. Other identified polypeptides included those involved in cellular stress responses, protein folding, and protein degradation. Specific inhibitors of Hsp70s and the 20S proteasome were employed in experiments to test their involvement in hair bundle repair. The results of those experiments suggested that repair requires biologically active Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes. A model is proposed that considers the function of extracellular Hsp70s and 20S proteasomes in the repair of damaged hair cells.

  16. Diets of insectivorous birds along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yard, H.K.; van Riper, Charles; Brown, B.T.; Kearsley, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    We examined diets of six insectivorous bird species (n = 202 individuals) from two vegetation zones along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 1994. All bird species consumed similar quantities of caterpillars and beetles, but use of other prey taxa varied. Non-native leafhoppers (Opsius stactagolus) specific to non-native tamarisk (Tamarix chinensis) substantially augmented Lucy's Warbler (Vermivora luciae) diets (49%), while ants comprised 82% of Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) diets. Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia) diets were composed of 45% aquatic midges. All bird species consumed the non-native leafhopper specific to tamarisk. Comparison of bird diets with availability of arthropod prey from aquatic and terrestrial origins showed terrestrial insects comprised 91% of all avian diets compared to 9% of prey from aquatic origin. Seasonal shifts in arthropod prey occurred in diets of three bird species, although no seasonal shifts were detected in arthropods sampled in vegetation indicating that at least three bird species were not selecting prey in proportion to its abundance. All bird species had higher prey overlap with arthropods collected in the native, mesquite-acacia vegetation zone which contained higher arthropod diversity and better prey items (i.e., Lepidoptera). Lucy's Warbler and Yellow Warbler consumed high proportions of prey items found in greatest abundance in the tamarisk-dominated vegetation zone that has been established since the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. These species appeared to exhibit ecological plasticity in response to an anthropogenic increase in prey resources.

  17. Age-related prevalence and intensity of Trichuris trichiura infection in a St. Lucian community.

    PubMed

    Bundy, D A; Cooper, E S; Thompson, D E; Anderson, R M; Didier, J M

    1987-01-01

    Age-related changes in the average worm burden and the prevalence of Trichuris trichiura infection, in a village community in St. Lucia, were examined by field studies based on worm expulsion techniques. Horizontal age-intensity profiles were convex in form with peak parasite loads occurring in the 2 to 15-year-old children. Prevalence is shown to be a poor indicator of changes in average worm load with age. Faecal egg counts (epg and epd) provide a qualitative measure of worm burdens since fecundity is shown to be approximately independent of worm load. The parasites were highly aggregated within the study community, with most people harbouring low burdens while a few individuals harboured very heavy burdens. Of the total parasite populations in the study sample, 84% were harboured by the 2 to 15-year-old children. Of those individuals harbouring 100 worms or more, 87% were in the 2 to 10-year-old age range. Crude estimates of population parameters (basic reproductive rate, 4-5; rate of reinfection, 90 year-1) suggest that the rate of reinfection is higher than for other helminth parasites of man. The control of morbidity and parasite transmission is discussed in the context of targeting drug treatment at the child segment of the study population.

  18. Submarine canyon deposits, central California coast, and their possible relation to an Eocene low sea-level stand

    SciTech Connect

    Seiders, V.M.; Joyce, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    A cliff exposure in the northern Santa Lucia Range is interpreted to represent the north margin of an Eocene submarine canyon. The exposure shows an unconformity between The Rocks Sandstone Member of the Reliz Canyon Formation and the underlying crystalline basement rocks. Sandstone beds overlie the unconformity at an angle of about 20/sup 0/. Stratigraphic relations exposed nearby show that about 220 m of the Reliz Canyon and Church Creek Formations pinches out northward against the basement across a distance of about 900 m of the Reliz Canyon and Church Creek Formations pinches out northward against the basement across a distance of about 900 m. This corresponds to an original southward slope of the unconformity of about 14/sup 0/. Farther south, an even steeper slope to the north may be indicated, but a fault of uncertain horizontal displacement intervenes. The Reliz Canyon Formation seems to have been deposited in a small northwest-trending submarine canyon in the vicinity of the exposed unconformity; elsewhere in the region the Reliz Canyon Formation may have been deposited in two other canyons or restricted basins. Fossil data show that the voluminous sand of The Rocks Sandstone Member was deposited near the early-middle Eocene boundary, a postulated time of worldwide low sea level. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  19. A review of the Paectes arcigera species complex (Guenée) (Lepidoptera, Euteliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Pogue, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Five new species of Paectes Hübner [1818] related to Paectes arcigera (Guenée) (Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, British Virgin Islands, Guadeloupe, Dominica, St. Lucia, Trinidad) and Paectes longiformis Pogue (Brazil) are described: Paectes asper sp. n. (Florida, Bahamas, Cuba, Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, British Virgin Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Dominica, Colombia), Paectes medialba sp. n. (Argentina), Paectes similis sp. n. (Brazil), Paectes sinuosa sp. n. (Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay), and Paectes tumida sp. n. (Colombia, Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana). Adults and genitalia are illustrated for all species. Taxonomic changes include the rev. stat. of Paectes nana (Walker) (Florida, Greater Antilles, Mexico, Guatemala, Galapagos) as a valid species and revised synonyms Paectes indefatigabilis Schaus and Paectes isabel Schaus as junior synonyms of Paectes nana instead of Paectes arcigera. New host records for Paectes sinuosa and Paectes nana reared on Brazilian peppertree (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi, Anacardiaceae) are presented. The holotype and female genitalia of Paectes obrotunda (Guenée) are illustrated. PMID:23730180

  20. Genetic Characterization of Northwestern Colombian Chikungunya Virus Strains from the 2014-2015 Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Juan D; Kautz, Tiffany; Camacho, Erwin; Paternina, Luis; Guzmán, Hilda; Díaz, Francisco J; Blanco, Pedro; Tesh, Robert; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-09-07

    Chikungunya fever, an acute and often chronic arthralgic disease caused by the mosquito-borne alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), spread into the Americas in late 2013. Since then it has caused epidemics in nearly all New World countries, the second largest being Colombia with over 450,000 suspected cases beginning in September, 2014, and focused in Bolivar Department in the north. We examined 32 human sera from suspected cases, including diverse age groups and both genders, and sequenced the CHIKV envelope glycoprotein genes, known determinants of vector host range. As expected for Asian lineage CHIKV strains, these isolates lacked known Aedes albopictus-adaptive mutations. All the Colombian strains were closely related to those from the Virgin Islands, Saint Lucia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and Brazil, consistent with a single, point-source introduction from the southeast Asia/Pacific region. Two substitutions in the E2 and E1 envelope glycoprotein genes were found in the Colombian strains, especially E1-K211E involving a residue shown previously to affect epistatically the penetrance of the E1-A226V A. albopictus-adaptive substitution. We also identified two amino acid substitutions unique to all American CHIKV sequences: E2-V368A and 6K-L20M. Only one codon, 6K-47, had a high nonsynonymous substitution rate suggesting positive selection.

  1. Fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua on minimally-processed peaches under different storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Isabel; Abadias, Maribel; Anguera, Marina; Usall, Josep; Viñas, Inmaculada

    2010-10-01

    Consumption of fresh-cut produce has sharply increased recently causing an increase of foodborne illnesses associated with these products. As generally, acidic fruits are considered 'safe' from a microbiological point of view, the aim of this work was to study the growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella and Listeria innocua on minimally-processed peaches. The three foodborne pathogens population increased more than 2 log(10)units on fresh-cut peach when stored at 20 and 25 degrees C after 48 h. At 10 degrees C only L. innocua grew more than 1 log(10)unit and it was the only pathogen able to grow at 5 degrees C. Differences in growth occurred between different peach varieties tested, with higher population increases in those varieties with higher pH ('Royal Glory' 4.73+/-0.25 and 'Diana' 4.12+/-0.18). The use of common strategies on extending shelf life of fresh-cut produce, as modified atmosphere packaging and the use of the antioxidant substance, ascorbic acid (2%w/v), did not affect pathogens' growth at any of the temperatures tested (5 and 25 degrees C). Minimally-processed peaches have shown to be a good substrate for foodborne pathogens' growth regardless use of modified atmosphere and ascorbic acid. Therefore, maintaining cold chain and avoiding contamination is highly necessary.

  2. Revisiting play elements and self-handicapping in play: a comparative ethogram of five Old World monkey species.

    PubMed

    Petrů, Milada; Spinka, Marek; Charvátová, Veronika; Lhota, Stanislav

    2009-08-01

    Play behavior has been viewed as a mixture of elements drawn from "serious" behavior, interspersed by ritualized play signals. Two other types of play behaviors have been overlooked: patterns that are dissimilar from any serious behavior and patterns with self-handicapping character, that is, those that put the animal into unnecessary disadvantageous positions or situations. Here the authors show that these 2 types of patterns can constitute a major part of play repertoire. From our own videorecordings and observations, we constructed play ethograms of 5 monkey species (Semnopithecus entellus, Erythrocebus patas, Chlorocebus pygerythrus, Cercopithecus neglectus, and Cercopithecus diana). The authors evaluated the self-handicapping character of each pattern and in Hanuman langurs also the (dis)similarity to serious behavior. Of the 74 patterns in the 5 species, 33 (45%) were judged to have a self-handicapping character. Of 48 patterns observed in langurs, 16 (33%) were totally dissimilar to any serious langur behavior known to us. The authors discuss the possibility that the different types of play elements may have different functions in play.

  3. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-11-10

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein (APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls.

  4. MicroRNA regulation in heart and skeletal muscle over the freeze-thaw cycle in the freeze tolerant wood frog.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Saumya; Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-02-01

    The North American wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of just a few anuran species that tolerates whole body freezing during the winter and has been intensely studied to identify the biochemical adaptations that support freeze tolerance. Among these adaptations is the altered expression of many genes, making freeze-responsive changes to gene regulatory mechanisms a topic of interest. The present study focuses on the potential involvement of microRNAs as one such regulatory mechanism and aims to better understand freeze/thaw stress-induced microRNA responses in the freeze-tolerant wood frog. Using quantitative PCR, relative levels of 53 microRNAs were measured in heart and skeletal muscle of control, 24 h frozen, and 8 h thawed frogs. MicroRNAs showed tissue specific expression patterns: 21 microRNAs decreased in the heart during thawing, whereas 16 microRNAs increased during freezing stress in skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that select genes may be activated and suppressed in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively, in response to freezing. Bioinformatics analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted that the differentially expressed microRNAs may collectively regulate tissue-specific cellular pathways to promote survival of wood frogs undergoing freezing and thawing.

  5. Contribution to the understanding of the cycle of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens.

    PubMed

    Arzul, I; Chollet, B; Boyer, S; Bonnet, D; Gaillard, J; Baldi, Y; Robert, M; Joly, J P; Garcia, C; Bouchoucha, M

    2014-02-01

    The paramyxean parasite Marteilia refringens infects several bivalve species including European flat oysters Ostrea edulis and Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Sequence polymorphism allowed definition of three parasite types 'M', 'O' and 'C' preferably detected in oysters, mussels and cockles respectively. Transmission of the infection from infected bivalves to copepods Paracartia grani could be experimentally achieved but assays from copepods to bivalves failed. In order to contribute to the elucidation of the M. refringens life cycle, the dynamics of the infection was investigated in O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis and zooplankton over one year in Diana lagoon, Corsica (France). Flat oysters appeared non-infected while mussels were infected part of the year, showing highest prevalence in summertime. The parasite was detected by PCR in zooplankton particularly after the peak of prevalence in mussels. Several zooplanktonic groups including copepods, Cladocera, Appendicularia, Chaetognatha and Polychaeta appeared PCR positive. However, only the copepod species Paracartia latisetosa showed positive signal by in situ hybridization. Small parasite cells were observed in gonadal tissues of female copepods demonstrating for the first time that a copepod species other than P. grani can be infected with M. refringens. Molecular characterization of the parasite infecting mussels and zooplankton allowed the distinguishing of three Marteilia types in the lagoon.

  6. Stardial -- an autonomous astronomical camera on the WWW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, P. R.; Thakkar, U.

    1997-05-01

    The use of an autonomous electronic camera, called ``Stardial,'' for undergraduate instruction is described. Stardial delivers images of the night sky nearly in real-time to the world wide web (www.astro.uiuc.edu/stardial/). The remote instrumentation of Stardial is robust, inexpensive, and accomodates many students asynchronously with respect to the instructor(s). The guiding philosophy of the curriculum is to provide students with authentic astronomical data so that they may learn about science by doing it themselves on the internet. Students respond favorably to the opportunity to learn from their own experiences with genuine data, complete with its irregularities and its surprises. Perhaps surprisingly, 9 of 10 self-selected student volunteers in our pilot project were female. Stardial's instrumentation is similar to that of Gaustad et al., and to that of Richmond, Droege, et al. (both at this same meeting). Stardial has benefitted from contributions from students, especially Lawrence Tan, Troy Klyber, Jim Pulokas, Jim Waldemer, and Diana Lopez, and from a number of professionals, especially G.T. Becker, Mike Newberry, John Dolby, Tom Droege, Bob Mutel, Mike Richmond, John Thorstensen, and Rick White. Stardial is funded by the University of Illinois, primarily from the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. We welcome participation from amateur astronomers and other educators.

  7. [Twins in myth (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    de Rachewiltz, B; Parisi, P; Castellani, V

    1976-01-01

    Twins have an important place in mythology and a sacred character appears to be attached to them since the most ancient times. In ancient Egypt, the royal placenta was worshipped, being considered as the Pharao's twin (a conception that is still alive among certain African populations), and actually everyone was considered to possess a spiritual twin, the Ka or astral body, through whom it was supposed to be possible to operate with magic rituals and hit enemies. Twin gods were worshipped by Babylonians and Assyrians (who even introduced them among astronomic constellations), and may be also found in the Persian and Veda religions. In the classic, Greco-Roman world, the examples of twin gods and heroes are innumerable: from the twin sons of Zeus, the Dioscuri, to the opposite-sexed twin gods Apollo and Diana, to Rome's founders, Romulus and Remus, etc. Since the most ancient times, a magic conception is connected to the twins, either in a positive or a negative sense, but often with some kind of a "fatidic" aspect. Such a two-faced approach to the phenomenon of twinning, that variously characterizes near-east, protomediterranean, classic, and other ancient civilizations, may still be found in contemporary primitive societies.

  8. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: Seismic Risk Assessment by Acoustic Emission and Structural Numerical Models

    PubMed Central

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Invernizzi, Stefano; Accornero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named “The Sacred Mountain of Varallo.” Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the “Sacred Mountain of Varallo” and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth's crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects. PMID:24381511

  9. Acoustic Sensor Planning for Gunshot Location in National Parks: A Pareto Front Approach

    PubMed Central

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J.; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario. PMID:22303135

  10. Acoustic sensor planning for gunshot location in national parks: a pareto front approach.

    PubMed

    González-Castaño, Francisco Javier; Alonso, Javier Vales; Costa-Montenegro, Enrique; López-Matencio, Pablo; Vicente-Carrasco, Francisco; Parrado-García, Francisco J; Gil-Castiñeira, Felipe; Costas-Rodríguez, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution for gunshot location in national parks. In Spain there are agencies such as SEPRONA that fight against poaching with considerable success. The DiANa project, which is endorsed by Cabaneros National Park and the SEPRONA service, proposes a system to automatically detect and locate gunshots. This work presents its technical aspects related to network design and planning. The system consists of a network of acoustic sensors that locate gunshots by hyperbolic multi-lateration estimation. The differences in sound time arrivals allow the computation of a low error estimator of gunshot location. The accuracy of this method depends on tight sensor clock synchronization, which an ad-hoc time synchronization protocol provides. On the other hand, since the areas under surveillance are wide, and electric power is scarce, it is necessary to maximize detection coverage and minimize system cost at the same time. Therefore, sensor network planning has two targets, i.e., coverage and cost. We model planning as an unconstrained problem with two objective functions. We determine a set of candidate solutions of interest by combining a derivative-free descent method we have recently proposed with a Pareto front approach. The results are clearly superior to random seeding in a realistic simulation scenario.

  11. To Boldly Go: America's Next Era in Space. Sustaining Life on the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. France Cordova, NASA's Chief Scientist, opened this, the sixth seminar in the Administrator's Seminar Series, by introducing NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin. Mr Goldin welcomed the attendees and set the stage for Dr. Cordova's introduction of the first speaker, Dr. Robert Kates of Brown University. Dr. Kates primary concerns are global environmental changes, world hunger, and the size of the population. Human changes, he said, rival the changes of nature. Changes in the size of world population affect the need for more agricultural products, therefore more land for growing food, which leads to deforestation, which affects rainfall, and therefore the water supply which is in increased demand. Human ingenuity can reduce some shortages but generally doesn't keep up with increased demand for life-sustaining essentials. These problems require the concern of intergovernmental organizations, treaties and activities, as well as transnational corporations, and non-governmental and private, volunteer organizations. Next Dr. Diana Liverman of Pennsylvania State University spoke on human interactions regarding climate and society. She considered the effect of changes in land use on climate, using Mexico as an example. Mexicans changed from raising much wheat to raising more fruits and vegetables. This was in response to the demands of the market. The results were more industry, population growth, greater income, drought (because the new crops required more water), and conflicts over water supplies. Dr. Charles Kennel of the Office of Mission to Planet Earth joined Dr.s Cordova, Kates, and Liverman for the question and answer session that followed.

