Science.gov

Sample records for diaphyseal forearm fracture-nonunions

  1. History of operative treatment of forearm diaphyseal fractures.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Kozánek, Michal; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2014-02-01

    Diaphyseal fractures of the forearm have accompanied humanity throughout its history. Nonsurgical techniques dominated the treatment for centuries, and complications including nonunion and malunion were common. The 19th century featured the recognition of distinct injury patterns. With the development of anesthesia and antisepsis, the operative treatment became widespread. In 1878, Heine described fixation of the diaphyseal nonunion of the distal ulna using an intramedullary ivory peg. Parkhill reported on the application of external fixation for forearm fractures in 1897-1898. Hansmann published the case of plate osteosynthesis of an acute fracture of the radius in 1886. In 1913, Schöne published the technique of closed intramedullary fixation of diaphyseal fractures of the forearm using a silver wire. During the first 2 decades of the 20th century, plate osteosynthesis quickly spread across Europe and North America owing to the influence of Lambotte and Lane. After the World War II, plate osteosynthesis became the surgical treatment of choice for forearm diaphyseal fractures.

  2. Treatment of Diaphyseal Forearm Fractures in Children

    PubMed Central

    Vopat, Matthew L.; Kane, Patrick M.; Christino, Melissa A.; Truntzer, Jeremy; McClure, Philip; Katarincic, Julia; Vopat, Bryan G.

    2014-01-01

    Both bone forearm fractures are common orthopedic injuries. Optimal treatment is dictated not only by fracture characteristics but also patient age. In the pediatric population, acceptable alignment can tolerate greater fracture displacement due to the bone’s ability to remodel with remaining growth. Generally, these fractures can be successfully managed with closed reduction and casting, however operative fixation may also be required. The optimal method of fixation has not been clearly established. Currently, the most common operative interventions are open reduction with plate fixation versus closed or open reduction with intramedullary fixation. Plating has advantages of being more familiar to many surgeons, being theoretically superior in the ability to restore radial bow, and providing the possibility of hardware retention. Recently, intramedullary nailing has been gaining popularity due to decreased soft tissue dissection; however, a second operation is needed for hardware removal generally 6 months after the index procedure. Current literature has not established the superiority of one surgical method over the other. The goal of this manuscript is to review the current literature on the treatment of pediatric forearm fractures and provide clinical recommendations for optimal treatment, focusing specifically on children ages 3-10 years old. PMID:25002936

  3. Management of adult diaphyseal both-bone forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Leah M; Meals, Clifton G; Neviaser, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneous diaphyseal fractures of the radius and ulna, often referred to as both-bone forearm fractures, are frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons. Adults with this injury are typically treated with open reduction and internal fixation because of the propensity for malunion of the radius and ulna and the resulting loss of forearm rotation. Large case series support the use of plate and screw fixation for simple fractures. More complex fractures are managed according to strain theory, with the intention of controlling rather than eliminating motion at the fracture site. This can be achieved with flexible plate and screw constructs or intramedullary nails. In general, results of surgical fixation have been good, with only modest losses of forearm strength and rotation. Notable complications include nonunion, malunion, and refracture after device removal. PMID:24966250

  4. Reconstruction of malunited diaphyseal fractures of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2014-09-01

    The forearm is a complex anatomical and functional unit with unique osseous, soft tissue and articular relationships. Disruption of these important relations can have a significant impact, leading to pain, instability of the radio-ulnar articulation and reduced range of motion. The gold standard for treating forearm fractures in adults remains anatomic reduction, stable plate fixation and preservation of the surrounding blood supply. Failure to achieve these goals may lead to malunion, requiring reconstructive surgery, which can be technically challenging. In this review, we discuss the essential aspects of anatomy and pathomechanics, clinical and radiological assessment and the state of the art in pre-operative planning and deformity correction surgery.

  5. Treatment of Distal Radius Fracture Nonunion With Posterior Interosseous Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Shahryar-Kamrani, Reza; Ghane, Bahareh; Yavarikia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonunion of distal radius fractures is disabling. Treatment is difficult and the results are not predictable. However, posterior interosseous bone flap (PIBF) has been successful in treating forearm nonunion. Objectives To treat distal radius fracture nonunion with PIBF as a new procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective non-randomized cohort study was performed at two hospitals in Tehran between January 2011 and September 2015. PIBFs were applied in nine patients (10 nonunions) with a mean age of 55 years. Union success rate, grip strength, wrist range of motion, and forearm rotation were then evaluated. Results Although four of the patients had a history of infection, all participants achieved fracture union at a mean time of 3.8 months. Grip strength improved by 12.4 kg. There was also 36° improvement in wrist flexion, 20° improvement in wrist extension, 60° improvement in forearm supination, and 46° improvement in forearm pronation. The range of motion and grip strength improvements were significant. Conclusions Pedicled PIBF is a new option for treating distal radius fracture nonunion. The results are predictable in achieving union and good function, and this technique can be successfully used in cases with extensive soft-tissue damage or infection.

  6. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral diaphyseal forearm bone fracture: A rare injury report with literature review.

    PubMed

    Goni, Vijay; Behera, Prateek; Meena, Umesh Kumar; Gopinathan, Nirmal raj; Akkina, Narendranadh; Arjun, R H H

    2015-01-01

    Dislocation of the elbow along with shaft fractures of both bones of the ipsilateral forearm is a rare injury though elbow dislocation or fracture of the forearm bones may occur separately. Such injuries need a concentric reduction of the dislocation and an anatomical fixation of forearm bones for optimal functional outcomes. We report a case of elbow dislocation with fracture of the lateral condyle of the humerus along with fractures of shafts of the radius and ulna in a 44-year-old female. Closed reduction of the elbow and operative stabilization of all fractures were done with good clinical, radiological and functional outcomes in 2 years follow-up period. A significant degree of force is needed to produce a combined dislocation of a joint and fracture of bones around that joint and these complex injuries may be missed if the clinician is not aware of the possibility of such injuries. The fact that the previously reported cases had a posterolateral dislocation while our case had a posteromedial dislocation and a fracture of the lateral humeral condyle as well makes it unique in its presentation and worth reporting. We have also included an up to date literature review on this topic. PMID:26511306

  7. Older Age Does Not Affect Healing Time and Functional Outcomes After Fracture Nonunion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Taormina, David P.; Shulman, Brandon S.; Karia, Raj; Spitzer, Allison B.; Konda, Sanjit R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Elderly patients are at risk of fracture nonunion, given the potential setting of osteopenia, poorer fracture biology, and comorbid medical conditions. Risk factors predicting fracture nonunion may compromise the success of fracture nonunion surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of patient age on clinical and functional outcome following long bone fracture nonunion surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data identified 288 patients (aged 18-91) who were indicated for long bone nonunion surgery. Two-hundred and seventy-two patients satisfied study inclusion criteria and analyses were performed comparing elderly patients aged ≥65 years (n = 48) with patients <65 years (n = 224) for postoperative wound complications, Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA) functional status, healing, and surgical revision. Regression analyses were performed to look for associations between age, smoking status, and history of previous nonunion surgery with healing and functional outcome. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 91.5% (249 of 272) of patients. Results: Despite demographic differences in the aged population, including a predominance of medical comorbidities (P < .01) and osteopenia (P = .02), there was no statistical differences in the healing rate of elderly patients (95.8% vs 95.1%, P = .6) or time to union (6.2 ± 4.1 months vs. 7.2 ± 6.6, P = .3). Rates of postoperative wound complications and surgical revision did not statistically differ. Elderly patients reported similar levels of function up to 12 months after surgery. Regression analyses failed to show any significant association between age and final union or time to union. There was a strong positive association between smoking and history of previous nonunion surgery with time to union. Age was associated (positively) with 12-month SMFA activity score. Conclusions: Smoking and failure of previous surgical

  8. Treatment of Nonunion of Forearm Bones Using Radial Forearm Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Shahryar Kamrani, Reza; Farhoud, Amir Reza; Nabian, Mohammad Hossein; Farhadi, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of forearm fracture nonunion is challenging. Several surgical techniques for the treatment of forearm nonunion have been reported. Objectives: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of the radial forearm bone graft technique in cases with forearm nonunion. Patients and Methods: We treated 7 patients with forearm nonunions via radial forearm bone flap and internal plate fixation. On the preoperative examination and last follow-up, the quick disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (Q-DASH) score, elbow, forearm and wrist arches of motion and grip force were measured. At the final follow-up, radiographic union and patient satisfaction and return to work were assessed. Results: The mean follow-up duration was 34 ± 23 months. The Q-DASH scores improved from 70 ± 6 points preoperatively to 13 ± 15 points at final follow-up (P < 0.01). The preopetative range of motion (ROM) was 101 ± 26 degrees; whereas the final forearm ROM was 140 ± 17 (P = 0.01). All nonunions united uneventfully (range 3-6 months). At the last follow-up, the grip force was 83% of uninjured extremity and all patients were satisfied with the outcome of the operation. Conclusions: Radial forearm bone flap is a safe, useful and novel technique in cases with forearm nonunion. PMID:26839858

  9. No advantage to rhBMP-2 in addition to autogenous graft for fracture nonunion.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle; Forman, Jordanna; Taormina, David P; Egol, Kenneth A

    2014-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins are a necessary component of the fracture healing cascade. Few studies have delineated the efficacy of iliac crest bone graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2), especially, in comparison with the gold standard treatment of nonunion, which is autogenous bone graft alone. This study compared the outcome of patients with fracture nonunion treated with autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 adjuvant vs patients treated with autogenous bone graft alone. A total of 118 consecutive patients who were to undergo long bone nonunion surgery with autogenous bone graft (50) or autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 (68) were identified. Surgical intervention included either harvested iliac autogenous bone graft or autogenous bone graft plus 1.5 mg/mL of rhBMP-2 placed in and around the site of nonunion. No differences were found in the distribution of nonunion sites included within each group. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 100 of 118 patients (84.7%). Analyses of demographic characteristics (including tobacco), medical comorbidities, previous surgeries, and nonunion type (atrophic vs hypertrophic) did not differ. Postoperative complication rates did not differ. The percentage of patients who progressed to union did not differ. Mean time to union in the autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 group was 6.6 months (±3.9) vs 5.4 (±2.7) months in the autogenous bone graft-only group (P=.06). Rates of revision (16.2% for rhBMP-2 plus autogenous bone graft vs 8% for autogenous bone graft) did not differ statistically (P=.19), nor did 12-month scores of pain and functional assessment. Although rhBMP-2 is a safe adjuvant, there was no benefit seen when rhBMP-2 was added to autogenous bone graft in the treatment of long bone nonunion. Given its high cost, rhBMP-2 should be reconsidered as an aid to autogenous bone graft in the treatment of nonunion.

  10. No advantage to rhBMP-2 in addition to autogenous graft for fracture nonunion.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Richelle; Forman, Jordanna; Taormina, David P; Egol, Kenneth A

    2014-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins are a necessary component of the fracture healing cascade. Few studies have delineated the efficacy of iliac crest bone graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2), especially, in comparison with the gold standard treatment of nonunion, which is autogenous bone graft alone. This study compared the outcome of patients with fracture nonunion treated with autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 adjuvant vs patients treated with autogenous bone graft alone. A total of 118 consecutive patients who were to undergo long bone nonunion surgery with autogenous bone graft (50) or autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 (68) were identified. Surgical intervention included either harvested iliac autogenous bone graft or autogenous bone graft plus 1.5 mg/mL of rhBMP-2 placed in and around the site of nonunion. No differences were found in the distribution of nonunion sites included within each group. Twelve-month follow-up was obtained on 100 of 118 patients (84.7%). Analyses of demographic characteristics (including tobacco), medical comorbidities, previous surgeries, and nonunion type (atrophic vs hypertrophic) did not differ. Postoperative complication rates did not differ. The percentage of patients who progressed to union did not differ. Mean time to union in the autogenous bone graft plus rhBMP-2 group was 6.6 months (±3.9) vs 5.4 (±2.7) months in the autogenous bone graft-only group (P=.06). Rates of revision (16.2% for rhBMP-2 plus autogenous bone graft vs 8% for autogenous bone graft) did not differ statistically (P=.19), nor did 12-month scores of pain and functional assessment. Although rhBMP-2 is a safe adjuvant, there was no benefit seen when rhBMP-2 was added to autogenous bone graft in the treatment of long bone nonunion. Given its high cost, rhBMP-2 should be reconsidered as an aid to autogenous bone graft in the treatment of nonunion. PMID:24972432

  11. Infected forearm nonunion treated by bone transport after debridement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This is a therapeutic study to evaluate the results of the management of forearm infected nonunion using bone transport with external fixators after debridement. Methods We have retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 21 patients from October 1994 to June 2010 in our institution who were treated for the forearm infected nonunion by bone transport with external fixator after debridement. There were 12 males and 9 females. The mean age of the patients was 27.1 years. Of the initial fractures, nonunion of the radius alone invovled in 7 patients, nonunion of the ulna alone invovled in 12, and nonunion of the radius and ulna invovled in 2. Nineteen limbs (85.7%) were in active infected state with sinus and drainage. The mean amount of bone defect was 3.1 cm (range 1.8-4.6 cm) as measured on plain radiographs. Results The mean follow-up was 77.5 months. All patients achieved bony union and were satisfied with the functional and cosmetic outcome. All the infection had been controlled. The mean external fixation index was 42.5 day/cm. The average time for wound healing was 42 days. The mean length gained was 3.5 cm (2.1-5.3 cm). Conclusions The technique of bone transport after debridement is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment for forearm infected nonunion. PMID:24053582

  12. Staying Out of Trouble Performing Intramedullary Nailing of Forearm Fractures.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric diaphyseal forearm fractures occur commonly and often require reduction with stabilization. Intramedullary flexible nails provide an effective method for stabilizing and maintaining reduction of these fractures. There are a few specific technical pearls that can be implemented to improve efficiency of nail placement and minimize postoperative complications, such as painful hardware and compartment syndrome. PMID:27078233

  13. Scintigraphic findings in progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, M.M.; Billingsley, J.L.; Redwine, M.D.; Turnbull, G.L.; Brown, T.J.

    1982-04-01

    A 14-yr-old white male with a severe form of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann-Camurati disease) was referred to our institution for evaluation of splenomegaly, which is not usually associated with the disease. Our studies included bone-marrow, and liver-spleen scans. These scintigraphic findings, along with the probable cause for splenomegaly, are discussed.

  14. Scintigraphic findings in progressive diaphyseal dysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lundy, M.M.; Billingsley, M.L.; Redwine, M.D.; Turnbull, G.L.; Brown, T.J.

    1982-04-01

    A 14-yr-old white male with a severe form of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann-Camurati disease) was referred to our institution for evaluation of splenomegaly, which is not usually associated with the disease. Our studies included Tc-99m bone, bone-marrow, and liver-spleen scans. These scintigraphic findings, along with the probable cause for splenomegaly, are discussed.

  15. Primary diaphyseal tuberculosis of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, P; Bandyopadhyay, A; Ghosh, S; Kundu, A J

    2009-06-01

    Tuberculous osteomyelitis involving primarily the diaphysis without articular involvement is very rare. Pain and swelling are the common presenting symptoms. The nonspecific nature of the symptoms leads to a delay in the diagnosis. Radiographs may mimic pyogenic osteomyelitis, Brodie's abscess, tumours or granulomatous lesions. Curettage of the lesion and the histopathological examination of the material obtained are necessary for confirmation of the diagnosis and offer a chance for early healing. We report the successful diagnosis and management of a rare case in a 28-year-old man of Indian origin afflicted with primary diaphyseal tuberculosis of the left tibia.

  16. Multiple forearm robotic elbow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, John J.

    1990-01-01

    A dual forearmed robotic elbow configuration comprises a main arm having a double elbow from which two coplanar forearms depend, two actuators carried in the double elbow for moving the forearms, and separate, independent end effectors, operated by a cable carried from the main arm through the elbow, is attached to the distal end of each forearm. Coiling the cables around the actuators prevents bending or kinking when the forearms are rotated 360 degrees. The end effectors can have similar or different capabilities. Actuator cannisters within the dual elbow are modular for rapid replacement or maintenance. Coarse and fine resolver transducers within the actuators provide accurate position referencing information.

  17. [Bipolar forearm dislocation or floating forearm (a case report)].

    PubMed

    Daoudi, A; Elibrahimi, A; Loudiyi, W D; Elmrini, A; Chakour, K; Boutayeb, F

    2009-02-01

    Bipolar dislocation of the forearm or floating forearm is a rare injury. It combines concomitant elbow and wrist dislocation. Only six cases have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis of wrist dislocation may initially be missed and therefore the prognosis will be worse. The authors report a case of a bipolar dislocation with a posterior dislocation of the elbow and a perilunate dislocation of the wrist.

  18. Forearm training attenuates sympathetic responses to prolonged rhythmic forearm exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinoway, L.; Shenberger, J.; Leaman, G.; Zelis, R.; Gray, K.; Baily, R.; Leuenberger, U.

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (12 2-s contractions/min) evokes sympathoexcitation without significant engagement of metabolite-sensitive muscle afferents (B.A. Batman, J.C. Hardy, U.A. Leuenberger, M.B. Smith, Q.X. Yang and L.I. Sinoway. J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 1077-1081, 1994). This is in contrast to the sympathetic nervous system responses observed during fatiguing static forearm exercise where metabolite-sensitive afferents are the key determinants of sympathetic activation. In this report we examined whether forearm exercise training would attenuate sympathetic nervous system responses to rhythmic forearm exercise. We measured heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and NE spillover and clearance (tritiated NE kinetics) during nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise before and after a 4-wk unilateral forearm training paradigm. Training had no effect on forearm mass, maximal voluntary contraction, or heart rate but did attenuate the increase in MAP (increase in MAP: from 15.2 +/- 1.8 before training to 11.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg after training; P < 0.017), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (increase in bursts: from 10.8 +/- 1.4 before training to 6.2 +/- 1.1 bursts/min after training; P < 0.030), and the NE spillover (increases in arterial spillover: from 1.3 +/- 0.2 before training to 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.014; increase in venous spillover: from 2.0 +/- 0.6 before training to 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.037) seen in response to exercise performed by the trained forearm. Thus forearm training reduces sympathetic responses during a nonfatiguing rhythmic handgrip paradigm that does not engage muscle metaboreceptors. We speculate that this effect is due to a conditioning-induced reduction in mechanically sensitive muscle afferent discharge.

  19. Fractured diaphyseal tibiofibular synostosis in an adolescent soccer player.

    PubMed

    Santa Maria, Daniel L; Shaw, Thomas; Allen, Marque; Marin, James

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal tibiofibular synostosis is a rare cause of symptomatic shin pain with exertion. In this case, a 14-year-old male soccer player presented with atraumatic right shin pain made worse with running. Computed tomography revealed heterotopic ossification, or synostosis, of the tibial-fibular syndesmosis. The patient's symptoms improved with rest, without the need for operative intervention. PMID:25171880

  20. Longitudinal instability of the forearm.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, J; Watts, A C

    2016-10-01

    The Essex Lopresti lesion is a rare triad of injury to the radial head, interosseous membrane of the forearm and distal radio-ulnar joint, which results in longitudinal instability of the radius. If unrecognized this leads to chronic pain and disability which is difficult to salvage. Early recognition and appropriate treatment is therefore desirable to prevent long-term problems. The aim of this article is to review the pathoanatomy of longitudinal radius instability and use the existing literature and authors' experience to provide recommendations for recognition and treatment of acute and chronic forearm instability, including description of the author's technique for interosseous membrane reconstruction. PMID:27628434

  1. Robot Forearm and Dexterous Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    An electromechanical hand-and-forearm assembly has been developed for incorporation into an anthropomorphic robot that would be used in outer space. The assembly is designed to offer manual dexterity comparable to that of a hand inside an astronaut s suit; thus, the assembly may also be useful as a prosthesis or as an end effector on an industrial robot.

  2. Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Engelmann disease): scintigraphic-radiographic-clinical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, B.; Murphy, W.A.; Whyte, M.P.

    1981-07-01

    Four patients (2 males, 2 females; ages 15-47 yrs.) with variable clinical, radiographic, and scintigraphic manifestations of progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (PDD) or Engelmann disease were studied with 99mTc methylene diphosphonate bone imaging and radiographic skeletal surveys. Comparison of the results of the two imaging procedures showed that some affected bones were scintigraphically normal but radiographically abnormal and vice versa. These findings suggest that the lesions of PDD may mature, causing a significant decrease in disease activity, and that abnormally increased radiopharmaceutical accumulation during bone scintigraphy appears to be a sensitive indicator of disease activity.

  3. Articular to diaphyseal proportions of human and great ape metatarsals.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Damiano

    2010-10-01

    This study proposes a new way to use metatarsals to identify locomotor behavior of fossil hominins. Metatarsal head articular dimensions and diaphyseal strength in a sample of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and humans (n = 76) are used to explore the relationships of these parameters with different locomotor modes. Results show that ratios between metatarsal head articular proportions and diaphyseal strength of the hallucal and fifth metatarsal discriminate among extant great apes and humans based on their different locomotor modes. In particular, the hallucal and fifth metatarsal characteristics of humans are functionally related to the different ranges of motion and load patterns during stance phase in the forefoot of humans in bipedal locomotion. This method may be applicable to isolated fossil hominin metatarsals to provide new information relevant to debates regarding the evolution of human bipedal locomotion. The second to fourth metatarsals are not useful in distinguishing among hominoids. Further studies should concentrate on measuring other important qualitative and quantitative differences in the shape of the metatarsal head of hominoids that are not reflected in simple geometric reconstructions of the articulation, and gathering more forefoot kinematic data on great apes to better understand differences in range of motion and loading patterns of the metatarsals.

  4. Diaphyseal tibiofibular synostosis in professional athletes: Report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Sonnery-Cottet, B; Alessio-Mazzola, M; Luz, B F; Barbosa, N C; Tuteja, S; Kajetanek, C; Dellal, A; Thaunat, M

    2016-02-01

    Anterior leg pain is common in professional athletes and tibiofibular synostosis is reported to be a rare cause of anterior compartment pain or ankle pain related to sports activities. The management and appropriate treatment of this condition in professional athletes is controversial and the literature on the topic is sparse. Distal synostosis is usually related to ankle sprain and syndesmotic ligament injury, and proximal synostosis has been linked to leg length discrepancy and exostosis. Mid-shaft synostosis is even less common than proximal and distal forms. We present the treatment of mid-shaft tibiofibular synostosis in 2 cases of professional athletes (soccer and basketball player), along with a review of the literature. When diaphyseal synostosis is diagnosed, first-line conservative treatment, including ultrasound-guided steroid injection is recommended. However, if it does not respond to conservative management, surgical resection may be indicated to relieve symptoms.

  5. Dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations.

    PubMed

    Peaden, Allan W; Charles, Steven K

    2014-08-22

    Human movement generally involves multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) coordinated in a graceful and seemingly effortless manner even though the underlying dynamics are generally complex. Understanding these dynamics is important because it exposes the challenges that the neuromuscular system faces in controlling movement. Despite the importance of wrist and forearm rotations in everyday life, the dynamics of movements involving wrist and forearm rotations are currently unknown. Here we present equations of motion describing the torques required to produce movements combining flexion-extension (FE) and radial-ulnar deviation (RUD) of the wrist and pronation-supination (PS) of the forearm. The total torque is comprised of components required to overcome the effects of inertia, damping, stiffness, and gravity. Using experimentally measured kinematic data and subject-specific impedance parameters (inertia, damping, and stiffness), we evaluated movement torques to test the following hypotheses: the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are (1) dominated by stiffness, not inertial or damping effects, (2) significantly coupled through interaction torques due to stiffness and damping (but not inertia), and (3) too complex to be well approximated by a simple, linear model. We found that (1) the dynamics of movements combining the wrist and forearm are similar to wrist rotations in that stiffness dominates over inertial and damping effects (p<0.0001) by approximately an order of magnitude, (2) the DOF of the wrist and forearm are significantly coupled through stiffness, while interactions due to inertia and damping are small, and (3) despite the complexity of the exact equations of motion, the dynamics of wrist and forearm rotations are well approximated by a simple, linear (but still coupled) model (the mean error in predicting torque was less than 1% of the maximum torque). The exact and approximate models are presented for modeling wrist and forearm rotations in future

  6. Proximal femoral diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry in Orrorin tugenensis.

    PubMed

    Bleuze, M

    2012-06-01

    Functional adaptations in femora attributed to Orrorin tugenensis provide a unique opportunity to examine locomotor behavior very early in the hominin lineage. This study examines relative cortical thickness, cortical area (CA) relative to the polar moment of area (J), and J relative to femoral head superoinferior diameter (FHD) in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00 and BAR 1003'00), and compares patterns in this early hominin with those in a sample of modern humans (N=31), Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (N=8), Pan troglodytes troglodytes (N=13), and Pan paniscus (N=3). Relative cortical thickness and CA relative to J in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis are comparable to patterns generally found in other fossil hominins. Proximal femoral diaphyseal J relative to FHD in BAR 1002'00 is similar to patterns found in fossil hominins typically attributed to a non-Homo genus (i.e. SK 82, SK 97, and KNM-ER 738). Cross-sectional geometric patterns in the proximal femur of Orrorin are not unlike those generally found in australopithecines and fossil Homo. While the results of this study cannot confirm unequivocally that Orrorin was an obligate biped, a mode of locomotion comparable to that proposed for australopithecines cannot be ruled out. PMID:22609080

  7. Proximal femoral diaphyseal cross-sectional geometry in Orrorin tugenensis.

    PubMed

    Bleuze, M

    2012-06-01

    Functional adaptations in femora attributed to Orrorin tugenensis provide a unique opportunity to examine locomotor behavior very early in the hominin lineage. This study examines relative cortical thickness, cortical area (CA) relative to the polar moment of area (J), and J relative to femoral head superoinferior diameter (FHD) in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00 and BAR 1003'00), and compares patterns in this early hominin with those in a sample of modern humans (N=31), Plio-Pleistocene fossil hominins (N=8), Pan troglodytes troglodytes (N=13), and Pan paniscus (N=3). Relative cortical thickness and CA relative to J in the proximal femur of O. tugenensis are comparable to patterns generally found in other fossil hominins. Proximal femoral diaphyseal J relative to FHD in BAR 1002'00 is similar to patterns found in fossil hominins typically attributed to a non-Homo genus (i.e. SK 82, SK 97, and KNM-ER 738). Cross-sectional geometric patterns in the proximal femur of Orrorin are not unlike those generally found in australopithecines and fossil Homo. While the results of this study cannot confirm unequivocally that Orrorin was an obligate biped, a mode of locomotion comparable to that proposed for australopithecines cannot be ruled out.

  8. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Huyer, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  9. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Huyer, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen. PMID:27517030

  10. Rare Proximal Diaphyseal Stress Fractures of the Fifth Metatarsal Associated With Metatarsus Adductus.

    PubMed

    Wamelink, Kyle E; Marcoux, John T; Walrath, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Before the report of English surgeon Robert Jones, who sustained a fracture to his fifth metatarsal while dancing around a tent pole, metatarsal fractures were thought to be the result of direct trauma to the foot. The mechanism of metatarsal fractures, in particular, those involving the fifth metatarsal, is now well understood. Patients with an adducted alignment of their forefoot can overload the fifth metatarsal base, putting them at an increased risk of fractures of this bone. Studies have reported that 2 distinct types of proximal diaphyseal or junctional fractures of the fifth metatarsal occur: the acute proximal diaphyseal or transverse proximal diaphyseal fracture and the proximal diaphyseal stress fracture. The radiographic characteristics associated with proximal diaphyseal stress fractures of the fifth metatarsal can vary by the chronicity; however, the findings typically entail a radiolucent fracture line with surrounding reactive sclerosis. In addition, a reduced medullary canal width can be appreciated. In the present retrospective analysis of patients with stress-related trauma to the fifth metatarsal base with an adducted forefoot, 2012 foot trauma cases were reviewed at 3 separate institutions. Of the 2012 cases, 22 (1.11%) met the outlined criteria of stress fractures of the fifth metatarsal base and underlying metatarsus adductus. PMID:27066870

  11. Atypical femoral diaphyseal and subtrochanteric fractures and their association with bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Frankie; Lau, Tak-Wing; To, Michael; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei; Kung, Annie Wai Chee

    2009-01-01

    Antiresorptive bisphosphonate agents are the mainstay of treatment for osteoporosis in both men and postmenopausal women. However, recent studies have raised concerns about the oversuppression of bone turnover related to the long-term use of bisphosphonates. Cases of atypical femoral diaphyseal and subtrochanteric fracture were reported recently in patients on long-term alendronate, and oversuppression of bone turnover was postulated to be the cause. We retrospectively reviewed all patients with femoral diaphyseal and subtrochanteric fracture presented between July 2003 and June 2008, and identified 10 patients who reported prior bisphosphonate use. Bone formation markers of all these patients were in the low range. Although the incidence of bisphosphonate-related atypical fracture accounts for an extremely low percentage of the total number of femoral diaphyseal and subtrochanteric fractures, we observed a steady increase from 0% in 2003 to 2004 to 25% in 2007 to 2008. PMID:21686468

  12. Acute bilateral spontaneous forearm compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David M; Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; Subramaniam, Tava; McCabe, John P

    2014-01-01

    Acute spontaneous compartment syndrome of the forearm is rarely reported in the literature. It is typically associated with trauma or thromboembolism in the acute setting and repetitive exertional stress in the chronic setting. However it is rare for it to present bilaterally with no apparent underlying cause. We report the case of a young 31-year-old lady who presented to our Emergency Department with bilateral compartment syndrome of the forearm. Her presenting complaints included acute severe pain and swelling of the forearms bilaterally, with a decreased range of movement of the wrist and fingers. She also complained of numbness in all fingers. She had no history of recent trauma and ultrasound scans showed no evidence of vascular compromise. Past medical history was notable only for idiopathic hypertension and coeliac disease. The patient was taken to theatre urgently where flexor and extensor compartments and carpal tunnel were decompressed. Pronator Teres was found to be dusky initially but turned pink after decompression. All other muscles were normal. An interesting fact of this case was that combination of the high compartment pressures and anaesthetic related hypotension caused the forearm pulses to become impalpable at induction, these returned intra-operatively. The patient has been seen in the outpatient department following discharge. She is well apart from some mildly reduced grip strength in her right hand likely due to carpal tunnel decompression. No cause was found for the scenario after extensive medical investigation.

  13. Role of Nonbehavioral Factors in Adjusting Long Bone Diaphyseal Structure in Free-ranging Pan troglodytes.

    PubMed

    Carlson, K J; Sumner, D R; Morbeck, M E; Nishida, T; Yamanaka, A; Boesch, C

    2008-12-01

    Limb bones deform during locomotion and can resist the deformations by adjusting their shapes. For example, a tubular-shaped diaphysis best resists variably-oriented deformations. As behavioral profiles change during adulthood, patterns of bone deformation may exhibit age trends. Habitat characteristics, e.g., annual rainfall, tree density, and elevation changes, may influence bone deformations by eliciting individual components of behavioral repertoires and suppressing others, or by influencing movements during particular components. Habituated chimpanzee communities provide a unique opportunity to examine these factors because of the availability of morphological data and behavioral observations from known-age individuals inhabiting natural habitats. We evaluated adult femora and humeri of 18 female and 10 male free-ranging chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from communities in Gombe (Tanzania), Mahale Mountains (Tanzania), and Taï Forest (Côte d'Ivoire) National Parks. We compare cross sections at several locations (35%, 50%, 65% diaphyseal lengths). Community comparisons highlight different diaphyseal shapes of Taï females relative to Mahale and Gombe females, particularly in humeral diaphyses. Age trends in diaphyseal shapes are consistent with reduced activity levels in general, not only reduced arboreal activity. Age-related bone loss is apparent among community females, but is less striking among males. Community trends in diaphyseal shape are qualitatively consistent with ranked annual rainfall at localities, tree density, and elevation change or ruggedness of terrain. Habitat characteristics may contribute to variation in diaphyseal shape among chimpanzee communities, much like among modern human groups, but verification awaits further rigorous experimental and comparative analyses.

  14. [Treatment of humeral diaphyseal fractures in adults using centro-medullary pinning. Operative technic and indications].

    PubMed

    de la Caffinière, J Y; Kassab, G; Ould Ouali, A

    1988-01-01

    The ascending intramedullary "pinning" technique is known for twenty-five years. Theoretically successful for the diaphyseal humeral fractures in adults, it appeared until now with some disadvantages which limited its use. By adding some modifications, the authors show that this technique is worthwhile in dislocation fractures in adults. PMID:3253848

  15. Spastic Paralysis of the Elbow and Forearm.

    PubMed

    Gharbaoui, Idris; Kania, Katarzyna; Cole, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    As the physiologic recovery period concludes, the patient is evaluated for surgical procedures that may rebalance muscle function and correct deformity. Upper extremity function is the product of complex and highly sophisticated mechanisms working in unison, and a careful, systematic preoperative evaluation is critical. A good function of the hand cannot be achieved without adequate position of the shoulder, elbow, forearm, and wrist. The goals of surgery must be practical and clearly understood by the patient and the family. PMID:26869862

  16. Outcome of limb reconstruction system in open tibial diaphyseal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ajmera, Anand; Verma, Ankit; Agrawal, Mukul; Jain, Saurabh; Mukherjee, Arunangshu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Management of open tibial diaphyseal fractures with bone loss is a matter of debate. The treatment options range from external fixators, nailing, ring fixators or grafting with or without plastic reconstruction. All the procedures have their own set of complications, like acute docking problems, shortening, difficulty in soft tissue management, chronic infection, increased morbidity, multiple surgeries, longer hospital stay, mal union, nonunion and higher patient dissatisfaction. We evaluated the outcome of the limb reconstruction system (LRS) in the treatment of open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss as a definative mode of treatment to achieve union, as well as limb lengthening, simultaneously. Materials and Methods: Thirty open fractures of tibial diaphysis with bone loss of at least 4 cm or more with a mean age 32.5 years were treated by using the LRS after debridement. Distraction osteogenesis at rate of 1 mm/day was done away from the fracture site to maintain the limb length. On the approximation of fracture ends, the dynamized LRS was left for further 15-20 weeks and patient was mobilized with weight bearing to achieve union. Functional assessment was done by Association for the Study and Application of the Methods of Illizarov (ASAMI) criteria. Results: Mean followup period was 15 months. The mean bone loss was 5.5 cm (range 4-9 cm). The mean duration of bone transport was 13 weeks (range 8-30 weeks) with a mean time for LRS in place was 44 weeks (range 24-51 weeks). The mean implant index was 56.4 days/cm. Mean union time was 52 weeks (range 31-60 weeks) with mean union index of 74.5 days/cm. Bony results as per the ASAMI scoring were excellent in 76% (19/25), good in 12% (3/25) and fair in 4% (1/25) with union in all except 2 patients, which showed poor results (8%) with only 2 patients having leg length discrepancy more than 2.5 cm. Functional results were excellent in 84% (21/25), good in 8% (2/25), fair in 8% (2/25). Pin tract

  17. Biphasic forearm vascular responses to intraarterial arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S; Takeshita, A; Imaizumi, T; Hirooka, Y; Yoshida, M; Ando, S; Nakamura, M

    1989-01-01

    Forearm vascular responses to arginine vasopressin (AVP) infused into a brachial artery in a wide range of infusion rates (0.05-2.0 ng/kg per min) were examined in 20 young healthy volunteers. Intraarterial AVP at lower doses (0.05 and 0.1 ng/kg per min) caused forearm vasoconstriction, whereas AVP at a dose of 0.2 ng/kg per min or higher caused forearm vasodilatation. The maximal forearm vasoconstriction was induced at the venous plasma AVP level of 76.3 +/- 8.8 pg/ml. Forearm vasodilatation was associated with the venous plasma AVP level of 369 +/- 43 pg/ml or higher. Forearm vasodilatation was the result of the direct effect of AVP since forearm blood flow and vascular resistance in the contralateral arm did not change. We attempted to explore the mechanisms involved in AVP-induced direct vasodilatation. The treatment with indomethacin, 75 mg/d for 3 d, did not alter AVP-induced forearm vasodilatation. In contrast, intraarterial infusion of isoosmolar CaCl2 totally prevented AVP-induced forearm vasodilatation. Intra-arterial CaCl2 also markedly attenuated forearm vasodilatation induced by intraarterial sodium nitroprusside, but did not alter forearm vasodilatation induced by intraarterial isoproterenol. These results indicate that the direct vascular effects of intra-arterial AVP on the forearm vessels are biphasic, causing vasoconstriction at lower doses and vasodilatation at higher doses. The direct vasodilatation induced by intraarterial AVP at higher doses is not mediated by prostaglandins but may involve cGMP-related mechanisms. PMID:2547832

  18. Management of the Mangled Hand and Forearm.

    PubMed

    Gupta; Wolff

    1995-07-01

    In this article the authors describe the methods and procedures that have been used to help patients regain hand and forearm function after mangling injuries. Assessment of the pathophysiologic condition, careful inventory of the injured structures, and early aggressive wound excision and reconstruction, followed by expert rehabilitation, are advocated. The importance of vascular restoration, stable skeletal fixation, and provision of adequate skin cover are stressed. In addition to describing their treatment approach, the authors emphasize the need for the surgeon to be well acquainted with each phase of the treatment process. PMID:10795029

  19. Exposure of the forearm and distal radius.

    PubMed

    Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Mudgal, Chaitanya

    2014-11-01

    Approaches to the forearm use internervous planes to allow adequate bone exposure and prevent muscle denervation. The Henry approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the median and radial nerves. The Thompson approach utilizes the plane between muscles supplied by the radial and posterior interosseous nerves. The distal radius may be approached volarly. The extended flexor carpi radialis approach is useful for intraarticular fractures, subacute fractures, and malunions. The distal radius can be approached dorsally by releasing the third dorsal compartment and continuing the dissection subperiosteally. Choice of approach depends on the injury pattern and the need for exposure. PMID:25440071

  20. Linear milia en plaque on the forearm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Gharami, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A 64-year-old man presented with asymptomatic eruption on his right forearm and the dorsum of the hand present for 2 weeks. There was no history of trauma, prolonged sun exposure, or application of or contact with any substance prior to the development of lesions. He was a known hypertensive and diabetic and was taking treatment for these conditions. The rest of his history was noncontributory. On examination, multiple grouped tiny white papules were found on both normal skin and on the erythematous plaque. These papules were of almost uniform size (2-4 mm) and were notable for absence of umbilication. The erythematous plaque was roughly 15 cm in length and was extending along the ulnar border of forearm and dorsum of hand in a linear pattern (Figure 1). The surface temperature of the plaque appeared similar to the surrounding area, and the surface was studded with multiple tiny white papules. There were no lesions suggestive of chronic actinic damage in the surrounding area. The papules revealed solid whitish material on expression with a needle. The rest of the mucocutaneous examination was noncontributory. Based on clinical presentation, a diagnosis of linear milia en plaque was made. PMID:25335356

  1. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... Control No. 2900-NEW (Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)''....

  2. Teaching Strategies for the Forearm Pass in Volleyball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casebolt, Kevin; Zhang, Peng; Brett, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article shares teaching strategies for the forearm pass in the game of volleyball and identifies how they will help students improve their performance and development of forearm passing skills. The article also provides an assessment rubric to facilitate student understanding of the skill.

  3. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  4. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types.

  5. Radioguided parathyroidectomy in forearm graft for recurrent hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ardito, G; Revelli, L; Giustozzi, E; Giordano, A

    2012-01-01

    We report a peculiar case of recurrent hyperparathyroidism caused by hyperplasia of a forearm graft implanted following a total parathyroidectomy in a 38-year-old patient with chronic renal failure. The forearm graft hyperplasia was detected using (99)Tc(m)-sestamibi scanning, which identified hyperplastic transplanted parathyroid tissue in the forearm of the patient. During the initial surgery, the surgeon failed to mark the parathyroid tissue with sutures or clips to facilitate locating it. Therefore, we referred the patient for radioguided surgery. This surgical procedure allowed us to locate and completely remove the hyperfunctioning transplanted parathyroid tissue.

  6. Taxonomic identification of Lower Pleistocene fossil hominins based on distal humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional shape.

    PubMed

    Lague, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple hominin species during the Lower Pleistocene has long presented a challenge for taxonomic attribution of isolated postcrania. Although fossil humeri are well-suited for studies of hominin postcranial variation due to their relative abundance, humeral articular morphology has thus far been of limited value for differentiating Paranthropus from Homo. On the other hand, distal humeral diaphyseal shape has been used to justify such generic distinctions at Swartkrans. The potential utility of humeral diaphyseal shape merits larger-scale quantitative analysis, particularly as it permits the inclusion of fragmentary specimens lacking articular morphology. This study analyzes shape variation of the distal humeral diaphysis among fossil hominins (c. 2-1 Ma) to test the hypothesis that specimens can be divided into distinct morphotypes. Coordinate landmarks were placed on 3D laser scans to quantify cross-sectional shape at a standardized location of the humeral diaphysis (proximal to the olecranon fossa) for a variety of fossil hominins and extant hominids. The fossil sample includes specimens attributed to species based on associated craniodental remains. Mantel tests of matrix correlation were used to assess hypotheses about morphometric relationships among the fossils by comparing empirically-derived Procrustes distance matrices to hypothetical model matrices. Diaphyseal shape variation is consistent with the hypothesis of three distinct morphotypes (Paranthropus, Homo erectus, non-erectus early Homo) in both eastern and southern Africa during the observed time period. Specimens attributed to non-erectus early Homo are unique among hominids with respect to the degree of relative anteroposterior flattening, while H. erectus humeri exhibit morphology more similar to that of modern humans. In both geographic regions, Paranthropus is characterized by a morphology that is intermediate with respect to those morphological features that differentiate

  7. Atypical Fractures are Mainly Subtrochanteric in Singapore and Diaphyseal in Sweden: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Schilcher, Jörg; Howe, Tet Sen; Png, Meng Ai; Aspenberg, Per; Koh, Joyce S B

    2015-11-01

    We have previously noted a dichotomy in the location of atypical fractures along the femoral shaft in Swedish patients, and a mainly subtrochanteric location of atypical fractures in descriptions of patients from Singapore. These unexpected differences were now investigated by testing the following hypotheses in a cross-sectional study: first, that there is a dichotomy also in Singapore; second, that the relation between subtrochanteric and diaphyseal location is different between the two countries; third, that the location is related to femoral bow. The previously published Swedish sample (n = 151) was re-measured, and a new Singaporean sample (n = 75) was established. Both samples were based on radiographic classification of all femoral fractures in women above 55 years of age. The distance between the fracture line and the lesser trochanter was measured. Femoral bow was classified as present or absent on frontal radiographs. Frequency distribution of the measured distances was analyzed using the Bayesian information criterion to choose the best description of the observed variable distribution in terms of a compilation of normally distributed subgroups. The analysis showed a clear dichotomy of the fracture location: either subtrochanteric or diaphyseal. Subtrochanteric fractures comprised 48% of all fractures in Singapore, and 17% in Sweden (p = 0.0001). In Singapore, femoral bow was associated with more fractures in the diaphyseal subgroup (p = 0.0001). This was not seen in Sweden. A dichotomous location of atypical fractures was confirmed, because it was found also in Singapore. The fractures showed a different localization pattern in the two countries. This difference may be linked to anatomical variations, but might also be related to cultural differences between the two populations that influence physical activity.

  8. Taxonomic identification of Lower Pleistocene fossil hominins based on distal humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional shape

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of multiple hominin species during the Lower Pleistocene has long presented a challenge for taxonomic attribution of isolated postcrania. Although fossil humeri are well-suited for studies of hominin postcranial variation due to their relative abundance, humeral articular morphology has thus far been of limited value for differentiating Paranthropus from Homo. On the other hand, distal humeral diaphyseal shape has been used to justify such generic distinctions at Swartkrans. The potential utility of humeral diaphyseal shape merits larger-scale quantitative analysis, particularly as it permits the inclusion of fragmentary specimens lacking articular morphology. This study analyzes shape variation of the distal humeral diaphysis among fossil hominins (c. 2-1 Ma) to test the hypothesis that specimens can be divided into distinct morphotypes. Coordinate landmarks were placed on 3D laser scans to quantify cross-sectional shape at a standardized location of the humeral diaphysis (proximal to the olecranon fossa) for a variety of fossil hominins and extant hominids. The fossil sample includes specimens attributed to species based on associated craniodental remains. Mantel tests of matrix correlation were used to assess hypotheses about morphometric relationships among the fossils by comparing empirically-derived Procrustes distance matrices to hypothetical model matrices. Diaphyseal shape variation is consistent with the hypothesis of three distinct morphotypes (Paranthropus, Homo erectus, non-erectus early Homo) in both eastern and southern Africa during the observed time period. Specimens attributed to non-erectus early Homo are unique among hominids with respect to the degree of relative anteroposterior flattening, while H. erectus humeri exhibit morphology more similar to that of modern humans. In both geographic regions, Paranthropus is characterized by a morphology that is intermediate with respect to those morphological features that differentiate

  9. Oblique wedge osteotomy for femoral diaphyseal deformity in fibrous dysplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Hashimoto, Y; Mizuno, K

    2001-03-01

    A patient with fibrous dysplasia who had a three-dimensional diaphyseal deformity in the left femur was treated using an oblique wedge osteotomy. The patient was 26-year-old man with a history of two pathologic fractures in the midshaft of the femur. A 22 degrees angular deformity in the coronal plane and 15 degrees anterior bowing were corrected. The results at a followup 2 years after surgery were satisfactory in functional and radiologic terms. The technique and advantages of the oblique wedge osteotomy are discussed. PMID:11249172

  10. Forearm posture and mobility in quadrupedal dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Bonnan, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupedality evolved four independent times in dinosaurs; however, the constraints associated with these transitions in limb anatomy and function remain poorly understood, in particular the evolution of forearm posture and rotational ability (i.e., active pronation and supination). Results of previous qualitative studies are inconsistent, likely due to an inability to quantitatively assess the likelihood of their conclusions. We attempt to quantify antebrachial posture and mobility using the radius bone because its morphology is distinct between extant sprawled taxa with a limited active pronation ability and parasagittal taxa that have an enhanced ability to actively pronate the manus. We used a sliding semi-landmark, outline-based geometric morphometric approach of the proximal radial head and a measurement of the angle of curvature of the radius in a sample of 189 mammals, 49 dinosaurs, 35 squamates, 16 birds, and 5 crocodilians. Our results of radial head morphology showed that quadrupedal ceratopsians, bipedal non-hadrosaurid ornithopods, and theropods had limited pronation/supination ability, and sauropodomorphs have unique radial head morphology that likely allowed limited rotational ability. However, the curvature of the radius showed that no dinosaurian clade had the ability to cross the radius about the ulna, suggesting parallel antebrachial elements for all quadrupedal dinosaurs. We conclude that the bipedal origins of all quadrupedal dinosaur clades could have allowed for greater disparity in forelimb posture than previously appreciated, and future studies on dinosaur posture should not limit their classifications to the overly simplistic extant dichotomy.

  11. Testing Tactile Masking between the Forearms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Sarah; Harris, Laurence R

    2016-01-01

    Masking, in which one stimulus affects the detection of another, is a classic technique that has been used in visual, auditory, and tactile research, usually using stimuli that are close together to reveal local interactions. Masking effects have also been demonstrated in which a tactile stimulus alters the perception of a touch at a distant location. Such effects can provide insight into how components of the body's representations in the brain may be linked. Occasional reports have indicated that touches on one hand or forearm can affect tactile sensitivity at corresponding contralateral locations. To explore the matching of corresponding points across the body, we can measure the spatial tuning and effect of posture on contralateral masking. Careful controls are required to rule out direct effects of the remote stimulus, for example by mechanical transmission, and also attention effects in which thresholds may be altered by the participant's attention being drawn away from the stimulus of interest. The use of this technique is beneficial as a behavioural measure for exploring which parts of the body are functionally connected and whether the two sides of the body interact in a somatotopic representation. This manuscript describes a behavioural protocol that can be used for studying contralateral tactile masking. PMID:26889736

  12. Forearm Posture and Mobility in Quadrupedal Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    VanBuren, Collin S.; Bonnan, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupedality evolved four independent times in dinosaurs; however, the constraints associated with these transitions in limb anatomy and function remain poorly understood, in particular the evolution of forearm posture and rotational ability (i.e., active pronation and supination). Results of previous qualitative studies are inconsistent, likely due to an inability to quantitatively assess the likelihood of their conclusions. We attempt to quantify antebrachial posture and mobility using the radius bone because its morphology is distinct between extant sprawled taxa with a limited active pronation ability and parasagittal taxa that have an enhanced ability to actively pronate the manus. We used a sliding semi-landmark, outline-based geometric morphometric approach of the proximal radial head and a measurement of the angle of curvature of the radius in a sample of 189 mammals, 49 dinosaurs, 35 squamates, 16 birds, and 5 crocodilians. Our results of radial head morphology showed that quadrupedal ceratopsians, bipedal non-hadrosaurid ornithopods, and theropods had limited pronation/supination ability, and sauropodomorphs have unique radial head morphology that likely allowed limited rotational ability. However, the curvature of the radius showed that no dinosaurian clade had the ability to cross the radius about the ulna, suggesting parallel antebrachial elements for all quadrupedal dinosaurs. We conclude that the bipedal origins of all quadrupedal dinosaur clades could have allowed for greater disparity in forelimb posture than previously appreciated, and future studies on dinosaur posture should not limit their classifications to the overly simplistic extant dichotomy. PMID:24058633

  13. Mid-diaphyseal Endosteal Thickening With Subsequent Medullary Narrowing in a Patient With Hallermann-Streiff Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaissi, Ali Al; Handelbauer, Albert; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2011-01-01

    We report on a 5-year-old girl who presented with the full clinical criteria of Hallermann-Streiff syndrome (HSS). Classically, overtubulation (thin and gracile) bones are the characteristic and constant features in HSS. Interestingly, our present patient manifested unusual mid-diaphyseal endosteal thickening with subsequent medullary narrowing (defective endosteal resorption). To the best of our knowledge no previous reports described such unusual feature in a patient with HSS. Keywords Hallermann-Streiff syndrome; Mid-diaphyseal thickening; Radiology PMID:22393346

  14. Acquired Solitary Glomangiomyoma on the Forearm: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir; Balcioglu, Mecdi Gurhan; Kadioglu, Emine

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours are benign lesions which are frequently seen on hand (particularly subungual region). In this report a 52-year-old male patient with glomangiomyoma on the left forearm has been presented. With a preliminary diagnosis of haemangioma, a subcutaneous well-circumscribed nodular lesion of the patient was excised. On histomorphological examination glomus cells, vascular structures and spindle-shaped smooth muscle cells were seen around it. Immunohistochemistry of smooth muscle cells and glomus cells showed positivity for smooth muscle actin. By means of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with glomangiomyoma. Glomus tumours are rare in the forearm (In the literatüre there are two cases). Moreover, glomangiomyomas are the least common histomorphological type of glomus tumour and are generally seen in the lower extremity. In the literature, a few cases of glomangioma and solitary glomus tumour has been described on the forearm histologically and only a few glomangiomyoma cases on forearm location. We have presented the glomangiomyoma on the forearm as a rarely-seen case. Early diagnosis of the glomangiomyoma on the forearm is of importance for the prevention of morbidity.

  15. Impaired vasodilation of forearm resistance vessels in hypercholesterolemic humans.

    PubMed Central

    Creager, M A; Cooke, J P; Mendelsohn, M E; Gallagher, S J; Coleman, S M; Loscalzo, J; Dzau, V J

    1990-01-01

    The effect of hypercholesterolemia on vascular function was studied in humans. To eliminate the potential confounding effects of atherosclerosis, vascular reactivity was measured in the forearm resistance vessels of 11 normal subjects (serum LDL cholesterol = 111 +/- 7 mg/dl) and 13 patients with hypercholesterolemia (serum LDL cholesterol = 211 +/- 19 mg/dl, P less than 0.05). Each subject received intrabrachial artery infusions of methacholine, which releases endothelium-derived relaxant factor, and nitroprusside which directly stimulates guanylate cyclase in vascular smooth muscle. Maximal vasodilatory potential was determined during reactive hyperemia. Vasoconstrictive responsiveness was examined during intra-arterial phenylephrine infusion. Forearm blood flow was determined by venous occlusion plethysmography. Basal forearm blood flow in normal and hypercholesterolemic subjects was comparable. Similarly, reactive hyperemic blood flow did not differ between the two groups. In contrast, the maximal forearm blood flow response to methacholine in hypercholesterolemic subjects was less than that observed in normal subjects. In addition, the forearm blood flow response to nitroprusside was less in hypercholesterolemic subjects. There was no difference in the forearm vasoconstrictive response to phenylephrine in the two groups. Thus, the vasodilator responses to methacholine and nitroprusside were blunted in patients with hypercholesterolemia. We conclude that in humans with hypercholesterolemia, there is a decreased effect of nitrovasodilators, including endothelium-derived relaxing factor, on the vascular smooth muscle of resistance vessels. PMID:2195060

  16. Acquired Solitary Glomangiomyoma on the Forearm: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir; Balcioglu, Mecdi Gurhan; Kadioglu, Emine

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours are benign lesions which are frequently seen on hand (particularly subungual region). In this report a 52-year-old male patient with glomangiomyoma on the left forearm has been presented. With a preliminary diagnosis of haemangioma, a subcutaneous well-circumscribed nodular lesion of the patient was excised. On histomorphological examination glomus cells, vascular structures and spindle-shaped smooth muscle cells were seen around it. Immunohistochemistry of smooth muscle cells and glomus cells showed positivity for smooth muscle actin. By means of these findings, the patient was diagnosed with glomangiomyoma. Glomus tumours are rare in the forearm (In the literatüre there are two cases). Moreover, glomangiomyomas are the least common histomorphological type of glomus tumour and are generally seen in the lower extremity. In the literature, a few cases of glomangioma and solitary glomus tumour has been described on the forearm histologically and only a few glomangiomyoma cases on forearm location. We have presented the glomangiomyoma on the forearm as a rarely-seen case. Early diagnosis of the glomangiomyoma on the forearm is of importance for the prevention of morbidity. PMID:27630858

  17. Microstructure and micromechanical properties of the mid-diaphyses of human fetal femurs.

    PubMed

    Su, X W; Feng, Q L; Cui, F Z; Zhu, X D

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure, composition and the micromechanical properties across the thickness of femoral mid-diaphyses from 14 to 26 week human fetuses have been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to examine structural changes with maturation. The fetal bones consist of layers of woven bone. From young to old fetuses and from outer to inner bone layers, the collagen fibrils become more cross-linked, densely packed and change from disordered to an ordered arrangement. The collagen fibril bundles are also more preferentially oriented and change from a chiefly circumferential to longitudinal direction. The sizes of the apatite crystals also increase with age. The Ca/P ratio remains constant around 1.55 for all the bone layers except the outmost layer which is lower than 1.2. An nano-indenter was used to evaluate the microhardness and elastic modulus of each bone layer. The increase of microhardness and elastic modulus correlates with the maturation of bone. The mechanical properties of the mid-diaphyses of human fetal femurs are anisotropic, which is due to the preferential orientation of collagen fibrils.

  18. The pattern of femoral diaphyseal fractures in children admitted in Sarawak General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rasit, A H; Mohammad, A W; Pan, K L

    2006-02-01

    Trend towards changing the face of management for pediatric femoral fractures tends to advocate operative treatment. This study was undertaken to review our current practice in the wake of recent progress in the management of pediatric femoral fractures. Fifty patients with femoral diaphyseal fracture treated in Sarawak General Hospital were reviewed retrospectively after an average follow-up of 2.6 years. There were 36 boys and 14 girls, with a mean age of 6.2 years (range five months to 14 years). Children under six years of age constituted the majority of the patients. Half of the fractures were caused by road traffic accident. Nine patients had associated injuries. The most common site of fracture was at the middle third (N=31). The treatment regimens were delayed hip spica (DHS) in 16, immediate hip spica (IHS) in 24, plate osteosynthesis (PO) in five, titanium elastic nailing (TEN) in five, and external fixation (EF) in one. The minimum hospital stay was two days, and the maximum 33 days (mean, 9.7 days). Malunion was the commonest complication. Conservative treatment is the preferred option for children under six years of age. It is cost-effective with minimal complication. The other treatment options are reserved for specific indication in older children. Diaphyseal fractures of the femur in children can be adequately managed non-operatively.

  19. [Acute forearm compartment syndrome after total arch replacement].

    PubMed

    Kigawa, Ikutaro; Miyairi, Takeshi; Tanaka, Satona; Unai, Shinya; Miura, Sumio; Ohno, Takayuki; Fukuda, Sachito; Takamoto, Shinichi

    2011-06-01

    A 61-year-old female presented with shortness of breath and was found to have moderate aortic regurgitation with annulo-aortic ectasia and an aneurysm involving the aortic arch. She underwent Bentall operation and total arch replacement with a branched prosthesis. The patient developed hypesthesia and paresis of the left forearm one day after the surgery. Computed tomography revealed complete occlusion of the left subclavian artery (LSA). An emergency operation was performed 15 hours after the initial operation. A new bypass graft to the axillary artery was placed since the LSA was occluded by the wide arterial dissection. However, her left forearm showed rapid swelling within a few hours. Under the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the forearm, emergency decompression fasciotomy was performed. She was discharged with a mild dysfunction of her forearm and hand 40 days after the operation. The rapid progression of ACS was thought to have been associated with not only the severe and prolonged ischemia but also the venous obstruction caused by the ligation of left brachiocephalic vein during the initial operation. Immediate and complete decompression, including the deep compartment of the forearm, was essential to achieve a full functional recovery from ACS.

  20. Case report: accessory head of the deep forearm flexors

    PubMed Central

    JONES, M.; ABRAHAMS, P. H.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    In 1813 Gantzer described 2 accessory muscles in the human forearm which bear his name (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875) and these have subsequently been reported with variable attachments (Wood, 1868; Macalister, 1875; Turner, 1879; Schäfer & Thane, 1894; Le Double, 1897; Dykes & Anson, 1944; Mangini, 1960; Malhotra et al. 1982; Kida, 1988; Tountas & Bergman, 1993). The accessory heads of the deep flexors of the forearm (Gantzer's muscles) have been described as 2 different small bellies which insert either into FPL or FDP. There are no previous reports which have mentioned the existence of an accessory muscle which inserts into both of the 2 deep flexors of the forearm as in the case presented here. PMID:9306208

  1. 78 FR 36308 - Proposed Information Collection (Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment period, comments may be viewed.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Elbow and Forearm Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form...

  2. [A former bodybuilder with a swelling on the forearm].

    PubMed

    Strijbos, Ruben M; Zwaard, Ton M

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old man came to the general practitioner with a solitary compressible swelling on his left forearm, which enlarged during exercise. The patient reported a history of bodybuilding and he worked as a plasterer. Physical examination revealed primary varicose of the upper extremity, a rare localisation of a common vascular disease.

  3. Complications of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Chia, Benjamin; Kozin, Scott H; Herman, Martin J; Safier, Shannon; Abzug, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Distal radius and forearm fractures represent a large percentage of pediatric fractures. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall onto an outstretched arm, which can lead to substantial rotational displacement. If this rotational displacement is not adequately addressed, there will be resultant loss of forearm motion and subsequent limitations in performing the activities of daily living. Good initial reductions and proper casting techniques are necessary when treating distal radius and forearm fractures nonsurgically; however, maintaining an acceptable reduction is not always possible. Atraumatic reduction of a displaced physeal fracture should occur within 7 days of the injury. If an impending malunion presents at 2 weeks or later after injury, observation is warranted because of concerns about physeal arrest with repeated attempts at manipulation, and it should be followed by a later assessment of functional limitations. Pediatric patients and their parents have higher expectations for recovery, which has contributed to an increase in the surgical management of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures. In addition, surgical interventions, such as intramedullary nailing, have their own associated complications.

  4. Evidence-based Comprehensive Approach to Forearm Arterial Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Janice N.; Pacheco, Jose A.; Margolis, David S.; Swartz, Tianyi; Massey, Brandon Z.; Guisto, John A.; Smith, Jordan L.; Sheppard, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Penetrating injury to the forearm may cause an isolated radial or ulnar artery injury, or a complex injury involving other structures including veins, tendons and nerves. The management of forearm laceration with arterial injury involves both operative and nonoperative strategies. An evolution in management has emerged especially at urban trauma centers, where the multidisciplinary resource of trauma and hand subspecialties may invoke controversy pertaining to the optimal management of such injuries. The objective of this review was to provide an evidence-based, systematic, operative and nonoperative approach to the management of isolated and complex forearm lacerations. A comprehensive search of MedLine, Cochrane Library, Embase and the National Guideline Clearinghouse did not yield evidence-based management guidelines for forearm arterial laceration injury. No professional or societal consensus guidelines or best practice guidelines exist to our knowledge. Discussion The optimal methods for achieving hemostasis are by a combination approach utilizing direct digital pressure, temporary tourniquet pressure, compressive dressings followed by wound closure. While surgical hemostasis may provide an expedited route for control of hemorrhage, this aggressive approach is often not needed (with a few exceptions) to achieve hemostasis for most forearm lacerations. Conservative methods mentioned above will attain the same result. Further, routine emergent or urgent operative exploration of forearm laceration injuries are not warranted and not cost-beneficial. It has been widely accepted with ample evidence in the literature that neither injury to forearm artery, nerve or tendon requires immediate surgical repair. Attention should be directed instead to control of bleeding, and perform a complete physical examination of the hand to document the presence or absence of other associated injuries. Critical ischemia will require expeditious surgical restoration of

  5. Compartment syndrome resulting from undetected ulnar artery injury in the absence of a forearm fracture.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Priyanka; Lloyd-Hughes, Hawys; Halsey, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy presented following a transient crush injury to his forearm. He displayed mild abrasions but no laceration or associated fractures. The injury resulted in traumatic rupture of the ulnar artery, which caused a large forearm haematoma and an acute forearm compartment syndrome. Prompt clinical diagnosis and operative intervention were required to prevent disastrous consequences.

  6. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

    PubMed

    Garayoa, Santiago Amillo; Romero-Muñoz, Luis M; Pons-Villanueva, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm requires immediate treatment to avoid damage of the soft tissues and a poor functional outcome for the forearm. Muscular and bone lesions are the main causes of acute compartment syndromes. We report a case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm caused by a calcific tendinitis of the distal biceps.

  7. [Counter-lateral compression in oblique pseudarthroses of diaphyses of the tubular bones of the lower limbs].

    PubMed

    Kravchuk, V I

    1976-06-01

    The author reports the results of treatment in 58 patients with oblique aplastic pseudarthrosis of tubular bones diaphyses of the lower limbs. For treatment extrafocal with counter-lateral compression by means of pins with bearing surfaces. By the present time nearly in all patients (52 of 58) with the mentioned complications such kind of treatment resulted in rehabilitation of the main motion-bearing function of the extremity.

  8. Low-energy diaphyseal femoral fractures associated with bisphosphonate use and severe curved femur: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2012-09-01

    Recent reports have raised concerns about low-energy subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures after long-term bisphosphonate treatment, which may be associated with severely suppressed bone turnover (SSBT). However, diaphyseal femoral fractures without bisphosphonate treatment have also been reported in patients with severely curved femur, which are commonplace in the elderly. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate associations between occurrence of such fractures, bisphosphonate use, and curvature of the femur. Nine consecutive elderly patients treated for low-energy diaphyseal femoral fractures between 2005 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients sustained bilateral fractures. Eight patients were administered bisphosphonates and one patient was administered raloxifene. Duration of osteoporosis treatment, type of fractures, surgical procedure, cortical thickness and curvature of opposite femur were evaluated. The cortical thickness and femoral curvature were further compared with those of 24 control subjects without fractures. The mean duration of drug administration was 3.6 years. All fractures showed similar X-ray patterns of simple transverse fracture with medial spike. Only one femur showed thickening of the femoral cortex. One case was treated with locking plate fixation, while the other cases were operated with intramedullary nails (9 antegrade nails, 2 retrograde nails). One femur treated with retrograde nail showed delayed bone union. The femoral curvature was significantly higher in the low-energy fracture group than the control group (P < 0.01); however, cortical thickness did not show a significant difference between the groups. In addition to SSBT, increased femoral curvature might be a causative factor for low-energy diaphyseal femoral fracture in the elderly.

  9. Long-term anabolic effects of prostaglandin-E2 on tibial diaphyseal bone in male rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Li, Xiao Jian

    1991-01-01

    The effects of long-term prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on tibial diaphyseal bone were studied in 7-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats given daily subcutaneous injections of 0, 1, 3 and 6 mg PGE2/kg/day for 60, 120 and 180 days. The tibial shaft was measured by single photon absorptiometry and dynamic histomorphometric analyses were performed on double-fluorescent labeled undecalcified tibial diaphyseal bone samples. Exogenous PGE2 administration produced the following transient changes in a dose-response manner between zero and 60 days: (1) increased bone width and mineral density; (2) increased total tissue and total bone areas; (3) decreased marrow area; (4) increased periosteal and corticoendosteal lamellar bone formation; (5) activated corticoendosteal lamellar and woven trabecular bone formation; and (6) activated intracortical bone remodeling. A new steady-state of increased tibial diaphyseal bone mass and elevated bone activities were observed from day 60 onward. The elevated bone mass level attained after 60 days of PGE2 treatment was maintained at 120 and 180 days. These observations indicate that the powerful anabolic effects of PGE2 will increase both periosteal and corticoendosteal bone mass and sustain the transient increase in bone mass with continuous daily administration of PGE2.

  10. [Infection following centro-medullary nailing of diaphyseal femoral and tibial fractures].

    PubMed

    Lortat-Jacob, A; Sutour, J M; Beaufils, P

    1986-01-01

    The authors have treated 51 cases of infection arising after intramedullary nailing of the femur or tibia. In 3 cases amputation was required, 48 united, but 10 were still draining. The final result was obtained after an average of 15 months. An average of four procedures per patient were needed. All the cases were septic non-unions at the onset of treatment, except 18 cases which had already united. In these cases, simple removal of the femoral nail led to rapid healing. In contrast, healing was less easy to obtain in the tibia. In 33 septic non-unions, 12 femoral and 21 tibial, the best results at the femoral level were obtained by retaining the nail in situ. At the tibial level, retention of the nail was rarely followed by bony union. Removal of the nail and the use of external fixation gave good results for the infection, but rarely resulted in bony union (1 case out of 14). The failures were treated by further operation of bone resection and grafting. The authors recommend, in cases of tibial septic non-union after nailing that primary removal of the nail should be associated with bony resection and external fixation, followed by reconstructive grafting, either by open cancellous grafting extending to the fibula or conventional tibio fibular grafting. In 8 cases, 7 in the femur and 1 in the tibia, the infection extended throughout the entire diaphysis and in 3 of these cases, a large diaphyseal resection was required. PMID:3823510

  11. [Therapy of diaphyseal fractures of the leg in a district hospital].

    PubMed

    Pavlícek, B

    1993-02-01

    During the period between 1987 and 1991 at the surgical department of the Trebíc hospital 136 casualties with closed diaphyseal fractures were treated. All patients were older than 18 years and monotraumas were involved. The patients were treated by immobilization by a classical high plaster bandage, functional plaster as recommended by Sarmient, extension treatment, miniosteosynthesis, osteosynthesis using a splint, intramedullary fixation as described by Küntscher and Simon-Enders-Weidner, or possibly by a combination of the mentioned methods. The author divides fractures of the leg into stable and unstable fractures and fracture with so-called urgently indicated osteosynthesis. The mean period of treatment with high plaster bandage was 31.7 weeks, functional plaster according to Sarmient 20.2 weeks, miniosteosynthesis with plaster fixation 25.5 weeks. When splints were used, the mean period of treatment was 30.5 weeks, in osteosynthesis according to Enders 20.6 weeks. The best results in stable fractures were achieved by functional plaster according to Sarmient, in unstable fractures and those with indicated osteosynthesis by using intramedullary fixation as described by Enders. PMID:8211388

  12. Profunda femoris artery pseudoaneurysm following revision for femoral shaft fracture nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Valli, Federico; Teli, Marco GA; Innocenti, Marco; Vercelli, Ruggero; Prestamburgo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Femoral artery pseudoaneurysms (FAPs) have been described following internal fixation of intertrocantheric, subtrocantheric and intracapsular femoral neck fractures as well as core decompression of the femoral head. The diagnosis of FAP is usually delayed because of non-specific clinical features like pain, haematoma, swelling, occasional fever and unexplained anaemia. Because of the insidious onset and of the possible delayed presentation of pseudoaneurysms, orthopaedic and trauma surgeons should be aware of this complication. We report a case of Profunda Femoris arterial branch pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed in a 40-year-old male 4 wk after revision with Kuntscher intramedullary nail of a femoral shaft nonunion. The diagnosis was achieved by computed tomography angiography and the lesion was effectively managed by endovascular repair. The specific literature and suggestions for treatment are discussed in the paper. PMID:23878785

  13. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  14. Motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using forearm electrical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takao; Kusuhara, Toshimasa; Yamamoto, Yoshitake

    2013-04-01

    The extroversion or hyperextension of elbow joint cause disorders of elbow joint in throwing a baseball. A method, which is easy handling and to measure motion objectively, can be useful for evaluation of throwing motion. We investigated a possibility of motion discrimination of throwing a baseball using electrical impedance method. The parameters of frequency characteristics (Cole-Cole arc) of forearm electrical impedance were measured during four types of throwing a baseball. Multiple discriminant analysis was used and the independent variables were change ratios of 11 parameters of forearm electrical impedance. As results of 120 data with four types of throwing motion in three subjects, hitting ratio was very high and 95.8%. We can expect to discriminate throwing a baseball using multiple discriminant analysis of impedance parameters.

  15. [Treatment outcome for forearm shaft fracture using AO plate stabilization].

    PubMed

    Kaleta, M; Małecki, P; Tokarowski, A; Kusz, D

    1995-01-01

    Results of treatment for 104 forearm shaft fractures in 70 patients have been presented. In all cases included in this study an open reduction of the fracture was followed by AO plate stabilization. Functional and radiological assessment was carried out according to the criteria of Anderson et al. Excellent and good functional results were achieved in 48 cases, fair in 10 and poor in 12 cases. The ulna united in 75%, the radius in 78% (delayed union included). Cross- union occurred in three patients, one case of destabilization at fracture site was observed, no infection has been noted. AO plate osteosynthesis proved to be still valuable mode of treatment for forearm shaft fracture. PMID:7587501

  16. Carpal and Forearm Kinematics During a Simulated Hammering Task

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Evan L.; Moore, Douglas C.; Akelman, Edward; Wolfe, Scott W.; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Hammering is a functional task in which the wrist generally follows a path of motion from a position of combined radial deviation and extension to combined ulnar deviation and flexion, colloquially referred to as a dart thrower's motion (DTM). The purpose of this study was to measure wrist and forearm motion and scaphoid and lunate kinematics during a simulated hammering task. We hypothesized that the wrist follows an oblique path from radial extension to ulnar flexion and that there would be minimal radiocarpal motion during the hammering task. Methods 13 healthy volunteers consented to have their wrist and distal forearm imaged with computed tomography at five positions in a simulated hammering task. The kinematics of the carpus and distal radial ulnar joint were calculated using established markerless bone registration methods. The path of wrist motion was described relative to the sagittal plane. Forearm rotation and radioscaphoid and radiolunate motion were computed as a function wrist position. Results All volunteers performed the simulated hammering task using a path of wrist motion from radial extension to ulnar flexion that was oriented an average 41 ± 3° from the sagittal plane. These paths did not pass through the anatomic neutral wrist position; rather they passed through the neutral hammering position, which was offset by 36° ± 8° in extension. Rotations of the scaphoid and lunate were not minimal but averaged 40% and 41% respectively of total wrist motion. The range of forearm pronosupination during the task averaged 12 ± 8°. Conclusions The simulated hammering task was performed using a wrist motion that followed an oblique path, from radial extension to ulnar flexion. Scaphoid and lunate rotations were significantly reduced, but not minimized, when compared with rotations during pure wrist flexion/extension. This is likely due to the fact that an extended wrist position was maintained throughout the entire task studied. PMID:20610055

  17. Forearm muscle oxygenation decreases with low levels of voluntary contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, A. R.; Rempel, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to determine if the near infrared spectroscopy technique was sensitive to changes in tissue oxygenation at low levels of isometric contraction in the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle. Nine subjects were seated with the right arm abducted to 45 degrees, elbow flexed to 85 degrees, forearm pronated 45 degrees, and wrist and forearm supported on an armrest throughout the protocol. Altered tissue oxygenation was measured noninvasively with near infrared spectroscopy. The near infrared spectroscopy probe was placed over the extensor carpi radialis brevis of the subject's right forearm and secured with an elastic wrap. After 1 minute of baseline measurements taken with the muscle relaxed, four different loads were applied just proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joint such that the subjects isometrically contracted the extensor carpi radialis brevis at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction for 1 minute each. A 3-minute recovery period followed each level of contraction. At the end of the protocol, with the probe still in place, a value for ischemic tissue oxygenation was obtained for each subject. This value was considered the physiological zero and hence 0% tissue oxygenation. Mean tissue oxygenation (+/-SE) decreased from resting baseline (100% tissue oxygenation) to 89 +/- 4, 81 +/- 8, 78 +/- 8, and 47 +/- 8% at 5, 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction, respectively. Tissue oxygenation levels at 10, 15, and 50% of the maximum voluntary contraction were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than the baseline value. Our results indicate that tissue oxygenation significantly decreases during brief, low levels of static muscle contraction and that near infrared spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting deoxygenation noninvasively at low levels of forearm muscle contraction. Our findings have important implications in occupational medicine because oxygen depletion induced by low levels of muscle

  18. Total lower lip reconstruction using sensate composite radial forearm flap.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Ragip; Ortak, Turgut; Koçer, Uğur; Celebioğlu, Selim; Sensöz, Omer; Tiftikcioglu, Yigit Ozer

    2003-05-01

    In modern plastic and reconstructive surgery, shape and function must be considered together. These are the most important goals of any operation. There are a lot of techniques that have been reported for total lower lip reconstruction. It is believed that the radial forearm flap is the most suitable technique for lower lip and chin reconstruction after tumor excision so as to achieve better shape and functional results. The sensate radial forearm-palmaris longus free flap was used for total lower lip reconstruction in 17 patients with lower lip carcinoma with a mean age of 51 years. Two of the patients were female, and 15 were male. All the patients had squamous cell carcinoma. The patients were followed up for 1 to 3 years. Complications of these operations were partial superficial flap loss in 1 patient, partial graft loss in the donor areas of two flaps, and infection in only 1 patient. Wound dehiscence, fistula formation, suture abscesses, or sialocele was not seen in any patient. In this study, the aim was to demonstrate that the sensate radial forearm flap could produce acceptable esthetic results, good sphincteric function, and sensation in the early period after surgery. PMID:12826811

  19. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  20. The locomotion of Babakotia radofilai inferred from epiphyseal and diaphyseal morphology of the humerus and femur.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Damiano; Ruff, Christopher B; Capobianco, Alessio; Rafferty, Katherine L; Habib, Michael B; Patel, Biren A

    2016-09-01

    Palaeopropithecids, or "sloth lemurs," are a diverse clade of large-bodied Malagasy subfossil primates characterized by their inferred suspensory positional behavior. The most recently discovered genus of the palaeopropithecids is Babakotia, and it has been described as more arboreal than Mesopropithecus, but less than Palaeopropithecus. In this article, the within-bone and between-bones articular and cross-sectional diaphyseal proportions of the humerus and femur of Babakotia were compared to extant lemurs, Mesopropithecus and Palaeopropithecus in order to further understand its arboreal adaptations. Additionally, a sample of apes and sloths (Choloepus and Bradypus) are included as functional outgroups composed of suspensory adapted primates and non-primates. Results show that Babakotia and Mesopropithecus both have high humeral/femoral shaft strength proportions, similar to extant great apes and sloths and indicative of forelimb suspensory behavior, with Babakotia more extreme in this regard. All three subfossil taxa have relatively large femoral heads, also associated with suspension in modern taxa. However, Babakotia and Mesopropithecus (but not Palaeopropithecus) have relatively small femoral head surface area to shaft strength proportions suggesting that hind-limb positioning in these taxa during climbing and other behaviors was different than in extant great apes, involving less mobility. Knee and humeral articular dimensions relative to shaft strengths are small in Babakotia and Mesopropithecus, similar to those found in modern sloths and divergent from those in extant great apes and lemurs, suggesting more sloth-like use of these joints during locomotion. Mesopropithecus and Babakotia are more similar to Choloepus in humerofemoral head and length proportions while Palaeopropithecus is more similar to Bradypus. These results provide further evidence of the suspensory adaptations of Babakotia and further highlight similarities to both extant suspensory

  1. Clinical reliability of radial forearm free flap in repair of buccal defects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ideal method for buccal defects should provide good outcome of both function and appearance; our goal is to highlight the reliability of radial forearm flap in buccal reconstruction. Methods A retrospective study was conducted. From 2005 to 2012, 20 radial forearm flaps were used to repair the defects. We analyzed the superiority and reliability of the flap; in addition, we reviewed some related literature and made a comparison between radial forearm flap and platysma flap. Results All radial forearm flaps totally survived, but two flaps suffered venous obstruction, hematoma, respectively. Radial forearm flap preserved the original interincisal distance well. In our follow-up, all patients had sufficient mouth-opening width (mean: 4.3 cm). Conclusion Radial forearm flap is a reliable method for buccal defect reconstruction. PMID:23363472

  2. Effect of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; Szymanski, Jessica M; Molloy, Joseph M; Pascoe, David D

    2004-08-01

    This study examined the effect of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on male high school baseball players (mean age = 15.3 +/- 1.1 years). Participants (N = 43) were tested for 10 repetition maximum (RM) wrist barbell flexion, wrist barbell extension, dominant (D) and nondominant (ND) hand-forearm supination, D and ND forearm pronation, D and ND wrist radial deviation, D and ND wrist ulnar deviation, D and ND grip strength, and a 3RM parallel squat (PS) and bench press (BP). Group 1 (n = 23) and group 2 (n = 20), randomly assigned by a stratified sampling technique, performed the same resistance exercises while training 3 days a week for 12 weeks according to a stepwise periodized model. Group 2 also performed wrist and forearm exercises 3 days a week for 12 weeks to determine if additional wrist and forearm training provided further wrist and forearm strength improvements. All wrist and forearm strength variables were measured before and after 12 weeks of training. The 3RM PS and BP were measured at 0 and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training. Both groups significantly increased wrist and forearm strength (kg +/- SD) except 10RM D and ND forearm supination for group 1 (p < 0.05). Group 2 showed statistically greater improvements (p < 0.05) in all wrist and forearm strength variables than did group 1 except for D and ND grip strength. Predicted 1RM (kg +/- SD) PS and BP increased significantly (p < 0.05) after weeks 4, 8, and 12 for both groups. These data indicate that a 12-week stepwise periodized training program can significantly increase wrist, forearm, PS, and BP strength for both groups. Additionally, group 2 had further wrist and forearm strength gains.

  3. [Fasciocutaneous forearm flaps in the management of the catastrophic hand].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Tenorio, J G; Gómez-Cansino, E

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a series of cases with severe hand injury that required antebrachial flaps as part of treatment, and their functional results. The clinical records of patients with a diagnosis of traumatic hand injury and major skin cover losses, reconstructed with a reverse-flow forearm flap, were reviewed. The following variables were studied: type of flap, sex, age, mechanism of injury, receiver site, size, adjacent injuries and their treatment, vascular integrity test prior to flap placement, operative time, follow-up and complications. A total of 25 patients were included, with 25 reverse-flow fasciocutaneous forearm flaps; in 15 of them the blood supply was based on the radial artery and in 10 in the posterior interosseous artery. The Allen test was used in 13 cases of radial flaps (RF) to check the integrity of the superficial palmar arch; Doppler ultrasound was used in the remaining two cases. Sixteen cases (64%) underwent bone and tendon reconstruction, four cases (16%) isolated tenorrhaphy of one or several tendons, two cases (8%) isolated osteosynthesis, one case due to electrical burn underwent Littler opponensplasty with a radial flap in the anterior aspect of the wrist (4%), and in two cases (8%) an isolated flap was used. In one 67 year-old patient (4%) there was congestion and total loss of the posterior interosseous flap. The recommended indications for this type of flap are: coverage of the distal forearm, hand dorsum and fingers, first interdigital space, palmar region of the wrist and hand. Only two cases required coverage of the palmar region of the wrist and hand, and they were both treated with radial flaps, probably for reasons of anatomical convenience. PMID:26016286

  4. Florid reactive periostitis of the forearm bones in a child.

    PubMed

    Mathew, S E; Madhuri, V; Alexander, M; Walter, N M; Gibikote, S V

    2011-03-01

    Florid reactive periostitis is a pronounced periosteal reaction, usually affecting the hands and feet, for which there is no obvious cause. It is rare in children and in long bones. We report an unusual case of florid reactive periostitis in a ten-year-old girl that involved both bones of the forearm. The lesion resolved over a period of one year, leaving a residual exostosis. She developed a physeal bar in the distal ulna in the region of the lesion at one-year follow-up. This was thought to be a complication of the biopsy procedure and was treated by resection and proximal ulnar lengthening.

  5. Total Lip Reconstruction with Tendinofasciocutaneous Radial Forearm Flap

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Eldad; Krieger, Yuval; Shoham, Yaron; Arnon, Ofer; Sagi, Amiram; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Squamous cell carcinoma is a common tumour of lower lip. Small defects created by surgical resection may be readily reconstructed by linear closure or with local flaps. However, large tumours resection often results with microstomia and oral incompetence, drooling, and speech incomprehension. The goal of this study is to describe our experience with composite free radial forearm-palmaris longus tendon flap for total or near total lower lip reconstruction. Patients and Methods. This procedure was used in 5 patients with 80–100% lip defect resulting from Squamous cell carcinoma. Patients' age ranged from 46 to 82 years. They are three male patients and two female. In 3 cases chin skin was reconstructed as well and in one case a 5 cm segment of mandible was reconstructed using radius bone. In one case where palmaris longus was missing hemi-flexor carpi radialis tendon was used instead. All patients tolerated the procedure well. Results. All flaps totally survived. No patient suffered from drooling. All patients regained normal diet and normal speech. Cosmetic result was fair to good in all patients accept one. Conclusion. We conclude that tendino-fasciocutaneous radial forearm flap for total lower lip reconstruction is safe. Functional and aesthetic result approaches reconstructive goals. PMID:24672301

  6. The distally based forearm island flap in hand reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jeng, S F; Wei, F C

    1998-08-01

    The distally based forearm island flap is vascularized by the perforators of the distal radial artery. The skin flap is along the axis of the radial artery, and the pivot point of its subcutaneous pedicle is about 2 to 4 cm above the radial styloid process. We have treated 12 patients with 12 flaps for soft-tissue defects of the hand. Of these recipient sites, seven were in dorsal hands, two were in thumbs, two were in forearms, and one was in the palmar area. The donor-tissue variants included eight skin flaps, two adipofascial flaps, and two sensate flaps. The sizes of the flaps ranged from 6 x 4 cm to 14 x 6 cm. The donor site wound could be closed primarily in five patients. Two sensate flaps, innervated by the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve, could provide sensation for thumb reconstruction. The advantage of this flap is its constant and reliable blood supply without sacrifice of the main radial artery. The elevation of the flap is simple and rapid. There is the potential that this flap can be used as an innervated flap, and there is no need of microsurgical technique.

  7. Microwave Imaging of Human Forearms: Pilot Study and Image Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Colin; Zakaria, Amer; Pistorius, Stephen; LoVetri, Joe

    2013-01-01

    We present a pilot study using a microwave tomography system in which we image the forearms of 5 adult male and female volunteers between the ages of 30 and 48. Microwave scattering data were collected at 0.8 to 1.2 GHz with 24 transmitting and receiving antennas located in a matching fluid of deionized water and table salt. Inversion of the microwave data was performed with a balanced version of the multiplicative-regularized contrast source inversion algorithm formulated using the finite-element method (FEM-CSI). T1-weighted MRI images of each volunteer's forearm were also collected in the same plane as the microwave scattering experiment. Initial “blind” imaging results from the utilized inversion algorithm show that the image quality is dependent on the thickness of the arm's peripheral adipose tissue layer; thicker layers of adipose tissue lead to poorer overall image quality. Due to the exible nature of the FEM-CSI algorithm used, prior information can be readily incorporated into the microwave imaging inversion process. We show that by introducing prior information into the FEM-CSI algorithm the internal anatomical features of all the arms are resolved, significantly improving the images. The prior information was estimated manually from the blind inversions using an ad hoc procedure. PMID:24023539

  8. Human forearm position sense after fatigue of elbow flexor muscles

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, L D; Hesse, C W; Morgan, D L; Proske, U

    2004-01-01

    After a period of eccentric exercise of elbow flexor muscles of one arm in young, adult human subjects, muscles became fatigued and damaged. Damage indicators were a fall in force, change in resting elbow angle and delayed onset of soreness. After the exercise, subjects were asked to match the forearm angle of one arm, whose position was set by the experimenter, with their other arm. Subjects matched the position of the unsupported reference arm, when this was unexercised, with a significantly more flexed position in their exercised indicator arm. Errors were in the opposite direction when the reference arm was exercised. The size of the errors correlated with the drop in force. Less consistent errors were observed when the reference arm was supported. A similar pattern of errors was seen after concentric exercise, which does not produce muscle damage. The data suggested that subjects were using as a position cue the perceived effort required to maintain a given forearm angle against the force of gravity. The fall in force from fatigue after exercise meant more effort was required to maintain a given position. That led to matching errors between the exercised and unexercised arms. It was concluded that while a role for muscle spindles in kinaesthesia cannot be excluded, detailed information about static limb position can be derived from the effort required to support the limb against the force of gravity. PMID:15181165

  9. NIR time domain diffuse optical tomography experiments on human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng; Tanikawa, Yukari; Homma, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Yukio

    2003-07-01

    To date, the applications of near infrared (NIR) diffusion optical tomography (DOT) are mostly focused on the potential of imaging woman breast, human head hemodynamics and neonatal head. For the neonates, who are suffered from ischaemia or hemorrhages in brain, bedside monitoring of the cerebral perfusion situation, e.g., the blood oxygen saturation and blood volume, is necessary for avoiding permanent injure. NIR DOT is on the promising tools because it is noninvasive, smaller in size, and moveable. Prior to achieving the ultimate goal of imaging infant brain and woman breast using DOT, in this paper, the developed methodologies are justified by imaging in vivo human forearms. The absolute absorption- and scattering-coefficient images revealed the inner structure of the forearm and the bones were clearly distinguished from the muscle. The differential images showed the changes in oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin and blood volume during the hand-gripping exercises, which are consistent with the physiological process reported on literatures.

  10. Handgrip strength dominance is associated with difference in forearm muscle size.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] It is unknown whether handgrip strength dominance is related to the size of the forearm flexor muscles. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between side-by-side differences in handgrip strength and forearm muscle thickness. [Subjects] Thirty-one young women (26 right handed and 5 left handed) between the ages of 20 and 33 years volunteered to participate. [Methods] Two muscle thicknesses (forearm-ulna and forearm-radius muscle thicknesses) were measured using B-mode ultrasound at the anterior forearm on both sides of the body. Handgrip strength was also measured on both sides. [Results] The side-by-side difference in handgrip strength was 10.2% for the right-handed group, meaning the right hand was stronger. However, the left hand of the left-handed group was 7.8% stronger compared with their right hand. There was a significant positive correlation between side-by-side differences in handgrip strength and forearm-ulna muscle thickness (r = 0.765) and between handgrip strength and forearm-radius muscle thickness (r = 0.622). [Conclusion] Our results indicate that side-by-side differences in forearm muscle size may strongly contribute to handgrip strength dominance.

  11. Whole bone geometry and bone quality in distal forearm fracture.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Ian H; Fazzalari, Nicola L

    2008-09-01

    Fracture of the distal radius is a sentinel for future increased risk of other "osteoporotic" fractures, in which the peak age for incidence of distal radius fracture is 5 to 10 years before that for spine and hip fractures. Mean bone mineral density (BMD) of the distal radius was lower in patients with osteoporosis compared with age- and sex-matched normal subjects. However, it has been shown that to predict the strength of the distal radius at the site where fractures occur requires more than measurement of bone mineral content (BMC) or BMD. Only moderate correlations have been found between forearm sites, which may be a result of differences in bone composition between sites. Different forearm sites may be used interchangeably for diagnostic purposes, but the prognostic value is not known. Using the distal radius as a screening tool for identifying individuals at risk of "osteoporotic" fracture shows that forearm site selection and accuracy of measurement can be important confounders in group studies.Improving resolution of computed tomography (CT) scanners has enabled quantitation of cortical bone density and cortical thickness. These measurements have enabled the mechanism of bone loss in the distal radius to be elucidated and show that, after menopause, bone loss is primarily through thinning of the cortex. CT imaging allows the precise localization of bone changes in individuals and should be of value in the assessment of the severity of osteoporosis. It also shows that this technology has the potential to determine the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. A concerted effort has been made to elucidate the interrelationships between the amount of bone and the geometry and that clinical imaging of BMC and/or cross-sectional area in the radius would provide improved prediction of an individual's risk of fracture.The technological tools are available, in the clinic, to accurately measure the 3-dimensional (3D) geometry of the distal radius and the amount of

  12. Mucormycosis infection following intravenous access in the forearm

    PubMed Central

    Wollstein, Ronit; Palekar, Alka

    2010-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an opportunistic infection that is often fatal, requiring aggressive local control as well as systemic therapy. A rare case of a forearm infection originating in a traumatic intravenous access portal is described in the present study. The Mucor species infection prevented liver transplant, and the patient passed away. In the present case, it was decided to limit the resection to the skin and subcutaneous tissue based on a frozen section and the viability of the biopsied tissue. With consistently rising numbers of immunocompromised patients, awareness and familiarity with mucormycosis in the extremities is important. Knowing that a minimal traumatic event may precede the infection could assist in prevention and early diagnosis. Guidelines for pathological and clinical diagnosis and treatment need to be further clarified. PMID:21629620

  13. Time resolved optical tomography of the human forearm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Elizabeth M. C.; Hebden, Jeremy C.; Schweiger, Martin; Dehghani, Hamid; Schmidt, Florian E. W.; Delpy, David T.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2001-04-01

    A 32-channel time-resolved optical imaging instrument has been developed principally to study functional parameters of the new-born infant brain. As a prelude to studies on infants, the device and image reconstruction methodology have been evaluated on the adult human forearm. Cross-sectional images were generated using time-resolved measurements of transmitted light at two wavelengths. All data were acquired using a fully automated computer-controlled protocol. Images representing the internal scattering and absorbing properties of the arm are presented, as well as images that reveal physiological changes during a simple finger flexion exercise. The results presented in this paper represent the first simultaneous tomographic reconstruction of the internal scattering and absorbing properties of a clinical subject using purely temporal data, with additional co-registered difference images showing repeatable absorption changes at two wavelengths in response to exercise.

  14. Biomechanics of Forearm Rotation: Force and Efficiency of Pronator Teres

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form. Moreover, activity

  15. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm.

    PubMed

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called "intent detection," has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05-0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup. PMID:27148039

  16. Forearm Range of Motion in Australovenator wintonensis (Theropoda, Megaraptoridae)

    PubMed Central

    White, Matt A.; Bell, Phil R.; Cook, Alex G.; Barnes, David G.; Tischler, Travis R.; Bassam, Brant J.; Elliott, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The hypertrophied manual claws and modified manus of megaraptoran theropods represent an unusual morphological adaptation among carnivorous dinosaurs. The skeleton of Australovenator wintonensis from the Cenomanian of Australia is among the most complete of any megaraptorid. It presents the opportunity to examine the range of motion of its forearm and the function of its highly modified manus. This provides the basis for behavioural inferences, and comparison with other Gondwanan theropod groups. Digital models created from computed tomography scans of the holotype reveal a humerus range of motion that is much greater than Allosaurus, Acrocanthosaurus, Tyrannosaurus but similar to that of the dromaeosaurid Bambiraptor. During flexion, the radius was forced distally by the radial condyle of the humerus. This movement is here suggested as a mechanism that forced a medial movement of the wrist. The antebrachium possessed a range of motion that was close to dromaeosaurids; however, the unguals were capable of hyper-extension, in particular manual phalanx I-2, which is a primitive range of motion characteristic seen in allosaurids and Dilophosaurus. During flexion, digits I and II slightly converge and diverge when extended which is accentuated by hyperextension of the digits in particular the unguals. We envision that prey was dispatched by its hands and feet with manual phalanx I-2 playing a dominant role. The range of motion analysis neither confirms nor refutes current phylogenetic hypotheses with regards to the placement of Megaraptoridae; however, we note Australovenator possessed, not only a similar forearm range of motion to some maniraptorans and basal coelurosaurs, but also similarities with Tetanurans (Allosauroids and Dilophosaurus). PMID:26368529

  17. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm.

    PubMed

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called "intent detection," has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05-0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup.

  18. Forearm Range of Motion in Australovenator wintonensis (Theropoda, Megaraptoridae).

    PubMed

    White, Matt A; Bell, Phil R; Cook, Alex G; Barnes, David G; Tischler, Travis R; Bassam, Brant J; Elliott, David A

    2015-01-01

    The hypertrophied manual claws and modified manus of megaraptoran theropods represent an unusual morphological adaptation among carnivorous dinosaurs. The skeleton of Australovenator wintonensis from the Cenomanian of Australia is among the most complete of any megaraptorid. It presents the opportunity to examine the range of motion of its forearm and the function of its highly modified manus. This provides the basis for behavioural inferences, and comparison with other Gondwanan theropod groups. Digital models created from computed tomography scans of the holotype reveal a humerus range of motion that is much greater than Allosaurus, Acrocanthosaurus, Tyrannosaurus but similar to that of the dromaeosaurid Bambiraptor. During flexion, the radius was forced distally by the radial condyle of the humerus. This movement is here suggested as a mechanism that forced a medial movement of the wrist. The antebrachium possessed a range of motion that was close to dromaeosaurids; however, the unguals were capable of hyper-extension, in particular manual phalanx I-2, which is a primitive range of motion characteristic seen in allosaurids and Dilophosaurus. During flexion, digits I and II slightly converge and diverge when extended which is accentuated by hyperextension of the digits in particular the unguals. We envision that prey was dispatched by its hands and feet with manual phalanx I-2 playing a dominant role. The range of motion analysis neither confirms nor refutes current phylogenetic hypotheses with regards to the placement of Megaraptoridae; however, we note Australovenator possessed, not only a similar forearm range of motion to some maniraptorans and basal coelurosaurs, but also similarities with Tetanurans (Allosauroids and Dilophosaurus).

  19. Diminished baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance following training.

    PubMed

    Mack, G W; Thompson, C A; Doerr, D F; Nadel, E R; Convertino, V A

    1991-12-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg.min.100 ml.ml-1) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml.kg-1 to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml.min-1.kg-1 and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml.kg-1, respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units.mm Hg-1 (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units.mm Hg-1 for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm Hg after training.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1798379

  20. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called “intent detection,” has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05–0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup. PMID:27148039

  1. Age estimation of immature human skeletal remains from the diaphyseal length of the long bones in the postnatal period.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Abrantes, Joana; Humphrey, Louise T

    2014-09-01

    Age at death in immature human skeletal remains has been estimated from the diaphyseal length of the long bones, but few studies have actually been designed specifically for the purpose of age estimation and those which have, show important caveats. This study uses regression and classical calibration to model the relationship between age and diaphyseal length of the six long bones, in a sample of 184 known sex and age individuals (72 females and 112 males), younger than 13 years of age, selected from Portuguese and English skeletal collections. Age estimation models based on classical calibration were obtained for each of the six long bones, and separately for each sex and for the sexes combined, and also for the entire sample and when it is subdivided into two subsamples at the age of 2 years. Comparisons between inverse and classical calibration show there is a systematic bias in age estimations obtained from inverse calibration. In the classical calibration models, the length of the femur provides the most accurate estimates of age. Age estimates are more accurate for the male subsample and for individuals under the age of 2 years. These results and a test of previously published methods caution against inverse calibration as a technique for developing age estimation methods even from the immature skeleton. Age estimation methods developed using cemetery collections of identified human skeletons should not be uncritically applied to present-day populations from the same region since many populations have experienced dramatic secular trends in growth and adult height over the last century.

  2. Reduced diaphyseal strength associated with high intracortical vascular porosity within long bones of children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, John; Smith, Peter; Harris, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta is a genetic disorder resulting in bone fragility. The mechanisms behind this fragility are not well understood. In addition to characteristic bone mass deficiencies, research suggests that bone material properties are compromised in individuals with this disorder. However, little data exists regarding bone properties beyond the microstructural scale in individuals with this disorder. Specimens were obtained from long bone diaphyses of nine children with osteogenesis imperfecta during routine osteotomy procedures. Small rectangular beams, oriented longitudinally and transversely to the diaphyseal axis, were machined from these specimens and elastic modulus, yield strength, and maximum strength were measured in three-point bending. Intracortical vascular porosity, bone volume fraction, osteocyte lacuna density, and volumetric tissue mineral density were determined by synchrotron micro-computed tomography, and relationships among these mechanical properties and structural parameters were explored. Modulus and strength were on average 64–68% lower in the transverse vs. longitudinal beams (P<0.001, linear mixed model). Vascular porosity ranged between 3–42% of total bone volume. Longitudinal properties were associated negatively with porosity (P≤0.006, linear regressions). Mechanical properties, however, were not associated with osteocyte lacuna density or volumetric tissue mineral density (P≥0.167). Bone properties and structural parameters were not associated significantly with donor age (p≥0.225, linear mixed models). This study presents novel data regarding bone material strength in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Results confirm that these properties are anisotropic. Elevated vascular porosity was observed in most specimens, and this parameter was associated with reduced bone material strength. These results offer insight towards understanding bone fragility and the role of intracortical porosity on the strength of bone

  3. Diaphyseal femoral fractures below the age of six years: Results of plaster application and long term followup

    PubMed Central

    Catena, Nunzio; Sénès, Filippo M; Riganti, Simone; Boero, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Background: In children less than 6 years, the treatment of femoral shaft fracture is often non surgical, using closed reduction and casting. The literature reports many experience about this type of trauma but none of these has a long term followup. We present a retrospective study on a group of femoral diaphyseal fractures treated nonsurgically in children up to 6 years of age, with a minimum of 10 year followup. Materials and Methods: 48 cases (36 males/12 females) with femoral diaphyseal fractures treated between January 1988 and December 1998 were reviewed. Patients with fractures due to obstetrical trauma and pathologic fractures were excluded. The mean age of the patients was 3.3 ± 1.1 years (range 5 months-6 years). Right side was involved in 21 cases (44%), and left side in 27 cases (56%). In 34 cases (71%), closed reduction was performed and hip spica was applied with the hip and knee flexed to 45°. In 8 cases (17%), skeletal traction was applied to perform fracture reduction and the traction pin was embedded in plaster while in the remaining 6 cases (12%), the Delitala pressure apparatus was applied after casting. Results: All fractures healed in our study. There were no complications (infection or vascular nervous issues, axial deviations, consolidation delays, or pseudoarthrosis). In 13 cases (27%), followup examinations showed mean lengthening of 1.3 ± 0.75 (range 0.5-2.5 cm) of the fractured lower limb. All these patients were treated with skin traction before treatment and presented with 2.08 ± 0.28 cm mean initial femoral shortening. In 1 case (2%) with 2.5 cm lengthening, epiphysiodesis of the ipsilateral knee was performed. No patients showed prolonged difficulty with gait disorders. Conclusion: On the basis of our results conservative treatment of femoral shaft fractures in children can be considered less invasive and safe procedure. PMID:24600060

  4. Donor site morbidity of the fasciocutaneous radial forearm flap: what does the patient really bother?

    PubMed

    de Witt, Christien A; de Bree, Remco; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M; Quak, Jasper J; Leemans, C René

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this study was the evaluation of donor site morbidity in head and neck cancer patients after reconstruction using a free vascularized radial forearm flap with emphasis on subjective complaints. Fifty patients who underwent at least 6 months before a reconstruction using a free vascularized radial forearm flap were asked to fill out two questionnaires regarding cosmetics and sensibility and forearm disabilities. Furthermore, a function test including movement extensions (flexion-extension, ulnar-radial deviation and pronation-supination), strength (pinch and grip) and temperature (digiti I and V) of the donor and non-donor site were measured and compared. Thirty-five percent of the patients reported no complaints regarding cosmetics and sensibility and 75% mentioned no forearm disabilities. There was no difference in movement extensions, temperature and grip strength between donor and non-donor sites. The difference in pinch strength appeared to be significant (p < 0.001). The total score of the questionnaire on forearm disabilities correlated significantly with extension, pronation and grip strength of the donor arm. Donor site morbidity of the radial forearm flap measured by objective functional tests was limited but subjective self-ratings revealed complaints regarding cosmestics and sensibility and to a lesser extent regarding forearm disability. The present data may be used for solid patient counselling.

  5. [An analysis on the forearm bone mass density of rural female and the environmental risk factors].

    PubMed

    Hong, X; Lü, H; Yang, J; Li, Z

    2001-07-01

    The distribution of distal and proximal forearm bone mass densities (BMD) with age was discribed and the environmental risk factors of rural female analyzed. A group of 1432 rural female aged 15 and over were sellected. Their demographic characteristics, living and eating habit were obtained by standardized questionnaire. The distal and proximal forearm bone mass density were measured by peripheral dual-energy X ray absorptionmetry (pDEXA). The results showed that the distal and proximal forearm BMDs were increased with age before age 25 and 30 respectively, and reached the peak value at age 30-35. The distal forearm bone density decreased significantly at age 40 while the proximal forearm BMD decreased at age 45. Bone loss rate of the two bone sites was increased significantly at age 50 and reached the peak value at age 55-60. Only the the density of proximal forearm bone, and the year of menopause was the main cause of low bone density. Body weight was the positive factor for bone density at age less than 60. Height only positively affected the proximal forearm bone of those at age 30-45. More ever, drinking tea, parity and educational status may affect distal forearm bone in certain age group while parity, educational status, occupation and marital status were possible risk factors of proximal forearm BMD. It is concluded that environmental risk factors of BMD varied with bone site and age. The prevention of low BMD must rely on subject's age and bone site. The surveillance of low bone density must put the emphasis on spony bone.

  6. [Ultrasonic evaluation of biomechanical properties of the interosseus membranes of the forearm. I. Selection of a quality index].

    PubMed

    Korzh, N A; Pokhvaliĭ, A N; Akimov, A B

    1990-09-01

    In the article is presented the echographic semiotics of the forearm interosseous membrane, based on the results of 10 forearm examinations. Qualitative echographic parameters, describing the forearm interosseous membrane geometry in different biomechanical situations, have been analysed. It has been determined that the ultrasound echography permits to visualize for certain the forearm interosseous membrane. As the criteria of the membrane geometry can be used such indicators as its area and profile height. Ultrasound echography permits to detect interosseous membrane tissue strain in case of forearm rotation and external compression in interosseous space, due to which its elasticity is evaluated.

  7. Nonunion of the ulna after elastic stable intramedullary nailing for unstable forearm fractures: a case series.

    PubMed

    Ballal, Moez S; Garg, Neeraj K; Bruce, Colin E; Bass, Alfie

    2009-09-01

    Elastic stable intramedullary nailing (ESIN) for displaced forearm fractures in children has shown good results over the last two decades. To our knowledge, nonunion as complications after ESIN fixation of displaced forearm fractures is not well reported in English literature. In our institute, and over a period of 10 years, we identified three cases of nonunion of the ulna after ESIN fixation of unstable and displaced forearm both bone fractures. Two patients had closed fractures and one patient had an open fracture. There was no deep infection in any case. All cases after revision surgery went into union. PMID:19581817

  8. Motorcycle racer with unilateral forearm flexor and extensor chronic exertional compartment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Winkes, Michiel B; Teijink, Joep A; Scheltinga, Marc R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a case of a 26-year-old man, a motorcycle racer, who presented with progressive pain, weakness and swelling of his right forearm and loss of power in his index finger, experienced during motor racing. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of both flexor and extensor compartments of his forearm was diagnosed by dynamic intracompartmental muscle pressure measurements. After fasciotomies, all symptoms were resolved and the patient was able to improve on his preinjury racing skills, without any limitations. A literature review and a surgical 'how-to' for correct release of the extensor and deep flexor compartments of the forearm are provided. PMID:27080851

  9. Successful Salvage of Mucormycosis Infection of the Forearm and Osteomyelitis of the Ulna

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eon K.; Eo, SuRak; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    A 6-month-old child developed cutaneous mucormycosis of the forearm 5 weeks after liver transplantation, which progressed to osteomyelitis of the proximal ulna. Aggressive treatment, which included serial radical debridements, intravenous administration of amphotericin B, and eventually split thickness skin graft coverage resulted in successful functional salvage of the forearm, wrist, and hand. Of the nine previously reported cases of mucormycosis affecting the forearm or hand in immunocompromised patients, all either required amputation of the hand or below elbow amputation, or resulted in the patient’s death. Definitive early diagnosis and serial radical debridements may allow salvage of a functional hand. PMID:18780010

  10. Standardized trauma (tape stripping) in human vulvar and forearm skin. Effects on transepidermal water loss, capacitance and pH.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, D; Elsner, P; Maibach, H I

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical trauma to genital skin may favor the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases. To study differences between vulvar and forearm skin in epidermal repair after standardized trauma, transepidermal water loss, capacitance and pH of forearm and vulvar skin in 10 healthy premenopausal women were monitored for 7 days after a standardized trauma induced by tape stripping to glistening. Vulvar and forearm skin showed similar responses immediately after tape stripping: a sudden increase in transepidermal water loss and capacitance. Forearm skin, however, reacted more intensely than vulvar skin; forearm skin readings remained significantly higher than normal values for 2 days after tape stripping, whereas vulvar skin readings were not significantly different from normal. Thus, vulvar skin did not respond as extensively as forearm skin, presumably because it is a less complete barrier against excess body water loss. On the other hand, vulvar skin seemed to recover faster from skin damage than forearm skin, probably because of its higher epidermal cell turnover.

  11. Diminished Baroreflex Control of Forearm Vascular Resistance Following Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Thompson, C. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Nadel, E. R.; Convertino, V. A.

    1991-01-01

    The stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR units in mm Hg x min x I00 ml/ml) were studied in 14 volunteers before and after 10 wk of endurance training. We assessed the relationship betaleen reflex stimulus (changes in central venous pressure, CVP) and response (FVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to - 2O mm Hg). Changes in CVP during LBNP were estimated from pressure changes in a large peripheral vein in the dependent arm of the subject in the right lateral decubitus position. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(sub 2max)) and total blood volume increased with endurance training from 37.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min x kg and 63.6 +/- 2.1 ml/kg to 45.3 +/- 1.4 ml/ min x kg and 69.3 +/- 2.8 ml/kg respectively (P less than 0.05). Reflex forearm vasoconstriction occurred in response to a reduction in estimated CVP, and the absolute change in FVR per unit of CVP was reduced from -5.96 +/- 0.79 to -4.06 +/- 0.52 units x mm/ Hg (P less than 0.05) following exercise training but was unchanged from -6.10 to 0.57 to -6.22 +/- 0.94 units x mm/ Hg for the time control group (N = 7). Resting values for FVR were similar before and after exercise training; however, resting estimated CVP was elevated from 9.5 +/- 0.5 mm x Hg before training to 11.3 +/- 0.6 mm x Hg after training. The reduction in sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR was linearly related to the increase in blood volume (r = 0.65, P less than 0.05). suggesting that diminished cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of FVR in physically fit individuals is related, in part, to a training-induced blood volume expansion.

  12. Carotid baroreceptor influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level lower body negative pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Cynthia A.; Ludwig, David A.; Convertino, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    The degree of forearm vasoconstriction induced by low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) provides a measure of the responsiveness of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex. The validity of this measurement is based on the assumption that this vasoconstriction response is not influenced by unloading of carotid baroreceptors. To test the hypothesis that arterial baroreceptor unloading does not alter the degree of forearm vascular resistance during low levels of LBNP, 12 subjects were exposed to -15 and -20 mm Hg LBNP with and without additional artificial (+ 10 mm Hg neck pressure) unloading of the carotid baroreceptors. There was no measurable influence of carotid unloading on forearm vascular resistance at either level of LBNP. It is concluded that forearm vascular resistance measured during cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading is unaffected by carotid baroreceptor unloading within the magnitude encountered during low levels of LBNP.

  13. Measurement of the subcutaneous fat in the distal forearm by single photon absorptiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassager, C.; Borg, J.; Christiansen, C.

    1989-02-01

    The influence of subcutaneous fat on single photon (/sup 125/I) absorptiometry (SPA) measurement of bone mineral content of the distal forearm was investigated. A fat correction model was tested by measurements on eight lean subjects with different amounts of porcine fat around their forearm, and further validated from measurements on 128 females. In addition, it is shown that the fat content in the distal forearm can be measured by SPA with a short-term precision at 1.9% in an obese subject and that it correlates well with total body fat (r2 = .7) measured by dual photon absorptiometry, skinfold thickness (r2 = .5), and body mass index (r2 = .6). By using this method in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial, hormonal substitutional therapy significantly decreased the forearm fat content without affecting the body weight in postmenopausal osteoporotic women.

  14. Spontaneous migration of bullet from arm to forearm and its ultrasound guided removal.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Singla, Amit; Saini, Pramod; Mittal, Samarth; Chowdhary, Buddhadev

    2013-10-19

    Spontaneous migration of a retained bullet is rare. We are presenting here a case of a 24-year-old male with spontaneous migration of bullet from arm to forearm. At the time of initial injury, bullet was left inside the arm as it was deep and patient had no complaints. Three months after injury, he started complaining of pain over forearm and tingling sensations in the forearm and hand over median nerve distribution. Radiographs showed bullet in the proximal forearm. The bullet was than precisely localized and removed under ultrasound guidance. This case report emphasizes the fact that spontaneous migration of bullet in extremities may occur and have the potential to cause neurovascular damage. Removal under ultrasound guidance is a viable option in such locations.

  15. Altered baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance during simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Doerr, D. F.; Vernikos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Reflex peripheral vasoconstriction induced by activation of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in response to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) is a basic mechanism for elevating systemic vascular resistance and defending arterial blood pressure during orthostatically-induced reductions in cardiac filling and output. The sensitivity of the cardiopulmonary baroreflex response [defined as the slope of the relationship between changes in forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and CVP] and the resultant vasoconstriction are closely and inversely associated with the amount of circulating blood volume. Thus, a high-gain FVR response will be elicited by a hypovolemic state. Exposure to microgravity during spaceflight results in reduced plasma volume. It is therefore reasonable to expect that the FVR response to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading would be accentuated following adaptation to microgravity. Such data could provide better insight about the physiological mechanisms underlying alterations in blood pressure control following spaceflight. We therefore exposed eleven men to 6 degrees head-down bedrest for 7 days and measured specific hemodynamic responses to low levels of the lower body negative pressure to determine if there are alterations in cardiopulmonary baroreceptor stimulus-FVR reflex response relationship during prolonged exposure to an analog of microgravity.

  16. Forearm motion discrimination technique using real-time EMG signals.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Haruaki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method of discriminating real-time motion from electromyogram (EMG) signals. We previously proposed a motion discrimination method. This method could discriminate five motions (hand opening, hand closing, hand chucking, wrist extension, and wrist flexion) at a rate of above 90 percent from four channel EMG signals in the forearm. The method prevents elbow motions from interfering with hand motion discrimination. However, discrimination processing time of this method is more than 300 ms, and the shortest delay time that is perceivable by the user is generally regarded to be roughly 300 ms. Furthermore, a robot hand has a mechanical delay time. Thus, the discrimination time should be less than 300 ms. Here, we propose a real-time motion discrimination method using a hyper-sphere model. In comparison with the old model, the hyper-sphere models can make more complex decision regions which can discriminate at the state of the motion. Furthermore, this model can learn EMG signals in real-time. We experimentally verified that the discrimination accuracies of this method were above 90 percent. Moreover, elbow motions did not interfere with the hand motion discrimination. The discrimination processing time was less than 300 ms, and was about 30 percent shorter than that of the old method. PMID:22255323

  17. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at Mid Forearm Level

    PubMed Central

    Dusad, Tarun; Meena, D.S.; Saini, Narendra; Sharma, Yogesh; Khurana, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Schwannomas are also known as neurilemmoma that usually originate from Schwann cells located in the peripheral nerve sheaths. It usually occurs in the age group of 20 to 70 years. These are the commonest tumors of the peripheral nerves, 5% of which occur in the adults and 19% of the tumors occur in upper extremities. Schwannomas are generally presented as an asymptomatic mass. Discomfort may be the only presenting complaint of the patient. Paresthesia may be elicited on tapping the swelling. Magnetic resonanceimaging, and ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old male came to our hospital for a lump located at the volar side of the right mid forearm for 10 years with discomfort and paresthesia in median nerve distribution of hand which appeared in last two years. Total excision was performed for the lesion. Histopathological examination of the mass revealed typical features of schwannoma. At two months follow-up, the patient was symptom free with mild paresthesia in his index and middle fingers. Conclusion: Benign tumours involving peripheral nerves of the upper extremity are uncommon. Schwannomas are theoretically removable because they repulse fascicular groups without penetrating them, thus allowing their enucleation while preserving nerve continuity, as reported in our patient.

  18. Determination of antiseptic efficacy of rubs on the forearm and consequences for surgical hand disinfection.

    PubMed

    Hübner, N-O; Kellner, N B; Partecke, L I; Koburger, T; Heidecke, C-D; Kohlmann, T; Kramer, A

    2011-05-01

    While hands are acknowledged to be the most important source of pathogens from the skin of the surgical team, the transmission of pathogens from the forearms may also be relevant. Preoperative hand disinfection is recommended, but evidence-based standards for the forearms are lacking. As neither the European standard EN 12791 nor the American guidelines ASTM 1115 are applicable to the forearms, a new test method based on the European standard EN 12791 and the German Society for Hygiene and Microbiology (DGHM) method for testing for the efficacy of skin antiseptics was developed to address the forearms. The antiseptic efficacy of a commercially available alcohol-based hand rub [76.7% (w/w) ethanol] was assessed on the upper arm after 15s, 2.5 min, and 30 min, and on the lower arm after 2.5 min, 30 min, and 3 h. On the upper arm, application of the product followed the DGHM standard procedure. On the forearm, the product was applied by the participants themselves with the right hand over the left forearm and vice versa as performed during preoperative hand disinfection. Sampling and culture were performed according to the DGHM method for skin antisepsis on the upper arm. Twenty-two volunteers were investigated. The efficacy of the antiseptic treatment on the forearm was not significantly lower than on the upper arm for any of the areas tested (P > 0.05). Reduction factors for all tested areas and times were quite similar, with confidence intervals ranging between 1.43 and 2.31 log₁₀. We suggest that an application time of 10s may be sufficient for the treatment of the forearm as part of preoperative hand disinfection, provided that an appropriate product is used.

  19. Forearm compartment syndrome as a result of eosinophilic fasciitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Alolabi, Bashar; Lesieur, Martin; Smilovici, Brian; Koo, Kevin; El Bahtimi, Reem; Jenkinson, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilic fasciitis is an uncommon scleroderma-like connective tissue disease, usually characterized by symmetrical and painful swelling and induration of the skin and thickened fascia infiltrated with lymphocytes and eosinophils. A middle-aged woman with follicular lymphoma being treated with chemotherapy presented with acute onset atraumatic forearm swelling and severe pain. The history, physical examination, and pressure measurements were consistent with compartment syndrome. Intraoperative biopsy of the forearm fascia confirmed eosinophilic fasciitis.

  20. Effects of forearm and palm supports on the upper extremity during computer mouse use.

    PubMed

    Onyebeke, Lynn C; Young, Justin G; Trudeau, Matthieu B; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2014-05-01

    The use of forearm and palm supports has been associated with lower neck and shoulder muscle activity as well as reduced musculoskeletal discomfort during keyboard use, however, few studies have investigated their effect during computer mouse use. Eight men and eight women completed several computer mousing tasks in six arm support conditions: Forearm Support, Flat Palm Support, Raised Palm Support, Forearm + Flat Palm Support, Forearm + Raised Palm Support, and No Support. Concurrently, an infrared three-dimensional motion analysis system measured postures, six-degree-of-freedom force-torque sensors measured applied forces & torques, and surface electromyography measured muscle activity. The use of forearm support compared to the no support condition was significantly associated with less shoulder muscle activity & torque, and the raised palm support was associated with less wrist extension. Forearm supports reduced shoulder flexion torque by 90% compared to no support. The use of either support also resulted in lower applied forces to the mouse pad. Participants reported less musculoskeletal discomfort when using a support. These results provide recommendations for office workstation setup and inform ergonomists of effective ways to reduce musculoskeletal exposures.

  1. Minimally Invasive Treatment of a Complex Tibial Plateau Fracture with Diaphyseal Extension in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Ashok K; Pawaskar, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal tibia comprise a huge spectrum of injuries with different fracture configurations. The combination of tibia plateau fracture with diaphyseal extension is a rare injury with sparse literature being available on treatment of the same. Various treatment modalities can be adopted with the aim of achieving a well-aligned, congruous, stable joint, which allows early motion and function. We report a case of a 40-year-old male who sustained a Schatzker type VI fracture of left tibial plateau with diaphyseal extension. On further investigations, the patient was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus with grossly deranged blood sugar levels. The depressed tibial condyle was manipulated to lift its articular surface using K-wire as a joystick and stabilized with an additional K-wire. Distal tibial skeletal traction was maintained for three weeks followed by an above knee cast. At eight months of follow-up, X-rays revealed a well-consolidated fracture site, and the patient had attained a reasonably good range of motion with only terminal restriction of squatting. Tibial plateau fractures with diaphyseal extension in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is certainly a challenging entity. After an extended search of literature, we could not find any reports highlighting a similar method of treatment for complex tibial plateau injuries in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. PMID:27335711

  2. Minimally Invasive Treatment of a Complex Tibial Plateau Fracture with Diaphyseal Extension in a Patient with Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Ashok K; Dhake, Rakesh P; Pawaskar, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the proximal tibia comprise a huge spectrum of injuries with different fracture configurations. The combination of tibia plateau fracture with diaphyseal extension is a rare injury with sparse literature being available on treatment of the same. Various treatment modalities can be adopted with the aim of achieving a well-aligned, congruous, stable joint, which allows early motion and function. We report a case of a 40-year-old male who sustained a Schatzker type VI fracture of left tibial plateau with diaphyseal extension. On further investigations, the patient was diagnosed to have diabetes mellitus with grossly deranged blood sugar levels. The depressed tibial condyle was manipulated to lift its articular surface using K-wire as a joystick and stabilized with an additional K-wire. Distal tibial skeletal traction was maintained for three weeks followed by an above knee cast. At eight months of follow-up, X-rays revealed a well-consolidated fracture site, and the patient had attained a reasonably good range of motion with only terminal restriction of squatting. Tibial plateau fractures with diaphyseal extension in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus is certainly a challenging entity. After an extended search of literature, we could not find any reports highlighting a similar method of treatment for complex tibial plateau injuries in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. PMID:27335711

  3. Texture-induced vibrations in the forearm during tactile exploration

    PubMed Central

    Delhaye, Benoit; Hayward, Vincent; Lefèvre, Philippe; Thonnard, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    Humans can detect and discriminate between fine variations of surface roughness using active touch. It is hitherto believed that roughness perception is mediated mostly by cutaneous and subcutaneous afferents located in the fingertips. However, recent findings have shown that following abolishment of cutaneous afferences resulting from trauma or pharmacological intervention, the ability of subjects to discriminate between textures roughness was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that the somatosensory system is able to collect textural information from other sources than fingertip afference. It follows that signals resulting of the interaction of a finger with a rough surface must be transmitted to stimulate receptor populations in regions far away from the contact. This transmission was characterized by measuring in the wrist vibrations originating at the fingertip and thus propagating through the finger, the hand and the wrist during active exploration of textured surfaces. The spectral analysis of the vibrations taking place in the forearm tissues revealed regularities that were correlated with the scanned surface and the speed of exploration. In the case of periodic textures, the vibration signal contained a fundamental frequency component corresponding to the finger velocity divided by the spatial period of the stimulus. This regularity was found for a wide range of textural length scales and scanning velocities. For non-periodic textures, the spectrum of the vibration did not contain obvious features that would enable discrimination between the different stimuli. However, for both periodic and non-periodic stimuli, the intensity of the vibrations could be related to the microgeometry of the scanned surfaces. PMID:22783177

  4. Proximal diaphyseal fractures of the fifth metatarsal--treatment of the fractures and their complications in athletes.

    PubMed

    Zelko, R R; Torg, J S; Rachun, A

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-one patients (age range, 15 to 26; 18 patients 15 to 20 years old) had proximal diaphyseal fractures of the fifth metatarsal. Clinical records and radiographs for all patients were available for review. Patient treatment had been individualized and included several methods, including rest, plaster immobilization, and bone grafting. Twenty of the 21 patients were boys or men participating in athletics. Nine of the 21 fractures and 8 of the reinjuries were sustained while playing basketball. Healing required a minimum of 3 months (with bone graft) and some fractures were not radiographically healed at 20 months, although the patients were clinically asymptomatic. The fracture of the proximal shaft of the fifth metatarsal, particularly the 1.5-cm segment distal to the tuberosity, is a troublesome injury in the active athlete. The clinical course does not appear to be influenced by the usual initial conservative treatment modalities, although many of these fractures will heal if the athlete is willing to restrict activities for a prolonged period of time. In this series, bone grafting with a tibial corticocancellous graft after thorough curettage of sclerotic bone obliterating the medullary canal was the most effective treatment modality for delayed union.

  5. Characterization of evoked tactile sensation in forearm amputees with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Guohong; Sui, Xiaohong; Li, Si; He, Longwen; Lan, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The goal of this study is to characterize the phenomenon of evoked tactile sensation (ETS) on the stump skin of forearm amputees using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Approach. We identified the projected finger map (PFM) of ETS on the stump skin in 11 forearm amputees, and compared perceptual attributes of the ETS in nine forearm amputees and eight able-bodied subjects using TENS. The profile of perceptual thresholds at the most sensitive points (MSPs) in each finger-projected area was obtained by modulating current amplitude, pulse width, and frequency of the biphasic, rectangular current stimulus. The long-term stability of the PFM and the perceptual threshold of the ETS were monitored in five forearm amputees for a period of 11 months. Main results. Five finger-specific projection areas can be independently identified on the stump skin of forearm amputees with a relatively long residual stump length. The shape of the PFM was progressively similar to that of the hand with more distal amputation. Similar sensory modalities of touch, pressure, buzz, vibration, and numb below pain sensation could be evoked both in the PFM of the stump skin of amputees and in the normal skin of able-bodied subjects. Sensory thresholds in the normal skin of able-bodied subjects were generally lower than those in the stump skin of forearm amputees, however, both were linearly modulated by current amplitude and pulse width. The variation of the MSPs in the PFM was confined to a small elliptical area with 95% confidence. The perceptual thresholds of thumb-projected areas were found to vary less than 0.99 × 10-2 mA cm-2. Significance. The stable PFM and sensory thresholds of ETS are desirable for a non-invasive neural interface that can feed back finger-specific tactile information from the prosthetic hand to forearm amputees.

  6. Leucine meal increases glutamine and total nitrogen release from forearm muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T T; Brennan, M F; Fitzpatrick, G F; Knight, D C

    1981-01-01

    To assess the consequences of elevated branched chain amino acid levels on alanine, glutamine, and ammonia metabolism in muscle, L-leucine meals (14.7 g) were consumed by six normal postabsorptive individuals. Bilateral forearm studies were performed, and the dominant arm was subjected to 15 min of light exercise, using a calibrated dynamometer, beginning 45 min after the ingestion of the meal. Large uptakes of leucine were seen across both forearm muscle beds within 30 min of the meal. After exercise, blood flow in the dominant arm increased from 3.1 +/- 0.4 to 5.2 +/- 0.9 ml/100 ml forearm per minute (mean +/- SEM, P less than 0.005). Glutamine flux out of the dominant forearm increased threefold after the ingestion of the leucine meal and increased eightfold over base line after exercise. Less marked changes (significant only at 90 min) in the nonexercised, nondominant arm were also seen. Alanine flux out of the dominant forearm muscle bed increased modestly at 75 and 90 min. No significant change in ammonia flux across either forearm muscle bed was noted. Unexpectedly, large and significant net nitrogen loss from both forearm muscle beds was documented. Thus, following the ingestion of a leucine meal and light exercise, the primary means by which excess nitrogen is routed out of muscle is via glutamine formation and release with alanine and ammonia pathways playing relatively minor roles. More importantly, the ingestion of significant amounts of leucine by normal subjects, presumably in optimal nitrogen balance, results in a net loss of nitrogen from muscle. PMID:7320199

  7. Sensitivity of different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm to corticosteroid-induced skin blanching.

    PubMed

    Meyer, E; Smith, E W; Haigh, J M

    1992-10-01

    The intensity of corticosteroid-induced blanching has been found to vary at different areas of the flexor aspect of the human forearm. A retrospective analysis of 38,880 observations of skin blanching in 56 volunteers was conducted to assess the sensitivity of forearm skin to betamethasone 17-valerate. The mid-forearm appears to be more sensitive to the blanching response than do the areas close to the wrist or elbow. These results indicate that each preparation under evaluation should be applied to several sites along the forearm when using the human skin blanching assay in order to obtain an accurate comparative assessment of corticosteroid release from topical delivery vehicles.

  8. Insulin sensitivity of protein and glucose metabolism in human forearm skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Louard, R J; Fryburg, D A; Gelfand, R A; Barrett, E J

    1992-01-01

    Physiologic increases of insulin promote net amino acid uptake and protein anabolism in forearm skeletal muscle by restraining protein degradation. The sensitivity of this process to insulin is not known. Using the forearm perfusion method, we infused insulin locally in the brachial artery at rates of 0.00 (saline control), 0.01, 0.02, 0.035, or 0.05 mU/min per kg for 150 min to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by 0, approximately 20, approximately 35, approximately 60, and approximately 120 microU/ml (n = 35). L-[ring-2,6-3H]phenylalanine and L-[1-14C]leucine were infused systemically, and the net forearm balance, rate of appearance (Ra) and rate of disposal (R(d)) of phenylalanine and leucine, and forearm glucose balance were measured basally and in response to insulin infusion. Compared to saline, increasing rates of insulin infusion progressively increased net forearm glucose uptake from 0.9 mumol/min per 100 ml (saline) to 1.0, 1.8, 2.4, and 4.7 mumol/min per 100 ml forearm, respectively. Net forearm balance for phenylalanine and leucine was significantly less negative than basal (P < 0.01 for each) in response to the lowest dose insulin infusion, 0.01 mU/min per kg, and all higher rates of insulin infusion. Phenylalanine and leucine R(a) declined by approximately 38 and 40% with the lowest dose insulin infusion. Higher doses of insulin produced no greater effect (decline in R(a) varied between 26 and 42% for phenylalanine and 30-50% for leucine). In contrast, R(d) for phenylalanine and leucine did not change with insulin. We conclude that even modest increases of plasma insulin can markedly suppress proteolysis, measured by phenylalanine R(a), in human forearm skeletal muscle. Further increments of insulin within the physiologic range augment glucose uptake but have little additional effect on phenylalanine R(a) or balance. These results suggest that proteolysis in human skeletal muscle is more sensitive than glucose uptake to physiologic

  9. Forearm blood flow responses of offspring of hypertensives to an extended stress task.

    PubMed

    Ditto, B; Miller, S B

    1989-02-01

    The forearm blood flow and other cardiovascular responses of 10 healthy young men with a parental history of hypertension to an extended laboratory stressor were compared with the responses of 10 age-matched men with normotensive parents. To eliminate the effects of the anticipation of stress on baseline measures, all subjects participated in a separate 1-hour counterbalanced baseline session in which no stress was presented. There were no significant differences between the two groups in resting blood pressure, heart rate, blood volume pulse, forearm blood flow and vascular resistance, and self-report anxiety, although offspring of hypertensive parents exhibited marginally greater (p = 0.08) forearm blood flow at rest. During the stress session, subjects played video games for 1 hour and avoided mild electric shocks depending on performance. Offspring of hypertensive parents exhibited significantly greater heart rate (+19 +/- 6 vs. +3 +/- 2%), forearm blood flow (+52 +/- 14 vs. +9 +/- 4%), and self-report anxiety (+25 +/- 6 vs. +9 +/- 3%) responses to the task. There were no significant group differences in blood pressure response to the task. Significant positive correlations between forearm blood flow and heart rate responses to the task were observed. These findings extend earlier results that suggested healthy young offspring of hypertensive and normotensive parents may exhibit different patterns of hemodynamic response to stress in the absence of differences in resting blood pressure or blood pressure responsiveness to stress. PMID:2914737

  10. Forearm blood flow responses of offspring of hypertensives to an extended stress task.

    PubMed

    Ditto, B; Miller, S B

    1989-02-01

    The forearm blood flow and other cardiovascular responses of 10 healthy young men with a parental history of hypertension to an extended laboratory stressor were compared with the responses of 10 age-matched men with normotensive parents. To eliminate the effects of the anticipation of stress on baseline measures, all subjects participated in a separate 1-hour counterbalanced baseline session in which no stress was presented. There were no significant differences between the two groups in resting blood pressure, heart rate, blood volume pulse, forearm blood flow and vascular resistance, and self-report anxiety, although offspring of hypertensive parents exhibited marginally greater (p = 0.08) forearm blood flow at rest. During the stress session, subjects played video games for 1 hour and avoided mild electric shocks depending on performance. Offspring of hypertensive parents exhibited significantly greater heart rate (+19 +/- 6 vs. +3 +/- 2%), forearm blood flow (+52 +/- 14 vs. +9 +/- 4%), and self-report anxiety (+25 +/- 6 vs. +9 +/- 3%) responses to the task. There were no significant group differences in blood pressure response to the task. Significant positive correlations between forearm blood flow and heart rate responses to the task were observed. These findings extend earlier results that suggested healthy young offspring of hypertensive and normotensive parents may exhibit different patterns of hemodynamic response to stress in the absence of differences in resting blood pressure or blood pressure responsiveness to stress.

  11. Anticipatory and Reactive Response to Falls: Muscle Synergy Activation of Forearm Muscles.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Greg; Kerr, Graham

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the surface electromyogram response of six forearm muscles to falls onto the outstretched hand. The extensor carpi radialis longus, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris, abductor pollicis longus, flexor carpi radialis and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles were sampled from eight volunteers who underwent ten self-initiated falls. All muscles initiated prior to impact. Co-contraction is the most obvious surface electromyogram feature. The predominant response is in the radial deviators. The surface electromyogram timing we recorded would appear to be a complex anticipatory response to falling modified by the effect on the forearm muscles following impact. The mitigation of the force of impact is probably more importantly through shoulder abduction and extension and elbow flexion rather than action of the forearm muscles.

  12. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm secondary to infection within the space of Parona.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Wiqqas; Khan, Irfan; Robinson, Paul; Thalava, Ramesh

    2011-09-01

    The deep midpalmar space of the hand communicates with the space of Parona in the forearm. Infection of these deep spaces can be difficult to diagnose. This article presents the first reported case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm secondary to infection within the space of Parona. This article discusses the anatomy of the space of Parona, highlighting its communicating spaces and the importance of recognizing a deep-space infection of the hand as a possible cause of compartment syndrome of the forearm. This article also suggests a method of clinical examination to aid in the diagnosis of infection within the space of Parona to allow more specific planning of surgical intervention through early decompressive surgery, with surgical exploration to exclude and drain infection when no other clear cause for the rise in pressure within the osteofascial compartment is apparent. PMID:21902163

  13. Acute compartment syndrome of the forearm secondary to infection within the space of Parona.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Wiqqas; Khan, Irfan; Robinson, Paul; Thalava, Ramesh

    2011-09-09

    The deep midpalmar space of the hand communicates with the space of Parona in the forearm. Infection of these deep spaces can be difficult to diagnose. This article presents the first reported case of acute compartment syndrome of the forearm secondary to infection within the space of Parona. This article discusses the anatomy of the space of Parona, highlighting its communicating spaces and the importance of recognizing a deep-space infection of the hand as a possible cause of compartment syndrome of the forearm. This article also suggests a method of clinical examination to aid in the diagnosis of infection within the space of Parona to allow more specific planning of surgical intervention through early decompressive surgery, with surgical exploration to exclude and drain infection when no other clear cause for the rise in pressure within the osteofascial compartment is apparent.

  14. Effect of ambient temperature on the thermal profile of the human forearm, hand, and fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1976-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures were measured on the right and left sides of seven resting men. The purpose was to determine the bilateral symmetry of these segmental temperature profiles at ambient temperatures from 10 to 45 C. Thermistors placed on the right and left forearms, hands, and index fingers were used to monitor the subjects until equilibration was reached at each ambient temperature. Additionally, thermal profiles of both hands were measured with copper-constantan thermocouples. During one experimental condition (23 C ambient), rectal, ear canal, and 24 skin temperatures were measured on each subject. Average body and average skin temperatures are given for each subject at the 23 C ambient condition. Detailed thermal profiles are also presented for the dorsal, ventral, and circumferential left forearm, hand, and finger skin temperatures at 23 C ambient. No significant differences were found between the mean skin temperatures of the right and left contralateral segments at any of the selected ambient temperatures.