  12. [Cognitive reserve in substance addicts in treatment: relation to cognitive performance and activities of daily living].

    PubMed

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; Rojo-Mota, Gloria; Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M; Fernández-Méndez, Laura M; Morales-Alonso, Sara; Prieto-Hidalgo, Ana

    2014-12-01

    Introduccion. El concepto de reserva cognitiva ha ido ganando interes en la medida en que se ha acumulado evidencia sobre su relacion con la resistencia del cerebro a declinar en su funcionamiento ante amenazas o alteraciones neurologicas. Aunque se ha estudiado en un gran numero de alteraciones (degenerativas, traumaticas, psicopatologicas), pocos trabajos relacionan la reserva cognitiva con la adiccion a sustancias, un proceso multidimensional con clara base neurologica. Objetivo. Explorar la reserva cognitiva de pacientes en tratamiento por adiccion a drogas, relacionandolo con su rendimiento cognitivo en pruebas neuropsicologicas y en actividades de la vida diaria. Pacientes y metodos. Muestra de 57 pacientes en tratamiento por adiccion a sustancias en un centro especifico. Se administraron el cuestionario de reserva cognitiva, la evaluacion cognitiva de Montreal y el inventario de sintomas prefrontales, y se recogieron variables relacionadas con la adiccion. Resultados. Se encontro una relacion positiva entre la reserva cognitiva y el tiempo de abstinencia, y negativa con la gravedad de la adiccion. Aparecieron diferencias significativas segun la reserva cognitiva en rendimiento neuropsicologico (especialmente en ciertos dominios cognitivos) y en actividades cotidianas. Conclusiones. La reserva cognitiva aparece como una variable relacionada con la adiccion y los deficits cognitivos que la acompañan; resulta ser una potencial diana de las actividades rehabilitadoras, vinculada al paradigma de enriquecimiento ambiental, como estrategia para potenciar la resistencia frente al deterioro cognitivo que favorece y mantiene la adiccion y para disminuir el potencial reforzador de la conducta de consumo.

  13. Temporal changes of microRNA gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i expression in chickens challenged with subgroup J avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jun; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Huanmin; Li, Hongxin; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-02-11

    Two important microRNAs, gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i were examined for the relative expression in liver and bone marrow tissues from specific pathogen free chickens that were challenged either with GD1109 or NX0101 strain of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J). The GD1109 strain of ALV-J reportedly causes hemangioma (HE) and NX0101 reportedly causes myeloma (ML) in susceptible chickens. Temporal changes of both gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i expression in ALV-J infected chickens were observed in contrast to its counterpart of a non-infected negative control group of chickens (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01) during the first 120 days post infection. Use of the web-based computational DIANA-mirPath software (available at http://microrna.gr/mirpath ), it was predicted that both gga-let-7b and gga-let-7i were involved in multiple pathways including signaling pathways, such as MAPK, TGF-beta, Notch, Wnt, mTOR, Cell cycle, P53 and Jak-STAT. Combining our experimental data with reports on the microRNAs, we suggest that both gga-let-7i and gga-let-7b may also act as tumor suppressors in chicken, especially play a critical role in tumorigenesis induced by ALV-J.

  14. Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamzina, Diana

    Diana Gamzina March 2016 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Multiscale Thermo-Mechanical Design and Analysis of High Frequency and High Power Vacuum Electron Devices Abstract A methodology for performing thermo-mechanical design and analysis of high frequency and high average power vacuum electron devices is presented. This methodology results in a "first-pass" engineering design directly ready for manufacturing. The methodology includes establishment of thermal and mechanical boundary conditions, evaluation of convective film heat transfer coefficients, identification of material options, evaluation of temperature and stress field distributions, assessment of microscale effects on the stress state of the material, and fatigue analysis. The feature size of vacuum electron devices operating in the high frequency regime of 100 GHz to 1 THz is comparable to the microstructure of the materials employed for their fabrication. As a result, the thermo-mechanical performance of a device is affected by the local material microstructure. Such multiscale effects on the stress state are considered in the range of scales from about 10 microns up to a few millimeters. The design and analysis methodology is demonstrated on three separate microwave devices: a 95 GHz 10 kW cw sheet beam klystron, a 263 GHz 50 W long pulse wide-bandwidth sheet beam travelling wave tube, and a 346 GHz 1 W cw backward wave oscillator.

  15. Picasso Paintings, Moon Rocks, and Hand-Written Beatles Lyrics: Adults' Evaluations of Authentic Objects.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Brandy N; Gelman, Susan A; Wilson, Alice; Hood, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Authentic objects are those that have an historical link to a person, event, time, or place of some significance (e.g., original Picasso painting; gown worn by Princess Diana; your favorite baby blanket). The current study examines everyday beliefs about authentic objects, with three primary goals: to determine the scope of adults' evaluation of authentic objects, to examine such evaluation in two distinct cultural settings, and to determine whether a person's attachment history (i.e., whether or not they owned an attachment object as a child) predicts evaluation of authentic objects. We found that college students in the U.K. (N = 125) and U.S. (N = 119) consistently evaluate a broad range of authentic items as more valuable than matched control (inauthentic) objects, more desirable to keep, and more desirable to touch, though only non-personal authentic items were judged to be more appropriate for display in a museum. These patterns were remarkably similar across the two cultural contexts. Additionally, those who had an attachment object as a child evaluated objects more favorably, and in particular judged authentic objects to be more valuable. Altogether, these results demonstrate broad endorsement of "positive contagion" among college-educated adults.

  16. New 1π sr acceptance angle display-type ellipsoidal mesh analyzer for electron energy and two-dimensional angular distribution as well as imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László; Goto, Kentaro; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    We propose a Display-type Ellipsoidal Mesh Analyzer (DELMA) using a newly developed 1π sr wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens (WAAEL), energy aperture and some other electrostatic lenses [1-5]. It can display two-dimensional angular distributions of charged particles within the acceptance angle of ±60°, which is much larger than the largest acceptance angle range so far and comparable to the display-type spherical mirror analyzer (DIANA) developed by Daimon et al. [6,8-11]. It also has a focusing capability with 5 times magnification and ˜30 μm lateral resolution. The relative energy resolution is typically from 2 to 5×10-3 depending on the emission area of the sample, as well as on the diameter of energy aperture.Because this new analyzer has a function of low-magnification photoemission electron microscope, this instrument will be extended and applied as a new type Stereo-PEEM [7] in near future.

  17. Aneurysm miRNA Signature Differs, Depending on Disease Localization and Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Busch, Martin; Scholz, Claus-Jürgen; Kellersmann, Richard; Otto, Christoph; Chernogubova, Ekaterina; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zernecke, Alma; Lorenz, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Limited comprehension of aneurysm pathology has led to inconclusive results from clinical trials. miRNAs are key regulators of post-translational gene modification and are useful tools in elucidating key features of aneurysm pathogenesis in distinct entities of abdominal and popliteal aneurysms. Here, surgically harvested specimens from 19 abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 8 popliteal artery aneurysm (PAA) patients were analyzed for miRNA expression and histologically classified regarding extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammation. DIANA-based computational target prediction and pathway enrichment analysis verified our results, as well as previous ones. miRNA-362, -19b-1, -194, -769, -21 and -550 were significantly down-regulated in AAA samples depending on degree of inflammation. Similar or inverse regulation was found for miR-769, 19b-1 and miR-550, -21, whereas miR-194 and -362 were unaltered in PAA. In situ hybridization verified higher expression of miR-550 and -21 in PAA compared to AAA and computational analysis for target genes and pathway enrichment affirmed signal transduction, cell-cell-interaction and cell degradation pathways, in line with previous results. Despite the vague role of miRNAs for potential diagnostic and treatment purposes, the number of candidates from tissue signature studies is increasing. Tissue morphology influences subsequent research, yet comparison of distinct entities of aneurysm disease can unravel core pathways. PMID:26771601

  18. Venus - 3D Perspective View of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This computer-generated perspective view of Latona Corona and Dali Chasma on Venus shows Magellan radar data superimposed on topography. The view is from the northeast and vertical exaggeration is 10 times. Exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (i.e. faults and fractures) and topography. Latona Corona, a circular feature approximately 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) in diameter whose eastern half is shown at the left of the image, has a relatively smooth, radar-bright raised rim. Bright lines or fractures within the corona appear to radiate away from its center toward the rim. The rest of the bright fractures in the area are associated with the relatively deep (approximately 3 kilometers or 1.9 miles) troughs of Dali Chasma. The Dali and Diana Chasma system consist of deep troughs that extend for 7,400 kilometers (4,588 miles) and are very distinct features on Venus. Those chasma connect the Ovda and Thetis highlands with the large volcanoes at Atla Regio and thus are considered to be the 'Scorpion Tail' of Aphrodite Terra. The broad, curving scarp resembles some of Earth's subduction zones where crustal plates are pushed over each other. The radar-bright surface at the highest elevation along the scarp is similar to surfaces in other elevated regions where some metallic mineral such as pyrite (fool's gold) may occur on the surface.

  19. In Situ Boundary Layer Coral Metabolism in the Atlantic Ocean Acidification Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillis, Wade

    2013-04-01

    and Chris Langdon, Brice Loose, Dwight Gledhill, Diana Hsueh, Derek Manzello, Ian Enochs, Ryan Moyer We present net ecosystem productivity (nep) and net ecosystem calcification (nec) in coral and seagrass ecosystems using the boundary layer gradient flux technique (CROSS). Coastal anthropogenic inputs and changes in global ocean chemistry in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide has emerged in recent years as a topic of considerable concern. Coral reefs are particularly vulnerable from eroded environmental conditions including ocean acidification and water pollution. The Atlantic Ocean Acidification Testbed (AOAT) project monitors metabolism to ascertain the continuing health of coral reef ecosystems. The CROSS boundary layer nep/nec approach is one component of this diagnostic program. Certification of CROSS as an operational monitoring tool is underway in the AOAT. CROSS inspects a benthic community and measures productivity/respiration and calcification/dissolution over an area of 10 square meters. Being a boundary layer tool, advection and complex mesoscale flows are not a factor or concern and CROSS is autonomous and can be used at deep benthic sites. The interrogation area is not enclosed therefore exposed to ambient light, flow, and nutrient levels. CROSS is easy to deploy, unambiguous, and affordable. Repeated measurements have been made from 2011-2012 in reefal systems in La Parguera Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys, USA. Diurnal, seasonal and regional metabolism will be compared and discussed. The ability to accurately probe benthic ecosystems provides a powerful management and research tool to policy makers and researchers.

  20. Molecular diversity of Cotton leaf curl Gezira virus isolates and their satellite DNAs associated with okra leaf curl disease in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Okra leaf curl disease (OLCD) is a major constraint on okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) production and is widespread in Africa. Using a large number of samples representative of the major growing regions in Burkina Faso (BF), we show that the disease is associated with a monopartite begomovirus and satellite DNA complexes. Twenty-three complete genomic sequences of Cotton leaf curl Gezira virus (CLCuGV) isolates associated with OLCD, sharing 95 to 99% nucleotide identity, were cloned and sequenced. Six betasatellite and four alphasatellite (DNA-1) molecules were also characterized. The six isolates of betasatellite associated with CLCuGV isolates correspond to Cotton leaf curl Gezira betasatellite (CLCuGB) (88 to 98% nucleotide identity). One isolate of alphasatellite is a variant of Cotton leaf curl Gezira alphasatellite (CLCuGA) (89% nucleotide identity), whereas the three others isolates appear to correspond to a new species of alphasatellite (CLCuGA most similar sequence present 52 to 60% nucleotide identity), provisionally named Okra leaf curl Burkina Faso alphasatellite (OLCBFA). Recombination analysis of the viruses demonstrated the interspecies recombinant origin of all CLCuGV isolates, with parents being close to Hollyhock leaf crumple virus (AY036009) and Tomato leaf curl Diana virus (AM701765). Combined with the presence of satellites DNA, these results highlight the complexity of begomoviruses associated with OLCD. PMID:20178575

  1. Meeting report of the first conference of the International Placenta Stem Cell Society (IPLASS)

    PubMed Central

    Parolini, O.; Alviano, F.; Betz, A.G.; Bianchi, D.W.; Götherström, C.; Manuelpillai, U.; Mellor, A.L.; Ofir, R.; Ponsaerts, P.; Scherjon, S.A.; Weiss, M.L.; Wolbank, S.; Wood, K.J.; Borlongan, C.V.

    2012-01-01

    The International Placenta Stem Cell Society (IPLASS) was founded in June 2010. Its goal is to serve as a network for advancing research and clinical applications of stem/progenitor cells isolated from human term placental tissues, including the amnio-chorionic fetal membranes and Wharton's jelly. The commitment of the Society to champion placenta as a stem cell source was realized with the inaugural meeting of IPLASS held in Brescia, Italy, in October 2010. Officially designated as an EMBO-endorsed scientific activity, international experts in the field gathered for a 3-day meeting, which commenced with “Meet with the experts” sessions, IPLASS member and board meetings, and welcome remarks by Dr. Ornella Parolini, President of IPLASS. The evening's highlight was a keynote plenary lecture by Dr. Diana Bianchi. The subsequent scientific program consisted of morning and afternoon oral and poster presentations, followed by social events. Both provided many opportunities for intellectual exchange among the 120 multi-national participants. This allowed a methodical and deliberate evaluation of the status of placental cells in research in regenerative and reparative medicine. The meeting concluded with Dr. Parolini summarizing the meeting's highlights. This further prepared the fertile ground on which to build the promising potential of placental cell research. The second IPLASS meeting will take place in September 2012 in Vienna, Austria. This meeting report summarizes the thought-provoking lectures delivered at the first meeting of IPLASS. PMID:21575989

  2. Bio-informatic trends for the determination of miRNA-target interactions in mammals.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jonathon; Strauss, William M

    2007-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that regulate mRNAs through a sequence-specific mechanism. By virtue of their structure and mechanism of action, computational methods have been devised to investigate the encoding of miRNA genes and the targets of miRNA action. A variety of assumptions have predicated the implementation of these various computational solutions. Evolutionary sequence conservation, secondary structure, and folding energetics are some of the assumptions that have been used. The success of these different computational solutions has been evaluated for both elucidation of new miRNAs and deducing targets of miRNA action. While the focus is on search techniques for new miRNAs, we have compared the programs miRseeker, miRScan, PalGrade, ProMiR, and miRAlign as examples of implementation of these techniques. For these programs, a benchmark comparison between theoretical estimation and actual identification is possible. We have also compared the target prediction programs TargetScanS, PicTar, DIANA-microT, miRanda, and RNAhybrid. However, it is difficult to rigorously assess the benchmark performance of these programs due to the difficulty in confirming their theoretical predictions.

  3. Pharmaceuticals, alkylphenols and pesticides in Mediterranean coastal waters: Results from a pilot survey using passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munaron, Dominique; Tapie, Nathalie; Budzinski, Hélène; Andral, Bruno; Gonzalez, Jean-Louis

    2012-12-01

    21 pharmaceuticals, 6 alkylphenols and 27 hydrophilic pesticides and biocides were investigated using polar organic contaminant integrative samplers (POCIS) during a large-scale study of contamination of French Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine and transitional water-bodies, defined under the EU Water Framework Directive were monitored. Our results show that the French Mediterranean coastal waters were contaminated with a large range of emerging contaminants, detected at low concentrations during the summer season. Caffeine, carbamazepine, theophilline and terbutaline were detected with a detection frequency higher than 83% in the coastal waters sampled, 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), 4-tert-octylphenol (4-OP) and 4-nonylphenol diethoxylate (NP2EO) were detected in all coastal waters sampled, and diuron, terbuthylazine, atrazine, irgarol and simazine were detected in more than 77% of samples. For pharmaceuticals, highest time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations were measured for caffeine and carbamazepine (32 and 12 ng L-1, respectively). For alkylphenols, highest TWA concentrations were measured for 4-nonylphenol mono-ethoxylate and 4-nonylphenol (41 and 33 ng L-1, respectively), and for herbicides and biocides, they were measured for diuron and irgarol (33 and 2.5 ng L-1, respectively). Except for Diana lagoon, lagoons and semi-enclosed bays were the most contaminated areas for herbicides and pharmaceuticals, whilst, for alkylphenols, levels of contamination were similar in lagoons and coastal waters. This study demonstrates the relevance and utility of POCIS as quantitative tool for measuring low concentrations of emerging contaminants in marine waters.

  4. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-07-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  5. Picasso Paintings, Moon Rocks, and Hand-Written Beatles Lyrics: Adults’ Evaluations of Authentic Objects

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wilson, Alice; Hood, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Authentic objects are those that have an historical link to a person, event, time, or place of some significance (e.g., original Picasso painting; gown worn by Princess Diana; your favorite baby blanket). The current study examines everyday beliefs about authentic objects, with three primary goals: to determine the scope of adults’ evaluation of authentic objects, to examine such evaluation in two distinct cultural settings, and to determine whether a person’s attachment history (i.e., whether or not they owned an attachment object as a child) predicts evaluation of authentic objects. We found that college students in the U.K. (N = 125) and U.S. (N = 119) consistently evaluate a broad range of authentic items as more valuable than matched control (inauthentic) objects, more desirable to keep, and more desirable to touch, though only non-personal authentic items were judged to be more appropriate for display in a museum. These patterns were remarkably similar across the two cultural contexts. Additionally, those who had an attachment object as a child evaluated objects more favorably, and in particular judged authentic objects to be more valuable. Altogether, these results demonstrate broad endorsement of "positive contagion" among college-educated adults. PMID:20631919

  6. The social consequences of conspiracism: Exposure to conspiracy theories decreases intentions to engage in politics and to reduce one's carbon footprint.

    PubMed

    Jolley, Daniel; Douglas, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    The current studies explored the social consequences of exposure to conspiracy theories. In Study 1, participants were exposed to a range of conspiracy theories concerning government involvement in significant events such as the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. Results revealed that exposure to information supporting conspiracy theories reduced participants' intentions to engage in politics, relative to participants who were given information refuting conspiracy theories. This effect was mediated by feelings of political powerlessness. In Study 2, participants were exposed to conspiracy theories concerning the issue of climate change. Results revealed that exposure to information supporting the conspiracy theories reduced participants' intentions to reduce their carbon footprint, relative to participants who were given refuting information, or those in a control condition. This effect was mediated by powerlessness with respect to climate change, uncertainty, and disillusionment. Exposure to climate change conspiracy theories also influenced political intentions, an effect mediated by political powerlessness. The current findings suggest that conspiracy theories may have potentially significant social consequences, and highlight the need for further research on the social psychology of conspiracism.

  7. Using unsteady-state water level data to estimate channel roughness and discharge hydrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aricò, Costanza; Nasello, Carmelo; Tucciarelli, Tullio

    2009-08-01

    A novel methodology for simultaneous discharge and channel roughness estimation is developed and applied to data sets available at three experimental sites. The methodology is based on the synchronous measurement of water level data in two river sections far some kilometers from each other, as well as on the use of a diffusive flow routing solver and does not require any direct velocity measurement. The methodology is first analyzed for the simplest case of a channel with a large slope, where the kinematic assumption holds. A sensitivity and a model error analysis are carried out in this hypothesis in order to show the stability of the results with respect to the error in the input parameters in the case of homogeneous roughness and to analyze the effect of unknown roughness heterogeneity on the estimated discharges. The methodology is then extended to the more general case of channels with mild slope and validated using field data previously collected in three Italian rivers: the Arno (in Tuscany), the Tiber (in Latium) and the Vallo di Diana, a small tributary of the Tanagro river (in Southern Italy). The performance of the proposed algorithm has been investigated according to three performance criteria estimating the quality of the match between the measured and the computed stage and discharge hydrographs. Results of the field tests can be considered good, despite the uncertainties of the field data and of the measured values.

  8. Bond-slip behavior of CFRP plate-concrete interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, D. Y.; Park, S. K.; Hong, S. N.

    2011-11-01

    The paper deals with evaluation of the bond performance between a CFRP plate and concrete with respect to various compressive strengths of concrete and bond lengths of the CFRP plate as parameters. To consider stress conditions in the tensile zone of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, double-lap axial tension tests were conducted for eight specimens with CFRP plates bonded to concrete prisms. In addition, a simple linear bond-slip model for the CFRP plate/concrete joints, developed from the bond tests, was used. To verify the model proposed, a total of seven RC beams were strengthened with CFRP plates and tested in flexure employing various bond lengths, strengthening methods, and numbers of CFRP plates. A nonlinear finite-element analysis, with the bond-slip model incorporated in the DIANA program, was performed for the strengthened RC beams. Also, the results of flexural test and analytical predictions are found to be in close agreement in terms of yield and ultimate loads and ductility.

  9. The Sacred Mountain of Varallo in Italy: seismic risk assessment by acoustic emission and structural numerical models.

    PubMed

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Invernizzi, Stefano; Accornero, Federico

    2013-01-01

    We examine an application of Acoustic Emission (AE) technique for a probabilistic analysis in time and space of earthquakes, in order to preserve the valuable Italian Renaissance Architectural Complex named "The Sacred Mountain of Varallo." Among the forty-five chapels of the Renaissance Complex, the structure of the Chapel XVII is of particular concern due to its uncertain structural condition and due to the level of stress caused by the regional seismicity. Therefore, lifetime assessment, taking into account the evolution of damage phenomena, is necessary to preserve the reliability and safety of this masterpiece of cultural heritage. A continuous AE monitoring was performed to assess the structural behavior of the Chapel. During the monitoring period, a correlation between peaks of AE activity in the masonry of the "Sacred Mountain of Varallo" and regional seismicity was found. Although the two phenomena take place on very different scales, the AE in materials and the earthquakes in Earth's crust, belong to the same class of invariance. In addition, an accurate finite element model, performed with DIANA finite element code, is presented to describe the dynamic behavior of Chapel XVII structure, confirming visual and instrumental inspections of regional seismic effects.

  10. Two-dimensional 1H-NMR study of the spatial structure of neurotoxin II from Naja naja oxiana.

    PubMed

    Golovanov, A P; Lomize, A L; Arseniev, A S; Utkin, Y N; Tsetlin, V I

    1993-05-01

    The spatial structure of neurotoxin II from the venom of the central Asian cobra Naja naja oxiana was determined by two-dimensional 1H-NMR techniques and computational analysis. Nearly complete proton resonance assignments for 61 amino acid residues have been made using two-dimensional (2D) homonuclear total correlated spectroscopy, 2D homonuclear double-quantum-filtered correlated spectroscopy and 2D homonuclear NOE spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. The cross-peak volumes in NOESY spectra spin-spin coupling constants of vicinal protons NH-C alpha H and C alpha H-C beta H and the observation of slow deuterium exchange of amide protons were used to define local structure and a set of constraints for distance geometry program DIANA. The average root-mean-square deviations are 53 pm for backbone heavy atoms and 118 pm for all heavy atoms of 19 final neurotoxin II conformations. The spatial structure is characterized by a short double-stranded (residues 1-5 and 13-17) and a triple-stranded (residues 22-30, 33-41 and 50-54) antiparallel beta-sheets.

  11. [Neurological disorders and the blood-brain barrier. Strategies and limitations for drug delivery to the brain].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Alazne; Álvarez, Antonia; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-03-01

    Introduccion. La incidencia de enfermedades del sistema nervioso central (SNC) aumenta a causa del envejecimiento de la sociedad. Desgraciadamente, los tratamientos clasicos para tratarlas no resultan efectivos debido a la presencia de la barrera hematoencefalica. Objetivo. Abordar las propiedades de la barrera hematoencefalica que impiden el transporte de los farmacos al cerebro y las principales estrategias para tratar las afecciones neurologicas. Desarrollo. La barrera hematoencefalica esta compuesta principalmente por un endotelio vascular especializado y las celulas de la glia. Esta constituye una herramienta a disposicion del organismo para aislar al SNC del resto del cuerpo. Sin embargo, tambien supone un impedimento para que muchos farmacos alcancen su diana en el cerebro. Conclusiones. Para poder tratar las afecciones neurologicas, los farmacos deben ser capaces de alcanzar el cerebro. Los agentes terapeuticos pueden diseñarse para que sean capaces de atravesar esta barrera, o bien facilitar su entrada mediante el uso de sistemas de liberacion. Para evaluar la efectividad de los tratamientos dirigidos a enfermedades del SNC, se emplean los modelos animales de enfermedades neurologicas asi como modelos in vitro de barrera hematoencefalica.

  12. An alternative to fully coupled reactive transport simulations for long-term prediction of chemical reactions in complex geological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kempka, Thomas; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    uncertainty underlying the geochemical models. References [1] Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Kempka, T. Kühn, M. 2013. Evaluation of longterm mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: an integrative approach using geochemical modelling and reservoir simulation. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 19: 720-730, doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2013.05.014 [2] Kempka, T., Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Tillner, E. Kühn, M. 2013. Assessment of Long-term CO2 Trapping Mechanisms at the Ketzin Pilot Site (Germany) by Coupled Numerical Modelling. Energy Procedia 37: 5419-5426, doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2013.06.460 [3] Xu, T., Spycher, N., Sonnenthal, E., Zhang, G., Zheng, L., Pruess, K. 2010. TOUGHREACT Version 2.0: A simulator for subsurface reactive transport under non-isothermal multiphase flow conditions, Computers & Geosciences 37(6), doi:10.1016/j.cageo.2010.10.007

  13. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    ée. Some faults, located between Guadeloupe and Montserrat have throws up to thousand meters. Between St Lucia and Martinique, the St Lucia channel is crosscut by several normal faults with scarps up to 100m-high. These faults extend onshore and cut the southern shore of Martinique. Given their length (~20km), they could produce magnitude 6 or more earthquakes in the most tourist towns of the island (St Anne, St Lucie). Recent coseismic offsets could be identified along most faults in the chirp profiles. Turbidite deposits recognized in the Küllenberg cores could be related to damaging earthquakes. High resolution SAR imagery (25 cm) reveals several coseismic scarps in Les Saintes channel along the faults that ruptured in 2004. References: Feuillet, N., I. Manighetti, and P. Tapponnier, Arc parallel extension and localization of volcanic complexes in guadeloupe, lesser antilles, Journal of Geophysical Research, 107, 2002. Feuillet, N., P. Tapponnier, I. Manighetti, B. Villemant, and G. C. P. King, Differential uplift and tilt of pleistocene reef platforms and quaternary slip Lopez, A.M., S. Stein, T. Dixon, G. Sella, E. Calais, P. Jansma, J. Weber, and P. La Femina, Is there a northern lesser antilles forearc block ?, Geophysical Research Letters, 33, 2006.

  14. Tracing crustal and slab contributions to arc magmatism in the lesser antilles island arc using helium and carbon relationships in geothermal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, M. C.; Hilton, D. R.; Kreulen, R.

    1998-10-01

    We report helium and carbon isotope and CO 2/ 3He ratios from a regional survey of geothermal fluids from the Lesser Antilles island arc, an arc system where there is compelling geochemical evidence for the superimposition of a crustal component onto mantle-derived magmas. A predominant mantle helium isotope signature is observed throughout the arc. The highest ratios coincide with MORB helium (˜8R A where R A = air 3He/ 4He) and occur towards the centre of the arc (the islands of Martinique, Dominica, Guadeloupe, and Montserrat). In the south and north of the arc (Grenada, St. Vincent, St. Lucia in the south and Nevis and Saba in the north) 3He/ 4He ratios are lower and lie between 4.9 and 6.8R A. This regional variation is also apparent in the carbon isotope systematics: the central portion of the arc (Martinique to Montserrat) have δ 13C(CO 2) values between -2‰ and -4‰ (vs. PDB), heavier than the range observed in MORB (-4 to -9‰). The south of the arc (Grenada to St.Lucia) is characterized by MORB-like carbon isotope ratios (centred on -6‰). CO 2/ 3He ratios are significantly higher than the MORB value (˜2 × 10 9) for the entire arc. The values in the central islands fall close to 10 10 whereas the southern volcanoes have higher ratios between 10 10-10 13. Assuming the Lesser Antilles mantle wedge has a MORB-like helium and carbon composition our data can be explained by mixing of mantle wedge carbon with at least two other carbon components: an isotopically-heavy marine limestone endmember of slab-derivation and an isotopically-lighter component representing either slab-derived organic carbon and/or an upper crustal component with a large fraction of organic carbon. The helium-carbon systematics of the central portion of the arc are consistent with a large slab-derived marine limestone input to the carbon inventory, and we calculate a non-mantle:mantle carbon flux of 5.7:1. MORB-like helium isotope ratios, which are sensitive to perturbation by

  15. Verification of geomechanical integrity and prediction of long-term mineral trapping for the Ketzin CO2 storage pilot site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempka, Thomas; De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2014-05-01

    .1 %, respectively. We verified the mechanical integrity of the storage system during site operation and predicted the trapping mechanisms for the Ketzin pilot site based on a time-dependent integration of relevant processes for a time period of 16,000 years. Supported by our coupled modelling results, we conclude that CO2 storage at the Ketzin site is safe and reliable on the pilot scale. References [1] Martens, S., Kempka, T., Liebscher, A., Lüth, S., Möller, F., Myrttinen, A., Norden, B., Schmidt-Hattenberger, C., Zimmer, M., Kühn, M. Europe's longest-operating on-shore CO2 storage site at Ketzin, Germany: a progress report after three years of injection. Environmental Earth Sciences 2012 67(2): 323-334. [2] Kempka, T., Kühn, M. Numerical simulations of CO2 arrival times and reservoir pressure coincide with observations from the Ketzin pilot site, Germany. Environmental Earth Sciences 2013 70(8): 3675-3685. [3] Kempka, T., Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Tillner, E., Kühn, M. Assessment of Long-term CO2 Trapping Mechanisms at the Ketzin Pilot Site (Germany) by Coupled Numerical Modelling. Energy Procedia 2013 37: 5419-5426. [4] Klein, E., De Lucia, M., Kempka, T., Kühn, M. Evaluation of long-term mineral trapping at the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage: An integrative approach using geochemical modelling and reservoir simulation. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 2013 19: 720-730.

  16. Complex faulting associated with the 22 December 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon California, earthquake, aftershocks and postseismic surface deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaren, M.K.; Hardebeck, J.L.; van der Elst, N.; Unruh, J.R.; Bawden, G.W.; Blair, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    We use data from two seismic networks and satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery to characterize the 22 December 2003 Mw 6.5 San Simeon earthquake sequence. Absolute locations for the mainshock and nearly 10,000 aftershocks were determined using a new three-dimensional (3D) seismic velocity model; relative locations were obtained using double difference. The mainshock location found using the 3D velocity model is 35.704?? N, 121.096?? W at a depth of 9.7 ?? 0.7 km. The aftershocks concentrate at the northwest and southeast parts of the aftershock zone, between the mapped traces of the Oceanic and Nacimiento fault zones. The northwest end of the mainshock rupture, as defined by the aftershocks, projects from the mainshock hypocenter to the surface a few kilometers west of the mapped trace of the Oceanic fault, near the Santa Lucia Range front and the > 5 mm postseismic InSAR imagery contour. The Oceanic fault in this area, as mapped by Hall (1991), is therefore probably a second-order synthetic thrust or reverse fault that splays upward from the main seismogenic fault at depth. The southeast end of the rupture projects closer to the mapped Oceanic fault trace, suggesting much of the slip was along this fault, or at a minimum is accommodating much of the postseismic deformation. InSAR imagery shows ???72 mm of postseismic uplift in the vicinity of maximum coseismic slip in the central section of the rupture, and ???48 and ???45 mm at the northwest and southeast end of the aftershock zone, respectively. From these observations, we model a ???30-km-long northwest-trending northeast-dipping mainshock rupture surface - called the mainthrust - which is likely the Oceanic fault at depth, a ???10-km-long southwest-dipping backthrust parallel to the mainthrust near the hypocenter, several smaller southwest-dipping structures in the southeast, and perhaps additional northeast-dipping or subvertical structures southeast of the mainshock plane

  17. Complex geohazard susceptibility zoning for effective landuse planning and catastroph prevention in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hradecky, P.; Baron, I.

    2012-04-01

    The Czech Geological Survey conducted projects of geological mapping and complex geohazard susceptibility zoning in Nicaragua in the years 1997-2009. For selected areas in vicinity of major cities and towns basic geological maps at a scalle 1:50,000, maps of geomorphic features (Geomorphic Inventory Maps), Morphostructural Maps of estimated fault zones, and derived Geohazard Susceptibility maps were done. These maps were prepared during field campaigns by direct field mapping, analysis of remote-sensing data, communicating the local authorities, interwieving the local inhabitants and with very close cooperation with the local partner of the projects - the Instituto Nicaragüense de Estudios Territoriales (INETER). The resulting maps and explanatory reports presented the dangerous natural processes that occurred in each respective area in the past and proposed preventive measures in detail. Zones evaluated as highly susceptible, e.g., to (i) mass movements, (ii) large inundations, (iii) torrential flooding, (iv) seismogenic liquefaction, etc., were presented in bold colours on the maps. Such maps and reports were presented to local authorities and inhabitants of respective cities during public breefings at the end of each mapping campaign. In such a way, areas of Pacific volcanic ridge (1997-2003), Jinotega (2004), Somoto (2005), Estelí (2006), Boaco and Santa Lucia (2007, 2008), Sebaco (2008) and Jalapa (2009) were elaborated. The maps then served to the INETER for implementation into the landuse plans, evacuation routes and other preventive measures to protect and save human lives and inftrastructure. This approach could serve as a muster for a simple, cost effective and relatively fast geohazards susceptibility evaluation of any area in any developing country. The projects also paid attention to capacity building of our Nicaraguan partners. These projects of the Czech Geological Survey were conducted as the international aid of the Czech Republic to Nicaragua

  18. Absorption and scattering by interstellar dust in the silicon K-edge of GX 5-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeegers, S. T.; Costantini, E.; de Vries, C. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Chihara, H.; de Groot, F.; Mutschke, H.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Zeidler, S.

    2017-03-01

    Context. We study the absorption and scattering of X-ray radiation by interstellar dust particles, which allows us to access the physical and chemical properties of dust. The interstellar dust composition is not well understood, especially on the densest sight lines of the Galactic plane. X-rays provide a powerful tool in this study. Aims: We present newly acquired laboratory measurements of silicate compounds taken at the Soleil synchrotron facility in Paris using the Lucia beamline. The dust absorption profiles resulting from this campaign were used in this pilot study to model the absorption by interstellar dust along the line of sight of the low-mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Methods: The measured laboratory cross-sections were adapted for astrophysical data analysis and the resulting extinction profiles of the Si K-edge were implemented in the SPEX spectral fitting program. We derive the properties of the interstellar dust along the line of sight by fitting the Si K-edge seen in absorption in the spectrum of GX 5-1. Results: We measured the hydrogen column density towards GX 5-1 to be 3.40 ± 0.1 × 1022 cm-2. The best fit of the silicon edge in the spectrum of GX 5-1 is obtained by a mixture of olivine and pyroxene. In this study, our modeling is limited to Si absorption by silicates with different Mg:Fe ratios. We obtained an abundance of silicon in dust of 4.0 ± 0.3 × 10-5 per H atom and a lower limit for total abundance, considering both gas and dust of >4.4 × 10-5 per H atom, which leads to a gas to dust ratio of >0.22. Furthermore, an enhanced scattering feature in the Si K-edge may suggest the presence of large particles along the line of sight.