  15. [A rare cause of compartment syndrome of the forearm and hand following snake bite injury].

    PubMed

    Schnecker, K

    1990-06-01

    With the intention to commit suicide a 25 year old patient was bitten by his own rattle snake. At the time of the admission the skin of the right forearm was dark, a hemorrhagic necrotizing colour, and the patient was in shock. He was immediately taken to the intensive care unit and the shock symptoms were treated there. Parasthesias in the area of the nervus medianus were also noticed. The treatment included an antiserum and the release of the tourniquet which caused a further increase of the swelling of the forearm. The lesion led to a hemorrhagic necrotizing inflammation. The surgical incision of the loge of Guyon, the carpal channel, the forearm and proximal of the lacertus fibrosus was persuaded. The circulation improved immediately and after three weeks the nerval function had recovered. The skin defect was covered 14 days after the first operation with meshgraft.

  16. Quantifying forearm muscle activity during wrist and finger movements by means of multi-channel electromyography.

    PubMed

    Gazzoni, Marco; Celadon, Nicolò; Mastrapasqua, Davide; Paleari, Marco; Margaria, Valentina; Ariano, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The study of hand and finger movement is an important topic with applications in prosthetics, rehabilitation, and ergonomics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) is the gold standard for the analysis of muscle activation. Previous studies investigated the optimal electrode number and positioning on the forearm to obtain information representative of muscle activation and robust to movements. However, the sEMG spatial distribution on the forearm during hand and finger movements and its changes due to different hand positions has never been quantified. The aim of this work is to quantify 1) the spatial localization of surface EMG activity of distinct forearm muscles during dynamic free movements of wrist and single fingers and 2) the effect of hand position on sEMG activity distribution. The subjects performed cyclic dynamic tasks involving the wrist and the fingers. The wrist tasks and the hand opening/closing task were performed with the hand in prone and neutral positions. A sensorized glove was used for kinematics recording. sEMG signals were acquired from the forearm muscles using a grid of 112 electrodes integrated into a stretchable textile sleeve. The areas of sEMG activity have been identified by a segmentation technique after a data dimensionality reduction step based on Non Negative Matrix Factorization applied to the EMG envelopes. The results show that 1) it is possible to identify distinct areas of sEMG activity on the forearm for different fingers; 2) hand position influences sEMG activity level and spatial distribution. This work gives new quantitative information about sEMG activity distribution on the forearm in healthy subjects and provides a basis for future works on the identification of optimal electrode configuration for sEMG based control of prostheses, exoskeletons, or orthoses. An example of use of this information for the optimization of the detection system for the estimation of joint kinematics from sEMG is reported.

  17. Long bone articular and diaphyseal structure in Old World monkeys and apes. II: Estimation of body mass.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Christopher B

    2003-01-01

    Body mass estimation equations are generated from long bone cross-sectional diaphyseal and articular surface dimensions in 176 individuals and 12 species of hominoids and cercopithecoids. A series of comparisons is carried out to determine the best body mass predictors for each of several taxonomic/locomotor groupings. Articular breadths are better predictors than articular surface areas, while cross-sectional shaft strengths are better predictors than shaft external breadths. Percent standard errors of estimate (%SEEs) and percent prediction errors for most of the better predictors range between 10-20%. Confidence intervals of equations using sex/species means are fairly representative of those calculated using individual data, except for sex/species means equations with very low %SEEs (under about 10%), where confidence intervals (CIs) based on individuals are likely to be larger. Given individual variability, or biological "error," this may represent a lower limit of precision in estimating individual body masses. In general, it is much more preferable to determine at least broad locomotor affinities, and thus appropriate modern reference groups, before applying body mass estimation equations. However, some structural dimensions are less sensitive to locomotor distinctions than others; for example, proximal tibial articular M-L breadth is apparently "locomotor blind" regarding body mass estimation within the present study sample. In other cases where locomotor affiliation is uncertain, mean estimates from different reference groups can be used, while for some dimensions no estimation should be attempted. The techniques are illustrated by estimating the body masses of four fossil anthropoid specimens of Proconsul nyanzae, Proconsul heseloni, Morotopithecus bishopi, and Theropithecus oswaldi.

  18. EVALUATION OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING FIXATION OF DIAPHYSEAL HUMERAL FRACTURES USING THE MINIMALLY INVASIVE BRIDGE-PLATE TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Superti, Mauro José; Martynetz, Fábio; Falavinha, Ricardo Sprenger; Fávaro, Rodrigo Caldonazzo; Boas, Luis Felipe Villas; Filho, Salim Mussi; Martynetz, Juliano; Ribas, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to describe the experience of our group in treating humeral shaft fractures using the bridge–plate technique via an anterior approach. Methods: Seventeen patients with acute diaphyseal humeral fractures with an indication for surgical treatment who were operated in 2006–2010 were evaluated. The AO and Gustilo & Anderson classifications were used. All the patients were operated using the anterior bridge-plate technique and completed a follow–up period of at least twelve months. Results: Sixteen men and one woman were treated. Their mean age was 31.8 years (18–52). Among the injury mechanisms found were: five motorcycle accidents, four car accidents, three fractures due to firearm projectiles, two falls to the ground and finally, with one case each, assault, crushing and being run over. Eight patients had open fractures: two grade I, one grade II, four grade IIIa and one grade IIIb, according to the Gustilo-Anderson classification. In relation to the AO classification, we found: one 12A1, three 12A2, four 12A3, one 12B1, four 12 B2, three 12B3 and one 12C2. The mean postoperative follow-up was 25 months (12–48). As complications, two patients had pain in the elbow and a ROM deficit and one had deep infection. The mean time taken to achieve consolidation was 17.5 weeks. There was no loss of reduction, pseudarthrosis or malunion in this series of patients. Conclusion: The authors believe that the technique described has low rates of complications and morbidity, with good initial results, although the series is limited by the small sample. PMID:27042639

  19. Establishing biomechanical mechanisms in mouse models: practical guidelines for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in the diaphyses of long bones.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, Karl J; Silva, Matthew J; Vashishth, Deepak; Guo, X Edward; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2015-06-01

    Mice are widely used in studies of skeletal biology, and assessment of their bones by mechanical testing is a critical step when evaluating the functional effects of an experimental perturbation. For example, a gene knockout may target a pathway important in bone formation and result in a "low bone mass" phenotype. But how well does the skeleton bear functional loads; eg, how much do bones deform during loading and how resistant are bones to fracture? By systematic evaluation of bone morphological, densitometric, and mechanical properties, investigators can establish the "biomechanical mechanisms" whereby an experimental perturbation alters whole-bone mechanical function. The goal of this review is to clarify these biomechanical mechanisms and to make recommendations for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in mouse bones, with a focus on long-bone diaphyses and cortical bone. Further, minimum reportable standards for testing conditions and outcome variables are suggested that will improve the comparison of data across studies. Basic biomechanical principles are reviewed, followed by a description of the cross-sectional morphological properties that best inform the net cellular effects of a given experimental perturbation and are most relevant to biomechanical function. Although morphology is critical, whole-bone mechanical properties can only be determined accurately by a mechanical test. The functional importance of stiffness, maximum load, postyield displacement, and work-to-fracture are reviewed. Because bone and body size are often strongly related, strategies to adjust whole-bone properties for body mass are detailed. Finally, a comprehensive framework is presented using real data, and several examples from the literature are reviewed to illustrate how to synthesize morphological, tissue-level, and whole-bone mechanical properties of mouse long bones. PMID:25917136

  20. Establishing Biomechanical Mechanisms in Mouse Models: Practical Guidelines for Systematically Evaluating Phenotypic Changes in the Diaphyses of Long Bones

    PubMed Central

    Jepsen, Karl J; Silva, Matthew J; Vashishth, Deepak; Guo, X Edward; van der Meulen, Marjolein CH

    2016-01-01

    Mice are widely used in studies of skeletal biology, and assessment of their bones by mechanical testing is a critical step when evaluating the functional effects of an experimental perturbation. For example, a gene knockout may target a pathway important in bone formation and result in a “low bone mass” phenotype. But how well does the skeleton bear functional loads; eg, how much do bones deform during loading and how resistant are bones to fracture? By systematic evaluation of bone morphological, densitometric, and mechanical properties, investigators can establish the “biomechanical mechanisms” whereby an experimental perturbation alters whole-bone mechanical function. The goal of this review is to clarify these biomechanical mechanisms and to make recommendations for systematically evaluating phenotypic changes in mouse bones, with a focus on long-bone diaphyses and cortical bone. Further, minimum reportable standards for testing conditions and outcome variables are suggested that will improve the comparison of data across studies. Basic biomechanical principles are reviewed, followed by a description of the cross-sectional morphological properties that best inform the net cellular effects of a given experimental perturbation and are most relevant to biomechanical function. Although morphology is critical, whole-bone mechanical properties can only be determined accurately by a mechanical test. The functional importance of stiffness, maximum load, postyield displacement, and work-to-fracture are reviewed. Because bone and body size are often strongly related, strategies to adjust whole-bone properties for body mass are detailed. Finally, a comprehensive framework is presented using real data, and several examples from the literature are reviewed to illustrate how to synthesize morphological, tissue-level, and whole-bone mechanical properties of mouse long bones. PMID:25917136

  1. [Combined Monteggia and Galeazzi lesions of the forearm : a rare injury].

    PubMed

    Letta, C; Schmied, M; Haller, A; Rindlisbacher, A

    2012-11-01

    Combined forearm fractures are identified according to their location as Galeazzi, Monteggia or Essex-Lopresti injuries. The feature common to these three forms is the combination of a forearm fracture with instability of the distal or proximal radio-ulnar joint. The combination of Galeazzi and Monteggia fractures in the same extremity is an exceedingly rare occurrence. It has been reported in eight cases including two pediatric patients worldwide. In this case report the rare occurrence of the combination of these injuries and the possibility of pitfalls in the operative treatment are presented.

  2. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  3. Carotid-cardiac baroreflex influence on forearm vascular resistance during low level LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, David

    1990-01-01

    Twelve healthy males were tested at low levels of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) with and without artificial stimulation of the carotid-cardiac baroreceptors. The carotid-cardiac baroreceptors were stimulated by applying a pressure of 10 mmHg to the carotid artery via a pressurized neck chamber. During the procedure, forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) were measured using a Whitney mercury silastic strain gauge technique. FBF decreased while FVR increased with increased intensity of LBNP. Both FBF and FVR were unaffected by carotid-cardiac baroreceptor stimulation.

  4. Childhood Forearm Breaks Resulting from Mild Trauma May Indicate Bone Deficits

    MedlinePlus

    ... overall bone health. X-ray image of a child’s forearm fracture. Photo credit: eORIF LLC. In this investigation, Sundeep Khosla, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic, and colleagues used a powerful new technology ... and structure. They examined 115 children ages 8 to 15 who had sustained a ...

  5. A Magnetoencephalographic Study of Sensorimotor Activity Differences during Unilateral and Bilateral Forearm Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakagawa, Kei

    2010-01-01

    This study compared activation of the sensorimotor area using magnetoencephalography after unilateral and bilateral movements. Thirteen healthy individuals and a patient with mild hemiplegia performed unilateral and bilateral forearm pronation movements. Among healthy participants, there were no significant differences in motor-evoked field during…

  6. Action of tizanidine on responses of forearm flexors and extensors to torque disturbances.

    PubMed Central

    Mackel, R; Brink, E E; Nakajima, Y

    1984-01-01

    The effects of tizanidine on the electromyographic responses of forearm flexors and extensors to torque disturbances were studied in normal subjects. Tizanidine had a strong depressive action on all the reflex responses, and on muscle background activity. It is concluded that the action on reflexes is not specific, but secondary to decreased spinal cord excitability. PMID:6502168

  7. Nonoperatively treated forearm shaft fractures in children show good long-term recovery

    PubMed Central

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Victorzon, Sarita; Antila, Eeva; Pokka, Tytti; Serlo, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The incidence of forearm shaft fractures in children has increased and operative treatment has increased compared with nonoperative treatment in recent years. We analyzed the long-term results of nonoperative treatment. Patients and methods — We performed a population-based age- and sex-matched case-control study in Vaasa Central Hospital, concerning fractures treated in the period 1995–1999. There were 47 nonoperatively treated both-bone forearm shaft fractures, and the patients all participated in the study. 1 healthy control per case was randomly selected and evaluated for comparison. We analyzed clinical and radiographic outcomes of all fractures at a mean of 11 (9–14) years after the trauma. Results — The main outcome, pronosupination of the forearm, was not decreased in the long term. Grip strength was also equally as good as in the controls. Wrist mobility was similar in flexion (85°) and extension (83°) compared to the contralateral side. The patients were satisfied with the outcome, and pain-free. Radiographally, 4 cases had radio-carpal joint degeneration and 4 had a local bone deformity. Interpretation — The long-term outcome of nonoperatively treated both-bone forearm shaft fractures in children was excellent. PMID:25238437

  8. The Effect of Movement Imagery Training on Learning Forearm Pass in Volleyball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ay, Khitam Mousa; Halaweh, Rami Saleh; Al-Taieb, Mohammad Abu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of movement imagery on learning the forearm pass in volleyball. Twenty four mail students from Physical Education Factuly at Jordan University (19 ± 0.5) years of age. After Completed the Movement Imagery Questionnaire-Revised (MIQ-R; Hall & Martin, 1997) the subjects randomly divided into two groups,…

  9. Oromandibular reconstruction using a keel-shaped modification of the radial forearm osteocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Weinzweig, N; Jones, N F; Shestak, K C; Moon, H K; Davies, B W

    1994-10-01

    The keel-shaped modification for harvest of the radial forearm osteocutaneous flap has been used to reconstruct 19 oromandibular defects in 18 patients. Fourteen men and 4 women ranging in age from 22 to 72 years have undergone composite mandibular reconstruction, with follow-up ranging from 3 to 36 months. Sixteen patients (17 reconstructions) had resection of advanced malignancies, and 2 patients sustained shotgun wounds. Twelve symphyseal and 7 lateral or posterior defects were reconstructed with donor radius bone ranging in length from 5 to 13.5 cm. Double osteotomies were performed in 7 patients. Two skin paddles were used in 4 patients to provide simultaneous intraoral lining and external skin coverage. The radial forearm osteocutaneous flap is still an excellent choice for oromandibular reconstruction. Anterior and lateral composite mandibular defects were satisfactorily reconstructed both aesthetically and functionally using the keel-shaped modification of the radial forearm flap. Donor-site problems were uncommon and minor, and long-term forearm function was minimally affected. Radius fracture occurred in only 1 patient. PMID:7810951

  10. Evaluation of wrist and forearm motion in college-aged baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Solomito, Matthew J; Garibay, Erin J; Woods, Jessica R; Ounpuu, Sylvia; Nissen, Carl W

    2014-11-01

    Current pitching literature focuses primarily on the elbow and glenohumeral joints. This has led to a paucity of information regarding the forearm and wrist, and the limited data available are inconsistent. Therefore, this article seeks to provide a comprehensive description of the kinematics and kinetics of the wrist and forearm for the fastball, curveball, slider/cutter, and change-up for college-level baseball pitchers. Thirty-six collegiate pitchers were evaluated using motion analysis techniques. Results indicated that pitching the curveball generated the greatest forearm supination (16 ± 13°) compared with the other three pitch types (p < 0.05). The curveball and slider/cutter were pitched with less wrist extension and greater ulnar deviation compared with the fastball and change-up. The curveball was found to produce the greatest ulnar moment (7.3 ± 2.2 Nm) and was significantly different from the moments noted when pitching the fastball and change-up (5.1 ± 1.9 and 4.9 ± 1.9 Nm, respectively; p < 0.05). These results indicate that it may be possible to objectively determine pitch type from kinematic data of the wrist and forearm. It may also be possible that coaches may be able to identify abnormal pitching mechanics from more proximal segments by understanding the motion of the wrist.

  11. Design of a Model of Forearm Bone Fractures for Educational Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jastaniah, Saddig; Hamdan, Abdulrahman; Alhadrami, Abdullah; Almatrafi, Talal; Arif, Ahmed; Almalki, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    This work explores a new approach to demonstrate possible forearm fractures in humans as an educating means for student radiographers. The Design of abnormal bones are not normally available as phantoms; the manufacturer usually produces normal human musculoskeletal models for educational purposes. Hence fractures and abnormalities are usually…

  12. Evaluation of Muscle Activities in Human Forearms under Exercises by Diffuse Optical Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, Yukari; Gao, Feng; Miyakawa, Michio; Kiryu, Toru; Kizuka, Tomohiro; Endo, Yasuomi; Okawa, Shinpei; Yamada, Yukio

    During the forearm exercise, it is generally understood that the inner muscles work for the task, and the outer muscles work to fix the joints for the efficient work of the inner muscles. For evaluation of the exercise, quantitative measurement of inner muscle activities is necessary. Electromyograph (EMG) and oxygen monitoring using continuous-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (CW-NIRS) have been used for the evaluation because both of them are the modalities of safe, portable and noninvasive measurements of muscle activities. However, these modalities can show the qualitative changes in the muscle activities in the vicinity of the skin surface. Time-resolved diffuse optical tomography (TR-DOT) can quantitatively provide tomographic images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the whole muscles. In vivo experiments of TR-DOT were performed for human forearms under handgrip exercises, and DOT images of the changes in the oxygenation state of the forearms were reconstructed using the algorithm based on the modified generalized pulsed spectrum technique. The DOT images are compared with the MR-images, and it is shown that the activities of the inner muscles of the forearms were active during the handgrip excises.

  13. Effects of forearm bier block with bretylium on the hemodynamic and metabolic responses to handgrip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.; Shoemaker, J. K.; McQuillan, P. M.; Kunselman, A. R.; Smith, M. B.; Yang, Q. X.; Smith, H.; Gray, K.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a reduction in sympathetic tone to exercising forearm muscle would increase blood flow, reduce muscle acidosis, and attenuate reflex responses. Subjects performed a progressive, four-stage rhythmic handgrip protocol before and after forearm bier block with bretylium as forearm blood flow (Doppler) and metabolic (venous effluent metabolite concentration and (31)P-NMR indexes) and autonomic reflex responses (heart rate, blood pressure, and sympathetic nerve traffic) were measured. Bretylium inhibits the release of norepinephrine at the neurovascular junction. Bier block increased blood flow as well as oxygen consumption in the exercising forearm (P < 0.03 and P < 0.02, respectively). However, despite this increase in flow, venous K(+) release and H(+) release were both increased during exercise (P < 0.002 for both indexes). Additionally, minimal muscle pH measured during the first minute of recovery with NMR was lower after bier block (6.41 +/- 0.08 vs. 6.20 +/- 0.06; P < 0.036, simple effects). Meanwhile, reflex effects were unaffected by the bretylium bier block. The results support the conclusion that sympathetic stimulation to muscle during exercise not only limits muscle blood flow but also appears to limit anaerobiosis and H(+) release, presumably through a preferential recruitment of oxidative fibers.

  14. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  15. Increased renal and forearm vasoconstriction in response to exercise after heart transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Haywood, G A; Counihan, P J; Sneddon, J F; Jennison, S H; Bashir, Y; McKenna, W J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test the hypothesis that the loss of the inhibitory effect of the cardiac ventricular afferent fibres on the vasomotor centre would result in increased vasoconstrictor drive to the forearm and renal vascular beds during supine exercise in heart transplant recipients. DESIGN--Comparison of regional haemodynamic response to exercise in heart transplant recipients and two age matched control groups. SETTING--Regional heart transplant unit. PATIENTS AND METHODS--Orthotopic heart transplant recipients (n = 10), patients with NYHA class II heart failure (n = 10), and normal controls (n = 10) underwent short duration maximal supine bicycle exercise. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Simultaneous measurements were made of heart rate, systemic blood pressure, oxygen consumption (VO2), forearm blood flow, and renal blood flow. Forearm blood flow was measured by forearm plethysmography and renal blood flow by continuous renal vein thermodilution. RESULTS--The peak forearm vascular resistance was significantly greater in the transplant group than in the controls (mean (SEM) 75 (18) v 40 (7) resistance units, p < 0.05). The percentage fall in renal blood flow at peak exercise was significantly greater in heart transplant recipients than in the controls (44% (4%) v 32% (4%), p < 0.05) as was the percentage increase in renal vascular resistance (transplants: 116% (19%) v controls: 78% (17%), p < 0.05). Regional haemodynamics during exercise in the heart failure group were not significantly different from those in the controls. CONCLUSIONS--These findings suggest that surgical division of the cardiac ventricular afferent fibres results in increased vasoconstrictor drive to the kidneys and non-exercising muscle during exercise. This mechanism may contribute to persistent exercise limitation and renal impairment after heart transplantation. PMID:8398495

  16. The influence of strength-endurance training on the oxygenation of isometrically contracted forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Usaj, Anton; Jereb, Blaz; Robi, Pritrznik; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-08-01

    Ice-climbers frequently use the squeezing of rubber rings for increasing their isometric strength-endurance in the forearm muscles. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether such training influences oxygenation and endurance of forearm muscles at higher as well as lower testing intensities. Fourteen healthy young ice-climbers were divided and randomized into two groups. Group A performed a specific ice-climbing test, an ice-axe-grasping (axe weight 750 g) until fatigue. Group B performed 150 N isometric hand-squeezing of dynamometer until fatigue. Both groups performed similar training of squeezing a rubber ring at 30% of Maximal Voluntary Contraction (MVC) for 6 weeks. The forearm oxygenation was assessed by relative saturation of oxygen (RSO(2)), total hemoglobin concentration (RTOTHb), the concentration of oxygenated hemoglobin (ROXYHb) and concentration of deoxygenated hemoglobin (RDEOXYHb). The results revealed that muscle strength-endurance training increased performance of forearm muscles during 150 N contraction with an accompanied increase in oxygenation of the exercising muscles. In contrast, the same training did not influence the performance of forearm muscles during ice-axe-grasping in spite of increased oxygenation. Muscle oxygenation during intense isometric contraction is low in spite of an increase observed in training. This may be due to oxygenation levels that were below the limit where oxygenation may influence the duration of the contraction. Increased oxygenation may have occurred due to an increased blood flow and perfusion through superficial muscles or layers may not have contributed to the generation of the force of the contraction, as would be the case in deeper muscle layers.

  17. Associations between Handgrip Strength and Ultrasound-Measured Muscle Thickness of the Hand and Forearm in Young Men and Women.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Counts, Brittany R; Barnett, Brian E; Dankel, Scott J; Lee, Kofan; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2015-08-01

    It is unknown whether muscle size of intrinsic hand muscles is associated with handgrip strength. To investigate the relationships between handgrip strength and flexor muscle size of the hand and forearm, muscle thickness (MT) of 86 young adults (43 men and 43 women) between the ages of 18 and 34 y was measured by ultrasound. Two MTs (forearm radius and forearm ulna MT) in the anterior forearm, two MTs (lumbrical and dorsal interosseous MT) in the anterior hand and handgrip strength were measured on the right side. Linear regression with part (also referred to as semipartial) correlation coefficients revealed that forearm ulna MT positively correlated with handgrip strength in both men (part = 0.379, p = 0.001) and women (part = 0.268, p = 0.002). Dorsal interosseous MT correlated with handgrip strength in women only (part = 0.289, p = 0.001). Our results suggest that the forearm ulna and dorsal interosseous MTs for women and forearm ulna MTs for men are factors contributing to prediction of handgrip strength in young adults.

  18. Correlation between dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius on the distal radioulnar joint during supination and pronation of forearm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Song, Young Dong; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the patterns of movements about radius and ulna in individual degrees of forearm rotation. And, we also determined the effect of forearm rotation on translation and rotation of the radius with reference to the ulna, and to measure the relationship between forearm rotation, translation and rotation of the radius. Computed tomography of multiple, individual forearm positions, from 90° pronation to 90° supination, was conducted in 26 healthy volunteers (mean age, 43.9 years) to measure dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius in the DRUJ in each forearm position. The mean dorsovolar translations were within 1.99 mm at 90° pronation to -2.03 mm at 90° supination. The rotations of the radius were 71.20° at 90° pronation and -46.63° at 90° supination. There were strong correlations between degrees of forearm rotation and dorsovolar translation (r=0.861, p<0.001) and rotation of the radius (r=0.960, p<0.001), suggesting that the DRUJ, carpal joints, and rotatory laxity of the carpal ligament, especially in supination, contribute to forearm supination and pronation. These findings provide an understanding of wrist kinematics, are may be useful in reconstructive wrist surgery to achieve normal range of motion, and are may be helpful for the design of DRUJ reconstruction using prostheses.

  19. The effect of warmth or/and vitamin E supplementation on forearm blood flow and forearm vascular resistance in sickle cell and non sickle cell anaemia subjects.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Gbadamosi, T A; Kehinde, M O; Gbenebitse, S

    2003-03-01

    The effects of warmth stimulation and/or supplementation with vitamin E (300 mg/day for 6 weeks) on forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) were measured in 8 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (mean age = 22.8 + 0.8 years) and 11 non sickle cell anaemia (NSCA) subjects (mean age = 23.2 + 1.1 years) of both sexes. Warmth stimulation was induced by immersing the left foot in warm water at 400C for 2 minutes. Forearm blood flow was measured with the venous occlusion plethysmography method. Warmth increased FBF (p <0.01 in each group) and reduced FVR (p <0.05) in NSCA subjects. The change in FBF was greater (p < 0.05) in the NSCA subjects than in the SCA subjects. Supplementation with vitamin E reduced systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) (p < 0.001 in each case) in the NSCA subjects but had little or no effect on the SCA subjects. Vitamin E increased FBF in NSCA subjects (p < 0.05) and SCA subjects (p < 0.01) and decreased FVR in both groups (p < 0.05 in NSCA and p < 0.01 in SCA subjects). The change in FVR seen in the NSCA subjects was less (p < 0.01) than the change in SCA subjects. After supplementation with vitamin E, warmth further decreased SBP (p < 0.01 in each group) and FVR (p < 0.01 in each case) and increased FBF in both groups (p < 0.01 respectively). The changes caused by warmth after vitamin E supplementation on the blood pressure parameters, FBF and FVR were similar in the two groups of subjects.

  20. Comparative Anatomical Analyses of the Forearm Muscles of Cebus libidinosus (Rylands et al. 2000): Manipulatory Behavior and Tool Use

    PubMed Central

    Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre; Maior, Rafael Souto; Carneiro-e-Silva, Frederico O.; Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A. G. M. F.; Tavares, Maria Clotilde; Nishijo, Hisao; Tomaz, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the flexor and extensor muscles in Cebus libidinosus' forearm and compares them with those from humans, chimpanzees and baboons. The data is presented in quantitative anatomical indices for similarity. The capuchin forearm muscles showed important similarities with chimpanzees and humans, particularly those that act on thumb motion and allow certain degree of independence from other hand structures, even though their configuration does not enable a true opposable thumb. The characteristics of Cebus' forearm muscles corroborate the evolutionary convergence towards an adaptive behavior (tool use) between Cebus genus and apes. PMID:21789230

  1. Surface Electromyography of the Forearm Musculature During the Windmill Softball Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Remaley, D. Trey; Fincham, Bryce; McCullough, Bryan; Davis, Kirk; Nofsinger, Charles; Armstrong, Charles; Stausmire, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies investigating the windmill softball pitch have focused primarily on shoulder musculature and function, collecting limited data on elbow and forearm musculature. Little information is available in the literature regarding the forearm. This study documents forearm muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity that has not been previously published. Purpose: Elbow and upper extremity overuse injuries are on the rise in fast-pitch softball pitchers. This study attempts to describe forearm muscle activity in softball pitchers during the windmill softball pitch. Overuse injuries can be prevented if a better understanding of mechanics is defined. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Surface EMG and high-speed videography was used to study forearm muscle activation patterns during the windmill softball pitch on 10 female collegiate-level pitchers. Maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle was used as a normalizing value. Each subject was tested during a single laboratory session per pitcher. Data included peak muscle activation, average muscle activation, and time to peak activation for 6 pitch types: fastball, changeup, riseball, curveball, screwball, and dropball. Results: During the first 4 phases, muscle activity (seen as signal strength on the EMG recordings) was limited and static in nature. The greatest activation occurred in phases 5 and 6, with increased signal strength, evidence of stretch-shortening cycle, and different muscle characteristics with each pitch style. These 2 phases of the windmill pitch are where the arm is placed in the 6 o’clock position and then at release of the ball. The flexor carpi ulnaris signal strength was significantly greater than the other forearm flexors. Timing of phases 1 through 5 was successively shorter for each pitch. There was a secondary pattern of activation in the flexor carpi ulnaris in phase 4 for all pitches except the fastball and riseball. Conclusion: During the 6

  2. Instability in human forearm movements studied with feed-back-controlled muscle vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, A; Trend, P S

    1988-01-01

    1. Frequency-modulated vibration was applied to the elbow flexor and extensor tendons to produce reflex movements of the forearm in normal subjects. The modulating (command) signal caused equal and opposite deviations from the 40 Hz carrier frequency so that when flexor vibratory frequency increased, extensor frequency decreased, and vice versa. 2. It is argued that the movements resulted largely from the reflex action of muscle spindle primary afferents whose firing frequency had been 'taken over' and modulated by the vibration. 3. Bode plots relating forearm movements to command signal (modulating) frequency showed the transfer function of the Ia afferent-CNS-muscle-load system to have a low-pass filter characteristic. The phase lag of movement on command increased progressively with command signal frequency, exceeding 180 deg at 3-4 Hz. 4. The transduced forearm movements were fed back to provide the command signal to the vibrators (and thus indirectly to the spindle afferents) via a filter mimicking the dynamic responsiveness of muscle spindle primary endings. Our aim was to 'break into' the reflex arc, and re-route it so that we could artificially vary the gain without significantly altering the dynamics of the pathway. 5. Nearly all subjects developed forearm oscillations (tremor) when the gain exceeded a threshold value. Subjects varied widely in their threshold, though for a given subject the threshold remained fairly constant from day to day. The results suggest that reflexly active individuals may not have a large safety margin with respect to forearm instability. 6. The frequency range of the oscillations observed in seven subjects was 3-8 Hz. The frequencies depended upon the level of flexor-extensor co-contraction, and increased from 3 to 5 Hz at 10% co-contraction to 5-8 Hz at 100% co-contraction. An analysis of the mechanical impedance of the arm provided estimates of tremor frequencies consistent with these results. 7. These unexpectedly low tremor

  3. Diaphyseal lengthening for brachymetatarsia.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, J J; Mueller, R A

    1987-01-01

    The authors present a case report of brachymetatarsia. The literature is reviewed, various surgical treatments are discussed, and the preferred surgical procedure that relieved symptoms and achieved cosmetic approval is described. PMID:3655202

  4. Forearm blood flow during body temperature transients produced by leg exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, C. B.; Roberts, M. F.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.; Nadel, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    Subjects exercised for 30 min on a bicycle ergometer at 30, 50, and 70% of maximal aerobic power in ambient temperatures of 15, 25, and 35 C and vapor pressures of less than 18 torr. Exercise was used to vary internal temperature during an experiment, and different ambient temperatures were used to vary skin temperatures independently of internal temperature. Forearm skin temperature was fixed at about 36.5 C. Esophageal temperature was measured with a thermocouple at the level of the left atrium, and mean skin temperature was calculated from a weighted mean of thermocouple temperatures at eight skin sites. Forearm blood flow was measured by electrocapacitance plethysmography. Data are well accounted for by a linear equation independent of exercise intensity, although some subjects showed an equivocal vasodilator effect of exercise.

  5. Variation of forearm, hand, and finger blood flow indices with ambient temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Forearm, hand, and finger blood flow (impedance) changes are measured by impedance rheography on seven healthy male subjects aged 20-35 yr during exposure to ambient temperatures ranging from 10 to 46 C. All observations are made in an environmental chamber at a dew point temperature of 13 + or - 0.25 C. It is shown that impedance rheography is suitable for quantifying peripheral circulatory responses to thermal stress. The measured blood flow indices are found to be consistent with previously reported values for the forearm, hand, and fingers obtained using air or water displacement plethysmography. In particular, the more distal body segments exhibit relatively larger vasomotor responses to changes in ambient temperature than do the more proximal body segments.

  6. Microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis of the skin changes of free forearm flaps in intraoral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rubino, Corrado; Dessy, Luca A; Farace, Francesco; Ena, Pasquale; Mazzarello, Vittorio

    2002-10-01

    In the literature, few studies based on clinical and histological evaluation analyze skin structural changes after transplantation to the oral cavity. Ten patients affected by squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who were reconstructed with a free forearm flap were included in the current study to analyze skin alterations. The authors performed a histological and ultrastructural evaluation of skin samples from the free forearm flap before transplantation and 18 months after intraoral reconstruction. They analyzed cytokeratin and involucrin distribution, which represent markers of maturation and differentiation of epithelia. The aim of this study was to demonstrate whether skin "mucosalization" occurs. They found that the skin undergoes some morphological changes induced by the intraoral environment. Cytokeratin and involucrin distribution is mostly unchanged. This aspect is in favor of skin structure preservation. Thus, they found that "mucosalization" of the skin is not evident after 18 months. PMID:12370640

  7. Skin and muscle components of forearm blood flow in directly heated resting man.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detry, J.-M. R.; Brengelmann, G. L.; Rowell, L. B.; Wyss, C.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in forearm muscle blood flow (FMBF) during direct whole-body heating were measured in 17 normal subjects using three different methods. We conclude that FMBF is not increased by direct whole-body heating. Since renal and splanchnic blood flow fall 30% under these conditions, maximal total skin blood flow in 12 previously studied subjects can be estimated from the rise in cardiac output to be 7.6 L/min (3.0-11.1 L/min).

  8. Forearm articular proportions and the antebrachial index in Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis and the great apes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cunningham, Deborah L; Amaral, Lia Q

    2015-12-01

    When hominin bipedality evolved, the forearms were free to adopt nonlocomotor tasks which may have resulted in changes to the articular surfaces of the ulna and the relative lengths of the forearm bones. Similarly, sex differences in forearm proportions may be more likely to emerge in bipeds than in the great apes given the locomotor constraints in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo. To test these assumptions, ulnar articular proportions and the antebrachial index (radius length/ulna length) in Homo sapiens (n=51), Gorilla gorilla (n=88), Pan troglodytes (n=49), Pongo pygmaeus (n=36) and Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 are compared. Intercept-adjusted ratios are used to control for size and minimize the effects of allometry. Canonical scores axes show that the proximally broad and elongated trochlear notch with respect to size in H. sapiens and A. afarensis is largely distinct from G. gorilla, P. troglodytes and P. pygmaeus. A cluster analysis of scaled ulnar articular dimensions groups H. sapiens males with A.L. 438-1 ulna length estimates, while one A.L. 288-1 ulna length estimate groups with Pan and another clusters most closely with H. sapiens, G. gorilla and A.L. 438-1. The relatively low antebrachial index characterizing H. sapiens and non-outlier estimates of A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 differs from those of the great apes. Unique sex differences in H. sapiens suggest a link between bipedality and forearm functional morphology.

  9. [Successful treatment of subglottic tracheal stenosis with a mucosa-lined radial forearm fascia flap].

    PubMed

    Mandapathil, M; Hoffmann, T K; Freitag, L; Reddy, N; Lang, S; Delaere, P

    2012-12-01

    Short-segment tracheal stenosis is often treated by segmental resection and end-to-end anastomosis. Longer-segment stenosis can sometimes be treated using dilation, laser therapy, bronchoscopic stent insertion and segmental resection and reconstruction. Long-segment restenosis with a buildup of scar tissue due to successful resection surgery in the past represents a particular therapeutic challenge and a sufficiently vascularized transplant may be the only option. We describe the case of a 37-year-old patient who underwent a tracheal reconstruction using a mucosa-lined radial forearm flap. Subsequent to a traumatic laryngotracheal fracture, long-term ventilation and multiple surgical interventions, the patient had developed a functionally relevant subglottic stenosis (5.5 cm). Following longitudinal anterior resection of the trachea 1 cm above and below the stenosis, a Dumon® stent was inserted. Simultaneously, a radial forearm fascia flap was harvested, as were two full-thickness buccal mucosa grafts, which were sutured onto the subcutaneous tissue and fascia of the forearm flap. Beginning caudally, the mucosa-lined flap was then sutured, air-tight, into the anterior tracheal defect with the mucosa facing the lumen. Finally, end-to-end anastomosis connected the blood vessels of the radial forearm flap to the recipient blood vessels in the neck. The patient was successfully extubated after 24 h and discharged after 5 days. A postoperative CT scan revealed optimal placement of the stent and the patient's speech and breathing were sufficiently re-established. The stent was removed bronchoscopically 6 weeks after surgery. Examinations during the 6-month follow-up period showed that the diameter of the reconstructed airway was retained and the patient remained symptom-free.

  10. Non-contact strain measurement in the mouse forearm loading model using digital image correlation (DIC).

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Dallas, Mark; Vizcarra, Bruno; Liu, Ying; Johnson, Mark L; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the use of a non-contact method known as digital image correlation (DIC) to measure strains in the mouse forearm during axial compressive loading. A two camera system was adapted to analyze the medial and lateral forearm displacements simultaneously, and the derived DIC strain measurements were compared to strain gage readings from both the ulna and radius. Factors such as region-of-interest (ROI) location, lens magnification, noise, and out-of-plane motion were examined to determine their influence on the DIC strain measurements. We confirmed that our DIC system can differentiate ROI locations since it detected higher average strains in the ulna compared to the radius and detected compressive strains on medial bone surfaces vs. tensile strains on lateral bone surfaces. Interestingly, the DIC method also captured heterogeneity in surface strain fields which are not detectable by strain gage based methods. A separate analysis of the noise intrinsic to the DIC system also revealed that the noise constituted less than 4.5% of all DIC strain measurements. Furthermore, finite element (FE) simulations of the forearm showed that out-of-plane motion was not a significant factor that influenced DIC measurements. Finally, we observed that average DIC strain measurements can be up to 1.5-2 times greater than average strain gage readings on the medial bone surfaces. These findings suggest that strain experienced in the mouse forearm model by loading is better captured through DIC as opposed to strain gages, which as a result of being glued to the bone surface artificially stiffen the bone and lead to an underestimation of the strain response. PMID:26388521

  11. Pretreatment of photoaged forearm skin with topical tretinoin accelerates healing of full-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Popp, C; Kligman, A M; Stoudemayer, T J

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of skin with all-trans retinoic acid (tretinoin) has been shown to enhance wound healing. Previous studies have mainly used animal models to demonstrate this effect. We wanted to determine whether pretreatment could promote wound healing in severely photoaged dorsal forearm skin. Four elderly men with severely actinically damaged forearms were treated daily for 16 weeks. One arm was treated with 0.05-0.1% tretinoin cream (Retin A, Ortho), and the other with Purpose cream (Ortho) as a vehicle control. Four-millimetre punch biopsies were taken from both dorsal forearms prior to treatment. After 16 weeks, full-thickness 2-mm punch biopsies were taken from both sides. Serial photographs were taken, and healing of the wounds quantitatively assessed by image analysis. On the 11th day, the wounds were excised using a 4-mm biopsy punch. Biopsies were processed for light microscopy. After 16 weeks, the tretinoin-treated forearms showed moderate erythema and scaling. Polarized light photographs revealed multiple, red, vascularized foci and/or a diffuse network of small vessels. The histological effects were typical for tretinoin, i.e. compaction of the stratum corneum, epidermal acanthosis with correction of atypia, an increase in small vessels, and increased cellularity in the upper dermis. Purpose cream had no effect, either clinically or histologically. On the tretinoin-treated side, the wound areas were 35-37% smaller on days 1 and 4, and 47-50% smaller on days 6, 8, 11, compared with the controls. Clinically and histologically, reepithelialization occurred more rapidly. Thus tretinoin dramatically accelerated wound healing in photodamaged skin.

  12. Non-contact strain measurement in the mouse forearm loading model using digital image correlation (DIC).

    PubMed

    Begonia, Mark T; Dallas, Mark; Vizcarra, Bruno; Liu, Ying; Johnson, Mark L; Thiagarajan, Ganesh

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the use of a non-contact method known as digital image correlation (DIC) to measure strains in the mouse forearm during axial compressive loading. A two camera system was adapted to analyze the medial and lateral forearm displacements simultaneously, and the derived DIC strain measurements were compared to strain gage readings from both the ulna and radius. Factors such as region-of-interest (ROI) location, lens magnification, noise, and out-of-plane motion were examined to determine their influence on the DIC strain measurements. We confirmed that our DIC system can differentiate ROI locations since it detected higher average strains in the ulna compared to the radius and detected compressive strains on medial bone surfaces vs. tensile strains on lateral bone surfaces. Interestingly, the DIC method also captured heterogeneity in surface strain fields which are not detectable by strain gage based methods. A separate analysis of the noise intrinsic to the DIC system also revealed that the noise constituted less than 4.5% of all DIC strain measurements. Furthermore, finite element (FE) simulations of the forearm showed that out-of-plane motion was not a significant factor that influenced DIC measurements. Finally, we observed that average DIC strain measurements can be up to 1.5-2 times greater than average strain gage readings on the medial bone surfaces. These findings suggest that strain experienced in the mouse forearm model by loading is better captured through DIC as opposed to strain gages, which as a result of being glued to the bone surface artificially stiffen the bone and lead to an underestimation of the strain response.

  13. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Forearm Kinesio Taping on Grip Strength

    PubMed Central

    Kouhzad Mohammadi, Hosein; Khademi Kalantari, Khosro; Naeimi, Sedighe Sadat; Pouretezad, Mohammad; Shokri, Esmaeil; Tafazoli, Mojdeh; Dastjerdi, Mahboobeh; Kardooni, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the fundamental role of gripping in most upper limb activities, grip strength promotion is a chief goal in the treatment of patients with upper limb musculoskeletal disorders. Kinesio taping is a novel and effective therapeutic technique believed to facilitate muscle contraction through stimulating mechanoreceptors and increasing the sensory feedback around the taped region. Objectives: The present study aimed to identify the best region (flexor, extensor and flexor/extensor regions) and time (immediate, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 hours) of forearm Kinesio taping to obtain the maximum improvement in grip strength. Materials and Methods: In this longitudinal study, 40 healthy men and women (the mean age of 22.3 ± 2.19 years) were selected among students of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran by simple, nonrandom sampling method. A dynamometer was used to measure grip strength immediately and every 30 minutes during the two hours after I-shaped application of tape (with 50% stretch) to the flexor, extensor, and flexor/extensor forearm muscles. Results: Grip strength was significantly increased in various muscle groups for males (P = 0.002) and females (P = 0.000) of the forearm and at different intervals for males (P = 0.000) and females (P = 0.000). Moreover, in both men and women, tape application to the extensor region provided greater grip strength compared to taping of the flexor and flexor/extensor regions (P = 0.000 for both). Furthermore, the maximum increase in grip strength were 0.5 (10.8% increase, P = 0.001) and 1.5 h (23.9% increase, P = 0.000) after taping in males and females, respectively. Conclusions: Taping the extensor region of forearm is recommended to achieve higher grip strength. Although grip strength increased at a slower pace in females than males, the final values were higher in women. PMID:25389492

  14. [Results of treating forearm bone shaft fractures with a 3.5 mm self compressive plate].

    PubMed

    Małecki, P; Kaleta, M; Tokarowski, A; Kusz, D; Wójcik, B

    1997-01-01

    Results of 29 forearm bones shaft fracture treatment with 3.5mm self compressive plate in 26 patients aged 18-64 (mean 33) are presented. Open reduction with 3.5mm self compressive plate fixation has been performed in all cases. Anderson et al criteria were used to assess functional and radiological outcome. Excellent and good functional results were achieved in 25 cases, one was rated fair, no poor results were observed. PMID:9490253

  15. Influence of forearm muscle metaboreceptor activation on sweating and cutaneous vascular responses during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Amano, Tatsuro; Ichinose, Masashi; Inoue, Yoshimitsu; Nishiyasu, Takeshi; Koga, Shunsaku; Kenny, Glen P; Kondo, Narihiko

    2016-06-01

    We examined whether the sustained activation of metaboreceptor in forearm during cycling exercise can modulate sweating and cutaneous vasodilation. On separate days, 12 young participants performed a 1.5-min isometric handgrip exercise at 40% maximal voluntary contraction followed by 1) 9-min forearm ischemia (Occlusion, to activate metaboreceptor) or 2) no ischemia (Control) in thermoneutral conditions (27°C, 50%) with mean skin temperature clamped at 34°C. Thirty seconds after the handgrip exercise, participants cycled for 13.5 min at 40% V̇o2 max For Occlusion, forearm ischemia was maintained for 9 min followed by no ischemia thereafter. Local sweat rate (SR, ventilated capsule) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler perfusion units/mean arterial pressure) on the contralateral nonischemic arm as well as esophageal and skin temperatures were measured continuously. The period of ischemia in the early stages of exercise increased SR (+0.03 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P < 0.05) but not CVC (P > 0.05) above Control levels. No differences were measured in the esophageal temperature at which onset of sweating (Control 37.19 ± 0.09 vs. Occlusion 37.07 ± 0.09°C) or CVC (Control 37.21 ± 0.08 vs. Occlusion 37.08 ± 0.10°C) as well as slopes for these responses (all P > 0.05). However, a greater elevation in SR occurred thereafter such that SR was significantly elevated at the end of the ischemic period relative to Control (0.37 ± 0.05 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), respectively, P < 0.05) despite no differences in esophageal temperature. We conclude that the activation of forearm muscle metaboreceptor can modulate sweating, but not CVC, during cycling exercise without affecting the core temperature-SR relationship. PMID:27053652

  16. Forearm bone density in users of Depo-Provera as a contraceptive method.

    PubMed

    Bahamondes, L; Perrotti, M; Castro, S; Faúndes, D; Petta, C; Bedone, A

    1999-05-01

    The impact of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate use on bone mineral density was assessed in a cross-sectional study of 100 women recruited from a teaching hospital in Campinas, Brazil, during 1996-98. Bone mineral density, as evaluated at the midshaft and distal radius of the nondominant forearm by single x-ray absorptiometry, was compared in 50 women 35-45 years of age who had been using Depo-Provera for contraception for 1 year or more (mean duration, 46.4 +or- 38.6 months) but had never used any other hormonal method and 50 age- and weight-matched women who had never used any form of hormonal contraception. Although mean bone mineral density at the midshaft of the forearm was lower in Depo-Provera users than nonusers of hormonal contraception (0.459 +or- 0.042 vs. 0.474 +or- 0.049 g/sq. cm), the difference was not statistically significant. At the distal portion, bone mineral density was significantly lower in Depo-Provera users than nonusers of hormonal methods (0.362 +or- 0.040 vs. 0.392 +or- 0.049 g/sq. cm, p 0.001). The duration of Depo-Provera use was not related to bone mineral density, even when women had used the method for more than 5 years. Multiple regression analysis indicated that 4 pregnancies, White race, and Depo-Provera use were significantly associated with lower bone mineral density at the midshaft section of the forearm; at the distal section of the forearm, these variables were Depo-Provera use, more than 4 pregnancies, White race, older age at menarche, and habitual coffee drinking. These findings do not provide sufficient evidence to conclude that Depo-Provera users are at increased risk of osteoporosis.

  17. Macroscopic study of the functional significance of the forearm muscles in the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hideki; Sasaki, Motoki; Narushima, Etsuo; Komiya, Teruyuki; Hayashida, Akiko; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Stafford, Brian J

    2003-08-01

    The extensor and flexor group muscles and their related muscles were functional-morphologically observed in the dead body of the giant panda to clarify the action of the forearm and the palm in the manipulation of the species. The Musculus flexor carpi ulnaris had two developed heads, however, we can conclude that the contraction of this muscle slightly changes the angle of the accessory carpal bone to the ulna. The data pointed out that the accessory carpal bone acts as a supporting post, when the giant panda seizes the object. The M. abductor digiti I longus possessed the well-developed origin in both ulna and radius. These findings suggest that this muscle may function as a supinator of the forearm. We also suggest that the well-developed M. pronator quadratus and M. pronator teres, and the proximal part of the M. abductor digiti I longus and the M. supinator may efficiently contribute to the pronator-spinator action of the forearm, when the giant panda brings the food to its mouth using the manipulation system equipped in the palm region.

  18. Supinated forearm is correlated with the onset of medial epicondylitis in professional slalom water-skiers

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Donato; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Balato, Giovanni; D’Addona, Alessio; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background prolonged and laborious activities involving wrists and forearms has been long associated with the onset of epicondylitis. Slalom water-skiing can be included in this category. The purpose of the study is to analyse the correlation between the pronated or supinated position of forearms during water-skiing practice and the presence respectively of lateral and medial epicondylitis. Methods sixty-six pro and semi-pro slalom water-skiers were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire was submitted to each athlete. Diagnosis of lateral or medial epicondylitis was made through anamnesis and clinical exam by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Chi-squared were performed for categorical variables, and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous ones. Results from 116 upper limbs examined, we observed 15 (12.9%) cases of lateral epicondylitis, 30 (25.9%) cases of medial epicondylitis, 10 (8.6%) were affected by both lateral and medial epicondylitis. Lateral and medial epicondylitis were associated (95% C.I.=2,489–26,355; P=<0,001) and the supinated position was correlated with medial epicondylitis (95% C.I.=1,529–9,542; P=0.003). Conclusion slalom water-skiing can be considered a high-risk sport for epicondylitis. In slalom water-skiers there is a correlation between development of lateral and medial epicondylitis in the same upper limb. Supinated position of forearms is strongly associated with the diagnosis of medial epicondylitis. PMID:27331043

  19. EFFECT OF USING WRIST ORTHOSES ON FOREARM FLEXOR AND EXTENSOR MUSCLE ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Novais Van Petten, Adriana Maria Valladão; Ávila, Antônio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of using wrist immobilization orthoses made from different materials, on activation of the flexor and extensor musculature of the forearm while performing specific tasks. Methods: Twenty-six adults, with an average age of 26.2 years, underwent the Jebsen-Taylor functional hand test and the grip strength test (Jamar® dynamometer) under three conditions: free hand, wearing a composite orthosis and wearing a thermoplastic orthosis. The tests were carried out using the dominant hand only. During the tests, surface electrodes were attached to the flexor and extensor muscles of the forearm to record the muscle electrical activity. The results obtained under the three conditions were compared and analyzed using the Wilcoxon statistical test. Results: Significant differences in muscle activation were found between using the free hand and using any of the orthoses. There was no significant difference in muscle activation between the two types of orthosis. A decrease in activity of the extensor muscles of the forearm was observed during all the tasks, as well as an increase in activation of the flexor muscles with the use of the orthoses. Conclusion: These results are important for defining whether an orthosis should be prescribed during the rehabilitation process for a wide range of disorders, such as tendinitis of the flexors and extensors of the wrist and fingers, as well as for predicting the length of time for which these devices should be used. PMID:27022523

  20. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke. PMID:22254624

  1. Incidence of forearm and hand ischaemia related to radial artery cannulation in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Vos, A; Okken, A

    1990-01-01

    We report the incidence of transient and permanent ischaemia of the forearm and hand caused by radial artery cannulation in a series of 98 newborn infants. Birth weight ranged from 550 to 3920 g (median 1600 g) and gestational age ranged from 26 to 40 weeks (median 31 weeks). In 4 of the 98 infants transient ischaemia of the forearm and/or hand occurred. In three infants the onset of ischaemia was probably related to thrombo-embolic events and in one infant to inadequate palmar collateral circulation. Permanent ischaemic damage with tissue loss did not occur in any infant. It is concluded that permanent ischaemic damage to the forearm and/or the hand with tissue loss, attributable to radial artery cannulation, is seldom encountered in newborn infants. In minimizing the risk of ischaemia, careful assessment of palmar collateral circulation prior to cannulation and of all factors predisposing to the onset of ischaemia is essential. Immediate removal of the catheter at the earliest signs of ischaemia, is essential to prevent ensuing tissue loss.

  2. 3D Measurement of Forearm and Upper Arm during Throwing Motion using Body Mounted Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Hideharu; Sagawa, Koichi; Kuroshima, Kouta; Tsukamoto, Toshiaki; Urita, Kazutaka; Ishibashi, Yasuyuki

    The aim of this study is to propose the measurement method of three-dimensional (3D) movement of forearm and upper arm during pitching motion of baseball using inertial sensors without serious consideration of sensor installation. Although high accuracy measurement of sports motion is achieved by using optical motion capture system at present, it has some disadvantages such as the calibration of cameras and limitation of measurement place. Whereas the proposed method for 3D measurement of pitching motion using body mounted sensors provides trajectory and orientation of upper arm by the integration of acceleration and angular velocity measured on upper limb. The trajectory of forearm is derived so that the elbow joint axis of forearm corresponds to that of upper arm. Spatial relation between upper limb and sensor system is obtained by performing predetermined movements of upper limb and utilizing angular velocity and gravitational acceleration. The integration error is modified so that the estimated final position, velocity and posture of upper limb agree with the actual ones. The experimental results of the measurement of pitching motion show that trajectories of shoulder, elbow and wrist estimated by the proposed method are highly correlated to those from the motion capture system within the estimation error of about 10 [%].

  3. Thenar muscle blood flow and bone mineral in the forearms of lumberjacks.

    PubMed

    Karjalainen, P; Alhava, E M; Valtola, J

    1975-02-01

    Forty lumberjacks who had used a chain saw for 0-20 years and who had no general disease affecting the bones were studied by measuring the thenar muscle blood flow of both hands by the 133-Xe local clearance method. Bone mineral in the left forearm in the region of cancellous and cortical bone was assessed by the 241-Am gamma ray attenuation method. Virbration was found to decrease the blood flow in the saw-bearing left hand compared with the right hand of the lumberjacks. The bone mineral density (g/vm-3) was lower in the forearm bones of the lumberjacks than in controls of the same age with healthy bones. Moreover the poorer the thenar muscle blood flow, the greater was the decrease in the mineral density of the distal radius. Measurement of the mineral density of the forearm bones by the gramma ray attenuation method can be used for early detection of bone lesions in traumatic vasospastic disease.

  4. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke.

  5. String vibration dampers do not reduce racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm.

    PubMed

    Li, F X; Fewtrell, D; Jenkins, M

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of string vibration damping devices on reducing racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm. Twenty participants volunteered to hold a tennis racket stationary in a forehand and backhand stroking position while tennis balls were fired at 20 m x s(-1) towards two impact locations, the node of vibration and the dead spot. A three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on damping condition, impact location and stroke condition was performed on the data. The resonant frequency of the hand-held racket was found to be approximately 120 Hz. No significant differences in amplitude of vibration at the resonant frequency were found for the wrist or the elbow when damped and non-damped impacts were compared. Impacts at the dead spot produced greater amplitudes of vibration (P < 0.01) but no interaction between impact location and string dampers was evident. The string dampers had no effect on the grip force used or the muscle electrical activity in the forearm after impact. In conclusion, we found that string dampers do not reduce the amount of racket frame vibration received at the forearm. We suggest that string dampers remain a popular accessory among tennis players because of their acoustic effects and psychological support rather than any mechanical advantage. PMID:15801498

  6. Evaluating Bone Health in Egyptian Children with Forearm Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elbatrawy, Salwa; Gobashy, Amr; Moreira, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. Methods. A case control study of 46 children aged 3 to 10 years with or without forearm fractures. Validated questionnaires were used to assess calcium and vitamin D intake as well as sun exposure. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D were collected. Bone mineral density was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Compared to the Control group, calcium and vitamin D intake was lower in the Cases group (p = 0.03). Cases had higher Body Mass Index than Controls, p = 0.01. Children in the Cases group had lower mean serum calcium values 8.3 ± 1.4 compared to 9.3 ± 1.1 in Controls (p = 0.01). Alkaline phosphatase was higher in Cases 265 ± 65.8 than Controls 226 ± 54.6 (p = 0.03). Vitamin D and bone mineral density scores were significantly lower in the Cases group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data shows an increased rate of vitamin D deficiency and decreased bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. PMID:27651803

  7. [Forearm osteomusculocutaneous free filet flap for arm reconstruction after amputation as an alternative to shoulder disarticulation].

    PubMed

    Gachie, E; Alet, J-M; Nguyen, P; Della Volpe, C; Casanova, D

    2015-04-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old woman suffering from a type I neurofibromatosis (also known as Von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis) who was diagnosed with a high-grade schwannosarcoma of the median nerve, between the upper third and the medium third of the arm, upon contact with the humerus, invading the humeral vessels. The oncologic treatment of this tumour consisted in the amputation of the arm through the surgical neck of the humerus. In order to create a laterothoracic claw, to bring a partial function of the upper limb back, we decided to realize a free fillet forearm flap. This composite flap was composed of the radius and the ulna, all the forearm muscles and the skin of the anterior side of the forearm. A humeroradial plate osteosynthesis was done and the flap was then harvested with the radial pedicle, and anastomosed to the axillar artery. This procedure gave our patient a functional stump, giving back the arm functionality, especially the claw movement. PMID:25001415

  8. Evaluating Bone Health in Egyptian Children with Forearm Fractures: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Elbatrawy, Salwa; Gobashy, Amr; Moreira, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. Methods. A case control study of 46 children aged 3 to 10 years with or without forearm fractures. Validated questionnaires were used to assess calcium and vitamin D intake as well as sun exposure. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D were collected. Bone mineral density was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Compared to the Control group, calcium and vitamin D intake was lower in the Cases group (p = 0.03). Cases had higher Body Mass Index than Controls, p = 0.01. Children in the Cases group had lower mean serum calcium values 8.3 ± 1.4 compared to 9.3 ± 1.1 in Controls (p = 0.01). Alkaline phosphatase was higher in Cases 265 ± 65.8 than Controls 226 ± 54.6 (p = 0.03). Vitamin D and bone mineral density scores were significantly lower in the Cases group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data shows an increased rate of vitamin D deficiency and decreased bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures.

  9. Forearm Skin Blood Flow After Kinesiology Taping in Healthy Soccer Players: An Exploratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Kirsty A.; Unnithan, Vish; Hopkins, Nicola D.

    2015-01-01

    Context Kinesiology tape (KT) has become popular among athletes for both injury prevention and rehabilitation due to its reported therapeutic effects, including facilitation of lymphatic flow and enhanced peripheral blood flow. However, evidence to support such claims is insufficient. Objective To determine whether KT improves skin blood flow (SkBF) responses in young, elite soccer players. Design Randomized crossover study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Thirteen healthy, elite, adolescent male soccer players (age = 14.7 ± 0.6 years). Intervention(s) Participants completed 2 experimental trials; during trial 1, the volar aspect of the dominant forearm was taped. Forearm SkBF was measured within the taped area and 3 cm lateral to the taped area. During trial 2, no tape was applied to either site. Both trials were performed within 7 days. Main Outcome Measure(s) Baseline and maximal thermally (42°C) stimulated SkBF responses were assessed using laser Doppler flowmetry. Continuously measured SkBF and derived mean arterial pressure obtained at 5-minute intervals were used to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC), the primary outcome measure. Results No differences were observed for baseline SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. After local heating, no differences were evident for SkBF or CVC between trials or measurement sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, in healthy, trained adolescent males, KT was not associated with increased forearm SkBF. PMID:26445024

  10. String vibration dampers do not reduce racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm.

    PubMed

    Li, F X; Fewtrell, D; Jenkins, M

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of string vibration damping devices on reducing racket frame vibration transfer to the forearm. Twenty participants volunteered to hold a tennis racket stationary in a forehand and backhand stroking position while tennis balls were fired at 20 m x s(-1) towards two impact locations, the node of vibration and the dead spot. A three-way analysis of variance with repeated measures on damping condition, impact location and stroke condition was performed on the data. The resonant frequency of the hand-held racket was found to be approximately 120 Hz. No significant differences in amplitude of vibration at the resonant frequency were found for the wrist or the elbow when damped and non-damped impacts were compared. Impacts at the dead spot produced greater amplitudes of vibration (P < 0.01) but no interaction between impact location and string dampers was evident. The string dampers had no effect on the grip force used or the muscle electrical activity in the forearm after impact. In conclusion, we found that string dampers do not reduce the amount of racket frame vibration received at the forearm. We suggest that string dampers remain a popular accessory among tennis players because of their acoustic effects and psychological support rather than any mechanical advantage.

  11. Penile reconstruction: combined use of an innervated forearm osteocutaneous flap and big toe pulp.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Nozaki, M; Morioka, K; Huang, T T

    1999-09-01

    The use of a radial forearm flap has become the most popular method to reconstruct a phallus in recent years. This method of reconstruction, however, is plagued with problems such as urethral fistula and loss of phallic girth as a result of tissue atrophy, rendering a phallic contour that is cosmetically unsatisfactory. We had the opportunity of modifying the technique of penile reconstruction using a forearm osteocutaneous flap to minimize these problems. Specifically, a segment of the big toe pulp is used to reconstruct a glans penis. Sensory restoration in the "glans" and "penile shaft" is restored by coapting the digital and the antebrachial nerves to the penile nerve remnants. A segment of flexor carpi radialis muscle is included in the design of a forearm flap to reinforce the coaptation site of the urethral tract. An arteriovenous shunt is incorporated in the shaft as a mechanism to elicit erection of the penis by compressing the root of the neophallus. We had used these technical modifications in a 51-year-old man who had undergone penile amputation because of cancer. The cosmetic appearance and erotic and tactile sensation in the shaft and glans were proper and satisfactory at the end of fourth year after the surgery. The coital function was also satisfactory. PMID:10654748

  12. Coriolis-induced cutaneous blood flow increase in the forearm and calf.

    PubMed

    Cheung, B; Hofer, K

    2001-04-01

    Using venous occlusion plethysmography, Sunahara et al. reported that Coriolis-induced nausea was accompanied by an increase in forearm blood flow, suggesting a decrease in sympathetic activity to this vascular bed. No significant blood pressure and heart rate changes were observed. Vasodilation of the limbs theoretically impairs orthostatic tolerance, particularly if blood flow is shown to increase simultaneously in the lower limbs. This study examined the latter possibility. Seventeen subjects were exposed to the Coriolis cross-coupling effects induced by 20 RPM yaw rotation, and a simultaneous 45 degrees pitch forward head movement in the sagittal plane every 12 s. Forearm and calf skin blood flow were monitored in real-time using laser Doppler flowmetry (PeriFlux 4001). Our results indicated a significant (p < 0.001) simultaneous forearm and calf skin blood flow increase as a result of Coriolis cross-coupling across all 15 susceptible subjects. No significant changes in blood pressure and heart rate were observed. Coriolis-induced cardiovascular changes may confound previous reports on reduced G tolerance using ground-based centrifuges that invariably evoke cross-coupling effects.

  13. Evaluating Bone Health in Egyptian Children with Forearm Fractures: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    El-Sakka, Abeer; Penon, Cristina; Hegazy, Adham; Elbatrawy, Salwa; Gobashy, Amr; Moreira, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the likelihood of vitamin D deficiency and low bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. Methods. A case control study of 46 children aged 3 to 10 years with or without forearm fractures. Validated questionnaires were used to assess calcium and vitamin D intake as well as sun exposure. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D were collected. Bone mineral density was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results. Compared to the Control group, calcium and vitamin D intake was lower in the Cases group (p = 0.03). Cases had higher Body Mass Index than Controls, p = 0.01. Children in the Cases group had lower mean serum calcium values 8.3 ± 1.4 compared to 9.3 ± 1.1 in Controls (p = 0.01). Alkaline phosphatase was higher in Cases 265 ± 65.8 than Controls 226 ± 54.6 (p = 0.03). Vitamin D and bone mineral density scores were significantly lower in the Cases group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Our data shows an increased rate of vitamin D deficiency and decreased bone mineral density in Egyptian children with forearm fractures. PMID:27651803

  14. Treatment of hesitation marks on the forearm by the pinhole method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; No, Yeon A; Kang, Jin Moon; Chung, Won Soon; Kim, Young Koo; Seo, Seong Jun; Park, Kui Young

    2016-09-01

    Scars from self-inflicted wounds, referred to as "hesitation marks," are usually linear, flat, poorly oriented, white in color, and often located on the forearm. Many patients do not undergo treatment for these due to limited available modalities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the pinhole method using a 10,600 nm carbon dioxide (CO2) laser for treating hesitation marks on the forearm. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with hesitation marks treated by the pinhole method from March 2010 to April 2014. Eleven patients with hesitation marks (mean age 37.8 years; range, 23-67 years) were treated with the pinhole method over the 4-year study period. Subjects were treated via the pinhole method in one to six treatment sessions at 4- to 8-week intervals. Two blinded observers evaluated photographs taken at baseline and 3 months after the final treatment and assessed improvement using a quartile grading scale. Compared with baseline, there was mild to moderate improvement in all patients (mean score 3.0). The patient satisfaction survey revealed a mean improvement score of 2.82. The pinhole method using a CO2 laser may be an effective treatment option in patients with hesitation marks on the forearm. PMID:27329380

  15. Management of a long segmental defect at the proximal meta-diaphyseal junction of the tibia using a cylindrical titanium mesh cage.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, Peter A W; Haase, Nina; Rübberdt, Alexander; Wich, Michael; Ekkernkamp, Axel

    2002-09-01

    This case report describes a Gustilo Anderson type IIIB tibia fracture associated with extensive segmental bone loss at the proximal meta-diaphyseal junction associated with a tibial plateau fracture and an avulsion of the tibial tubercle. After the tibial plateau fracture was stabilized using cannulated lag screws, the shaft fracture was stabilized using a statically locked intramedullary nail in combination with a cylindrical titanium mesh cage and cancellous bone graft. The soft tissue defect was covered with local flaps. Immediate full weight bearing was initiated, and early functional recovery was achieved. At the final follow-up, plain radiographs demonstrated excellent limb alignment, and bony healing with computed tomography examination revealed bony ingrowth through the cage. This technique may be a reasonable alternative in the treatment of segmental bone loss of long bones.