  19. Modelling the cosmological co-evolution of supermassive black holes and galaxies - I. BH scaling relations and the AGN luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marulli, Federico; Bonoli, Silvia; Branchini, Enzo; Moscardini, Lauro; Springel, Volker

    2008-04-01

    We model the cosmological co-evolution of galaxies and their central supermassive black holes (BHs) within a semi-analytical framework developed on the outputs of the Millennium Simulation. This model, described in detail by Croton et al. and De Lucia and Blaizot, introduces a `radio mode' feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) at the centre of X-ray emitting atmospheres in galaxy groups and clusters. Thanks to this mechanism, the model can simultaneously explain: (i) the low observed mass dropout rate in cooling flows; (ii) the exponential cut-off in the bright end of the galaxy luminosity function and (iii) the bulge-dominated morphologies and old stellar ages of the most massive galaxies in clusters. This paper is the first of a series in which we investigate how well this model can also reproduce the physical properties of BHs and AGN. Here we analyse the scaling relations, the fundamental plane and the mass function of BHs, and compare them with the most recent observational data. Moreover, we extend the semi-analytic model to follow the evolution of the BH mass accretion and its conversion into radiation, and compare the derived AGN bolometric luminosity function with the observed one. While we find for the most part a very good agreement between predicted and observed BH properties, the semi-analytic model underestimates the number density of luminous AGN at high redshifts, independently of the adopted Eddington factor and accretion efficiency. However, an agreement with the observations is possible within the framework of our model, provided it is assumed that the cold gas fraction accreted by BHs at high redshifts is larger than at low redshifts.

  20. Role of large flank-collapse events on magma evolution of volcanoes. Insights from the Lesser Antilles Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Villemant, Benoît; Friant, Anne Le; Paterne, Martine; Cortijo, Elsa

    2013-08-01

    Flank-collapse events are now recognized as common processes of destruction of volcanoes. They may occur several times on a volcanic edifice pulling out varying volumes of material from km3 to thousands of km3. In the Lesser Antilles Arc, a large number of flank-collapse events were identified. Here, we show that some of the largest events are correlated to significant variations in erupted magma compositions and eruptive styles. On Montagne Pelée (Martinique), magma production rate has been sustained during several thousand years following a 32 ka old flank-collapse event. Basic and dense magmas were emitted through open-vent eruptions that generated abundant scoria flows while significantly more acidic magmas were produced before the flank collapse. The rapid building of a new cone increased the load on magma bodies at depth and the density threshold. Magma production rate decreased and composition of the erupted products changed to more acidic compared to the preceding period of activity. These low density magma generated plinian and dome-forming eruptions up to the Present. In contrast at Soufrière Volcanic Centre of St. Lucia and at Pitons du Carbet in Martinique, the flank-collapses have an opposite effect: in both cases, the acidic magmas erupted immediately after the flank-collapses. These magmas are highly porphyritic (up to 60% phenocrysts) and much more viscous than the magmas erupted before the flank-collapses. They have been generally emplaced as voluminous and uptight lava domes (called “the Pitons”). Such magmas could not ascent without a significant decrease of the threshold effect produced by the volcanic edifice loading before the flank-collapse.

  1. Excitation of interstellar hydrogen chloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufild, David A.; Green, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    We have computed new rate coefficients for the collisional excitation of HCl by He, in the close-coupled formalism and using an interaction potential determined recently by Willey, Choong, & DeLucia. Results have been obtained for temperatures between 10 K and 300 K. With the use of the infinite order sudden approximation, we have derived approximate expressions of general applicability which may be used to estimate how the rate constant for a transition (J to J prime) is apportioned among the various hyperfine states F prime of the final state J prime. Using these new rate coefficients, we have obtained predictions for the HCl rotational line strengths expected from a dense clump of interstellar gas, as a function of the HCl fractional abundance. Over a wide range of HCl abundances, we have found that the line luminosities are proportional to abundance(exp 2/3), a general result which can be explained using a simple analytical approximation. Our model for the excitation of HCl within a dense molecular cloud core indicates that the J = 1 goes to 0 line strengths measured by Blake, Keene, & Phillips toward the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1) imply a fractional abundance n(HCl)/n(H2) approximately 2 x 10(exp -9), a value which amounts to only approximately 0.3% of the cosmic abundance of chlorine nuclei. Given a fractional abundance of 2 x 10(exp -9), the contribution of HCl emission to the total radiative cooling of a dense clump is small. For Orion, we predict a flux approximately 10(exp -19) W/sq cm for the HCl J = 3 goes to 2 line near 159.8 micrometers, suggesting that the strength of this line could be measured using the Infrared Space Observatory.

  2. A binational cohort study of intestinal colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis in patients admitted to rehabilitation centres.

    PubMed

    Adler, A; Baraniak, A; Izdebski, R; Fiett, J; Gniadkowski, M; Hryniewicz, W; Salvia, A; Rossini, A; Goossens, H; Malhotra, S; Lerman, Y; Elenbogen, M; Carmeli, Y

    2013-02-01

    The aims of our study were to analyse the risk factors for colonization by Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)-producing Proteus mirabilis (ESBL-PM) in rehabilitation patients and to characterize the molecular features of these strains. The study was conducted in two rehabilitation centres located in Rome, Italy (Fondazione Santa Lucia IRCCS (FSL)), and Tel-Aviv, Israel (Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (TASMC)). Carriage of ESBL-PM was surveyed by rectal swabs. Strain typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Identification of ESBL genes was done by PCR and sequencing. Patients admitted to the same institutions without ESBL carriage were included as controls. The study group included 70 and 41 patients from FSL and TASMC, respectively. In FSL, the multivariate analysis identified severe acute brain injury (OR = 15, 95% CI = 3.2-69.5, p 0.001), decubitus ulcer (OR = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.2-9.8, p 0.018) and recent treatment with quinolones (OR = 5.7, 95% CI = 1.07-30.1, p 0.042) as independent risk factors. ESBL-PM carriers stayed longer in the hospital on average and were less likely to be discharged home. No significant risk factor was identified in TASMC. There were no similarities in PFGE types or ESBL genes between the ESBL-PM isolates from the two institutions. In both hospitals, a variety of PFGE types existed but a single ESBL type predominated, namely TEM-92 in FSL (n = 64/70; 91%) and CTX-M-2 in TASMC (n = 37/41; 90%). A new TEM ESBL variant, TEM-177 was identified in FSL. The clonal diversity and the predominance of a single ESBL type suggested that horizontal gene transfer played an important role in dissemination of resistance. The development of a population analysis tool that would allow tracing deeper genetic relationships is required.

  3. Chemical Cues Released by an Alien Invasive Aquatic Gastropod Drive Its Invasion Success

    PubMed Central

    Raw, Jacqueline L.; Miranda, Nelson A. F.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chemical cues provide aquatic organisms with sensory information that guides behavioural responses and thus interactions among themselves, each other and the environment. Chemical cues are considered important for predator avoidance, foraging, larval settlement and broadcast spawning in aquatic environments. However, the significance of their role as drivers of direct interactions between heterospecifics has been largely overlooked. Methodology/Principal Findings A video camera and a demarcated arena were used in situ to record behavioural responses of three native gastropod species, Assiminea cf. capensis, Melanoides tuberculata and Coriandria durbanensis, exposed to treatments representing chemical cues released by a non-native invasive gastropod, Tarebia granifera. The responses were measured quantitatively as displacement and orientation of movement at locations in St Lucia Estuary, within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the east coast of South Africa. All native gastropods exhibited a negative taxis response to chemical cues released by T. granifera, while T. granifera individuals responded randomly to conspecifics. Displacement was measured relative to the source of the extract, the number of steps taken were determined with path analysis and orientation was determined from the mean (±95% CIs) turning angles, with significant negative turning angles representing negative taxis. Responses to treatments corresponding to the environment and conspecifics were random and undirected, indicating kinesis. Conclusion/Significance This study presents evidence for interactions driven by chemical cues between a non-native invasive gastropod and several gastropods native to South Africa. The results indicate that chemical cues can facilitate invasion success as the behavioural response of native gastropods is to move away allowing additional food and space resources to become available to T. granifera. PMID:23691151

  4. The morphology, processes, and evolution of Monterey Fan: a revisit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Field, Michael E.; Masson, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-range (GLORIA) and mid-range (TOBI) sidescan imagery and seismic-reflection profiles have revealed the surface morphology and architecture of the complete Monterey Fan. The fan has not developed a classic wedge shape because it has been blocked for much of its history by Morro Fracture Zone. The barrier has caused the fan to develop an upper-fan and lower-fan sequence that are distinctly different from one another. The upper-fan sequence is characterized by Monterey and Ascension Channels and associated Monterey Channel-levee system. The lower-fan sequence is characterized by depositional lobes of the Ascension, Monterey, and Sur-Parkington-Lucia systems, with the Monterey depositional lobe being the youngest. Presently, the Monterey depositional lobe is being downcut because the system has reached a new, lower base level in the Murray Fracture Zone. A five-step evolution of Monterey Fan is presented, starting with initial fan deposition in the Late Miocene, about 5.5 Ma. This first stage was one of filling bathymetric lows in the oceanic basement in what was to become the upper-fan segment. The second stage involved filling the bathymetric low on the north side of Morro Fracture Zone, and probably not much sediment was transported beyond the fracture zone. The third stage witnessed sediment being transported around both ends of Morro Fracture Zone and initial sedimentation on the lower-fan segment. During the fourth stage Ascension Channel was diverted into Monterey Channel, thereby cutting off sedimentation to the Ascension depositional lobe.

  5. Record of Plio-Pleistocene extreme event in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc basin. Example of Grande-Terre (Guadeloupe, French West Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanlèn, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Randrianasolo, A.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Cornée, J. J.; Münch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Guadeloupe archipelago is part of the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc and is therefore subjected to both enhanced seismic and volcanic activity related to the Lesser Antilles subduction zone, along which the Atlantic plate is subducted westward bellow the Caribbean plate. The volcanic arc is composed of several immerged volcanic islands (St Kitts, Nevis Montserrat, Basse Terre, Dominica, Martinique, St Lucia, Grenada) and submerged volcanoes (Kick em'Jenny). These volcanoes are known to be explosives and when they are entering in an eruptive cycle, debris flow could potentially initiate a tsunami and generate peculiar deposits within the sedimentary record recognized as tsunami deposits (or tsunamite). Subduction- related earthquakes might also initiate slope instabilities and trigger debris flow. Another controlling factor of slope (in-)-stabilities and debris flow is massive rainfalls. During cyclonic season (June to December), massive rainfalls are recorded in the area, which moreover is located on the trajectory of Atlantic Hurricanes that are responsible for numerous landslides. As a consequence, tsunami deposit are described and well studied in the Lesser Antilles arc as the islands shoreline and coastal plain are perpetually re-shaped by hurricanes responsible for tempestite deposits. However, the report of these deposit concern recent to actual events, for example present-day deposits consisting of large (metric) boulders, more or less aligned, located in the supralittoral fringe can be observed along Guadeloupe shore. In this study, we investigate the Plio-pleistocene sedimentary sequence of Grande Terre carbonate platform (Guadeloupe), and track the presence of such extreme-event related deposits and discuss our findings in the frame of the Lesser Antilles geological context.

  6. An anthropological genetic perspective on Creolization in the Anglophone Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jada Benn; Stone, Anne C; Kittles, Rick

    2013-05-01

    Variable socio-cultural influences developed in the colonial Caribbean as a result of competing European hegemonic rule. In this study, we examine how colonial regulations regarding social hierarchies and mate choice worked to influence the genetic landscape of contemporary African Caribbean populations. To this end, 420 individuals from Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Thomas, St. Vincent, Jamaica, and Trinidad were genotyped for 105 autosomal ancestry informative markers. Based on these data, population substructure and admixture were assessed using an exact test, a model-based clustering method, and principal components analysis. On average, individual admixture estimates of the pooled African Caribbean sample were 77% (SD ± 18%) West African, 15% (SD ± 15%) European, and 7.7% (SD ± 8%) Native American. In general, ancestry estimates were significantly different between Dominica and all other islands. Genetic structure analyses indicated subdivision into two subpopulations on most islands. Finally, unlike all of the other Caribbean populations that clustered adjacent to African populations, the Dominican population was more intermediate between the three parental groups in the principal components plot. As a result of the significant French influence throughout Dominican history, Dominica did not have the same cultural influences that typified other Anglophone colonies. Consequently, there were different social hierarchies and resulting mate choices on Dominica compared with the other considered islands. This study highlights the complex socio-cultural history of a broad region of the Caribbean and attests to the interplay between social and biological factors in shaping the genetic diversity present in present-day communities.

  7. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures.

    PubMed

    Friggens, Megan M; Finch, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy's warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be used

  8. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Prospero, J.M.; Carey, S.N.

    2007-01-01

    We studied soils on high-purity limestones of Quaternary age on the western Atlantic Ocean islands of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from the islands of Dominica and St. Lucia (somewhat farther from Barbados), the fine-grained component of distal loess from the lower Mississippi River Valley, and wind-transported dust from Africa. These four parent materials can be differentiated using trace elements (Sc, Cr, Th, and Zr) and rare earth elements that have minimal mobility in the soil-forming environment. Barbados soils have compositions that indicate a complex derivation. Volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent appears to have been the most important influence, but African dust is a significant contributor, and even Mississippi River valley loess may be a very minor contributor to Barbados soils. Soils on the Florida Keys and islands in the Bahamas appear to have developed mostly from African dust, but Mississippi River valley loess may be a significant contributor. Our results indicate that inputs of African dust are more important to the genesis of soils on islands in the western Atlantic Ocean than previously supposed. We hypothesize that African dust may also be a major contributor to soils on other islands of the Caribbean and to soils in northern South America, central America, Mexico, and the southeastern United States. Dust inputs to subtropical and tropical soils in this region increase both nutrient-holding capacity and nutrient status and thus may be critical in sustaining vegetation. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Spectrum of Methyl Formate Between 214 and 265 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, James P.; Fortman, Sarah; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2015-06-01

    We have studied methyl formate, one of the so-called 'astronomical weeds', in the 214--265 GHz band. We have experimentally gathered a set of intensity calibrated, complete, and temperature resolved spectra from across the astronomically significant temperature range of 248--406 K. Using our previously reported method of analysis, the point by point method, we are capable of generating the complete spectrum at an arbitrary temperature. Thousands of lines, of nontrivial intensity, which were previously not included in the available astrophysical catalogs have been found. The sensitivity of the point by point analysis is such that we are able to identify lines which would not have manifest in a single scan across the band. The consequence has been to reveal not only a number of new methyl formate lines, but also trace amounts of contaminants. We show how the intensities from the contaminants can be removed with indiscernible impact on the signal from methyl formate. To do this we use the point by point results from our previous studies of these contaminants. The efficacy of this process serves as strong proof of concept for usage of our point by point results on the problem of the 'weeds'. The success of this approach for dealing with the weeds has also previously been reported. J.~McMillan, S.~Fortman, C.~Neese, F.~DeLucia, ApJ. 795, 56 (2014) S.~Fortman, J.~McMillan, C.~Neese, S.~Randall, and A.~Remijan, J.~Mol.~Spectrosc. 280, 11 (2012).

  10. Selected parameters of immunological response in hop growers during the period of intensive application of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Tokarska-Rodak, Małgorzata; Toś-Luty, Sabina; Haratym-Maj, Agnieszka

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was determination of selected parameters of immunological response among hop growers and farmers in conditions of intensive exposure to means of plant protection. Survey data was collected from 238 males aged 25-70 living in the area of Wilków near Puławy (Lublin Region). Control group were males from the area of Witoszyn (Lublin Region)--53 people aged 25-70 occupied mainly with land cultivation. Based on an environmental survey conducted among hop growers and farmers, the respondents were divided into 3 age groups: 25-40, 41-55 and 56-70. Laboratory tests covered the determination of selected morphological parameters, phagocytic test, NBT test, and myeloperoxidasis (MPO) concentration in blood serum of hop growers and farmers.A significant decrease was noted in the number of platelets in the general population of hop growers and in individual age groups, compared to the control groups of farmers. Analysis of individual sub-populations of leukocytes showed a significantly higher number statistically of basophils and lymphocytes among hop growers, compared to farmers. A detailed analysis of the degree of phagocytic and bactericidal activity of neutrophils allowed us to presume that during the period of spraying there occurred a mobilisation of the granulocytic system, manifested by the presence of over 90% of neutrophils of intensified phagocytic activity, and 20% of neutrophils of intensified bactericidal activity. The preparations prepared by the routine NBT test method were analysed with the use of LUCIA computer programme (version 4.51). The analysis of the level of MPO in blood serum in the populations examined showed the presence of statistically significant differences. In hop growers, the MPO level was significantly higher statistically (60.0 ng/ml), compared to the control group of farmers (43.4 ng/ml).