  16. The Effects of Forearm Support on Upper Body for People in Front of Monitor: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Jingtong; Wu, Xiaojing; Duan, Xin; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    With the ever-growing number of people who work at visual display terminals, the work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper body are believed to be an important problem all over the world. The forearm support, which can keep the forearm and wrist in biomechanical posture, is a possible protective factor of the development of upper body syndrome. This meta-analysis examines the efficacy of forearm support in reducing upper body syndrome. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Ovid, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, Google Scholar, CNKI database, and Wanfang database were searched from inception until May 29, 2013. Relevant studies were included after the screening of title, abstract, and the full text. Impact of bias was assessed independently by 2 authors. Four studies that met all the inclusion criteria were included finally. The combined results based on all studies suggested that statistically the forearm support had a nonsignificant effect on upper body syndrome (odds ratio [OR] = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49, 1.02). The result of subgroup analysis suggested that forearm support has a significant effect on neck or shoulder syndrome (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.43, 1.14) and the effect on upper extremity syndrome (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.19) is not significant. This meta-analysis suggested that the forearm support had statistically nonsignificant effect on preventing upper body syndrome on the whole. PMID:24428221

  17. The Impact of Obesity on Complications of Elbow, Forearm, and Hand Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    London, Daniel A.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Lalchandani, Gopal R.; Okoroafor, Ugochi C.; Wildes, Troy S.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the rates of postoperative complications in obese and non-obese patients following elbow, forearm, and hand surgeries. Methods: This case-control study examined 436 patients whose body mass index (BMI) was over 35 and who underwent hand, wrist, forearm, or elbow surgery between 2009-2013. Controls were patients (n=433) with a BMI<30 who had similar surgeries over the same period, and frequency-matched by type of surgery (i.e., bony, soft tissue, or nerve), age, and sex. Postoperative complications were defined as infection requiring antibiotic or reoperation, delayed incision healing, nerve dysfunction, wound dehiscence, hematoma, and other reoperation. Medical comorbidities (e.g., hypertension, diabetes, stroke, vascular disease, kidney disease, and liver disease) were recorded. Chi-square analyses were performed to explore the association between obesity and postoperative complications. Similar analyses were performed stratified by surgery type and BMI classification. Logistic regression modeling was performed to identify predictors of postoperative complications accounting for surgery type, BMI, the presence of comorbidities, patient age, and patient sex. This same model was also run separately for case and control patients. Results: The overall complication rate was 8.7% with similar rates between obese and non-obese patients (8.5% vs 9.0%). Bony procedures resulted in the greatest risk of complication in both groups (15% each group). Multivariate analysis confirmed surgery type as the only significant predictor of complications for non-obese patients. However, among obese patients, both bony surgery and increasing BMI were associated with greater complication rates. Discussion: Not all obese patients appear to be at any higher risk for complications after elbow, forearm, and hand surgery compared to non-obese patients. However, there appears to be a dose-dependent effect of BMI among obese patients such that increasing-obesity heightens the

  18. Prospective biomechanical evaluation of donor site morbidity after radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Riecke, Björn; Kohlmeier, Carsten; Assaf, Alexandre T; Wikner, Johannes; Drabik, Anna; Catalá-Lehnen, Philip; Heiland, Max; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2016-02-01

    Although the radial forearm free flap (RFF) is a commonly-used microvascular flap for orofacial reconstruction, we are aware of few prospective biomechanical studies of the donor site. We have therefore evaluated the donor site morbidity biomechanically of 30 consecutive RFF for orofacial reconstruction preoperatively and three months postoperatively. This included the Mayo wrist score, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score, grip strength, followed by tip pinch, key pinch, palmar pinch, and range of movement of the wrist. Primary defects were all closed with local full-thickness skin grafts from the donor site forearm, thereby circumventing the need for a second defect. Postoperative functional results showed that there was a reduction in hand strength measured by (grip strength: -24.1%, in tip pinch: -23.3%, in key pinch: -16.5, and in palmar pinch: -19.3%); and wrist movement measured by extension (active=14.3% / passive= -11.5%) and flexion = -14.8% / -8.9%), and radial (-9.8% / -9.8%) and ulnar (-11.0% / -9.3%) abduction. The Mayo wrist score was reduced by 9.4 points (-12.9%) and the DASH score increased by 16.1 points (+35.5%) compared with the same forearm preoperatively. The local skin graft resulted in a robust wound cover with a good functional result. Our results show that the reduction in hand strength and wrist movement after harvest of a RFF is objectively evaluable, and did not reflect the subjectively noticed extent and restrictions in activities of daily living. Use of a local skin graft avoids a second donor site and the disadvantages of a split-thickness skin graft.

  19. Repeatability of local forearm vasoconstriction to endothelin-1 measured by venous occlusion plethysmography

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, Fiona E; Newby, David E; Sciberras, David G; McCrea, Jacqueline B; Goldberg, Michael R; Webb, David J

    2002-01-01

    Aims We investigated the repeatability of the forearm blood flow response to intra-arterial infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1), assessed by venous occlusion plethysmography. Methods In eight healthy men (aged 18–50 years), on four separate occasions, ET-1 (2.5 or 10 pmol min−1) was infused for 120 min via a 27 SWG cannula sited in the brachial artery of the nondominant arm. Each dose level was administered twice on consecutive visits. The dose order was randomized. Results are expressed as percentage change from baseline at 120 min (mean ± s.e. mean). Results ET-1 caused significant vasoconstriction (P < 0.0001 anova) at both doses (38 ± 3%, 2.5 pmol min−1 and 62 ± 3%, 10 pmol min−1; mean visit 1 and 2). There was no difference in the response to either dose on repeated challenge. Responses appeared to be less variable when expressed as percentage change in the ratio of blood flow (infused:noninfused) in both arms than as percentage change in blood flow in the infused arm alone, as indicated by repeatability coefficients (15% vs 21%, 2.5 pmol min−1 and 11% vs 13%, 10 pmol min−1; ratio vs infused arm alone). Conclusions We have shown dose-dependent vasoconstriction in the forearm vascular bed to intra-arterial infusion of ET-1 and that this response is less variable when expressed as percentage change in the ratio of forearm blood flow than percentage change in the infused arm. These data should also provide useful information to determine the power of early clinical pharmacology studies investigating the activity of endothelin receptor antagonists. PMID:12392586

  20. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy in the soft tissue of the forearm: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yangyang; Zheng, Jicui; Yang, Shaobao; Zhu, Haitao; Dong, Kuiran; Xiao, Xianmin; Chen, Lian

    2015-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is rare. Only 3 cases have been reported in the soft tissue of the extremities up to date. It has a typically biphasic feature in morphology. Epithelial and melanotic markers are positive in the epitheliod cells and neuron-specific enolase or synaptophysin is positive in the small blue round cells in immunohistochemistry. Radical resection and close follow-up is the treatment strategy in general situation. Here we report one case of MNTI in the upper extremity with review of the literature. This is the first case of MNTI in the forearm.

  1. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy in the soft tissue of the forearm: report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yangyang; Zheng, Jicui; Yang, Shaobao; Zhu, Haitao; Dong, Kuiran; Xiao, Xianmin; Chen, Lian

    2015-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of infancy is rare. Only 3 cases have been reported in the soft tissue of the extremities up to date. It has a typically biphasic feature in morphology. Epithelial and melanotic markers are positive in the epitheliod cells and neuron-specific enolase or synaptophysin is positive in the small blue round cells in immunohistochemistry. Radical resection and close follow-up is the treatment strategy in general situation. Here we report one case of MNTI in the upper extremity with review of the literature. This is the first case of MNTI in the forearm. PMID:26722579

  2. [Reconstruction of oral mucosa with a micro-vascularized fascia-cutaneous flap from the forearm].

    PubMed

    Burgueño García, Miguel; Cebrián Carretero, José Luis; Muñoz Caro, Jesús Manuel; Arias Gallo, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Epidermoid carcinoma of jugal mucosa is an aggressive tumor. Its treatment is based on broad excision and reconstruction in order to avoid fibrosis and restriction of mouth opening. Neck dissection and radiotherapy are indicated in selected cases. We display our experience with microvascularized flaps with the aim of preventing the flaws. We reconsider 8 patients (representing 10 flaps) handle in our Department. Besides we discuss other therapeutic alternatives after the growth's removal. The conclusion reached is that the mucovascularized forearm flaps give a great quantity of thin tissue and therefore so results to be the best option for the reconstruction of the jugal mucosa.

  3. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense.

    PubMed

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5-17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18-25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: -2.85° in early childhood; -2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  4. Quantitative values of blood flow through the human forearm, hand, and finger as functions of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, L. D.

    1974-01-01

    A literature search was made to obtain values of human forearm, hand and finger blood flow as functions of environmental temperature. The sources used include both government and laboratory reports and the research presented in the open literature. An attempt was made to review many of the more quantitative noninvasive determinations and to collate the results in such a way as to yield blood flow values for each body segment as continuous functions of temperature. A brief review of the various ways used to measure blood flow is included along with an abstract of each work from which data was taken.

  5. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M.; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5–17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18–25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: −2.85° in early childhood; −2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  6. Wheelbarrow tire explosion causing trauma to the forearm and hand: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tire explosion injuries are rare, but they may result in a severe injury pattern. Case reports and statistics from injuries caused by exploded truck tires during servicing are established, but trauma from exploded small tires seems to be unknown. Case presentation A 47-year-old german man inflated a wheelbarrow tire. The tire exploded during inflation and caused an open, multiple forearm and hand injury. Conclusion Even small tires can cause severe injury patterns in the case of an explosion. High inflating pressures and low safety distances are the main factors responsible for this occurrence. Broad safety information and suitable filling devices are indispensable for preventing these occurrences. PMID:19946543

  7. Development of Proprioceptive Acuity in Typically Developing Children: Normative Data on Forearm Position Sense

    PubMed Central

    Holst-Wolf, Jessica M.; Yeh, I-Ling; Konczak, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the development of proprioception in healthy, typically developing children by objectively measuring forearm position sense acuity. We assessed position sense acuity in a cross-sectional sample of 308 children (5–17 years old; M/F = 127/181) and a reference group of 26 healthy adults (18–25 years old; M/F = 12/14) using a body-scalable bimanual manipulandum that allowed forearm flexion/extension in the horizontal plane. The non-dominant forearm was passively displaced to one of three target positions. Then participants actively matched the target limb position with their dominant forearm. Each of three positions was matched five times. Position error (PE), calculated as the mean difference between the angular positions of the matching and reference arms, measured position sense bias or systematic error. The respective standard deviation of the differences between the match and reference arm angular positions (SDPdiff) indicated position sense precision or random error. The main results are as follows: First, systematic error, measured by PE, did not change significantly from early childhood to late adolescence (Median PE at 90° target: −2.85° in early childhood; −2.28° in adolescence; and 1.30° in adults). Second, response variability as measured by SDPdiff significantly decreased with age (Median SDPdiff at 90° target: 9.66° in early childhood; 5.30° in late adolescence; and 3.97° in adults). The data of this large cross-sectional sample of children document that proprioceptive development in typically developing children is characterized as an age-related improvement in precision, not as a development or change in bias. In other words, it is the reliability of the perceptual response that improves between early childhood and adulthood. This study provides normative data against which position sense acuity in pediatric patient populations can be compared. The underlying neurophysiological processes that could explain the observed

  8. Acute plastic bowing of the forearm in adults: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tada, K; Ikeda, K; Tsubouchi, H; Tomita, K

    2008-08-01

    We report 2 adult cases where the diagnosis of acute plastic bowing of the forearm was either delayed or missed. In a 21-year-old man, ulnar bowing was missed and fixation was not performed because the patient had no limitation to his range of movement or pain. In a 24-year-old woman, the presentation of bowing in both the ulna and radius was delayed and corrective osteotomy was necessary for restoration of full range of movement. Prompt diagnosis enables manual reposition for easy restoration of full range of movement. PMID:18725680

  9. [Update in Current Care guidelines: repetitive strain injuries of the hand and forearm].

    PubMed

    Liira, Helena; Haukka, Eija; Karppinen, Jaro; Linnanen, Päivi; Malmivaara, Antti; Pasternack, Iris; Sirola, Joonas; Viikari-Juntura, Eira; Waris, Eero

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive strain injuriesof the upper extremities refer to pain in the forearm, wrist and hand, caused by excessive strain. Diagnoses include tenosynovitis, epicondylitis and carpal tunnel syndrome. Treatment is aimed at alleviating pain, restoring normal physical functioning and maintain ability to work. Preventive interventions have shown some attenuation of discomfort but no effects on disease prevalance or sick leave days. Return to work interventions seem to decrease length of sickness absences. Part time work has hastened return to work and decreased sickness absences in musculoskeletal disorders.

  10. Delayed union of the distal ulna in a child after both bone forearm fracture.

    PubMed

    Fike, E A; Bartal, E

    1998-01-01

    Fractures of the distal third of the forearm are common in children. These fractures are known to heal readily and rapidly. We describe a 10-year-old boy who had a closed, low-energy fracture of the distal radius and ulna. The radius healed promptly, but the ipsilateral ulna had radiographic evidence of delayed union. We have not found a report of a nonunion of this kind in the literature. With the increasing use of internal fixation and the lack of guidance in the literature, we questioned the standard use of closed treatment. We treated this patient nonoperatively, despite the delay in union, and the fracture healed in 4 months.

  11. Architectural properties of the neuromuscular compartments in selected forearm skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Liu, An-Tang; Liu, Ben-Li; Lu, Li-Xuan; Chen, Gang; Yu, Da-Zhi; Zhu, Lie; Guo, Rong; Dang, Rui-Shan; Jiang, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The purposes f this study were to (i) explore the possibility of splitting the selected forearm muscles into separate compartments in human subjects; (ii) quantify the architectural properties of each neuromuscular compartment; and (iii) discuss the implication of these properties in split tendon transfer procedures. Twenty upper limbs from 10 fresh human cadavers were used in this study. Ten limbs of five cadavers were used for intramuscular nerve study by modified Sihler's staining technique, which confirmed the neuromuscular compartments. The other 10 limbs were included for architectural analysis of neuromuscular compartments. The architectural features of the compartments including muscle weight, muscle length, fiber length, pennation angle, and sarcomere length were determined. Physiological cross-sectional area and fiber length/muscle length ratio were calculated. Five of the selected forearm muscles were ideal candidates for splitting, including flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radials, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor carpi ulnaris and pronator teres. The humeral head of pronator teres contained the longest fiber length (6.23 ± 0.31 cm), and the radial compartment of extensor carpi ulnaris contained the shortest (2.90 ± 0.28 cm). The ulnar compartment of flexor carpi ulnaris had the largest physiological cross-sectional area (5.17 ± 0.59 cm(2)), and the ulnar head of pronator teres had the smallest (0.67 ± 0.06 cm(2)). Fiber length/muscle length ratios of the neuromuscular compartments were relatively low (average 0.27 ± 0.09, range 0.18-0.39) except for the ulnar head of pronator teres, which had the highest one (0.72 ± 0.05). Using modified Sihler's technique, this research demonstrated that each compartment of these selected forearm muscles has its own neurovascular supply after being split along its central tendon. Data of the architectural properties of each neuromuscular compartment provide insight into the 'design' of their

  12. The Effects of Surface-Induced Loads on Forearm Muscle Activity During Steering a Bicycle

    PubMed Central

    Arpinar-Avsar, Pinar; Birlik, Gülin; Sezgin, Önder C.; Soylu, Abdullah R.

    2013-01-01

    On the bicycle, the human upper extremity has two essential functions in steering the bicycle and in supporting the body. Through the handlebar, surface- induced loads are transmitted to the hand and arm of the bicycle rider under vibration exposure conditions. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of vibration exposure on forearm muscle activity for different road surfaces (i.e. smooth road, concrete stone pavement, rough road) and for different bicycles. Ten subjects participated in experiments and two types of bicycles, i.e. Road Bike (RB) and Mountain Bike (MTB) are compared. The acceleration magnitudes were dominant along x and z-axes. The r.m.s acceleration values in the z direction at the stem of MTB were at most 2.56, 7.04 and 10.76 m·s-2 when pedaling respectively on asphalt road, concrete pavement and rough road. In the case of RB the corresponding values were respectively 4.43, 11.75 and 27.31 m·s-2. The cumulative normalized muscular activity levels during MTB trials on different surfaces had the same tendency as with acceleration amplitudes and have ranked in the same order from lowest to highest value. Although road bike measurements have resulted in a similar trend of increment, the values computed for rough road trials were higher than those in MTB trials. During rough road measurements on MTB, rmsEMG of extensor muscles reached a value corresponding to approximately 50% of MVC (Maximum Voluntary Contraction). During RB trials performed on rough road conditions, rmsEMG (%MVC) values for the forearm flexor muscles reached 45.8% of their maximal. The level of muscular activity of forearm muscles in controlling handlebar movements has been observed to be enhanced by the increase in the level of vibration exposed on the bicycle. Since repeated forceful gripping and pushing forces to a handle of a vibratory tool can create a risk of developing circulatory, neurological, or musculoskeletal disorder, a bicycle rider can be

  13. Effects of long-term tennis playing on the muscle-bone relationship in the dominant and nondominant forearms.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Jaffré, Christelle; Arlettaz, Alexandre; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent; Courteix, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    The relationship between muscle strength and bone mineral density illustrates the positive effect of mechanical loading on bone. But local and systemic factors may affect both muscle and bone tissues. This study investigated the effects of long-term tennis playing on the relationship between lean tissue mass and bone mineral content in the forearms, taking the body dimensions into account. Fifty-two tennis players (age 24.2 +/- 5.8 yrs, 16.2 +/- 6.1 yrs of practice) were recruited. Lean tissue mass (LTM), bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density were measured at the forearms from a DXA whole-body scan. Grip strength was assessed with a dynamometer. A marked side-to-side difference (p < 0.0001) was found in favor of the dominant forearm in all parameters. Bone area and BMC correlated with grip strength on both sides (r = 0.81-0.84, p < 0.0001). The correlations were still significant after adjusting for whole-body BMC, body height, or forearm length. This result reinforced the putative role of the muscles in the mechanical loading on bones. In addition, forearm BMC adjusted to LTM or grip strength was higher on the dominant side, suggesting that tennis playing exerts a direct effect on bone.

  14. Tissue expansion using osmotically active hydrogel systems for direct closure of the donor defect of the radial forearm flap.

    PubMed

    Bergé, S J; Wiese, K G; von Lindern, J J; Niederhagen, B; Appel, T; Reich, R H

    2001-07-01

    Although widely used, the radial forearm flap has been criticized for the poor quality of its donor site. Attempts to avoid donor-site problems have concentrated on the elaboration of the split-thickness and full-thickness skin graft methods of reconstruction. Skin grafts frequently fail over the flexor carpi radialis tendon, leading to chronic skin breakdown or, at best, tendon adhesion. Tissue expansion appears to be a good alternative that allows the use of local tissues to ultimately improve the forearm donor-site appearance. To avoid the disadvantages of traditional silicone balloon expanders (such as pressure peaks, infection, the valve at a distance from the expander, postoperative fillings), an osmotically active system was used. In an 18-month prospective study, 10 osmotically active hydrogel tissue expanders were placed on the forearms of 10 patients. The radial forearm flap was performed for intraoral reconstruction after surgical resection of oral cavity malignancies. The study showed that, in nine out of 10 patients, the expanded skin achieved was sufficient to cover the donor site after raising the forearm flap. Additionally, the expansion-related swelling pressure was well tolerated by the patients, the cosmetic results were very satisfactory, and the incidence of complications was very low. By using osmotically active hydrogel tissue expanders, there is no postoperative filling and no risk of complications arising from defective balloon expanders, filling valves, or missing ports.

  15. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips. PMID:27267082

  16. An electromyographic study of the effect of hand grip sizes on forearm muscle activity and golf performance.

    PubMed

    Sorbie, Graeme G; Hunter, Henry H; Grace, Fergal M; Gu, Yaodong; Baker, Julien S; Ugbolue, Ukadike Chris

    2016-01-01

    The study describes the differences in surface electromyography (EMG) activity of two forearm muscles in the lead and trail arm at specific phases of the golf swing using a 7-iron with three different grip sizes among amateur and professional golfers. Fifteen right-handed male golfers performed five golf swings using golf clubs with three different grip sizes. Surface EMG was used to measure muscle activity of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) on both forearms. There were no significant differences in forearm muscle activity when using the three golf grips within the group of 15 golfers (p > 0.05). When using the undersize grip, club head speed significantly increased (p = 0.044). During the backswing and downswing phases, amateurs produced significantly greater forearm muscle activity with all three grip sizes (p < 0.05). In conclusion, forearm muscle activity is not affected by grip sizes. However, club head speed increases when using undersize grips.

  17. Contribution of weather to the seasonality of distal forearm fractures: a population-based study in Rochester, Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S J; Sargent, D J; Atkinson, E J; O'Fallon, W M; Melton, L J

    1999-01-01

    Distal forearm fractures due to falls were more frequent in the winter (p < 0.0001) among Rochester men and women 35 years of age or older in 1952-89. The winter excess was partially explained by a greater relative risk of distal forearm fractures on days with freezing rain (1.65; 95% CI 1.28-2.13) or snow (1.42; 95% CI 1.17-1.74) among women under 65 years of age and on days with freezing rain (1.63; 95% CI 1.23-2.17) among older women. The greater seasonality of forearm compared with hip fractures is explained by the fact that more of them occur out-of-doors. However, residual effects of season after adjusting for daily weather conditions suggest that other factors may play a role.

  18. [Dislocation fractures of the forearm. Galeazzi, Monteggia, and Essex-Lopresti injuries].

    PubMed

    Lendemans, S; Taeger, G; Nast-Kolb, D

    2008-12-01

    Combined forearm fractures are identified according to their location as Galeazzi, Monteggia, or Essex-Lopresti injuries. The feature common to these three forms is the combination of a forearm fracture with instability of the distal or proximal radioulnar joint. Appropriate management of the injury at an early stage is indispensable to achieve good functional results. Galeazzi fractures should initially be treated by open reduction and correct anatomy restored by plate osteosynthesis. Fixation of the distal radioulnar joint with Kirschner wires should be performed in cases of persistent dislocation or instability and limited to 6 weeks. Monteggia fractures should be surgically approached, taking care not to overlook possible additional injuries (radial head, coronoid process). Essex-Lopresti injuries are treated by surgical reconstruction of the radial head, and in cases of comminuted fractures by implanting a radial head prosthesis. Subsequent treatment entails at least 14 days immobilization in a supinated position using an upper arm cast. Early functional therapy should follow when all three forms of injuries have been treated.

  19. Spontaneous Bone Regeneration in an Open Segmental Fracture of the Forearm with Extruded Middle Segment

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Bibek K; Vaishya, Raju

    2016-01-01

    Open segmental fractures of both bones of the forearm with the loss of the middle segment of the radius is a rare injury in children. An eight-year-old boy presented to our clinic four days following a road traffic accident. The child’s mother was carrying a 12-cm long extruded and soiled segment of the radius bone. The extruded bone segment seemed necrotic, and we decided not to use it for replantation. The wound over the forearm fracture was infected. It was debrided and regularly dressed until it became healthy. We planned to use a fibular graft for the gap and to fix the graft with a Kirschner wire (K-wire). The operation was delayed due to the poor wound condition. At the four-week follow-up, we noticed unexpected signs of bone regeneration in the bone defect of the radius. After eight weeks, a complete spontaneous reconstruction of the bone was noted. This case highlights the excellent healing potential of the bones in children, where even if a long segment of the bone is lost, we can expect spontaneous complete regeneration of the bone if the periosteum is intact and continuous. PMID:27738571

  20. A Compact Forearm Crutch Based on Force Sensors for Aided Gait: Reliability and Validity.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Sevillano, José Luis; Ridao-Fernández, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, patients who suffer injuries in some lower member require forearm crutches in order to partially unload weight-bearing. These lesions cause pain in lower limb unloading and their progression should be controlled objectively to avoid significant errors in accuracy and, consequently, complications and after effects in lesions. The design of a new and feasible tool that allows us to control and improve the accuracy of loads exerted on crutches during aided gait is necessary, so as to unburden the lower limbs. In this paper, we describe such a system based on a force sensor, which we have named the GCH System 2.0. Furthermore, we determine the validity and reliability of measurements obtained using this tool via a comparison with the validated AMTI (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA) OR6-7-2000 Platform. An intra-class correlation coefficient demonstrated excellent agreement between the AMTI Platform and the GCH System. A regression line to determine the predictive ability of the GCH system towards the AMTI Platform was found, which obtained a precision of 99.3%. A detailed statistical analysis is presented for all the measurements and also segregated for several requested loads on the crutches (10%, 25% and 50% of body weight). Our results show that our system, designed for assessing loads exerted by patients on forearm crutches during assisted gait, provides valid and reliable measurements of loads.

  1. A Compact Forearm Crutch Based on Force Sensors for Aided Gait: Reliability and Validity

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro-Moriana, Gema; Sevillano, José Luis; Ridao-Fernández, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, patients who suffer injuries in some lower member require forearm crutches in order to partially unload weight-bearing. These lesions cause pain in lower limb unloading and their progression should be controlled objectively to avoid significant errors in accuracy and, consequently, complications and after effects in lesions. The design of a new and feasible tool that allows us to control and improve the accuracy of loads exerted on crutches during aided gait is necessary, so as to unburden the lower limbs. In this paper, we describe such a system based on a force sensor, which we have named the GCH System 2.0. Furthermore, we determine the validity and reliability of measurements obtained using this tool via a comparison with the validated AMTI (Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc., Watertown, MA, USA) OR6-7-2000 Platform. An intra-class correlation coefficient demonstrated excellent agreement between the AMTI Platform and the GCH System. A regression line to determine the predictive ability of the GCH system towards the AMTI Platform was found, which obtained a precision of 99.3%. A detailed statistical analysis is presented for all the measurements and also segregated for several requested loads on the crutches (10%, 25% and 50% of body weight). Our results show that our system, designed for assessing loads exerted by patients on forearm crutches during assisted gait, provides valid and reliable measurements of loads. PMID:27338396

  2. Noninvasive measurement of postocclusive parameters in human forearm blood by near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Prahlad; Radhakrishnan, S.; Reddy, M. Ramasubba

    2005-04-01

    Near infrared (NIR) light in the wavelength range from 700 to 900 nm can pass through skin, bone and other tissues relatively easily. As a result, NIR techniques allow a noninvasive assessment of hemoglobin saturation for a wide range of applications, such as in the study of muscle metabolism, the diagnosis of vascular disorders, brain imaging, and breast cancer detection. Near infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is an effective tool to measure the hemoglobin concentration in the tissues, which can discriminate optically the oxy- and deoxy- hemoglobin species because of their different near-infrared absorption spectra. We have developed an NIRS probe consisting of a laser diode of 830 nm wavelength and a PIN photodiode in reflectance mode. We have selected a set of healthy volunteers (mean age 30, range 26-40 years) for the study. The probe is placed on forearm of each subject and the backscattered light intensity is measured by occluding the blood flow at 210, 110 and 85 mmHg pressures. Recovery time, peak time and time after 50% release of the cuff pressure are determined from the optical densities during the post occlusive state of forearm. These parameters are useful for determining the transient increase in blood flow after the release of blood occlusion. Clinically, the functional aspects of blood flow in the limbs could be evaluated noninvasively by NIRS.

  3. Radial forearm and forehead flap reconstruction following resection of a nasal arteriovenous malformation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Shin; Lin, Yung-Song; Lin, Bor-Shyh; Lien, Ching-Feng; Liu, Ching-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a structural vascular abnormality in which the arterial vasculature connects with the venous vasculature without capillary connections. AVM confined to the nasal cavity is considerably rare. Blurred vision can be one of the associated symptoms. A combined approach of complete surgical resection with prior superselective embolization is the treatment of choice. Following resection, the reconstruction of facial defects, particularly in the nasal area, is challenging. The present study reports the rare case of a patient with an AVM in the nasal cavity, in which embolization, resection and flap reconstruction were performed. Embolization and complete surgical resection were used to avoid recurrence. Subsequently, a combination of free radial forearm and forehead flaps was used for the reconstruction of the nasal defect, without prosthesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of AVM confined to the nasal cavity, managed by a combination of free radial forearm and forehead flap reconstruction following complete resection. The cosmetic results of the procedure were acceptable.

  4. Effects of caffeine on blood pressure, heart rate, and forearm blood flow during dynamic leg exercise.

    PubMed

    Daniels, J W; Molé, P A; Shaffrath, J D; Stebbins, C L

    1998-07-01

    This study examined the acute effects of caffeine on the cardiovascular system during dynamic leg exercise. Ten trained, caffeine-naive cyclists (7 women and 3 men) were studied at rest and during bicycle ergometry before and after the ingestion of 6 mg/kg caffeine or 6 mg/kg fructose (placebo) with 250 ml of water. After consumption of caffeine or placebo, subjects either rested for 100 min (rest protocol) or rested for 45 min followed by 55 min of cycle ergometry at 65% of maximal oxygen consumption (exercise protocol). Measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP), forearm blood flow (FBF), heart rate, skin temperature, and rectal temperature and calculation of forearm vascular conductance (FVC) were made at baseline and at 20-min intervals. Plasma ANG II was measured at baseline and at 60 min postingestion in the two exercise protocols. Before exercise, caffeine increased both systolic blood pressure (17%) and MAP (11%) without affecting FBF or FVC. During dynamic exercise, caffeine attenuated the increase in FBF (53%) and FVC (50%) and accentuated exercise-induced increases in ANG II (44%). Systolic blood pressure and MAP were also higher during exercise plus caffeine; however, these increases were secondary to the effects of caffeine on resting blood pressure. No significant differences were observed in heart rate, skin temperature, or rectal temperature. These findings indicate that caffeine can alter the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise in a manner that may modify regional blood flow and conductance. PMID:9655769

  5. Use of the subcutaneous venous network of the forearm to create an arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Gołębiowski, Tomasz; Letachowicz, Krzysztof; Letachowicz, Waldemar; Kusztal, Mariusz; Garcarek, Jerzy; Strempska, Beata; Weyde, Wacław; Klinger, Marian

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of vascular access in patients with kidney allograft failure is a challenging problem. A case of a 62-year-old man with transplanted kidney insufficiency is described. The patient was initially dialyzed with a wrist radial-cephalic arteriovenous fistula. In the post-transplantation period, the enormously dilated venous part of the anastomosis was ligated and the part of the vein suspected of being the source of bacteremia was excised. The man was referred to our department due to kidney allograft failure for vascular access creation. During preoperative assessment, we unexpectedly found a soft thrill on the forearm. Doppler ultrasound confirmed fistula patency, although the blood supply was not sufficient to perform dialysis. Angiography showed the blood flow from the radial artery to the cephalic vein, through a complicated vessel system consisting of inter alia a dilated vein of the subcutaneous venous network. We successfully used this vein as the vascular access outflow for fistula recreation. In conclusion, making use of veins of the subcutaneous venous network of the forearm for creation of a native fistula should be considered in selected cases. PMID:25881485

  6. Coordination of human upper arm and forearm motion in rapid extensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahvi, Mahmood

    1991-01-01

    In many movements of the upper limb such as reaching, positioning, and displacing the objects, the hand moves smoothly along a uni-directional planar trajectory with a bell-shaped speed profile. Because of variability of the load, gravitational and velocity interaction forces between its segments, the dynamics of the arm during the motion is very complex. Motion of the upper arm and the forearm are coordinated to produce smooth movements despite such complex dynamics. This coordination constitutes an important organizational feature of arm movement. The present paper describes some experimental results related to the above and interprets their role in producing smooth motion of the hand. Trajectories of the right upper limb in vertical plane and the simultaneous muscles' EMG activities were recorded for extensions of various amplitudes under four loads. The forearm trajectories are smooth with bell-shaped speed profiles. The upper arm trajectories may have bimodal speed profiles and three segments, resembling an inverted 'Z.' Segmentation is sharper for the points near the shoulder joint, and is accentuated by load. As one moves from the central points near the shoulder joint to the peripheral points near the hand, the three segments merge and result in smooth curves with single-peaked speed profiles. The three segments have a coherent time course and can be identified rather accurately and non-ambiguously. The observed trajectories and the EMG patterns reveal an effective coordination strategy which utilizes the structure and the dynamics of the moving arm to produce smooth movement.

  7. The Effect of Repetitive Passive and Active Movements on Proprioception Ability in Forearm Supination

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, OhSung; Lee, SeungWon; Lee, YoungWoo; Seo, DongKwon; Jung, SangWoo; Choi, WonJae

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted in order to investigate the effect of repetitive passive movement and repetitive active movement on proprioception in forearm supination. [Subjects] This study had a cross-sectional design. Twenty-three right-handed healthy subjects were recruited. All subjects randomly received both repetitive passive movement and repetitive active movement (repetitive passive/active movement at 120°/s with 60 repetitions over a 0–80° range). Active and passive joint repositioning of all subjects was measured using the error score for position sense, both before and after repositioning intervention. [Results] In the repetitive passive movement test, there was a statistically significant decrease in the pre- versus post-repositioning error scores in the active and passive angle examinations. In the repetitive active movement test, there was a statistically significant increase in pre- versus post-repositioning error scores in the active and passive angle examinations. In the comparison of position sense, there was a statistically significant decrease in both active and passive angle repositioning error scores in repetitive passive movement versus repetitive active movement. [Conclusion] Repetitive passive movement improved the proprioception results for forearm supination, compared to repetitive active movement. Results of this study indicate that repetitive passive movement can be recommended to clinicians for rehabilitation therapy as it provides greater proprioception benefits. PMID:24259808

  8. The effects of forearm fatigue on baseball fastball pitching, with implications about elbow injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Hwa; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Jou, I-Ming; Kuo, Li-Chieh; Tai, Ta-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the contribution of flexor muscles to the forearm through fatigue; therefore, the differences in forearm mechanisms on the pitching motion in fastball were analysed. Fifteen baseball pitchers were included in this study. Ultrasonographical examination of participants' ulnar nerve in the cubital tunnel with the elbow extended and at 45°, 90° and 120° of flexion was carried. A three-dimensional motion analysis system with 14 reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the flexor carpi ulnaris, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles of the dominant arm. Flexor carpi ulnaris muscle activity showed a significant difference during the acceleration phase, with a peak value during fastball post-fatigue (P = 0.02). Significant differences in the distance between ulnar nerve and medial condyle on throwing arm and non-throwing arm were observed as the distance increased with the elbow movement from 0° to 120° of flexion (P = 0.01). The significant increase of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle activity might be responsible for maintaining the stability of the wrist joint. The increased diameter might compress the ulnar nerve and cause several pathological changes. Therefore, fatigue in baseball pitchers still poses a threat to the ulnar nerve because the flexor carpi ulnaris and flexor carpi radialis all originate from the medial side of the elbow, and the swelling tendons after fatigue might be a key point.

  9. A case of rotational restriction of the forearm due to abnormal configuration of pronator quadratus muscle.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yusuke; Sawaizumi, Takuya; Tsunoda, Ryu; Horiguchi, Gen; Matsui, Syuhei; Takai, Shinro

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of rotational restriction of the forearm due to abnormal configuration of the pronator quadratus muscle. A 20-year-old man developed right wrist joint pain on pitching of a baseball game and thereafter displayed rotational disorder of the forearm. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a space-occupying lesion from the volar side of the radius to the dorsal side of the ulna. The lesion was iso-hyperintense on T1-weighted (T1W) images and showed a mixed pattern of high intensities on T2-weighted (T2W) images. His symptoms were immediately reduced after removal of the mass. Histological examination showed that the mass contained much skeletal muscle and revealed myxoid degeneration of striated muscles. We assumed that his pronator quadratus muscle had been a divided form of deep layer and superficial layer tissue, possibly congenitally. We supposed that the deep layer had degenerated due to chronic stimulation and had extended around to the dorsal side of the ulna, which caused rotational restriction from the resulting impaired distal radioulnar joint. To our knowledge, there has been no similar case reported in the literature.

  10. Head-down-tilt bed rest alters forearm vasodilator and vasoconstrictor responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Silber, D. H.; Gray, K.; Herr, M.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1998-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days alters vascular reactivity to vasodilatory and vasoconstrictor stimuli, the reactive hyperemic forearm blood flow (RHBF, measured by venous occlusion plethysmography) and mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres) responses after 10 min of circulatory arrest were measured in a control trial (n = 20) and when sympathetic discharge was increased by a cold pressor test (RHBF + cold pressor test; n = 10). Vascular conductance (VC) was calculated (VC = RHBF/MAP). In the control trial, peak RHBF at 5 s after circulatory arrest (34.1 +/- 2.5 vs. 48.9 +/- 4.3 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1) and VC (0.34 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.53 +/- 0.05 ml . 100 ml-1 . min-1 . mmHg-1) were reduced in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR tests (P < 0. 05). Total excess RHBF over 3 min was diminished in the post- compared with the pre-HDBR trial (84.8 vs. 117 ml/100 ml, P < 0.002). The ability of the cold pressor test to lower forearm blood flow was less in the post- than in the pre-HDBR test (P < 0.05), despite similar increases in MAP. These data suggest that regulation of vascular dilation and the interaction between dilatory and constrictor influences were altered with bed rest.

  11. On optimal electrode configuration to estimate hand movements from forearm surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Paleari, Marco; Di Girolamo, Michela; Celadon, Nicoló; Favetto, Alain; Ariano, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the movement of the hand from sEMG signals acquired on the forearm is key in the development of future prosthetics of the upper limb. Despite the technical advancement on this technique, state of the art of sEMG still relies strongly on optimal electrode placement which is typically performed by a specialist by mean of a heuristic search. Involving a specialist has few major disadvantages including high costs and relatively long schedules. This work searches an optimal electrode configuration which could reduce or avoid the intervention of a specialist. More than 200 different possible electrode configurations were assessed by means of the average recognition rate over 11 different movements of the hand, wrist, and fingers. It is shown that using two rows of 8 equally spaced electrodes around the circumference of the forearm could be an optimal trade-off solution to accomplish the task of recognizing hand movement (ARR = 92%) without the need for a specialist or very complex hardware. PMID:26737680

  12. Functional assessment: Free thin anterolateral thigh flap versus free radial forearm reconstruction for hemiglossectomy defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingxing; Hu, Qingang; Tang, Enyi; Wang, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare free thin anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with free radial forearm (FRF) flap in the reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects, and to introduce our methods and experience in the tongue reconstruction with free thin ALT flap. Material and Methods The clinicopathologic data of 46 tongue carcinoma cases hospitalized from December 2009 to April 2014 were obtained from Nangjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University. All the subjects were evaluated for the articulation and the swallowing function 3 months after the surgery. Results Among these 46 patients, 12 patients underwent tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy with ALT flap; 34 patients underwent tongue reconstruction with FRF flap. The differences in the incidence of vascular crisis, the speech and the swallowing function between two groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Thin ALT flap could be one of the ideal flaps for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and the neglectable donor site morbidity. Key words:Free thin anterolateral thigh flap, free radial forearm flap, hemiglossectomy, reconstruction, morbidity. PMID:26449437

  13. Case report: acute forearm compartment syndrome due to sudden, forceful supination of the hand.

    PubMed

    Pantle, Hardin A; Chanmugam, Arjun

    2010-10-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a limb-threatening condition if not recognized and treated promptly. Appropriate management includes early fasciotomy, which often results in better functional outcomes. Although there are many causes of compartment syndrome, the common findings are significant pain, swelling, and limited range of motion. Diagnosis is usually based on physical findings in the setting of a compelling history. Before surgical intervention, the diagnosis is usually confirmed by measuring elevated compartment pressures. The patient described in this case report developed acute compartment syndrome of the forearm after his hand became trapped in machinery that applied sudden supination to the hand, and avulsed the distal portion of the left index finger. There was no direct trauma to the forearm. In this case, acute compartment syndrome was likely due to a combination of contained hemorrhage into the muscle sheath, closed muscle strain causing edema, and possibly axial traction applied to the tendons of the index finger. Acute compartment syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any patient complaining of severe pain in an extremity, even in the absence of commonly recognized mechanisms of injury.

  14. Analysis of the forearm rotational efficiency in extant hominoids: new insights into the functional implications of upper limb skeletal structure.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Manyosa, Joan; Malgosa, Assumpció; Jordana, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    The greatly diversified locomotor behaviors in the Hominoidea impose different mechanical requirements in the upper limb of each species. As forearm rotation has a major role in locomotion, the skeletal structures involved in this movement may display differences among taxa that reflect functional adaptations. To test this, we use a biomechanical model that quantifies the rotatory capacity of pronator teres (rotational efficiency) from skeletal measurements. Using a large sample of hominoids, we aim to identify the morphological adaptations that confer differences in the mechanics of forearm motion and to assess the functional advantage of these adaptations. Forearm positions along the pronation-supination range where rotational efficiency is maximal depend on the orientation of the humeral medial epicondyle and differ among taxa. Our results indicate that these are related to locomotor mode. Knuckle-walkers exhibit a medial epicondyle more posteriorly directed, which, in elbow angles close to extension, causes rotational efficiency to be maximal in pronated positions of the forearm. Species with a significant amount of arboreal locomotion, such as vertical climbing, i.e., Pongo spp., Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla, display more proximally oriented epicondyles, which, in elbow flexion, leads to maximum rotational efficiencies in supinated positions of the forearm. Hylobatidae, with the less posteriorly and proximally oriented epicondyle, show their maximum rotational efficiencies closer to the forearm neutral position throughout most of the flexion-extension range, which may be linked to brachiation in this taxon. In humans, the epicondylar orientation and thus the positions of the maximum rotational efficiencies fall between arboreal and terrestrial hominoids. This may be related to the enhanced manipulative skills of the upper limb. In conclusion, the current analysis indicates that the orientation of the humeral medial epicondyle is linked to the locomotor

  15. Analysis of the forearm rotational efficiency in extant hominoids: new insights into the functional implications of upper limb skeletal structure.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Manyosa, Joan; Malgosa, Assumpció; Jordana, Xavier

    2014-11-01

    The greatly diversified locomotor behaviors in the Hominoidea impose different mechanical requirements in the upper limb of each species. As forearm rotation has a major role in locomotion, the skeletal structures involved in this movement may display differences among taxa that reflect functional adaptations. To test this, we use a biomechanical model that quantifies the rotatory capacity of pronator teres (rotational efficiency) from skeletal measurements. Using a large sample of hominoids, we aim to identify the morphological adaptations that confer differences in the mechanics of forearm motion and to assess the functional advantage of these adaptations. Forearm positions along the pronation-supination range where rotational efficiency is maximal depend on the orientation of the humeral medial epicondyle and differ among taxa. Our results indicate that these are related to locomotor mode. Knuckle-walkers exhibit a medial epicondyle more posteriorly directed, which, in elbow angles close to extension, causes rotational efficiency to be maximal in pronated positions of the forearm. Species with a significant amount of arboreal locomotion, such as vertical climbing, i.e., Pongo spp., Pan troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla, display more proximally oriented epicondyles, which, in elbow flexion, leads to maximum rotational efficiencies in supinated positions of the forearm. Hylobatidae, with the less posteriorly and proximally oriented epicondyle, show their maximum rotational efficiencies closer to the forearm neutral position throughout most of the flexion-extension range, which may be linked to brachiation in this taxon. In humans, the epicondylar orientation and thus the positions of the maximum rotational efficiencies fall between arboreal and terrestrial hominoids. This may be related to the enhanced manipulative skills of the upper limb. In conclusion, the current analysis indicates that the orientation of the humeral medial epicondyle is linked to the locomotor

  16. Effects of combined wrist flexion/extension and forearm rotation and two levels of relative force on discomfort.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid Ali; O'Sullivan, Leonard; Gallwey, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    This study investigated perceived discomfort in an isometric wrist flexion task. Independent variables were wrist flexion/extension (55%, 35% flexion, neutral, 35% and 55% extension ranges of motion (ROM)), forearm rotation (60%, 30% prone, neutral, 30% and 60% supine ROM) and two levels of flexion force (10% and 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)). Discomfort was significantly affected by flexion force, forearm rotation and a two-way interaction of force with forearm rotation (each p < 0.05). High force for 60%ROM forearm pronation and supination resulted in increasingly higher discomfort for these combinations. Flexion forces were set relative to the MVC in each wrist posture and this appears to be important in explaining a lack of significant effect (p = 0.34) for flexion/extension on discomfort. Regression equations predicting discomfort were developed and used to generate iso-discomfort contours, which indicate regions where the risk of injury should be low and others where it is likely to be high. Regression equations predicting discomfort and iso-discomfort contours are presented, which indicate combinations of upper limb postures for which discomfort is predicted to be low, and others where it is likely to be high. These are helpful in the study of limits for risk factors associated with upper limb musculoskeletal injury in industry.

  17. Virtual Reality Anatomy: Is It Comparable with Traditional Methods in the Teaching of Human Forearm Musculoskeletal Anatomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Codd, Anthony M.; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy…

  18. Maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy in relation to offspring forearm fractures: prospective study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sesilje B; Rasmussen, Morten A; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Vestergaard, Peter; Mølgaard, Christian; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I; Strøm, Marin

    2015-04-01

    Limited evidence exists for an association between maternal diet during pregnancy and offspring bone health. In a prospective study, we examined the association between dietary patterns in mid-pregnancy and offspring forearm fractures. In total, 101,042 pregnancies were recruited to the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) during 1996-2002. Maternal diet was collected by a food frequency questionnaire. Associations were analyzed between seven dietary patterns extracted by principal component analysis and offspring first occurrence of any forearm fracture diagnosis, extracted from the Danish National Patient Register, between time of birth and end of follow-up (< 16 year) (n = 53,922). In multivariable Cox regression models, offspring of mothers in the fourth vs. first quintile of the Western pattern had a significant increased risk (Hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval: 1.11, 1.01-1.23) of fractures, and there was a borderline significant positive trend (p = 0.06). The other dietary patterns showed no associations and neither did supplementary analyses of macro- and micronutrients or single food groups, except for the intake of artificially sweetened soft drinks, which was positively associated with offspring forearm fractures (p = 0.02). In the large prospective DNBC high mid-pregnancy consumption of Western diet and artificially sweetened soft drinks, respectively, indicated positive associations with offspring forearm fractures, which provides interesting hypotheses for future research. PMID:25849947

  19. Forearm blood flow and oxygen consumption in patients with bilateral repetitive strain injury measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brunnekreef, Jaap J; Oosterhof, Jan; Thijssen, Dick H J; Colier, Willy N J M; van Uden, Caro J T

    2006-05-01

    Despite the social impact of repetitive strain injury (RSI), little is known about its pathophysiological mechanism. The main objective of this study was to assess the local muscle oxygenation (mVO2) and blood flow (mBF) of the forearm in individuals with RSI during isometric contractions of the forearm. We employed the non-invasive optical technique near-infrared spectroscopy to assess forearm VO2 and BF. These variables were assessed at 10%, 20%, and 40% of their individual maximal voluntary strength. Twenty-two patients with RSI symptoms in both arms (bilateral RSI) and 30 healthy age-matched subjects participated in this cross-sectional study. The results showed lower mVO2 during exercise and a reduced mBF after exercise. The results suggest that mVO2 and mVO2 are lower in the forearms of individuals with RSI compared with their controls at similar working intensities. This finding indicates that the underlying vasculature may be impaired. Although these findings contribute to the understanding of RSI, future research is necessary to further unravel the mechanisms of this area.

  20. Sexual dimorphism in growth in the relative length of the forearm and relative knee height during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Szczepanska, Natalia; Koziel, Slawomir

    2016-10-01

    There are numerous studies concerning sexual dimorphism in body proportions, but only a few have investigated growth in the relative length of particular segments of the upper and lower limbs during adolescence. The aim of the study is an assessment of sex differences of longitudinal growth in the relative length of the forearm and knee height among adolescents. Sample involved 121 boys and 111 girls, participants of the Wroclaw Growth Study, examined annually between 8 and 18 years of age. Sexual dimorphism in six ratios: forearm length and knee height relatively to: trunk, height, and limb length were analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measurements. The sex and age relative to an estimate of maturity timing (3 years before, and after age class at peak height velocity [PHV]) were independent variables. All of the ratios showed significant sex differences in interaction with age relative to age at PHV. The relative length of the forearm, in boys, did not change significantly with the years relative to age at PHV, whereas in girls, was the lowest in the two first age classes and afterward significantly increased just 1 year before and during the adolescent growth spurt, remaining unchanged in further age classes. For relative knee height no clear pattern for sex differences was noticed. It is proposed that relatively longer forearms, particularly in relation to the trunk in girls, could have evolved as an adaptation to more efficient infant carrying and protection during breastfeeding.

  1. Transposition of the radius upon the ulna in transverse forearm deficiency to facilitate later lengthening: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Exner, G U

    1998-01-01

    Transverse below-elbow forearm deficiency was treated in two adolescents by turning and transposing the radial stump on the ulna and later lengthening by 5 and 5.5 cm, respectively. This resulted in improved function without and with the use of prosthesis.

  2. Speech after Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction of the Tongue: A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of Vowel and Diphthong Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Happonen, Risto-Pekka; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use acoustic analyses to describe speech outcomes over the course of 1 year after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) reconstruction of the tongue. Eighteen Canadian English-speaking females and males with reconstruction for oral cancer had speech samples recorded (pre-operative, and 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year…

  3. Pedicled Supraclavicular Artery Island Flap Versus Free Radial Forearm Flap for Tongue Reconstruction Following Hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Senlin; Chen, Wei; Cao, Gang; Dong, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated the tongue function and donor-site morbidity of patients with malignant tumors who had undergone immediate flap reconstruction surgery. Twenty-seven patients who had undergone immediate reconstruction after hemiglossectomy were observed. Twelve patients were reconstructed using the pedicled supraclavicular artery island flap (PSAIF) and 15 patients using the free radial forearm flap (FRFF). Flap survival, speech and swallowing function, and donor-site morbidity at the 6-month follow-up were evaluated. All the flaps were successfully transferred. No obvious complications were found in either the transferred flaps or donor regions. Age, sex, defect extent, speech and swallowing function were comparable between the 2 groups. Donor-site complications were less frequent with PSAIF reconstruction than FRFF reconstruction. The PSAIF is reliable and well suited for hemiglossectomy defect. It has few significant complications, and allows preservation of oral function.

  4. [Three-dimensional planing and correction of osteotomies in the forearm and the hand].

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Andreas; Fürnstahl, Philipp; Nagy, Ladislav

    2014-07-01

    New 3-dimensional supported technologies considerably improved accuracy of corrective osteotomies and allowed alignments of cuts not possible before. The introduction of simply applicable software made it possible also for not in informatics educated persons to segment CT data, generate 3D models of bones and compare them with the mirrored opposite side. Only this approach allows an exact analysis of deformation, the creation of an operation plan and the virtual performance of the procedure in 3D. The production of individualized drilling and sawing guides which fit defined and unique to the bone surface by laser sintering technique permits an exact implementation of the planning to the operation. The technique is presented on the basis of cases of the forearm and hand.

  5. Poikilodermatous changes on the forearms of a woman practicing aroma-therapy: extracervical poikiloderma of Civatte?

    PubMed

    Katoulis, Alexandros; Makris, Michalis; Gregoriou, Stamatis; Rallis, Eustathios; Kanelleas, Antonis; Stavrianeas, Nicolaos; Rigopoulos, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 48-year-old, Caucasian female who presented with slowly progressing asymptomatic poikilodermatous changes of the extensor aspects of the forearms. She also had typical Poikiloderma of Civatte on the V of the neck and erythemato-telangiectatic rosacea of the central face. The patient had been practicing aroma-therapy for many years. Histologic examination revealed findings consistent with PC. Patch-testing revealed positive reactions to Fragrance mix and Nickel sulphate. Based on clinical and histological findings, a diagnosis of extracervical PC was suggested. PC with extra-cervical or extra-facial involvement is rare. In addition, this case supports the theory that contact sensitization to fragrances may contribute to the development of PC. PMID:25054757

  6. Duplex in the assessment of the free radial forearm flaps: Is it time to change practice?

    PubMed

    Ganesan, K; Stead, L; Smith, A B; Ong, T K; Mitchell, D A; Kanatas, A N

    2010-09-01

    Radial forearm free flaps (RFFFs) are safe, but critical ischaemia of the hand has been described and is catastrophic. Every effort should therefore be made to improve the safety margin even further. Colour flow duplex ultrasound (US) is a simple, non-invasive and effective assessment tool. We compared it with Allen's test to identify serious vascular anomalies. We studied 121 patients who were listed to have a RFFF harvested, all of whom had both duplex US assessment and Allen's testing of the selected arm. The significance of differences in proportions was assessed using McNemar's test. Five of the 121 patients had an alternative flap selected as a consequence of the duplex assessment. A single flap failed. There were no ischaemic vascular complications that affected the hand.

  7. A restrained-torque-based motion instructor: forearm flexion/extension-driving exoskeleton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    When learning complicated movements by ourselves, we encounter such problems as a self-rightness. The self-rightness results in a lack of detail and objectivity, and it may cause to miss essences and even twist the essences. Thus, we sometimes fall into the habits of doing inappropriate motions. To solve these problems or to alleviate the problems as could as possible, we have been developed mechanical man-machine human interfaces to support us learning such motions as cultural gestures and sports form. One of the promising interfaces is a wearable exoskeleton mechanical system. As of the first try, we have made a prototype of a 2-link 1-DOF rotational elbow joint interface that is applied for teaching extension-flexion operations with forearms and have found its potential abilities for teaching the initiating and continuing flection motion of the elbow.

  8. [Repetitive strain injuries. Forearm pain caused by tissue responses to repetitive strain].

    PubMed

    Sorgatz, H

    2002-10-01

    According to the National Research Council, painful work-related upper limb disorders are caused by different pathophysiological mechanisms, one of which is repetitive strain injury (RSI). Forearm pain, tenderness, and paresthesias are thought to result from a continual risk of exceeding limits of "cumulative trauma load tolerance" (CTLT, cf. NRC 2001) in soft tissue by thousands of high-frequency, repetitive movements. On the other hand, repetitive painful stimulations also produce neuroplastic changes in the spinal and supraspinal nociceptive systems. Thus, repetitive motor and nociceptive impulses become part of the same motor programs, which are also responsible for high-frequency movements and tissue damage. In this way RSI pain may be felt as a task-related response, even after all injuries are completely healed. Consequences of this neuroplastic CTLT model for RSI prevention and therapy are discussed.

  9. Effect of exercise training on cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, G. W.; Convertino, V. A.; Nadel, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    We studied the stimulus-response characteristics of cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) in four groups of male volunteer subjects: i) unfit, ii) physically fit, iii) before and after 10 wk of endurance training (chronic blood volume expansion), and iv) before and after acute blood volume expansion. We assessed the relationship between reflex stimulus, i.e., changes in central venous pressure and response, i.e., FVR, during unloading of cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors with lower body negative pressure (LBNP, 0 to -20 mm Hg). The slope of the linear relationship between FVR and CVP, the index of the responsiveness of this baroreflex, was significantly diminished (> 50%) in the fit subjects compared with the unfit. The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely correlated with the subject's total blood volume, suggesting that blood volume expansion was related to the attenuated CP baroreflex. In the exercise training study, maximal oxygen consumption and blood volume increased following 10 wk of endurance training (N = 14) but were unchanged in the time control group (N = 7). The slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was significantly reduced (32%) following 10 wk of training but was unchanged in the time control group. The reduction in slope of the FVR-CVP relationship was inversely related to the increase in blood volume associated with exercise training. Acute blood volume expansion 8 ml.kg-1 body weight with 5% human serum albumin solution) significantly reduced the slope of the FVR-CVP relationship. These data support the hypothesis that the attenuated forearm vascular reflex in physically fit individuals is related to a training-induced hypervolemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  10. Osmoreceptors do not exhibit a sex-dependent modulation of forearm skin blood flow and sweating.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ramirez, Juliana; McGinn, Ryan; Carter, Michael R; Franco-Lopez, Hernan; Kenny, Glen P

    2014-02-01

    Studies show that increases in plasma osmolality result in a delayed onset threshold of thermoeffector responses. However, it remains unclear if there are sex-related differences in the osmotically induced changes in both sweating and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Nine young men and nine young women were passively heated (water-perfused suit) to 1.5°C above baseline esophageal temperature while in an isosmotic (0.9% NaCl saline infusion) (ISO) and hyperosmotic (3% NaCl saline infusion) (HYP) state. Forearm sweat rate (ventilated capsule), skin blood flow (laser-Doppler), esophageal temperature and skin temperature were continuously recorded. Sweat gland output (SGO) on the forearm was calculated from the number of heat activated sweat glands (modified iodine-paper technique) at the end of heating. The onset threshold and thermosensitivity of sweating and CVC were determined using the linear portion of each response plotted against mean body temperature and analyzed using segmented regression analysis. We show that the osmotically induced delay in the onset threshold of sweating and CVC is similar between males and females. Although the thermosensitivity of CVC was similar between sexes (P = 0.601), the thermosensitivity of sweating was consistently lower in females compared to males (P = 0.018). The lower thermosensitivity in sudomotor response of females was accompanied by a lower SGO (P = 0.003), albeit similar sweat gland activation to males (P = 0.644). We conclude that sex-related differences in thermoeffector activity are independent of osmoreceptor activation. Therefore, osmoreceptors do not exhibit sex-related differences in the modulation of CVC and sweating responses during heat stress.

  11. Ultrasound for Distal Forearm Fracture: A Systematic Review and Diagnostic Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Douma-den Hamer, Djoke; Blanker, Marco H.; Edens, Mireille A.; Buijteweg, Lonneke N.; Boomsma, Martijn F.; van Helden, Sven H.; Mauritz, Gert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting distal forearm fractures. Methods A systematic review and diagnostic meta-analysis was performed according to the PRISMA statement. We searched MEDLINE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library from inception to September 2015. All prospective studies of the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound versus radiography as the reference standard were included. We excluded studies with a retrospective design and those with evidence of verification bias. We assessed the methodological quality of the included studies with the QUADAS-2 tool. We performed a meta-analysis of studies evaluating ultrasound to calculate the pooled sensitivity and specificity with 95% confidence intervals (CI95%) using a bivariate model with random effects. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis were used to examine the effect of methodological differences and other study characteristics. Results Out of 867 publications we included 16 studies with 1,204 patients and 641 fractures. The pooled test characteristics for ultrasound were: sensitivity 97% (CI95% 93–99%), specificity 95% (CI95% 89–98%), positive likelihood ratio (LR) 20.0 (8.5–47.2) and negative LR 0.03 (0.01–0.08). The corresponding pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) was 667 (142–3,133). Apparent differences were shown for method of viewing, with the 6-view method showing higher specificity, positive LR, and DOR, compared to the 4-view method. Conclusion The present meta-analysis showed that ultrasound has a high accuracy for the diagnosis of distal forearm fractures in children when used by proper viewing method. Based on this, ultrasound should be considered a reliable alternative, which has the advantages of being radiation free. PMID:27196439

  12. The Tromsø Study: artifacts in forearm bone densitometry--prevalence and effect.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, G K; Tollan, A; Magnus, J H; Søgaard, A J; Ringberg, T; Fønnebø, V

    1999-01-01

    Suboptimal performance of bone densitometer, operator and/or subject may cause artifacts of consequence both for individual patient management and research. The prevalence and effects of such artifacts are largely unknown in densitometry. A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out of artifacts in forearm bone densitometry with single X-ray Absorptiometry (SXA) of the nondominant hand (distal and ultradistal site). After the screening, all scans were reviewed for artifact detection and reanalysis. The effect on the bone mineral density (BMD) result was found by comparing artifactual scans with a reanalyzed version or with normal repeat scans. All women aged 50-74 years, all men aged 55-74 years and 5-10% samples of other age groups aged >/=25 years attending the fourth Tromso health study were invited to have bone densitometry. The response rate from the background population was 80% (n = 7948). Fourteen percent of subjects had a movement artifact at either the distal or ultradistal site. The individual BMD variation was twice as large in scans with a movement artifact (0.94%) compared with normal scans (0.58%) (p = 0.0027). The radial endplate was inaccurately detected in 74% of the scans. Reanalysis of these scans led to a mean 3.8% decrease in the BMD value and an increase in the prevalence of osteoporosis of 10%. Artifacts were thus common, and their effects were clinically relevant in forearm bone densitometry. Artifacts and their effects need to be characterized in other bone densitometry settings also.

  13. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  14. Residual Upper Arm Motor Function Primes Innervation of Paretic Forearm Muscles in Chronic Stroke after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) Training

    PubMed Central

    Curado, Marco Rocha; Cossio, Eliana Garcia; Broetz, Doris; Agostini, Manuel; Cho, Woosang; Brasil, Fabricio Lima; Yilmaz, Oezge; Liberati, Giulia; Lepski, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Background Abnormal upper arm-forearm muscle synergies after stroke are poorly understood. We investigated whether upper arm function primes paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke patients after Brain-Machine Interface (BMI)-based rehabilitation. Shaping upper arm-forearm muscle synergies may support individualized motor rehabilitation strategies. Methods Thirty-two chronic stroke patients with no active finger extensions were randomly assigned to experimental or sham groups and underwent daily BMI training followed by physiotherapy during four weeks. BMI sessions included desynchronization of ipsilesional brain activity and a robotic orthosis to move the paretic limb (experimental group, n = 16). In the sham group (n = 16) orthosis movements were random. Motor function was evaluated with electromyography (EMG) of forearm extensors, and upper arm and hand Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) scores. Patients performed distinct upper arm (e.g., shoulder flexion) and hand movements (finger extensions). Forearm EMG activity significantly higher during upper arm movements as compared to finger extensions was considered facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to test inter-session reliability of facilitation of forearm EMG activity. Results Facilitation of forearm EMG activity ICC ranges from 0.52 to 0.83, indicating fair to high reliability before intervention in both limbs. Facilitation of forearm muscles is higher in the paretic as compared to the healthy limb (p<0.001). Upper arm FMA scores predict facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention in both groups (significant correlations ranged from R = 0.752, p = 0.002 to R = 0.779, p = 0.001), but only in the experimental group upper arm FMA scores predict changes in facilitation of forearm muscles after intervention (R = 0.709, p = 0.002; R = 0.827, p<0.001). Conclusions Residual upper arm motor function primes recruitment of paralyzed forearm muscles in chronic stroke

  15. Three-dimensional printing of rhBMP-2-loaded scaffolds with long-term delivery for enhanced bone regeneration in a rabbit diaphyseal defect.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Se Eun; Park, Ju Young; Kundu, Joydip; Kim, Sung Won; Kang, Seong Soo; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-07-01

    In this study, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) delivery system with slow mode was successfully developed in three-dimensional (3D) printing-based polycaprolactone (PCL)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffolds for bone formation of critical-sized rabbit segmental diaphyseal defect. To control the delivery of the rhBMP-2, collagen (for long-term delivery up to 28 days) and gelatin (for shor-term delivery within a week) solutions encapsulating rhBMP-2 were dispensed into a hollow cylinderical type of PCL/PLGA scaffold. An effective dose of 5μg/mL was determined by measuring the alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin gene expression levels of human nasal inferior turbinate-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hTMSCs) seeded on the PCL/PLGA/collagen scaffold in vitro. However, it was found that a burst release of rhBMP-2 from the PCL/PLGA/gelatin scaffold did not induce the osteogenic differentiation of hTMSCs in vitro at an equivalent dose. In the in vivo animal experiements, microcomputed tomography and histological analyses confirmed that PCL/PLGA/collagen/rhBMP-2 scaffolds (long-term delivery mode) showed the best bone healing quality at both weeks 4 and 8 after implantation without inflammatory response. On the other hand, a large number of macrophages indicating severe inflammation provoked by burst release of rhBMP-2 were observed in the vicinity of PCL/PLGA/gelatin/rhBMP-2 (short-term delivery mode) at week 4.

  16. Diminished forearm vasomotor response to central hypervolemic loading in aerobically fit individuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, X.; Gallagher, K. M.; SMith, S. A.; Bryant, K. H.; Raven, P. B.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that cardiopulmonary baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) during central hypervolemic loading was less sensitive in exercise trained high fit individuals (HF) compared to untrained average fit individuals (AF). Eight AF (age: 24 +/- 1 yr and weight: 78.9 +/- 1.7 kg) and eight HF (22 +/- 1 yr 79.5 +/- 2.4 kg) voluntarily participated in the investigation. Maximal aerobic power (determined on a treadmill), plasma volume and blood volume (Evans blue dilution method) were significantly greater in the HF than AF (60.8 +/- 0.7 vs. 41.2 +/- 1.9 ml.kg-1.min-1, 3.96 +/- 0.17 vs 3.36 +/- 0.08 1, and 6.33 +/- 0.23 vs 5.28 +/- 0.13 1). Baseline heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by an intraradial catheter or a Finapres finger cuff), forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography), and FVR, calculated from the ratio (MAP-CVP)/FBF, were not different between the HF and the AF. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP, -5, -10, -15, and -20 torr) and passive leg elevation (LE, 50 cm) combined with lower body positive pressure (LBPP, +5, +10, and +20 torr) were utilized to elicit central hypovolemia and hypervolemia, respectively. Range of CVP (from LBNP to LE+LBPP) was similar in the AF (from -3.9 to +1.9 mm Hg) and HF (from -4.0 to +2.2 mm Hg). However, FVR/CVP was significantly less in the HF (-1.8 +/- 0.1 unit.mm Hg-1) than AF (-34 +/- 0.1 unit.mm Hg-1). The FVR decrease in response to increase in CVP was significantly diminished in the HF (-1.46 +/- 0.45 unit.mm Hg-1) compared to the AF (-4.40 +/- 0.97 unit.mm Hg-1), and during LBNP induced unloading the FVR/CVP of the HF (-2.01 +/- 0.49 unit.mm Hg-1) was less (P < 0.08) than the AF (-3.28 +/- 0.69 unit.mm Hg-1). We concluded that the cardiopulmonary baroreceptor mediated FVR reflex response was significantly less sensitive to changes in CVP in individuals who practice exercise training.

  17. Motor and sensory cortical reorganization after bilateral forearm transplantation: Four-year follow-up fMRI case study.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Castillo, Carlos R; Aguilar-Castañeda, Erika; Iglesias, Martin; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the cortical activity pattern of one patient who received bilateral forearm transplants. Using fMRI we acquired motor and sensory brain activity every year after surgery and during three consecutive years while the patient underwent physical rehabilitation. The motor related cortical activity evaluated during the first year showed a sparse pattern involving several brain regions. Over time, the analysis showed a progressive delimitation of the motor-related areas that had significant activity. The results also showed continuous size reductions of the activated cluster in the motor cortex. The activation in the sensory cortex showed significant increases in cluster size over time. The intensity of both motor and sensory cortical activations correlated with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire. Our results show significant cortical reorganization of motor and sensory cortices after transplantation of bilateral forearm transplantation over a four-year period.

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Forearm Nerve Blocks: A Novel Application for Pain Control in Adult Patients with Digit Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patricia Javedani, Parisa; Amini, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Phalanx fractures and interphalangeal joint dislocations commonly present to the emergency department. Although these orthopedic injuries are not complex, the four-point digital block used for anesthesia during the reduction can be painful. Additionally, cases requiring prolonged manipulation or consultation for adequate reduction may require repeat blockade. This case series reports four patients presenting after mechanical injuries resulting in phalanx fracture or interphalangeal joint dislocations. These patients received an ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block of the forearm with successful subsequent reduction. To our knowledge, use of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks of the forearm for anesthesia in reduction of upper extremity digit injuries in adult patients in the emergency department setting has not been described before. PMID:27555971

  19. In Vivo Noninvasive Analysis of Human Forearm Muscle Function and Fatigue: Applications to EVA Operations and Training Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fotedar, L. K.; Marshburn, T.; Quast, M. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Forearm muscle fatigue is one of the major limiting factors affecting endurance during performance of deep-space extravehicular activity (EVA) by crew members. Magnetic resonance (MR) provides in vivo noninvasive analysis of tissue level metabolism and fluid exchange dynamics in exercised forearm muscles through the monitoring of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-31-MRS) parameter variations. Using a space glove box and EVA simulation protocols, we conducted a preliminary MRS/MRI study in a small group of human test subjects during submaximal exercise and recovery and following exhaustive exercise. In assessing simulated EVA-related muscle fatigue and function, this pilot study revealed substantial changes in the MR image longitudinal relaxation times (T2) as an indicator of specific muscle activation and proton flux as well as changes in spectral phosphocreatine-to-phosphate (PCr/Pi) levels as a function of tissue bioenergetic potential.

  20. Acute cyclooxygenase inhibition does not alter muscle sympathetic nerve activity or forearm vasodilator responsiveness in lean and obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Jill N.; Charkoudian, Nisha; Matzek, Luke J.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Joyner, Michael J.; Curry, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is often characterized by chronic inflammation that may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk via sympathoexcitation and decreased vasodilator responsiveness. We hypothesized that obese individuals would have greater indices of inflammation compared with lean controls, and that cyclooxygenase inhibition using ibuprofen would reduce muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and increase forearm blood flow in these subjects. We measured MSNA, inflammatory biomarkers (C‐reactive protein [CRP] and Interleukin‐6 [IL‐6]), and forearm vasodilator responses to brachial artery acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside in 13 men and women (7 lean; 6 obese) on two separate study days: control (CON) and after 800 mg ibuprofen (IBU). CRP (1.7 ± 0.4 vs. 0.6 ± 0.3 mg/L; P < 0.05) and IL‐6 (4.1 ± 1.5 vs. 1.0 ± 0.1pg/mL; P < 0.05) were higher in the obese group during CON and tended to decrease with IBU (IL‐6: P < 0.05; CRP: P = 0.14). MSNA was not different between groups during CON (26 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (lean) versus 26 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (obese); P = 0.50) or IBU (25 ± 4 bursts/100 heart beats (lean) versus 30 ± 5 bursts/100 heart beats (obese); P = 0.25), and was not altered by IBU. Forearm vasodilator responses were unaffected by IBU in both groups. In summary, an acute dose of ibuprofen did not alter sympathetic nerve activity or forearm blood flow responses in healthy obese individuals, suggesting that the cyclooxygenase pathway is not a major contributor to these variables in this group. PMID:25347862

  1. Long-term follow-up study of radial forearm free flap reconstruction after hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Masaya; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Akiko; Komori, Takahide; Terashi, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on postoperative long-term results in patients who underwent reconstructive free flap transfer following hemiglossectomy had some issues, including the heterogeneity of the patient population and the observation period. The present study aimed to evaluate changes of reconstructed tongues in patients who underwent radial forearm free flap (RFFF) after hemiglossectomy with long-term follow-up. We enrolled 23 patients who underwent RFFF after hemiglossectomy with a postoperative follow-up of 5 years or more. Postoperative status (eating, speech, sensation function) was assessed by concise medical inquiries. Morphological changes of flaps were evaluated by reviewing clinical photographs. Hemiglossectomy involving the base of the tongue was performed in 4 cases (17.4%) and was limited to the mobile tongue in 19 cases (82.6%). The mean follow-up was 85.4 months (range, 60-122 months). All patients experienced gradually improved postoperative status. The most significant improvement was found between 1 and 5 years after surgery (P = 0.007), but not between 1 and 3 years (P = 0.075) or between 3 and 5 years (P = 0.530). In almost all of the flaps, there were few morphological changes throughout the follow-up period. Postoperative status in patients who underwent reconstructive RFFF following hemiglossectomy improved sequentially.

  2. Brachialis muscle transfer to the forearm for the treatment of deformities in spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, T; Bicer, A; Aydin, H U; Tuncer, S; Aydin, A; Hosbay, Z Y

    2013-01-01

    The use of the brachialis muscle for tendon transfers in cerebral palsy has not been described previously. In this study, the brachialis muscle was used for transfer in 11 patients with spastic cerebral palsy for the restoration of forearm supination, wrist extension, or finger extension. Four patients underwent brachialis rerouting supinatorplasty. Active supination increased in two (60° and 50°), minimally increased in one (5°), and did not change in one patient. Five patients had a brachialis to extensor carpi radialis brevis transfer. The mean gain in postoperative active wrist extension was 65°. Two patients with finger flexion deformity and no active metacarpophalangeal joint movement underwent a brachialis to extensor digitorum communis transfer, and they attained an improved posture of finger extension although their postoperative metacarpophalangeal flexion-extension movement arc was 5° and 25°. None of the patients developed any loss of active flexion at the elbow. Our preliminary experience suggests that the brachialis muscle may serve as an alternative tendon transfer in cerebral palsy.

  3. Cortical and trabecular bone at the forearm show different adaptation patterns in response to tennis playing.

    PubMed

    Ducher, Gaële; Prouteau, Stéphanie; Courteix, Daniel; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2004-01-01

    Bone responds to impact-loading activity by increasing its size and/or density. The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude and modality of the bone response between cortical and trabecular bone in the forearms of tennis players. Bone area, bone mineral content (BMC), and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ulna and radius were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 57 players (24.5 +/- 5.7 yr old), at three sites: the ultradistal region (50% trabecular bone), the mid-distal regions, and third-distal (mainly cortical bone). At the ultradistal radius, the side-to-side difference in BMD was larger than in bone area (8.4 +/- 5.2% and 4.9 +/- 4.0%, respectively, p < 0.01). In the cortical sites, the asymmetry was lower (p < 0.01) in BMD than in bone area (mid-distal radius: 4.0 +/- 4.3% vs 11.7 +/- 6.8%; third-distal radius: 5.0 +/- 4.8% vs 8.4 +/- 6.2%). The asymmetry in bone area explained 33% of the variance of the asymmetry in BMC at the ultradistal radius, 66% at the mid-distal radius, and 53% at the third-distal radius. The ulna displayed similar results. Cortical and trabecular bone seem to respond differently to mechanical loading. The first one mainly increases its size, whereas the second one preferentially increases its density.

  4. POSTERIOR INTERBONE ARTERY FLAP FOR COVERING SERIOUS FOREARM, WRIST AND HAND INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Sérgio José; Domingos da Costa, Ricardo Pereira; de Oliveira, Emanoel; Prudente, Fabrício Guimarães; Mendonça, Marcelo Paris; Soares de Camargo, Christiano

    2015-01-01

    To assess the results achieved with posterior interbone artery flap covering serious injuries of the distal third of the forearm, wrist and hand, evaluating the degree of effectiveness of this procedure. Methods: 35 patients with serious injuries of the distal third of upper limbs were studied. We assessed the kind of trauma, injury site, flap size, skin coverage need, clinical outcome and complications. Results: The most frequent mechanism of trauma was motorcycle accident. The most commonly affected regions were: dorsal hand, wrist volar regions and the first commissure. In all patients, the flap size was enough to cover key tissues exposed by the injury. The donor area did not show complications, being primarily closed in 23 cases. The outcomes were good for 31 cases. In 22 patients, no complication was found, and the flap was completely lost in four. Conclusion: Posterior interbone artery flap provides good outcomes in covering serious injuries of the distal third of upper limbs, leading to a stable and reliable coverage, not compromising key irrigating arteries of the hand, enabling the performance of reconstruction procedures. Therefore, this is a useful alternative in such cases. PMID:26998451

  5. Interpretations of responses using the isolated forearm technique in general anaesthesia: a debate.

    PubMed

    Pandit, J J; Russell, I F; Wang, M

    2015-07-01

    The isolated forearm technique (IFT) enables an otherwise paralysed patient to communicate awareness to the anaesthetist. We present a debate that focuses on how best to interpret IFT responses. On one side, Pandit argues that there is a range of response types from none through to movement initiated by the patient to alert the researcher. He also presents a de novo numerical scale by which IFT responses could be classed. Each response type reflects the underlying mental state (degree of unconsciousness), and he concludes that the effect of general anaesthesia on patients is not binary but heterogeneous. There can be mental states resulting from anaesthesia that produce adequate levels of conscious impairment sufficient for surgery to proceed, but in which a degree of wakefulness, including a capacity for later recall, is retained (a state previously termed 'dysanaesthesia'). A literature review of IFT (31 trials) is presented to support this assertion. In rebuttal, Russell and Wang argue that IFT response types are not so discrete, and that the IFT technique precludes higher levels of response. They argue that overinterpretation of IFT responses might in fact result in a greater risk of accidental awareness; a binary interpretation of the IFT response is the safest option. All authors agree that the IFT has a role in clinical practice and the study of anaesthetic mechanisms.

  6. Study of clutter origin in in-vivo epi-optoacoustic imaging of human forearms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisser, Stefan; Held, Gerrit; Akarçay, Hidayet G.; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Epi-optoacoustic (OA) imaging offers flexible clinical diagnostics of the human body when the irradiation optic is attached to or directly integrated into the acoustic probe. Epi-OA images, however, encounter clutter that deteriorates contrast and significantly limits imaging depth. This study elaborates clutter origin in clinical epi-optoacoustic imaging using a linear array probe for scanning the human forearm. We demonstrate that the clutter strength strongly varies with the imaging location but stays stable over time, indicating that clutter is caused by anatomical structures. OA transients which are generated by strong optical absorbers located at the irradiation spot were identified to be the main source of clutter. These transients obscure deep in-plane OA signals when detected by the transducer either directly or after being acoustically scattered in the imaging plane. In addition, OA transients generated in the skin below the probe result in acoustic reverberations, which cause problems in image interpretation and limit imaging depth. Understanding clutter origin allows a better interpretation of clinical OA imaging, helps to design clutter compensation techniques and raises the prospect of contrast optimization via the design of the irradiation geometry.

  7. Intersegmental dynamics of 3D upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kozo; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Norimasa; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The shoulder internal rotation (IR) and forearm pronation (PR) are important elements for baseball pitching, however, how rapid rotations of IR and PR are produced by muscular torques and inter-segmental forces is not clear. The aim of this study is to clarify how IR and PR angular velocities are maximized, depending on muscular torque and interactive torque effects, and gain a detailed knowledge about inter-segmental interaction within a multi-joint linked chain. The throwing movements of eight collegiate baseball pitchers were recorded by a motion capture system, and induced-acceleration analysis was used to assess the respective contributions of the muscular (MUS) and interactive torques associated with gyroscopic moment (GYR), and Coriolis (COR) and centrifugal forces (CEN) to maximum angular velocities of IR (MIRV) and PR (MPRV). The results showed that the contribution of MUS account for 98.0% of MIRV, while that contribution to MPRV was indicated as negative (-48.1%). It was shown that MPRV depends primarily on the interactive torques associated with GYR and CEN, but the effects of GYR, COR and CEN on MIRV are negligible. In conclusion, rapid PR motion during pitching is created by passive-effect, and is likely a natural movement which arises from 3D throwing movement. Applying the current analysis to IR and PR motions is helpful in providing the implications for improving performance and considering conditioning methods for pitchers.

  8. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training.

    PubMed

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Bettermann, Ralf; Schroeder, Ulrik; Jonas, Stephan M

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user's hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98 . 30 % ( ± 1 . 26 % ) for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills. PMID:27527167

  9. Deep Soft Tissue Leiomyoma of Forearm: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Bommireddy, Babulreddy; Gurram, Vijay

    2016-06-01

    Leiomyomas are benign tumours of smooth-muscle origin representing 4.4% of all benign soft-tissue neoplasms. They are classified as cutaneous, vascular and leiomyomas of deep soft tissues. Leiomyomas rarely occur in extremities and are more common in the lower limb than in the upper extremity. Deep soft tissue leiomyomas are even rare with a very few reported cases so far in the literature. A 25-year-old female presented to us with an atraumatic slowly enlarging mass in the right forearm from 6 months with mild erosion of cortex of radius. She was otherwise healthy, MRI revealed a soft tissue lesion involving the interosseous space, isointense on T1, slightly hyperintense on T2 and hyperintense on STIR images. The tumour was excised intoto. The case is presented due to its rarity and the risk of tumor misdiagnosis. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any solitary painful slow growing mass of the extremities. If adequate margins are obtained recurrence of this tumour is very rare. PMID:27504364

  10. Intersegmental dynamics of 3D upper arm and forearm longitudinal axis rotations during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Naito, Kozo; Takagi, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Norimasa; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Takeo

    2014-12-01

    The shoulder internal rotation (IR) and forearm pronation (PR) are important elements for baseball pitching, however, how rapid rotations of IR and PR are produced by muscular torques and inter-segmental forces is not clear. The aim of this study is to clarify how IR and PR angular velocities are maximized, depending on muscular torque and interactive torque effects, and gain a detailed knowledge about inter-segmental interaction within a multi-joint linked chain. The throwing movements of eight collegiate baseball pitchers were recorded by a motion capture system, and induced-acceleration analysis was used to assess the respective contributions of the muscular (MUS) and interactive torques associated with gyroscopic moment (GYR), and Coriolis (COR) and centrifugal forces (CEN) to maximum angular velocities of IR (MIRV) and PR (MPRV). The results showed that the contribution of MUS account for 98.0% of MIRV, while that contribution to MPRV was indicated as negative (-48.1%). It was shown that MPRV depends primarily on the interactive torques associated with GYR and CEN, but the effects of GYR, COR and CEN on MIRV are negligible. In conclusion, rapid PR motion during pitching is created by passive-effect, and is likely a natural movement which arises from 3D throwing movement. Applying the current analysis to IR and PR motions is helpful in providing the implications for improving performance and considering conditioning methods for pitchers. PMID:25303496

  11. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training.

    PubMed

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Bettermann, Ralf; Schroeder, Ulrik; Jonas, Stephan M

    2016-08-03

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user's hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98 . 30 % ( ± 1 . 26 % ) for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills.

  12. Circadian dosing time dependency in the forearm skin penetration of methyl and hexyl nicotinate.

    PubMed

    Reinberg, A E; Soudant, E; Koulbanis, C; Bazin, R; Nicolaï, A; Mechkouri, M; Touitou, Y

    1995-01-01

    The forearm skin penetration of hydrophilic methyl nicotinate (MN) and lipophilic hexyl nicotinate (HN) was assessed around the clock. The sixteen healthy women (median age: 22 years, weight: 57 kg and height: 162 cm) who volunteered for the study were synchronized with a diurnal activity from 07.00h (+/- 1h) to 23.00h (+/- 1h.30min) and a nocturnal rest before and during the 48h sojourn in air-conditioned rooms (26 degrees C +/- 0.5 degrees C). Both HN (0.5% ethanol solution) and MN (5% ethanol solution) have a vasodilative effect on dermal vessels. The lag time (LT) between the delivery of a fixed volume (10 microliters) of the agent at the skin surface and the beginning of the vasodilatation, detected with a laser-Doppler method, was used to quantify the penetration kinetics. Tests were performed every 4h, at fixed clock hours, over a span of a 40h. Two types of tests were done with each of the agents: fixed site (one site only) and shifted sites (10 different places). Both cosinor and ANOVA have been used for statistical analyses. The shortest LT (fastest penetration) was located around 04.00h. The longest LT (slowest penetration) occurred during the day with a single peak around 13.00h in three of the situations, or two peaks (HN with fixed site). A rather large rhythm amplitude (peak-to-trough difference larger than 50% of the 24h mean LT) was validated.

  13. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training

    PubMed Central

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Bettermann, Ralf; Schroeder, Ulrik; Jonas, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user’s hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98.30% (±1.26%) for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills. PMID:27527167

  14. Deep Soft Tissue Leiomyoma of Forearm: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas are benign tumours of smooth-muscle origin representing 4.4% of all benign soft-tissue neoplasms. They are classified as cutaneous, vascular and leiomyomas of deep soft tissues. Leiomyomas rarely occur in extremities and are more common in the lower limb than in the upper extremity. Deep soft tissue leiomyomas are even rare with a very few reported cases so far in the literature. A 25-year-old female presented to us with an atraumatic slowly enlarging mass in the right forearm from 6 months with mild erosion of cortex of radius. She was otherwise healthy, MRI revealed a soft tissue lesion involving the interosseous space, isointense on T1, slightly hyperintense on T2 and hyperintense on STIR images. The tumour was excised intoto. The case is presented due to its rarity and the risk of tumor misdiagnosis. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any solitary painful slow growing mass of the extremities. If adequate margins are obtained recurrence of this tumour is very rare. PMID:27504364

  15. Influence of temperature on irritation in the hand/forearm immersion test.

    PubMed

    Clarys, P; Manou, I; Barel, A O

    1997-05-01

    As indicated by in vitro experiments the penetration of irritants through the skin is significantly influenced by the temperature of the solution. In vivo experiments, demonstrated equally a significant influence of temperature in surfactant-induced skin irritation. In order to evaluate the irritant potential of detergent solutions under normal user conditions, we used the hand/forearm immersion test. We compared 2 detergents with different anionic character in a repetitive immersion protocol (30 min immersion on 4 consecutive days). The solutions were tested at 2 temperatures (37 degrees C and 40 degrees C). The irritation was quantified by assessment of the stratum corneum barrier function (transepidermal water loss), skin redness (a* colour parameter) and skin dryness (capacitance method). Both detergents affected the integrity of the skin in a significant way. The anionic content as well as the temperature of the solutions were found to be determinative for the irritant potential, with a stronger response for higher anionic content and temperature, respectively. PMID:9197957

  16. Muscular forearm activation in hand-grip tasks with superimposition of mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Fattorini, L; Tirabasso, A; Lunghi, A; Di Giovanni, R; Sacco, F; Marchetti, E

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the muscular activation of the forearm, with or without vibration stimuli at different frequencies while performing a grip tasks of 45s at various level of exerted force. In 16 individuals, 9 females and 7 males, the surface electromyogram (EMG) of extensor carpi radialis longus and the flexor carpi ulnari muscles were assessed. At a short latency from onset EMG, RMS and the level of MU synchronization were assessed to evaluate the muscular adaptations. Whilst a trend of decay of EMG Median frequency (MDFd) was employed as an index of muscular fatigue. Muscular tasks consists of the grip of an instrumented handle at a force level of 20%, 30%, 40%, 60% of the maximum voluntary force. Vibration was supplied by a shaker to the hand in mono-frequential waves at 20, 30, 33 and 40Hz. In relation to EMG, RMS and MU synchronization, the muscular activation does not seem to change with the superimposition of the mechanical vibrations, on the contrary a lower MDFd was observed at 33Hz than in absence of vibration. This suggests an early muscular fatigue induced by vibration due to the fact that 33Hz is a resonance frequency for the hand-arm system.

  17. Virtual reality anatomy: is it comparable with traditional methods in the teaching of human forearm musculoskeletal anatomy?

    PubMed

    Codd, Anthony M; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy was produced using the open source 3D imaging program "Blender." The aim was to evaluate the use of 3D virtual reality when compared with traditional anatomy teaching methods. Three groups were identified from the University of Manchester second year Human Anatomy Research Skills Module class: a "control" group (no prior knowledge of forearm anatomy), a "traditional methods" group (taught using dissection and textbooks), and a "model" group (taught solely using e-resource). The groups were assessed on anatomy of the forearm by a ten question practical examination. ANOVA analysis showed the model group mean test score to be significantly higher than the control group (mean 7.25 vs. 1.46, P < 0.001) and not significantly different to the traditional methods group (mean 6.87, P > 0.5). Feedback from all users of the e-resource was positive. Virtual reality anatomy learning can be used to compliment traditional teaching methods effectively.

  18. Angioplasty of forearm arteries as a finger salvage procedure for patient with end-stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yuk; Chan, Yiu Che; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Due to the relatively low metabolic demand and extensive collaterals of the upper limb, peripheral arterial disease seldom leads to tissue loss, except in patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF), rheumatologic diseases, Raynaud’s disease, frostbites, or distal emboli. We report a case of a 51-year-old lady with ESRF who presented to our tertiary referral vascular center with infected gangrene of her right ring finger. Duplex ultrasound showed that her forearm arteries were severely diseased. Digital subtraction angiogram showed severe multilevel stenoses/occlusions in her forearm radial and ulnar arteries. These lesions were successfully angioplastized with 2 mm × 25 mm angioplasty balloon. Completion angiogram showed good radiological results with some post-dilatation spasm which improved with intra-arterial glyceryl trinitrate. The sepsis improved after revascularization, and the distal phalanx was allowed to self-demarcate with dressings and autoamputate with good clinical results. Our case illustrated that even in delayed setting, patients could still benefit from specialist vascular care with a combination of expert care and angioplasty of forearm arteries, with successful salvage of her finger. PMID:27143949

  19. An examination of the strength and electromyographic responses after concentric vs. eccentric exercise of the forearm flexors.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Beck, Travis W; Defreitas, Jason M; Wages, Nathan P

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the strength and electromyographic (EMG) responses in exercised and nonexercised limbs after concentric (CON) vs. eccentric (ECC) exercise of the forearm flexors. Twenty-five men (mean ± SD age, 23.6 ± 3.8 years; height, 179.7 ± 6.6 cm; body weight, 87.4 ± 14.6 kg) performed 6 sets of 10 maximal CON isokinetic (CON exercise) or ECC isokinetic (ECC exercise) muscle actions of the dominant (DOM) forearm flexors on 2 separate randomly ordered visits. Each subject performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of both the DOM and nondominant (NONDOM) forearm flexors before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) the exercise interventions. The DOM limb was the only limb exercised for both interventions. A bipolar EMG signal was detected from the biceps brachii during each MVC. The results showed that there were significant 17 and 21% decreases in maximal strength after the CON exercise and ECC exercise, respectively. When collapsed across exercise conditions, strength for the DOM and NONDOM limbs significantly decreased 36 and 4% after exercise, respectively. Accompanied with the strength losses, normalized EMG amplitude for the DOM and NONDOM limbs also reduced 21 and 7%, respectively. These findings suggested that the CON exercise and ECC exercise interventions caused similar strength losses for the exercised arm. There was also a strength loss in the contralateral nonexercised arm that was likely because of neural factors.

  20. Angioplasty of forearm arteries as a finger salvage procedure for patient with end-stage renal failure.

    PubMed

    Law, Yuk; Chan, Yiu Che; Cheng, Stephen Wing-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Due to the relatively low metabolic demand and extensive collaterals of the upper limb, peripheral arterial disease seldom leads to tissue loss, except in patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF), rheumatologic diseases, Raynaud's disease, frostbites, or distal emboli. We report a case of a 51-year-old lady with ESRF who presented to our tertiary referral vascular center with infected gangrene of her right ring finger. Duplex ultrasound showed that her forearm arteries were severely diseased. Digital subtraction angiogram showed severe multilevel stenoses/occlusions in her forearm radial and ulnar arteries. These lesions were successfully angioplastized with 2 mm × 25 mm angioplasty balloon. Completion angiogram showed good radiological results with some post-dilatation spasm which improved with intra-arterial glyceryl trinitrate. The sepsis improved after revascularization, and the distal phalanx was allowed to self-demarcate with dressings and autoamputate with good clinical results. Our case illustrated that even in delayed setting, patients could still benefit from specialist vascular care with a combination of expert care and angioplasty of forearm arteries, with successful salvage of her finger. PMID:27143949

  1. Intra-session and inter-day reliability of forearm surface EMG during varying hand grip forces.

    PubMed

    Hashemi Oskouei, Alireza; Paulin, Michael G; Carman, Allan B

    2013-02-01

    Surface electromyography (EMG) is widely used to evaluate forearm muscle function and predict hand grip forces; however, there is a lack of literature on its intra-session and inter-day reliability. The aim of this study was to determine reliability of surface EMG of finger and wrist flexor muscles across varying grip forces. Surface EMG was measured from six forearm flexor muscles of 23 healthy adults. Eleven of these subjects undertook inter-day test-retest. Six repetitions of five randomized isometric grip forces between 0% and 80% of maximum force (MVC) were recorded and normalized to MVC. Intra- and inter-day reliability were calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurement (SEM). Normalized EMG produced excellent intra-session ICC of 0.90 when repeated measurements were averaged. Intra-session SEM was low at low grip forces, however, corresponding normalized SEM was high (23-45%) due to the small magnitude of EMG signals. This may limit the ability to evaluate finer forearm muscle function and hand grip forces in daily tasks. Combining EMG of functionally related muscles improved intra-session SEM, improving within-subject reliability without taking multiple measurements. Removing and replacing electrodes inter-day produced poor ICC (ICC < 0.50) but did not substantially affect SEM.

  2. Comparison of the radial forearm flap and the thinned anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap for reconstruction of tongue defects: an evaluation of donor-site morbidity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Hung-Chi; Huang, Yau-Lin; Mardini, Samir; Feng, Guan-Ming

    2004-12-01

    The radial forearm flap is commonly used for reconstruction of tongue defects following tumor extirpation. This flap is easy to harvest and offers thin tissue with large-caliber vessels. However, its use leaves behind a conspicuous aesthetic deformity in the forearm and requires the sacrifice of a major artery of that limb, the radial artery. The anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap has found clinical applications in the reconstruction of soft-tissue defects requiring thin tissue. More recently, in a thinned form, the anterolateral thigh flap has been used for reconstructing defects of the tongue with functional results equivalent to that of the radial forearm flap. For the reconstruction of tongue defects, these two flaps could provide similar soft-tissue coverage, but they seem to result in different donor-site appearances. The donor site is closed primarily, leaving only a linear scar that is inconspicuous with normal clothing, and no functional deficit is left behind in the thigh. Thus, for the supply of flaps for tongue defects, a comparison between the radial forearm flap and the anterolateral thigh flap donor sites is provided in this study. Between December of 2000 and August of 2002, 41 patients who underwent reconstruction of defects of the tongue using either a radial forearm flap or an anterolateral thigh flap were evaluated. The focus was on the evaluation of the functional and aesthetic outcome of the donor site after harvesting these flaps for the purpose of reconstructing either total or partial tongue defects. Finally, a comparison was performed between the donor sites of the two flaps. The disadvantages of the radial forearm flap include the conspicuous unattractive scar in the forearm region, pain, numbness, and the sacrifice of a major artery of the limb. In some patients, the donor-site scar of the forearm acted as a social stigma, preventing these patients from leading a normal life. In contrast, the anterolateral thigh cutaneous flap, after

  3. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms.

    PubMed

    Doomernik, D E; Kruse, R R; Reijnen, M M P J; Kozicz, T L; Kooloos, J G M

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and limitations of each substance was given, and a comparison of vascular infusion procedures in both preservation methods was made. A literature search was performed in order to identify the most commonly used vascular injection products. Acrylic paint, latex, gelatin, silicone, Araldite F and Batson's No. 17 were selected for the study. One fresh-frozen and one embalmed cadaver forearm were infused with each injection product according to a uniform protocol. The curing time, skin- and subcutaneous tissue penetration, degree of filling of the arterial tree, extravasations, consistency of the injected vessels during dissection, and the costs of each injection fluid were noted. There was a large variation between the injection fluids in processing- and curing time, colour intensity, flexibility, fragility, elasticity, strength, toxicity and costs. All fluids were suitable for infusion. The penetration of injection fluid into the skin and subcutaneous tissue was significantly better in fresh-frozen specimens (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively), with significantly smaller branches casted (P = 0.004). Vascular infusion of fresh-frozen cadaver specimens results in a significantly better filled coloured arterial tree, enabling more detail to be achieved and smaller branches casted. The biomechanical properties of fresh-frozen soft tissues are less affected compared with formalin fixation. All the injection fluids studied are suitable for vascular infusion, but their different properties ensure that certain products and procedures are more suitable for specific study purposes.

  4. Psychophysical Evaluation of the Capability for Phantom Limb Movement in Forearm Amputees.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Mita, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    A phantom limb is the sensation that an amputated limb is still attached to the body and is moving together with other body parts. Phantom limb phenomenon is often described on the basis of the patient's subjective sense, for example as represented using a visual analog scale (VAS). The aim of this study was to propose a novel quantification method for behavioral aspect of phantom limb by psychophysics. Twelve unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform phantom wrist motion with various motion frequencies (60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240% of preferred speed). The attainment of phantom limb motion in each session was rated by the VAS ranging from 0 (hard) to 10 (easy). The relationship between the VAS and motion frequency was mathematically fitted by quadric function, and the value of shift and the degree of steepness were obtained as evaluation variables for the phantom limb movement. In order to test whether the proposed method can reasonably quantify the characteristics of phantom limb motion, we compared the variables among three different phantom limb movement conditions: (1) unilateral (phantom only), (2) bimanual, and (3) bimanual wrist movement with mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF). While VAS rating showed a larger extent of inter- and intra-subject variability, the relationship of the VAS in response to motion frequency could be fitted by quadric curve, and the obtained parameters based on quadric function well characterize task-dependent changes in phantom limb movement. The present results suggest the potential usefulness of psychophysical evaluation as a validate assessment tool of phantom limb condition. PMID:27227973

  5. Radionuclide assessment of peripheral hemodynamics: a new technique for measurement of forearm blood volume and flow

    SciTech Connect

    Todo, Y.; Tanimoto, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Iwasaki, T.

    1986-02-01

    A new peripheral hemodynamic measurement system using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells has been developed. This method was carried out on 22 normal subjects, 29 with coronary artery disease, and two with dilated cardiomyopathy. Peripheral hemodynamic indices obtained from this method included forearm blood volume (FBV), venous capacity (FVC), venous capacity index (VCI), blood flow (FBF), and vascular resistance (FVR), and were compared with the central hemodynamic parameters of left ventricular filling pressure (LVFP), cardiac output (CO), and total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR) obtained with an invasive technique. The normal values were FBV 8.54 +/- 2.04 ml/100 ml; FVC 4.54 +/- 1.23 ml/100 ml; VCI 65.5 +/- 3.8%; FBF 4.26 +/- 0.56 ml/100 ml/min; and FVR 20.9 +/- 4.4 mmHg/ml/100 ml/min. These values were in good agreement with the values reported using conventional plethysmography. The 16 patients with congestive heart failure (NYHA Class II or III) showed significantly lower FBV, FVC, and FBF values and significantly higher VCI and FVR values than the healthy subjects. Capacitance vessel parameters (FBV, FVC, and VCI) and LVFP, FBF and CO, and FVR and TSVR each showed significant correlation; reproducibility was also good. The advantages of this method are (a) the detector does not come in contact with the region being measured; (b) it is possible to ascertain the absolute quantity of blood in the tissue; (c) extravasation of the plasma component can be ignored; and (d) data processing is simple.

  6. Psychophysical Evaluation of the Capability for Phantom Limb Movement in Forearm Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Mita, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    A phantom limb is the sensation that an amputated limb is still attached to the body and is moving together with other body parts. Phantom limb phenomenon is often described on the basis of the patient’s subjective sense, for example as represented using a visual analog scale (VAS). The aim of this study was to propose a novel quantification method for behavioral aspect of phantom limb by psychophysics. Twelve unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform phantom wrist motion with various motion frequencies (60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 220, 240% of preferred speed). The attainment of phantom limb motion in each session was rated by the VAS ranging from 0 (hard) to 10 (easy). The relationship between the VAS and motion frequency was mathematically fitted by quadric function, and the value of shift and the degree of steepness were obtained as evaluation variables for the phantom limb movement. In order to test whether the proposed method can reasonably quantify the characteristics of phantom limb motion, we compared the variables among three different phantom limb movement conditions: (1) unilateral (phantom only), (2) bimanual, and (3) bimanual wrist movement with mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF). While VAS rating showed a larger extent of inter- and intra-subject variability, the relationship of the VAS in response to motion frequency could be fitted by quadric curve, and the obtained parameters based on quadric function well characterize task-dependent changes in phantom limb movement. The present results suggest the potential usefulness of psychophysical evaluation as a validate assessment tool of phantom limb condition. PMID:27227973

  7. Ischemic block of the forearm abolishes finger movements but not their associated anticipatory postural adjustments.

    PubMed

    Bruttini, Carlo; Esposti, Roberto; Bolzoni, Francesco; Cavallari, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Voluntary movement is known to induce postural perturbations that are counteracted by unconscious anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs). Thus, for every movement, two motor commands are dispatched: a voluntary command recruiting the prime mover and a postural command driving the APAs. These commands are classically thought to be separated; this study investigates whether they could be instead considered as two elements within the same motor program. We analyzed the APAs in biceps brachii, triceps brachii and anterior deltoid that stabilize the arm when briskly flexing the index finger (prime mover flexor digitorum superficialis). APAs and prime mover activation were recorded before, under and after ischemic block of the forearm. Ischemia paralyzed the prime mover, thus suppressing the finger movement and the ensuing postural perturbation. If the two commands had been separated, it would have been expected that after a few failed attempts to flex the index finger, the APAs were suppressed too, being purposeless without postural perturbation. APAs were still present under ischemia even after 60 movement trials. No significant changes were found in APA amplitude in biceps and triceps among different conditions, or in the average APA latency. Inhibitory APA in anterior deltoid was reduced but still present under ischemia. In addition, the pharmacologic block of the sole median nerve produced similar effects. APAs were instead almost abolished when applying a fixation point to the wrist. The observation that APAs remained tailored to the expected perturbation even when that perturbation did not occur supports the idea of a functionally unique motor command driving both the prime mover and the muscles of the APA chain.

  8. Reduction of Donor Site Morbidity of Free Radial Forearm Flaps: What Level of Evidence Is Available?

    PubMed Central

    Loeffelbein, Denys J.; Al-Benna, Sammy; Steinsträßer, Lars; Satanovskij, Robin M.; Rohleder, Nils H.; Mücke, Thomas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kesting, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The radial forearm free flap (RFFF) is the most commonly used free flap in head and neck reconstructive surgery. However, despite excellent results with respect to the site of reconstruction, donor site morbidity cannot be neglected. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge and analyzes the level of evidence with regard to perioperative management of the reduction of RFFF donor site morbidity. Methods: The medical Internet source PubMed was screened for relevant articles. All relevant articles were tabulated according to the levels of scientific evidence, and the available methods for reduction of donor site morbidity are discussed. Results: Classification into levels of evidence reveals 3 publications (1.5%) with level I (randomized controlled trials), 29 (14.0%) with level II (experimental studies with no randomization, cohort studies, or outcome research), 3 (1.5%) with level III (systematic review of case-control studies or individual case-control studies), 121 (58.7%) with level IV (nonexperimental studies, such as cross-sectional trials, case series, case reports), and 15 (7.3%) with level V (narrative review or expert opinion without explicit critical appraisal). Thirty-five (17.0%) articles could not be classified, because they focused on a topic other than donor site morbidity of the RFFF. Conclusions: Although great interest has been expressed with regard to reducing the donor site morbidity of the workhorse flap in microvascular reconstruction procedures, most publications fail to provide the hard facts and solid evidence characteristic of high-quality research. PMID:22331991

  9. A comparative study of vascular injection fluids in fresh-frozen and embalmed human cadaver forearms.

    PubMed

    Doomernik, D E; Kruse, R R; Reijnen, M M P J; Kozicz, T L; Kooloos, J G M

    2016-10-01

    Over the years, various vascular injection products have been developed to facilitate anatomical dissections. This study aimed to compare the most commonly used vascular injection products in fresh-frozen and formalin-embalmed cadaver specimens. An overview of the properties, advantages and limitations of each substance was given, and a comparison of vascular infusion procedures in both preservation methods was made. A literature search was performed in order to identify the most commonly used vascular injection products. Acrylic paint, latex, gelatin, silicone, Araldite F and Batson's No. 17 were selected for the study. One fresh-frozen and one embalmed cadaver forearm were infused with each injection product according to a uniform protocol. The curing time, skin- and subcutaneous tissue penetration, degree of filling of the arterial tree, extravasations, consistency of the injected vessels during dissection, and the costs of each injection fluid were noted. There was a large variation between the injection fluids in processing- and curing time, colour intensity, flexibility, fragility, elasticity, strength, toxicity and costs. All fluids were suitable for infusion. The penetration of injection fluid into the skin and subcutaneous tissue was significantly better in fresh-frozen specimens (P = 0.002 and P = 0.009, respectively), with significantly smaller branches casted (P = 0.004). Vascular infusion of fresh-frozen cadaver specimens results in a significantly better filled coloured arterial tree, enabling more detail to be achieved and smaller branches casted. The biomechanical properties of fresh-frozen soft tissues are less affected compared with formalin fixation. All the injection fluids studied are suitable for vascular infusion, but their different properties ensure that certain products and procedures are more suitable for specific study purposes. PMID:27329696

  10. Effect of wrist and forearm training on linear bat-end, center of percussion, and hand velocities and on time to ball contact of high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; McIntyre, Joseph S; Szymanski, Jessica M; Molloy, Joseph M; Madsen, Nels H; Pascoe, David D

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the effects of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on linear bat-end velocity (BV), center of percussion velocity (CV), hand velocity (HV), and time to ball contact of high school baseball players. Forty-three baseball players were randomly assigned by a stratified sampling technique to 1 of 2 training groups. Group 1 (n = 23) and group 2 (n = 20) performed the same full-body resistance exercises while training 3 days a week for 12 weeks according to a stepwise periodized model. Group 2 also performed wrist and forearm exercises 3 days a week for 12 weeks. Wrist and forearm strength were measured pre- and posttraining. Linear BV, CV, HV, and time to ball contact were recorded pre- and posttraining by a motion-capture system. A 3 repetition maximum (RM) parallel squat and bench press were measured at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training. Both groups showed statistically significant increases (p < or = 0.01) in linear BV, CV, and HV (m.s(-1) +/- SD) after 12 weeks of training; however, there were no differences between the 2 groups. Both groups statistically increased wrist and forearm strength (p < or = 0.05). Group 2 had statistically greater increases (p < or = 0.05) in 10 of 12 wrist and forearm strength measures than did group 1. Both groups made statistically significant increases in predicted 1RM parallel squat and bench press after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training; however, there were no differences between groups. These data indicate that a 12-week stepwise periodized training program can significantly increase wrist and forearm strength, linear BV, CV, and HV among high school baseball players. However, increased wrist and forearm strength did not contribute to further increases in linear BV, CV, or HV. PMID:16503687

  11. Effect of wrist and forearm training on linear bat-end, center of percussion, and hand velocities and on time to ball contact of high school baseball players.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, David J; McIntyre, Joseph S; Szymanski, Jessica M; Molloy, Joseph M; Madsen, Nels H; Pascoe, David D

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the effects of 12 weeks of wrist and forearm training on linear bat-end velocity (BV), center of percussion velocity (CV), hand velocity (HV), and time to ball contact of high school baseball players. Forty-three baseball players were randomly assigned by a stratified sampling technique to 1 of 2 training groups. Group 1 (n = 23) and group 2 (n = 20) performed the same full-body resistance exercises while training 3 days a week for 12 weeks according to a stepwise periodized model. Group 2 also performed wrist and forearm exercises 3 days a week for 12 weeks. Wrist and forearm strength were measured pre- and posttraining. Linear BV, CV, HV, and time to ball contact were recorded pre- and posttraining by a motion-capture system. A 3 repetition maximum (RM) parallel squat and bench press were measured at baseline and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training. Both groups showed statistically significant increases (p < or = 0.01) in linear BV, CV, and HV (m.s(-1) +/- SD) after 12 weeks of training; however, there were no differences between the 2 groups. Both groups statistically increased wrist and forearm strength (p < or = 0.05). Group 2 had statistically greater increases (p < or = 0.05) in 10 of 12 wrist and forearm strength measures than did group 1. Both groups made statistically significant increases in predicted 1RM parallel squat and bench press after 4, 8, and 12 weeks of training; however, there were no differences between groups. These data indicate that a 12-week stepwise periodized training program can significantly increase wrist and forearm strength, linear BV, CV, and HV among high school baseball players. However, increased wrist and forearm strength did not contribute to further increases in linear BV, CV, or HV.

  12. The effect of vitamin C and/or warmth on forearm blood flow and vascular resistance in sickle cell anaemia subjects.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Aisuodionwe, S I; Kehinde, M O; Gbenebitse, S

    2002-06-01

    This study seeks to examine the effects of vitamin C supplementation or/and warmth on forearm blood flow (FBF) and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) in sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects in the steady state. Sixteen (16) SCA subjects of both sexes (mean age, 23.4+/-1.5 yrs.) were studied. Blood pressure (BP, mm Hg) and FBF (ml/min) measurements were made at rest, with warmth stimulation, after vitamin C supplementation for 6 weeks at 300 mg per day and with warmth stimulation after vitamin C supplementation. Warmth stimulation was induced by immersing the left foot in a bowl of water at a temperature of 40 degrees C for 2 minutes. Forearm blood flow (FBF) [corrected] was measured by means of a forearm plethysmograph. Forearm vascular resistance (FVR, arbitrary units) was calculated by dividing mean arterial pressure (MAP) with FBF. Warmth stimulation at 40 C significantly decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) (p<0.05), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p<0.01), MAP (p<0.01) and FVR (p<0.01) but significantly increased FBF (p<0.01). Vitamin C supplementation also significantly reduced SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.01), MAP (p<0.01) and FVR (p<0.05) but significantly increased FBF (p<0.01). After vitamin C supplementation, warmth stimulation potentiated the reduction in SBP (p<0.001), DBP (p<0.01), FVR (p <0.01) and increase in FBF (p<0.01). In conclusion, warmth stimulation at 40 [corrected] degrees C or vitamin C supplementation caused a decrease in arterial blood pressure, forearm vascular resistance and increase in forearm blood flow in sickle cell anaemia subjects. Pretreatment with vitamin C enhanced the vasodilator effect of warmth.

  13. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  14. Evaluation of physical and emotional responses to vibrotactile stimulation of the forearm in young adults, the elderly, and transradial amputees.

    PubMed

    Ko, Chang-Yong; Chang, Yunhee; Kim, Sol-Bi; Kim, Shinki; Kim, Gyoosuk; Ryu, Jeicheong; Mun, Museong; Mun, Musung; Bae, Tae Soo

    2015-01-01

    Vibrotactile stimulation (VS) is widely used in the biomedical and biomechanics fields. Most studies have attempted to verify the effects and/or function of VS, but few studies have evaluated emotional response (ER) to VS, although emotions play a critical role in human behavior. This study aimed to evaluate the subjective response (SR) to VS in young, elderly, and amputee adults and to verify whether VS on the forearm evokes displeasure. Twenty-four young adults (YM: male 13, YF: female 11), 31 elderly subjects (EM: male 15, EF: female 16), and 19 transradial amputees (AM: male 11, AF: female 8) participated. Eight equally spaced vibration motors were attached around the circumference of the forearm (channels 1-4 on the lateral site and channels 5-8 on the medial site) and were located 25% of the proximal forearm. Vibration stimuli with frequencies ranging from 37Hz to 258Hz were applied. An SR 10-level test and ER (displeasure or not) test were performed. In all 3 groups, SRs to the lateral site were higher than those to the medial site (YM group, p<0.001; YF group, p=0.002; EM group, p<0.001; EF group, p=0.031; AM group, p<0.001; AF group, p=0.021). Additionally, SRs were saturated at certain frequencies (YM group, 149Hz; YF and EM groups, 198Hz; EF and AM groups, 120Hz; AF group, 176Hz). Several subjects (YM group, 7; YF group, 4; EM group, 2; EF group, 6; AM group, 3; AF group, 1) expressed displeasure, and ERs were different according to sex, age, or amputation. As a result, the lateral site was more sensitive to VS than the medial site, regardless of sex, age, or amputation. Furthermore, VS may evoke displeasure.

  15. Scheme for Creating a Subcutaneous Tunnel to Place an Indwelling Implantable Central Venous Access System in the Forearm

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro Tanikake, Masato; Arimoto, Hiroshi; Utsunomiya, Keita; Narabayashi, Isamu; Narumi, Yoshifumi

    2008-11-15

    We report a method that we have devised in which a secure subcutaneous tunnel is prepared during the placement of an indwelling central venous reservoir in the forearm. Subjects included 69 cases in which a procedure for implanting an indwelling reservoir in the forearm was performed between June 2006 and May 2007. For the subcutaneous tunnel, a 22-G Cathelin needle was advanced from the puncture site, turning toward the subcutaneous pocket side to the deep subcutaneous area. A 14-G Surflo IV catheter was then advanced along the 22-G Cathelin needle from the subcutaneous pocket. With the tip of the 14-G Surflo IV catheter emerging above the skin at the puncture site, the inner needle of the 14-G Surflo IV catheter and the 22-G Cathelin needle were removed. The catheter was passed through the outer 14-G Surflo IV catheter to emerge on the subcutaneous pocket site, then the outer needle of the Surflo catheter was also removed, and a connection to the port was made to create the subcutaneous tunnel. In all 69 cases, the subcutaneous tunnel in the forearm of the nondominant arm was successfully created within a short period of time (100% success rate). No problems were observed due to slack in the catheter until removal of the sutures 1 week later and for 3 months after treatment. With this method, we believe that a subcutaneous tunnel can be prepared in which the contained catheter has minimal freedom of movement, and which minimizes any damage induced by slack in the catheter within the subcutaneous tunnel.

  16. Entrapment of Extensor Pollicis Longus Tendon after Volar Plating of a Smith Type Pediatric Distal Forearm Fracture.

    PubMed

    Franz, Torsten

    2016-06-01

    Extensor pollicis longus tendon entrapment is a rare complication of volarly displaced pediatric distal radius fractures. The few pediatric case reports have described tendon entrapment associated with conservative fracture treatment, or have been recognized at subsequent revision surgery after failure to achieve closed fracture reduction. A case of extensor pollicis longus tendon entrapment after open reduction and volar plate fixation of a pediatric distal forearm fracture is reported. This complication may also occur secondarily after open reduction and volar plating of the distal radius. PMID:27454642

  17. Anatomical study of the forearm and hand nerves of the domestic cat ( Felis catus), puma ( Puma concolor) and jaguar ( Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, H L; Silva, L B; Rafasquino, M E; Mateo, A G; Zuccolilli, G O; Portiansky, E L; Alonso, C R

    2013-04-01

    The innervation of the forearm and hand regions of cats has not been well described despite its importance for any surgery or any neurological disorder. It is probably the main area where disorders of peripheral nerves in this species are observed. In felines, the forelimbs facilitate the jump and represent the most important way for capturing prey. The main muscles and nerves involved in this activity are located in the region of the forearm and hand. The aim of the present study was to provide a detailed description of the innervation of the forearm and hand regions of the jaguar and puma, in comparison with that of the domestic cat, contributing thus with the anatomical knowledge of the area for applying it to surgery and pathology. The forearms of three pumas and two jaguars (all of them fixed in formalin) and of six domestic cats (fresh) were dissected. The nerves path and their forearm distribution patterns of all three species were described. The analysed results indicate that the observed variations between species are minimal; thus, the anatomy described for domestic cats can be widely applied to American wild felids. PMID:22783947

  18. Anatomical study of the forearm and hand nerves of the domestic cat ( Felis catus), puma ( Puma concolor) and jaguar ( Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, H L; Silva, L B; Rafasquino, M E; Mateo, A G; Zuccolilli, G O; Portiansky, E L; Alonso, C R

    2013-04-01

    The innervation of the forearm and hand regions of cats has not been well described despite its importance for any surgery or any neurological disorder. It is probably the main area where disorders of peripheral nerves in this species are observed. In felines, the forelimbs facilitate the jump and represent the most important way for capturing prey. The main muscles and nerves involved in this activity are located in the region of the forearm and hand. The aim of the present study was to provide a detailed description of the innervation of the forearm and hand regions of the jaguar and puma, in comparison with that of the domestic cat, contributing thus with the anatomical knowledge of the area for applying it to surgery and pathology. The forearms of three pumas and two jaguars (all of them fixed in formalin) and of six domestic cats (fresh) were dissected. The nerves path and their forearm distribution patterns of all three species were described. The analysed results indicate that the observed variations between species are minimal; thus, the anatomy described for domestic cats can be widely applied to American wild felids.

  19. Ultrasonographic diagnostics of pain in the lateral cubital compartment and proximal forearm

    PubMed Central

    Nowicki, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Pain in the lateral compartment of the elbow joint and decreased strength of the extensor muscle constitute a fairly common clinical problem. These symptoms, occurring in such movements as inverting and converting the forearm, pushing, lifting and pulling, mostly affect people who carry out daily activities with an intense use of wrist, e.g. work on computer. Strains in this area often result from persistent overload and degeneration processes of the common extensor tendon and the radial collateral ligament. Similar symptoms resulting from the compression of deep branch of the radial nerve in radial nerve tunnel should be remembered as well. It happens that both conditions occur simultaneously. A proper diagnosis is essential in undertaking an effective treatment. Ultrasonography is a non-invasive method and the application of high-end apparatus with heads of frequencies exceeding 12 MHz allows for a precise evaluation of joint structures, tendons and nerves. In case of the so-called tennis elbow, the examination allows for evaluation of the degree and extent of injury to the radial collateral ligament and common extensor tendon, in addition to the presence of blood vessels in inflicted area. Administration of autologous blood platelets concentrate containing growth factors, used in treatment of tennis elbow, is performed under ultrasound image control conditions. This allows for a precise incision of scar whilst keeping a healthy (unaffected) tissue margin to form fine channels enabling the penetration of growth factors. Post-surgery medical check-up allows for the evaluation of treatment effectiveness. In radial nerve tunnel syndrome, the ultrasound examination can reveal abnormalities in the deep branch of the radial nerve and within the anatomical structures adjacent to the nerve in the radial nerve tunnel. Furthermore, the ultrasound examination allows for detection of other articular and extraarticular pathologies, which affect the compression of the deep

  20. Human eccrine hamartoma of the forearm-antebrachial organ of the ringtailed lemur (Lemur catta). A possible phylogenetic relationship?

    PubMed

    Kopera, D; Soyer, H P; Kerl, H

    1994-06-01

    A 31-year-old woman presented with a clinically otherwise unsuspicious area of profuse sweating on her right forearm. Without triggering agents, sweating attacks producing a clear, serous fluid were observed daily. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy specimen showed hyperplastic eccrine glands with pale, stippled cytoplasm characteristic of eccrine hamartoma. No explanation, however, has been given for the fact that several authors observed eccrine hamartomas in the same anatomical location. Adolescent lemurs of the species catta (ringtailed lemur) are equipped with a pair of antebrachial cutaneous glands located on the volar surface of the wrist. They exude a clear secretion enabling them to "brachial branch mark" their territories. Histopathologic findings in the ringtailed lemur's antebrachial organ show characteristics of both apocrine and eccrine glands. In contrast to normal apocrine glands, however, the antebrachial organs of ringtailed lemurs reach the epidermis directly and are not connected to hair follicles. According to the "biogenetic law" of Ernst Haeckel, stating that ontogeny has to be seen as a short and incomplete repetition of phylogeny, a human fetus passes all evolutional stages from a single cell via amphibians and mammals to a human being. Thus, the antebrachial organ of the ringtailed lemur may be the "phylogenetic explanation" for eccrine hamartomas of the forearm in humans. The histopathologic findings of the antebrachial organ and of eccrine hamartomas are in accordance with this hypothesis. PMID:7943634

  1. Microsurgical Urethroplasty for Complex Bulbar Urethral Strictures Using the Radial Forearm Free Flap Prelaminated with Buccal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ajay; Sham, Eric; Chee, Justin

    2016-06-01

    Background Complex bulbar urethral strictures are a heterogeneous group, including those secondary to radiotherapy, failed previous open urethroplasty, and total bulbar necrosis following pelvic trauma. Traditional urethroplasty techniques in this group are unpredictable. We describe a novel technique of a buccal mucosa-prelaminated radial forearm free flap urethroplasty, which seeks to improve the quality of life for this group of patients. Methods Known, reliable techniques from two surgical specialties were combined to create a novel surgical solution, consisting of a radial forearm free flap prelaminated with buccal mucosa. Prospective data were collected on patient and stricture characteristics, complications, and results, including voiding flow rates, urethrography, and cystourethroscopy. Success was defined as the ability to void per urethra. The procedure was performed in four patients, previously considered unreconstructable and who were suprapubic catheter dependent. Results Microsurgical transfer was successful in all four cases. All patients were voiding per urethra and remained catheter free at a minimum of 12-month follow-up. There was no significant donor morbidity and all patients were able to return to their usual occupation. Mean voiding flow rates were 17.3 mL/s. Flexible cystoscopy revealed well-vascularized, patent neomucosa. Conclusions We demonstrate proof of concept for a novel technique of microsurgical urethroplasty. We believe this technique may have widespread application in the treatment of radiation-induced and other complex urethral strictures where traditional urethroplasty has limited success.

  2. Reliability and Validity Study of the Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale for People with Sprained Ankles, Walking with Forearm Crutches

    PubMed Central

    Ridao-Fernández, Carmen; Ojeda, Joaquín; Benítez-Lugo, Marisa; Sevillano, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to design and validate a functional assessment scale for assisted gait with forearm crutches (Chamorro Assisted Gait Scale—CHAGS) and to assess its reliability in people with sprained ankles. Design Thirty subjects who suffered from sprained ankle (anterior talofibular ligament first and second degree) were included in the study. A modified Delphi technique was used to obtain the content validity. The selected items were: pelvic and scapular girdle dissociation(1), deviation of Center of Gravity(2), crutch inclination(3), steps rhythm(4), symmetry of step length(5), cross support(6), simultaneous support of foot and crutch(7), forearm off(8), facing forward(9) and fluency(10). Two raters twice visualized the gait of the sample subjects which were recorded. The criterion-related validity was determined by correlation between CHAGS and Coding of eight criteria of qualitative gait analysis (Viel Coding). Internal consistency and inter and intra-rater reliability were also tested. Results CHAGS obtained a high and negative correlation with Viel Coding. We obtained a good internal consistency and the intra-class correlation coefficients oscillated between 0.97 and 0.99, while the minimal detectable changes were acceptable. Conclusion CHAGS scale is a valid and reliable tool for assessing assisted gait with crutches in people with sprained ankles to perform partial relief of lower limbs. PMID:27168236

  3. Microsurgical Urethroplasty for Complex Bulbar Urethral Strictures Using the Radial Forearm Free Flap Prelaminated with Buccal Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ajay; Sham, Eric; Chee, Justin

    2016-06-01

    Background Complex bulbar urethral strictures are a heterogeneous group, including those secondary to radiotherapy, failed previous open urethroplasty, and total bulbar necrosis following pelvic trauma. Traditional urethroplasty techniques in this group are unpredictable. We describe a novel technique of a buccal mucosa-prelaminated radial forearm free flap urethroplasty, which seeks to improve the quality of life for this group of patients. Methods Known, reliable techniques from two surgical specialties were combined to create a novel surgical solution, consisting of a radial forearm free flap prelaminated with buccal mucosa. Prospective data were collected on patient and stricture characteristics, complications, and results, including voiding flow rates, urethrography, and cystourethroscopy. Success was defined as the ability to void per urethra. The procedure was performed in four patients, previously considered unreconstructable and who were suprapubic catheter dependent. Results Microsurgical transfer was successful in all four cases. All patients were voiding per urethra and remained catheter free at a minimum of 12-month follow-up. There was no significant donor morbidity and all patients were able to return to their usual occupation. Mean voiding flow rates were 17.3 mL/s. Flexible cystoscopy revealed well-vascularized, patent neomucosa. Conclusions We demonstrate proof of concept for a novel technique of microsurgical urethroplasty. We believe this technique may have widespread application in the treatment of radiation-induced and other complex urethral strictures where traditional urethroplasty has limited success. PMID:26848566

  4. Effects of electrode size and spacing on sensory modalities in the phantom thumb perception area for the forearm amputees.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Chai, G H; Zhu, K H; Lan, N; Sui, X H

    2015-01-01

    Tactile sensory feedback plays a key role in accomplishing the dexterous manipulation of prosthetic hands for the amputees, and the non-invasive transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of the phantom finger perception (PFP) area would be an effective way to realize sensory feedback clinically. In order to realize the high-spatial-resolution tactile sensory feedback in the PFP region, we investigated the effects of electrode size and spacing on the tactile sensations for potentially optimizing the surface electrode array configuration. Six forearm-amputated subjects were recruited in the psychophysical studies. With the diameter of the circular electrode increasing from 3 mm to 12 mm, the threshold current intensity was enhanced correspondingly under different sensory modalities. The smaller electrode could potentially lead to high sensation spatial resolution. Whereas, the smaller the electrode, the less the number of sensory modalities. For an Φ-3 mm electrode, it is even hard for the subject to perceive any perception modalities under normal stimulating current. In addition, the two-electrode discrimination distance (TEDD) in the phantom thumb perception area decreased with electrode size decreasing in two directions of parallel or perpendicular to the forearm. No significant difference of TEDD existed along the two directions. Studies in this paper would guide the configuration optimization of the TENS electrode array for potential high spatial-resolution sensory feedback.

  5. The weight of computer mouse affects the wrist motion and forearm muscle activity during fast operation speed task.

    PubMed

    Chen, Han-Ming; Lee, Chang-Sian; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu

    2012-06-01

    The frequent use of the computer mouse was reported to be associated with the development of the musculoskeletal disorders in the wrist, forearm, and shoulder regions. This study was to examine the effect of the mouse weights and operation speeds on the wrist motion and muscle activity. 25 subjects (20 males and 5 females) were instructed to repetitively point-and-click the mouse between two targets displaced in the monitor with five different weighted mice (weights around 70, 100, 130, 160, and 190 g) at the fast (50 repetition/min) and slow (25 repetition/min) operation speeds. Surface electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis, extensor carpi ulnaris, extensor digitorum, and upper trapezius muscles were recorded, and the electrogoniometer was used to register the wrist motions. The results showed that the maximal ulnar deviation was not significantly different among the examined conditions. The wrist movement range and the forearm muscle activities showed a V-shape tendency with the lowest value in the mouse weight of 130 g. This tendency was diminished during the slow speed tasks. The results suggested that the proper mouse weight could benefit the users in terms of increasing the movement efficiency and decreasing the muscular costs.

  6. Postsurgical compartment syndrome of the forearm diagnosed in a child receiving a continuous infra-clavicular peripheral nerve block.

    PubMed

    Sermeus, L; Boeckx, S; Camerlynck, H; Somville, J; Vercauteren, M

    2015-01-01

    Opinions diverge as to whether or not regional anaesthesia delays the diagnosis of evolving acute compartment syndrome. Withholding regional anaesthesia from patients with painful orthopaedic injuries may be ethically unacceptable, however. In this report, we describe a case of acute compartment syndrome in a 4-year old child who underwent resection of a forearm osteochondroma. Analgesia was satisfactory during the first post-operative night, but the child later complained of pain despite an effective infra-clavicular block. Motor function and sensibility were disturbed and the fingers were swollen. The forearm cast was removed as it was suspected to be causing external compression. Pain disappeared while motor function and sensation recovered. The child was discharged without any complications. Despite an effective peripheral nerve block and the young age of the patient, the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome could be made thanks to a well-defined post-operative analgesia protocol, a high level of suspicion and careful clinical assessment when break-through pain occurred.

  7. Effect of systemic pH on pH sub i and lactic acid generation in exhaustive forearm exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, V.L.; Schubert, C.; Keller, U.; Mueller, S. Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington )

    1988-09-01

    To investigate whether changes in systemic pH affect intracellular pH (pH{sub i}), energy-rich phosphates, and lactic acid generation in muscle, eight normal volunteers performed exhaustive forearm exercise with arterial blood flow occluded for 2 min on three occasions. Subjects ingested 4 mmol/kg NH{sub 4}Cl (acidosis; A) or NaHCO{sub 3} (alkalosis; B) or nothing (control; C) 3 h before the exercise. Muscle pH{sub i} and phosphocreatine (PCr) content were measured with {sup 31}P-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy during exercise and recovery. Lactate output during 0.5-7 min of recovery was calculated as deep venous-arterial concentration differences times forearm blood flow. Before exercise, blood pH and bicarbonate were lower in acidosis than alkalosis and intermediate in control. Lactic acid output during recovery was less with A than B and intermediate in C. PCr utilization and resynthesis were not affected by extracellular pH changes. pH{sub i} did not differ before exercise or at its end. Hence systemic acidosis inhibited and alkalosis stimulated lactic acid output. These findings suggest that systemic pH regulates cellular acid production, protecting muscle pH, at the expense of energy availability.

  8. Effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Markus D; Pedersen, Mogens T; Mortensen, Ole S; Sjøgaard, Gisela; Zebis, Mette K

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of specific resistance training on forearm pain and work disability in industrial technicians. Design and setting Two-armed cluster randomised controlled trial of 20 weeks performed at two industrial production units in Copenhagen, Denmark. Participants Working-age industrial technicians both with and without pain and disability. Interventions The training group (n=282) performed specific resistance training for the shoulder, neck and arm muscles three times a week. The control group (n=255) was advised to continue normal physical activity. Outcome All participants rated forearm pain intensity (Visual Analogue Scale, 0–100 mm) once a week (primary outcome) and replied to a questionnaire on work disability (Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand, 0–100) at baseline and follow-up (secondary outcome). Results Questionnaires were sent to 854 workers of which 30 (n=282) and 27 (n=255) clusters were randomised to training and control, respectively. Of these, 211 and 237 participants, respectively, responded to the follow-up questionnaire. Intention-to-treat analyses including both individuals with and without pain showed that from baseline to follow-up, pain intensity and work disability decreased more in the training group than in the control group (4–5 on a scale of 0–100, p<0.01–0.001). Among those with pain >30 mm Visual Analogue Scale at baseline (n=54), the OR for complete recovery at follow-up in the training group compared with the control group was 4.6 (95% CI 1.2 to 17.9). Among those with work disability >30 at baseline (n=113), the OR for complete recovery at follow-up in the training group compared with the control group was 6.0 (95% CI 1.8 to 19.8). Conclusion Specific resistance training of the shoulder, neck and arm reduces forearm pain and work disability among industrial technicians. Trial registration number NCT01071980. PMID:22331386

  9. Modulatory Effects of the Ipsi and Contralateral Ventral Premotor Cortex (PMv) on the Primary Motor Cortex (M1) Outputs to Intrinsic Hand and Forearm Muscles in Cebus apella

    PubMed Central

    Quessy, Stephan; Côté, Sandrine L.; Hamadjida, Adjia; Deffeyes, Joan; Dancause, Numa

    2016-01-01

    The ventral premotor cortex (PMv) is a key node in the neural network involved in grasping. One way PMv can carry out this function is by modulating the outputs of the primary motor cortex (M1) to intrinsic hand and forearm muscles. As many PMv neurons discharge when grasping with either arm, both PMv within the same hemisphere (ipsilateral; iPMv) and in the opposite hemisphere (contralateral; cPMv) could modulate M1 outputs. Our objective was to compare modulatory effects of iPMv and cPMv on M1 outputs to intrinsic hand and forearm muscles. We used paired-pulse protocols with intracortical microstimulations in capuchin monkeys. A conditioning stimulus was applied in either iPMv or cPMv simultaneously or prior to a test stimulus in M1 and the effects quantified in electromyographic signals. Modulatory effects from iPMv were predominantly facilitatory, and facilitation was much more common and powerful on intrinsic hand than forearm muscles. In contrast, while the conditioning of cPMv could elicit facilitatory effects, in particular to intrinsic hand muscles, it was much more likely to inhibit M1 outputs. These data show that iPMv and cPMv have very different modulatory effects on the outputs of M1 to intrinsic hand and forearm muscles. PMID:27473318

  10. A Longitudinal Acoustic Study of the Effects of the Radial Forearm Free Flap Reconstruction on Sibilants Produced by Tongue Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laaksonen, Juha-Pertti; Rieger, Jana; Harris, Jeffrey; Seikaly, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic properties of 980 tokens of sibilants /s, z, [approximately]/ produced by 17 Canadian English-speaking female and male tongue cancer patients were studied. The patients had undergone tongue resection and tongue reconstruction with a radial forearm free flap (RFFF). The spectral moments (mean, skewness) and frication duration were analysed…

  11. Predicted vitamin D status during pregnancy in relation to offspring forearm fractures in childhood: a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sesilje B; Strøm, Marin; Maslova, Ekaterina; Granström, Charlotta; Vestergaard, Peter; Mølgaard, Christian; Olsen, Sjurdur F

    2015-12-14

    In a prospective cohort study, the association between maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and offspring forearm fractures during childhood and adolescence was analysed in 30 132 mother and child pairs recruited to the Danish National Birth Cohort between 1996 and 2002. Data on characteristics, dietary factors and lifestyle factors were collected on several occasions during pregnancy. We analysed the association between predicted vitamin D status, based on a subsample with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) biomarker measurements (n 1497) from gestation week 25, and first-time forearm fractures among offspring between birth and end of follow-up. Diagnoses were extracted from the Danish National Patient Register. Multivariable Cox regression models using age as the underlying time scale indicated no overall association between predicted vitamin D status (based on smoking, season, dietary and supplementary vitamin D intake, tanning bed use and outdoor physical activity) in pregnancy and offspring forearm fractures. Likewise, measured 25(OH)D, tanning bed use and dietary vitamin D intake were not associated with offspring forearm fractures. In mid-pregnancy, 91 % of the women reported intake of vitamin D from dietary supplements. Offspring of women who took >10 µg/d in mid-pregnancy had a significantly increased risk for fractures compared with the reference level of zero intake (hazard ratios (HR) 1·31; 95% CI 1·06, 1·62), but this was solely among girls (HR 1·48; 95% CI 1·10, 2·00). Supplement use in the peri-conceptional period exhibited similar pattern, although not statistically significant. In conclusion, our data indicated no protective effect of maternal vitamin D status with respect to offspring forearm fractures.

  12. Biomechanical analysis of forearm pronation and its relationship to ball movement for the two-seam and four-seam fastball pitches.

    PubMed

    Keeley, David W; Wicke, Jason; Alford, Ken; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2010-09-01

    This study examined forearm pronation in relation to both the vertical and horizontal ball movement measured for 2 variations of the fastball pitch. Ten healthy collegiate baseball pitchers participated in the study (age: 19.4 +/- 0.7 yr, height: 1.90 +/- 0.06 m, mass: 88.50 +/- 9.05 kg). Reflective markers were placed at the level of each joint center's location, and standard high-speed video techniques were used to record the participants as they threw 10 maximal effort fastball pitches. Marker positions were digitized in each video frame from which forearm pronation data were calculated. Across all pitchers, magnitude of both the vertical and horizontal ball movement was observed to be greater for the 2-seam fastball than for the 4-seam fastball. Regardless of pitch type, positive relationships were observed between all forearm pronation parameters and both vertical and horizontal ball movement. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.583, p < 0.01) was identified between forearm pronation acceleration at ball release and the magnitude of vertical ball movement regardless of pitch type. These results suggest that pitchers may be able to manipulate the magnitude of vertical ball movement by altering pronation accelerations at ball release. In addition, it appears that pitchers should alter their current training techniques so as to increase the endurance capabilities of the primary pronator muscles of the forearm. In doing so, they may be able to limit the effects of fatigue on these muscles during pitching, thus preventing a decrease in the magnitude of vertical ball movement that typically occurs late in a pitching performance.