  11. Bioclimatic comfort and the thermal perceptions and preferences of beach tourists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutty, Michelle; Scott, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The largest market segment of global tourism is coastal tourism, which is strongly dependent on the destination's thermal climate. To date, outdoor bioclimatic comfort assessments have focused exclusively on local residents in open urban areas, making it unclear whether outdoor comfort is perceived differently in non-urban environments or by non-residents (i.e. tourists) with different weather expectations and activity patterns. This study provides needed insight into the perception of outdoor microclimatic conditions in a coastal environment while simultaneously identifying important psychological factors that differentiate tourists from everyday users of urban spaces. Concurrent micrometeorological measurements were taken on several Caribbean beaches in the islands of Barbados, Saint Lucia and Tobago, while a questionnaire survey was used to examine the thermal comfort of subjects ( n = 472). Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) conditions of 32 to 39 °C were recorded, which were perceived as being "slightly warm" or "warm" by respondents. Most beach users (48 to 77 %) would not change the thermal conditions, with some (4 to 15 %) preferring even warmer conditions. Even at UTCI of 39 °C, 62 % of respondents voted for no change to current thermal conditions, with an additional 10 % stating that they would like to feel even warmer. These results indicate that beach users' thermal preferences are up to 18 °C warmer than the preferred thermal conditions identified in existing outdoor bioclimatic studies from urban park settings. This indicates that beach users hold fundamentally different comfort perceptions and preferences compared to people using urban spaces. Statistically significant differences ( p ≤ .05) were also recorded for demographic groups (gender, age) and place of origin (climatic region).

  12. Snake venomics of the Lesser Antillean pit vipers Bothrops caribbaeus and Bothrops lanceolatus: correlation with toxicological activities and immunoreactivity of a heterologous antivenom.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, José María; Sanz, Libia; Escolano, José; Fernández, Julián; Lomonte, Bruno; Angulo, Yamileth; Rucavado, Alexandra; Warrell, David A; Calvete, Juan J

    2008-10-01

    The venom proteomes of the snakes Bothrops caribbaeus and Bothrops lanceolatus, endemic to the Lesser Antillean islands of Saint Lucia and Martinique, respectively, were characterized by reverse-phase HPLC fractionation, followed by analysis of each chromatographic fraction by SDS-PAGE, N-terminal sequencing, MALDI-TOF mass fingerprinting, and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides. The venoms contain proteins belonging to seven ( B. caribbaeus) and five ( B. lanceolatus) types of toxins. B. caribbaeus and B. lanceolatus venoms contain phospholipases A 2, serine proteinases, l-amino acid oxidases and zinc-dependent metalloproteinases, whereas a long disintegrin, DC-fragments and a CRISP molecule were present only in the venom of B. caribbaeus, and a C-type lectin-like molecule was characterized in the venom of B. lanceolatus. Compositional differences between venoms among closely related species from different geographic regions may be due to evolutionary environmental pressure acting on isolated populations. The venoms of these two species differed in the composition and the relative abundance of their component toxins, but they exhibited similar toxicological and enzymatic profiles in mice, characterized by lethal, hemorrhagic, edema-forming, phospholipase A 2 and proteolytic activities. The venoms of B. caribbaeus and B. lanceolatus are devoid of coagulant and defibrinogenating effects and induce only mild local myotoxicity in mice. The characteristic thrombotic effect described in human envenomings by these species was not reproduced in the mouse model. The toxicological profile observed is consistent with the abundance of metalloproteinases, PLA 2s and serine proteinases in the venoms. A polyvalent (Crotalinae) antivenom produced in Costa Rica was able to immunodeplete approximately 80% of the proteins from both B. caribbaeus and B. lanceolatus venoms, and was effective in neutralizing the lethal, hemorrhagic, phospholipase

  13. What do simulations predict for the galaxy stellar mass function and its evolution in different environments?

    SciTech Connect

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Bundy, Kevin; More, Surhud; De Lucia, Gabriella; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Calvi, Rosa

    2014-06-10

    We present a comparison between the observed galaxy stellar mass function and the one predicted from the De Lucia and Blaizot semi-analytic model applied to the Millennium Simulation, for cluster satellites and galaxies in the field (meant as a wide portion of the sky, including all environments), in the local universe (z ∼ 0.06), and at intermediate redshift (z ∼ 0.6), with the aim to shed light on the processes which regulate the mass distribution in different environments. While the mass functions in the field and in its finer environments (groups, binary, and single systems) are well matched in the local universe down to the completeness limit of the observational sample, the model overpredicts the number of low-mass galaxies in the field at z ∼ 0.6 and in clusters at both redshifts. Above M {sub *} = 10{sup 10.25} M {sub ☉}, it reproduces the observed similarity of the cluster and field mass functions but not the observed evolution. Our results point out two shortcomings of the model: an incorrect treatment of cluster-specific environmental effects and an overefficient galaxy formation at early times (as already found by, e.g., Weinmann et al.). Next, we consider only simulations. Also using the Guo et al. model, we find that the high-mass end of the mass functions depends on halo mass: only very massive halos host massive galaxies, with the result that their mass function is flatter. Above M {sub *} = 10{sup 9.4} M {sub ☉}, simulations show an evolution in the number of the most massive galaxies in all environments. Mass functions obtained from the two prescriptions are different, however, results are qualitatively similar, indicating that the adopted methods to model the evolution of central and satellite galaxies still have to be better implemented in semi-analytic models.

  14. An international campaign of the 19th century to determine the solar parallax. The US Naval expedition to the southern hemisphere 1849-1852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrimpf, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    In 1847 Christian Ludwig Gerling, Marburg (Germany), suggested the solar parallax to be determined by measuring the position of Venus close to its inferior conjunction, especially at the stationary points, from observatories on nearly the same meridian but widely differing in latitude. James M. Gilliss, astronomer at the newly founded U.S. Naval Observatory, enthusiastically adopted this idea and procured a grant for the young astronomical community of the United States for an expedition to Chile. There they were to observe several conjunctions of Venus and oppositions of Mars, while the accompanying measurements were to be taken at the US Naval Observatory in Washington D.C. and the Harvard College Observatory at Cambridge, USA. This expedition was supported by A.V. Humboldt, C.F. Gauß, J.F. Encke, S.C. Walker, A.D. Bache, B. Peirce and others. From 1849 to 1852 not only were astronomical, but also meteorological and magnetic observations and measurements recorded, mainly in Santa Lucia close to Santiago, Chile. By comparing these measurements with those taken simultaneously at other observatories around the world the solar parallax could be calculated, although incomplete data from the corresponding northern observatories threatened the project's success. In retrospect this expedition can be recognized as the foundation of the Chilean astronomy. The first director of the new National Astronomical Observatory of Chile was Dr. C.W. Moesta, a Hessian student of Christian Ludwig Gerling's. The exchange of data between German, American and other astronomers during this expedition was well mediated by J.G. Flügel, consul of the United States of America and representative of the Smithsonian Institution in Europe, who altogether played a major role in nurturing the relationship between the growing scientific community in the U.S. and the well established one in Europe at that time.

  15. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures

    PubMed Central

    Friggens, Megan M.; Finch, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy’s warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be

  16. HIV Viral Load Trends in Six Eastern Caribbean Countries Utilizing a Regional Laboratory Referral Service: Implications for Treatment as Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Landis, R. Clive; Carmichael-Simmons, Kelly; Hambleton, Ian R.; Best, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since 2009, seven countries in the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), Antigua & Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincent & the Grenadines, have been utilizing a laboratory referral service for HIV-1 viral load (VL) offered by The Ladymeade Reference Unit (LRU) Laboratory, Barbados. The objective of this study was to evaluate 5 year VL trends in the six larger OECS countries participating in this regional referral service. Methods Blood samples were collected in source countries and transported to Barbados as frozen plasma according to a standardized protocol. Plasma specimens were amplified by RT PCR on a Roche TaqMan 48 analyser (Roche Diagnostics, Panama City, Panama). VL was considered optimally suppressed below a threshold level of < 200 HIV-1 copies/mL of blood. The same threshold was used as a binary indicator in an analysis of the secular change in VL suppression. Montserrat was excluded due to insufficient number of samples. Results A steady rise in VL referrals from OECS countries was recorded, rising from 312 samples in 2009 to 1,060 samples in 2013. A total of 3,543 samples were tested, with a sample rejection rate (9.2%) mostly due to breaks in the cold chain. Aggregate VL data showed the odds of VL suppression in the Eastern Caribbean improved by 66% for each additional year after 2009 (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.46 to 1.88]; p<0.001). Conclusion We demonstrate the feasibility of establishing a regional laboratory referral service for HIV VL monitoring in the Eastern Caribbean. Aggregate VL trends showed a significant year-on-year improvement in VL suppression, implying public health benefits through treatment as prevention in the OECS. VL provides a powerful monitoring & evaluation tool for strengthening HIV programs at country level among the small island states participating in this regional referral network. PMID:25923741

  17. Stratigraphy of Pyroclastic Deposits of EL Aguajito Caldera, Baja California Sur, MÉXICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio Ocampo, L. S.; Macias, J. L.; García Sánchez, L.; Pola, A.; Saucedo, R.; Sánchez, J. M.; Avellán, D. R.; Cardona, S.; Reyes-Agustín, G.; Arce, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    El Aguajito caldera is located in the State of Baja California Sur, it comprises an area of 450 km2 and sits within the Santa Rosalía Basin which is controlled by NE-SW extensional structures and the NW-SE Cimarron Fault that transects the caldera structure. The oldest rocks are ~90 Ma granodiorites covered by an Oligocene-Miocene volcano-sedimentary sequence, the Miocene Santa Lucia Formation and La Esperanza basalt. Pliocene volcanism is represented by La Reforma caldera, El Aguajito caldera, and the Tres Vírgenes Volcanic complex. This study focuses on the cartography and stratigraphy of area in order to understand the evolution of the volcanic system. The stratigraphy from base to top consists of a series of shallow marine sediments (fossiliferous sandstones) covered by a thick sequence of ignimbrites and pyroclastic flows interbedded with volcaniclastic deposits (Gloria and El Infierno Formations). On top of these deposits is El Aguajito caldera, it consists of a 2 m thick pumice fallout followed by an ignimbrite with three transitional lithofacies: a ≤30-m thick light-pink pyroclastic flow enriched in pumice at the base that gradually becomes enrich in lithics towards the top with the occurrence of degasing pipes. On top rests a 15 m-thick light-purple ignimbrite slightly welded with fiammes and a sequence of pumiceous pyroclastic flows and fallouts. These deposits have been associate to the caldera formation with a collapse diameter of ~8 km marked by rhyolitic domes exposed along a ring collapse crowned the sequence as well as NW-SE aligned rhyolitic domes parallel to the seashore. This cartography allowed to present a preliminary new geological map with four stratigraphic units recognized so far, that were emplaced under subaerial conditions beginning with a Plinian column followed by the emplacement of El Aguajito ignimbrite with its subsequent caldera collapse and finally the extrusion of resurgent domes.

  18. Influence of buffer species on the thermodynamics of short DNA duplex melting: sodium phosphate versus sodium cacodylate.

    PubMed

    Alemayehu, Saba; Fish, Daniel J; Brewood, Greg P; Horne, M Todd; Manyanga, Fidelis; Dickman, Rebekah; Yates, Ian; Benight, Albert S

    2009-03-05

    Thermodynamic parameters of the melting transitions of 53 short duplex DNAs were experimentally evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry melting curve analysis. Solvents for the DNA solutions contained approximately 1 M Na+ and either 10 mM cacodylate or phosphate buffer. Thermodynamic parameters obtained in the two solvent environments were compared and quantitatively assessed. Thermodynamic stabilities (deltaG(o) (25 degrees C)) of the duplexes studied ranged from quite stable perfect match duplexes (approximately -30 kcal/mol) to relatively unstable mismatch duplexes (approximately -9 kcal/mol) and ranged in length from 18 to 22 basepairs. A significant difference in stability (average free energy difference of approximately 3 kcal/mol) was found for all duplexes melted in phosphate (greater stability) versus cacodylate buffers. Measured effects of buffer species appear to be relatively unaffected by duplex length or sequence content. The popular sets of published nearest-neighbor (n-n) stability parameters for Watson-Crick (w/c) and single-base mismatches were evaluated from melting studies performed in cacodylate buffer (SantaLucia and Hicks, Annu. Rev. Biophys. Biomol. Struct. 2004, 33, 415). Thus, when using these parameters to make predictions of sequence dependent stability of DNA oligomers in buffers other than cacodylate (e.g., phosphate) one should be mindful that in addition to sodium ion concentration, the type of buffer species also provides a minor but significant contribution to duplex stability. Such considerations could potentially influence results of sequence dependent analysis using published n-n parameters and impact results of thermodynamic calculations. Such calculations and analyses are typically employed in the design and interpretation of DNA multiplex hybridization experiments.

  19. Microwave Spectroscopy of Trans-Ethyl Methyl Ether in the Ground State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Sakai, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shozo; Miyamoto, Taihei; Fujitake, Masaharu; Ohashi, Nobukimi

    2013-06-01

    The trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) has two inequivalent methyl group internal rotors which corresponds to the two vibrational motions, ν_{28} and ν_{29}. Due to these internal rotations, a rotational transition could be split into maximum five components. The skeletal torsion (ν_{30}) is another low-lying state (ν_{30}) that interacts with the ν_{28} and ν_{29} modes. The microwave spectra of the trans-ethyl methyl ether molecule in the ν_{28} = 1, ν_{29} = 1, and ν_{30} = 1, 2 and 3 have been extensively studied by using Hougen's tunneling matrix formalism. The microwave spectroscopy in the ground state was studied by several groups. The splitting due to the ν_{28} mode (C-CH_3 internal rotation) is small in the ground state and was not fully resolved in most of the previous studied rotational transitions. In this paper, we report the results of the pulsed nozzle-jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy so as to measure the fully resolved spectra. The submillmeter wave spectroscopy was also carried out. Our analysis including the previously reported transitions would be useful for astronomical observations. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, N. Mori, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc. {269}, 242 2011. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc. {255}, 164 2009. K. Kobayashi, T. Matsui, N. Mori, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi J. Mol. Spectrosc.{251}, 301 2008. K. Kobayashi, K. Murata, S. Tsunekawa, and N. Ohashi Int. Symposium on Mol. Spectrosc., 65th Meeting TH15 2010.} M. Hayashi, and K. Kuwada J. Mol. Structure {28}, 147 1975. M. Hayashi, and M. Adachi J. Mol. Structure {78}, 53 1982. S. Tsunekawa, Y. Kinai, Y. Kondo, H. Odashima, and K. Takagi Molecules {8}, 103 2003. U. Fuchs, G. Winnewisser, P. Groner, F. C. De Lucia, and E. Herbst Astrophys. J. Suppl. {144}, 277 2003.

  20. Numerical Calculation of Neoclassical Distribution Functions and Current Profiles in Low Collisionality, Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Lyons, S.C. Jardin, and J.J. Ramos

    2012-06-28

    A new code, the Neoclassical Ion-Electron Solver (NIES), has been written to solve for stationary, axisymmetric distribution functions (f ) in the conventional banana regime for both ions and elec trons using a set of drift-kinetic equations (DKEs) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. Solvability conditions on the DKEs determine the relevant non-adiabatic pieces of f (called h ). We work in a 4D phase space in which Ψ defines a flux surface, θ is the poloidal angle, v is the total velocity referenced to the mean flow velocity, and λ is the dimensionless magnetic moment parameter. We expand h in finite elements in both v and λ . The Rosenbluth potentials, φ and ψ, which define the integral part of the collision operator, are expanded in Legendre series in cos χ , where χ is the pitch angle, Fourier series in cos θ , and finite elements in v . At each ψ , we solve a block tridiagonal system for hi (independent of fe ), then solve another block tridiagonal system for he (dependent on fi ). We demonstrate that such a formulation can be accurately and efficiently solved. NIES is coupled to the MHD equilibrium code JSOLVER [J. DeLucia, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 37 , pp 183-204 (1980).] allowing us to work with realistic magnetic geometries. The bootstrap current is calculated as a simple moment of the distribution function. Results are benchmarked against the Sauter analytic formulas and can be used as a kinetic closure for an MHD code (e.g., M3D-C1 [S.C. Jardin, et al ., Computational Science & Discovery, 4 (2012).]).

  1. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    Lucia last year at the final meeting in Columbus - is what problems can we solve when real, fully capable spectrometers become essentially free to build?

  2. The Complete, Temperature Resolved Experimental Spectrum of Methanol Between 560 and 654 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2013-06-01

    The complete spectrum of methanol (CH_3OH) in the 560.4-654.0 GHz spectral region has been characterized over a range of astrophysically significant temperatures, 248-397 K. Analysis of experimental spectra recorded with absolute intensity calibration over a slow temperature ramp provides a means for the simulation of the spectrum as a function of temperature without a complete quantum mechanical (QM) model. These results include contributions from v_t = 3 and other higher states that are difficult to model via QM techniques. They also contain contributions from the ^{13}C isotopologue in natural abundance. These results are used to both provide catalogs in the usual line frequency, linestrength, and lower state energy format and in a frequency point-by-point format that is particularly well suited for the characterization of blended lines. In contrast to our earlier work on the semi-rigid species ethyl cyanide and vinyl cyanide, significant intensity difference between these experimental values and those calculated by QM methods were found for some of the lines. Analysis of these differences points to the difficulty of the calculation of dipole matrix elements in the context of the internal rotation of the methanol molecule. We will compare our experimental intensities with the most recent QM model, as well as an earlier QM model that includes the variation of the dipole moment function with the torsional angle. S. M. Fortman, I. R. Medvedev, C. F. Neese, and F. C. De Lucia, Astrophys. J. 737, 20/1-6 (2011). L.-H. Xu, et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 305-313 (2008). M. A. Mekhtiev, P. D. Godfrey, and J. T. Hougen, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 194, 171-178 (1999).

  3. The countries and languages that dominate biological research at the beginning of the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Monge-Nájera, Julian; Nielsen, Vanessa

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, studies of scientific productivity are biased in two ways: they are based on Current Contents, an index centered in British and American journals, and they seldom correct for population size, ignoring the relative effort that each society places in research. We studied national productivity for biology using a more representative index, the Biological Abstracts, and analyzed both total and relative productivity. English dominates biological publications with 87% (no other individual language reaches 2%). If the USA is considered a region by itself, it occupies the first place in per capita production of biology papers, with at least twice the productivity of either Asia or Europe. Canada, Oceania and Latin America occupy an intermediate position. The global output of scientific papers is dominated by Europe, USA. Japan, Canada, China and India. When corrected for population size, the countries with the greatest productivity of biology papers are the Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands, Australia, Saint Lucia and Montserrat. The predominance of English as the language of biological research found in this study shows a continuation of the trend initiated around the year 1900. The large relative productivity of the USA reflects the importance that American society gives to science as the basis for technological and economic development, but the USA's share of total scientific output has decreased from 44% in 1983 to 34% in 2002, while there is a greater growth of science in India, Japan and Latin America, among others. The increasing share obtained by China and India may reflect a recent change in attitude towards funding science. The leadership of Nordic nations, Israel, Switzerland, Netherlands and Australia can be explained by cultural attitude. Apparently, a positive trend is emerging in Latin America, where Chile improved its ranking in per capita productivity but Argentina, Costa Rica, Uruguay, Brazil and Cuba fell. Nevertheless, the

  4. Genotoxic effects of glyphosate or paraquat on earthworm coelomocytes.

    PubMed

    Muangphra, Ptumporn; Kwankua, Wimon; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2014-06-01

    The potential genotoxicity (nuclear anomalies, damage to single-strand DNA) and pinocytic adherence activity of two (glyphosate-based and paraquat-based) commercial herbicides to earthworm coelomocytes (immune cells in the coelomic cavity) were assessed. Coelomocytes were extracted from earthworms (Pheretima peguana) exposed to concentrations LUCIA image analyzer measure of tail DNA %, tail length, and tail moment), and Neutral Red (to detect phagocytic or pinocytic activity). The LC50 value for paraquat was 65-fold lower than for glyphosate indicating that paraquat was far more acutely toxic to P. peguana. There were significant (P < 0.05) differences from the control group in total coelomocyte micronuclei, binuclei, and trinuclei frequencies of earthworms exposed to glyphosate at 25 × 10(-1) (10(-3) LC50) and paraquat at 39 × 10(-5) (10(-4) LC50) μg cm(-2) filter paper. In earthworms exposed to glyphosate, no differences in tail DNA%, tail length, and tail moment of coelomocytes were detected. In contrast, for paraquat at 10(-1) LC50 concentration, there were significant (P < 0.05) differences between tail DNA % and tail length, and at LC50 concentration, tail moment was also significantly different when compared with controls. A decline in pinocytic adherence activity in coelomocytes occurred on exposure to glyphosate or paraquat at 10(-3) LC50 concentration. This study showed that, at concentrations well below field application rates, paraquat induces both clastogenic and aneugenic effects on earthworm coelomocytes whereas glyphosate causes only aneugenic effects and therefore does not pose a risk of gene mutation in this earthworm.

  5. Neural complexity: A graph theoretic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, L.; Buckley, C. L.; Bullock, S.

    2011-04-01

    One of the central challenges facing modern neuroscience is to explain the ability of the nervous system to coherently integrate information across distinct functional modules in the absence of a central executive. To this end, Tononi [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA.PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.91.11.5033 91, 5033 (1994)] proposed a measure of neural complexity that purports to capture this property based on mutual information between complementary subsets of a system. Neural complexity, so defined, is one of a family of information theoretic metrics developed to measure the balance between the segregation and integration of a system’s dynamics. One key question arising for such measures involves understanding how they are influenced by network topology. Sporns [Cereb. Cortex53OPAV1047-321110.1093/cercor/10.2.127 10, 127 (2000)] employed numerical models in order to determine the dependence of neural complexity on the topological features of a network. However, a complete picture has yet to be established. While De Lucia [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.71.016114 71, 016114 (2005)] made the first attempts at an analytical account of this relationship, their work utilized a formulation of neural complexity that, we argue, did not reflect the intuitions of the original work. In this paper we start by describing weighted connection matrices formed by applying a random continuous weight distribution to binary adjacency matrices. This allows us to derive an approximation for neural complexity in terms of the moments of the weight distribution and elementary graph motifs. In particular, we explicitly establish a dependency of neural complexity on cyclic graph motifs.

  6. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.

    2008-05-20

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z{<=}20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-{mu}XRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each locati0008.

  7. Resilience of estuarine phytoplankton and their temporal variability along salinity gradients during drought and hypersalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nche-Fambo, F. A.; Scharler, U. M.; Tirok, K.

    2015-06-01

    In South African estuaries, there is no knowledge on the resilience and variability in phytoplankton communities under conditions of hypersalinity, extended droughts and reverse salinity gradients. Phytoplankton composition, abundance and biomass vary with changes in environmental variables and taxa richness declines specifically under hypersaline conditions. This research thus investigated the phytoplankton community composition, its resilience and variability under highly variable and extreme environmental conditions in an estuarine lake system (Lake St. Lucia, South Africa) over one year. The lake system was characterised by a reverse salinity gradient with hypersalinity furthest from the estuarine inlet during the study period. During this study, 78 taxa were recorded: 56 diatoms, eight green algae, one cryptophyte, seven cyanobacteria and six dinoflagellates. Taxon variability and resilience depended on their ability to tolerate high salinities. Consequently, the phytoplankton communities as well as total abundance and biomass differed along the salinity gradient and over time with salinity as the main determinant. Cyanobacteria were dominant in hypersaline conditions, dinoflagellates in marine-brackish salinities, green algae and cryptophytes in lower salinities (brackish) and diatoms were abundant in marine-brackish salinities but survived in hypersaline conditions. Total abundance and biomass ranged from 3.66 × 103 to 1.11 × 109 Cells/L and 1.21 × 106 to 1.46 × 1010 pgC/L respectively, with the highest values observed under hypersaline conditions. Therefore, even under highly variable, extreme environmental conditions and hypersalinity the phytoplankton community as a whole was resilient enough to maintain a relatively high biomass throughout the study period. The resilience of few dominant taxa, such as Cyanothece, Spirulina, Protoperidinium and Nitzschia and the dominance of other common genera such as Chlamydomonas, Chroomonas, Navicula, Gyrosigma

  8. Prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in 10 Caribbean countries.

    PubMed

    Forde, Martin S; Dewailly, Eric; Robertson, Lyndon; Laouan Sidi, Elhadji A; Côté, Suzanne; Dumas, Pierre; Ayotte, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Prenatal exposures to legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxin-like compounds (DLC), as well as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE), were analyzed in pregnant women from 10 Caribbean countries. A total of 438 samples were collected and descriptive statistics calculated and compared to comparable Canadian Health Measure Survey (CHMS) and U.S. National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) datasets. Maternal POPs blood concentrations were found to be generally relatively low in the Caribbean samples compared with the U.S. and Canada datasets. Evidence of exposure to DLC and PBDE was established. DLC levels ranged from a geometric mean low of 3.96 pg/g lipids in Antigua and Barbuda to a high of 11.4 pg/g lipids in St. Lucia. Several of the PBDEs (15, 17, 25, 28, 33, 100) were detected in less than 60% of the country' samples. For PBDE-47, significantly higher levels were found in Bermuda, while Jamaica recorded a significantly low level. The overall calculated concentration of PBDE-47 for the Caribbean (5.33 μg/kg lipids) was significantly lower than the concentrations measured for the U.S. (10.83 μg/kg lipids) and Canada (23.90 μg/kg lipids). This study confirms that prenatal expose to multiple environmental chemicals is taking place in the Caribbean and highlights the need to implement surveillance programs that continuously monitor, intervene, and evaluate the levels of these toxic environmental contaminants to ensure that they are reduced as much as possible and that the health risk to humans, in particular the unborn child, are minimized.

  9. A focus on the consumer: social marketing for change.

    PubMed

    Lucaire, L E

    1985-01-01

    Social marketing is the application of commercial marketing principles to advance a social cause, issue, behavior, product, or service. Social marketing has added a framework to social efforts that heretofore lacked organization and has inspired projects that otherwise might never have been initiated. In the US, social marketing techniques have been particularly successful in the health field. Although advertising and other communications are central to social marketing, the discipline also depends upon other elements of what is termed the marketing mix: product, price, place, and promotion. Social marketing is a cyclical process involving 6 steps: analysis; planning; development, testing, and refining elements of the plan; implementation; assessment of in-market effectiveness; and feedback. In developing countries, health has similarly been the greatest beneficiary to date of applied social marketing techniques. Family planning programs and oral rehydration therapy (ORT) projects have used social marketing techniques effectively in numerous developing countries. Social marketing has been even more widely applied in the sale of contraceptives in developing countries. Contraceptive social marketing (CSM) programs are well established in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Nepal, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico, and Egypt. More recently programs have been established in Honduras, Guatemala, Barbados, St. Vincent, and St. Lucia. SOMARC (Social Marketing for Change) is a project funded by the US Agency for International Development (AID) and is working with existing CSM programs and helping to launch new CSM programs. CSM programs are successfully functioning as legitimate marketing organizations in developing countries and are using local private sector resources in the process. Program results are encouraging. Social marketing requires both experience and sensitivity to local conditions. Many developing countries now have their own marketing resources

  10. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z⩽20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-μXRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each location.

  11. Bioclimatic comfort and the thermal perceptions and preferences of beach tourists.

    PubMed

    Rutty, Michelle; Scott, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The largest market segment of global tourism is coastal tourism, which is strongly dependent on the destination's thermal climate. To date, outdoor bioclimatic comfort assessments have focused exclusively on local residents in open urban areas, making it unclear whether outdoor comfort is perceived differently in non-urban environments or by non-residents (i.e. tourists) with different weather expectations and activity patterns. This study provides needed insight into the perception of outdoor microclimatic conditions in a coastal environment while simultaneously identifying important psychological factors that differentiate tourists from everyday users of urban spaces. Concurrent micrometeorological measurements were taken on several Caribbean beaches in the islands of Barbados, Saint Lucia and Tobago, while a questionnaire survey was used to examine the thermal comfort of subjects (n = 472). Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI) conditions of 32 to 39 °C were recorded, which were perceived as being "slightly warm" or "warm" by respondents. Most beach users (48 to 77 %) would not change the thermal conditions, with some (4 to 15 %) preferring even warmer conditions. Even at UTCI of 39 °C, 62 % of respondents voted for no change to current thermal conditions, with an additional 10 % stating that they would like to feel even warmer. These results indicate that beach users' thermal preferences are up to 18 °C warmer than the preferred thermal conditions identified in existing outdoor bioclimatic studies from urban park settings. This indicates that beach users hold fundamentally different comfort perceptions and preferences compared to people using urban spaces. Statistically significant differences (p ≤ .05) were also recorded for demographic groups (gender, age) and place of origin (climatic region).

  12. Long noncoding RNA FTX is upregulated in gliomas and promotes proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by negatively regulating miR-342-3p.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiguang; Bi, Yunke; Li, Jianhua; Peng, Fei; Li, Hui; Li, Chenguang; Wang, Laizang; Ren, Fubin; Xie, Chen; Wang, Pengwei; Liang, Weiwei; Wang, Zhi; Zhu, Dan

    2017-04-01

    Gliomas remain a major public health challenge, posing a high risk for brain tumor-related morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms that drive the development of gliomas remain largely unknown. Emerging evidence has shown that long noncoding RNAs are key factors in glioma pathogenesis. qRT-PCR analysis was used to assess the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p in the different stages of gliomas in tissues. Bioinformatics tool DIANA and TargetSCan were used to predict the targets of FTX and miR-342-3p, respectively. Pearson's correlation analysis was performed to test the correlation between the expression levels of FTX, miR-342-3p, and astrocyte-elevated gene-1 (AEG-1). To examine the role of FTX in regulating proliferation and invasion of glioma cells, specific siRNA was used to knockdown FTX, and MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) and transwell assays were performed. Furthermore, rescue experiments were performed to further confirm the regulation of miR-342-3p by FTX. We then found that the expression of FTX and miR-342-3p was associated with progression of gliomas. FTX directly inhibited the expression of miR-342-3p, which subsequently regulates the expression of AEG-1. Collectively, FTX is critical for proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by regulating miR-342-3p and AEG-1. Our findings indicate that FTX and miR-342-3p may serve as a biomarker of glioma diagnosis, and offer potential novel therapeutic targets of treatment of gliomas.

  13. PREFACE: 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ručevskis, Sandris

    2015-11-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies (IMST 2015) took place in Riga, Latvia from 30th September - 2nd October, 2015. The first event of the conference series, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University, was held in 2013. Following the established tradition, the aim of the conference was to promote and discuss the latest results of industrial and academic research carried out in the following engineering fields: analysis and design of advanced structures and buildings; innovative, ecological and energy efficient building materials; maintenance, inspection and monitoring methods; construction technologies; structural management; sustainable and safe transport infrastructure; and geomatics and geotechnics. The conference provided an excellent opportunity for leading researchers, representatives of the industrial community, engineers, managers and students to share the latest achievements, discuss recent advances and highlight the current challenges. IMST 2015 attracted over 120 scientists from 24 countries. After rigorous reviewing, over 80 technical papers were accepted for publication in the conference proceedings. On behalf of the organizing committee I would like to thank all the speakers, authors, session chairs and reviewers for their efficient and timely effort. The 2nd International Conference on Innovative Materials, Structures and Technologies was organized by the Faculty of Civil Engineering of Riga Technical University with the support of the Latvia State Research Programme under the grant agreement "INNOVATIVE MATERIALS AND SMART TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY, IMATEH". I would like to express sincere gratitude to Juris Smirnovs, Dean of the Faculty of Civil Engineering, and Andris Chate, manager of the Latvia State Research Programme. Finally, I would like to thank all those who helped to make this event happen. Special thanks go to Diana

  14. The relationship between caves minerals and hypogene speleogenesis along the Cerna Valley (SW Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onac, B. P.; Sumrall, J.; Tamas, T.; Povara, I.; Veres, D.; Darmiceanu, V.; Lascu, C.

    2009-04-01

    Over 100 caves are known to develop in the Jurassic and Cretaceous limestone that outcrops on both sides of the Cerna Valley in southwestern Romania. High temperature anomalies are rather uncommon in the cave environment; however, in certain caves in the lower part of Cerna Valley one can measure air temperatures as high as 40°C. This situation is due to the presence of thermal water pooling or flowing through the caves or to the hot steam that rises along fractures from deeper thermal water pools. During the long evolution of the thermo-mineral activity along the Cerna Valley interaction has occurred on a wide scale between the cave host rock or/and cave sediments and the ascending hot steam or/and thermal solutions of all types (mainly sulfide-rich). The present work documents the products of these processes and record the occurrence of twenty-four secondary cave minerals (both of primarily or replacement origin) precipitated under particular cave environments. Among these, glauberite, apjonite, halotrichite, pickeringite, rapidcreekite, tamarugite, and darapskite are the most interesting. The mineral samples were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope analyses with the scope of linking the cave minerals with possible hypogene speleogenetic processes. The isotopic measurements (δ34S) performed on sulfate speleothems contribute valuable information on both minerals and caves origin. Apart from two minerals (i.e., calcite and gypsum), which were identified in every cave investigated so far, all the others fall into three distinct associations that have resulted from specific reactions under highly particular settings in Diana (sulfate-dominated association), Adam (phosphate-dominated), and Great Sălitrari (sulfate/phosphate/nitrate-rich association) caves. These three remarkable cave occurrences are presented along with morphological features that confirm the

  15. MiRImpact, a new bioinformatic method using complete microRNA expression profiles to assess their overall influence on the activity of intracellular molecular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Artcibasova, Alina V.; Korzinkin, Mikhail B.; Sorokin, Maksim I.; Shegay, Peter V.; Zhavoronkov, Alex A.; Gaifullin, Nurshat; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Vorobyev, Nikolay V.; Kuzmin, Denis V.; Kaprin, Аndrey D.; Borisov, Nikolay M.; Buzdin, Anton A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MicroRNAs (miRs) are short noncoding RNA molecules that regulate expression of target mRNAs. Many published sources provide information about miRs and their targets. However, bioinformatic tools elucidating higher level impact of the established total miR profiles, are still largely missing. Recently, we developed a method termed OncoFinder enabling quantification of the activities of intracellular molecular pathways basing on gene expression data. Here we propose a new technique, MiRImpact, which enables to link miR expression data with its estimated outcome on the regulation of molecular pathways, like signaling, metabolic, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and DNA repair pathways. MiRImpact uses OncoFinder rationale for pathway activity calculations, with the major distinctions that (i) it deals with the concentrations of miRs - known regulators of gene products participating in molecular pathways, and (ii) miRs are considered as negative regulators of target molecules, if other is not specified. MiRImpact operates with 2 types of databases: for molecular targets of miRs and for gene products participating in molecular pathways. We applied MiRImpact to compare regulation of human bladder cancer-specific signaling pathways at the levels of mRNA and miR expression. We took 2 most complete alternative databases of experimentally validated miR targets – miRTarBase and DianaTarBase, and an OncoFinder database featuring 2725 gene products and 271 signaling pathways. We showed that the impact of miRs is orthogonal to pathway regulation at the mRNA level, which stresses the importance of studying posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. We also report characteristic set of miR and mRNA regulation features linked with bladder cancer. PMID:27027999

  16. Correlates of objectively measured physical activity in adolescents with Down syndrome: the UP & DOWN study.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Gomez, Rocío; Veiga, Óscar L; Sanz, Alberto; Fernhall, Bo; Díaz-Cueto, Mario; Villagra, Ariel

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: los correlatos de actividad física (AF) no han sido estudiados en adolescentes con síndrome de Down (SD). Entendiendo los correlatos de AF se podría aportar información para desarrollar estrategias para incrementar los niveles de AF en esta población diana. Objetivo: el objetivo de este estudio fue identificar correlatos de AF en adolescentes con SD. Métodos: la información de los niveles de AF y sus potenciales correlatos fue recogida en 98 adolescentes con SD (63 hombres, con edades comprendidas entre 11-20 años), usando acelerómetros y cuestionarios proxy-reportados. Se utilizó análisis de covarianza y análisis de regresión lineal múltiple para examinar los correlatos de AF. Resultados: nuestros resultados muestran que la edad y el estatus socioeconómico de los participantes fue asociado con niveles de AF como correlatos no modificables. Además, el apoyo de los padres, la AF del padre y el tiempo dedicado a ver la televisión con hermanos y amigos fueron asociados con niveles de AF como correlatos modificables. Discusión y conclusión: ambos factores modificables y no modificables se asocian con niveles de AF en adolescentes con SD. Por lo tanto, una mejor comprensión de los correlatos de AF podría contribuir a desarrollar estrategias de promoción de la AF en adolescentes con SD.