  13. Deficits in distal radius bone strength, density and microstructure are associated with forearm fractures in girls: an HR-pQCTstudy

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, M.; Macdonald, H. M.; Mulpuri, K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forearm fractures are common during growth. We studied bone strength in youth with a recent forearm fracture. In girls, suboptimal bone strength was associated with fractures. In boys, poor balance and physical inactivity may lead to fractures. Prospective studies will confirm these relationships and identify targets for prevention strategies. Introduction The etiology of pediatric forearm fractures is unclear. Thus, we examined distal radius bone strength, microstructure, and density in children and adolescents with a recent low- or moderate-energy forearm fracture and those without forearm fractures. Methods We assessed the non-dominant (controls) and non-fractured (cases) distal radius (7 % site) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (Scanco Medical AG) in 270 participants (girls: cases n=47, controls n=61 and boys: cases n=88, controls n=74) aged 8–16 years. We assessed standard anthropometry, maturity, body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), Hologic QDR 4500 W) physical activity, and balance. We fit sex-specific logistic regression models for each bone outcome adjusting for maturity, ethnicity, height, and percent body fat. Results In girls, impaired bone strength (failure load, ultimate stress) and a high load-to-strength ratio were associated with low-energy fractures (odds ratios (OR) 2.8–4.3). Low total bone mineral density (Tt.BMD), bone volume ratio, trabecular thickness, and cortical BMD and thickness were also associated with low-energy fractures (ORs 2.0–7.0). In boys, low Tt.BMD, but not bone strength, was associated with low-energy fractures (OR=1.8). Boys with low-energy fractures had poor balance and higher percent body fat compared with controls (p<0.05). Boys with fractures (both types) were less active than controls (p<0.05). Conclusions Forearm fracture etiology appears to be sex-specific. In girls, deficits in bone strength are associated with fractures. In boys, a

  14. Maintained hand function and forearm bone health 14 months after an in-home virtual-reality videogame hand telerehabilitation intervention in an adolescent with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Meredith R; Warden, Stuart J; Fess, Elaine; Rabin, Bryan; Yonkman, Janell; Shirley, Bridget; Burdea, Grigore C

    2011-03-01

    Virtual reality videogames can be used to motivate rehabilitation, and telerehabilitation can be used to improve access to rehabilitation. These uses of technology to improve health outcomes are a burgeoning area of rehabilitation research. So far, there is a lack of reports of long-term outcomes of these types of interventions. The authors report a 15-year-old boy with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and epilepsy because of presumed perinatal stroke who improved his plegic hand function and increased his plegic forearm bone health during a 14-month virtual reality videogame hand telerehabilitation intervention. A total of 14 months after the intervention ended, repeat evaluation demonstrated maintenance of both increased hand function and forearm bone health. The implications of this work for the future of rehabilitation in children with neurological disabilities are discussed in this article.

  15. Maintained Hand Function and Forearm Bone Health 14 Months After an In-Home Virtual-Reality Videogame Hand Telerehabilitation Intervention in an Adolescent With Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Meredith R.; Warden, Stuart J.; Fess, Elaine; Rabin, Bryan; Yonkman, Janell; Shirley, Bridget; Burdea, Grigore C.

    2015-01-01

    Virtual reality videogames can be used to motivate rehabilitation, and telerehabilitation can be used to improve access to rehabilitation. These uses of technology to improve health outcomes are a burgeoning area of rehabilitation research. So far, there is a lack of reports of long-term outcomes of these types of interventions. The authors report a 15-year-old boy with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and epilepsy because of presumed perinatal stroke who improved his plegic hand function and increased his plegic forearm bone health during a 14-month virtual reality videogame hand telerehabilitation intervention. A total of 14 months after the intervention ended, repeat evaluation demonstrated maintenance of both increased hand function and forearm bone health. The implications of this work for the future of rehabilitation in children with neurological disabilities are discussed in this article. PMID:21383228

  16. Bats: Body mass index, forearm mass index, blood glucose levels and SLC2A2 genes for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanxing; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Wenjie; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Bats have an unusually large volume of endocrine tissue, with a large population of beta cells, and an elevated sensitivity to glucose and insulin. This makes them excellent animal models for studying diabetes mellitus. We evaluated bats as models for diabetes in terms of lifestyle and genetic factors. For lifestyle factors, we generated data sets of 149 body mass index (BMI) and 860 forearm mass index (FMI) measurements for different species of bats. Both showed negative inter-species correlations with blood glucose levels in sixteen bats examined. The negative inter-species correlations may reflect adaptation of a small insectivorous ancestor to a larger frugivore. We identified an 11 bp deletion in the proximal promoter of SLC2A2 that we predicted would disrupt binding sites for the transcription repressor ZNF354C. In frugivorous bats this could explain the relatively high expression of this gene, resulting in a better capacity to absorb glucose and decrease blood glucose levels. PMID:27439361

  17. Economic consequences of accidents to hands and forearms by log splitters and circular saws: cost of illness study.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Martin; Karlsson, Johan; Carlsson, Katarina Steen; Dahlin, Lars B; Rosberg, Hans-Eric

    2011-02-01

    We estimated costs associated with injuries to hands from log splitters and circular saws used to cut up firewood and assessed the value of prevention. The study was carried out as a cost of illness study with an incidence approach based on 57 consecutive patients (median age 51; range 8-81) with injuries to the hand or forearm. Twenty-six of the 57 had an amputation which required microsurgery and 31/57 had various injuries. Median Hand Injury Severity Score (HISS) reflecting the severity of all injuries was 67 (range 6-332). Median DASH score after 2-7 years was 12.5 (0-73.3). Total cost (direct costs, costs of lost productivity, and lost quality of life) was estimated to roughly EUR 14 million (EUR 2.8 million/year), where the cost of lost quality of life is 82% of the total cost and loss of productivity and direct costs are 9% each. Injuries sustained from log splitters and circular saws account for considerable costs, but first and foremost human suffering.

  18. Bats: Body mass index, forearm mass index, blood glucose levels and SLC2A2 genes for diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanxing; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Wenjie; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Shuyi

    2016-01-01

    Bats have an unusually large volume of endocrine tissue, with a large population of beta cells, and an elevated sensitivity to glucose and insulin. This makes them excellent animal models for studying diabetes mellitus. We evaluated bats as models for diabetes in terms of lifestyle and genetic factors. For lifestyle factors, we generated data sets of 149 body mass index (BMI) and 860 forearm mass index (FMI) measurements for different species of bats. Both showed negative inter-species correlations with blood glucose levels in sixteen bats examined. The negative inter-species correlations may reflect adaptation of a small insectivorous ancestor to a larger frugivore. We identified an 11 bp deletion in the proximal promoter of SLC2A2 that we predicted would disrupt binding sites for the transcription repressor ZNF354C. In frugivorous bats this could explain the relatively high expression of this gene, resulting in a better capacity to absorb glucose and decrease blood glucose levels. PMID:27439361

  19. A New Approach for Human Forearm Motion Assist by Actuated Artificial Joint-An Inner Skeleton Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Subrata Kumar; Kiguchi, Kazuo; Teramoto, Kenbu

    In order to help the physical activities of the elderly or physically disabled persons, we propose a new concept of a power-assist inner skeleton robot (i.e., actuated artificial joint) that is supposed to assist the human daily life motion from inside of the human body. This paper presents an implantable 2 degree of freedom (DOF) inner skeleton robot that is designed to assist human elbow flexion-extension motion and forearm supination-pronation motion for daily life activities. We have developed a prototype of the inner skeleton robot that is supposed to assist the motion from inside of the body and act as an actuated artificial joint. The proposed system is controlled based on the activation patterns of the electromyogram (EMG) signals of the user's muscles by applying fuzzy-neuro control method. A joint actuator with angular position sensor is designed for the inner skeleton robot and a T-Mechanism is proposed to keep the bone arrangement similar to the normal human articulation after the elbow arthroplasty. The effectiveness of the proposed system has been evaluated by experiment.

  20. Representation of Afferent Signals from Forearm Muscle and Cutaneous Nerves in the Primary Somatosensory Cortex of the Macaque Monkey

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Yaguchi, Hiroaki; Tomatsu, Saeka; Takei, Tomohiko; Oya, Tomomichi

    2016-01-01

    Proprioception is one’s overall sense of the relative positions and movements of the various parts of one’s body. The primary somatosensory cortex (SI) is involved in generating the proprioception by receiving peripheral sensory inputs from both cutaneous and muscle afferents. In particular, area 3a receives input from muscle afferents and areas 3b and 1 from cutaneous afferents. However, segregation of two sensory inputs to these cortical areas has not been evaluated quantitatively because of methodological difficulties in distinguishing the incoming signals. To overcome this, we applied electrical stimulation separately to two forearm nerves innervating muscle (deep radial nerve) and skin (superficial radial nerve), and examined the spatiotemporal distribution of sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in SI of anaesthetized macaques. The SEPs arising from the deep radial nerve were observed exclusively at the bottom of central sulcus (CS), which was identified as area 3a using histological reconstruction. In contrast, SEPs evoked by stimulation of the superficial radial nerve were observed in the superficial part of SI, identified as areas 3b and 1. In addition to these earlier, larger potentials, we also found small and slightly delayed SEPs evoked by cutaneous nerve stimulation in area 3a. Coexistence of the SEPs from both deep and superficial radial nerves suggests that area 3a could integrate muscle and cutaneous signals to shape proprioception. PMID:27701434

  1. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beekvelt, Mireille C.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G.; Hopman, Maria T.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1997-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  2. Validation of measurement protocols to assess oxygen consumption and blood flow in the human forearm by near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Beekvelt, Mireille C. P.; Colier, Willy N.; van Engelen, Baziel G. M.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Wevers, Ron A.; Oeseburg, Berend

    1998-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to monitor oxygenation changes in muscle. Quantitative values for O2 consumption, blood flow and venous saturation have been reported by several investigators. The amount of these measurements is, however, still limited and complete validation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the different NIRS methods to calculate O2 consumption (VO2) and forearm blood flow (FBF) and to validate the data with the accepted method of strain-gauge plethysmography and blood sampling. Thirteen subjects were tested in rest and during static isometric handgrip exercise at 10% MVC. The NIRS optodes were positioned on the flexor region of the arm. A significant correlation was found between plethysmograph data and NIRS [tHb] during venous occlusion in rest (r EQ 0.925 - 0.994, P < 0.05) as well as during exercise (r equals 0.895 - 0.990, P < 0.05). No correlation was found, however, for the calculated FBF and VO2 values between NIRS and the combination of plethysmography and blood sampling. In rest nor during exercise. It seems that although NIRS is a good qualitative monitoring technique, quantification is difficult due to the great variability that is found between the subjects.

  3. False aneurysm of the interosseous artery and anterior interosseous syndrome - an unusual complication of penetrating injury of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Palsies involving the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) comprise less than 1% of all upper extremity nerve palsies. Objectives This case highlights the potential vascular and neurological hazards of minimal penetrating injury of the proximal forearm and emphasizes the phenomenon of delayed presentation of vascular injuries following seemingly obscure penetrating wounds. Case Report We report a case of a 22-year-old male admitted for a minimal penetrating trauma of the proximal forearm that, some days later, developed an anterior interosseous syndrome. A Duplex study performed immediately after the trauma was normal. Further radiologic investigations i.e. a computer-tomographic-angiography (CTA) revealed a false aneurysm of the proximal portion of the interosseous artery (IA). Endovascular management was proposed but a spontaneous rupture dictated surgical revision with simple excision. Complete neurological recovery was documented at 4 months postoperatively. Conclusions/Summary After every penetrating injury of the proximal forearm we propose routinely a detailed neurological and vascular status and a CTA if Duplex evaluation is negative. PMID:20034382

  4. Forearm bone mineral density by age in 7,620 men and women: the Tromsø study, a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, G K; Fønnebø, V; Tollan, A; Søgaard, A J; Magnus, J H

    2001-03-01

    Population-based studies of adult forearm bone mineral density (BMD) by age are scarce, and standardized reference values are lacking. In this cross-sectional study, men aged 55-74 years, women aged 50-74 years, and representative 5-10% samples of remaining age groups between 25 and 84 years living in Tromsø, Norway, were invited for forearm BMD measurement in 1994-1995. The authors measured 3,062 men and 4,558 women (response rate, 78%) by single x-ray absoptiometry at distal and ultradistal forearm sites. Up to age 50, the mean BMD difference was -0.1% per 1-year age group in both sexes. After age 50, the mean BMD difference per 1-year age group was -0.6% in men and -1.3% (distal) and -1.5% (ultradistal) in women. The BMD by age curve was linear for men throughout senescence, but women had a slope change to -0.7% (distal) and -0.8% (ultradistal) per 1-year age group from the 65- to 69-year age group. BMD levels and BMD by age association in the general population (n = 7,620) and in the population without bone-threatening diseases or medication (n = 5,179) were similar. Only longitudinal studies can clarify whether cohort effects or longitudinal BMD development patterns explain these cross-sectional results.

  5. Low Osteoporosis Treatment Initiation Rate in Women after Distal Forearm or Proximal Humerus Fracture: A Healthcare Database Nested Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Viprey, Marie; Caillet, Pascal; Canat, Guillaume; Jaglal, Susan; Haesebaert, Julie; Chapurlat, Roland; Schott, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Treatment initiation rates following fragility fractures have often been reported to be low and in recent years numerous programs have been implemented worldwide to increase them. This study aimed at describing osteoporosis (OP) treatment initiation in a representative sample of women who were hospitalized for a distal forearm fracture (DFF) or proximal humerus fracture (PHF) in 2009-2011 in France. The data source was a nationwide sample of 600,000 individuals, extracted from the French National Insurance Healthcare System database. All women aged 50 years and older who were hospitalized for a DFF or PHF between 2009 and 2011 and who had not received any OP treatment in the preceding 12 months were included in a retrospective cohort study. OP treatments initiated during the year following the fracture were analyzed. From 2009 to 2011, 729 women were hospitalized for a DFF or a PHF and 284 were on OP treatment at the time of the fracture occurrence. Among the 445 women who had no prevalent OP treatment, 131 (29.4%) received supplementation treatment only (vitamin D and/or calcium) and 42 (9.4%) received a pharmacologic OP treatment in the year following their fracture. Pharmacological OP treatments included bisphosphonates (n = 21), strontium ranelate (n = 14), hormone replacement therapy (n = 4), or raloxifene (n = 3). General practitioners prescribed 75% of initial OP treatments. Despite the guidelines published in 2006 and the numerous initiatives to promote post-fracture OP treatment, OP treatment initiation rate in women who were hospitalized for a fragility fracture remained low in 2009-2011 in France. PMID:26630534

  6. Low Osteoporosis Treatment Initiation Rate in Women after Distal Forearm or Proximal Humerus Fracture: A Healthcare Database Nested Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Viprey, Marie; Caillet, Pascal; Canat, Guillaume; Jaglal, Susan; Haesebaert, Julie; Chapurlat, Roland; Schott, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Treatment initiation rates following fragility fractures have often been reported to be low and in recent years numerous programs have been implemented worldwide to increase them. This study aimed at describing osteoporosis (OP) treatment initiation in a representative sample of women who were hospitalized for a distal forearm fracture (DFF) or proximal humerus fracture (PHF) in 2009–2011 in France. The data source was a nationwide sample of 600,000 individuals, extracted from the French National Insurance Healthcare System database. All women aged 50 years and older who were hospitalized for a DFF or PHF between 2009 and 2011 and who had not received any OP treatment in the preceding 12 months were included in a retrospective cohort study. OP treatments initiated during the year following the fracture were analyzed. From 2009 to 2011, 729 women were hospitalized for a DFF or a PHF and 284 were on OP treatment at the time of the fracture occurrence. Among the 445 women who had no prevalent OP treatment, 131 (29.4%) received supplementation treatment only (vitamin D and/or calcium) and 42 (9.4%) received a pharmacologic OP treatment in the year following their fracture. Pharmacological OP treatments included bisphosphonates (n = 21), strontium ranelate (n = 14), hormone replacement therapy (n = 4), or raloxifene (n = 3). General practitioners prescribed 75% of initial OP treatments. Despite the guidelines published in 2006 and the numerous initiatives to promote post-fracture OP treatment, OP treatment initiation rate in women who were hospitalized for a fragility fracture remained low in 2009–2011 in France. PMID:26630534

  7. Living related hemi-face skin transplant using radial forearm free flap for a xeroderma pigmentosa patient: early outcome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Xeroderma pigmentosa (XP) is a hereditary disease characterized by deficient repair of DNA damage that occurred on exposure of the skin to ultraviolet irradiation. The affected children have a propensity to develop multiple skin cancers mainly in the face and eventually die before the age of 20. Hypothesis Allograft replacement of facial skin by a healthy skin from normal person might decrease the incidence of skin cancer development, the number of surgical procedures, and eventually might improve the survival of these miserable patients. Methods As Cadaveric organs are unavailable in our country. After approval from the ethical committee, confirmed agreement of the donor and the patient's guardian, a radial forearm free flap was transplanted from an ABO compatible mother to her 5 year old daughter with XP. The mother had an older daughter died from the same disease at the age of 14. The flap replaced skin of the hemi face that developed precancerous lesions. The girl was kept on adjusted doses of immunosuppressive drugs. Results The flap survived, wounds healed uneventfully. The flap developed a reddish spot one and half month following transplant where baseline skin biopsy was taken. In the fifth months the girl presented with bad non salvageable rejection that ended up loosing the flap. On long term follow up, the girl started to develop skin lesion on the virgin half of the face. Our early cosmetic result replacing half of the facial skin was very promising. In addition the girl did not develop skin lesions in the operated site. Conclusion Our early cosmetic result was very promising. In addition to this, the girl did not develop skin lesions in the operated side of the face PMID:20626898

  8. Design and Kinematic Evaluation of a Novel Joint-Specific Play Controller: Application for Wrist and Forearm Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel B.; Wilcox, Bethany; Costa, Laura; Kerman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background The wrist extensors and flexors are profoundly affected in most children with hemiparetic cerebral palsy (CP) and are the major target of physical therapists' and occupational therapists' efforts to restore useful hand functions. A limitation of any therapeutic or exercise program can be the level of the child's engagement or adherence. The proposed approach capitalizes on the primary learning avenue for children: toy play. Objective This study aimed to develop and evaluate the measurement accuracy of innovative, motion-specific play controllers that are engaging rehabilitative devices for enhancing therapy and promoting neural plasticity and functional recovery in children with CP. Design Design objectives of the play controller included a cost-effective, home-based supplement to physical therapy, the ability to calibrate the controller so that play can be accomplished with any active range of motion, and the capability of logging play activity and wrist motion over week-long periods. Methods Accuracy of the play controller in measuring wrist flexion-extension was evaluated in 6 children who were developing in a typical manner, using optical motion capture of the wrist and forearm as the gold standard. Results The error of the play controller was estimated at approximately 5 degrees in both maximum wrist flexion and extension. Limitations Measurements were taken during a laboratory session, with children without CP, and no toy or computer game was interfaced with the play controller. Therefore, the potential engagement of the proposed approach for therapy remains to be evaluated. Conclusions This study presented the concept, development, and wrist tracking accuracy of an inexpensive approach to extremity therapy that may have a health benefit for children with hemiparesis, and potentially for patients of any age with a wide range of extremity neuromotor impairments. PMID:25573759

  9. Shoulder and forearm oxygenation and myoelectric activity in patients with work-related muscle pain and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Elcadi, Guilherme H; Forsman, Mikael; Aasa, Ulrika; Fahlstrom, Martin; Crenshaw, Albert G

    2013-05-01

    We tested hypotheses of (a) reduced oxygen usage, oxygen recovery, blood flow and oxygen consumption; and (b) increased muscle activity for patients diagnosed with work-related muscle pain (WRMP) in comparison to healthy controls. Oxygenation was measured with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and muscle activity with EMG for the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and trapezius descendens (TD) muscles. Eighteen patients with diffuse neck-shoulder-arm pain and 17 controls (matched in age and sex) were equipped with NIRS and EMG probes. After determining an individual's maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force, short-term (20 s) isometric contractions for the ECR and TD of 10, 30, 50 and 70 % MVC generated ∆StO₂ and StO₂% recovery (Rslope) from NIRS, and RMS%max from EMG signals. In addition, upper arm venous (VO) and arterial (AO) occlusions generated slopes of total hemoglobin (HbTslope) and deoxyhemoglobin (HHbslope) for the resting ECR as surrogates of blood flow and oxygen consumption, respectively. Mixed model analyses, t tests, and Mann-Whitney test were used to assess differences between groups. There was no significant difference in MVC between groups for either muscle. Also, ∆StO₂%, Rslope for either muscle, and ECR-HbTslope were not different between groups, thus our hypotheses of reduced oxygen use, recovery, and blood flow for patients were not confirmed. However, patients had a significantly lower ECR-HHbslope confirming our hypothesis of reduced consumption. Further, there was no difference in RMS%max during contractions meaning that the hypothesis of increased activity for patients was not confirmed. When taking into account the number of NIRS variables studied, differences we found between our patient group and healthy controls (i.e., in forearm oxygen consumption and shoulder oxygen saturation level) may be considered modest. Overall our findings may have been impacted by the fact that our patients and controls were similar in muscle strength

  10. Peripherally Placed Totally Implantable Venous-access Port Systems of the Forearm: Clinical Experience in 763 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goltz, Jan P. Scholl, Anne; Ritter, Christian O.; Wittenberg, Guenther; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2010-12-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of percutaneously placed totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) of the forearm. Between January 2006 and October 2008, peripheral TIVAPs were implanted in 763 consecutive patients by ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance. All catheters were implanted under local anesthesia and were tunneled subcutaneously. Indication, technical success, and complications were retrospectively analyzed according to Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) criteria. Presence of antibiotic prophylaxis, periprocedurally administered drugs (e.g., sedation), and laboratory results at the time of implantation were analyzed. Maintenance during the service interval was evaluated. In total, 327,499 catheter-days were analyzed. Technical success rate was 99.3%. Reasons for initial failure of implantation were either unexpected thrombosis of the subclavian vein, expanding tumor mass of the mediastinum, or failure of peripheral venous access due to fragile vessels. Mean follow-up was 430 days. There were 115 complications observed (15.1%, 0.03 per 100 catheter-days), of which 33 (4.3%) were classified as early (within 30 days from implantation) and 82 (10.7%) as late. Catheter-related venous thrombosis was found in 65 (8.5%) of 763 (0.02 per 100 catheter-days) TIVAPs. Infections were observed in 41 (5.4%) of 763 (0.01 per 100 catheter-days) devices. Other complications observed included dislocation of the catheter tip (0.8%), occlusion (0.1%), or rupture (0.1%) of the port catheter. Dislocated catheters were corrected during a second interventional procedure. In conclusion, implantation of percutaneously placed peripheral TIVAPs shows a high technical success rate and low risk of early complications when ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance are used. Late complications are observed three times as often as early complications.

  11. Relationship between changes in total-body water and fluid distribution with maximal forearm strength in elite judo athletes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Analiza M; Fields, David A; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, Luís B

    2011-09-01

    Among judo athletes, strong grip strength is crucial for performing offensive and defensive maneuvers that rely predominantly on forearm maximal strength (FMS). The study aims were to evaluate changes in total-body water (TBW) and its compartments (extracellular water [ECW] and intracellular water [ICW]) and their relationship with loss of FMS in elite judo athletes. At baseline (weight stability), 27 male elite athletes were evaluated (age: 23.2 ± 2.8 years) and again evaluated 1-3 days before competition. Athletes were free to gain or lose weight based upon their specific competition needs. Using dilution techniques (deuterium and bromide), TBW and ECW were estimated, and ICW was calculated (ICW = TBW - ECW). Fat, fat-free mass, and appendicular lean soft tissue (LST) were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Handgrip was used to assess FMS. Using a reduction of 2% as a representative outcome for decreased FMS, 10 athletes were identified as having lost FMS, whereas 17 changed <2% or gained. Comparison of means and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results from baseline to before competition indicated that those who lost ≥2% of FMS significantly decreased TBW and ICW by -2.7 ± 3.0 and -4.4 ± 4.2%, respectively. The groups differed in ICW changes (-4.4 ± 4.2 vs. 1.9 ± 6.1%), respectively, for those who lost FMS by ≥2%. The ICW changes, but not in TBW or ECW, significantly predicted the risk of losing FMS (β = 0.206; p = 0.027), even adjusting for weight and arm LST changes. These findings indicated that reductions in ICW increased the risk of losing grip strength in elite judo athletes. PMID:21869630

  12. Phase IIB Randomized Study of Topical Difluoromethylornithine and Topical Diclofenac on Sun-Damaged Skin of the Forearm.

    PubMed

    Jeter, Joanne M; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Stratton, Steven P; Myrdal, Paul B; Warneke, James A; Einspahr, Janine G; Bartels, Hubert G; Yozwiak, Michael; Bermudez, Yira; Hu, Chengcheng; Bartels, Peter; Alberts, David S

    2016-02-01

    Prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers remains a health priority due to high costs associated with this disease. Diclofenac and difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) have demonstrated chemopreventive efficacy for cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. We designed a randomized study of the combination of DFMO and diclofenac in the treatment of sun-damaged skin. Individuals with visible cutaneous sun damage were eligible. Subjects were randomized to one of the three groups: topical DFMO applied twice daily, topical diclofenac applied daily, or DFMO plus diclofenac. The treatment was limited to an area on the left forearm, and the duration of use was 90 days. We hypothesized that combination therapy would have increased efficacy compared with single-agent therapy. The primary outcome was change in karyometric average nuclear abnormality (ANA) in the treated skin. Individuals assessing the biomarkers were blinded regarding the treatment for each subject. A total of 156 subjects were randomized; 144 had baseline and end-of-study biopsies, and 136 subjects completed the study. The ANA unexpectedly increased for all groups, with higher values correlating with clinical cutaneous inflammation. Nearly all of the adverse events were local cutaneous effects. One subject had cutaneous toxicity that required treatment discontinuation. Significantly more adverse events were seen in the groups taking diclofenac. Overall, the study indicated that the addition of topical DFMO to topical diclofenac did not enhance its activity. Both agents caused inflammation on a cellular and clinical level, which may have confounded the measurement of chemopreventive effects. More significant effects may be observed in subjects with greater baseline cutaneous damage.

  13. Diminished Bone Strength Is Observed in Adult Women and Men Who Sustained a Mild Trauma Distal Forearm Fracture During Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Achenbach, Sara J; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Kirmani, Salman; McCready, Louise K; Melton, L Joseph; Amin, Shreyasee

    2015-01-01

    Children and adolescents who sustain a distal forearm fracture (DFF) owing to mild, but not moderate, trauma have reduced bone strength and cortical thinning at the distal radius and tibia. Whether these skeletal deficits track into adulthood is unknown. Therefore, we studied 75 women and 75 men (age range, 20 to 40 years) with a childhood (age <18 years) DFF and 150 sex-matched controls with no history of fracture using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HRpQCT) to examine bone strength (ie, failure load) by micro–finite element (µFE) analysis, as well as cortical and trabecular bone parameters at the distal radius and tibia. Level of trauma (mild versus moderate) was assigned using a validated classification scheme, blind to imaging results. When compared to sex-matched, nonfracture controls, women and men with a mild trauma childhood DFF (eg, fall from standing height) had significant reductions in failure load (p < 0.05) of the distal radius, whereas women and men with a moderate trauma childhood DFF (eg, fall while riding a bicycle) had values similar to controls. Consistent findings were observed at the distal tibia. Furthermore, women and men with a mild trauma childhood DFF had significant deficits in distal radius cortical area (p < 0.05), and significantly lower dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived bone density at the radius, hip, and total body regions compared to controls (all p < 0.05). By contrast, women and men with a moderate trauma childhood DFF had bone density, structure, and strength that did not differ significantly from controls. These findings in young adults are consistent with our observations in children/adolescents with DFF, and they suggest that a mild trauma childhood DFF may presage suboptimal peak bone density, structure, and strength in young adulthood. Children and adolescents who suffer mild trauma DFFs may need to be targeted for lifestyle interventions to help achieve improved skeletal

  14. [Stab wounds of the hand and forearm due to Kuluna in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo): types of injuries and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kibadi, K; Portaels, F; Pichot, Y; Kapinga, M; Moutet, F

    2015-01-01

    Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a particular form of juvenile delinquency and insecurity intensifies in the city of Kinshasa. This is the phenomenon Kuluna. It is organized gangs equipped with machetes and other weapons. The main objective of this study is to know the phenomenon Kuluna and describe the upper limb injuries caused by machetes, while insisting on the specifics of the management of these lesions in our communities. This retrospective descriptive study examines 14 cases of wounds of the hand and forearm due to stab phenomenon Kuluna, in Kinshasa. It covers the period from 1 November 2010 to 1 November 2013. Among the 14 patients with lesions in the hand and forearm admitted and treated at the Unit of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns, University Clinics of Kinshasa to attacks due to the phenomenon Kuluna. We have 11 men and 3 women. The average age was 33, 5 years (extremes of 21 and 56 years). The right upper limb is reached that the left upper limb, respectively 12 patients and 2 patients. The lesions are localized to the wrist in the majority of cases (10 patients) in the palm of hand and in 3 patients in the fingers in 1 patient. The palmar surface is reached (10 cases) and the dorsal (4 cases). Zone 5 of the International Classification of flexor and Zone 8 topographic classification extensors at hand are the predilection sites of lesions respectively the palmar surface (6 out of 10) and the dorsal (2 case 4). The median nerve at the wrist is cut in half the cases. On bone lesions localized to the forearm, we observed a high incidence of fracture of the ulna (62.5%). The treatment begins with the stabilization of bone pieces, gestures revascularization and nerve sutures and suture tendon and finally skin coverage. Rehabilitation was mandatory, she supervises the actions of repair and it continues until the recovery of function. PMID:26837110

  15. Specific endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonism does not modulate insulin-induced hemodynamic effects in the human kidney, eye, or forearm.

    PubMed

    Rab, Anna; Dallinger, Susanne; Polak, Kaija; Pleiner, Johannes; Polska, Elzbieta; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2004-05-01

    There is evidence that hyperinsulinemia may stimulate endothelin-1 (ET-1) generation or release, which may affect diabetic vascular complications. BQ-123, a specific ET(A) receptor antagonist, was used to investigate if insulin-induced vascular effects are influenced by an acute ET-1 release. Two randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over studies were performed. In protocol 1, 12 healthy subjects received, on separate study days, infusions of BQ-123 (60 microg/min for 30 min) during placebo clamp conditions, BQ-123 during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia (3 mU/kg/min for 390 min), or placebo during euglycemic hyperinsulinemia. Fundus pulsation amplitude (FPA) was measured to assess pulsatile choroidal blood flow, and mean flow velocity (MFV) of the ophtalmic artery was measured by color Doppler imaging. In protocol 2, eight healthy subjects received, on separate study days, intra-arterial infusions of BQ-123 (32 microg/min for 120 min) during placebo or insulin clamp. Forearm blood flow was measured with bilateral plethysmography, expressing the ratio of responses in the intervention arm and in the control arm. Insulin alone increased FPA (+10%, p < 0.001) and forearm blood flow (+19%). BQ-123 increased FPA, MFV, and forearm blood flow ratio in the absence and presence of exogenous insulin, but this effect was not different between normo- and hyperinsulinemic conditions. ET-1 plasma concentrations were not affected by insulin. In conclusion, these data do not support the concept that hyperinsulinemia increases ET-1 generation in healthy subjects. Our results, however, cannot necessarily be extrapolated to diabetic and obese subjects.

  16. [Stab wounds of the hand and forearm due to Kuluna in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo): types of injuries and treatment].

    PubMed

    Kibadi, K; Portaels, F; Pichot, Y; Kapinga, M; Moutet, F

    2015-01-01

    Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), a particular form of juvenile delinquency and insecurity intensifies in the city of Kinshasa. This is the phenomenon Kuluna. It is organized gangs equipped with machetes and other weapons. The main objective of this study is to know the phenomenon Kuluna and describe the upper limb injuries caused by machetes, while insisting on the specifics of the management of these lesions in our communities. This retrospective descriptive study examines 14 cases of wounds of the hand and forearm due to stab phenomenon Kuluna, in Kinshasa. It covers the period from 1 November 2010 to 1 November 2013. Among the 14 patients with lesions in the hand and forearm admitted and treated at the Unit of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns, University Clinics of Kinshasa to attacks due to the phenomenon Kuluna. We have 11 men and 3 women. The average age was 33, 5 years (extremes of 21 and 56 years). The right upper limb is reached that the left upper limb, respectively 12 patients and 2 patients. The lesions are localized to the wrist in the majority of cases (10 patients) in the palm of hand and in 3 patients in the fingers in 1 patient. The palmar surface is reached (10 cases) and the dorsal (4 cases). Zone 5 of the International Classification of flexor and Zone 8 topographic classification extensors at hand are the predilection sites of lesions respectively the palmar surface (6 out of 10) and the dorsal (2 case 4). The median nerve at the wrist is cut in half the cases. On bone lesions localized to the forearm, we observed a high incidence of fracture of the ulna (62.5%). The treatment begins with the stabilization of bone pieces, gestures revascularization and nerve sutures and suture tendon and finally skin coverage. Rehabilitation was mandatory, she supervises the actions of repair and it continues until the recovery of function.

  17. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional alpha-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for alpha(1)- or alpha(2)-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (alpha(2)-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct alpha(1)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (DeltaFVC = -11 +/- 3% versus -39 +/- 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-3 +/- 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to alpha(2)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (-13 +/- 4% versus -40 +/- 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-4 +/- 4%). In Prototol 2 (n = 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce alpha(1)-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (-38 +/- 3%) and ATP (-33 +/- 2%) were not significantly different from rest (-40 +/- 3%; P> 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (-22 +/- 6%) and high dose ATP (-8 +/- 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became

  18. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional α-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for α1- or α2-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (α1-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (α2-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct α1-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (ΔFVC =−11 ± 3%versus−39 ± 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−3 ± 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to α2-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (−13 ± 4%versus−40 ± 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−4 ± 4%). In Prototol 2 (n= 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce α1-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (−38 ± 3%) and ATP (−33 ± 2%) were not significantly different from rest (−40 ± 3%; P < 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (−22 ± 6%) and high dose ATP (−8 ± 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became progressively greater (moderate =−48

  19. The suitability of an uncemented hydroxyapatite coated (HAC) hip hemiarthroplasty stem for intra-capsular femoral neck fractures in osteoporotic elderly patients: the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Index, a solution to preventing intra-operative periprosthetic fracture.

    PubMed

    Chana, Rishi; Mansouri, Reza; Jack, Chris; Edwards, Max R; Singh, Ravi; Keller, Carmel; Khan, Farid

    2011-11-18

    This study will seek to identify a measurable radiographic index, the Metaphyseal-Diaphyseal Index (MDI) score to determine whether intra-operative fracture in osteoporotic bone can be predicted.A 5 year prospective cohort of 560 consecutive patients, undergoing hemiarthroplasty (cemented or uncemented), was evaluated. A nested case-control study to determine risk factors affecting intra-operative fracture was carried out. The Vancouver Classification was used to classify periprosthetic fracture. The MDI score was calculated using radiographs from the uncemented group. As a control (gold standard), Yeung et al's Canal Bone Ratio (CBR) score was also calculated. From this, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was formulated for both scores and area under the curve (AUC) compared. Intra and inter-observer correlations were determined. Cost analysis was also worked out for adverse outcomes. Four hundred and seven uncemented and one hundred and fifty-three cemented stems were implanted. The use of uncemented implants was the main risk factor for intra-operative periprosthetic fracture. Sixty-two periprosthetic fractures occurred in the uncemented group (15.2%), nine occurred in the cemented group (5.9%), P < 0.001. The revision rate for sustaining a periprosthetic fracture (uncemented group) was 17.7%, P < 0.001 and 90 day mortality 19.7%, P < 0.03. MDI's AUC was 0.985 compared to CBR's 0.948, P < 0.001. The MDI score cut-off to predict fracture was 21, sensitivity 98.3%, specificity 99.8%, positive predictive value 90.5% and negative predictive value 98%. Multivariate regression analysis ruled out any other confounding factors as being significant. The intra and inter-observer Pearson correlation scores were r = 0.99, P < 0.001. JRI uncemented hemiarthroplasty has a significantly higher intra-operative fracture rate. We recommend cemented arthroplasty for hip fractures. We propose a radiographic system that may allow surgeons to select patients who are good

  20. Site-Specific Advantages in Skeletal Geometry and Strength at the Proximal Femur and Forearm in Young Female Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Dowthwaite, Jodi N.; Rosenbaum, Paula F.; Scerpella, Tamara A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated site-specific skeletal adaptation to loading during growth,comparing radius (RAD) and femoral neck (FN) DXA scans in young female gymnasts (GYM) and non-gymnasts (NON). Methods Subjects from an ongoing longitudinal study (8-26 yrs old) underwent annual DXA scans (proximal femur, forearm, total body) and anthropometry, completing maturity and physical activity questionnaires. This cross-sectional analysis used the most recent data meeting the following criteria: gynecological age ≤2.5 yrs post-menarche; GYM annual mean gymnastic exposure ≥5.0 h/wk in the prior year. Bone geometric and strength indices were derived from scans for 173 subjects (8-17 yrs old) via hip structural analysis (femoral narrow neck, NN) and similar radius formulae (1/3 and Ultradistal (UD)). Maturity was coded as M1 (Tanner I breast), M2 (pre-menarche, ≥Tanner II breast) or M3 (post-menarche). ANOVA and chi square compared descriptive data. Two factor ANCOVA adjusted for age, height, total body non-bone lean mass and percent body fat; significance was tested for main effects and interactions between gymnastic exposure and maturity. Results At the distal radius, GYM means were significantly greater than NON means for all variables (p<0.05). At the proximal femur, GYM exhibited narrower periosteal and endosteal dimensions, but greater indices of cortical thickness, BMC, aBMD and section modulus, with lower buckling ratio (p <0.05). However, significant interactions between maturity and loading were detected for the following: 1) FN bone mineral content (BMC), NN buckling ratio (GYM BMC advantages only in M1 and M3; for BMC and buckling ratio, M1 advantages were greatest; 2) 1/3 radius BMC, width, endosteal diameter, cortical cross-sectional area, section modulus (GYM advantages primarily post-menarche); 3) UD radius BMC and axial compressive strength (GYM advantages were larger with greater maturity, greatest post-menarche). Conclusions Maturity-specific comparisons

  1. Shaft Fractures of Both Forearm Bones: The Outcomes of Surgical Treatment with Plating Only and Combined Plating and Intramedullary Nailing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Yi, Jin Woong; Lee, Jung Bum; Lim, Byoung Gu

    2015-01-01

    Background Plate fixation is the most commonly used technique for the treatment of shaft fractures of both forearm bones (SFBFBs). However, all fractures are difficult to treat with plate fixation because of soft tissue injuries, fracture patterns, or the patient's condition. The purpose of this study is to compare the functional results of plate fixation only and combined plate and intramedullary (IM) nail fixation in SFBFBs. Methods Fifty-nine cases of SFBFBs that were surgically treated from June 2007 to July 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. In this study, 47 cases that were followed up for more than 12 months were included. All SFBFBs were divided into two groups according to the methods used for internal fixation: plate fixation only (group A) and combined plate and IM nail fixation (group B). The fixation methods were determined intraoperatively. Plate fixation was considered as the first option in all cases, but combined plate and IM nail fixation was selected as the second option if it was difficult to be fixed with plate only. Groups A and B comprised of 31 and 16 cases, respectively. The functional results were evaluated by the Grace and Eversmann rating system and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire. Results In groups A and B, a radiologic union was achieved in 30/31 and 14/16 cases and average union time was 11.1 and 17.8 weeks, respectively. According to the Grace and Eversmann rating system, group A had excellent results in 15 cases, good in 14, acceptable in one, and unacceptable in one. Group B had excellent results in three cases, good in nine, acceptable in two, and unacceptable in two. The average DASH score was 7.1 points (range, 0 to 19.2 points) in group A and 15.1 points (range, 0 to 29.6 points) in group B. Three cases of nonunion with unacceptable results achieved a bony union by additional procedures and the functional results of these cases improved to good or excellent. Conclusions The functional

  2. Bone Strength and Structural Deficits in Children and Adolescents With a Distal Forearm Fracture Resulting From Mild Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Joshua N; Amin, Shreyasee; Melton, L Joseph; Kirmani, Salman; McCready, Louise K; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Müller, Ralph; Khosla, Sundeep

    2014-01-01

    Although distal forearm fractures (DFFs) are common during childhood and adolescence, it is unclear whether they reflect underlying skeletal deficits or are simply a consequence of the usual physical activities, and associated trauma, during growth. Therefore, we examined whether a recent DFF, resulting from mild or moderate trauma, is related to deficits in bone strength and cortical and trabecular bone macro- and microstructure compared with nonfracture controls. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to assess micro-finite element-derived bone strength (ie, failure load) and to measure cortical and trabecular bone parameters at the distal radius and tibia in 115 boys and girls with a recent (<1 year) DFF and 108 nonfracture controls aged 8 to 15 years. Trauma levels (mild versus moderate) were assigned based on a validated classification scheme. Compared with sex-matched controls, boys and girls with a mild-trauma DFF (eg, fall from standing height) showed significant deficits at the distal radius in failure load (−13% and −11%, respectively; p<0.05) and had higher (“worse”) fall load-to-strength ratios (both þ10%; p<0.05 for boys and p=0.06 for girls). In addition, boys and girls with a mild-trauma DFF had significant reductions in cortical area (−26% and −23%, respectively; p<0.01) and cortical thickness (−14% and −13%, respectively; p<0.01) compared with controls. The skeletal deficits in the mild-trauma DFF patients were generalized, as similar changes were present at the distal tibia. By contrast, both boys and girls with a moderate-trauma DFF (eg, fall from a bicycle) had virtually identical values for all of the measured bone parameters compared with controls. In conclusion, DFFs during growth have two distinct etiologies: those owing to underlying skeletal deficits leading to fractures with mild trauma versus those owing to more significant trauma in the setting of normal bone strength. PMID:23959563

  3. Fenofibrate improves endothelial function in the brachial artery and forearm resistance arterioles of statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sandra J; Chew, Gerard T; Davis, Timothy M E; Watts, Gerald F

    2010-05-01

    Dyslipidaemia contributes to endothelial dysfunction and CVD (cardiovascular disease) in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. While statin therapy reduces CVD in these patients, residual risk remains high. Fenofibrate corrects atherogenic dyslipidaemia, but it is unclear whether adding fenofibrate to statin therapy lowers CVD risk. We investigated whether fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. In a cross-over study, 15 statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients, with LDL (low-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol <2.6 mmol/l and endothelial dysfunction [brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilatation) <6.0%] were randomized, double-blind, to fenofibrate 145 mg/day or matching placebo for 12 weeks, with 4 weeks washout between treatment periods. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium-independent NMD (nitrate-mediated dilatation) were measured by ultrasonography at the start and end of each treatment period. PIFBF (post-ischaemic forearm blood flow), a measure of microcirculatory endothelial function, and serum lipids, lipoproteins and apo (apolipoprotein) concentrations were also measured. Compared with placebo, fenofibrate increased FMD (mean absolute 2.1+/-0.6 compared with -0.3+/-0.6%, P=0.04), but did not alter NMD (P=0.75). Fenofibrate also increased maximal PIFBF {median 3.5 [IQR (interquartile range) 5.8] compared with 0.3 (2.1) ml/100 ml/min, P=0.001} and flow debt repayment [median 1.0 (IQR 3.5) compared with -1.5 (3.0) ml/100 ml, P=0.01]. Fenofibrate lowered serum cholesterol, triacylgycerols (triglycerides), LDL-cholesterol, apoB-100 and apoC-III (P < or = 0.03), but did not alter HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol or apoA-I. Improvement in FMD was inversely associated with on-treatment LDL-cholesterol (r=-0.61, P=0.02) and apoB-100 (r=-0.54, P=0.04) concentrations. Fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. This may relate partly to enhanced reduction in LDL-cholesterol and

  4. Neural control of rhythmic human arm movement: phase dependence and task modulation of hoffmann reflexes in forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul; Collins, David F; Frigon, Alain; Hoogenboom, Nienke

    2003-01-01

    Although we move our arms rhythmically during walking, running, and swimming, we know little about the neural control of such movements. Our working hypothesis is that neural mechanisms controlling rhythmic movements are similar in the human lumbar and cervical spinal cord. Thus reflex modulation during rhythmic arm movement should be similar to that seen during leg movement. Our main experimental hypotheses were that the amplitude of H-reflexes in the forearm muscles would be modulated during arm movement (i.e., phase-dependent) and would be inhibited during cycling compared with static contraction (i.e., task-dependent). Furthermore, to determine the locus of any modulation, we tested the effect that active and passive movement of the ipsilateral (relative to stimulated arm) and contralateral arm had on H-reflex amplitude. Subjects performed rhythmic arm cycling on a custom-made hydraulic ergometer in which the two arms could be constrained to move together (180 degrees out of phase) or could rotate independently. Position of the stimulated limb in the movement cycle is described with respect to the clock face. H-reflexes were evoked at 12, 3, 6, and 9 o'clock positions during static contraction as well as during rhythmic arm movements. Reflex amplitudes were compared between tasks at equal M wave amplitudes and similar levels of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the target muscle. Surface EMG recordings were obtained bilaterally from flexor carpi radialis as well as from other muscles controlling the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Compared with reflexes evoked during static contractions, movement of the stimulated limb attenuated H-reflexes by 50.8% (P < 0.005), 65.3% (P < 0.001), and 52.6% (P < 0.001) for bilateral, active ipsilateral, and passive ipsilateral movements, respectively. In contrast, movement of the contralateral limb did not significantly alter H-reflex amplitude. H-reflexes were also modulated by limb position (P < 0.005). Thus task- and phase

  5. Prelamination of Neourethra with Uterine Mucosa in Radial Forearm Osteocutaneous Free Flap Phalloplasty in the Female-to-Male Transgender Patient

    PubMed Central

    Salgado, Christopher J.; Chim, Jimmy; Medina, Carlos A.; Demaso, Stephanie; Gomez, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Radial forearm free flap phalloplasty is the most commonly performed flap for neophallus construction in the female-to-male (FtM) transgender patient. Urological complications, however, can arise quite frequently and can prevent the patient from urinating in the standing position, an important postsurgical goal for many. Using mucosa to construct the fixed urethra and to prelaminate the penile urethra has been successful in reducing urologic complications, particularly strictures and fistulas. Until now, only buccal, vaginal, colonic, and bladder sites have been described as sources for these mucosal grafts. We present the successful use of uterine mucosa for prelamination of the neourethra in an FtM patient who underwent hysterectomy and vaginectomy at the prelamination stage of a radial forearm phalloplasty. Three months postoperatively, the patient was able to void while standing and showed no evidence of stricture or fistula on retrograde cystogram. These results suggest that uterine mucosa may be used for prelamination of the penile neourethra in patients undergoing phalloplasty. PMID:27069708

  6. Non-invasive Monitoring of Lactate Dynamics in Human Forearm Muscle After Exhaustive Exercise by 1H-MRS at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance in energy metabolism, lactate in human skeletal muscle has been difficult to detect by non-invasive 1H MRS mainly due to interference from large water and lipid signals. Long echo-time (TE) acquisitions at 7 Tesla effectively attenuates the water and lipid signals in forearm muscle allowing direct observation of both lactate resonances, the methine at 4.09 ppm and the methyl at 1.31 ppm. Using this approach, we are able to monitor lactate dynamics at a temporal resolution of 32 sec. While lactate was not detectable at rest, immediately after an acute period of exercise to fatigue the forearm muscle, lactate rose to a level comparable to that of creatine (~30 mmol/kg wet weight). In a typical 1H MR spectrum collected using a TE of 140 ms, the lactate methine and methyl resonances both appear as doublets with an unusually large splitting of ~20 Hz due to residual dipolar coupling. During muscle recovery following exercise, the lactate signals decay rapidly with a time constant of t½ = 2.0 ± 0.6 min (n = 12 subjects). This fast and simple lactate detection method may prove valuable for monitoring lactate metabolism in cancer and in sports medicine applications. PMID:23192863

  7. Local full-thickness skin graft of the donor arm--a novel technique for the reduction of donor site morbidity in radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Riecke, B; Assaf, A T; Heiland, M; Al-Dam, A; Gröbe, A; Blessmann, M; Wikner, J

    2015-08-01

    A novel technique to reduce donor site morbidity after radial forearm free flap (RFFF) harvest, using a local full-thickness skin graft (FTSG), is described. Thirty consecutive patients undergoing RFFF for head and neck reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective study. Donor site defect closure was performed with spindle-shaped FTSGs excised from the wavelike skin incision made for the vascular pedicle. Both the removal site of the FTSG on the volar forearm and the covered RFFF donor site healed uneventfully in 29 cases, with no impairment of function related to the skin graft. No skin graft failure and no exposure, tenting, or adherence of the flexor tendons occurred. All patients expressed satisfaction with postoperative pain, the functional outcome, and cosmetic appearance. Primary donor site defect closure could be achieved in all cases with the use of a local FTSG. This graft can be gained at the access incision for the vascular pedicle, avoids expansion of the incision for a local flap technique, and does not prolong wound healing, and thus reduces both donor site and graft site morbidity of the RFFF. This technique leads to an inconspicuous aesthetic result with no apparent relevant functional deficits and avoids the need for a second donor site.

  8. The forearm positioning changes electromyographic activity of upper limb muscles and handgrip strength in the task of pushing a load cart.

    PubMed

    de Ponte, Áurea Maria; Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira; Pletsch, Ariane Hidalgo Mansano; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Brandino, Hugo Evangelista; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the electromyographic activity of the upper limb muscles as well as the handgrip strength during the activity of pushing a load cart. Eighteen healthy male right-handed volunteers (21.50 ± 2.77 years old) took part in the study. Electrodes were placed on upper trapezius fibres, brachial biceps, brachial triceps, and extensors and flexors of wrist and fingers. The original handle of the load cart was replaced by two handgrip systems mounted on load cells, thus allowing the handgrip strength to be measured according to the wrist position variation, that is, wrists in neutral position with pronated forearm (WN-PF) or in ulnar deviation with forearm in neutral position (WUD-NF). The signals generated by the load cells during manoeuvre of the load cart and the electromyographic signals were simultaneously captured. Signal processing was performed by using a specific routine developed for analysis of root mean square (RMS) and median frequency (MF). Greater handgrip strength occurred in WN-PF position. In maximal isometric contraction, the RMS of the flexors and extensors showed greater electromyographic activity in WN-PF (intra-muscles) and extensors position (inter-muscles). Decreased handgrip strength in the latter stages of the circuit, with variation of the RMS and MF of all muscles tested. One can conclude that electromyographic activity and handgrip strength are both affected during the phases of an elliptical displacement of the load cart.

  9. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHILDREN DIAPHYSEAL FEMORAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Cassiano Ricardo; Traldi, Eduardo Franceschini; Posser, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the personal, fracture, treatment and complication characteristics among patients with pediatric femoral shaft fractures attended at the pediatric orthopedic service of the Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital. Methods: This was a retrospective cross-sectional study on a population consisting of patients with femoral shaft fractures, aged between birth and 14 years and 11 months, who were divided into four age groups. Information was obtained from medical records and was transferred to a survey questionnaire to present personal, fracture, treatment and complication variables. Results: The study population consisted of 96 patients. Their mean age was 6.8 years. The cases were predominantly among males, comprising closed fractures on the right side, in the middle third with a single line. Regarding fracture etiology, traffic accidents predominated overall in the sample. Most of the patients (74 to 77.1%) presented femoral fractures as their only injury. Conservative treatment predominated in the group younger than six years of age, and surgical treatment in the group aged 6 to 14 years and 11 months. The complications observed until bone union were: discrepancy, infection and movement limitation. The mean time taken for consolidation was 9.6 ± 2.4 weeks, varying with age. Conclusion: The features of these fractures were similar to those described in the literature and the treatment used showed good results. The Joana de Gusmão Children's Hospital has used the treatment proposed in the literature for pediatric femoral shaft fractures. PMID:27042619

  10. The influence of bicycle exercise, with or without hand immersion in cold water, on forearm sweating in young and middle-aged women.

    PubMed

    Cable, N T; Green, J H

    1990-07-01

    Forearm sweat production rate (SPR) and external auditory meatal temperature (TEAM) were examined in five young and five middle-aged women in response to intermittent exercise, on three separate occasions. The first experiment was a control study, while in the second study the left hand was immersed in cold water at the onset of sweating during each exercise bout, and in the third study this immersion was accompanied by venous occlusion of the upper left arm. TEAM increased by 0.5 degrees C during exercise with no significant differences between the groups on any occasion. The young women displayed a greater peak SPR during exercise in the control than the middle-aged women (52.5 +/- 23.9 vs. 16.7 +/- 6.5 mg cm2 h-1, P less than 0.001). With hand immersion, peak SPR was depressed to 14.0 +/- 4.6 mg cm2 h-1 (P less than 0.001) in the young women and to 13.1 +/- 4.5 mg cm2 h-1 in the middle-aged (P less than 0.05). With hand immersion and venous occlusion the peak SPR in young women increased (43.0 +/- 9.2 mg cm2 h-1). In the older women SPR was 14.9 +/- 6.1 mg cm2 h-1, which was not different from either control or cold-immersed values. Thus, forearm SPR during low-intensity intermittent exercise is greater in young compared with middle-aged women, despite similar changes in TEAM. The response to hand immersion in cold water was more marked in the young subjects.

  11. Long-lasting modulation of human motor cortex following prolonged transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of forearm muscles: evidence of reciprocal inhibition and facilitation.

    PubMed

    Tinazzi, Michele; Zarattini, Stefano; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Romito, Silvia; Farina, Simona; Moretto, Giuseppe; Smania, Nicola; Fiaschi, Antonio; Abbruzzese, Giovanni

    2005-03-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that motor cortex excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent inputs, like peripheral electrical stimulation. Most studies in humans mainly dealt with the effects of prolonged low-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on motor cortical excitability, despite its being known from animal studies that high-frequency stimulation can also result in changes of the cortical excitability. To investigate the possible effects of high-frequency peripheral stimulation on motor cortical excitability we recorded motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the left motor cortex from the right flexor carpi radialis (FCR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) in normal subjects, before and after transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of 30 min duration applied over the FCR. The amplitude of MEPs from the FRC was significantly reduced from 10 to 35 min after TENS while the amplitude of MEPs from ECR was increased. No effects were observed in the FDI muscle. Indices of peripheral nerve (M-wave) and spinal cord excitability (H waves) did not change throughout the experiment. Electrical stimulation of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve has no significant effect on motor cortex excitability. These findings suggest that TENS of forearm muscles can induce transient reciprocal inhibitory and facilitatory changes in corticomotoneuronal excitability of forearm flexor and extensor muscles lasting several minutes. These changes probably may occur at cortical site and seem to be mainly dependent on stimulation of muscle afferents. These findings might eventually lead to practical applications in rehabilitation, especially in those syndromes in which the excitatory and inhibitory balance between agonist and antagonist is severely impaired, such as spasticity and dystonia.

  12. Self-induced carving and scarification of the forearms as a manifestation of sexual abuse in a 14-YEAR-old adolescent girl

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh

    2000-05-01

    Background: Numerous cutaneous abnormalities have been described in adolescent girls who have been sexually abused. These include bruising, bite marks, cuts, scratches, abrasions, edema, hematomas or other evidence of struggle. Victims frequently shower or bathe excessively in an effort to cleanse their skin following such an unwanted encounter. However, there is a paucity of information in the literature regarding the association of sexual abuse and removal of the superficial layers of the skin as a more desperate attempt by teenagers to rid themselves of the perpetrator. The purpose of this paper is to heighten awareness among practitioners that self-induced cutting and carving of the forearms with scarification may occur as a manifestation of sexual abuse in young women.Methods: A 14-year-old girl was seen in an adolescent medicine consultation setting during the spring of 1999 for evaluation of an anxiety disorder. During the interview the girl related that she had been under considerable stress and that she was having difficulty sleeping. She also had worsening of facial tics that had been previously noted in association with obsessive compulsive behaviors. She had been receiving psychotherapy and was being treated with fluoxetine, but the symptoms were becoming more severe. On examination she appeared very anxious and demonstrated numerous involuntary, repetitive facial grimaces. Similar twitching movements of the neck were also noted. In addition, she had several well healed scars over both forearms. The lesions were linear with a range of one half to one inch in width and three to four inches in length. The remainder of the general physical examination was entirely unremarkable.Results: The etiology of the scars was initially unknown. Upon further questioning the patient was asked directly about what had caused these marks. At that point she broke down and cried as she related that had been sexually assaulted several months earlier. She stated that she

  13. Effect of Strength Training on Oxidative Stress and the Correlation of the Same with Forearm Vasodilatation and Blood Pressure of Hypertensive Elderly Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Filipe Fernandes Oliveira; Batista, Rafael Marinho Falcão; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Castellano, Lúcio Roberto Cançado; Ritti-Dias, Raphael Mendes; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of strength training on oxidative stress and the correlation of the same with forearm vasodilatation and mean blood pressure of hypertensive elderly women, at rest (basal) and during a static handgrip exercise. Insufficiently active hypertensive elderly women (N = 25; mean age = 66.1 years) were randomized into a 10 week strength training group (n = 13) or control (n = 12) group. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), plasma nitrite (NO2-), forearm blood flow (FBF), mean blood pressure (MBP) and vascular conductance ([FBF / MBP] x 100) were evaluated before and after the completion of the interventions. The strength training group increased the TAC (pre: Median = 39.0; Interquartile range = 34.0–41.5% vs post: Median = 44.0; Interquartile range = 38.0–51.5%; p = 0.006) and reduced the MDA (pre: 4.94 ± 1.10 μM vs post: 3.90 ± 1.35 μM; p = 0.025; CI-95%: -1.92 –-0.16 μM). The strength training group increased basal vascular conductance (VC) (pre: 3.56 ±0.88 units vs post: 5.21 ±1.28 units; p = 0.001; CI-95%: 0.93–2.38 units) and decreased basal MBP (pre: 93.1 ±6.3 mmHg vs post: 88.9 ±5.4 mmHg; p = 0.035; CI-95%: -8.0 –-0.4 mmHg). Such changes were also observed during static handgrip exercise. A moderate correlation was observed between changes in basal VC and MBP with changes in NO2- (ΔVC → r = -0.56, p = 0.047; ΔMBP → r = -0.41, p = 0.168) and MDA (ΔVC → r = 0.64, p = 0.019; ΔMBP → r = 0.31, p = 0.305). The strength training program reduced the oxidative stress of the hypertensive elderly women and this reduction was moderately correlated with their cardiovascular benefits. Trial Registration: ensaiosclinicos.gov.br RBR-48c29w PMID:27529625

  14. Pilot study for reconstruction of soft tissues: muscle cross-sectional area of the forearm estimated from cortical bone for a Neolithic sample.

    PubMed

    Slizewski, Astrid; Burger-Heinrich, Eva; Francken, Michael; Wahl, Joachim; Harvati, Katerina

    2014-06-01

    On a basis of a method for muscle cross-sectional area estimation from cortical bone area that was previously developed (Slizewski et al. Anat Rec 2013; 296:1695-1707), we reconstructed muscle cross-sectional area at 65% of radius length for a sample of Neolithic human remains from the Linear Pottery Culture (ca. 5,700-4,900 years BC). Muscle cross-sectional area estimations for the Neolithic sample were compared to in vivo measurements from a recent human sample. Results demonstrate that the Neolithic individuals had larger muscle cross-sectional area relative to radius length than the contemporary humans and that their forearms were more muscular and robust. We also found significant differences in relative muscle cross-sectional area between Neolithic and recent children that indicate different levels of physical stress and isometric activities. Our results fit into the framework of studies previously published about the sample and the Linear Pottery Culture. Therefore, the new approach was successfully applied to an archaeological sample for the first time here. Results of our pilot study indicate that muscle cross-sectional area estimation could in the future supplement other anthropological methods currently in use for the analysis of postcranial remains.

  15. [Research on infrared radiation characteristics of skin covering two acupuncture points in the hand and forearm, NeiGuan and LaoGong points].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Yu, Wenlong; Cui, Han; Shi, Huafeng; Jin, Lei

    2013-06-01

    In order to research the infrared radiation characteristics of the skin covering Traditional Chinese acupuncture points, which are NeiGuan in the forearm and LaoGong in the center of the palm, we detected continuously the infrared radiation spectra of the human body surface by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that firstly, the differences of the infrared radiation spectra of the human body surface were obvious between individuals. Secondly, the infrared radiation intensity of the human body surface changed with time changing. The infrared radiation intensity in two special wavelength ranges (wavelengths from 6. 79 microm to 6. 85 microm and from 13. 6 microm to 14. 0 microm) changed much more than that in other ranges obviously. Thirdly, the proportions of the infrared radiation spectra changed, which were calculated from the spectra of two different aupuncture points, were same in these two special wavelength ranges, but their magnitude changes were different. These results suggested that the infrared radiation of acupuncture points have the same biological basis, and the mechanism of the infrared radiation in these two special wavelength ranges is different from other tissue heat radiation.

  16. Ultrasound-Derived Forearm Muscle Thickness Is a Powerful Predictor for Estimating DXA-Derived Appendicular Lean Mass in Japanese Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Abe, Takashi; Fujita, Eiji; Thiebaud, Robert S; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Akamine, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    To test the validity of published equations, anterior forearm muscle thickness (MT-ulna) of 158 Japanese older adults (72 men and 86 women) aged 50-79 y was measured with ultrasound. Appendicular lean soft tissue mass (aLM) was estimated from MT-ulna using two equations (body height without [eqn 1] and with [eqn 2]) previously published in the literature. Appendicular lean mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorption (DXA), and this method served as the reference criterion. There was a strong correlation between DXA-derived and ultrasound-estimated aLM in both equations (r = 0.882 and r = 0.944). Total error was 2.60 kg for eqn (1) and 1.38 kg for eqn (2). A Bland-Altman plot revealed that there was no systematic bias between DXA-derived and ultrasound-estimated aLM; however, eqn (1) overestimated aLM compared with DXA-derived aLM. Our results suggest that an ultrasound MT-ulna equation that includes body height is appropriate and useful for estimating aLM in Japanese adults. PMID:27321173

  17. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the forearm in elite rowers: a technique for mini-open fasciotomy and a report of six cases.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John W K; Thomas, Philip; Aster, Asir; Wilkes, Graeme; Hayton, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) of the forearm may occur in sports requiring prolonged grip strength. CECS is a function of increasing pressure following muscle expansion within an inelastic tissue envelope resulting in compromise of perfusion and tissue function. Typical symptoms are pain, distal paraesthesia and loss of function. The condition is self-limiting and resolves completely between periods of activity. With no effective medical treatment, the gold standard remains four compartment open fasciotomy (Söderberg, J Bone Joint Surg Br 78(5):780-2, 1996; Wasilewski and Asdourian, Am J Sports Med 19(6):665-7, 1991). Minimally invasive techniques have been described (Croutzet et al., Tech Hand Up Extrem Surg 13(3):137-40, 2009) but have a risk of neuro-vascular injury, especially to the ulnar nerve while releasing the deep flexor compartment. We present a safe technique used with six elite rowers for mini-open fasciotomy to minimise scarring and time away from training while reducing the risk of neurovascular injury. PMID:24426965

  18. The role of α-adrenergic receptors in mediating beat-by-beat sympathetic vascular transduction in the forearm of resting man.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Seth T; Holwerda, Seth W; Credeur, Daniel P; Zuidema, Mozow Y; Medley, John H; Dyke, Peter C; Wray, D Walter; Davis, Michael J; Fadel, Paul J

    2013-07-15

    Sympathetic vascular transduction is commonly understood to act as a basic relay mechanism, but under basal conditions, competing dilatory signals may interact with and alter the ability of sympathetic activity to decrease vascular conductance. Thus, we determined the extent to which spontaneous bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate decreases in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) and the contribution of local α-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways to the observed FVC responses. In 19 young men, MSNA (microneurography), arterial blood pressure and brachial artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasound) were continuously measured during supine rest. These measures were also recorded in seven men during intra-arterial infusions of normal saline, phentolamine (PHEN) and PHEN with angiotensin II (PHEN+ANG). The latter was used to control for increases in resting blood flow with α-adrenergic blockade. Spike-triggered averaging was used to characterize beat-by-beat changes in FVC for 15 cardiac cycles following each MSNA burst and a peak response was calculated. Following MSNA bursts, FVC initially increased by +3.3 ± 0.3% (P = 0.016) and then robustly decreased to a nadir of -5.8 ± 1.6% (P < 0.001). The magnitude of vasoconstriction appeared graded with the number of consecutive MSNA bursts; while individual burst size only had a mild influence. Neither PHEN nor PHEN+ANG infusions affected the initial rise in FVC, but both infusions significantly attenuated the subsequent decrease in FVC (-2.1 ± 0.7% and -0.7 ± 0.8%, respectively; P < 0.001 vs. normal saline). These findings indicate that spontaneous MSNA bursts evoke robust beat-by-beat decreases in FVC that are exclusively mediated via α-adrenergic receptors.

  19. Nerve compression syndromes of the hand and forearm associated with tumours of non-neural origin and tumour-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Villén, G; Badiola, J; Alvarez-Alegret, R; Mayayo, E

    2014-06-01

    Nerve compression syndromes caused by non-neural tumours or tumour-like lesions are rare. We retrospectively reviewed 541 consecutive patients operated on by the same surgeon to study nerve compression syndromes in the forearm and hand. There were 414 due to nerve compression and 127 caused by tumours. Twenty-two patients showed compression neuropathy associated with 17 tumours and six tumour-like lesions, with 13 different pathological types. The most common types were fatty and vascular tumours. Twenty-one tumours were extraneural and one was intraneural. The median nerve was affected in nine cases, the ulnar nerve or the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve in five cases, the posterior interosseous nerve or the superficial radial branch in four cases and the common digital nerves in two cases. There was a concomitant involvement of the median and ulnar nerves in two other patients. Clinically, there were eight different compression neuropathies, of which the most frequent was the carpal tunnel syndrome. The postoperative histology was consistent with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings in the vascular and fatty tumours. Pain disappeared completely in 15 out of 16 patients with preoperative pain. All patients had preoperative paraesthesia, which persisted after tumour excision in three patients: attenuated in two patients and unchanged in one. In three patients, we did not observe any change in paresis or amyotrophy. The mean postoperative follow-up was 31 months, without tumour recurrence. The quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score went from 49.9 points preoperatively to 10.2 points after surgery.