  17. Computational identification of microRNAs associated to both epithelial to mesenchymal transition and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Falzone, Luca; Candido, Saverio; Salemi, Rossella; Basile, Maria S.; Scalisi, Aurora; McCubrey, James A.; Torino, Francesco; Signorelli, Salvatore S.; Montella, Maurizio; Libra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the leading cancer of the urinary tract. It is often diagnosed at advanced stage of the disease. To date, no specific and effective early detection biomarkers are available. Cancer development and progression are associated with the involvement of both epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor microenvironment of which NGAL/MMP-9 complex represents the main player in bladder cancer. It is known that change in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression may result in gene modulation. Therefore, the identification of specific miRNAs associated with EMT pathway and NGAL/MMP-9 complex may be useful to detect the development of bladder cancer at early stages. On this ground, the expression levels of miRNAs in public available datasets of bladder cancer containing data of non-coding RNA profiling was evaluated. This analysis revealed a group of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between bladder cancer patients and related healthy controls. By miRNA prediction tool (mirDIP), the relationship between the identified miRNAs and the EMT genes was established. Using the DIANA-mirPath (v.2) software, miRNAs, able to modulate the expression of NGAL and MMP-9 genes, were recognized. The results of this study provide evidence that the downregulated hsa-miR-145-5p and hsa-miR-214-3p may modulate the expression of both EMT and NGAL/MMP-9 pathways. Therefore, further validation analyses may confirm the usefulness of these selected miRNAs for predicting the development of bladder cancer at the early stage of the disease. PMID:27602581

  18. Dehydration triggers differential microRNA expression in Xenopus laevis brain.

    PubMed

    Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-11-15

    African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, although primarily aquatic, have a high tolerance for dehydration, being capable of withstanding the loss of up to 32-35% of total water body water. Recent studies have shown that microRNAs play a role in the response to dehydration by the liver, kidney and ventral skin of X. laevis. MicroRNAs act by modulating the expression of mRNA transcripts, thereby affecting diverse biochemical pathways. In this study, 43 microRNAs were assessed in frog brains comparing control and dehydrated (31.2±0.83% of total body water lost) conditions. MicroRNAs of interest were measured using a modified protocol which employs polyadenylation of microRNAs prior to reverse transcription and qPCR. Twelve microRNAs that showed a significant decrease in expression (to 41-77% of control levels) in brains from dehydrated frogs (xla-miR-15a, -150, -181a, -191, -211, -218, -219b, -30c, -30e, -31, -34a, and -34b) were identified. Genomic analysis showed that the sequences of these dehydration-responsive microRNAs were highly conserved as compared with the comparable microRNAs of mice (91-100%). Suppression of these microRNAs implies that translation of the mRNA transcripts under their control could be enhanced in response to dehydration. Bioinformatic analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted the top two KEGG pathways that these microRNAs collectively regulate: 1. Axon guidance, and 2. Long-term potentiation. Previous studies indicated that suppression of these microRNAs promotes neuroprotective pathways by increasing the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and activating anti-apoptotic pathways. This suggests that similar actions may be triggered in X. laevis brains as a protective response to dehydration.

  19. PREFACE: 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics (ISCMP): Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Pecheva, Emilia; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2012-12-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 17th International School on Condensed Matter Physics: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. Like prior events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saints Constantine and Helena near Varna, going back to the refurbished facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 17 different countries delivered 31 invited lecturers and 78 posters, contributing through three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the accepted papers illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not least significant factor for the success of the 17 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. Visits to the Archaeological Museum (rich in valuable gold treasures of the ancient Thracian culture) and to the famous rock monastery Aladja were organized for the participants from the Varna Municipality. These Proceedings are published for the second time by the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for supporting this idea. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saints Constantine and Helena, 1-5 September 2014. It will be entitled: Challenges of the Nanoscale Science: Theory, Materials and Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Emilia Pecheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa Editors

  20. Effect of Surface Alloying by Silicon on the Corrosion Resistance and Biocompatibility of the Binary NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psakhie, S. G.; Meisner, S. N.; Lotkov, A. I.; Meisner, L. L.; Tverdokhlebova, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents the study on changes in element and phase compositions in the near-surface layer and on surface topography of the NiTi specimens after the silicon ion-beam treatment. The effect of these parameters of the near-surface layer on corrosion properties in biochemical solutions and biocompatibility with mesenchymal stem cells of rat marrow is studied. Ion-beam surface modification of the specimens was performed by a DIANA-3 implanter (Tomsk, Russia), using single-ion-beam pulses under oil-free pumping and high vacuum (10-4 Pa) conditions in a high-dose ion implantation regime. The fluence made 2 × 1017 cm-2, at an average accelerating voltage of 60 kV, and pulse repetition frequency of 50 Hz. The silicon ion-beam treatment of specimen surfaces is shown to bring about a nearly twofold improvement in the corrosion resistance of the material to attack by aqueous solutions of NaCl (artificial body fluid) and human plasma and a drastic decrease in the nickel concentration after immersion of the specimens into the solutions for ~3400 and ~6000 h, respectively (for the artificial plasma solution, a nearly 20-fold decrease in the Ni concentration is observed). It is shown that improvement of NiTi corrosion resistance after treatment by Si ions occurs mainly due to the formation of two-layer composite coating based on Ti oxides (outer layer) on the NiTi surface and adjacent inner layer of oxides, carbides, and silicides of the NiTi alloy components. Inner layer with high silicon concentration serves as a barrier layer preventing nickel penetration into biomedium. This, in our opinion, is the main reason why the NiTi alloy exhibits no cytotoxic properties after ion modification of its surface and leads to the biocompatibility improvement at the cellular level, respectively.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumor necrosis factor alpha, which is linked to the development of cutaneous SCC, modulates differential epidermal microRNAs expression

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ashok; Willems, Estelle; Singh, Anupama; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Ong, Irene M.; Mehta, Suresh L.; Verma, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is linked to the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a non-melanoma form of skin cancer that can metastasize. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is linked to UVR-induced development of SCC. To find clues about the mechanisms by which TNFα may promote UVR-induced development of SCC, we investigated changes in the expression profiling of microRNAs (miRNA), a novel class of short noncoding RNAs, which affects translation and stability of mRNAs. In this experiment, TNFα knockout (TNFα KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were exposed to acute UVR (2.0 kJ/m2) and the expression profiling of epidermal miRNA was determined 4hr post UVR exposure. TNFα deletion in untreated WT mice resulted in differential expression (log fold change>1) of seventeen miRNA. UVR exposure in WT mice induced differential expression of 22 miRNA. However, UVR exposure in TNFα KO mice altered only two miRNAs. Four miRNA, were differentially expressed between WT+UVR and TNFα KO+UVR groups. Differentially expressed selected miRNAs were further validated using real time PCR. Few of the differentially expressed miRNAs (miR-31-5p, miR-196a-5p, miR-127-3p, miR-206-3p, miR-411-5p, miR-709, and miR-322-5p) were also observed in UVR-induced SCC. Finally, bio-informatics analysis using DIANA, MIRANDA, Target Scan, and miRDB algorithms revealed a link with major UVR-induced pathways (MAPK, PI3K-Akt, transcriptional mis-regulation, Wnt, and TGF-beta). PMID:26918454

  2. Pricing products: juxtaposing affordability with quality appeal.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Choosing appropriate product prices is 1 of the most crucial steps in creating an effective contraceptive social marketing (CSM) sales campaign. The Social Marketing Forum conducted an informal survey of social marketing project managers, international contractors, and marketing consultants to determine how CSM programs cope with pricing problems and ways to circumvent some obstacles. According to Diana Altman, a family planning consultant, low prices that make products available to needy individuals are more important than the program's self sufficiency, yet if prices are too low, consumers think the products were unusable in the US and thus were dumped on local markets. Other key factors include commercial competition, spiraling inflation rates, and problems with rising prices and retailer/distributor margins. A sampling of per capita gross national products indicates the poverty level of most CSM projects' target market. Consequently, CSM projects must set low pices, regardless of program operating costs. The goal often is to increase the demand and availability for contraceptives. The fact that social marketing products must pass through retail networks to reach consumers complicates the pricing equation. To deal with the problem, India's Nirodh program gives a 25% margin to distributors/wholesalers, compared to 6% offered on most other goods. Retailers also receive a 25% margin, more than double the commercial rate. Once prices are set, increases pose hazards. Local government approval often is a prerequisite and can require lengthy negotiations. Market studies remain a valuable approach to effective pricing, according to PNA's Mallamad and other research consultants. They cite such effective research strategies as test marketing products and asking consumers how prices affect buying habits. Further, CSM projects can jump over some pricing hurdles through creative marketing. An effective pricing strategy alone cannot produce a successful CSM program. Pricing

  3. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danza, Katia; Summa, Simona De; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways. PMID:25333258

  4. MiR-578 and miR-573 as potential players in BRCA-related breast cancer angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; De Summa, Simona; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Merla, Giuseppe; Simone, Gianni; Tommasi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of microRNA (miRNAs), a new class of small RNA molecules, in governing angiogenesis has been well described. Our aim was to investigate miRNA-mediated regulation of angiogenesis in a series of familial breast cancers stratified by BRCA1/2 mutational status in BRCA carriers and BRCA non-carriers (BRCAX). Affymetrix GeneChip miRNA Arrays were used to perform miRNA expression analysis on 43 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumour tissue familial breast cancers (22 BRCA 1/2-related and 21 BRCAX). Pathway enrichment analysis was carried out with the DIANA miRPath v2.0 web-based computational tool, and the miRWalk database was used to identify target genes of deregulated miRNAs. An independent set of 8 BRCA 1/2-related and 11 BRCAX breast tumors was used for validation by Real-Time PCR. In vitro analysis on HEK293, MCF-7 and SUM149PT cells were performed to best-clarify miR-573 and miR-578 role. A set of 16 miRNAs differentially expressed between BRCA 1/2-related and BRCAX breast tumors emerged from the profile analysis. Among these, miR-578 and miR-573 were found to be down-regulated in BRCA 1/2-related breast cancer and associated to the Focal adhesion, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling pathways. Our data highlight the role of miR-578 and miR-573 in controlling BRCA 1/2-related angiogenesis by targeting key regulators of Focal adhesion, VEGF and HIF-1 signaling pathways.

  5. TGFbeta and miRNA regulation in familial and sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Danza, Katia; De Summa, Simona; Pinto, Rosamaria; Pilato, Brunella; Palumbo, Orazio; Carella, Massimo; Popescu, Ondina; Digennaro, Maria; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Tommasi, Stefania

    2017-01-30

    The term 'BRCAness' was introduced to identify sporadic malignant tumors sharing characteristics similar to those germline BRCA-related. Among all mechanisms attributable to BRCA1 expression silencing, a major role has been assigned to microRNAs. MicroRNAs role in familial and sporadic breast cancer has been explored but few data are available about microRNAs involvement in homologous recombination repair control in these breast cancer subgroups. Our aim was to seek microRNAs associated to pathways underlying DNA repair dysfunction in breast cancer according to a family history of the disease. Affymetrix GeneChip microRNA Arrays were used to perform microRNA expression analysis in familial and sporadic breast cancer. Pathway enrichment analysis and microRNA target prediction was carried out using DIANA miRPath v.3 web-based computational tool and miRWalk v.2 database. We analyzed an external gene expression dataset (E-GEOD-49481), including both familial and sporadic breast cancers. For microRNA validation, an independent set of 19 familial and 10 sporadic breast cancers was used. Microarray analysis identified a signature of 28 deregulated miRNAs. For our validation analyses by real time PCR, we focused on miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 because associated to TGF-β signalling pathway, ATM and BRCA1 genes expression. Our results highlighted alterations in miR-92a-1*, miR-1184 and miR-943 expression levels suggesting their involvement in repair of DNA double-strand breaks through TGF-beta pathway control.

  6. Distinct microRNA expression signatures in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaowei; Xu, Xiaohan; Wang, Jun; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yijiang

    2012-12-01

    Human atrial and ventricular myocardium has distinct structure and physiology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the central players in the regulation of gene expression, participating in many physiological processes. A comprehensive knowledge of miRNA expression in the human heart is essential for the understanding of myocardial function. The aim of this study was to compare the miRNA signature in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. Agilent human miRNA arrays were used to indicate the miRNA expression signatures of the right atrial (n = 8) and ventricular (n = 9) myocardium of healthy individuals. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs) were used to validate the array results. DIANA-mirPath was used to incorporate the miRNAs into pathways. MiRNA arrays showed that 169 miRNAs were expressed at different levels in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis based on the 169 dysregulated miRNAs showed that miRNA expression categorized two well-defined clusters that corresponded to human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The qRT-PCR results correlated well with the microarray data. Bioinformatic analysis indicated the potential miRNA targets and molecular pathways. This study indicates that distinct miRNA expression signatures in human right atrial and ventricular myocardium. The findings provide a novel understanding of the molecular differences between human atrial and ventricular myocardium and may establish a framework for an anatomically detailed evaluation of cardiac function regulation.

  7. PREFACE 16 ISCMP: Progress in Solid State and Molecular Electronics, Ionics and Photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimova-Malinovska, Doriana; Nesheva, Diana; Petrov, Alexander G.; Primatarowa, Marina T.

    2010-11-01

    We are pleased to introduce the Proceedings of the 16 ISCMP, organized by the Institute of Solid State Physics of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The Chairman of the School was Professor Alexander G Petrov. The School was dedicated to the late Professor Joe Marshall, who served for a long time as Chairman and Honorary Chairman and left us just after having completed the proceedings of the previous School. Like previous events, the School took place in the beautiful Black Sea resort of Saint Constantine and Elena near Varna, going back to the renewed facilities of the Panorama hotel. Participants from 19 different countries delivered 34 invited lecturers and 75 posters, contributing to three sessions of poster presentations. Papers submitted to the Proceedings were refereed according to the high standards of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series and the articles published in this volume illustrate the diversity and the high level of the contributions. Not the least significant factor in the success of the 16 ISCMP was the social program, both the organized events (Welcome and Farewell Parties) and the variety of pleasant local restaurants and beaches. These Proceedings are published for the first time in Journal of Physics: Conference Series. We are grateful to the Journal's staff for encouraging this idea. The Scientific Committee of the ISCMP dedicates this volume of the Proceedings to the living memory of Professor Joe Marshall, Honorary Chairman of the ISCMP. The Committee decided that the next event will take place again in Saint Constantine and Elena, in September 2012. It will be entitled: Open Problems in Condensed Matter Physics, Biomedical Physics and their Applications. Doriana Dimova-Malinovska, Diana Nesheva, Alexander G Petrov and Marina T Primatarowa

  8. The real new economy.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Diana

    2003-10-01

    During the soar-and-swoon days of the late 1990s, many people believed that information technology, and the Internet in particular, were "changing everything" in business. A fundamental change did happen in the 1990s, but it was less about technology than about competition. Under director Diana Farrell, the McKinsey Global Institute has conducted an extensive study of productivity and its connection to corporate IT spending and use during that period. The study revealed that information technology is important--but not central--to the fate of industries and individual companies. So if information technology was not the primary factor in the productivity surge, what was? The study points to competition and innovation. In those industries that saw increases in competitive intensity, managers were forced to innovate aggressively to protect their revenues and profits. Those innovations--in products, business practices, and technology--led to the gains in productivity. In fact, a critical dynamic of the new economy--the real new economy--is the virtuous cycle of competition, innovation, and productivity growth. Managers can innovate in many ways, but during the 1990s, information technology was a particularly powerful tool, for three reasons: First, IT enabled the development of attractive new products and efficient new business processes. Second, it facilitated the rapid industrywide diffusion of innovations. And third, it exhibited strong scale economies--its benefits multiplied rapidly as its use expanded. This article reveals surprising data on how various industries in the United States and Europe were affected by competition, innovation, and information technology in the 1990s and offers insights about how managers can get more from their IT investments.

  9. How Diet Intervention via Modulation of DNA Damage Response through MicroRNAs May Have an Effect on Cancer Prevention and Aging, an in Silico Study

    PubMed Central

    Carotenuto, Felicia; Albertini, Maria C.; Coletti, Dario; Vilmercati, Alessandra; Campanella, Luigi; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Teodori, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a molecular mechanism that cells have evolved to sense DNA damage (DD) to promote DNA repair, or to lead to apoptosis, or cellular senescence if the damage is too extensive. Recent evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRs) play a critical role in the regulation of DDR. Dietary bioactive compounds through miRs may affect activity of numerous genes. Among the most studied bioactive compounds modulating expression of miRs are epi-gallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin, resveratrol and n3-polyunsaturated fatty acids. To compare the impact of these dietary compounds on DD/DDR network modulation, we performed a literature search and an in silico analysis by the DIANA-mirPathv3 software. The in silico analysis allowed us to identify pathways shared by different miRs involved in DD/DDR vis-à-vis the specific compounds. The results demonstrate that certain miRs (e.g., -146, -21) play a central role in the interplay among DD/DDR and the bioactive compounds. Furthermore, some specific pathways, such as “fatty acids biosynthesis/metabolism”, “extracellular matrix-receptor interaction” and “signaling regulating the pluripotency of stem cells”, appear to be targeted by most miRs affected by the studied compounds. Since DD/DDR and these pathways are strongly related to aging and carcinogenesis, the present in silico results of our study suggest that monitoring the induction of specific miRs may provide the means to assess the antiaging and chemopreventive properties of particular dietary compounds. PMID:27213347

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis).

    PubMed

    Brown, L R; Wüthrich, K

    1992-10-20

    The three-dimensional structure in solution of the alpha-neurotoxin from the black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis) has been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A high quality structure for this 60-residue protein was obtained from 656 NOE distance constraints and 143 dihedral angle constraints, using the distance geometry program DIANA for the structure calculation and AMBER for restrained energy minimization. For a group of 20 conformers used to represent the solution structure, the average root-mean-square deviation value calculated for the polypeptide backbone heavy atoms relative to the mean structure was 0.45 A. The protein consists of a core region from which three finger-like loops extend outwards. It includes a short, two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet of residues 1-5 and 13-17, a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet involving residues 23-31, 34-42 and 51-55, and four disulfide bridges in the core region. There is also extensive non-regular hydrogen bonding between the carboxy-terminal tail of the polypeptide chain and the rest of the core region. Comparison with the crystal structure of erabutoxin-b indicates that the structure of alpha-neurotoxin is quite similar to other neurotoxin structures, but that local structural differences are seen in regions thought to be important for binding of neurotoxins to the acetylcholine receptor. For two regions of the alpha-neurotoxin structure there is evidence for an equilibrium between multiple conformations, which might be related to conformational rearrangements upon binding to the receptor. Overall, the alpha-neurotoxin presents itself as a protein with a stable core and flexible surface areas that interact with the acetylcholine receptor in such a way that high affinity binding is achieved by conformational rearrangements of the deformable regions of the neurotoxin structure.

  11. 2010 John H. Gibbon Lecture. Just say yes!

    PubMed

    DeBois, William J

    2010-12-01

    Advancing anything requires change and a new method. It can be a challenge to bring about the change that you believe in. This change however requires you to plan and say no to the old way of doing things. Fortunately there is a positive way to say no whereby important needs are met. As Ury suggests, we need to focus on how the two opposing forces need to be addressed. There is your internal focus of what's important to you and the opposing external focus of others--what's important to them. We can't lose sight of this because when we do, we risk disrespecting others. As technicians we are in a unique position as perfusionists whereby we work closely with physicians and on occasion will direct them to perform tasks. Additionally, many other non-physicians are not familiar with our responsibilities. We need to make others knowledgeable of the education, skill, and passion we possess. I really enjoy what I do as a perfusionist and I am proud to be recognized for my team's contribution and of having received the Gibbon award. Bob Parsons, the CEO and founder of The Go Daddy Group, Inc., said "We're not here for a long time, we're here for a good time!" This all has been a real good time. Thank you. My Perfusion Team is currently: Barbara Elmer, Marie Kilcullen, Jim McVey, Marie Zanichelli, Junli Liu, Anthony Lamonica, Karen Hussey, Lilia Voevidko, Haleh Ebrahimi, Sergey Savy, Akilah Richards, Diana Froehlich.

  12. CrossHub: a tool for multi-way analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) in the context of gene expression regulation mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, George S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Zaretsky, Andrew R.; Nasedkina, Tatiana V.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.; Senchenko, Vera N.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of different mechanisms to the regulation of gene expression varies for different tissues and tumors. Complementation of predicted mRNA–miRNA and gene–transcription factor (TF) relationships with the results of expression correlation analyses derived for specific tumor types outlines the interactions with functional impact in the current biomaterial. We developed CrossHub software, which enables two-way identification of most possible TF–gene interactions: on the basis of ENCODE ChIP-Seq binding evidence or Jaspar prediction and co-expression according to the data of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, the largest cancer omics resource. Similarly, CrossHub identifies mRNA–miRNA pairs with predicted or validated binding sites (TargetScan, mirSVR, PicTar, DIANA microT, miRTarBase) and strong negative expression correlations. We observed partial consistency between ChIP-Seq or miRNA target predictions and gene–TF/miRNA co-expression, demonstrating a link between these indicators. Additionally, CrossHub expression-methylation correlation analysis can be used to identify hypermethylated CpG sites or regions with the greatest potential impact on gene expression. Thus, CrossHub is capable of outlining molecular portraits of a specific gene and determining the three most common sources of expression regulation: promoter/enhancer methylation, miRNA interference and TF-mediated activation or repression. CrossHub generates formatted Excel workbooks with the detailed results. CrossHub is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/crosshub/. PMID:26773058

  13. Recent Progress in GW-based Methods for Excited-State Calculations of Reduced Dimensional Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Jornada, Felipe H.

    2015-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of excited-state phenomena within the GW and GW-Bethe-Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approaches allow one to accurately study the electronic and optical properties of various materials, including systems with reduced dimensionality. However, several challenges arise when dealing with complicated nanostructures where the electronic screening is strongly spatially and directionally dependent. In this talk, we discuss some recent developments to address these issues. First, we turn to the slow convergence of quasiparticle energies and exciton binding energies with respect to k-point sampling. This is very effectively dealt with using a new hybrid sampling scheme, which results in savings of several orders of magnitude in computation time. A new ab initio method is also developed to incorporate substrate screening into GW and GW-BSE calculations. These two methods have been applied to mono- and few-layer MoSe2, and yielded strong environmental dependent behaviors in good agreement with experiment. Other issues that arise in confined systems and materials with reduced dimensionality, such as the effect of the Tamm-Dancoff approximation to GW-BSE, and the calculation of non-radiative exciton lifetime, are also addressed. These developments have been efficiently implemented and successfully applied to real systems in an ab initio framework using the BerkeleyGW package. I would like to acknowledge collaborations with Diana Y. Qiu, Steven G. Louie, Meiyue Shao, Chao Yang, and the experimental groups of M. Crommie and F. Wang. This work was supported by Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR10-1006184.

  14. Experimental search for radiative decays of the pentaquark baryon {Theta}{sup +}(1540)

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, V. V.; Asratyan, A. E.; Borisov, V. S.; Curceanu, C.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Guaraldo, C.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Larin, I. F.; Matveev, V. A.; Shebanov, V. A.; Shishov, N. N.; Sokolov, L. I.; Tumanov, G. K.; Verebryusov, V. S.

    2010-07-15

    The data on the reactions K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup 0{gamma}}X and K{sup +}Xe {sup {yields}}K{sup +{gamma}}X, obtained with the bubble chamber DIANA, have been analyzed for possible radiative decays of the {Theta}{sup +}(1540) baryon: {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma} and {Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}. No signals have been observed, and we derive the upper limits {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p) < 0.032 and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma})/{Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 0.041 which, using our previous measurement of {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}KN) = 0.39 {+-} 0.10 MeV, translate to {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{gamma}) < 8 keV and {Gamma}({Theta}{sup +} {sup {yields}}K{sup +}n{gamma}) < 11 keV at 90% confidence level. We have also measured the cross sections of K{sup +}-induced reactions involving emission of a neutral pion: {sigma}(K{sup +}n {sup {yields}}K{sup 0}p{pi}{sup 0}) = 68 {+-} 18 {mu}b and {sigma}(K{sup +}N {sup {yields}}K{sup +}N{pi}{sup 0}) = 30 {+-} 8 {mu}b for incident K{sup +} momentum of 640 MeV.

  15. U-Pb garnet, sphene, monazite, and rutile ages: Implications for the duration of high-grade metamorphism and cooling histories, Adirondack Mts. , New York

    SciTech Connect

    Mezger, K.; Rawnsley, C.M.; Hanson, G.N. ); Bohlen, S.R. )

    1991-05-01

    Garnet ages for the Lowlands range from 1,168-1,127 Ma, those from the central and southern Highlands from 1,154-1,013 Ma. Metamorphism in the Highlands may not have occurred as a single event but rather in several discrete thermal pulses. An age of 1,153 {plus minus} 3 Ma was determined for garnets in the syn-regional metamorphic contact aureole of the Diana syenite, consistent with that of the syenite intrusion, 1 155 {plus minus} 4 Ma. Garnets just outside the contact aureole give an age of 1,168 {plus minus} 6 Ma. In the Lowlands, monazite yielded an age of 1,161 {plus minus} 1 Ma, rutiles yielded ages of 1,005 {plus minus} 2 Ma and 953 {plus minus} 4 Ma, and sphene ages range from 1,156 to 1,103 Ma. In the Highlands, monazite yielded an age of 1,033 {plus minus} 1 Ma, rutiles yielded ages of 911 {plus minus} 2 Ma and 885 {plus minus} 2 and sphenes from 1,033 Ma to 991 Ma. The rutile and monazite ages indicate that both terranes cooled at time-integrated rates of ca. 1.5C/Ma for at least 150 Ma following the last phase of high-grade metamorphism. The Lowlands cooled to ca. 400C by ca. 1,000 Ma and the Highlands by ca. 900 Ma. The mineral ages indicate that metamorphic pressures and temperatures recorded by thermobarometry correspond to conditions attained polychronically over 150 Ma or more. Mineral ages combined with temperature estimates for peak metamorphism indicate that the closure temperature for the U-Pb system is >800C in garnet, 640-730C in monazite, and 500-670C in sphene.

  16. Synanthropy of sarcophagidae (Diptera) in La Pintada, Antioquia-Colombia.

    PubMed

    Yepes-Gaurisas, Daniela; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Juan David; de Mello-Patiu, Cátia Antunes; Wolff Echeverri, Marta

    2013-09-01

    Recently, populations of flies have increased in numbers given the elevated levels of organic matter waste produced by anthropic activities and domestication of animals. Such increase represents a worldwide health concern, since flies can be vectors of human diseases. The great variety of feeding and developmental habits of flies of the family Sarcophagidae taking place on animal corpses, feces and decomposed organic matter make them potential vectors of pathogens. Herein, we evaluated the synanthropic index (SI), as well as other ecological aspects of this family, through simultaneous monthly samplings in three areas with different degrees of human disturbance (urban, rural and forest). Each area had four van Someren Rydon traps, each one with a different bait (i.e., human feces, chicken viscera, fish and decomposing onion). Traps were active during 48 hours each month, and specimen collection was made every 12 hours. A total of 7 446 Sarcophagidae individuals were collected (1275 males and 6171 females), belonging to 27 species and nine genera. Tricharaea (Sarcophagula) canuta (Sl = +96.67), Oxysarcodexia taitensis (SI = +93.85), Peckia (Peckia) chrysostoma (SI = +90.00) and Tricharaea (Sarcophagula) occidua (SI = +88.76) exhibited the highest values of synanthropy index, revealing a strong preference for human settlements. The most abundant species were Oxysarcodexia conclausa (21.80%), Ravinia effrenata (18.67%), Oxysarcodexia bakeri (11.45%) and Oxysarcodexia taitensis (10.20%), all of which exhibited preference for urban environments. Additionally, we are reporting seven new records of Sarcophagid flies for Colombia: Oxysarcodexia angrensis, Oxysarcodexia bakeri, Oxysarcodexia diana, Oxysarcodexia similata, Oxysarcodexia timida, Peckia (Peckia) pexata and Titanogrypa (Cucullomyia) placida.

  17. Common features of microRNA target prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Sarah M; Thompson, Jeffrey A; Ufkin, Melanie L; Sathyanarayana, Pradeep; Liaw, Lucy; Congdon, Clare Bates

    2014-01-01

    The human genome encodes for over 1800 microRNAs (miRNAs), which are short non-coding RNA molecules that function to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. Due to the potential for one miRNA to target multiple gene transcripts, miRNAs are recognized as a major mechanism to regulate gene expression and mRNA translation. Computational prediction of miRNA targets is a critical initial step in identifying miRNA:mRNA target interactions for experimental validation. The available tools for miRNA target prediction encompass a range of different computational approaches, from the modeling of physical interactions to the incorporation of machine learning. This review provides an overview of the major computational approaches to miRNA target prediction. Our discussion highlights three tools for their ease of use, reliance on relatively updated versions of miRBase, and range of capabilities, and these are DIANA-microT-CDS, miRanda-mirSVR, and TargetScan. In comparison across all miRNA target prediction tools, four main aspects of the miRNA:mRNA target interaction emerge as common features on which most target prediction is based: seed match, conservation, free energy, and site accessibility. This review explains these features and identifies how they are incorporated into currently available target prediction tools. MiRNA target prediction is a dynamic field with increasing attention on development of new analysis tools. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive assessment of these tools in a manner that is accessible across disciplines. Understanding the basis of these prediction methodologies will aid in user selection of the appropriate tools and interpretation of the tool output.

  18. An atlas of type I MADS box gene expression during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-09-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and beta-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis.

  19. An Atlas of Type I MADS Box Gene Expression during Female Gametophyte and Seed Development in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Marian; Heijmans, Klaas; Airoldi, Chiara; Davies, Brendan; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the plant type I MADS domain subfamily have been reported to be involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, from the 61 type I genes in the Arabidopsis genome, only PHERES1, AGAMOUS-LIKE80 (AGL80), DIANA, AGL62, and AGL23 have been functionally characterized, which revealed important roles for these genes during female gametophyte and early seed development. The functions of the other genes are still unknown, despite the fact that the available single T-DNA insertion mutants have been largely investigated. The lack of mutant phenotypes is likely due to a considerable number of recent intrachromosomal duplications in the type I subfamily, resulting in nonfunctional genes in addition to a high level of redundancy. To enable a breakthrough in type I MADS box gene characterization, a framework needs to be established that allows the prediction of the functionality and redundancy of the type I genes. Here, we present a complete atlas of their expression patterns during female gametophyte and seed development in Arabidopsis, deduced from reporter lines containing translational fusions of the genes to green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase. All the expressed genes were revealed to be active in the female gametophyte or developing seed, indicating that the entire type I subfamily is involved in reproductive development in Arabidopsis. Interestingly, expression was predominantly observed in the central cell, antipodal cells, and chalazal endosperm. The combination of our expression results with phylogenetic and protein interaction data allows a better identification of putative redundantly acting genes and provides a useful tool for the functional characterization of the type I MADS box genes in Arabidopsis. PMID:20631316

  20. Beyond offshoring: assess your company's global potential.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Diana

    2004-12-01

    In the past few years, companies have become aware that they can slash costs by offshoring: moving jobs to lower-wage locations. But this practice is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how globalization can transform industries, according to research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). The institute's yearlong study suggests that by streamlining their production processes and supply chains globally, rather than just nationally or regionally, companies can lower their costs-as we've seen in the consumer-electronics and PC industries. Companies can save as much as 70% of their total costs through globalization--50% from offshoring, 5% from training and business-task redesign, and 15% from process improvements. But they don't have to stop there. The cost reductions make it possible to lower prices and expand into new markets, attracting whole new classes of customers. To date, however, few businesses have recognized the full scope of performance improvements that globalization makes possible, much less developed sound strategies for capturing those opportunities. In this article, Diana Farrell, director of MGI, offers a step-by-step approach to doing both things. Among her suggestions: Assess where your industry falls along the globalization spectrum, because not all sectors of the economy face the same challenges and opportunities at the same time. Also, pay attention to production, regulatory, and organizational barriers to globalization. If any of these can be changed, size up the cost-saving (and revenue-generating) opportunities that will emerge for your company as a result of those changes. Farrell also defines the five stages of globalization-market entry, product specialization, value chain disaggregation, value chain reengineering, and the creation of new markets-and notes the different levers for cutting costs and creating value that companies can use in each phase.