  20. Transverse Carpal Ligament and Forearm Fascia Release for the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Change the Entrance Angle of Flexor Tendons to the A1 Pulley: The Relationship between Carpal Tunnel Surgery and Trigger Finger Occurence

    PubMed Central

    Karalezli, Nazım; Kütahya, Harun; Güleç, Ali; Toker, Serdar; Karabörk, Hakan; Ogun, Tunc C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The appearance of trigger finger after decompression of the carpal tunnel without a preexisting symptom has been reported in a few articles. Although, the cause is not clear yet, the loss of pulley action of the transverse carpal ligament has been accused mostly. In this study, we planned a biomechanical approach to fresh cadavers. Methods. The study was performed on 10 fresh amputees of the arm. The angles were measured with (1) the transverse carpal ligament and the distal forearm fascia intact, (2) only the transverse carpal ligament incised, (3) the distal forearm fascia incised to the point 3 cm proximal from the most proximal part of the transverse carpal ligament in addition to the transverse carpal ligament. The changes between the angles produced at all three conditions were compared to each other. Results. We saw that the entrance angle increased in all of five fingers in an increasing manner from procedure 1 to 3, and it was seen that the maximal increase is detected in the middle finger from procedure 1 to procedure 2 and the minimal increase is detected in little finger. Discussion. Our results support that transverse carpal ligament and forearm fascia release may be a predisposing factor for the development of trigger finger by the effect of changing the enterance angle to the A1 pulley and consequently increase the friction in this anatomic area. Clinical Relevance. This study is a cadaveric study which is directly investigating the effect of a transverse carpal ligament release on the enterance angle of flexor tendons to A1 pulleys in the hand. PMID:23878529

  1. Severe frostbite injury in a 19-year-old patient requiring amputation of both distal forearms and lower legs due to delayed rescue: a need for advanced accident collision notification systems?

    PubMed

    Kloeters, Oliver; Ryssel, Henning; Suda, Arnold J; Lehnhardt, Marcus

    2011-06-01

    Frostbite injury is a rare but severe injury especially when rescue triage is prolonged. We here report the case of a 19-year-old male patient with severe frostbite injuries requiring amputation of both distal forearms and both lower legs due to delayed admission to medical care. This case demonstrates that even mild ambient temperatures can cause deleterious injuries if the exposure time is long enough paralleling our knowledge of burn trauma. Immediate admission to medical care is, therefore, paramount and GPS-based automated accident collision notification systems would therefore be of great benefit especially in rural areas. PMID:21298278

  2. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of staying still while the X-ray is ...

  3. A Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of SmartSet® HV and SmartSet® GHV Bone Cements in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-12

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  4. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  5. A Two Centre Study to Assess the Stability and Long-term Performance of the C-Stem™ AMT in a Total Primary Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

  6. A Randomised Single Centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of 4 Designs of the DePuy Ultima LX Stem in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-09

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorder; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  7. A Two Centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Metal-on-Metal Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  8. A Single Centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Ceramic-on-ceramic Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-06

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  9. A Multi-centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Summit™ Hip in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  10. A Multi-centre Study to Assess the Long-term Performance of the Pinnacle™ Cup With a Polyethylene-on-metal Bearing in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Rheumatoid Arthritis; Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

  11. A Randomised Single Centre Study to Compare the Long-Term Wear Characteristics of Marathon™ and Enduron™ Polyethylene Cup Liners in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-04-07

    Osteoarthritis; Post-Traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

  12. The treatment effect of the burn wound healing by electrolytic-reduction ion water lotion combination therapy. Part 2: Two degree burn of forearm to the dorsum of the hand.

    PubMed

    Shu, Tetsuo; Okajima, Masahiro; Wada, Yuko; Shimokawa, Ken-ichi; Ishii, Fumiyoshi

    2010-10-01

    Patient 1: A 1-year-and-3-month-old boy suffered a burn injury extending from the left forearm to hand due to boiling water. An extensive skin defect from the left forearm to the dorsum of the hand was observed, and an IIb-III degree burn was diagnosed. Treatment of the burn was started with the application of electrolytic-reduction ion water (ERI) lotion, antibiotic/steroid combination ointment, and vitamin A/E ointment with wrap therapy. Two days after the initiation of therapy, redness and swelling were still observed despite a slight decrease in swelling. After 21 days, skin redness decreased, and there was no functional impairment. After 74 days, the skin color was almost normal, and no functional impairment was observed, showing a favorable course. Patient 2: An 8.5-month-old girl suffered a burn injury extending from the fingers to dorsum of the right hand and right wrist due to boiling water. There was an extensive skin defect accompanied by bulla formation extending from the fingers and dorsum of the right hand. An II-degree burn was diagnosed. Treatment of the burn was started treatment similar to the Patient 1. Bulla decreased, but redness and swelling were still present 2-8 days after the initiation of therapy. After 16-25 days, both skin redness and swelling decreased. After 30 days, the epithelialization of the dorsum of the hand had almost completed. After 60 days, the skin color was nearly normal, and there was no functional impairment, showing a favorable course. In these patients, burn wounds completely healed without hypertrophic or keloid scar formation or pigmentation. These results suggest that extensive II-III burns can be adequately treated by this topical therapy.

  13. Biomechanical Strength of Large Diaphyseal Deep-frozen Allografts.

    PubMed

    Nather, A; Goh, J C

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the biomechanical strength of deep-frozen allografts as they heal. Twenty-eight adult cats were used with the tibia as the experimental model site. Deep-frozen allografts stored at -80 degrees C were used to reconstruct a large tibial defect (at least two-thirds of the diaphysis). An intra-medullary rod was used for fixation. The healing was studied by X-ray at observation periods of 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 36 weeks. Post-transplantation biomechanical testing was performed using the Shimadzu Universal Testing Machine DCS series with a torsion test device of 50 kg force metre. Parameters studied included maximum torque, torsional stiffness and energy of absorption. The transplanted grafts were compared to the mechanical properties of the internal controls of the normal opposite tibia of each cat. The results of the mechanical tests demonstrated that deep-frozen allografts did not regain normal strength. At nine months, only about 60% of normal torque strength and about 80% of normal torsional stiffness was achieved. Clinically, it is important to employ strong and rigid internal fixation using intra-medullary nailing rather than plating to allow for immediate mobilisation and reduce the rate of graft fracture.

  14. Absolute quantitation of phosphorus metabolites in the cerebral cortex of the newborn human infant and in the forearm muscles of young adults using a double-tuned surface coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Ernest B.

    The application of a double-tuned surface coil with strong coupling for both 31P and 1H to the in vivo measurement of metabolite concentrations by NMR spectroscopy is demonstrated. It is shown that sample loading, although important for a coil tuned to a single frequency, does not necessarily have a significant effect on absolute quantitation results if the coil is strongly coupled to the sample for both nuclei. For the coil used in the present study, the spectrometer calibration coefficient is almost independent of loading and the 1H and 31P flip angles at the coil center produced by fixed length pulses could be arranged to be nearly equal over a range of loading conditions. In seven normal infants, of gestational plus postnatal age 35 to 37 weeks, the cerebral cortex nucleotide triphosphate concentration was 3.7 ± 0.6 m M/liter wet (mean ± SD). Metabolite concentrations were low in the cerebral cortex of a severely birth asphyxiated infant. The adenosine triphosphate concentration in the resting, fresh forearm muscles of six young adults was 6.3 ± 0.8 m M/liter wet.

  15. Forewarning and Forearming Stereotype-Threatened Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGlone, Matthew S.; Aronson, Joshua

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated communicative strategies for helping female students cope with "stereotype threat". Participants completed a difficult math test after reading one of three coping messages: a control message encouraging perseverance, a "suppression" message describing stereotype threat and instructing participants to suppress associated…

  16. Flexible Intramedullary Nailing of Pediatric Humeral Fractures: Indications, Techniques, and Tips.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Derek M

    2016-06-01

    Most proximal and diaphyseal pediatric humeral fractures can be treated successfully by closed means; however, certain patient factors or fracture characteristics may make surgical stabilization with flexible intramedullary nails (FIN) a better choice. Common indications for FIN of pediatric humeral fractures include unstable proximal-third fractures in children nearing skeletal maturity, unstable distal metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fractures, shaft fractures in polytraumatized patients or patients with ipsilateral both-bone forearm fractures (floating elbow), and prophylactic stabilization of benign diaphyseal bone cysts or surgical stabilization of pathologic fractures. FIN can be safely inserted in an antegrade or retrograde manner depending on the fracture location and configuration. Careful dissection at the location of rod insertion can prevent iatrogenic nerve injuries. Rapid fracture union and return to full function can be expected in most cases. Implant prominence is the most common complication.

  17. Robot-musculoskeletal dynamic biomechanical model in robot-assisted diaphyseal fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wang, Tianmiao; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Lihai; Zhao, Yanpeng; Du, Hailong; Wang, Lifeng; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    A number of issues that exist in common fracture reduction surgeries can be mitigated by robot-assisted fracture reduction. However, the safety of patients and the performance of the robot, which are closely related to the muscle forces, are important indexes that restrict the development of robots. Though researchers have done a great deal of work on the biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, the dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, particularly the aspects related to the function of the robot, is not well understood. For this reason, we represent the complex biological system by establishing a dynamic biomechanical model based on the Hill muscle model and the Kane method for the robot that we have developed and the musculoskeletal system. We analyzed the relationship between the motion and force of the bone fragments and the robot during a simulation of a robot-assisted fracture reduction. The influence of the muscle force on the robot system was predicted and managed. The simulation results provide a basis for a fracture reduction path plan that ensures patient safety and a useful reference for the mechanical design of the robot.

  18. A visual servo-based teleoperation robot system for closed diaphyseal fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wang, Tianmiao; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Lihai; Du, Hailong; Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lifeng; Tang, Peifu

    2015-09-01

    Common fracture treatments include open reduction and intramedullary nailing technology. However, these methods have disadvantages such as intraoperative X-ray radiation, delayed union or nonunion and postoperative rotation. Robots provide a novel solution to the aforementioned problems while posing new challenges. Against this scientific background, we develop a visual servo-based teleoperation robot system. In this article, we present a robot system, analyze the visual servo-based control system in detail and develop path planning for fracture reduction, inverse kinematics, and output forces of the reduction mechanism. A series of experimental tests is conducted on a bone model and an animal bone. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the robot system. The robot system uses preoperative computed tomography data to realize high precision and perform minimally invasive teleoperation for fracture reduction via the visual servo-based control system while protecting surgeons from radiation.

  19. Audit of open tibial diaphyseal fracture management at a district accident centre.

    PubMed

    Clough, T M; Bale, R S

    2000-11-01

    Preston Acute Hospital is a designated district accident centre with a 24 h flying squad and on-site plastic and orthopaedic units. We performed a retrospective 5-year survey of open tibial shaft fracture management at our unit and compared our treatment to the guidelines of the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA) and British Association of Plastic Surgeons (BAPS). Deficiencies were highlighted and changes in practice made. We then re-audited our figures over an 18-month period to see if clinical improvements had been made. The audit demonstrated an incidence of open tibial shaft fractures of 15 per 50,000 new patients per year in accident and emergency. Gustilo grading, and thus full appreciation of soft tissues injury, was being underestimated, with 8% of the injuries undergraded at the time of surgery: 17% of Gustilo IIIA and 85% Gustilo IIIB required flap cover. Seventy-four percent of patients received their first orthopaedic procedure within the recommended 6 h of admission, but despite the on-site plastics unit, only 50% of cases in the initial survey had their soft tissue defect covered by the recommended 5 days. After changes to practice, 80% patients received their first orthopaedic procedure within the recommended 6 h of admission, and all had their soft tissue defect covered within 5 days; 5% of cases required fasciotomy to relieve compartment syndrome. We highlight features to alert the high energy (Gustilo III) status and recommend immediate involvement of plastic surgical colleagues with these injuries. We also highlight a high incidence of compartment syndrome in the young male patient with the lower energy Gustilo I injury.

  20. [Fracture of the diaphyseal radius during Cyr wheel practice - an uncommon injury of wheel gymnastics].

    PubMed

    Kauther, M D; Rummel, S; Hussmann, B; Lendemans, S; Nast-Kolb, D; Wedemeyer, C

    2011-12-01

    The cyr wheel is a modified gymnastic wheel with only one ring that can lead to extreme forces on the gymnast. We report on a distal radius shaft fracture (AO 22 A 2.1) and a fracture of the styloid process of the ulna that occurred after holding on to a slipping Cyr wheel and exposition to high pressure on the lower arm. The fracture was fixed by screws and a plate. PMID:22161268

  1. A visual servo-based teleoperation robot system for closed diaphyseal fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wang, Tianmiao; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Lihai; Du, Hailong; Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lifeng; Tang, Peifu

    2015-09-01

    Common fracture treatments include open reduction and intramedullary nailing technology. However, these methods have disadvantages such as intraoperative X-ray radiation, delayed union or nonunion and postoperative rotation. Robots provide a novel solution to the aforementioned problems while posing new challenges. Against this scientific background, we develop a visual servo-based teleoperation robot system. In this article, we present a robot system, analyze the visual servo-based control system in detail and develop path planning for fracture reduction, inverse kinematics, and output forces of the reduction mechanism. A series of experimental tests is conducted on a bone model and an animal bone. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the robot system. The robot system uses preoperative computed tomography data to realize high precision and perform minimally invasive teleoperation for fracture reduction via the visual servo-based control system while protecting surgeons from radiation. PMID:26199026

  2. Robot-musculoskeletal dynamic biomechanical model in robot-assisted diaphyseal fracture reduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Changsheng; Wang, Tianmiao; Hu, Lei; Zhang, Lihai; Zhao, Yanpeng; Du, Hailong; Wang, Lifeng; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    A number of issues that exist in common fracture reduction surgeries can be mitigated by robot-assisted fracture reduction. However, the safety of patients and the performance of the robot, which are closely related to the muscle forces, are important indexes that restrict the development of robots. Though researchers have done a great deal of work on the biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, the dynamics of the musculoskeletal system, particularly the aspects related to the function of the robot, is not well understood. For this reason, we represent the complex biological system by establishing a dynamic biomechanical model based on the Hill muscle model and the Kane method for the robot that we have developed and the musculoskeletal system. We analyzed the relationship between the motion and force of the bone fragments and the robot during a simulation of a robot-assisted fracture reduction. The influence of the muscle force on the robot system was predicted and managed. The simulation results provide a basis for a fracture reduction path plan that ensures patient safety and a useful reference for the mechanical design of the robot. PMID:26406025

  3. Stiffness Feedback for Myoelectric Forearm Prostheses Using Vibrotactile Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Heidi J B; Luft, Frauke; Rietman, Johan S; Veltink, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The ability to distinguish object stiffness is a very important aspect in object handling, but completely lacking in current myoelectric prostheses. In human hands both tactile and proprioceptive sensory information are required for stiffness determination. Therefore, it was investigated whether it is possible to distinguish object stiffness with vibrotactile feedback of hand opening and grasping force. Three configurations consisting of an array of coin motors and a single miniature vibrotactile transducer were investigated. Ten healthy subjects and seven subjects with upper limb loss due to amputation or congenital defects performed virtual grasping tasks, in which they controlled hand opening and grasping force. They were asked to determine the stiffness of a grasped virtual object from four options. With hand opening feedback alone or in combination with grasping force feedback, correct stiffness determination was achieved in around 60% of the cases and significantly higher than the 25% achieved without feedback or grasping force feedback alone. Despite the equal performance results, the combination of hand opening and grasping force feedback was preferred by the subjects over the hand opening feedback alone. No differences between feedback configurations and between subjects with upper limb loss and healthy subjects were found.

  4. [Reconstruction of the thumb using a forearm osseofasciocutaneous reverse flap].

    PubMed

    Jevtović, Dobrica; Dordević, Boban; Gacević, Milomir; Sijan, Goran

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences of the thumb reconstruction with osteofasciocutaneous reverse flap (OFCR flap). In the period between 1987 and 2000 the OFCR flap was used in 15 patients. The youngest of them was 18 and the oldest was 38 years of age. The average age was 25.4. All the patients had posttraumatic amputations. Defects on proximal phalangae and a part of metacarpal bone occurred in two cases. In one case there was an amputation on the base level of proximal phalanx and the metacarpophalangeal (MPH) joint was preserved. In all cases of reconstruction the OFCR flap was used, which included antebrachial skin nervs that were anastomosed with digital nerv. The flap nutrition was carried out through the reverse circulation of a. radialis, and the venous drainage through the comitant vein of a. radialis. Superficial veins were not anastomosed. Secondary defects were covered with a free skin graft. All the flaps survived. The bone graft was healed in the period of eight weeks. The sensibility of this flap was regained in the period of three to six months after the surgery. The distance of two-point discrimination (TPD) was increased for 30% compared to the same region on the other hand after six months. The opposition of the reconstructed thumb to the other fingers was possible, as well as abduction, adduction and normal grasp. The method of reconstruction of the amputated thumb with the OFCR flap was better than other classical methods because it allowed the reconstruction of all the structures in one surgical operation. The sensibility that was regained represented good protection from injuries. There were no functional damages on the secondary defect. The esthetic result was not good due to the lack of a fingernail. PMID:12557617

  5. Finding the Center of Volume of the Forearm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Stacy S.; Roselli, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    A typical first-year physics course teaches students about the center of mass using both regular and irregularly shaped objects. Students often suspend an object in each of two dimensions from a string with the intersection determining the center of mass of the object. While these methods can be effective, they are not particularly exciting or…

  6. Colleges Must Be Forearmed with Effective Policies on Weapons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alger, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    By the end of June, the U.S. Supreme Court will issue its first decision in many decades on the meaning of the right to keep and bear arms under the Constitution. The ruling could have a significant impact on federal gun-control regulations. The Second Amendment has historically not been held to apply to state regulations, but a decision by the…

  7. Transfer of tennis racket vibrations onto the human forearm.

    PubMed

    Hennig, E M; Rosenbaum, D; Milani, T L

    1992-10-01

    One of several factors suspected in the development of lateral epicondylitis, often referred to as tennis elbow, is the impact-induced vibration of the racket-and-arm system at ball contact. Using two miniature accelerometers at the wrist and the elbow of 24 tennis players, the effects of 23 different tennis racket constructions were evaluated in a simulated backhand stroke situation. The influences of body weight, skill level, and tennis racket construction onto the magnitude of vibrations at wrist and elbow were investigated. Amplitudes, integrals, and fourier components were used to characterize arm vibration. More than fourfold reductions in acceleration amplitude and integral were found between wrist and elbow. Off-center as compared with center ball impacts resulted in approximately three times increased acceleration values. Between subjects, body weight as well as skill level were found to influence arm vibration. Compared with proficient players, a group of less skilled subjects demonstrated increased vibration loads on the arm. Between different racket constructions, almost threefold differences in acceleration values could be observed. Increased racket head size as well as a higher resonance frequency of the racket were found to reduce arm vibration. The vibration at the arm after ball impact showed a strong inverse relationship (r = -0.88) with the resonance frequency of tennis rackets.

  8. Galeazzi fractures: our modified classification and treatment regimen.

    PubMed

    Fayaz, H C; Jupiter, J B

    2014-02-01

    While diaphyseal fractures of the forearm are a common orthopedic injury, Galeazzi fractures are difficult to treat. The current knowledge on pathobiomechanics and modified therapeutic decisions implicate the need to devise an updated classification and treatment regimen of Galeazzi fractures. We challenge the concept that isolated fractures of the radius should be considered as a Galeazzi fractures as long as stability of the distal radioulnar joint is not proven. Contrary to others we demonstrate that the fracture location alone is not sufficient to determine the stability of the distal radioulnar joint.

  9. Radial shaft stress fracture after internal fixation using a titanium plate.

    PubMed

    Nagoshi, Narihito; Yamanaka, Kazuyoshi; Sasaki, Takashi

    2015-05-20

    A 22-year-old man, a boxer, presented with acute right forearm pain after striking a punch mitt. The patient had sustained a diaphyseal fracture of the right radius 19 months previously and was treated by minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis using a titanium reconstruction plate. Radiography revealed stress fractures beneath a proximal screw hole of the plate. The forearm was protected in a splint for 6 weeks and the fracture healed. Titanium plates are superior to stainless steel plates, due to various properties of titanium including corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Removal of such plates is not routinely performed in our hospital, but plate removal may be warranted for patients who actively participate in certain sports.

  10. Chondroblastoma of Diaphysis of Radius in a Seven Year Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Punit, Abhinandan; Nadkarni, Sambaprasad; Doomra, Tanvir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign tumor derived from chondroblasts, is almost exclusively an epiphyseal lesion, although it may secondarily extend into metaphysis. It is most commonly found in lower extremity with most common sites being distal femur followed by proximal femur, proximal humerus and proximal tibia. It is the purpose of the report to describe chondroblastoma in a seven year old child in the diaphyseal area of radius which is a rare entity & frequently presents as diagnostic dilemma. Case Report: The authors report a case of chondroblastoma involving the diaphyseal area of radius in a seven year old female child. She presented with pain and swelling around the left distal third forearm for eight months. Wide excision of tumor was performed and the defect was bridged with avascular fibular auto graft, secured to host bone with k-wires and dynamic compression plate to achieve osteosynthesis. Conclusion: Pure metaphyseal and/or diaphyseal chondroblastomas are exceedingly rare. A presumptive diagnosis may be considered in the appropriate age group in the presence of chondroid matrix, perilesional edema, periosteal reaction, and marginal sclerosis. Regardless of all the diagnostic possibilities biopsy may still be required. However, knowledge of this entity will help make the final diagnosis and guide the correct treatment. PMID:27298978

  11. Prebending of a titanium elastic intramedullary nail in the treatment of distal radius fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Cai, Haoqi; Wang, Zhigang; Cai, Haiqing

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce a method to treat distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fractures by prebending an elastic intramedullary nail and to evaluate the factors influencing fracture apposition. Fifty-two consecutive patients (4 to 15 years old) with a distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fracture were included. The nail was inserted and advanced into the proximal radial fragment as normal. After bending the nail distally about 90° at the site predetermined to lie at the distal segment, the elastic intramedullary nail was advanced until the prebent part completely entered the marrow cavity. The fracture angular deformity was fully corrected in anterior-posterior and lateral views. The apposition rate was 90% to 100% in lateral view, >50% in anterior-posterior view. The operation time was 16.73 ± 6.253 minutes. The average time of fracture healing was 5 months (range, 4-7 months). During 12 to 19 months of follow-up, firm fracture healing and good remodeling were observed, and there was no impaired forearm rotation function or secondary fracture. Our study showed the treatment of distal radius diaphyseal metaphyseal junction fractures by prebent intramedullary nail could make up for the deficiency of Kirschner wires and steel plates and keep the fracture stable. Fracture type and the anatomical features of the distal radius were associated with fracture apposition. PMID:24833151

  12. Host-derived neoangiogenesis with short-term immunosuppression allows incorporation and remodeling of vascularized diaphyseal allogeneic rabbit femur transplants.

    PubMed

    Giessler, Goetz A; Zobitz, Mark; Friedrich, Patricia F; Bishop, Allen T

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that living bone allotransplants can incorporate, remodel, and maintain mechanical properties without long-term immunosuppression in a fashion comparable to living autotransplants. For this, viability is maintained by repair of nutrient vessels and neovascularization from implanted host-derived vasculature. Microsurgically revascularized femoral diaphysis allotransplants were transferred from young male New-Zealand-White (NZW) into 4 groups of male Dutch-Belted (DB) rabbits. Short-term immunosuppression by tacrolimus (IS, groups 4 and 5) and host-derived neovascularization (NV) from implanted fascial flaps was used to maintain viability (groups 3 and 5) as independent variables. Group 2 received neither IS nor NV. Vascularized pedicled autotransplants were orthotopically transplanted in group 1. After 16 weeks, transplants were evaluated using radiologic, histologic, biomechanical, and histomorphometric parameters. Vascularized bone allotransplants treated with both short-term IS and host-derived NV (group 5) healed in a fashion similar to pedicled autotransplants (group 1). Their radiographic scores were higher than other groups. Groups with patent fascial flaps (3 and 5) showed significantly greater neoangiogenesis than ligated controls (2 and 4). Tacrolimus administration did not affect neoangiogenesis. Elastic modulus and ultimate stress were significantly greater in autogenous bone than in allotransplanted femora. Biomechanical properties were not significantly different among allotransplants. Bone turnover was decreased with IS, but increased with NV by the implanted fascial flaps. Living allogeneic femoral allotransplants treated with short-term IS and host-derived neoangiogenesis can lead to stable transplant incorporation in this rabbit model. The combination of both factors optimizes bone healing. Transplant mineralization is improved with neoangiogenesis but diminished with IS.

  13. Iatrogenic Radial Nerve Palsy following Closed Reduction of a Simple Diaphyseal Humeral Fracture: Beware the Perfect X-Ray

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Morgan; O'Neill, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Radial nerve injury is a recognised complication associated with humeral shaft fracture. A case of iatrogenic radial nerve injury is presented following fracture reduction. The relevant anatomy, challenges in management of humeral fractures with associated radial nerve injury, and the importance of detailed clinical assessment and documentation are discussed. PMID:27478658

  14. Atypical subtrochanteric and diaphyseal femoral fractures: report of a task force of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

    PubMed

    Shane, Elizabeth; Burr, David; Ebeling, Peter R; Abrahamsen, Bo; Adler, Robert A; Brown, Thomas D; Cheung, Angela M; Cosman, Felicia; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Dell, Richard; Dempster, David; Einhorn, Thomas A; Genant, Harry K; Geusens, Piet; Klaushofer, Klaus; Koval, Kenneth; Lane, Joseph M; McKiernan, Fergus; McKinney, Ross; Ng, Alvin; Nieves, Jeri; O'Keefe, Regis; Papapoulos, Socrates; Sen, Howe Tet; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H; Weinstein, Robert S; Whyte, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Reports linking long-term use of bisphosphonates (BPs) with atypical fractures of the femur led the leadership of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) to appoint a task force to address key questions related to this problem. A multidisciplinary expert group reviewed pertinent published reports concerning atypical femur fractures, as well as preclinical studies that could provide insight into their pathogenesis. A case definition was developed so that subsequent studies report on the same condition. The task force defined major and minor features of complete and incomplete atypical femoral fractures and recommends that all major features, including their location in the subtrochanteric region and femoral shaft, transverse or short oblique orientation, minimal or no associated trauma, a medial spike when the fracture is complete, and absence of comminution, be present to designate a femoral fracture as atypical. Minor features include their association with cortical thickening, a periosteal reaction of the lateral cortex, prodromal pain, bilaterality, delayed healing, comorbid conditions, and concomitant drug exposures, including BPs, other antiresorptive agents, glucocorticoids, and proton pump inhibitors. Preclinical data evaluating the effects of BPs on collagen cross-linking and maturation, accumulation of microdamage and advanced glycation end products, mineralization, remodeling, vascularity, and angiogenesis lend biologic plausibility to a potential association with long-term BP use. Based on published and unpublished data and the widespread use of BPs, the incidence of atypical femoral fractures associated with BP therapy for osteoporosis appears to be very low, particularly compared with the number of vertebral, hip, and other fractures that are prevented by BPs. Moreover, a causal association between BPs and atypical fractures has not been established. However, recent observations suggest that the risk rises with increasing duration of exposure, and there is concern that lack of awareness and underreporting may mask the true incidence of the problem. Given the relative rarity of atypical femoral fractures, the task force recommends that specific diagnostic and procedural codes be created and that an international registry be established to facilitate studies of the clinical and genetic risk factors and optimal surgical and medical management of these fractures. Physicians and patients should be made aware of the possibility of atypical femoral fractures and of the potential for bilaterality through a change in labeling of BPs. Research directions should include development of animal models, increased surveillance, and additional epidemiologic and clinical data to establish the true incidence of and risk factors for this condition and to inform orthopedic and medical management. PMID:20842676

  15. Adaptation of Diaphyseal Structure with Aging and Increased Mechanical Usage in the Adult Rat: A Histomorphometrical and Biomechanical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Li, Xiao Jian; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental increase in mechanical usage or overloading of the left hindlimb was produced by immobilization of the contralateral hindlimb. The right hindlimb was placed in a flexed position against the body and was immobilized using an elastic bandage. Some control animals were sacrificed initially at time zero and increased mechanical usage and age-matched control animals were sacrificed after 2, 10, 18, and 26 weeks of treatment. All animals received double bone fluorochrome labeling prior to sacrifice. Cortical bone histomorphometry and cross-sectional moments of inertia were determined. Marrow cavity enlargement and total cross-sectional area expansion represented the age-related cortical bone changes. Increased mechanical usage enhanced periosteal bone modeling in the formation mode and dampened endocortical bone remodeling and bone modeling in the resorption mode (resorption drift) to create a slight positive bone balance. These observations are in general agreement with Frost's postulate for mechanical effects on bone modeling and remodeling. The maximum moment of inertia did not change significantly in either control or overloaded tibial shafts. The minimum and polar moment of inertias in overloaded bones increases over those of controls at 18 and 26 weeks of the experiment.

  16. Adaptation of Diaphyseal Structure With Aging and Increased Mechanical Usage in the Adult Rat: A Histomorphometrical and Biomechanical Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.; Li, Xiao Jian; Schaffler, Mitchell B.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental increase in mechanical usage or overloading of the left hindlimb was produced by immobilization of the contralateral hindlimb. The right hindlimb was placed in a flexed position against the body and was immobilized using an elastic bandage. Some control animals were sacrificed initially at time zero and increased mechanical usage and age-matched control animals were sacrificed after 2, 10, 18, and 26 weeks of treatment. All animals received double bone fluorochrome labeling prior to sacrifice. Cortical bone histomorphometry and cross-sectional moments of inertia were determined. Marrow cavity enlargement and total cross-sectional area expansion represented the age-related cortical bone changes. Increased mechanical usage enhanced periosteal bone modeling in the formation mode and dampened endocortical bone remodeling and bone modeling in the resorption mode (resorption drift) to create a slight positive bone balance. These observations are in general agreement with Frost's postulate for mechanical effects on bone modeling and remodeling. The maximum moment of inertia did not change significantly in either control or overloaded tibial shafts. The minimum and polar moment of inertias in overloaded bones increases over those of controls at 18 and 26 weeks of the experiment.

  17. Relationship between the chondrocyte maturation cycle and the endochondral ossification in the diaphyseal and epiphyseal ossification centers.

    PubMed

    Pazzaglia, Ugo E; Congiu, Terenzio; Sibilia, Valeria; Pagani, Francesca; Benetti, Anna; Zarattini, Guido

    2016-09-01

    The chondrocyte maturation cycle and endochondral ossification were studied in human, fetal cartilage Anlagen and in postnatal meta-epiphyses. The relationship between the lacunar area, the inter-territorial fibril network variations, and calcium phosphorus nucleation in primary and secondary ossification centers were assessed using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) morphometry. The Anlage topographic, zonal classification was derived from the anatomical nomenclature of the completely developed long bone (diaphysis, metaphyses and epiphyses). A significant increase in the chondrocyte lacunar area was documented in the Anlage of epiphyseal zones 4 and 3 to zone 2 (metaphysis) and zone 1 (diaphysis), with the highest variation from zone 2 to zone 1. An inverse reduction in the intercellular matrix area and matrix interfibrillar empty space was also documented. These findings are consistent with the osmotic passage of free cartilage water from the interfibrillar space into the swelling chondrocytes, which increased the ion concentrations to a critical threshold for mineral precipitation in the matrix. The mineralized cartilage served as a scaffold for osteoblast apposition both in primary and secondary ossification centers and in the metaphyseal growth plate cartilage, though at different periods of bone Anlage development and with distinct patterns for each zone. All developmental processes shared a common initial pathway but progressed at different rates, modes and organization in diaphysis, metaphysis and epiphysis. In the ossification phase the developing vascular supply appeared to play a key role in determining the cortical or trabecular structure of the long bones. J. Morphol. 277:1187-1198, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Quantification of nanoparticle uptake into hair follicles in pig ear and human forearm.

    PubMed

    Raber, A S; Mittal, A; Schäfer, J; Bakowsky, U; Reichrath, J; Vogt, T; Schaefer, U F; Hansen, S; Lehr, C-M

    2014-04-10

    Drug delivery via the hair follicle (HF) especially with nanoparticles (NP) recently gained attention due to a depot effect and facilitated absorption conditions within the lower HF. With the prospect of transdermal drug delivery, it is of interest to optimize the follicular uptake of NP. In this study, a method was developed to quantify NP uptake into HF and applied in vitro in a pig ear model and in vivo in human volunteers. The influence of NP material on HF uptake was investigated using fluorescence-labeled NP based on poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). All NP had similar hydrodynamic sizes (163-170 nm) but different surface modifications: (i) plain PLGA, (ii) chitosan-coated PLGA (Chit.-PLGA), and (iii) Chit.-PLGA coated with different phospholipids (PL) (DPPC (100), DPPC:Chol (85:15), and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8). Differential stripping was performed, including complete mass balance. The samples were extracted for fluorescence quantification. An effect of the PL coating on follicular uptake was observed as DPPC (100) and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8) penetrated into HF to a higher extent than the other tested NP. The effect was observed both in the pig ear model as well as in human volunteers, although it was statistically significant only in the in vitro model. An excellent in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC, r(2)=0.987) between both models was demonstrated, further supporting the suitability of the pig ear model as a surrogate for the in vivo situation in humans for quantifying NP uptake into HF. These findings may help to optimize NP for targeting the HF and to improve transdermal delivery. PMID:24486055

  19. New Forearm Elements Discovered of Holotype Specimen Australovenator wintonensis from Winton, Queensland, Australia

    PubMed Central

    White, Matt A.; Cook, Alex G.; Hocknull, Scott A.; Sloan, Trish; Sinapius, George H. K.; Elliott, David A.

    2012-01-01

    New skeletal elements are reported of the holotype specimen Australovenator wintonensis, from the type locality, near Winton, central western Queensland. New elements include left and right humeri, right radius, right radiale, right distal carpal 1, near complete right metacarpal I, left manual phalanx II-1, left manual phalanx II-2, near complete left manual phalanx II-3 and a left manual phalanx III-3. These new elements combined with those previously described are compared against other neovenatorids. PMID:22761772

  20. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity. PMID:21549937

  1. Percutaneous phenol blocks to motor points of spastic forearm muscles in head-injured adults.

    PubMed

    Garland, D E; Lilling, M; Keenan, M A

    1984-05-01

    The motor points of spastic wrist and finger flexors were identified using a nerve stimulator. These motor points were injected percutaneously with either a 3% or 5% aqueous solution of phenol in 11 patients with brain injury. The effectiveness of the blocks was assessed by recording the resting angle of the wrist, active extension of the wrist, and passive extension of the wrist--first with the fingers flexed and then with the fingers extended. The blocks were repeated once in two patients and twice in one patient for return of muscle tone which interfered with hand function. Relaxation of muscle tone persisted for up to two months following the injections. The resting angle of the wrist improved a mean of 25 degrees. Active wrist extension improved an average of 30 degrees. The changes in wrist measurements represent the effects of different processes: 1) the neurolytic effect of the phenol block; 2) improvement in the neurologic status of the patient; and 3) regeneration of the motor end plate. This procedure is an effective method of temporarily controlling spasticity and allowing functional hand training while neurologic recovery is occurring.

  2. Comparative analysis of antibodies to xCT (Slc7a11): Forewarned is forearmed.

    PubMed

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Albertini, Giulia; Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Holmseth, Silvia; Merckx, Ellen; Sato, Hideyo; Aerts, Joeri L; Smolders, Ilse; Arckens, Lutgarde; Danbolt, Niels C; Massie, Ann

    2016-04-01

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter or system Xc- exchanges cystine for glutamate, thereby supporting intracellular glutathione synthesis and nonvesicular glutamate release. The role of system Xc- in neurological disorders can be dual and remains a matter of debate. One important reason for the contradictory findings that have been reported to date is the use of nonspecific anti-xCT (the specific subunit of system Xc-) antibodies. Often studies rely on the predicted molecular weight of 55.5 kDa to identify xCT on Western blots. However, using brain extracts from xCT knockout (xCT(-/-)) mice as negative controls, we show that xCT migrates as a 35-kDa protein. Misinterpretation of immunoblots leads to incorrect assessment of antibody specificity and thereby to erroneous data interpretation. Here we have verified the specificity of most commonly used commercial and some in-house-developed anti-xCT antibodies by comparing their immunoreactivity in brain tissue of xCT(+/+) and xCT(-/-) mice by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The Western blot screening results demonstrate that antibody specificity not only differs between batches produced by immunizing different rabbits with the same antigen but also between bleedings of the same rabbit. Moreover, distinct immunohistochemical protocols have been tested for all the anti-xCT antibodies that were specific on Western blots in order to obtain a specific immunolabeling. Only one of our in-house-developed antibodies could reveal specific xCT labeling and exclusively on acetone-postfixed cryosections. Using this approach, we observed xCT protein expression throughout the mouse forebrain, including cortex, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain, thalamus, and amygdala, with greatest expression in regions facing the cerebrospinal fluid and meninges.

  3. Marked reduction of forearm carbon dioxide production during states of decreased metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A F; Jevning, R; Guich, S

    1987-01-01

    We studied oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and acid/base changes in 62 subjects during two hypometabolic states (35 during transcendental mediation and 27 during unstylized rest). The results indicate that, during these hypometabolic states, arterial-venous CO2 content difference declines, and that during transcendental meditation, arterial-venous CO2 content difference briefly disappears. This change is due to both an increase of arterial CO2 content and a decrease of venous CO2 content. Similar, but opposite and smaller, changes occurred in arterial and venous O2 content. Respiratory quotient was low at all times and decreased during the hypometabolic states. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, during hypometabolic states significant ketogenesis is induced, and provision of energy from the normally predominant process of beta-oxidation of fat becomes sufficient to provide energy for greatly reduced activity without entry of two carbon fragments into the tricarboxylic acid cycle; under these conditions, biochemical feedback mechanisms inhibit the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The net result of these metabolic changes could explain the major observations: absent carbon dioxide production while oxygen consumption declines but continues and the venous effluent contains more acid.

  4. Solitary fibrous tumour of the forearm. A rare tumour in an atypical site.

    PubMed

    Harrington, P; Merchant, W J; Walsh, M E

    1999-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm that usually arises from serosal surfaces. Although it is now increasingly recognized in extra-serosal locations, only two previous cases of SFT arising in an extremity have been reported. We describe another such case and review the literature regarding extra-serosal SFT.

  5. Chronic Disease Risks in Young Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Forewarned Is Forearmed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Carl V.; Schramm, Sarah C.; Karafa, Matthew; Tang, Anne S.; Jain, Anil K.

    2011-01-01

    An emerging, cost-effective method to examine prevalent and future health risks of persons with disabilities is electronic health record (EHR) analysis. As an example, a case-control EHR analysis of adults with autism spectrum disorder receiving primary care through the Cleveland Clinic from 2005 to 2008 identified 108 adults with autism spectrum…

  6. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  7. Communication channel modeling of human forearm with muscle fiber tissue characteristics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Qin, Yu-Ping; Liu, Yi-He; Vai, Mang I

    2016-09-14

    Human-Body Communication (HBC) is a wireless communication method using the human body tissue as a transmission medium for signals. This paper on the basis of human muscle fiber tissues' characteristics, it is first proposed to establish the analytical model of galvanic coupling human-body communication channel. In this model, the parallel and the transverse electrical characteristics of muscular tissue are fully considered, and the model accurately presents the transmission mechanism of galvanic coupling human-body communication signals in the channel. At last, through compare with the experimental results and calculation results, the maximum error of the model is 22.4% and the average error is 14.2% within the frequency range.

  8. Deep burn of hand and forearm treated by abdominal wall flap. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chiummariello, Stefano; Del Torto, Giuseppe; Maffia, Romano; Pataia, Elisabetta; Alfano, Carmine

    2015-06-24

    Le ustioni della mano sono sempre state uno dei maggiori problemi per i chirurghi ricostruttori a causa della sua particolare anatomia e delle sue complesse funzioni. Una guarigione spontanea di lesioni profonde in queste aree può portare a risultati catastrofici: una copertura cutanea adeguata è fondamentale per tutte le funzioni. La copertura precoce dei tessuti molli residuanti è fondamentale al fine di evitare la formazione di contratture disabilitanti che con il tempo potrebbero determinare anchilosi articolare e retrazione tendinea. Escissione precoce e innesti cutanei rappresentano la terapia standard per le ustioni della mano; in alcuni casi quest’approccio è inapplicabile e, pertanto, il ricorso ai lembi diventa inevitabile. In questo articolo riportiamo un caso di ustione complessa del dorso della mano trattata in prima istanza con innesti cutanei e, quindi, con un lembo addominale, riuscendo ad ottenere un’ottima copertura ed un buon recupero delle funzioni.

  9. Quantification of nanoparticle uptake into hair follicles in pig ear and human forearm.

    PubMed

    Raber, A S; Mittal, A; Schäfer, J; Bakowsky, U; Reichrath, J; Vogt, T; Schaefer, U F; Hansen, S; Lehr, C-M

    2014-04-10

    Drug delivery via the hair follicle (HF) especially with nanoparticles (NP) recently gained attention due to a depot effect and facilitated absorption conditions within the lower HF. With the prospect of transdermal drug delivery, it is of interest to optimize the follicular uptake of NP. In this study, a method was developed to quantify NP uptake into HF and applied in vitro in a pig ear model and in vivo in human volunteers. The influence of NP material on HF uptake was investigated using fluorescence-labeled NP based on poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). All NP had similar hydrodynamic sizes (163-170 nm) but different surface modifications: (i) plain PLGA, (ii) chitosan-coated PLGA (Chit.-PLGA), and (iii) Chit.-PLGA coated with different phospholipids (PL) (DPPC (100), DPPC:Chol (85:15), and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8). Differential stripping was performed, including complete mass balance. The samples were extracted for fluorescence quantification. An effect of the PL coating on follicular uptake was observed as DPPC (100) and DPPC:DOTAP (92:8) penetrated into HF to a higher extent than the other tested NP. The effect was observed both in the pig ear model as well as in human volunteers, although it was statistically significant only in the in vitro model. An excellent in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC, r(2)=0.987) between both models was demonstrated, further supporting the suitability of the pig ear model as a surrogate for the in vivo situation in humans for quantifying NP uptake into HF. These findings may help to optimize NP for targeting the HF and to improve transdermal delivery.

  10. Characterizing near-infrared spectroscopy responses to forearm post-occlusive reactive hyperemia in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Christopher M; Townsend, Dana K; Barstow, Thomas J

    2011-11-01

    During post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) there is a temporary increase in the total hemoglobin + myoglobin (T[Hb+Mb]) signal as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). This transient increase predicts differences in the kinetic responses of deoxy[Hb+Mb] and oxy[Hb+Mb] during PORH. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sigmoidal (Gompertz or logistic) or exponential functions better describe these response curves during PORH. The fit of the three functions (exponential, Gompertz and logistic) to the NIRS responses, as determined from residual sum of squares, was compared using repeated measures ANOVA on Ranks. The Gompertz function provided a better fit to the oxy[Hb+Mb] response curve than did either the exponential or logistic function (χ (2) = 21.7, df = 2, p < 0.001). The logistic function provided a better fit for the deoxy[Hb+Mb] response (χ (2) = 22.9, df = 2, p < 0.001) than did either the Gompertz or exponential functions. For both NIRS signals, the better fitting sigmoidal functions fit the data well, with an average r value of 0.99 or greater. Adipose tissue thickness was correlated with parameters related to signal strength (amplitude, r = 0.86-0.89; baseline, r = 0.67-0.75; all p < 0.001) but was not related to kinetic parameters (time constant and inflection point; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). These results suggest that during PORH distinct sigmoidal mathematical functions best describe the responses of the oxy[Hb+Mb] (Gompertz) and deoxy[Hb+Mb] (logistic) as measured by NIRS. Further, differences in both the kinetic and amplitude aspects for the responses of oxy[Hb+Mb] and deoxy[Hb+Mb] predict the observed transient change in T[Hb+Mb]. Our methods provide a technique to evaluate and quantify NIRS responses during PORH, which may have clinical utility.

  11. Non-cryogenic ultra-low field MRI of wrist-forearm area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savukov, I.; Karaulanov, T.; Wurden, C. J. V.; Schultz, L.

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI as an alternative to high field MRI can find some niche applications where high field is a liability. Previously we demonstrated hand images with a non-cryogenic ULF MRI system, but such a system was restrictive to the size of the imaging objects. We have modified the previous setup to increase the imaging volume and demonstrate the image of human hand near the wrist area. One goal for the demonstration is the evaluation of quality of larger bone structure to project image quality to other parts of extremities, such as elbows, shoulders, and knees. We found that after 12 min of acquisition, the image quality was quite satisfactory. To achieve this image quality, several problems were solved that appeared in the new system. The increase in the imaging volume size led to an increase in transient time and various measures were taken to reduce this time. We also explored a method of overcoming the artifacts and image quality reduction arising from field drifts present in the system due to heating of the coils. We believe that our results can be useful for evaluation of diagnostic capability of non-cryogenic ULF MRI of extremities and other parts of the body. The system can be also applied to image animals and tissues.

  12. Diagnostic Disparity in Solitary Cysticercosis of the Forearm in a Child.

    PubMed

    Naidu, R; Sankar, A; Shaila, M S; Shivananda, I; Desai, R

    2015-01-01

    Solitary cysticercosis of muscle is a rare disease causing diagnostic dilemma. Cysticercosis commonly affects the central nervous system and other tissues by dissemination imposing a serious health problem. We report this rare presentation of solitary cysticercosis of flexor digitorum superficialis in a five year old otherwise healthy child. The fine needle aspiration cytology and histopathological diagnosis were inconclusive but ultrasonography of the muscle clinched the diagnosis. PMID:26744203

  13. Monosynaptic reflexes in the superficial forearm flexors in man and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Deschuytere, J; Rosselle, N; De Keyser, C

    1976-06-01

    Indirect motor responses with the characteristics of the H wave were recorded from the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus muscles in normal adults. A series of experiments has been performed, constituting circumstantial arguments for the monosynaptic nature of these reflex responses. The findings in pathological conditions, which corroborated this point of view, are documented briefly.

  14. Load dependence of changes in forearm and peripheral vascular resistance after acute leg exercise in man.

    PubMed Central

    Piepoli, M; Isea, J E; Pannarale, G; Adamopoulos, S; Sleight, P; Coats, A J

    1994-01-01

    1. It is known that acute exercise is often followed by a reduction in arterial blood pressure. Little is known about the time course of the recovery of the blood pressure or the influence of the intensity of the exercise on this response. Controversy exists, in particular, concerning the changes in peripheral resistance that occur during this period. 2. Eight normal volunteers performed, in random order on separate days, voluntary upright bicycle exercise of three different intensities (maximal, moderate and minimal load) and, on another day, a control period of sitting on a bicycle. They were monitored for 60 min after each test. 3. Diastolic pressure fell after maximal exercise at 5 min (-15.45 mmHg) and 60 min (-9.45 mmHg), compared with the control day. Systolic and mean pressure also fell (non-significantly) after 45 min; heart rate was significantly elevated for the whole hour of recovery (at 60 min, +7.23 beats min-1). No changes in post-exercise blood pressure and heart rate were observed on the days of moderate and minimal exercises. 4. An increase in cardiac index was observed after maximal exercise compared with control (at 60 min, 2.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.2 l min-1 m-2). This was entirely accounted for by the persistent increase in heart rate, with no significant alteration in stroke volume after exercise on any day.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7965851

  15. Forearm Muscle Oxygenation Decreases During Low Levels of Brief, Isometric Contraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy Gita; Kahan, N. J.; Hargens, Alan R.; Rempel, D. M.; Hargens, Murthy G. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Regional muscle pain syndromes can be caused by repeated and sustained exertion of a specific muscle. Such exertion may elevate local tissue fluid pressure, reduce blood flow and tissue oxygenation (TO2), and cause fatigue, pain and functional deficits of the Involved muscle. Low levels (less than 20% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of prolonged static contraction of the upper extremity are common In many occupational settings and May cause fatigue. The purpose of our Investigation was to determine whether TO2 decreases significantly at low levels of static contraction of the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB).

  16. Baroreceptor unloading does not limit forearm sweat rate during severe passive heat stress.

    PubMed

    Schlader, Zachary J; Gagnon, Daniel; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-02-15

    This study tested the hypothesis that sweat rate during passive heat stress is limited by baroreceptor unloading associated with heat stress. Two protocols were performed in which healthy subjects underwent passive heat stress that elicited an increase in intestinal temperature of ∼1.8°C. Upon attaining this level of hyperthermia, in protocol 1 (n = 10, 3 females) a bolus (19 ml/kg) of warm (∼38°C) isotonic saline was rapidly (5-10 min) infused intravenously to elevate central venous pressure (CVP), while in protocol 2 (n = 11, 5 females) phenylephrine was infused intravenously (60-120 μg/min) to return mean arterial pressure (MAP) to normothermic levels. In protocol 1, heat stress reduced CVP from 3.9 ± 1.9 mmHg (normothermia) to -0.6 ± 1.4 mmHg (P < 0.001), while saline infusion returned CVP to normothermic levels (5.1 ± 1.7 mmHg; P > 0.999). Sweat rate was elevated by heat stress (1.21 ± 0.44 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1)) but remained unchanged during rapid saline infusion (1.26 ± 0.47 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P = 0.5), whereas cutaneous vascular conductance increased from 77 ± 10 to 101 ± 20% of local heating max (P = 0.029). In protocol 2, MAP was reduced with heat stress from 85 ± 7 mmHg to 76 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.048). Although phenylephrine infusion returned MAP to normothermic levels (88 ± 7 mmHg; P > 0.999), sweat rate remained unchanged during phenylephrine infusion (1.39 ± 0.22 vs. 1.41 ± 0.24 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1); P > 0.999). These data indicate that both cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor unloading do not limit increases in sweat rate during passive heat stress.

  17. Non-cryogenic ultra-low field MRI of wrist-forearm area.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I; Karaulanov, T; Wurden, C J V; Schultz, L

    2013-08-01

    Ultra-low field (ULF) MRI as an alternative to high field MRI can find some niche applications where high field is a liability. Previously we demonstrated hand images with a non-cryogenic ULF MRI system, but such a system was restrictive to the size of the imaging objects. We have modified the previous setup to increase the imaging volume and demonstrate the image of human hand near the wrist area. One goal for the demonstration is the evaluation of quality of larger bone structure to project image quality to other parts of extremities, such as elbows, shoulders, and knees. We found that after 12 min of acquisition, the image quality was quite satisfactory. To achieve this image quality, several problems were solved that appeared in the new system. The increase in the imaging volume size led to an increase in transient time and various measures were taken to reduce this time. We also explored a method of overcoming the artifacts and image quality reduction arising from field drifts present in the system due to heating of the coils. We believe that our results can be useful for evaluation of diagnostic capability of non-cryogenic ULF MRI of extremities and other parts of the body. The system can be also applied to image animals and tissues.

  18. Histological changes in radial forearm skin flaps in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A; Johnston, E; Badran, D H; Neilson, M; Soutar, D S; Robertson, A G; McDonald, S W

    2004-04-01

    We reported previously that skin flaps transplanted to the oral cavity in reconstructive surgery for oral cancer frequently acquired the gross appearance of buccal mucosa. The changes were shown to be reactive in nature. The "changed" flaps generally had a heavier infiltration of leukocytes in the dermis and appeared to have thicker epithelium. The present study quantifies these parameters, as well as the numbers of intraepithelial leukocytes. The flaps that had acquired the gross appearance of oral mucosa had significantly thicker epithelium, larger numbers of dermal leukocytes, and more intraepidermal inflammatory cells per unit length than flaps that retained the gross appearance of thin skin. No correlation was found between these changes and radiotherapy. PMID:15042571

  19. Acute forearm compressive myopathy syndrome secondary to upper limb entrapment: an unusual cause of renal failure.

    PubMed

    Tachtsi, Maria D; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Atmatzidis, Stefanos K; Papadimitriou, Dimitrios K; Atmatzidis, Konstantinos S

    2011-05-01

    Compressive myopathy syndrome (SCM) is a syndrome characterized by the lesion of skeletal muscle resulting in subsequent release of intracellular contents (myoglobin, creatine phosphokinase, potassium, etc.) into the circulatory system, which can cause potentially lethal complications. There are numerous causes that can lead to SCM resulting to acute rhabdomyolysis, and many patients present with multiple causes. The most common potentially lethal complication is acute renal failure. The occurrence of acute rhabdomyolysis should be considered as a possibility in any patient who can remain stationary for long periods, or is in a coma, or is intoxicated in any form. We report the rare case of a 26-year-old patient who developed SCM caused by ischemia reperfusion, with subsequent acute rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure after prolonged compression of the right upper extremity.

  20. [Kinesitherapy in the early postoperative period following intramedullary osteosynthesis of tibial fractures].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, D V; Vorob'ev, A V; Shimbaretskiĭ, A N; Komkova, O V

    2010-01-01

    A program of postoperative kinesitherapy oriented to normalize the muscular force of the shin, reduce the time needed to restore the weight-bearing function of the affected leg, and treat pain syndrome has been developed for the patients presenting with fractures, nonunions, and pseudoarthrosis of the tibia that were treated using intramedullary osteosynthesis. The efficacy of the program was evaluated in terms of restoration of the muscular force in the shin and improvement of microcirculation in the affected region. PMID:21089206

  1. Direction-specific diaphyseal geometry and mineral mass distribution of tibia and fibula: a pQCT study of female athletes representing different exercise loading types.

    PubMed

    Rantalainen, T; Nikander, R; Heinonen, A; Suominen, H; Sievänen, H

    2010-06-01

    Bones adapt to prevalent loading, which comprises mainly forces caused by muscle contractions. Therefore, we hypothesized that similar associations would be observed between neuromuscular performance and rigidity of bones located in the same body segment. These associations were assessed among 221 premenopausal women representing athletes in high-impact, odd-impact, high-magnitude, repetitive low-impact, and repetitive nonimpact sports and physically active referents aged 17-40 years. The whole group mean age and body mass were 23 (5) and 63 (9) kg, respectively. Bone cross sections at the tibial and fibular mid-diaphysis were assessed with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Density-weighted polar section modulus (SSI) and minimal and maximal cross-sectional moments of inertia (Imin, Imax) were analyzed. Bone morphology was described as the Imax/Imin ratio. Neuromuscular performance was assessed by maximal power during countermovement jump (CMJ). Tibial SSI was 31% higher in the high-impact, 19% in the odd-impact, and 30% in the repetitive low-impact groups compared with the reference group (P < 0.005). Only the high-impact group differed from the referents in fibular SSI (17%, P < 0.005). Tibial morphology differed between groups (P = 0.001), but fibular morphology did not (P = 0.247). The bone-by-group interaction was highly significant (P < 0.001). After controlling for height, weight, and age, the CMJ peak power correlated moderately with tibial SSI (r = 0.31, P < 0.001) but not with fibular SSI (r = 0.069, P = 0.313). In conclusion, observed differences in the association between neuromuscular performance and tibial and fibular traits suggest that the tibia and fibula experience different loading environments despite their anatomical vicinity.

  2. Flexible intramedullary nailing had better outcomes than kirschner wire fixation in children with distal humeral metaphyseal-diaphyseal junction fracture: a retrospective observational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yi-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Cai, Hai-Qing; Yang, Jie; Xu, Yun-Lan; Li, Yu-Chan

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness evaluation of flexible intramedullary nailing (FIN) and kirschner wire fixation (K-wire) used for MDJ fractures fixation have been described in multiple reports. But there have been few reports about comparison between FIN and K-wire in children with distal humeral MDJ fracture. In our retrospective study, Nineteen children received K-wire and twenty children received FIN, during the follow-up, six children in the K-wire group and one children in the FIN group was found to have postoperative cubitus varus; fixation method was an independent risk factor for postoperative cubitus varus (P = 0.001), fixation methods contributed significantly to operation time (t = 6.519, P < 0.001), surgical blood loss (t = 5.349, P < 0.001) and postoperative fracture healing time (t = 4.940, P < 0.001). We can conclude that FIN was related with lower incidence of postoperative cubitus varus, shorter operation time, less surgical blood loss and shorter fracture healing time compared to K-wire in children with MDJ fractures of the distal humerus. PMID:25419399

  3. [Open posterior dislocation of the elbow with fractures of the radial head and coronoid process and multiple diaphyseal fractures of the ulna].

    PubMed

    Visna, P; Kalvach, J; Beitl, E; Pilný, J; Cizmár, I

    2008-03-01

    A healthy, right-handed 34-year-old man was injured by repeated direct blows delivered to his left upper arm with a baseball bat. These blows led to a posterior dislocation of the elbow joint, associated with fractures of the radial head and the coronoid process. There was bone loss on the fractured joint surface of the olecranon, with simultaneous ipsilateral trauma to the ulna. The correct surgical approach in the case of such fractures is still the subject of some controversy. The treatment can have serious complications. The results of treatment are often poor, especially because of persisting instability and stiffness of the elbow following a long period of immobilisation. Few studies have been concentrated on this topic up to now. We report on the functional and radiological results 24 months after the treatment of this rare, open "shock triad in the elbow."

  4. Altered mineral metabolism in glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia. Effect of 25-hydroxyvitamin D administration.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, T J; Halstead, L R; Teitelbaum, S L; Hahn, B H

    1979-01-01

    Parameters of mineral and bone metabolism were studied in 17 patients treated chronically with supraphysiologic doses of glucocorticoids. When compared to 15 matched normal subjects, the patient group exhibited similar serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) levels, decreased intestinal 47Ca absorption, increased serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone, and decreased forearm bone mass. Iliac crest bone biopsies revealed a decreased bone formation rate and increased osteoclast number. Treatment with 25-OHD (mean dose 4.03 micrograms/d) and calcium (500 mg/d) in nine patients produced a 46% increase in 47Ca absorption (P less than 0.001) and a 54% decrease in serum immunoreactive parathyroid hormone (P less than 0.001) by 3 mo. In addition, by 12 mo the treatment group exhibited (a) a 13.2 +/- 5.1% increase in metaphyseal (P less than 0.001) and a 2.1 +/- 0.4% increase in diaphyseal (P less than 0.05) forearm bone mass, and (b) significant decreases in cortical and endosteal osteoclast number. Biochemical and bone mass changes persisted through 18 mo. No significant changes in any parameter occurred in eight control patients administered calcium 100 mg/d. It is concluded that treatment with 25-OHD and calcium can significantly improve parameters of mineral and bone metabolism in patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia. PMID:457875

  5. NOTCH signaling in skeletal progenitors is critical for fracture repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuicui; Inzana, Jason A.; Mirando, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhaoyang; Shen, Jie; O’Keefe, Regis J.; Awad, Hani A.; Hilton, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture nonunions develop in 10%–20% of patients with fractures, resulting in prolonged disability. Current data suggest that bone union during fracture repair is achieved via proliferation and differentiation of skeletal progenitors within periosteal and soft tissues surrounding bone, while bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) and other skeletal progenitors may also contribute. The NOTCH signaling pathway is a critical maintenance factor for BMSCs during skeletal development, although the precise role for NOTCH and the requisite nature of BMSCs following fracture is unknown. Here, we evaluated whether NOTCH and/or BMSCs are required for fracture repair by performing nonstabilized and stabilized fractures on NOTCH-deficient mice with targeted deletion of RBPjk in skeletal progenitors, maturing osteoblasts, and committed chondrocytes. We determined that removal of NOTCH signaling in BMSCs and subsequent depletion of this population result in fracture nonunion, as the fracture repair process was normal in animals harboring either osteoblast- or chondrocyte-specific deletion of RBPjk. Together, this work provides a genetic model of a fracture nonunion and demonstrates the requirement for NOTCH and BMSCs in fracture repair, irrespective of fracture stability and vascularity. PMID:26950423

  6. Activity-related sexual dimorphism in Alaskan foragers from Point Hope: Evidences from the upper limb.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Manyosa, Joan; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2015-01-01

    Ipiutak (100BCE-500CE) and Tigara (1200 - 1700CE) are two populations from Point Hope, Alaska. As commonly observed in forager communities, it may be expected males and females to have been involved in markedly different daily activities. Nevertheless, activity-related sexual dimorphism in these populations has been scarcely studied. Using humeral diaphyseal cross-sectional properties and forearm rotational efficiency, which are activity-dependent characteristics, we aim to assess differences between sexes and discuss what activities could have triggered them. Our results suggest that in Ipiutak males and females did not differ meaningfully in their cross-sectional properties. Conversely, in Tigara males had a greater rigidity of the entire humeral diaphysis than females, which suggests the existence of greater relative activity levels and more physically demanding tasks, possibly related to hunting activities. Concerning the differences between sexes in the forearm rotational efficiency, in Tigara females rotational efficiency in elbow flexion is maximal in a more supinated position than in males, which leads to an improvement of efficiency in those stages related to manipulation, and so improves the manipulative capacities of the upper limb. These differences in efficiency are caused by a more proximally oriented humeral medial epicondyle in females, which is thus confirmed to be a good feature to assess differences in labor. Therefore females in Tigara probably performed in a daily basis household activities, such as hide processing and other manipulative labors. In Ipiutak, the analysis of forearm rotational efficiency did not reveal differences between sexes. Overall, the results suggest that division of labor in Ipiutak was not as marked as in Tigara, where upper limb skeletal structure supports the idea that both sexes were involved in different daily activities. Nevertheless, the generalized lack of results in Ipiutak could be due to the small sample

  7. Short-Term Plasticity in a Monosynaptic Reflex Pathway to Forearm Muscles after Continuous Robot-Assisted Passive Stepping

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Kitamura, Taku; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Both active and passive rhythmic limb movements reduce the amplitude of spinal cord Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in muscles of moving and distant limbs. This could have clinical utility in remote modulation of the pathologically hyperactive reflexes found in spasticity after stroke or spinal cord injury. However, such clinical translation is currently hampered by a lack of critical information regarding the minimum or effective duration of passive movement needed for modulating spinal cord excitability. We therefore investigated the H-reflex modulation in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during and after various durations (5, 10, 15, and 30 min) of passive stepping in 11 neurologically normal subjects. Passive stepping was performed by a robotic gait trainer system (Lokomat®) while a single pulse of electrical stimulation to the median nerve elicited H-reflexes in the FCR. The amplitude of the FCR H-reflex was significantly suppressed during passive stepping. Although 30 min of passive stepping was sufficient to elicit a persistent H-reflex suppression that lasted up to 15 min, 5 min of passive stepping was not. The duration of H-reflex suppression correlated with that of the stepping. These findings suggest that the accumulation of stepping-related afferent feedback from the leg plays a role in generating short-term interlimb plasticity in the circuitry of the FCR H-reflex. PMID:27499737

  8. Climbing-specific finger flexor performance and forearm muscle oxygenation in elite male and female sport climbers.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Marc; Wegst, Daniel; Müller, Tom; Raschner, Christian; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-08-01

    Climbing performance relies to a great extent on the performance of the finger flexor muscles. Only a few studies investigated this performance in top class climbers and only one study compared gender-specific differences. This study investigated the climbing-specific finger flexor strength and endurance and related muscular oxygenation in 12 elite female and male climbers and 12 non-climbers. After the assessment of maximum voluntary finger flexor contraction (MVC), two isometric finger flexor endurance tests were performed at 40% MVC until exhaustion. A continuous isometric test was followed by an intermittent isometric test (10 s contraction, 3 s rest). Changes in oxygenation of finger flexor muscles were recorded using near infrared spectroscopy. MVC and strength-to-weight ratio were greater in climbers than non-climbers (P = 0.003; P < 0.001) and greater in men than women (P < 0.001; P = 0.002). Time to task failure for the intermittent test and the force-time integrals for the continuous and the intermittent test were also significantly greater in climbers (P = 0.030; P = 0.027; P = 0.005). During the intermittent test, re-oxygenation of the working muscles was faster in climbers (P < 0.05) without gender-specific differences. Close correlations were demonstrated between the best on-sight climbing performance and strength-to-weight ratio (r (2) = 0.946, P < 0.001) only in female climbers. The superior intermittent finger flexor endurance of climbers over non-climbers may be explained by the faster re-oxygenation of the finger flexor muscles during the short rest phases.

  9. Excitability changes in human forearm corticospinal projections and spinal reflex pathways during rhythmic voluntary movement of the opposite limb

    PubMed Central

    Carson, R G; Riek, S; Mackey, D C; Meichenbaum, D P; Willms, K; Forner, M; Byblow, W D

    2004-01-01

    Rhythmic movements brought about by the contraction of muscles on one side of the body give rise to phase-locked changes in the excitability of the homologous motor pathways of the opposite limb. Such crossed facilitation should favour patterns of bimanual coordination in which homologous muscles are engaged simultaneously, and disrupt those in which the muscles are activated in an alternating fashion. In order to examine these issues, we obtained responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary-evoked potentials, CMEPs), to peripheral nerve stimulation (H-reflexes and f-waves), and elicited stretch reflexes in the relaxed right flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during rhythmic (2 Hz) flexion and extension movements of the opposite (left) wrist. The potentials evoked by TMS in right FCR were potentiated during the phases of movement in which the left FCR was most strongly engaged. In contrast, CMEPs were unaffected by the movements of the opposite limb. These results suggest that there was systematic variation of the excitability of the motor cortex ipsilateral to the moving limb. H-reflexes and stretch reflexes recorded in right FCR were modulated in phase with the activation of left FCR. As the f-waves did not vary in corresponding fashion, it appears that the phasic modulation of the H-reflex was mediated by presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. The observation that both H-reflexes and f-waves were depressed markedly during movements of the opposite indicates that there may also have been postsynaptic inhibition or disfacilitation of the largest motor units. Our findings indicate that the patterned modulation of excitability in motor pathways that occurs during rhythmic movements of the opposite limb is mediated primarily by interhemispheric interactions between cortical motor areas. PMID:15331684

  10. Effect of Long-Term Use of Bisphosphonates on Forearm Bone: Atypical Ulna Fractures in Elderly Woman with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Atbasi, Zafer; Kavadar, Gülis; Demiralp, Bahtiyar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common musculoskeletal disease of the elderly population characterized by decreased bone mineral density and subsequent fractures. Bisphosphonates are a widely accepted drug therapy which act through inhibition of bone resorption and prevent fractures. However, in long-term use, atypical bisphosphonate induced fractures may occur, particularly involving the lower weight bearing extremity. Atypical ulna fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate use is rarely reported in current literature. We present a 62-year-old woman with atypical ulna due to long-term alendronate therapy without a history of trauma or fall. Clinicians should be aware of stress fracture in a patient who has complaints of upper extremity pain and history of long-term bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:27595031

  11. Effect of Long-Term Use of Bisphosphonates on Forearm Bone: Atypical Ulna Fractures in Elderly Woman with Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Yusuf; Atbasi, Zafer; Emre, Tuluhan Yunus; Kavadar, Gülis; Demiralp, Bahtiyar

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common musculoskeletal disease of the elderly population characterized by decreased bone mineral density and subsequent fractures. Bisphosphonates are a widely accepted drug therapy which act through inhibition of bone resorption and prevent fractures. However, in long-term use, atypical bisphosphonate induced fractures may occur, particularly involving the lower weight bearing extremity. Atypical ulna fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate use is rarely reported in current literature. We present a 62-year-old woman with atypical ulna due to long-term alendronate therapy without a history of trauma or fall. Clinicians should be aware of stress fracture in a patient who has complaints of upper extremity pain and history of long-term bisphosphonate therapy. PMID:27595031

  12. Short-Term Plasticity in a Monosynaptic Reflex Pathway to Forearm Muscles after Continuous Robot-Assisted Passive Stepping.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Kitamura, Taku; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Both active and passive rhythmic limb movements reduce the amplitude of spinal cord Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in muscles of moving and distant limbs. This could have clinical utility in remote modulation of the pathologically hyperactive reflexes found in spasticity after stroke or spinal cord injury. However, such clinical translation is currently hampered by a lack of critical information regarding the minimum or effective duration of passive movement needed for modulating spinal cord excitability. We therefore investigated the H-reflex modulation in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during and after various durations (5, 10, 15, and 30 min) of passive stepping in 11 neurologically normal subjects. Passive stepping was performed by a robotic gait trainer system (Lokomat(®)) while a single pulse of electrical stimulation to the median nerve elicited H-reflexes in the FCR. The amplitude of the FCR H-reflex was significantly suppressed during passive stepping. Although 30 min of passive stepping was sufficient to elicit a persistent H-reflex suppression that lasted up to 15 min, 5 min of passive stepping was not. The duration of H-reflex suppression correlated with that of the stepping. These findings suggest that the accumulation of stepping-related afferent feedback from the leg plays a role in generating short-term interlimb plasticity in the circuitry of the FCR H-reflex.

  13. Swollen right hand and forearm · minor trauma to hand · previous diagnosis of cellulitis · Dx?

    PubMed

    Rahal, Ahmad; Farhoud, Mahmoud; Gaines, Melissa

    2016-08-01

    A 63-year-old woman with a history of hyperlipidemia presented to our hospital with a swollen right hand. The patient noted that she had closed her hand in a car door one week earlier, causing minor trauma to the right third metacarpophalangeal joint. Shortly after injuring her hand, she'd sought care at an outpatient facility, where she was given a diagnosis of cellulitis and a prescription for an oral antibiotic. The swelling, however, worsened, prompting her visit to our hospital. PMID:27660839

  14. La diaphyse fémorale droite du squelette néandertalien de Saint-Césaire (Charente, France)The right femoral shaft of the Neanderthal skeleton of Saint-Césaire (Charente, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Prete, Aurélie; Vandermeersch, Bernard

    2001-07-01

    The Neanderthal skeleton from Saint-Césaire (France) shows a fragmentary right femora. We have decided to study the morphology and the metric proportions of this fragment. We have made a comparison with the other Neanderthal femora and with a sample of recent humans ( N=181) from European collections. It seems that this fragment of femora is clearly identical to other Neanderthal femora.

  15. A Case of Intractable Left Forearm Congenital Arteriovenous Fistula Ending with Amputation: Importance of New Medical Information Obtained via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiajia; Shimada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to consider the importance of medical information obtained via the Internet for difficult cases in hospitals, especially in those located in rural areas. We report here a case of congenital arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in the upper extremities. Patient: A 30-year-old lady was transported to our hospital by ambulance due to massive bleeding in her left hand. She was seen by our current cardiovascular surgery team for the first time, although she had been diagnosed with congenital AVF of the left arm 9 years previously. Because it was asymptomatic, she was followed up by observation. During 5 years of observation, symptoms such as cyanosis, pain, and refractory ulcers gradually developed. When she was 26 years old, she was referred to a university hospital in Akita, but surgery had already been judged to be impossible. When she was 30 years old, traumatic bleeding in her left hand and hemorrhagic shock led her to be taken to our hospital by ambulance. Using the Internet, we found an institution that had treated a large number of cases of AVF. After controlling the bleeding, we referred her to that institution. However, she could not be treated without an above-elbow amputation. Conclusion: Congenital AVF in the upper extremities is a rare vascular anomaly and has been generally accepted to be an extremely difficult disease to treat. Treatment should be started as early as possible before the presence of any symptoms. When a specialist is not available near the hospital, precise information must be found using the Internet and the patient should be referred without any delay. PMID:25650050

  16. Implications of the functional anatomy of the hand and forearm of Ailurus fulgens (Carnivora, Ailuridae) for the evolution of the 'false-thumb' in pandas.

    PubMed

    Antón, Mauricio; Salesa, Manuel J; Pastor, Juan F; Peigné, Stéphane; Morales, Jorge

    2006-12-01

    Both the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and the red panda (Ailurus fulgens) possess a 'false-thumb', actually an enlarged radial sesamoid bone, which contributes to the gripping action of the hand. These species are not closely related, however, as one is an ursid and the other an ailurid, so the fact that they share this adaptation implies a remarkable convergence. We studied the functional anatomy of this structure in the red panda, comparing it with existing descriptions of the grasping mechanism in both pandas. Previous interpretations of the radial sesamoid in Ailurus as a rod-like structure without direct articulation to the wrist bones are inaccurate. There are various important differences between the red panda and the giant panda. In the former, the lesser development of the radial sesamoid, its connection with the flexor retinaculum, the presence of an insertion of the muscle abductor pollicis longus in the first metacarpal, which enhances its supinatory action, and the presence of a muscle flexor brevis digitorum manus point to thin-branch climbing features serving as an exaptation to the more recent role of the red panda hand in the manipulation of bamboo.

  17. Environmental and organizational factors associated with elbow/forearm and hand/wrist disorder among sewing machine operators of garment industry in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kebede Deyyas, Wakjira; Tafese, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health problems related to upper limp musculoskeletal disorders were the major issue among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Galan City, Oromia Regional State. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 30, 2012. A total of 422 study subjects were included in this study. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on musculoskeletal symptom, sociodemographic data, and factors associated with the problems through face to face interview. From a total of 422 sewing machine operators included in the study 370 (87.7%) were females and 306 (72.5%) were in the age group of <30 years. The prevalence of self-reported work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders was 40% and 37.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, those who had >16 years of service were about five times more likely to develop elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders than those who had short (1-5 years) year of services [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.55-13.02], physical activities [AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 1.57-16.00], and methods of payment [AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.23-3.28], factors significantly associated with this disorders. Work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders were high among sewing machine operators in selected garment industries. Moreover, personal and environmental factors were identified as the potential risk factors related to elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among the study group. Therefore, government and the owner of the garment industries should give special attention to prevent and control the problems through proper occupational health and safety policy implementation in the country.

  18. Environmental and Organizational Factors Associated with Elbow/Forearm and Hand/Wrist Disorder among Sewing Machine Operators of Garment Industry in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede Deyyas, Wakjira; Tafese, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health problems related to upper limp musculoskeletal disorders were the major issue among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Galan City, Oromia Regional State. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 30, 2012. A total of 422 study subjects were included in this study. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on musculoskeletal symptom, sociodemographic data, and factors associated with the problems through face to face interview. From a total of 422 sewing machine operators included in the study 370 (87.7%) were females and 306 (72.5%) were in the age group of <30 years. The prevalence of self-reported work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders was 40% and 37.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, those who had >16 years of service were about five times more likely to develop elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders than those who had short (1–5 years) year of services [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.55–13.02], physical activities [AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 1.57–16.00], and methods of payment [AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.23–3.28], factors significantly associated with this disorders. Work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders were high among sewing machine operators in selected garment industries. Moreover, personal and environmental factors were identified as the potential risk factors related to elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among the study group. Therefore, government and the owner of the garment industries should give special attention to prevent and control the problems through proper occupational health and safety policy implementation in the country. PMID:25298780

  19. [The "Muffplastik"--a Fasciocutaneous Reconstruction Technique in a Case of Extensive Soft Tissue Defect of the Distal Forearm--Historical Technique or Salvage Procedure?].

    PubMed

    Wimmer, M D; Philipps, H M; Windemuth, M; Burger, C; Müller, M C

    2016-02-01

    We present a case of a distant pedicled flap to reconstruct a defect at the distal upper extremity. We used this flap as a salvage procedure to treat a patient in the intensive care unit who was in a reduced general condition with numerous comorbidities that made regional or free microvascular flaps hazardous. PMID:26662368

  20. Prolonged performance of a high repetition low force task induces bone adaptation in young adult rats, but loss in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14-18 months of age) and 14 young adult (2.5-6.5 months of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes. PMID:26517953

  1. Prolonged performance of a high repetition low force task induces bone adaptation in young adult rats, but loss in mature rats.

    PubMed

    Massicotte, Vicky S; Frara, Nagat; Harris, Michele Y; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steven N; Barbe, Mary F

    2015-12-01

    We have shown that prolonged repetitive reaching and grasping tasks lead to exposure-dependent changes in bone microarchitecture and inflammatory cytokines in young adult rats. Since aging mammals show increased tissue inflammatory cytokines, we sought here to determine if aging, combined with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task, enhances bone loss. We examined the radius, forearm flexor muscles, and serum from 16 mature (14-18 months of age) and 14 young adult (2.5-6.5 months of age) female rats after performance of a high repetition low force (HRLF) reaching and grasping task for 12 weeks. Young adult HRLF rats showed enhanced radial bone growth (e.g., increased trabecular bone volume, osteoblast numbers, bone formation rate, and mid-diaphyseal periosteal perimeter), compared to age-matched controls. Mature HRLF rats showed several indices of radial bone loss (e.g., decreased trabecular bone volume, and increased cortical bone thinning, porosity, resorptive spaces and woven bone formation), increased osteoclast numbers and inflammatory cytokines, compared to age-matched controls and young adult HRLF rats. Mature rats weighed more yet had lower maximum reflexive grip strength, than young adult rats, although each age group was able to pull at the required reach rate (4 reaches/min) and required submaximal pulling force (30 force-grams) for a food reward. Serum estrogen levels and flexor digitorum muscle size were similar in each age group. Thus, mature rats had increased bone degradative changes than in young adult rats performing the same repetitive task for 12 weeks, with increased inflammatory cytokine responses and osteoclast activity as possible causes.

  2. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion.

  3. Bone healing induced by ESWT

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Biagio; Notarnicola, Angela; Moretti, Lorenzo; Patella, Silvio; Tatò, Ilaria; Patella, Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    It has been at least two decades since the introduction of Extracorporeal Shock-Wave Treatment (ESWT) for the treatment of non-unions; despite conflicting opinions in the literature, it is recently achieving good results also in acute fractures. This paper reports Authors’ clinical experience with electromagnetic shock-waves in the treatment of delayed unions and fresh fractures. Nonunion cases experienced remarkable successful results at an average of 8-10 weeks after ESWT; high success rate is been also found for the acute fractures. It can be concluded that this therapy constitutes an important aid in treatment of non-unions and can be useful also in fresh bone fractures. PMID:22461166

  4. Can we achieve bone healing using the diamond concept without bone grafting for recalcitrant tibial nonunions?

    PubMed

    Ollivier, M; Gay, A M; Cerlier, A; Lunebourg, A; Argenson, J N; Parratte, S

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a combination of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 7 (rhBMP-7) and resorbable calcium phosphate bone substitute (rCPBS) as a salvage solution for recalcitrant tibial fracture nonunions. Twenty consecutive patients, 16 male and four female, with a mean age of 46.8±15.7 years (21-78) and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 24.2±5.3kgm(-2) (21.5-28.5), suffering from 20 recalcitrant tibial fracture nonunions were included. The mean number of operations performed prior to the procedure was 3.3, with homolateral iliac crest bone grafts being used for all of the patients. All patients were treated with a procedure including debridement and decortications of the bone ends, nonunion fixation with a locking plate, and filling of the bony defect with a combined graft of rhBMP-7 (as osteoinductor) with an rCPBS (as scaffold). The mean follow-up was 14±2.7 months. Both clinical and radiological union occurred in 18 cases, within a mean time of 4.7±3.2 months. A recurrence of deep infection was diagnosed for one of the non-consolidated patients. No specific complication of rCPBS or rhBMP-7 was encountered. This study supports the view that the application of rCPBS combined with rhBMP-7, without any bone grafting, is safe and efficient in the treatment of recalcitrant bone union. PMID:25933808

  5. Bone Morphogenetic Protein for the Healing of Tibial Fracture: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chaoyin; Wang, Chunyang; Chen, Hua; Chai, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review the evidence from RCTs on clinical outcomes and benefit of acute tibial fracture and nonunion treated with and without BMPs. Material We searched multiple databases (MEDLINE, EMABSE, BIOSIS and Cochrane central) as well as reference lists of articles and contacted authors. Evaluated outcomes included union rate, revision rate, hardware failure and infection. The weighted and standard mean difference (WMD and SMD) or the relative risk (RR) was calculated for continuous or dichotomous data respectively. The quality of the trial was assessed, and meta-analyses were performed with the Cochrane Collaboration’s REVMAN 5.0 software. Results Eight RCTs involving 1113 patients were included. For acute tibial fracture, BMP group was associated with a higher rate of union (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.30) and a lower rate of revision (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.85) compared with control group. No significant differences were found in rate of hardware failure and infection. The pooled RR for achieving union for tibial fracture nonunion was 0.98 (95% CI, 0.86 to 1.13). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the rate of revision (RR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.13 to 1.85) and infection (RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.02). Conclusion Study on acute tibial fractures suggests that BMP is more effective that controls, for bone union and for decreasing the rate of surgical revision to achieve union. For the treatment of tibial fracture nonunion, BMP leads to similar results to as autogenous bone grafting. Finally, well-designed RCTs of BMP for tibial fracture treatment are also needed. PMID:26509264

  6. Locomotor behavior and long bone morphology in individual free-ranging chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kristian J; Doran-Sheehy, Diane M; Hunt, Kevin D; Nishida, Toshisada; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Boesch, Christophe

    2006-04-01

    We combine structural limb data and behavioral data for free-ranging chimpanzees from Taï (Ivory Coast) and Mahale National Parks (Tanzania) to begin to consider the relationship between individual variation in locomotor activity and morphology. Femoral and humeral cross sections of ten individuals were acquired via computed tomography. Locomotor profiles of seven individuals were constructed from 3387 instantaneous time-point observations (87.4 hours). Within the limited number of suitable chimpanzees, individual variation in locomotor profiles displayed neither clear nor consistent trends with diaphyseal cross-sectional shapes. The percentages of specific locomotor modes did not relate well to diaphyseal shapes since neither infrequent nor frequent locomotor modes varied consistently with shapes. The percentage of arboreal locomotion, rather than estimated body mass, apparently had comparatively greater biological relevance to variation in diaphyseal shape. The mechanical consequences of locomotor modes on femoral and humeral diaphyseal shapes (e.g., orientation of bending strains) may overlap between naturalistic modes more than currently is recognized. Alternatively, diaphyseal shape may be unresponsive to mechanical demands of these specific locomotor modes. More data are needed in order to discern between these possibilities. Increasing the sample to include additional free-ranging chimpanzees, or primates in general, as well as devoting more attention to the mechanics of a greater variety of naturalistic locomotor modes would be fruitful to understanding the behavioral basis of diaphyseal shapes.

  7. Effects of low-intensity AC and/or DC electromagnetic fields on cell attachment and induction of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, N C; Ricci, J; Breger, L; Zychlinsky, A; Solomon, H; Chen, G G; Kuznetsov, D; Dorfman, R

    1997-01-01

    Rat tendon fibroblast (RTF) and rat bone marrow (RBM) osteoprogenitor cells were cultured and exposed to AC and/or DC magnetic fields in a triaxial Helmholtz coil in an incubator for up to 13 days. The AC fields were at 60 and 1000 Hz and up to 0.25 mT peak to peak, and the DC fields were up to 0.25 mT. At various combinations of field strengths and frequencies, AC and/or DC fields resulted in extensive detachment of preattached cells and prevented the normal attachment of cells not previously attached to substrates. In addition, the fields resulted in altered cell morphologies. When RTF and RBM cells were removed from the fields after several days of exposure, they partially reattached and assumed more normal morphologies. An additional set of experiments described in the Appendix corroborates these findings and also shows that low-frequency EMF also initiates apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death, at the onset of cell detachment. Taken together, these results suggest that the electromagnetic fields result in significant alterations in cell metabolism and cytoskeleton structure. Further work is required to determine the relative effect of the electric and magnetic fields on these phenomena. The research has implications for understanding the role of fields in affecting bone healing in fracture nonunions, in cell detachment in cancer metastasis, and in the effect of EMF on organisms generally.

  8. Biomechanical analyses of static and dynamic fixation techniques of retrograde interlocking femoral nailing using nonlinear finite element methods.

    PubMed

    Shih, Kao-Shang; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Hsu, Tzu-Pin; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Liaw, Chen-Kun

    2014-02-01

    Femoral shaft fractures can be treated using retrograde interlocking nailing systems; however, fracture nonunion still occurs. Dynamic fixation techniques, which remove either the proximal or distal locking screws, have been used to solve the problem of nonunion. In addition, a surgical rule for dynamic fixation techniques has been defined based on past clinical reports. However, the biomechanical performance of the retrograde interlocking nailing systems with either the traditional static fixation technique or the dynamic fixation techniques has not been investigated by using nonlinear numerical modeling. Three-dimensional nonlinear finite element models were developed, and the implant strength, fixation stability, and contact area of the fracture surfaces were evaluated. Three types of femoral shaft fractures (a proximal femoral shaft fracture, a middle femoral shaft fracture, and a distal femoral shaft fracture) fixed by three fixation techniques (insertion of all the locking screws, removal of the proximal locking screws, or removal of the distal locking screws) were analyzed. The results showed that the static fixation technique resulted in sufficient fixation stability and that the dynamic fixation techniques decreased the failure risk of the implant and produced a larger contact area of the fracture surfaces. The outcomes of the current study could assist orthopedic surgeons in comprehending the biomechanical performances of both static and dynamic fixation techniques. In addition, the surgeons could also select a fixation technique based on the specific patient situation using the numerical outcomes of this study.

  9. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): Utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Summary The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception. PMID:22847209

  10. Effects of low-intensity AC and/or DC electromagnetic fields on cell attachment and induction of apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, N.C.; Ricci, J.; Breger, L.; Zychlinsky, A.; Solomon, H.; Chen, G.G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Dorfman, R.

    1997-05-01

    Rat tendon fibroblast (RTF) and rat bone marrow (RBM) osteoprogenitor cells were cultured and exposed to AC and/or DC magnetic fields in a triaxial Helmholtz coil in an incubator for up to 13 days. The AC fields were at 60 and 1,000 Hz and up to 0.25 mT peak to peak, and the DC fields were up to 0.25 mT. At various combinations of field strengths and frequencies, AC and/or DC fields resulted in extensive detachment of preattached cells and prevented the normal attachment of cells not previously attached to substrates. In addition, the fields resulted in altered cell morphologies. When RTF and RBM cells were removed from the fields after several days of exposure, they partially reattached and assumed more normal morphologies. An additional set of experiments described in the Appendix corroborates these findings and also shows that low-frequency EMF also initiates apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death, at the onset of cell detachment. Taken together, these results suggest that the electromagnetic fields result in significant alterations in cell metabolism and cytoskeleton structure. Further work is required to determine the relative effect of the electric and magnetic fields on these phenomena. The research has implications for understanding the role of fields in affecting bone healing in fracture nonunions, in cell detachment in cancer metastasis, and in the effect of EMF on organisms generally.

  11. The Meniscus-Deficient Knee

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Allison J.; Erickson, Brandon J.; Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Yanke, Adam B.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cole, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are the most common knee injury, and partial meniscectomies are the most common orthopaedic surgical procedure. The injured meniscus has an impaired ability to distribute load and resist tibial translation. Partial or complete loss of the meniscus promotes early development of chondromalacia and osteoarthritis. The primary goal of treatment for meniscus-deficient knees is to provide symptomatic relief, ideally to delay advanced joint space narrowing, and ultimately, joint replacement. Surgical treatments, including meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT), high tibial osteotomy (HTO), and distal femoral osteotomy (DFO), are options that attempt to decrease the loads on the articular cartilage of the meniscus-deficient compartment by replacing meniscal tissue or altering joint alignment. Clinical and biomechanical studies have reported promising outcomes for MAT, HTO, and DFO in the postmeniscectomized knee. These procedures can be performed alone or in conjunction with ligament reconstruction or chondral procedures (reparative, restorative, or reconstructive) to optimize stability and longevity of the knee. Complications can include fracture, nonunion, patella baja, compartment syndrome, infection, and deep venous thrombosis. MAT, HTO, and DFO are effective options for young patients suffering from pain and functional limitations secondary to meniscal deficiency. PMID:26779547

  12. Are atrophic long-bone nonunions associated with low-grade infections?

    PubMed Central

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Spranger, Ole; Gantz, Simone; Burckhardt, Irene; Zimmermann, Stefan; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Moghaddam, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing, especially when associated with bacterial infection, is a severe complication following long-bone fractures and requires special treatment. Because standard diagnostic techniques might provide falsely negative results, we evaluated the sonication method for detection of bacteria on implants of patients with fracture nonunions. A total of 49 patients with a nonunion (group NU) and, for comparison, 45 patients who had undergone routine removal of osteosynthetic material (group OM), were included in the study. Five different diagnostic methods (culture of tissue samples, culture of intraoperative swabs, histopathology of tissue samples, culture of sonication fluid, and 16S ribosomal DNA polymerase chain reaction of sonication fluid) were compared and related to clinical data. Among the diagnostic tests, culture of sonication fluid demonstrated by far the highest detection rate of bacteria (57%) in group NU, and rather unexpectedly 40% in group OM. Culture of sonication samples also revealed a broad spectrum of bacteria, in particular Propionibacterium spp. In conclusion, our results indicate that more bacteria can be detected on implants of patients with atrophic nonunions of long-bone fractures by means of the sonication procedure, which provides a valuable additional diagnostic tool to decide on a surgical procedure (eg, two-step procedure) and to further specify antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26719698

  13. Smoking cessation and bone healing: optimal cessation timing.

    PubMed

    Truntzer, Jeremy; Vopat, Bryan; Feldstein, Michael; Matityahu, Amir

    2015-02-01

    Smoking is a worldwide epidemic. Complications related to smoking behavior generate an economic loss around $193 billion annually. In addition to impacting chronic health conditions, smoking is linked to increased perioperative complications in those with current or previous smoking history. Numerous studies have demonstrated more frequent surgical complications including higher rates of infection, poor wound healing, heightened pain complaints, and increased pulmonary morbidities in patients with a smoking history. Longer preoperative cessation periods also seem to correlate with reduced rates. At roughly 4 weeks of cessation prior to surgery, complication rates more closely reflect individuals without a smoking history in comparison with those that smoke within 4 weeks of surgery. In the musculoskeletal system, a similar trend has been observed in smokers with higher rates of fractures, nonunions, malunions, infections, osteomyelitis, and lower functional scores compared to non-smoking patients. Unfortunately, the present literature lacks robust data suggesting a temporal relationship between smoking cessation and bone healing. In our review, we analyze pseudoarthrosis rates following spinal fusion to suggest that bone healing in the context of smoking behavior follows a similar time sequence as observed in wound healing. We also discuss the implications for further clarity on bone healing and smoking cessation within orthopedics including improved risk stratification and better identification of circumstances where adjunct therapy is appropriate.

  14. Retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through ipsilateral traumatic amputation sites.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Chi, Benjamin B; Gordon, Wade T; Potter, Benjamin K

    2015-06-01

    The technique of retrograde intramedullary fixation of fractures through open traumatic amputations has not been previously described. We performed a retrospective case series at a tertiary-care military hospital setting. Ten patients met inclusion criteria. All were male, and all were injured through improvised explosive device. Outcome measures included the incidence of fracture nonunion, osteomyelitis or acute infection, heterotopic ossification (HO), as well as successful prosthesis fitting and ambulation. Average time to fixation after injury and amputation closure was 11.7 and 12.2 days, respectively. Follow-up averaged 20.2 months. The radiographic union rate was 100%, and time to osseous union averaged 7.5 months. One patient had an amputation site infection requiring revision, but none of the nails was removed for infectious reasons. HO occurred in 7 patients, and 2 patients required revision for symptomatic HO. All patients were successfully fitted with prostheses and able to ambulate. To our knowledge, this is the only series in the literature to specifically describe retrograde intramedullary fixation of long bone fractures through the zone of traumatic amputation sites. The infectious risk is relatively low, whereas the union rate (100%) and successful prosthesis fitting are high. For patients with similar injuries, retrograde intramedullary fixation through the zone of amputation is a viable treatment option.

  15. A novel bionic design of dental implant for promoting its long-term success using nerve growth factor (NGF): utilizing nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Yao, Yang; Wang, Yanying; Wu, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ping

    2012-08-01

    The absence of periodontium causes masticatory load in excess of the self-repairing potential of peri-implant bone; peri-implant bone loss caused by occlusal overload is not uncommon in patients and greatly diminishes chances of long-term success. Regenerative treatments may be useful in inducing peri-implant bone regeneration, but are only stopgap solutions to the aftermaths caused by the imperfect biomechanical compatibility of the dental implant. Despite promising success, the tissue-engineered periodontal ligament still needs a period of time to be perfected before being clinically applied. Hence, we propose a novel design of dental implant that utilizes nano-springs to construct a stress-cushioning structure inside the implant. Many studies have shown that NGF, a neurotrophin, is effective for nerve regeneration in both animal and clinical studies. Moreover, NGF has the potential to accelerate bone healing in patients with fracture and fracture nonunion and improve osseointegration of the implant. The key point of the design is to reduce stress concentrated around peri-implant bone by cushioning masticatory forces and distributing them to all the peri-implant bone through nano-springs, and promote osseoperception and osseointegration by NGF-induced nerve regeneration and new bone formation. This design, which transfers the main biomechanical interface of the implant from outside to inside, if proven to be valid, may to some extent compensate for the functions of lost periodontium in stress cushioning and proprioception.

  16. Recent advances in bone regeneration using adult stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zigdon-Giladi, Hadar; Rudich, Utai; Michaeli Geller, Gal; Evron, Ayelet

    2015-04-26

    Bone is a highly vascularized tissue reliant on the close spatial and temporal association between blood vessels and bone cells. Therefore, cells that participate in vasculogenesis and osteogenesis play a pivotal role in bone formation during prenatal and postnatal periods. Nevertheless, spontaneous healing of bone fracture is occasionally impaired due to insufficient blood and cellular supply to the site of injury. In these cases, bone regeneration process is interrupted, which might result in delayed union or even nonunion of the fracture. Nonunion fracture is difficult to treat and have a high financial impact. In the last decade, numerous technological advancements in bone tissue engineering and cell-therapy opened new horizon in the field of bone regeneration. This review starts with presentation of the biological processes involved in bone development, bone remodeling, fracture healing process and the microenvironment at bone healing sites. Then, we discuss the rationale for using adult stem cells and listed the characteristics of the available cells for bone regeneration. The mechanism of action and epigenetic regulations for osteogenic differentiation are also described. Finally, we review the literature for translational and clinical trials that investigated the use of adult stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells and CD34(+) blood progenitors) for bone regeneration.

  17. Attempting primary closure for all open fractures: the effectiveness of an institutional protocol

    PubMed Central

    Moola, Farhad O.; Carli, Alberto; Berry, Gregory K.; Reindl, Rudolf; Jacks, Duncan; Harvey, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate primary closure of open fractures has been historically believed to increase the risk of wound infection and fracture nonunion. Recent literature has challenged this belief, but uncertainty remains as to whether primary closure can be used as routine practice. This study evaluates the impact of an institutional protocol mandating primary closure for all open fractures. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all open fractures treated in a single level 1 trauma centre in a 5-year period. Prior to the study, a protocol was adopted standardizing management of open fractures and advocating primary closure of all wounds as a necessary goal of operative treatment. Patient and fracture characteristics, type of wound closure and development of infectious and bone healing complications were evaluated from time of injury to completion of outpatient follow-up. Results A total of 297 open fractures were treated, 255 (85.8%) of them with immediate primary closure. Type III open injuries accounted for 24% of all injuries. Wounds that were immediately closed had a superficial infection rate of 11% and a deep infection rate of 4.7%. Both proportions are equivalent to or lower than historical controls for delayed closure. Fracture classification, velocity of trauma and time to wound closure did not correlate significantly with infection, delayed union or nonunion. Conclusion Attempting primary closure for all open fractures is a safe and efficient practice that does not increase the postoperative risk of infection and delayed union or nonunion. PMID:24869621

  18. Cortical structure of hallucal metatarsals and locomotor adaptations in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Jashashvili, Tea; Dowdeswell, Mark R; Lebrun, Renaud; Carlson, Kristian J

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal morphology of long bones, in part, reflects in vivo loads experienced during the lifetime of an individual. The first metatarsal, as a cornerstone structure of the foot, presumably expresses diaphyseal morphology that reflects loading history of the foot during stance phase of gait. Human feet differ substantially from those of other apes in terms of loading histories when comparing the path of the center of pressure during stance phase, which reflects different weight transfer mechanisms. Here we use a novel approach for quantifying continuous thickness and cross-sectional geometric properties of long bones in order to test explicit hypotheses about loading histories and diaphyseal structure of adult chimpanzee, gorilla, and human first metatarsals. For each hallucal metatarsal, 17 cross sections were extracted at regularly-spaced intervals (2.5% length) between 25% and 65% length. Cortical thickness in cross sections was measured in one degree radially-arranged increments, while second moments of area were measured about neutral axes also in one degree radially-arranged increments. Standardized thicknesses and second moments of area were visualized using false color maps, while penalized discriminant analyses were used to evaluate quantitative species differences. Humans systematically exhibit the thinnest diaphyseal cortices, yet the greatest diaphyseal rigidities, particularly in dorsoplantar regions. Shifts in orientation of maximum second moments of area along the diaphysis also distinguish human hallucal metatarsals from those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Diaphyseal structure reflects different loading regimes, often in predictable ways, with human versus non-human differences probably resulting both from the use of arboreal substrates by non-human apes and by differing spatial relationships between hallux position and orientation of the substrate reaction resultant during stance. The novel morphological approach employed in this study offers the

  19. Cortical Structure of Hallucal Metatarsals and Locomotor Adaptations in Hominoids

    PubMed Central

    Jashashvili, Tea; Dowdeswell, Mark R.; Lebrun, Renaud; Carlson, Kristian J.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal morphology of long bones, in part, reflects in vivo loads experienced during the lifetime of an individual. The first metatarsal, as a cornerstone structure of the foot, presumably expresses diaphyseal morphology that reflects loading history of the foot during stance phase of gait. Human feet differ substantially from those of other apes in terms of loading histories when comparing the path of the center of pressure during stance phase, which reflects different weight transfer mechanisms. Here we use a novel approach for quantifying continuous thickness and cross-sectional geometric properties of long bones in order to test explicit hypotheses about loading histories and diaphyseal structure of adult chimpanzee, gorilla, and human first metatarsals. For each hallucal metatarsal, 17 cross sections were extracted at regularly-spaced intervals (2.5% length) between 25% and 65% length. Cortical thickness in cross sections was measured in one degree radially-arranged increments, while second moments of area were measured about neutral axes also in one degree radially-arranged increments. Standardized thicknesses and second moments of area were visualized using false color maps, while penalized discriminant analyses were used to evaluate quantitative species differences. Humans systematically exhibit the thinnest diaphyseal cortices, yet the greatest diaphyseal rigidities, particularly in dorsoplantar regions. Shifts in orientation of maximum second moments of area along the diaphysis also distinguish human hallucal metatarsals from those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Diaphyseal structure reflects different loading regimes, often in predictable ways, with human versus non-human differences probably resulting both from the use of arboreal substrates by non-human apes and by differing spatial relationships between hallux position and orientation of the substrate reaction resultant during stance. The novel morphological approach employed in this study offers the

  20. Cortical structure of hallucal metatarsals and locomotor adaptations in hominoids.

    PubMed

    Jashashvili, Tea; Dowdeswell, Mark R; Lebrun, Renaud; Carlson, Kristian J

    2015-01-01

    Diaphyseal morphology of long bones, in part, reflects in vivo loads experienced during the lifetime of an individual. The first metatarsal, as a cornerstone structure of the foot, presumably expresses diaphyseal morphology that reflects loading history of the foot during stance phase of gait. Human feet differ substantially from those of other apes in terms of loading histories when comparing the path of the center of pressure during stance phase, which reflects different weight transfer mechanisms. Here we use a novel approach for quantifying continuous thickness and cross-sectional geometric properties of long bones in order to test explicit hypotheses about loading histories and diaphyseal structure of adult chimpanzee, gorilla, and human first metatarsals. For each hallucal metatarsal, 17 cross sections were extracted at regularly-spaced intervals (2.5% length) between 25% and 65% length. Cortical thickness in cross sections was measured in one degree radially-arranged increments, while second moments of area were measured about neutral axes also in one degree radially-arranged increments. Standardized thicknesses and second moments of area were visualized using false color maps, while penalized discriminant analyses were used to evaluate quantitative species differences. Humans systematically exhibit the thinnest diaphyseal cortices, yet the greatest diaphyseal rigidities, particularly in dorsoplantar regions. Shifts in orientation of maximum second moments of area along the diaphysis also distinguish human hallucal metatarsals from those of chimpanzees and gorillas. Diaphyseal structure reflects different loading regimes, often in predictable ways, with human versus non-human differences probably resulting both from the use of arboreal substrates by non-human apes and by differing spatial relationships between hallux position and orientation of the substrate reaction resultant during stance. The novel morphological approach employed in this study offers the

  1. Osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A J; Stent, A W; Milne, M; Walmsley, E A

    2016-10-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare disorder characterised by a defect in osteoclastic bone resorption. This report describes osteopetrosis in a neonatal donkey that suffered a displaced tibial fracture. Radiographic examination identified generalised reduction in medullary cavity size, thickened mid-diaphyseal cortices and conical metaphyseal bone extending toward the mid-diaphysis of long bones. Postmortem examination identified additional fractures and brittle bones. Histologically, osteoclasts were absent in multiple bone sections. Diaphyseal cortices consisted of concentric bone lamellae with marrow tissue infiltration. Large wedges of secondary spongiosa extended from the metaphyseal growth plate. Clinical and histopathological features were similar to an osteoclast-deficient, autosomal recessive form of osteopetrosis in humans. PMID:27671079

  2. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-08-28

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense (99m)Technetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of "coated aorta" or "hairy kidneys". ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  4. Biomechanical testing of the LCP--how can stability in locked internal fixators be controlled?

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Karl; Dieter, Ulrich; Stachowiak, Gwidon; Gächter, André; Kuster, Markus S

    2003-11-01

    New plating techniques, such as non-contact plates, have been introduced in acknowledgment of the importance of biological factors in internal fixation. Knowledge of the fixation stability provided by these new plates is very limited and clarification is still necessary to determine how the mechanical stability, e.g. fracture motion, and the risk of implant failure can best be controlled. The results of a study based on in vitro experiments with composite bone cylinders and finite element analysis using the Locking Compression Plate (LCP) for diaphyseal fractures are presented and recommendations for clinical practice are given. Several factors were shown to influence stability both in compression and torsion. Axial stiffness and torsional rigidity was mainly influenced by the working length, e.g. the distance of the first screw to the fracture site. By omitting one screw hole on either side of the fracture, the construct became almost twice as flexible in both compression and torsion. The number of screws also significantly affected the stability, however, more than three screws per fragment did little to increase axial stiffness; nor did four screws increase torsional rigidity. The position of the third screw in the fragment significantly affected axial stiffness, but not torsional rigidity. The closer an additional screw is positioned towards the fracture gap, the stiffer the construct becomes under compression. The rigidity under torsional load was determined by the number of screws only. Another factor affecting construct stability was the distance of the plate to the bone. Increasing this distance resulted in decreased construct stability. Finally, a shorter plate with an equal number of screws caused a reduction in axial stiffness but not in torsional rigidity. Static compression tests showed that increasing the working length, e.g. omitting the screws immediately adjacent to the fracture on both sides, significantly diminished the load causing plastic

  5. Transient entrapment neuropathy of the posterior interosseous nerve in violin players.

    PubMed

    Maffulli, N; Maffulli, F

    1991-01-01

    Eleven white male right handed violin players complained of transient muscular deficit of the extensor compartment of the left forearm during and after prolonged playing. This was associated with paraesthesiae and pain. Relief was achieved keeping the wrist and the elbow flexed, with the supinated forearm held by the contralateral hand. An anatomical study showed changes of the relationship of the posterior interosseous nerve with its surrounding structures with pronation and supination of the forearm. On the basis of the clinical features, the anatomical studies and the response to a simple physiotherapeutic regime, it is suggested that prolonged pronation of the forearm may cause transient entrapment of the nerve. PMID:1849172

  6. Transient entrapment neuropathy of the posterior interosseous nerve in violin players.

    PubMed Central

    Maffulli, N; Maffulli, F

    1991-01-01

    Eleven white male right handed violin players complained of transient muscular deficit of the extensor compartment of the left forearm during and after prolonged playing. This was associated with paraesthesiae and pain. Relief was achieved keeping the wrist and the elbow flexed, with the supinated forearm held by the contralateral hand. An anatomical study showed changes of the relationship of the posterior interosseous nerve with its surrounding structures with pronation and supination of the forearm. On the basis of the clinical features, the anatomical studies and the response to a simple physiotherapeutic regime, it is suggested that prolonged pronation of the forearm may cause transient entrapment of the nerve. Images PMID:1849172

  7. Kinesthetic perceptions of earth- and body-fixed axes.

    PubMed

    Darling, W G; Hondzinski, J M

    1999-06-01

    The major purpose of this research was to determine whether kinesthetic/proprioceptive perceptions of the earth-fixed vertical axis are more accurate than perceptions of intrinsic axes. In one experiment, accuracy of alignment of the forearm to earth-fixed vertical and head- and trunk-longitudinal axes by seven blindfolded subjects was compared in four tasks: (1) Earth-Arm--arm (humerus) orientation was manipulated by the experimenter; subjects aligned the forearm parallel to the vertical axis, which was also aligned with the head and trunk longitudinal axis; (2) Head--head, trunk, and upper-limb orientations were manipulated by the experimenter, subjects aligned the forearm parallel to the longitudinal axis of the head using only elbow flexion/extension and shoulder internal/external rotation; (3) Trunk--same as (2), except that subjects aligned the forearm parallel to the trunk-longitudinal axis; (4) Earth--same as (2), except that subjects aligned the forearm parallel to the earth-fixed vertical. Head, trunk, and gravitational axes were never parallel in tasks 2, 3, and 4 so that subjects could not simultaneously match their forearm to all three axes. The results showed that the errors for alignment of the forearm with the earth-fixed vertical were lower than for the trunk- and head-longitudinal axes. Furthermore, errors in the Earth condition were less dependent on alterations of the head and trunk orientation than in the Head and Trunk conditions. These data strongly suggest that the earth-fixed vertical is used as one axis for the kinesthetic sensory coordinate system that specifies upper-limb orientation at the perceptual level. We also examined the effects of varying gravitational torques at the elbow and shoulder on the accuracy of forearm alignment to earth-fixed axes. Adding a 450 g load to the forearm to increase gravitational torques when the forearm is not vertical did not improve the accuracy of forearm alignment with the vertical. Furthermore

  8. Distinguishing between the bone fragments of medium-sized mammals and children. A histological identification method for archaeology.

    PubMed

    Cuijpers, Saddha A G F M

    2009-06-01

    In archaeology, it is not always possible to identify bone fragments. A novel approach was chosen to assess the potential of histology as an identification tool. Instead of studying a few bones of different categories from many species, this study concentrated on the diaphyses of long bones in four species of comparable size which are relevant to archaeology; young humans, pigs, sheep and goats, to broaden the insight into variations in diaphyseal bone structure within and between these species. A general difference in the primary bone structure was found between children older than one year and the three medium-sized mammals, namely lamellar vs. fibro-lamellar primary bone. Although, the diaphyseal bone structure of children below the age of one year also showed (developing) fibro-lamellar bone, its composition was distinctive from the medium-sized mammals. A difference in the secondary bone structure was also observed. Connecting (Volkmann's) canals, giving the secondary bone a reticular aspect, were seen in the medium-sized mammals but not in the young human long bones. To confirm the validity and applicability of these observed histological differences, a blind test was conducted on 14 diaphyseal fragments of identified long bones from archaeological sites. The results were very promising. All the bone fragments were correctly attributed using the difference in primary bone structure, even when the bone was severely degraded.

  9. Complex traumatic-degenerative injury of the proximal metaepiphysis of the humerus.

    PubMed

    Porcellini, G; Campi, F; Piu, M; Paladini, P

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe one case of displaced fracture of the proximal third of the humerus with high-grade degenerative arthropathy in the humeral head and in the glenoid surface on a humerus that had previously been treated thirty years earlier with a Delitala intramedullary nail for diaphyseal fracture. PMID:12025103

  10. Brachymetatarsia of the third and fourth metatarsals.

    PubMed

    Goforth, W P; Overbeek, T D

    2001-01-01

    A cylindrical autogenous diaphyseal bone graft from the neighboring second and fifth metatarsals to correct brachymetatarsia of the third and fourth metatarsals was last described by Biggs in 1979. The authors present a literature review and case report for the treatment of the rare clinical entity of brachymetatarsia. PMID:11466465

  11. The Changed Route of Anterior Tibial Artery due to Healed Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gökkuş, Kemal; Sagtas, Ergin; Comert, Nuri; Unal, Mehmet Bekir; Baloglu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    We would like to highlight unusual sequelae of healed distal third diaphyseal tibia fracture that was treated conservatively 36 years ago, in which we incidentally detected peripheral CT angiography. The anterior tibial artery was enveloped three-quarterly by the healing callus of the bone (distal tibia). PMID:27019760

  12. [Ultrasonography and Doppler effect, an original method for the early and dynamic evaluation of bone callus].

    PubMed

    Elanga, M; Bouche, B; Putz, P; Dumont, N

    1997-12-01

    The authors describe an original and simple method for monitoring bone healing, based upon ultrasonography and the Doppler effect. They present four cases of diaphyseal fractures followed by this method and correlated with clinical findings. This noninvasive and inexpensive method of investigation is full of prospect for the monitoring of bone healing after fracture.

  13. Directed osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem/precursor cells on silicate substituted calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kate; Travers, Paul; Chander, Chaman; Buckland, Tom; Campion, Charlie; Noble, Brendon

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient, underactive, or inappropriate osteoblast function results in serious clinical conditions such as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta and fracture nonunion and therefore the control of osteogenesis is a medical priority. In vitro mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be directed to form osteoblasts through the addition of soluble factors such as β-glycerophosphate, ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone; however this is unlikely to be practical in the clinical setting. An alternative approach would be to use a scaffold or matrix engineered to provide cues for differentiation without the need for soluble factors. Here we describe studies using Silicate-substituted calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and unmodified hydroxyapatite (HA) to test whether these materials are capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in the absence of soluble factors. Si-CaP supported attachment and proliferation of MSCs and induced osteogenesis to a greater extent than HA, as evidenced through upregulation of the osteoblast-related genes: Runx2 (1.2 fold), Col1a1 (2 fold), Pth1r (1.5 fold), and Bglap (1.7 fold) Dmp1 (1.1 fold), respectively. Osteogenic-associated proteins, alkaline phosphatase (1.4 fold), RUNX2, COL1A1, and BGLAP, were also upregulated and there was an increased production of mineralized bone matrix (1.75 fold), as detected by the Von Kossa Assay. These data indicate that inorganic substrates are capable of directing the differentiation programme of stem cells in the absence of known chemical drivers and therefore may provide the basis for bone repair in the clinical setting.

  14. Multi-variety bone bank in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Bi, Long; Meng, Guo-Lin; Liu, Min; Jin, Jing; Liu, Yin; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Jian; Hu, Yun-Yu

    2010-08-01

    This is a descriptive report of the establishment and operation of a Chinese bone bank, though not a typical one. While being engaged in collection, processing and storage of allogeneic tissues, the bone bank to which the author belongs concurrently develops and produces new, non-human derived, graft materials. Among others is reconstituted bone xenograft (RBX) which possesses strong osteoinductive capability without evoking immune rejection. Hence, its appellation "multi-variety bone bank," which was established by Dr. Hu Yunyu in 1990, the first of its kind in China. There are several salient features discriminating this bone bank from others. At this hospital-based non-profit institution, allograft hemi-joints are freshly prepared and distributed deep-frozen, instead of being freeze-dried on an industrialized basis for convenient transportation. The former has much more superior biological and mechanical properties as compared with the latter. However, allogeneic tissues are sometimes in short supply due to limited number of donors and the risk of some potential donors carrying viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), or hepatitis C virus (HCV). New graft materials, including reconstituted bone xenograft (RBX), were developed that serve as a supplement to allografts. RBX has been successfully used in clinical practice for the management of old fractures, nonunions and bone defects, most notably of contaminated, infected open fractures and osteomyelitis with the use of anti-infective reconstituted bone xenograft (ARBX). Additionally the multi-variety bone bank serves as a training base for educating professional personnel and researchers (postgraduates) in theories and technologies of tissue banking. Up to now, eighteen special technical staff members and approximately sixty senior researchers have been trained at this institution.

  15. A comparison between orthogonal and parallel plating methods for distal humerus fractures: a prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Kap Jung; Park, Kyung Hoon; Choy, Won Sik

    2014-10-01

    With the continuing improvements in implants for distal humerus fractures, it is expected that newer types of plates, which are anatomically precontoured, thinner and less irritating to soft tissue, would have comparable outcomes when used in a clinical study. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes in patients with distal humerus fractures who were treated with orthogonal and parallel plating methods using precontoured distal humerus plates. Sixty-seven patients with a mean age of 55.4 years (range 22-90 years) were included in this prospective study. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 2 treatments: orthogonal or parallel plating. The following results were assessed: operating time, time to fracture union, presence of a step or gap at the articular margin, varus-valgus angulation, functional recovery, and complications. No intergroup differences were observed based on radiological and clinical results between the groups. In our practice, no significant differences were found between the orthogonal and parallel plating methods in terms of clinical outcomes, mean operation time, union time, or complication rates. There were no cases of fracture nonunion in either group; heterotrophic ossification was found 3 patients in orthogonal plating group and 2 patients in parallel plating group. In our practice, no significant differences were found between the orthogonal and parallel plating methods in terms of clinical outcomes or complication rates. However, orthogonal plating method may be preferred in cases of coronal shear fractures, where posterior to anterior fixation may provide additional stability to the intraarticular fractures. Additionally, parallel plating method may be the preferred technique used for fractures that occur at the most distal end of the humerus.

  16. Arthroscopic Treatment of Posterior Impingement of the Hindfoot

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Dominic S.; Vora, Anand Mahesh; Kozy, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Open and arthroscopic techniques have been utilized in the treatment of posterior impingement of the ankle and hindfoot. Because posterior impingement occurs more frequently in patients who repetitively plantarflex the ankle, this population may especially benefit from a procedure that reduces pain and results in maximal range of motion (ROM). The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of hindfoot endoscopy in patients with posterior ankle impingement through higher level of function outcome measures and physical examination parameters, focused on analysis of ROM. Methods: 20 ankles (19 patients) were followed prospectively at a minimum 1 year follow-up (mean 38.2 months). 19 of 20 patients were competitive athletes. Patients completed a minimum of 3 months of nonoperative treatment. Diagnoses included os trigonum, tibial exostosis, talar exostosis, loose body or fracture nonunion, and ganglion cyst removal. Patients underwent arthroscopic treatment utilizing a posterior approach; all relevant pathology was addressed. Post-surgery, patients were placed in a splint for 3 to 7 days then placed in a CAM boot for 2 to 3 weeks, weight bearing as tolerated. Physical therapy was initiated within 7-10 days; strengthening exercises were initiated postoperatively at 1 month. Results: At most recent follow-up, VAS Pain and AOFAS Hindfoot scores showed significant improvement (p<0.01) pre to post-operatively; Tegner score remained unchanged (p=0.888). 3 patients were professional athletes; all returned to their previous level of professional activity. ROM variables between affected and unaffected sides reached statistical similarity at most recent follow-up. 15% of patients reported post-operative neuritis. No other complications were reported. Conclusion: Posterior ankle arthroscopy allows for maintenance or restoration of anatomic ROM of the ankle and hindfoot, ability to return to at least previous level of activity, and improvement in objective

  17. The Deep-Sea Natural Products, Biogenic Polyphosphate (Bio-PolyP) and Biogenic Silica (Bio-Silica), as Biomimetic Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of a Morphogenetically-Active Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C.; Feng, Qingling; Draenert, Florian; Müller, Werner E. G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone defects in human, caused by fractures/nonunions or trauma, gain increasing impact and have become a medical challenge in the present-day aging population. Frequently, those fractures require surgical intervention which ideally relies on autografts or suboptimally on allografts. Therefore, it is pressing and likewise challenging to develop bone substitution materials to heal bone defects. During the differentiation of osteoblasts from their mesenchymal progenitor/stem cells and of osteoclasts from their hemopoietic precursor cells, a lineage-specific release of growth factors and a trans-lineage homeostatic cross-talk via signaling molecules take place. Hence, the major hurdle is to fabricate a template that is functioning in a way mimicking the morphogenetic, inductive role(s) of the native extracellular matrix. In the last few years, two naturally occurring polymers that are produced by deep-sea sponges, the biogenic polyphosphate (bio-polyP) and biogenic silica (bio-silica) have also been identified as promoting morphogenetic on both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These polymers elicit cytokines that affect bone mineralization (hydroxyapatite formation). In this manner, bio-silica and bio-polyP cause an increased release of BMP-2, the key mediator activating the anabolic arm of the hydroxyapatite forming cells, and of RANKL. In addition, bio-polyP inhibits the progression of the pre-osteoclasts to functionally active osteoclasts. Based on these findings, new bioinspired strategies for the fabrication of bone biomimetic templates have been developed applying 3D-printing techniques. Finally, a strategy is outlined by which these two morphogenetically active polymers might be used to develop a novel functionally active polymer. PMID:23528950

  18. Relation between grip strength and radial bone mineral density in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Tsunoda, N; Yata, H; Katsukawa, F; Onishi, S; Yamazaki, H

    1995-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the relationship between bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength in young athletes who had not yet experienced age-related bone loss. Radial BMD and grip strength were measured in 10 male college wrestlers, 16 female college basketball players, and 12 female college tennis players. Radial BMD was measured in the distal and middle radius by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Isometric grip strength was assessed with a hand-held dynamometer. The dominant forearm was examined in the amateur wrestlers and basketball players for grip strength and BMD. Both forearms were examined in the tennis players. A significant positive correlation was found between radial BMD and grip strength in the dominant forearm, and between radial BMD and body weight. Moreover, to eliminate a possible effect of body weight on radial BMD, we compared radial BMD with grip strength in both the dominant and nondominant arm of 12 college tennis players. Grip strength in the dominant forearm was significantly greater than in the nondominant forearm. The midradial BMD of the dominant forearm was also significantly higher than in the nondominant forearm. Based on these findings, we conclude that grip strength is one of the determinant factors of radial BMD in the dominant forearm of young college athletes.

  19. Effect of elbow position on radiographic measurements of radio-capitellar alignment

    PubMed Central

    Sandman, Emilie; Canet, Fanny; Petit, Yvan; Laflamme, G-Yves; Athwal, George S; Rouleau, Dominique M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of different elbow and forearm positions on radiocapitellar alignment. METHODS: Fifty-one healthy volunteers were recruited and bilateral elbow radiographs were taken to form a radiologic database. Lateral elbow radiographs were taken with the elbow in five different positions: Maximal extension and forearm in neutral, maximal flexion and forearm in neutral, elbow at 90° and forearm in neutral, elbow at 90° and forearm in supination and elbow at 90° and forearm in pronation. A goniometer was used to verify the accuracy of the elbow’s position for the radiographs at a 90° angle. The radiocapitellar ratio (RCR) measurements were then taken on the collected radiographs using the SliceOmatic software. An orthopedic resident performed the radiographic measurements on the 102 elbows, for a total of 510 lateral elbow radiographic measures. ANOVA paired t-tests and Pearson coefficients were used to assess the differences and correlations between the RCR in each position. RESULTS: Mean RCR values were -2% ± 7% (maximal extension), -5% ± 9% (maximal flexion), and for elbow at 90° and forearm in neutral -2% ± 5%, supination 1% ± 6% and pronation 1% ± 5%. ANOVA analyses demonstrated significant differences between the RCR in different elbow and forearm positions. Paired t-tests confirmed significant differences between the RCR at maximal flexion and flexion at 90°, and maximal extension and flexion. The Pearson coefficient showed significant correlations between the RCR with the elbow at 90° - maximal flexion; the forearm in neutral-supination; the forearm in neutral-pronation. CONCLUSION: Overall, 95% of the RCR values are included in the normal range (obtained at 90° of flexion) and a value outside this range, in any position, should raise suspicion for instability. PMID:26925383

  20. Regional differences in peripheral circulation between upper and lower extremity in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Okumura, H; Aramaki, T; Katsuta, Y; Terada, H; Satomura, K; Akaike, M; Sekiyama, T

    1990-09-01

    In 42 patients with compensated cirrhosis and 31 control subjects, blood flow (BF) and vascular resistance (VR) were measured at the forearm and calf, using a pneumoplethysmograph. In some of the subjects deep-body temperature (DBT) was also measured by the zero heat flow method. In cirrhosis, BF and DBT were significantly higher and VR was significantly lower in the forearm than in the calf. Corresponding differences were not observed in control subjects. When these indices of the forearm were compared between cirrhosis and controls, BF and DBT were significantly higher and VR was significantly lower in cirrhosis than in controls. In cirrhotics in whom the gradient between forearm BF and calf BF was 1 ml.dl-1.min-1 or more (forearm greater than calf), the vascular response of the forearm to cold stimulation was reduced, whereas in the remaining patients and in controls the forearm BF and VR responded significantly. These results suggest that there is a regional difference in peripheral circulation in cirrhotics, partly with participation of impaired sympathetic nervous activity, which may account for the selective distribution observed in the clinical manifestations of vascular spider, palmar erythema, and warm hand, inclined toward the upper extremities or the upper part of the body.

  1. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise.

  2. Effect of tap-water iontophoresis on sweat gland recruitment, skin temperature and skin blood flow.

    PubMed

    Kolkhorst, Fred W; DiPasquale, Dana M; Buono, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    Our interest was to quantify the role of sweat gland activation on the maintenance of skin temperature during mild exercise in the heat. Seven days of tap-water iontophoresis decreased the number of active sweat glands by 72% which significantly increased forearm skin temperature and blood flow during mild exercise (70 W) in the heat (32 degrees C). Skin temperature of the treated forearm was 0.5 degrees C warmer (P=0.049); skin blood flow in the treated forearm was 13% higher than the control arm (P=0.021). These results illustrate the importance of sweat evaporation on skin temperature and blood flow during exercise. PMID:11858947

  3. Custom-made intercalary endoprosthetic reconstruction for a parosteal osteosarcoma of the femoral diaphysis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, SHI-CHANG; ZHANG, CHANG-QING; ZHANG, CHUN-LIN

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a case of a 44-year-old female patient who presented with a palpable mass of the left thigh. A diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma (POS) at the femoral diaphysis was made following a diagnostic workup. Previous reports of long bone diaphyseal POS are rare. A long diaphyseal segment of the femur containing the tumor was resected along with a healthy margin of soft tissues, and the damaged bone was reconstructed with a custom-made intercalary endoprosthesis. Subsequent pathological examination of the surgical sample confirmed the diagnosis of POS. No local recurrence or distant metastasis was observed, and the patient had a positive Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 28/30 (93.3%) at the 28-month post-surgery follow-up. The present study describes the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of this rare type of osteosarcoma. PMID:26722326

  4. [Chondromyxoid fibroma of bone: a rare benign bone tumor in children].

    PubMed

    Rouas, L; Malihy, A; Cherradi, N; Lamalmi, N; Alhamany, Z

    2004-12-01

    Chondromyxoid fibroma is a rare benign tumor that is typically found in the metaphyseal ends of long tubular bones, such as the tibia. The radiographic appearances are those of a single, lytic lesion with lobulated margins, septations, cortical expansion and a sclerotic rim. The classic histological feature of a chondromyxoid fibroma is stellate or spindle-shaped cells arranged in lobules in a myxoid or chondroid background. Two cases are presented here: 8, and 12-year-old patients, both with lesions in the proximal tibia. The first case showed an unusual feature: it was diaphyseal chondromyxoid fibroma. In the second case, the lesion was metaphyso-diaphyseal. The differential diagnosis includes chondroblastoma, myxoma, aneurysmal cyst as well as chondrosarcoma. A surgical conservative treatment with complete excision is recommended even in case of recurrence. PMID:15688891

  5. Heterogeneity of blood flow in tibial cortical bone: An experimental investigation using microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Willans, S.M.; McCarthy, I.D. )

    1991-03-01

    The distribution of tibial blood flow was measured by injecting approximately (600-1000) x 10(3) 15 mu microspheres, labelled with either tin-113 (113Sn) or cobalt-57 (57Co) into femoral arteries of five mature greyhounds. The diaphyseal cortex, stripped of periosteum and devoid of marrow, was sawn into 40 pieces (10 transverse sections x 4 anatomical quarters/section). Relative deposition densities of the 113Sn microspheres in 40 pieces of cortex were found. These values, together with their associated masses, proved, from a statistical point of view, that flow rate heterogeneity was substantial in the diaphysis. In particular, for the diaphyseal cortex, distribution of relative deposition densities (flow rates) in six bones was found to be positively-skewed with a relative dispersion ((SD/mean) x 100) of approximately 40%.

  6. Unusual presentation of Erdheim-Chester disease in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vallonthaiel, Archana George; Mridha, Asit Ranjan; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Jana, Manisha; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Khan, Shah Alam; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2016-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon, non-familial, non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, which involves skeletal system and soft tissue usually in middle aged and elderly patients. The characteristic radiologic features include bilateral, symmetric cortical osteosclerosis of the diaphyseal and metaphyseal parts of the long bones, or bilateral symmetrically abnormal intense 99mTechnetium labelling of the metaphyseal-diaphyseal region of the long bones, and computed tomography scan findings of “coated aorta” or “hairy kidneys”. ECD in childhood with osteolytic lesion is extremely rare. We describe an unusual case with an expansile lytic bone lesion at presentation in a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:27648170

  7. Experiment K305: Quantitative analysis of selected bone parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrongski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E.; Cann, C. E.; Arnaud, C. D.; Baylink, D. J.; Turner, R. T.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1981-01-01

    The skeletal alterations induced by space flight were determined to be a reduced rate of periosteal bone formation in tibial and humeral diaphyses, a decreased trabecular bone volume, and an increased fat content of the bone marrow in the proximal tibial metaphysis. An increased incidence of arrest lines in flight animals suggested that periosteal bone formation may have ceased during space flight. Endosteal bone resorption was not affected markedly.

  8. Cosmos 1129 - Spaceflight and bone changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wronski, T. J.; Morey-Holton, E.; Jee, W. S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were placed in orbit for an 18.5 day period aboard the Soviet Cosmos 1129 biological satellite. The skeletal changes which occurred during spaceflight were determined to be a reduced rate of periosteal bone formation in the tibial and humeral diaphyses, and a decreased trabecular bone volume and an increased fat content of the bone marrow in the proximal tibial metaphysis.

  9. Radiographic findings in liveborn triploidy.

    PubMed

    Silverthorn, K G; Houston, C S; Newman, D E; Wood, B J

    1989-01-01

    The detailed radiographic features of triploidy, a fatal congenital disorder with 69 chromosomes, have not previously been reported. Radiographs of ten liveborn infants with chromosomally confirmed triploidy showed six findings highly suggestive of this diagnosis: harlequin orbits, small anterior fontanelle, gracile ribs, diaphyseal overtubulation of long bones, upswept clavicles and antimongoloid pelvis. Sixteen other less specific findings showed many similarities to those found in trisomy 18.

  10. Mineralization- and remodeling-unrelated improvement of the post-yield properties of rat cortical bone by high doses of olpadronate.

    PubMed

    Capozza, R F; Mondelo, N; Reina, P S; Nocciolino, L; Meta, M; Roldan, E J; Ferretti, J L; Cointry, G R

    2013-06-01

    Some pharmacologic effects on bone modeling may not be evident in studies of remodeling skeletons. This study analyzes some effects of olpadronate on cortical bone modeling and post-yield properties in femurs diaphyses (virtually only-modeling bones) of young rats by mid-diaphyseal pQCT scans and bending tests. We studied 20/22 male/female animals traetad orally with olpadronate (45-90 mg/kg/d, 3 months) and 8/9 untreated controls. Both OPD doses enhanced diaphyseal cross-sectional moments of inertia (CSMI) with no change in cortical vBMD and elastic modulus. Yield stiffness and strength were mildly increased. Post-yield strength, deflection and energy absorption were strikingly enhanced. Ultimate strength was enhanced mainly because of effects on bone mass/geometry and post-yield properties. The large improvement of post-yield properties could be explained by improvements in bone geometry. Improvements in bone mass/geometry over weight-bearing needs suggest an enhanced modeling-related response to mechanical stimuli. Effects on tissue microstructural factors (not measured) could not be excluded. Results reveal novel olpadronate effects on bone strength and toughness unrelated to tissue mineralization and stiffness, even at high doses. Further studies could establish whether this could also occur in modeling-remodeling skeletons. If so, they could counteract the negative impact of anti-remodeling effects of bisphosphonates on bone strength.

  11. Ribbing disease: Uncommon cause of a common symptom

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Patnecha, Manish; Kumar, Praveen; Gadodia, Ankur; Subbarao, Kiran; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2011-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare form of sclerosing dysplasia characterized by benign endosteal and periosteal bone growth confined to the diaphyses of the long bones, usually the tibiae and femora. It occurs after puberty and is more commonly seen in women. The most common presenting symptom is pain that is usually self-limited; however, progression is known. The etiology and optimal treatment for the disease are as yet undefined. We present here the case of a 31-year-old woman with clinical, radiological and bone scan manifestations of Ribbing disease corroborated by bone biopsy. Radiographs demonstrated cortical thickening of the diaphyses of both tibiae. 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan revealed intense irregular uptake in diaphyseal region of both tibiae. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical thickening with bone marrow edema in bilateral tibial diaphysis with minimal adjacent soft tissue edema. Bone biopsy revealed predominantly dense lamellar bone with irregular sized and spaced haversian systems. Serum and urine markers of bone metabolism were within normal limits. The patient was treated with analgesics, and had partial relief from pain. Medullary rimming is the next treatment option in case pain progresses. This report emphasizes the role of bone scan in the diagnosis of this rare condition. PMID:21969779

  12. Sinusoidal electromagnetic fields promote bone formation and inhibit bone resorption in rat femoral tissues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Gao, Yu-Hai; Yan, Juan-Li; Shi, Wen-Gui; Xian, Cory J; Chen, Ke-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Effects of sinusoidal electromagnetic fields (SEMFs) on bone metabolism have not yet been well defined. The present study investigated SEMF effects on bone formation and resorption in rat femur bone tissues in vitro. Cultured femur diaphyseal (cortical bone) and metaphyseal (trabecular bone) tissues were treated with 50 Hz 1.8 mT SEMFs 1.5 h per day for up to 12 days and treatment effects on bone formation and resorption markers and associated gene expression were examined. Treatment with SEMFs caused a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and inhibited the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) activity in the femoral diaphyseal or metaphyseal tissues. SEMFs also significantly increased levels of mRNA expression of osterix (OSX), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and ALP in the bone tissues. SEMF treatment decreased glucose content and increased lactic acid contents in the culture conditioned medium. In addition, treatment with SEMFs decreased mRNA expression levels of bone resorption-related genes TRACP, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the cultured bone tissues. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that treatment with 1.8 mT SEMFs at 1.5 h per day promoted bone formation, increased metabolism and inhibited resorption in both metaphyseal and diaphyseal bone tissues in vitro.

  13. Atraumatic bilateral femur fracture in long-term bisphosphonate use.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Maria S; Reid, Kristoff R; Johnston, James C; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2009-08-01

    Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are commonly treated with the bisphosphonate class of medications, one of the most frequently prescribed medications in the United States. In the past 4 years, reports have been published implying that long-term bisphosphonate therapy could be linked to atraumatic femoral diaphyseal fractures. This article presents a case of a 67-year-old woman who presented with an atraumatic right femur fracture. She had a medical history notable for use of the bisphosphonate alendronate for 16 years before being switched to ibandronate for 1 year before presentation. She had sustained a similar fracture on the contralateral side 3 years previously. This case report, in addition to a review of the literature, shows that use of the bisphosphonate class of medications for an extended period of time may result in an increased susceptibility to atraumatic femoral diaphyseal fractures. Some studies have suggested that the reason may be the mechanism of action of bisphosphonates, resulting in decreased bone turnover and remodeling. Studies have not shown if the entire class of medications produce a similar result, but patients who have been treated with any bisphosphonate for an extended period of time should be considered at risk. In patients who have already sustained a femoral diaphyseal fracture, imaging of the contralateral side should be performed to identify cortical thickening as an early sign of fracture risk. Patients should also be questioned about thigh pain.

  14. Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... tightness of skin of fingers, hands, forearm, and face Hair loss Skin that is darker or lighter than normal Small white lumps beneath the skin that sometimes ooze a ... on the face Bone and muscle symptoms may include: Joint pain ...

  15. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... arm next to the body, elbow flexed to 90°, and the forearm in midposition 0° between supination and... Plate III) whose movement is limited, with a statement as to how near, in centimeters, the tip of...

  16. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and...

  17. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and...

  18. 38 CFR 4.71 - Measurement of ankylosis and joint motion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Shoulder rotation—arm abducted to 90°, elbow flexed to 90° with the position of the forearm reflecting the midpoint 0° between internal and external rotation of the shoulder; and (b) supination and...

  19. The Psychophysics of Cold Pressor Pain and Its Modification through Hypnotic Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilgard, Ernest R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Earlier reports of the pain of putting hand and forearm in circulating ice water were recomputed to study how subjects scale that pain and to find appropriate measures of its reduction under hypnotic analgesia. (Editor)

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... bone growth that results in very short stature (dwarfism). People with this condition have particularly short forearms ... Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome Encyclopedia: Polydactyly Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...